Science.gov

Sample records for map showing resources

  1. Maps showing metallic mineral resources of the Bendeleben and Solomon quadrangles, western Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamble, Bruce M.; Till, Alison B.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the potential for metallic mineral resources in the Bendeleben and Solomon quadrangles, central Seward Peninsul, Alaska (fig. 1), and was prepared as part of the AMRAP (Alaska Mineral Resources Appraisal Program) studies for these quadrangles, which were begun in 1981.  Geologic mapping during this study (TILL and others, 1986) included the southern part of the Kotzebue quadrangle.  However, stream-sediment and panned-concentrate samples were not collected in that area, and the mineral resources of the southern part of the Kotzebue quadrangle are not assessed in this report.

  2. Maps showing selected geology and phosphate resources of the Stewart Flat quadrangle, Caribou County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Derkey, Pamela Dunlap; Paul, Ken; Palmer, Pamela; Fakourbayat, Mahasti; Wotruba, Nancy J.; Hovland, R. David

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes information on the thickness, grade, lateral continuity, phosphate resources, and ownership of phosplate-bearing units in the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Phosphoria Formation in the Stewart Flat quadrangle. This report is one of a series of quadrangle reports prepared by the Idaho Bureau of Mines and Geology under U.S. Geological Survey cost sharing contract # 14-08-0001-17925 to calculate phosphate resources in southeastern Idaho (fig. 1).

  3. Map showing geothermal resources of The Lake City-Surprise Valley Known Geothermal Resource Area, Modoc County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal data are summarized from published and unpublished geophysical, geochemical, and geologic reports on Surprise Valley prepared during the past 26 years. Particular emphasis is placed on a comprehensive structural interpretation of the west half of the valley that is based on map compilation of concealed faults that have been inferred from geophysical methods and exposed faults that can be seen in the field and/or on aerial photographs. The faults apparently control the location of modern geothermal activity.

  4. Maps showing coal resources in the Crumpler Quadrangle, Mercer, McDowell, and Wyoming counties, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stricker, Gary D.

    1980-01-01

    Coal Geology The Crumpler quadrangle lies in the Appalachian Plateaus province, with the coal bearing Pocahontas and New River Formations of Pennsylvanian age having a gentle dip toward the northwest. Coal bed maps were prepared (figures 1-7) and resources were estimated (table 1) for seven of the many coal beds in the Crumpler quadrangle (Stricker, 1980, lists the names of the various coal beds in the quadrangle) following methods established by U.S. Bureau of Mines and U.S. Geological Survey, 1976. All of these coal beds crop out at the surface in the quadrangle, have a maximum thickness thickness of over-burden of less than 300 meters, and have been mined at the surface, or under-ground, or both. Resource estimates were not calculated for other coal beds in the Pocahontas and New River Formations, either because of insufficient data of because of the beds are too thin. Figure 8 is a generalized stratigraphic column of the coal-bearing sequence in the Crumpler quadrangle showing thickness and relative positions of the various coal beds. The Crumpler quadrangle originally contained about 498 million metric tons of coal. Approximately 326 million metric tons have been mined, or lost in mining, leaving remaining resources of 172 million metric tons. Analyses of the mined coal beds in the Crumpler and adjacent quadrangle show the coal is medium - to low volatile bituminous (most are low volatile bituminous), containing 14-27 percent volatile matter (with an arithmetic mean of 18 percent), 2.1-22.4 percent ash (with an arithmetic mean of 7 percent), and 0.5-1.8 percent total sulfur (with an arithmetic mean of 0.8 percent). Heating values range from 6,380 to 8,610 Kcal/kg on an as-received basis. Trace element and major and minor oxide composition, of both whole coal and laboratory ash, for 59 samples within or near the quadrangle were obtained from USCHEM (Geochemical Data File or National Coal Resources Data System), (Kozey and others, 1980.) Neither elements of

  5. Wind Resource Maps (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the wind resource potential that would be possible from development of the available windy land areas after excluding areas unlikely to be developed. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to Wind Powering America's online wind energy resource maps.

  6. 28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS LINCOLN BOULEVARD, BIG LOST RIVER, AND NAVAL REACTORS FACILITY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-101-2. DATED OCTOBER 12, 1965. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0101 851 151969. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. Maps showing coal-split boundaries, isopachs of coal splits, coal resources, and coal quality; Mammoth coal bed, Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation, Bull Mountain coal field, south-central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey Maps are presented showing coal-split boundaries, isopachs of coal splits, coal resources, and coal quality; mammoth coal bed, Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation, Bull Mountain coal field, south-central Montana.

  8. Map showing mineral-resource potential of the King Range and Chemise Mountain Instant Study Areas, Humboldt and Mendocino counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Sorg, D.H.; Ohlin, H.N.; Beutner, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    Minor manganese resources occur adjacent to the southeast corner of the King Range Instant Study Area near Queen Peak. The manganese forms small stratabound deposits associated with radiolarian chert and pillow basalt. The known deposits are too small and the manganese too low in concentration for further economic exploitation. Similar manganese mineralization may be within the belt of melange in the southeast corner of the King Range area and within the Chemise Mountain Instant Study Area, but economic deposits are unlikely. Although there has been historical base- and precious-metal exploration activity north of the King Range in the Mattole River drainage, our geologic and geochemical field data indicate almost no gold potential and low potentials for lead, zinc, copper, and silver. During this investigation, one high-grade vein and several minor veins containing lead, zinc, copper, and silver were discovered at Point Delgada immediately south of the King Range Instant Study Area. The vein mineralization is Miocene and cuts Cretaceous basalt flows, dikes, flow breccia, and younger overlying sedimentary rocks of the King Range. The vein mineralization at Point Delgada could be remobilized from more extensive unexposed stratabound base-metal mineralization at depth. Traces of lead and zinc detected within the King Range Instant Study Area may have similar stratabound or vein origins, but no resource potential is indicated. Minor copper mineralization with associated lead, zinc, and manganese anomalies within the Chemise Mountain Instant Study Area is of low economic potential because of the shearing, isolation, and lenticularity of the basaltic and cherty rocks within the melange mineralization.

  9. 9. SITE MAP HIGHLIGHTING SIGNIFICANT BUILDINGS AND SHOWING LOCATION LOCATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. SITE MAP HIGHLIGHTING SIGNIFICANT BUILDINGS AND SHOWING LOCATION LOCATION OF OUTPATIENT CLINIC ADDITION - U.S. Veterans Administration Medical Center, 600 South Seventieth Street, Lincoln, Lancaster County, NE

  10. 15. MAP OF ALAMEDA SHIPYARD SHOWING PROPOSED ADDITIONAL FACILITIES. United ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. MAP OF ALAMEDA SHIPYARD SHOWING PROPOSED ADDITIONAL FACILITIES. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. A site map with all existing structures keyed to an identification legend. Also shows proposed new structures. No architect noted. Drawn by "J.B.H." (John Hudspeth?). Sheet 2. Plan no. 10,528. Scale one inch to 100 feet. November 12, 1943, last revised 1/18/44. pencil on vellum - United Engineering Company Shipyard, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  11. Insurance Applications of Active Fault Maps Showing Epistemic Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, G.

    2005-12-01

    Insurance loss modeling for earthquakes utilizes available maps of active faulting produced by geoscientists. All such maps are subject to uncertainty, arising from lack of knowledge of fault geometry and rupture history. Field work to undertake geological fault investigations drains human and monetary resources, and this inevitably limits the resolution of fault parameters. Some areas are more accessible than others; some may be of greater social or economic importance than others; some areas may be investigated more rapidly or diligently than others; or funding restrictions may have curtailed the extent of the fault mapping program. In contrast with the aleatory uncertainty associated with the inherent variability in the dynamics of earthquake fault rupture, uncertainty associated with lack of knowledge of fault geometry and rupture history is epistemic. The extent of this epistemic uncertainty may vary substantially from one regional or national fault map to another. However aware the local cartographer may be, this uncertainty is generally not conveyed in detail to the international map user. For example, an area may be left blank for a variety of reasons, ranging from lack of sufficient investigation of a fault to lack of convincing evidence of activity. Epistemic uncertainty in fault parameters is of concern in any probabilistic assessment of seismic hazard, not least in insurance earthquake risk applications. A logic-tree framework is appropriate for incorporating epistemic uncertainty. Some insurance contracts cover specific high-value properties or transport infrastructure, and therefore are extremely sensitive to the geometry of active faulting. Alternative Risk Transfer (ART) to the capital markets may also be considered. In order for such insurance or ART contracts to be properly priced, uncertainty should be taken into account. Accordingly, an estimate is needed for the likelihood of surface rupture capable of causing severe damage. Especially where a

  12. 10. Detail of map showing Battery Davis and Panama Gun ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail of map showing Battery Davis and Panama Gun Mounts at right, by U.S. Engineering Office, San Francisco, California, August 5, 1934. - Fort Funston, Panama Mounts for 155mm Guns, Skyline Boulevard & Great Highway, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  13. 10. MAP SHOWING 'THE ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTING LINES AND WATERWAYS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. MAP SHOWING 'THE ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTING LINES AND WATERWAYS OF THE TELLURIDE POWER COMPANY OF COLORADO'. THE AMES POWER STATION LIES AT THE FORK OF THE GORGE, LOWER LEFT OF CENTER IN THE PHOTOGRAPH. - Ames Hydroelectric Plant, Ames, San Miguel County, CO

  14. Water resources. [mapping and management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, V. V.

    1974-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in applying ERTS-1 data to water resources problems, nevertheless, more time and effort still appear necessary for further quantification of results, including the specification of thematic measurement accuracies. More modeling can be done very profitably. In particular, more strategy models describing the processes wherein ERTS-1 data would be acquired, analyzed, processed, and utilized in operational situations could be profitably accomplished. It is generally observed that the ERTS-1 data applicability is evident in several areas and that the next most general and substantive steps in the implementation of the data in operational situations would be greatly encouraged by the establishment of an operational earth resources satellite organization and capability. Further encouragement of this operational capability would be facilitated by all investigators striving to document their procedures as fully as possible and by providing time and cost comparisons between ERTS-1 and conventional acquisition approaches.

  15. GUARD HOUSE AND SOUTH FIRE HOUSE, VICINITY MAP. (Shows the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GUARD HOUSE AND SOUTH FIRE HOUSE, VICINITY MAP. (Shows the Guard House and Barracks, and South Fire House in relation to nearby roads, railroad tracks, and the piers). Navy Yard, Mare Island, California. P.W. Drawing No. C-1899, approved 1941; file no. 930-C-1. Scale one inch to forty feet. 72 cn x 97 cm. Ink on vellum - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  16. Map showing lava-flow hazard zones, Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Thomas L.; Chun, Jon Y.F.; Exposo, Jean; Heliker, Christina; Hodge, Jon; Lockwood, John P.; Vogt, Susan M.

    1992-01-01

    This map shows lava-flow hazard zones for the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii. Volcano boundaries are shown as heavy, dark bands, reflecting the overlapping of lava flows from adjacent volcanoes along their common boundary. Hazard-zone boundaries are drawn as double lines because of the geologic uncertainty in their placement. Most boundaries are gradational, and the change In the degree of hazard can be found over a distance of a mile or more. The general principles used to place hazard-zone boundaries are discussed by Mullineaux and others (1987) and Heliker (1990). The differences between the boundaries presented here and in Heliker (1990) reflect new data used in the compilation of a geologic map for the Island of Hawaii (E.W. Wolfe and Jean Morris, unpub. data, 1989). The primary source of information for volcano boundaries and generalized ages of lava flows for all five volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii is the geologic map of Hawaii (E.W. Wolfe and Jean Morris, unpub. data, 1989). More detailed information is available for the three active volcanoes. For Hualalai, see Moore and others (1987) and Moore and Clague (1991); for Mauna Loa, see Lockwood and Lipman (1987); and for Kilauea, see Holcomb (1987) and Moore and Trusdell (1991).

  17. A Bibliometric Mapping of Open Educational Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zancanaro, Airton; Todesco, José Leomar; Ramos, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Open educational resources (OER) is a topic that has aroused increasing interest by researchers as a powerful contribution to improve the educational system quality and openness, both in face to face and distance education. The goal of this research is to map publications related to OER, dating from 2002 to 2013, and available through the Web of…

  18. Ontology Mappings to Improve Learning Resource Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasevic, Dragan; Hatala, Marek

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes an ontology mapping-based framework that allows searching for learning resources using multiple ontologies. The present applications of ontologies in e-learning use various ontologies (eg, domain, curriculum, context), but they do not give a solution on how to interoperate e-learning systems based on different ontologies. The…

  19. Map Showing Lava Inundation Zones for Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, F.A.; Graves, P.; Tincher, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The Island of Hawaii is composed of five coalesced basaltic volcanoes. Lava flows constitute the greatest volcanic hazard from these volcanoes. This report is concerned with lava flow hazards on Mauna Loa, the largest of the island shield volcanoes. Hilo lies 58 km from the summit of Mauna Loa, the Kona coast 33 km, and the southernmost point of the island 61 km. Hawaiian volcanoes erupt two morphologically distinct types of lava, aa and pahoehoe. The surfaces of pahoehoe flows are rather smooth and undulating. Pahoehoe flows are commonly fed by lava tubes, which are well insulated, lava-filled conduits contained within the flows. The surfaces of aa flows are extremely rough and composed of lava fragments. Aa flows usually form lava channels rather than lava tubes. In Hawaii, lava flows are known to reach distances of 50 km or more. The flows usually advance slowly enough that people can escape from their paths. Anything overwhelmed by a flow will be damaged or destroyed by burial, crushing, or ignition. Mauna Loa makes up 51 percent of the surface area of the Island of Hawaii. Geologic mapping shows that lava flows have covered more than 40 percent of the surface every 1,000 years. Since written descriptions of its activity began in A.D. 1832, Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times. Some eruptions begin with only brief seismic unrest, whereas others start several months to a year following increased seismic activity. Once underway, the eruptions can produce lava flows that reach the sea in less than 24 hours, severing roads and utilities. For example, the 1950 flows from the southwest rift zone reached the ocean in approximately three hours. The two longest flows of Mauna Loa are pahoehoe flows from the 50-kilometer-long 1859 and the 48-kilometer-long 1880-81 eruptions. Mauna Loa will undoubtedly erupt again. When it does, the first critical question that must be answered is: Which areas are threatened with inundation? Once the threatened areas are

  20. Geologic and Mineral Resource Map of Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doebrich, Jeff L.; Wahl, Ronald R.; With Contributions by Ludington, Stephen D.; Chirico, Peter G.; Wandrey, Craig J.; Bohannon, Robert G.; Orris, Greta J.; Bliss, James D.; Wasy, Abdul; Younusi, Mohammad O.

    2006-01-01

    Data Summary The geologic and mineral resource information shown on this map is derived from digitization of the original data from Abdullah and Chmyriov (1977) and Abdullah and others (1977). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has made no attempt to modify original geologic map-unit boundaries and faults as presented in Abdullah and Chmyriov (1977); however, modifications to map-unit symbology, and minor modifications to map-unit descriptions, have been made to clarify lithostratigraphy and to modernize terminology. Labeling of map units has not been attempted where they are small or narrow, in order to maintain legibility and to preserve the map's utility in illustrating regional geologic and structural relations. Users are encouraged to refer to the series of USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) 1:250,000-scale geologic quadrangle maps of Afghanistan that are being released concurrently as open-file reports. The classification of mineral deposit types is based on the authors' interpretation of existing descriptive information (Abdullah and others, 1977; Bowersox and Chamberlin, 1995; Orris and Bliss, 2002) and on limited field investigations by the authors. Deposit-type nomenclature used for nonfuel minerals is modified from published USGS deposit-model classifications, as compiled in Stoeser and Heran (2000). New petroleum localities are based on research of archival data by the authors. The shaded-relief base is derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM) data having 85-meter resolution. Gaps in the original SRTM DEM dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). The marginal extent of geologic units corresponds to the position of the international boundary as defined by Abdullah and Chmyriov (1977), and the international boundary as shown on this map was acquired from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af) in

  1. The Geology of Mars: What the New Global Map Shows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K. L.; Dohm, J. M.; Fortezzo, C. M.; Irwin, R. P.; Kolb, E. J.; Skinner, J. A.; Hare, T. M.; Platz, T.; Michael, G.; Robbins, S.

    2012-03-01

    We describe how post-Viking data sets and our comprehensive, digital, team-based mapping approach have resulted in more robust unit identification, stratigraphic analysis, and understanding of geologic materials and features on Mars.

  2. Map showing landslide susceptibility in Prince Georges County, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Prince Georges County was identified during a statewide investigation of landslide susceptibility (MF-2048) as the county with the most serious slope-stability problems. This map uses a ranking system ranging from 1 (nil to very low susceptibility) to 4 (moderate to severe susceptibility). Geologic factors and precipitation are major elements in the initiation of landslides in the county. The Potomac Group and the Marlboro Clay are the most slideprone units. This map should enable users to make a rapid, generalized evaluation of the potential for mass movement. Planners, engineers, soil scientists, geologist, university faculty, and elected officials should find it useful in the assessment of slope hazards for county-wide analyses.

  3. Mapping of Florida's Coastal and Marine Resources: Setting Priorities Workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Lisa; Wolfe, Steven; Raabe, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    of data for mapping; * seek innovative solutions to the primary obstacles identified; * identify the steps needed to move mapping of Florida's oceans and coasts forward, in preparation for a better coordinated, more cost-effective mapping program to allow State and Federal agencies to make better decisions on coastal-resource issues. Over 90 invited participants representing more than 30 State and Federal agencies, universities, NGOs, and private industries played a large role in the success of this two-day workshop. State of Florida agency participants created a ranked priority order for mapping 13 different regions around Florida. The data needed for each of the 13 priority regions were outlined. A matrix considering State and Federal priorities was created, utilizing input from all agencies. The matrix showed overlapping interests of the entities and will allow for partnering and leveraging of resources. The five most basic mapping needs were determined to be bathymetry, high-vertical resolution coastline for sea-level rise scenarios, shoreline change, subsurface geology, and benthic habitats at sufficient scale. There was a clear convergence on the need to coordinate mapping activities around the state. Suggestions for coordination included: * creating a glossary of terms: a standard for specifying agency data-mapping needs; * creating a geographic information officer (GIO) position or permanent organizing group to maintain communications established at this workshop and to maintain progress on the issues identified during the workshop. The person or group could develop a website, maintain a project-status matrix, develop a list of contacts, create links to legislative updates and links to funding sources; * developing a web portal and one-stop/clearinghouse of data. There was general consensus on the need to adopt a single habitat classification system and a strategy to accommodate existing systems smoothly. Unresolve

  4. MROrchestrator: A Fine-Grained Resource Orchestration Framework for MapReduce Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Bikash; Prabhakar, Ramya; Kandemir, Mahmut; Das, Chita; Lim, Seung-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Efficient resource management in data centers and clouds running large distributed data processing frameworks like MapReduce is crucial for enhancing the performance of hosted applications and boosting resource utilization. However, existing resource scheduling schemes in Hadoop MapReduce allocate resources at the granularity of fixed-size, static portions of nodes, called slots. In this work, we show that MapReduce jobs have widely varying demands for multiple resources, making the static and fixed-size slot-level resource allocation a poor choice both from the performance and resource utilization standpoints. Furthermore, lack of co-ordination in the management of mul- tiple resources across nodes prevents dynamic slot reconfigura- tion, and leads to resource contention. Motivated by this, we propose MROrchestrator, a MapReduce resource Orchestrator framework, which can dynamically identify resource bottlenecks, and resolve them through fine-grained, co-ordinated, and on- demand resource allocations. We have implemented MROrches- trator on two 24-node native and virtualized Hadoop clusters. Experimental results with a suite of representative MapReduce benchmarks demonstrate up to 38% reduction in job completion times, and up to 25% increase in resource utilization. We further show how popular resource managers like NGM and Mesos when augmented with MROrchestrator can hike up their performance.

  5. Using Eco-Mapping to Understand Family Strengths and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Katherine M.; Stricklin, Sarintha; Nowak, Theresa M.; Rous, Beth

    2008-01-01

    As professionals and families work together to identify and celebrate the strengths and resources unique to each family, new and innovative ways to describe and discuss family characteristics are needed. The eco-map, borrowed from social science disciplines, is one method used to describe family strengths and resources. The eco-map was developed…

  6. Wind Resource Mapping for United States Offshore Areas: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.

    2006-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is producing validated wind resource maps for priority offshore regions of the United States. This report describes the methodology used to validate the maps and to build a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database to classify the offshore wind resource by state, water depth, distance from shore, and administrative unit.

  7. Progress Maps. Assessment Resource Kit(ARK).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Geoff; Forster, Margaret

    A progress map describes the nature of development in an area of learning and thus serves as a frame of reference for monitoring individual growth. An essential feature of a progress map, which is an integral component of Developmental Assessment, is that it describes and illustrates developing competence. The first step in constructing a progress…

  8. Map showing locations of geophysical survey and modeling lines in the vicinity of New Madrid, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhea, Susan; Wheeler, Russell L.

    1994-01-01

    This is one of a series of five seismotectonic maps of the seismically active New Madrid area in southeast Missouri and adjacent parts of Arkansas, Kentucky, and Tennessee (table 1). We cannot legibly show all the seismotectonic data on a single map, therefore each of the five maps in this series groups a different type of related information. Rhea and others (1994) summarized the background and purpose of the seismotectonic map folio.

  9. Localization of Allotetraploid Gossypium SNPs Using Physical Mapping Resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent efforts in Gossypium SNP development have produced thousands of putative SNPs for G. barbadense, G. mustelinum, and G. tomentosum relative to G. hirsutum. Here we report on current efforts to localize putative SNPs using physical mapping resources. Recent advances in physical mapping resour...

  10. Genetic Linkage Maps: Strategies, Resources and Achievements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter is for the sunflower volume in the Crop GGB (Genetics, Genomics and Breeding) Book Series. The book includes chapters covering basic information about the sunflower plant, germplasm diversity, classical genetics and traditional breeding, genome mapping, regulation of seed oil conte...

  11. U.S. Solar Resource Maps and Tools from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Solar maps provide monthly average daily total solar resource information on grid cells. The insolation values represent the resource available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south at an angle from horizontal to equal to the latitude of the collector location. [Copied from http://www.nrel.gov/gis/solar.html] Several types of solar maps are made available. The U.S. Solar resource maps show the resource potential for energy from photovoltaics and from concentrating solar power (CSP). Both sets of maps are available in low or high resolution. A dynamic map based on version 2 of PVWATTS calculates electrical energy performance estimates for a grid-connected photovoltaic system. The map of U.S. Solar Measurement Station Locations is also dynamic, showing the spatial distribution of measurement stations across the U.S. that are monitored by programs and agencies such as DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program or NREL's Cooperative Network for Renewable Resource Measurements (CONFRRM). Clicking on a station location will take the user to the website of that station. Finally, static map images providing solar resource information averaged by month are also available.

  12. Exploiting map plans as resources for action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payton, David

    1989-01-01

    When plans are used as programs for controlling the action of autonomous or teleoperated robots, their abstract representation can easily obscure a great deal of the critical knowledge that originally led to the planned course of action. An autonomous vehicle experiment is highlighted which illustrates how the information barriers created by abstraction can result in undesirable action. It is then shown how the same task can be performed correctly using plans as a resource for action. As a result of this simple change in outlook, problems requiring opportunistic reaction to unexpected changes in the environment can be solved.

  13. Maps showing thermal maturity of Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Thomas M.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The Wind River Basin is a large Laramide (Late Cretaceous through Eocene) structural and sedimentary basin that encompasses about 7,400 square miles in central Wyoming. The basin is bounded by the Washakie Range, Owl Creek, and southern Bighorn Mountains on the north, the Casper arch on the east and northeast, the Granite Mountains on the south, and the Wind River Range on the west. Important conventional and unconventional oil and gas resources have been discovered and produced from reservoirs ranging in age from Mississippian through Tertiary. It has been suggested that various Upper Cretaceous marine shales are the principal hydrocarbon source rocks for many of these accumulations. Numerous source rock studies of various Upper Cretaceous marine shales throughout the Rocky Mountain region have led to the conclusion that these rocks have generated, or are capable of generating, oil and (or) gas. With recent advances and success in horizontal drilling and multistage fracture stimulation there has been an increase in exploration and completion of wells in these marine shales in other Rocky Mountain Laramide basins that were traditionally thought of only as hydrocarbon source rocks. Important parameters that control hydrocarbon production from shales include: reservoir thickness, amount and type of organic matter, and thermal maturity. The purpose of this report is to present maps and a structural cross section showing levels of thermal maturity, based on vitrinite reflectance (Ro), for Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the Wind River Basin.

  14. Leveraging Terminological Resources for Mapping between Rare Disease Information Sources

    PubMed Central

    Rance, Bastien; Snyder, Michelle; Lewis, Janine; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Background Rare disease information sources are incompletely and inconsistently cross-referenced to one another, making it difficult for information seekers to navigate across them. The development of such cross-references established manually by experts is generally labor intensive and costly. Objectives To develop an automatic mapping between two of the major rare diseases information sources, GARD and Orphanet, by leveraging terminological resources, especially the UMLS. Methods We map the rare disease terms from Orphanet and ORDR to the UMLS. We use the UMLS as a pivot to bridge between the rare disease terminologies. We compare our results to a mapping obtained through manually established cross-references to OMIM. Results Our mapping has a precision of 94%, a recall of 63% and an F1-score of 76%. Our automatic mapping should help facilitate the development of more complete and consistent cross-references between GARD and Orphanet, and is applicable to other rare disease information sources as well. PMID:23920611

  15. Development and improvement of the wind resources map over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, B.-K.; Lee, S.-W.; Byon, J.-Y.; Jeon, S.-H.; Park, Y.-S.; Choi, Y.-J.

    2012-04-01

    Renewable energy has been researched in many countries to restrict the emission of CO2 by substituting the fossil fuel to reduce the global warming. Recently, there has been growing penetration of renewable energy in Korea. Wind energy is one of the most cost-effective energy sources compared with other renewable energy sources in Korea. Since wind energy capacity depends on wind speed, wind resources map can provide the most suitable location for wind power generation. We developed 1-km horizontal resolution wind resources map over South Korea by using the numerical model WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting). We also developed 333-m horizontal resolution wind resources map which conducted numerical experiments using LES (Large Eddy Simulation) model to resolve turbulent features explicitly over the complex terrain with 333m horizontal resolution. In order to investigate the effect of complex terrain, we used high resolution of 100-m grid spacing topography data and 30-m grid spacing land-use data for lateral boundary condition. The wind resources map with 1-km grid resolution over Korea includes hourly wind variations during the TMY (Typical Meteorological Year) for 1998 ~ 2008. It shows abundant wind energy potential over the mountainous region and southwestern coastal region over South Korea, especially in spring and winter season. 1-km and 333-m wind resources map over the complex mountainous region such as Gang-won province showed well agreed with observed data at AWS (Automatic weather station). Moreover, we found that the 333-m wind resources map is more corresponded wind features over the complex terrain of Korea. After post-processing the 1-km wind resources map by using the GIS (Geographic Information System) tools, we have been displaying on web site (http://www.greenmap.go.kr) to provide these wind information for wind energy companies, experts in renewable energy and end users.

  16. Maps Showing Geology and Shallow Structure of Eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Hara, Charles J.; Oldale, Robert N.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents results of marine studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during the summers of 1975 and 1976 in eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vineyard Sound (fig. 1) located off the southeastern coast of Massachusetts. The study was made in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the New England Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It covered an area of the Atlantic Inner Continental Shelf between latitude 41 deg 12' and 41 deg 33'N, and between longitude 70 deg 37' and 71 deg 15'W (see index map). Major objectives included assessment of sand and gravel resources, environmental impact evaluation both of offshore mining of these resources and of offshore disposal of solid waste and dredge spoil material, identification and mapping of the offshore geology, and determination of the geologic history of this part of the Inner Shelf. A total of 670 kilometers (km) of closely spaced high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, 224 km of side-scan sonar data, and 16 cores totaling 90 meters (m) of recovered sediment, were collected during the investigation. This report is companion to geologic maps published for Cape Cod Bay (Oldale and O'Hara, 1975) and Buzzards Bay, Mass. (Robb and Oldale, 1977).

  17. Maps showing aeromagnetic survey and geologic interpretation of the Chignik and Sutwik Island quadrangles, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Case, J.E.; Cox, D.P.; Detra, D.E.; Detterman, R.L.; Wilson, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    An aeromagnetic survey over part of the Chignik and Sutwik Island quadrangles, on the southern Alaska Peninsula, was flown in 1977 as part of the Alaska mineral resource assessment program (AMRAP). Maps at scales 1:250,000 and 1:63,360 have been released on open-file (U.s. Geological Survey, 1978a, 1978b). This report includes the aeromagnetic map superimposed on the topographic base (sheet 1) and an interpretation map superimposed on the topographic and simplified geologic base (sheet 2). This discussion provides an interpretation of the aeromagnetic data with respect to regional geology, occurrence of ore deposits and prospects, and potential oil and gas resources. The survey was flown along northwest-southeast lines, spaced about 1.6 km apart, at a nominal elevation of about 300 m above the land surface. A proton-precession magnetometer was used for the survey, and the resulting digital data were computer contoured at intervals of 10 and 50 gammas (sheet 1). The International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) of 1965, updated to 1977, was removed from the total field data.

  18. World Map Showing Surface and Subsurface Distribution, and Lithologic Character of Middle and Late Neoproterozoic Rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, John H.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The map was prepared to outline the basic information on where Neoproterozoic rocks are present in the World, and of the lithologic character of these rocks. The information provides a better understanding of major Neoproterozoic tectonic subdivisions useful in paleogeographic and plate tectonic reconstructions. The time frame of the map is within the middle and late Neoproterozoic from approximately 870 to 540 Ma and is after widespread Mesoproterozoic Grenville-age collisional events that are considered to have formed the hypothetical supercontinent of Rodinia. Much of the time represented by the map is interpreted to be during the fragmentation of Rodinia. The recognition of Neoproterozoic rocks is commonly difficult because of limited isotopic or paloeontological dating. Thus, some rocks shown on the map could be older or younger than the age indicated. However, at the scale of the map the the problem may be minor. Enough information seems to be available to indicate the general age of the rocks. Many of the successions contain diamictite deposits considered to be glaciogenic and dated as middle or late Neoproterozoic. These deposits thus show a rough correlation of middle and late Neoproterozoic rocks of the world. The map is a Richardson map projection, except for Antarctica which is a polar projection. The map was prepared from about 650 references, shown in the text linked below under 'Sources of Information', used to outline distribution patterns, determine rock types, and provide information on the regional and local geologic framework of the rocks. The focus of the references is on the geologic information needed to prepare the map. Other information, such as plate tectonic reconstructions or paleomagnetic studies is generally not included. The 'Sources of Information' lists references alphabetically for each of 14 regions. In brackets is a code for each area. These codes provide help in locating the specific regions in the references.

  19. Mapping the governance of human resources for health in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Santric Milicevic, Milena; Vasic, Milena; Edwards, Matt

    2015-12-01

    This article maps the current governance of human resources for health (HRH) in relation to universal health coverage in Serbia since the health sector reforms in 2003. The study adapts the Global Health Workforce Alliance/World Health Organization four-dimensional framework of HRH in the context of governance for universal health coverage. A set of proxies was established for the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of HRH. Analysis of official HRH documentation from relevant institutions and reports were used to construct a governance profile of HRH for Serbia from the introduction of the reform in 2003 up to 2013. The results show that all Serbian districts (except Sremski) surpass the availability threshold of 59.4 skilled midwives, nurses and physicians per 10,000 inhabitants. District accessibility of health workforce greatly differed from the national average with variances from +26% to -34%. Analysis of national averages and patient load of general practitioners showed variances among districts by ± 21%, whilst hospital discharges per 100 inhabitants deviated between +52% and -45%. Pre-service and in-service education of health workforce is regulated and accredited. However, through its efforts to respond to population health needs Serbia lacks a single coordinating entity to take overall responsibility for effective and coordinated HRH planning, management and development within the broader landscape of health strategy development. PMID:26358245

  20. Classifying and mapping wetlands and peat resources using digital cartography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cameron, Cornelia C.; Emery, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Digital cartography allows the portrayal of spatial associations among diverse data types and is ideally suited for land use and resource analysis. We have developed methodology that uses digital cartography for the classification of wetlands and their associated peat resources and applied it to a 1:24 000 scale map area in New Hampshire. Classifying and mapping wetlands involves integrating the spatial distribution of wetlands types with depth variations in associated peat quality and character. A hierarchically structured classification that integrates the spatial distribution of variations in (1) vegetation, (2) soil type, (3) hydrology, (4) geologic aspects, and (5) peat characteristics has been developed and can be used to build digital cartographic files for resource and land use analysis. The first three parameters are the bases used by the National Wetlands Inventory to classify wetlands and deepwater habitats of the United States. The fourth parameter, geological aspects, includes slope, relief, depth of wetland (from surface to underlying rock or substrate), wetland stratigraphy, and the type and structure of solid and unconsolidated rock surrounding and underlying the wetland. The fifth parameter, peat characteristics, includes the subsurface variation in ash, acidity, moisture, heating value (Btu), sulfur content, and other chemical properties as shown in specimens obtained from core holes. These parameters can be shown as a series of map data overlays with tables that can be integrated for resource or land use analysis.

  1. Resource utilization model for the algorithm to architecture mapping model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoughton, John W.; Patel, Rakesh R.

    1993-01-01

    The analytical model for resource utilization and the variable node time and conditional node model for the enhanced ATAMM model for a real-time data flow architecture are presented in this research. The Algorithm To Architecture Mapping Model, ATAMM, is a Petri net based graph theoretic model developed at Old Dominion University, and is capable of modeling the execution of large-grained algorithms on a real-time data flow architecture. Using the resource utilization model, the resource envelope may be obtained directly from a given graph and, consequently, the maximum number of required resources may be evaluated. The node timing diagram for one iteration period may be obtained using the analytical resource envelope. The variable node time model, which describes the change in resource requirement for the execution of an algorithm under node time variation, is useful to expand the applicability of the ATAMM model to heterogeneous architectures. The model also describes a method of detecting the presence of resource limited mode and its subsequent prevention. Graphs with conditional nodes are shown to be reduced to equivalent graphs with time varying nodes and, subsequently, may be analyzed using the variable node time model to determine resource requirements. Case studies are performed on three graphs for the illustration of applicability of the analytical theories.

  2. Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing conditions on June 30, 1949. Drawing no. NA 91/A9-1(1) 1949 - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  3. Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing conditions on June 30, 1949. Drawing no. NA 91/A9-1(1) 1949 - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, East of Red Hill Avenue between Edinger Avenue & Barranca Parkway, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  4. Flexible cognitive resources: competitive content maps for attention and memory.

    PubMed

    Franconeri, Steven L; Alvarez, George A; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    The brain has finite processing resources so that, as tasks become harder, performance degrades. Where do the limits on these resources come from? We focus on a variety of capacity-limited buffers related to attention, recognition, and memory that we claim have a two-dimensional 'map' architecture, where individual items compete for cortical real estate. This competitive format leads to capacity limits that are flexible, set by the nature of the content and their locations within an anatomically delimited space. We contrast this format with the standard 'slot' architecture and its fixed capacity. Using visual spatial attention and visual short-term memory as case studies, we suggest that competitive maps are a concrete and plausible architecture that limits cognitive capacity across many domains. PMID:23428935

  5. Map Resource Packet: Course Models for the History-Social Science Framework, Grade Seven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This packet of maps is an auxiliary resource to the "World History and Geography: Medieval and Early Modern Times. Course Models for the History-Social Science Framework, Grade Seven." The set includes: outline, precipitation, and elevation maps; maps for locating key places; landform maps; and historical maps. The list of maps are grouped under…

  6. The Mapping and Evaluation of Groundwater Resources Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, C. L.

    2009-05-01

    To delineate and assess Ontario's overburden and bedrock aquifers the Ontario Geological Survey (OGS) has established a multifaceted groundwater mapping program to support sustainable resource development and effective watershed planning. The mapping program consists of five inter-related themes: GIS-based geoscience compilations; watershed-scale inventories; bedrock and surficial aquifer mapping; regional-scale data compilation; and thematic (research) investigations. Historic and/or previously existing geoscience mapping data has been digitized and integrated to form the foundation for additional work by the OGS and other public and private agencies. On-going components of the program involve the integrated use of geologic mapping, stratigraphic investigations, geochemical/geophysical surveys and numeric modelling. Primary thrusts of the program include: determining the regional extent and character of aquifers; identification of new potable groundwater sources; and understanding controls on water quality and quantity. The products and information generated by the program are fundamental to the implementation of provincial water management polices and strategies in that they directly contribute to the management of groundwater resources and an understanding of the physical environment. Outcomes of the groundwater program include: knowledge of aquifer-aquitard relationships allowing realistic vulnerability assessments and thus influencing land-use planning decisions; determination of groundwater withdrawals on the ability of aquifers to sustain production; and population growth centres targeting aquifers discovered by geologic investigations and modeling. Further, the geochemical survey components of the program are establishing regional ambient groundwater/stream sediment parameters to determine anthropogenic influences and delineate areas of potential health concerns and environmental impact. In order to maximize the value of the program and enable the

  7. Maps showing late Pleistocene and Holocene evolution of the South Texas continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pyle, Carroll A.; Berryhill, Henry L., Jr.; Trippet, Anita R.

    1979-01-01

    Interpretation of acoustical profiles has provided insight into the late Quaternary geologic history of the Continental Shelf off South Texas. (See the geographic index map on sheet 1 for location of the area studied.) The profiles reveal the interplay of tectonism, sedimentation, and cyclic fluctuations of sea level in the building and geologic evolution of the continental terrace. The sequence of sediments studied extends to about 200 meters (m) beneath the sea-floor surface. Four seismic-stratigraphic units underlain by four prominent sound reflectors were identified and mapped. This geologic synthesis, for which the research was funded by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), is but one aspect of a coordinated, multidisciplinary environmental study of the South Texas Outer Continental Shelf sponsored by BLM (Berryhill, 1976, 1977). The environmental studies are keyed to the leasing of Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lands for petroleum exploration and production. Their purpose is to provide the data development of petroleum resources on the OCS, as well as to provide the basis for predicting the impact of oil and gas exploration and production on the marine environment. Of primary concern is the recognition of geologic conditions that might be hazardous to structures placed on the sea floor. Geologic hazards relate directly to the potential for significant movement of the sea floor in the future. Judging sea-floor stability and recognizing geologic features that are potentially hazardous require an understanding of the recent geologic history of the area, which, in turn, entails determining the relative rates and interactions of sedimentation and tectonism through time. In addition to the primary objective, the synthesis provides knowledge about the magnitude and extent of sea-level fluctuations in the western Gulf of Mexico, and it provides a depositional facies model of possible use in appraising the resource potential of the more deeply buried

  8. Maps Showing Ground-Water Conditions in the San Francisco Peaks Area, Coconino County, Arizona - 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Appel, Cynthia L.; Bills, Donald J.

    1981-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The San Francisco Peaks area includes about 2,300 mi2, of which about 500 mi2 is in the Navajo Indian Reservation, in north-central Arizona. Ground-water development has been slight except for the public-supply wells for Flagstaff and domestic wells in Fort Valley, Pitman Valley, and the area west of Elden Mountain. The public water supply for Flagstaff is primarily from Upper Lake Mary but is supplemented by ground water from wells near Woody Mountain and Lower Lake Mary and from wells and springs in the Inner Basin. In 1978 about 2,000 acre-ft of ground water was withdrawn for public, industrial, domestic, and stock supplies in the San Francisco Peaks area. The hydrologic data on which these maps are based are available, for the most part, in computer-printout form and may be consulted at the Arizona Department of Water Resources, 99 East Virginia, Phoenix, and at U.S. Geological Survey offices in: Federal Building, 301 West Congress Street, Tucson; Valley Center, Suite 1880, Phoenix; and 2255 North Gemini Drive, Building 3, Flagstaff. Material from which copies can be made at private expense is available at the Tucson, Phoenix, and Flagstaff offices of the U.S. Geological Survey. Only the springs for which discharge data are available are shown on the maps, and only selected wells are shown in areas of high well density.

  9. Map showing landslide susceptibility in the municipality of Ponce, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Matthew C.; Santiago, Marilyn; Jibson, Randall W.; Questell, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    The risk of landslides during intense or prolonged rainfall is high in steeply sloping areas such as the municipality of Ponce, where 56 percent of the 301-square-kilometer municipality has slopes 10 degrees or greater. These are areas where the possibility of landsliding increases when triggering conditions such as heavy rainfall or excavation and construction occur. Using a 30-meter digital elevation model to classify hillslope angle, a digital map of bedrock geology, and maps showing the locations of landslides associated with a severe storm in October 1985, the municipality was classified into areas of low, moderate, and high susceptibility to landslides triggered by heavy rainfall. Areas defined by geology as having 0-0.1 landslides per square kilometer were mapped as having low landslide susceptibility, areas having 0.1-0.5 landslides per square kilometer were mapped as having moderate susceptibility, and areas having more than 0.5 landslides per square kilometer were mapped as having high landslide susceptibility. Areas with hillslope angles of 5 degrees or less were not classified as they are considered too flat for significant landslide susceptibility. The result of this classification indicates that 34 percent of the municipality has high susceptibility to rainfall-triggered landsliding, 24 percent has moderate susceptibility, and 9 percent has low susceptibility. Approximately 34 percent of the municipality, mainly areas with slopes of 5 degrees or less and water bodies, was not classified. Because of the uncertainties inherent in the susceptibility classification of extensive landscape areas as well as timing of landslide triggers, landslide susceptibility maps should be used with caution. The results of this study are valid for generalized planning and assessment purposes, but may be less useful at the site-specific scale where local geologic and geographic heterogeneities may occur. Construction in areas of moderate to high landslide susceptibility

  10. Map showing drainage basins and locations of streamflow-measuring sites, Fairfax County, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohler, E.H.

    1977-01-01

    A drainage basin map of Fairfax County shows basins for named streams with drainage areas of 1.1 sq mi (2.8 sq km) or more. Areas of minor streams draining directly into the Potomac River and Occoquan Creek are tabulated. The locations of continuous-record and partial-record (peak-flow and low-flow) flow sites are shown. The use of topographic and climatic characteristics of drainage basins to transfer flow data from gaged areas to ungaged areas is discussed. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. A gene-based SNP resource and linkage map for the copepod Tigriopus californicus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As yet, few genomic resources have been developed in crustaceans. This lack is particularly evident in Copepoda, given the extraordinary numerical abundance, and taxonomic and ecological diversity of this group. Tigriopus californicus is ideally suited to serve as a genetic model copepod and has been the subject of extensive work in environmental stress and reproductive isolation. Accordingly, we set out to develop a broadly-useful panel of genetic markers and to construct a linkage map dense enough for quantitative trait locus detection in an interval mapping framework for T. californicus--a first for copepods. Results One hundred and ninety Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to genotype our mapping population of 250 F2 larvae. We were able to construct a linkage map with an average intermarker distance of 1.8 cM, and a maximum intermarker distance of 10.3 cM. All markers were assembled into linkage groups, and the 12 linkage groups corresponded to the 12 known chromosomes of T. californicus. We estimate a total genome size of 401.0 cM, and a total coverage of 73.7%. Seventy five percent of the mapped markers were detected in 9 additional populations of T. californicus. Of available model arthropod genomes, we were able to show more colocalized pairs of homologues between T. californicus and the honeybee Apis mellifera, than expected by chance, suggesting preserved macrosynteny between Hymenoptera and Copepoda. Conclusions Our study provides an abundance of linked markers spanning all chromosomes. Many of these markers are also found in multiple populations of T. californicus, and in two other species in the genus. The genomic resource we have developed will enable mapping throughout the geographical range of this species and in closely related species. This linkage map will facilitate genome sequencing, mapping and assembly in an ecologically and taxonomically interesting group for which genomic resources are currently under development

  12. Mapping Arctic sea ice from the Earth Resources Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. C. (Principal Investigator); Bowley, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Methods of detecting ice and for distinguishing between ice and clouds are discussed, and examples of ERTS-1 data showing ice distributions in northern Hudson Bay, M'Clure Strait, the eastern Beaufort Sea, and the Greenland Sea are presented. The results of the initial analysis of ERTS-1 data indicate that the locations of ice edges and ice concentrations can be accurately mapped, and that considerable information on ice type can be derived through use of the various spectral bands. Ice features as small as 80 to 100 m width can be mapped.

  13. The use of interactive graphical maps for browsing medical/health Internet information resources

    PubMed Central

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel

    2003-01-01

    As online information portals accumulate metadata descriptions of Web resources, it becomes necessary to develop effective ways for visualising and navigating the resultant huge metadata repositories as well as the different semantic relationships and attributes of described Web resources. Graphical maps provide a good method to visualise, understand and navigate a world that is too large and complex to be seen directly like the Web. Several examples of maps designed as a navigational aid for Web resources are presented in this review with an emphasis on maps of medical and health-related resources. The latter include HealthCyberMap maps , which can be classified as conceptual information space maps, and the very abstract and geometric Visual Net maps of PubMed (for demos). Information resources can be also organised and navigated based on their geographic attributes. Some of the maps presented in this review use a Kohonen Self-Organising Map algorithm, and only HealthCyberMap uses a Geographic Information System to classify Web resource data and render the maps. Maps based on familiar metaphors taken from users' everyday life are much easier to understand. Associative and pictorial map icons that enable instant recognition and comprehension are preferred to geometric ones and are key to successful maps for browsing medical/health Internet information resources. PMID:12556244

  14. Maps Showing Distribution of Heavy Minerals on the South Texas Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shideler, Gerald L.; Flores, Romeo M.

    1976-01-01

    Heavy minerals constitute a natural resource which, under proper conditions, could have potential economic significance. The purpose of this report is to describe the heavy-mineral distribution in sea-floor sediments On the South Texas Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) within the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The South Texas OCS encompasses approximately 24,500 sq km extending southward from Matagorda Bay to the U.S.-Mexico border (fig. 1). In a shoreward direction, the OCS extends from the 180-m isobath to the Federal-State water boundary (16.6 km offshore); however, the mineral distribution patterns presented in these maps have been extrapolated slightly shoreward of the l5-m isobath. This work was part of a regional environmental studies program in the South Texas OCS that was conducted in conjunction with the offshore petroleum-lease sales, under the auspices of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Some previous work on heavy minerals within the OCS had been done by van Andel and Poole (1960) and van Andel (1960); the fOrIner work was based on relatively few OCS samples and was part of a broader regional study of the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  15. Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Depot Hill, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented seacliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast (Moore and others, 1999) do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the seacliffs, where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence (Griggs and Scholar, 1998; Griggs, 1994; Plant and Griggs, 1990; Griggs and Johnson, 1979 and 1983; Kuhn and Shepard, 1979). This is the first map in a series of maps documenting the processes of short-term seacliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot (Moore and others, 1999; Griggs and Savoy, 1985). This map presents seacliff failure and retreat data from Depot Hill, California, which is located five kilometers east of Santa Cruz (fig.1) near the town of Capitola, along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of seacliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the seacliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El NiOos; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. Four sets of vertical aerial photographs (Oct. 18, 1989; Jan. 27, 1998

  16. Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Seacliff State Beach, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented seacliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast (Moore and others, 1999) do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the seacliffs, where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence (Griggs and Scholar, 1998; Griggs, 1994; Plant and Griggs, 1990; Griggs and Johnson, 1979 and 1983; Kuhn and Shepard, 1979). This is the second map in a series of maps documenting the processes of short-term seacliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot (Moore and others, 1999; Griggs and Savoy, 1985). This map presents seacliff failure and retreat data from Seacliff State Beach, California, which is located seven kilometers east of Santa Cruz (fig. 1) along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of seacliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the seacliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El Ni?os; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. Four sets of vertical aerial photographs (Oct. 18, 1989; Jan. 27, 1998; Feb. 9, 1998

  17. Application of ERTS-1 satellite imagery for land use mapping and resource inventories in the central coastal region of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Thaman, R. R.; Senger, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 satellite imagery has proved a valuable data source for land use as well as natural and cultural resource studies on a regional basis. ERTS-1 data also provide an excellent base for mapping resource related features and phenomena. These investigations are focused on a number of potential applications which are already showing promise of having operational utility.

  18. Combined Gamma Ray/neutron Spectroscopy for Mapping Lunar Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Byrd, R. C.; Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Masarik, J.; Moss, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Some elements in the Moon can be resources, such as hydrogen and oxygen. Other elements, like Ti or the minerals in which they occur, such as ilmenite, could be used in processing lunar materials. Certain elements can also be used as tracers for other elements or lunar processes, such as hydrogen for mature regoliths with other solar-wind-implanted elements like helium, carbon, and nitrogen. A complete knowledge of the elemental composition of a lunar region is desirable both in identifying lunar resources and in lunar geochemical studies, which also helps in identifying and using lunar resources. The use of gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy together to determine abundances of many elements in the top few tens of centimeters of the lunar surface is discussed. To date, very few discussions of elemental mapping of planetary surfaces considered measurements of both gamma rays and the full range of neutron energies. The theories for gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy of the Moon and calculations of leakage fluxes are presented here with emphasis on why combined gamma ray/neutron spectroscopy is much more powerful than measuring either radiation alone.

  19. Geochemical maps showing distribution and abundance of tin in two fractions of stream-sediment concentrates, Silver City 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, New Mexico and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, Kenneth C.; Hassemer, Jerry R.; Forn, Carl L.; Siems, David F.

    1986-01-01

    These maps (Maps A and B) show the distribution and abundance tin in the nonmagnetic and magnetic fractions of heavy-mineral concentrates from stream sediments collected in the Silver City 1o x 2o quadrangle, New Mexico and Arizona. Geochemical maps showing the distribution and abundance of 10 other selected key elements and the mineral fluorite in the Silver City quadrangle are also part of this folio (Watts and Hassemer, 1980; Watts and others 1986a-i). These maps contribute to the assessment of mineral resources within Silver City 1o x 2o quadrangle by (1) showing regional patterns of elements enriched in heavy-mineral concentrates, thereby providing clues to regional patterns of mineralization; (2) showing new areas containing enriched metals, not previously known from mining activity; and (3) providing supportive data to the interpretive and summary maps (Watts and Hassmer, 1986) and the mineral resource assessment (Richter and others, 1983). Background information that pertains to published components of the Silver City Folio is also available (Richter and others, in press). 

  20. Geochemical maps showing distribution and abundance of manganese in two fractions of stream-sediment concentrates, Silver City 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, New Mexico and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, Kenneth C.; Hassemer, Jerry R.; Forn, Carl L.; Siems, David F.

    1986-01-01

    These maps (Maps A and B) show the distribution and abundance of maganese in the nonmagnetic and magnetic fractions of heavy-mineral concentrates from stream sediments collected in the Silver City 1o x 2o quadrangle, New Mexico and Arizona. Geochemical maps showing the distribution and abundance of 10 other selected key elements and the mineral fluorite in the Silver City quadrangle are also part of this folio (Watts and Hassemer, 1980; Watts and others 1986a-i). These maps contribute to the assessment of mineral resources within Silver City 1o x 2o quadrangle by (1) showing regional patterns of elements enriched in heavy-mineral concentrates, thereby providing clues to regional patterns of mineralization; (2) showing new areas containing enriched metals, not previously known from mining activity; and (3) providing supportive data to the interpretive and summary maps (Watts and Hassmer, 1986) and the mineral resource assessment (Richter and others, 1983). Background information that pertains to published components of the Silver City Folio is also available (Richter and others, in press). 

  1. Geochemical maps showing distribution and abundance of barium in two fractions of stream-sediment concentrates, Silver City 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, New Mexico and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, Kenneth C.; Hassemer, Jerry R.; Forn, Carl L.; Siems, David F.

    1986-01-01

    These maps (Maps A and B) show the distribution and abundance barium in the nonmagnetic and magnetic fractions of heavy-mineral concentrates from stream sediments collected in the Silver City 1o x 2o quadrangle, New Mexico and Arizona. Geochemical maps showing the distribution and abundance of 10 other selected key elements and the mineral fluorite in the Silver City quadrangle are also part of this folio (Watts and Hassemer, 1980; Watts and others 1986a-i). These maps contribute to the assessment of mineral resources within Silver City 1o x 2o quadrangle by (1) showing regional patterns of elements enriched in heavy-mineral concentrates, thereby providing clues to regional patterns of mineralization; (2) showing new areas containing enriched metals, not previously known from mining activity; and (3) providing supportive data to the interpretive and summary maps (Watts and Hassmer, 1986) and the mineral resource assessment (Richter and others, 1983). Background information that pertains to published components of the Silver City Folio is also available (Richter and others, in press). 

  2. Community Resource Mapping: A Strategy for Promoting Successful Transition for Youth with Disabilities. Information Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Kelli; Skinner, Becky

    This paper is a guide to mapping community resources as a way of identifying assets and resources that can be used to aid students with disabilities as they transition from school to adulthood. Discussion of the principles of community resource mapping (relationship-driven and across programmatic and geographic boundaries) is followed by a…

  3. Genetic mapping shows intraspecific variation and transgressive segregation for caterpillar-induced aphid resistance in maize.

    PubMed

    Tzin, Vered; Lindsay, Penelope L; Christensen, Shawn A; Meihls, Lisa N; Blue, Levi B; Jander, Georg

    2015-11-01

    Plants in nature have inducible defences that sometimes lead to targeted resistance against particular herbivores, but susceptibility to others. The metabolic diversity and genetic resources available for maize (Zea mays) make this a suitable system for a mechanistic study of within-species variation in such plant-mediated interactions between herbivores. Beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua) and corn leaf aphids (Rhopalosiphum maidis) are two naturally occurring maize herbivores with different feeding habits. Whereas chewing herbivore-induced methylation of 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one glucoside (DIMBOA-Glc) to form 2-hydroxy-4,7-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one glucoside (HDMBOA-Glc) promotes caterpillar resistance, lower DIMBOA-Glc levels favour aphid reproduction. Thus, caterpillar-induced DIMBOA-Glc methyltransferase activity in maize is predicted to promote aphid growth. To test this hypothesis, the impact of S. exigua feeding on R. maidis progeny production was assessed using seventeen genetically diverse maize inbred lines. Whereas aphid progeny production was increased by prior caterpillar feeding on lines B73, Ki11, Ki3 and Tx303, it decreased on lines Ky21, CML103, Mo18W and W22. Genetic mapping of this trait in a population of B73 × Ky21 recombinant inbred lines identified significant quantitative trait loci on maize chromosomes 1, 7 and 10. There is a transgressive segregation for aphid resistance, with the Ky21 alleles on chromosomes 1 and 7 and the B73 allele on chromosome 10 increasing aphid progeny production. The chromosome 1 QTL coincides with a cluster of three maize genes encoding benzoxazinoid O-methyltransferases that convert DIMBOA-Glc to HDMBOA-Glc. Gene expression studies and benzoxazinoid measurements indicate that S. exigua -induced responses in this pathway differentially affect R. maidis resistance in B73 and Ky21. PMID:26462033

  4. Maps showing petroleum exploration intensity and production in major Cambrian to Ordovician reservoir rocks in the Anadarko Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, Mitch; Hester, Tim

    1996-01-01

    The Anadarko basin is a large, deep, two-stage Paleozoic basin (Feinstein, 1981) that is petroleum rich and generally well explored. The Anadarko basin province, a geogrphic area used here mostly for the convenience of mapping and data management, is defined by political boundaries that include the Anadarko basin proper. The boundaries of the province are identical to those used by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in the 1995 National Assessment of United Stated Oil and Gas Resources. The data in this report, also identical to those used in the national assessment, are from several computerized data bases including Nehring Research Group (NRG) Associates Inc., Significant Oil and Gas Fields of the United States (1992); Petroleum Information (PI), Inc., Well History Control System (1991); and Petroleum Information (PI), Inc., Petro-ROM: Production data on CD-ROM (1993). Although generated mostly in response to the national assessment, the data presented here arc grouped differently and arc displayed and described in greater detail. In addition, the stratigraphic sequences discussed may not necessarily correlate with the "plays" of the 1995 national assessment. This report uses computer-generated maps to show drilling intensity, producing wells, major fields, and other geologic information relevant to petroleum exploration and production in the lower Paleozoic part of the Anadarko basin province as defined for the U.S. Geological Survey's 1995 national petroleum assessment. Hydrocarbon accumulations must meet a minimum standard of 1 million barrels of oil (MMBO) or 6 billion cubic feet of gas (BCFG) estimated ultimate recovery to be included in this report as a major field or revoir. Mapped strata in this report include the Upper Cambrian to Lower Ordovician Arbuckle and Low Ordovician Ellenburger Groups, the Middle Ordovician Simpson Group, and the Middle to Upper Ordovician Viola Group.

  5. Maps showing distribution of tungsten in heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    These maps are part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2 ° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other publications in this folio are listed in the selected references. Located in west-central Utah, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of latest Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrane into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were deeply eroded and the resulting debris deposited in the adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed during igneous activity in middle and late Cenozoic time. The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends which can be utilized along with geologic and geophysical data to assess the mineral resource potential for this quadrangle. These maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle show the regional distributions of copper in two fractions of heavy-mineral concentrates of drainage sediments.

  6. Maps showing distribution of copper in heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    These maps are part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2 ° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other publications in this folio are listed in the selected references. Located in west-central Utah, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of latest Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrane into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were deeply eroded and the resulting debris deposited in the adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed during igneous activity in middle and late Cenozoic time. The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends which can be utilized along with geologic and geophysical data to assess the mineral resource potential for this quadrangle. These maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle show the regional distributions of copper in two fractions of heavy-mineral concentrates of drainage sediments.

  7. Maps showing distribution of thorium in heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    These maps are part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2 ° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other publications in this folio are listed in the selected references. Located in west-central Utah, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of latest Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrane into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were deeply eroded and the resulting debris deposited in the adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed during igneous activity in middle and late Cenozoic time. The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends which can be utilized along with geologic and geophysical data to assess the mineral resource potential for this quadrangle. These maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle show the regional distributions of copper in two fractions of heavy-mineral concentrates of drainage sediments.

  8. Maps showing abundance and distribution of mercury in rock samples, Medford 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Oregon-California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whittington, Charles L.; Grimes, David J.; Leinz, Reinhard W.

    1985-01-01

    This map presents data on the abundance and distribution of mercury in 3,146 rock samples from the Medford quadrangle. Most of the rock samples were collected incidental to geologic, geochemical, and mineral resources studies in the period from 1974 to 1980, but about 6 percent date from earlier investigations (Wells, 1940; 1956; Wells and others 1949). 

  9. Map showing distribution of bismuth and cadmium in stream-sediment samples, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle shows the regional distribution of bismuth and cadimum in the less-than-0.180-mm (minus-80-mesh) fraction of stream sediments. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral-resource

  10. Map showing distribution of barium in stream-sediment samples, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle shows the regional distribution of barium in the less-than-0.180-mm (minus-80-mesh) fraction of stream sediments. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral-resource

  11. Map showing distribution of molybdenum in stream-sediment samples, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, shows the regional distribution of molybdenum in the less-than-0.180-mm (minus-80-mesh) fraction of stream-sediments. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral-resource

  12. Map showing distribution of thorium in stream-sediment samples, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, shows the regional distribution of thorium in the less-than-0.180-mm (minus-80-mesh) fraction of stream-sediments. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral-resource

  13. Map showing occurrences of spring-deposited travertine in the conterminous Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feth, J.H.; Barnes, Ivan

    1979-01-01

    Extinct travertine terraces occur hundreds of meters above present levels of spring activity and have potentials for interpretation of ancient hydrologic systems, rates of downcutting, or rates of tectonic uplift that remain virtually unexploited. The abundance and size of extinct travertine deposits suggest that in many places, such as pinnacles at the southwest end of the Searles Lake basin, California, spring activity was once more widespread and copious than it is now. Travertine of Eocene age has been reported, and a scattering of later Tertiary occurrences is known. But where age has been inferred, the inferred ages are predominantly Pleistocene or younger. So travertine seems to be a geologically transient phenomenon, subject either to removal by erosion or to burial and disappearance. Many travertine deposits are known to be on or close to faults. Their occurrence in otherwise structurally featureless alluvial valleys may, therefore, suggest the possibility of a hidden fault. From the Front Range to the Pacific, more than 300 travertime deposits have been identified. The map shows that the deposits are widely dispersed. However, there are apparent groupings on the Wasatch Fault and associated tectonic areas trending northward in Utah and southern Idaho, and also near the great fault zone that marks the eastern boundary of the Sierra Nevada, California. (Lantz-PTT)

  14. Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Seabright Beach, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented sea cliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the sea cliffs where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence. This is the third map in a series of maps prepared to document the processes of short-term sea cliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot. This map presents sea cliff failure and retreat data from the Seabright Beach section, California, which is located on the east side of Santa Cruz along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of sea cliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the sea cliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El Ni?os; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. During this study we developed a method for investigating short-term processes of sea cliff evolution using rectified photographic stereo models. This method allows us to document the linear extent of cliff failures, the spatial and temporal relationship between failures, and

  15. 2011, 2010 petroleum resource assessment of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska: GIS play maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrity, Christopher P.; Houseknecht, David W.; Bird, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    This report provides digital geographic information systems (GIS) files of maps for each of the 24 plays considered in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 2010 updated petroleum resource assessment of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) (Houseknecht and others, 2010). These are the sample plays evaluated in a previous USGS assessment of the NPRA (Bird and Houseknecht, 2002a), maps of which were released in pdf format (Bird and Houseknecht, 2002b). The 2010 updated assessment of the NPRA evaluated each of the previously used 24 plays based on new geologic data available from exploration activities and scientific research. Quantitative assessments were revised for 11 plays, and no revisions were made for 9 plays. Estimates of the volume of technically recoverable, undiscovered oil, and nonassociated gas resources in these 20 plays are reported elsewhere (Houseknecht and others, 2010). Four plays quantitatively assessed in 2002 were eliminated from quantitative assessment for reasons explained by Houseknecht and others (2010). The NPRA assessment study area includes Federal and native onshore land and adjacent State offshore areas. A map showing the areal extent of each play was prepared by USGS geologists as a preliminary step in the assessment process. Boundaries were drawn on the basis of a variety of information, including seismic reflection data, results of exploration drilling, and regional patterns of rock properties. Play boundary polygons were captured by digitizing the play maps prepared by USGS geologists.

  16. Listening to Students: Customer Journey Mapping at Birmingham City University Library and Learning Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Judith; Eade, Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    Birmingham City University's Library and Learning Resources' strategic aim is to improve student satisfaction. A key element is the achievement of the Customer Excellence Standard. An important component of the standard is the mapping of services to improve quality. Library and Learning Resources has developed a methodology to map these…

  17. Adding It Up: A Rationale for Mapping Public Resources for Children, Youth and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn-Khan, Margaret; Ferber, Thaddeus; Gaines, Elizabeth; Pittman, Karen

    2006-01-01

    This introduction, one of three parts of "Adding It Up: A Guide to Mapping Public Resources for Children, Youth and Families," explains the why, how and what behind creating a children, youth, and families (CYF) resource map. Setting the stage for what's involved in the process, this overview provides a good framework for understanding both the…

  18. Showing Where To Go by Maps or Pictures: An Empirical Case Study at Subway Exits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Toru; Yamazaki, Tetsuo

    This study empirically examined the effectiveness of different methods of presenting route information on a mobile navigation sysyem, for accurate and effortless orientation at subway exits. Specifically, it compared participants’ spatial orientation performance with pictures and maps, in relation to the levels of their spatial ability. Participants identified the directions toward the goals after coming onto the ground faster when viewing pictures than when viewing maps. Spatial orientation with maps was more difficult than that with pictures at exits where body rotation was necessary, especially for people with low mental-rotation ability. In contrast, pictures were equally effective for people with low and high mental-rotation ability. Reasons for the effectiveness of pictures and possibilities of using other presentation formats are discussed.

  19. The Highway Map as a Social Studies Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehemann, Jane

    1981-01-01

    Presents a sample exercise for a seventh-grade geography class using Pennsylvania highway maps. Part one is designed to provide practice in map reading skills. Part two focuses on unusual place names. (Author/SJL)

  20. Maps showing water geochemistry of the Buffalo Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Lake, Park, and Chaffee Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowlan, G.A.; Ficklin, Walter H.; Dover, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents results of geochemical studies carried out in June and July of 1982 in the Buffalo Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Colo. (see index map). Samples of water were collected from 84 streams and 18 springs draining the study area. Tabulations of the analyses and a sample locality map are in Ficklin and others (1984). The geochemistry of stream sediments and panned concentrates of the study area is in Nowlan and Gerstel (1985). The geology of the study area and vicinity is in Hedlund (1985). The mineral resource potential of the study area is described in Hedlund and others (1983). This report (1) assists in the assessment of the mineral resource potential of the Buffalo Peaks Wilderness Study Area; and (2) compares analyses of water samples with analyses of stream-sediment and panned-concentrate samples (Nowlan and Gerstel, 1985).

  1. Concept Maps: Practice Applications in Adult Education and Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Concept maps can be used as both a cognitive and constructivist learning strategy in teaching and learning in adult education and human resource development. The maps can be used to understand course readings, analyze case studies, develop reflective thinking and enhance research skills. The creation of concept maps can also be supported by the…

  2. The Power of Maps. Resource Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper-Hewitt Museum, Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Design, New York, NY.

    "The Power of Maps" is an exhibition held at the Smithsonian Institution, October 6, 1992 to March 7, 1993, that presented more than 300 maps dating from 1500 B.C. to today. This exhibition handbook has been organized to help teachers integrate the study of maps with their school curricula. The 17 suggested activities related directly to…

  3. Map showing structural control of breccia pipes on the southern Marble Plateau, north-central Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Sutphin, H.B.; Wenrich, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    Solution collapse breccia pipes, concentrated throughout the southwestern corner of the Colorado Plateau in Arizona, have been mapped in detail on the southern Marble Plateau. Within the study area, 77 of the 90 (86%) collapse structures fall within northwest-trending and northeast-trending zones that cover only 23% of the total surface area.

  4. Map showing thickness of young bay mud, southern San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, Sandra D.; Nichols, Donald R.; Wright, Nancy A.; Atwater, Brian

    1978-01-01

    Soft water-saturated estuarine deposits less than 10,000 years old underlie the southern part of San Francisco bay and the present and former marshlands that border the bay. Known locally as bay mud or as young bay mud, these deposits, and the estuarine environment that produces them, are of major importance in making decision on land use and development in the San Francisco Bay area. Knowledge of the distribution, thickness, and physical properties of young bay mud is critical to the feasibility, design, and maintenance of structures built on it. Fore this reason, numerous attempts have been made in the past to map or describe these characteristics (Mitchell, 1963; Goldman, 1969; McDonald and Nichols, 1974). The accompanying map of bay-mud thickness significantly revises part of an earlier compilation by Kahle and Goldman (1969) and includes new data from approximately 2400 boreholes, most of which have been drilled during the past 15 years. It also incorporates information on historic margins of San Francisco Bay and its tidal marshes (Nichols and Wright, 1971). Although this map was compelled mostly from data gathered during foundation investigations and construction projects, it is mostly from data gathered during foundation investigations and construction projects, it is not a substitute for such studies. Rather, the map provides regional information for land-use planning, seismic zonation, and design of foundation investigations.

  5. Map showing recently active breaks along the San Andreas Fault between Pt. Delgada and Bolinas Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Robert D., Jr.; Wolfe, Edward W.

    1970-01-01

    This strip map is one of a series of maps showing recently active fault breaks along the San Andreas and other active faults in California. It is designed to inform persons who are concerned with land use near the fault of the location of those fault breaks that have moved recently. The lines on the map are lines of rupture and creep that can be identified by field evidence and that clearly affect the present surface of the land. Map users should keep in mind that these lines are intended primarily as guides to help locate the fault; the mapped lines are not necessarily shown with the precision demanded by some engineering or land utilization needs.

  6. Earth Resources Technology Satellite data collection project, ERTS - Bolivia. [thematic mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The Earth Resources Technology Satellite program of Bolivia has developed a multidisciplinary project to carry out investigations in cartography and to prepare various thematic maps. In cartography, investigations are being carried out with the ERTS-1 images and with existing maps, to determine their application to the preparation of new cartographic products on one hand and on the other to map those regions where the cartography is still deficient. The application of the MSS images to the geological mapping has given more than satisfactory results. Working with conventional photointerpretation, it has been possible to prepare regional geological maps, tectonic maps, studies relative to mining, geomorphological maps, studies relative to petroleum exploration, volcanological maps and maps of hydrologic basins. In agriculture, the ERTS images are used to study land classification and forest and soils mapping.

  7. Genetic mapping shows intraspecific variation and transgressive segregation for caterpillar-induced aphid resistance in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants in nature have inducible defenses that sometimes lead to targeted resistance against particular herbivores, but susceptibility to others. The metabolic diversity and genetic resources available for maize (Zea mays) make this a suitable system for a mechanistic study of within- species variati...

  8. Snow mapping for water resource management using MODIS satellite data in northern Xinjiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Huan; Qin, Zhihao; Fang, Shifeng; Liu, Zhihui

    2008-10-01

    Snow is the most important freshwater resource in northern Xinjiang, which is a typical inland arid ecosystem in western China. Snow mapping can provide useful information for water resource management in this arid ecosystem. An applicable approach for snow mapping in Northern Xinjiang Basin using MODIS data was proposed in this paper. The approach of linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) was used to calculate snow cover fractions within a pixel, which was used to establish a regression function with NDSI at a 250-meter grid resolution. Field campaigns were conducted to examine whether NDSI can be used to extend the utility of the snow mapping approach to obtain sub-pixel estimates of snow cover. In addition, snow depths at 80 sampling sites were collected in the study region. The correlation between image reflectivity and snow depth as well as the comparison between measured snow spectra and image spectra were analyzed. An algorithm was developed on the basis of the correlation for snow depth mapping in the region. Validation for another dataset with 50 sampling sites showed an RMSE of 1.63, indicating that the algorithm was able to provide an estimation of snow depth at an accuracy of 1.63cm. The results indicated that snow cover area can reach 81% and average snow depth was 13.8 cm in north Xinjiang in January 2005. Generally speaking, the snow cover and depth had a trend of gradually decreasing from north to south and from the surroundings to the center. Temporally, the cover reached a maximum in early January, and the depth reached a maximum was ten days later. Snow duration was so different in different regions with the Aletai region having the longest and the Bole having the shortest. In the period of snow melting, snow depth decreased earlier, afterward snow cover dwindled. Our study showed that the spatial and temporal variation of snow cover was very critical for water resource management in the arid inland region and MODIS satellite data provide an

  9. Map of assessed coalbed-gas resources in the United States, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey National Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources Team; Biewick, Laura R. H., (compiler)

    2014-01-01

    This report presents a digital map of coalbed-gas resource assessments in the United States as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS quantitatively estimated potential volumes of undiscovered, technically recoverable natural gas resources within coalbed-gas assessment units (AUs). This is the third digital map product in a series of USGS unconventional oil and gas resource maps. The map plate included in this report can be printed in hardcopy form or downloaded in a Geographic Information System (GIS) data package, including an ArcGIS ArcMap document (.mxd), geodatabase (.gdb), and published map file (.pmf). In addition, the publication access table contains hyperlinks to current USGS coalbed-gas assessment publications and web pages.

  10. Map showing the potentiometric surface of the Aquia Aquifer, May 19-23, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, Frank; Drummond, Dave; Curley, Tracey

    1981-01-01

    The map is based on water level measurements made May 19-23, 1980. The well network used included 83 wells which have been screened in the Aquia aquifer (Aquia Formation of Paleocene Age). Highest levels of the potentiometric surface, 20 to 35 feet above sea level, were measured near the outcrop or subcrop of the aquifer in the topographically high areas of Anne Arundel and Prince Georges Counties. The potentiometric surface slopes to the southeast. Four separate and extensive cones of depression have developed in the potentiometric surface in the vicinities of Lexington Park, Leonardtown, Prince Frederick, and Chesapeake Beach. The cones of Leonardtown and Lexington Park seem to be merging. (USGS)

  11. Maps showing locations and descriptions of radiocarbon-dated samples from central and northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, Carol A.

    1982-01-01

    This compilation includes radiocarbon dates and other pertinent information about samples from northern and central California, principally north of latitude 36°, drawn largely from Radiocarbon, Science, unpublished data of U.S. Geological Survey geologists, and other published and unpublished data brought to the author's attention as of January 1981. It includes a location map, several tables, and two lists of sources that contain further information about the samples. This compilation is intended as a progress report rather than a complete survey of the literature.

  12. Community resources and strategies for association mapping in sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Association mapping is a powerful strategy for identifying genes underlying quantitative traits in plants. We have assembled and characterized genetic and phenotypic diversity of a sorghum panel suitable for association mapping, comprised of 377 accessions representing all major cultivated races (t...

  13. Reviewing Resources on Self-Determination: A Map for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browder, Diane M.; Wood, Wendy M.; Test, David W.; Karvonen, Meagan; Algozinne, Bob

    2001-01-01

    This article provides a map for teachers of students with or without disabilities to use in searching the self-determination literature for usable ideas. The map includes two primary paths: the first leads through the conceptual literature and the second through the intervention literature. Pitfalls are identified and examples illustrate uses in…

  14. Eulusmap: An international land resources map utilizing satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paludan, T.; Csati, E.

    1978-01-01

    In 1972, the International Geographical Union's Commission on World Land Use Survey adopted a project for a land-use map of Europe. Such a map, under the name Eulusmap was started earlier under sponsorship of several government offices in Hungary. Although there was great response from a number of contributors in many countries, it became evident by mid-1974 that the map would contain gaps and some inaccuracies unless additional data sources were utilized. By then, the satellite Landsat-1 had obtained imagery of most of Europe. Using theme extraction techniques, the map was completed in draft form and portions of it displayed at the 23d International Geographical Congress in Moscow during July 1976. Printing of the completed map was accomplished in May 1978.

  15. Incorporating variability in honey bee waggle dance decoding improves the mapping of communicated resource locations.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Roger; Couvillon, Margaret J; Burns, Dominic D R; Tasman, Kiah; Waxman, David; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2013-12-01

    Honey bees communicate to nestmates locations of resources, including food, water, tree resin and nest sites, by making waggle dances. Dances are composed of repeated waggle runs, which encode the distance and direction vector from the hive or swarm to the resource. Distance is encoded in the duration of the waggle run, and direction is encoded in the angle of the dancer's body relative to vertical. Glass-walled observation hives enable researchers to observe or video, and decode waggle runs. However, variation in these signals makes it impossible to determine exact locations advertised. We present a Bayesian duration to distance calibration curve using Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations that allows us to quantify how accurately distance to a food resource can be predicted from waggle run durations within a single dance. An angular calibration shows that angular precision does not change over distance, resulting in spatial scatter proportional to distance. We demonstrate how to combine distance and direction to produce a spatial probability distribution of the resource location advertised by the dance. Finally, we show how to map honey bee foraging and discuss how our approach can be integrated with Geographic Information Systems to better understand honey bee foraging ecology. PMID:24132490

  16. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the Hassayampa area, Maricopa and Yavapai counties, Arizona; 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanger, Henry W.; Appel, Cynthia L.

    1980-01-01

    The Hassayampa area includes about 1,300 square miles in west-central Arizona. The area consists of basins filled with alluvial deposits and mountains composed of crystalline and consolidated sedimentary rocks. The main water-bearing unit is the alluvial deposits, which consist of gravel, sand, silt, and clay. Other water-bearing units consist of crystalline and consolidated sedimentary rocks that may yield a few gallons per minute. In 1978 about 3,000 acre-feet of ground water was withdrawn from the area. Information shown on the maps includes depth to water, altitude of the water level, well depth, specific conductance, and fluoride concentration. Scale 1:125 ,000. (USGS)

  17. Phylogenetic character mapping of proteomic diversity shows high correlation with subspecific phylogenetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Telleria, Jenny; Biron, David G.; Brizard, Jean-Paul; Demettre, Edith; Séveno, Martial; Barnabé, Christian; Ayala, Francisco J.; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2010-01-01

    We performed a phylogenetic character mapping on 26 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite responsible for Chagas disease, and 2 stocks of the sister taxon T. cruzi marinkellei to test for possible associations between T. cruzi–subspecific phylogenetic diversity and levels of protein expression, as examined by proteomic analysis and mass spectrometry. We observed a high level of correlation (P < 10−4) between genetic distance, as established by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, and proteomic dissimilarities estimated by proteomic Euclidian distances. Several proteins were found to be specifically associated to T. cruzi phylogenetic subdivisions (discrete typing units). This study explores the previously uncharacterized links between infraspecific phylogenetic diversity and gene expression in a human pathogen. It opens the way to searching for new vaccine and drug targets and for identification of specific biomarkers at the subspecific level of pathogens. PMID:21059959

  18. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the Douglas Basin area, Cochise County, Arizona; 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, Larry J.; English, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    The Douglas basin area includes about 1,200 square miles in southeastern Arizona. The main use of ground water is for irrigation. For 1955-77, the estimated ground-water pumpage equaled or exceeded 50,000 acre-feet per year, and for 1966-77, the ground-water pumpage averaged about 109,000 acre-feet per year. Ground-water withdrawals have resulted in water-level declines in most of the area. Information shown on the maps includes change in water level (1966-78) and irrigated area; depth to water and altitude of the water level; and chemical quality of the water and well depth. Hydrographs of the water level in selected wells and a table of historical pumpage also are included. Scale 1:125,000. (USGS)

  19. Phylogenetic character mapping of proteomic diversity shows high correlation with subspecific phylogenetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Telleria, Jenny; Biron, David G; Brizard, Jean-Paul; Demettre, Edith; Séveno, Martial; Barnabé, Christian; Ayala, Francisco J; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2010-11-23

    We performed a phylogenetic character mapping on 26 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite responsible for Chagas disease, and 2 stocks of the sister taxon T. cruzi marinkellei to test for possible associations between T. cruzi-subspecific phylogenetic diversity and levels of protein expression, as examined by proteomic analysis and mass spectrometry. We observed a high level of correlation (P < 10(-4)) between genetic distance, as established by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, and proteomic dissimilarities estimated by proteomic Euclidian distances. Several proteins were found to be specifically associated to T. cruzi phylogenetic subdivisions (discrete typing units). This study explores the previously uncharacterized links between infraspecific phylogenetic diversity and gene expression in a human pathogen. It opens the way to searching for new vaccine and drug targets and for identification of specific biomarkers at the subspecific level of pathogens. PMID:21059959

  20. Map Showing Limits of Tahoe Glaciation in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, James Gregory; Mack, Gregory S.

    2008-01-01

    The latest periods of extensive ice cover in the Sierra Nevada include the Tahoe glaciation followed by the Tioga glaciation, and evidence for these ice ages is widespread in the Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks area. However, the timing of the advances and retreats of the glaciers during the periods of glaciation continues to be a matter of debate. A compilation of existing work (Clark and others, 2003) defines the Tioga glaciation at 14-25 thousand years ago and splits the Tahoe glaciation into two stages that range from 42-50 and 140-200 thousand years ago. The extent of the Tahoe ice mass shown in the map area is considered to represent the younger Tahoe stage, 42-50 thousand years ago. Evidence of glaciations older than the Tahoe is limited in the southern Sierra Nevada. After the Tioga glaciation, only minor events with considerably less ice cover occurred. The Tioga glaciation was slightly less extensive than the Tahoe glaciation, and each covered about half of the area of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. The Tahoe glaciers extended 500-1,000 ft lower and 0.5-1.2 mi farther down valleys. Evidence for the Tahoe glacial limits is not as robust as that for Tioga, but the extent of the Tahoe ice is mapped because it covered a larger area and the ice did leave prominent moraines (piles of sediment and boulders deposited by glaciers as they melted at their margins) lower on the east front of the range. Current Sierra redwood (Sequoiadendron giganteum) groves occur in a belt on the west side of the Sierra Nevada, generally west of the area of Tahoe glaciation.

  1. Map showing flood-prone areas, greater Denver area, Front Range Urban Corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCain, J.F.; Hotchkiss, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    The rapid growth of population in the Front Range Urban Corridor of Colorado is causing intense competition for available land resources. One form of competition posing serious problems in indiscriminate development on flood plains along creeks and rivers. Flood plains are natural features of the landscape developed by streams in carry water in excess of channel capacity. Although not used as often by the stream, flood plains are as much a part of the stream system as is the channel. Whenever man competes with this natural function of the flood plain he must inevitably pay the price through property damage and varying degrees of human suffering Flood damages in the United States have been estimated to average about \\$1 billion annually (American Public Works Association, 1966.) This tremendous waste of national resources is borne not only by those citizens in direct contact with floods but also to a lesser degree by all citizens through increased cost of public services. Thus, floods are of concern to the entire community, and solutions to existing or potential problems should be a community effort.

  2. Preliminary lithogeochemical map showing near-surface rock types in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, Virginia and Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peper, John D.; McCartan, Lucy B.; Horton, J. Wright, Jr.; Reddy, James E.

    2001-01-01

    This preliminary experimental lithogeochemical map shows the distribution of rock types in the Virginia and Maryland parts of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The map was produced digitally by classifying geologic-map units according to composition, mineralogy, and texture; rather than by age and stratigraphic relationships as shown on traditional geologic maps. This map differs from most lithologic maps in that the lithogeochemical unit classification distinguishes those rock units having key water-reactive minerals that may induce acid neutralization, or reduction, of hosted water at the weathering interface. The validity of these rock units, however, is independent of water chemistry, because the rock units are derived from geologic maps and rock descriptions. Areas of high soil carbon content, and sulfide metal deposits are also shown. Water-reactive minerals and their weathering reactions yield five lithogeochemical unit classes: 1) carbonate rock and calcareous rocks and sediments, the most acid-neutralizing; 2)carbonaceous-sulfidic rocks and sediments, oxygen-depleting and reducing; 3) quartzofeldspathic rocks and siliciclastic sediments, relatively weakly reactive with water; 4) mafic silicate rocks/sediments, oxygen consuming and high solute-load delivering; and, 5) the rarer calcareous-sulfidic (carbonaceous) rocks, neutralizing and reducing. Earlier studies in some parts of the map area have related solute loads in ground and stream waters to some aspects of bedrock lithology. More recent preliminary tests of relationships between four of the classes of mapped lithogeochemical units and ground water chemistry, in the Mid-Atlantic area using this map, have focused on and verified the nitrate-reducing and acid-neutralizing properties of some bedrock and unconsolidated aquifer rock types. Sulfide mineral deposits and their mine-tailings effects on waters are beginning to be studied by others. Additional testing of relationships among the lithogeochemical units

  3. Mapping Malus sieversii: A valuable genetic resource for apple breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS Plant Genetic Resources Unit has established a collection of Malus from around the world in order to preserve and develop genetic resources important to the apple industry. Among this collection is Malus sieversii, the main progenitor of the domestic apple, collected from Central Asia ...

  4. School Counselors and Collaboration: Finding Resources through Community Asset Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Dana; Farris, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Budget cuts in education demand that school counselors learn how to do more with what is presently available, and to collaborate with families and communities to find resources that meet student needs. In an effort to address how school counselors can be proactive in finding needed resources, this article draws on information from various…

  5. Maps Showing Composition of Surficial Sediments on the Insular Shelf of Southwestern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shideler, Gerald L.

    1980-01-01

    The limited availability of onshore sand deposits for use in construction appears to be a future major problem in Puerto Rico (U.S. Bureau of Mines, 1972; Committee on Puerto Rico and the Sea, 1974). Consequently, the mining of offshore sand deposits as supplemental sources of construction aggregate may becom e necessary. For this reason, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Department of Natural Resources of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico have conducted investigations of potential offshore sand deposits on the Puerto Rico insular shelf. This report provides information on the composition of surficial sediments on the southwestern Puerto Rico shelf (fig. 1), an area that may be one of the more favorable potential sites for offshore sand resources. Water depths over most of the study area are less than 22 meters (m). The sea floor is composed of live and dead patch and fringing reefs, areas of rock exposures, and sedim ent-covered areas. The adjacent coastline includes prominent embaym ents and a conspicuous rock promontory (Cabo Rojo) connected by a tombolo to the mainland of Puerto Rico. The study area is in the belt of northeast trade winds. Waves approach the coast predominantly from the southeast, resulting in a predominantly westward littoral drift along the south coast (Grove and Trumbull, 1978). Local sand movement on the southern shelf is shown by an active sand wave field south of Bah1a Sucia in which the sand wave crests have migrated toward the southwest (Grove and Trumbull, 1978). The presence of the sand wave field suggests that large volumes of sand having potential for mining are locally present in the study area.

  6. High-fidelity national carbon mapping for resource management and REDD+

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High fidelity carbon mapping has the potential to greatly advance national resource management and to encourage international action toward climate change mitigation. However, carbon inventories based on field plots alone cannot capture the heterogeneity of carbon stocks, and thus remote sensing-assisted approaches are critically important to carbon mapping at regional to global scales. We advanced a high-resolution, national-scale carbon mapping approach applied to the Republic of Panama – one of the first UN REDD + partner countries. Results Integrating measurements of vegetation structure collected by airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) with field inventory plots, we report LiDAR-estimated aboveground carbon stock errors of ~10% on any 1-ha land parcel across a wide range of ecological conditions. Critically, this shows that LiDAR provides a highly reliable replacement for inventory plots in areas lacking field data, both in humid tropical forests and among drier tropical vegetation types. We then scale up a systematically aligned LiDAR sampling of Panama using satellite data on topography, rainfall, and vegetation cover to model carbon stocks at 1-ha resolution with estimated average pixel-level uncertainty of 20.5 Mg C ha-1 nationwide. Conclusions The national carbon map revealed strong abiotic and human controls over Panamanian carbon stocks, and the new level of detail with estimated uncertainties for every individual hectare in the country sets Panama at the forefront in high-resolution ecosystem management. With this repeatable approach, carbon resource decision-making can be made on a geospatially explicit basis, enhancing human welfare and environmental protection. PMID:23866822

  7. Map showing ground-water conditions in the House Rock area, Coconino County, Arizona-- 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levings, G.W.; Farrar, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    The House Rock area includes about 1,500 sq mi in north-central Arizona. Ground water is present in several aquifers that are made up of one or more formations. In the Paria Plateau and Wahweap areas ground water is obtained from the N aquifer, which includes the Navajo Sandstone, Kayenta Formation, and Moenave Formation. Reported static water levels in wells range from 515 to 1,500 ft below the land surface. The chemical quality of the water in the N aquifer varies with location, and dissolved solids generally are less than 850 milligrams per liter. Several wells and test holes in the Lees Ferry area penetrate either the alluvium, Chinle Formation, Moenkopi Formation, or a combination of these. As of 1976, water from these wells was not being used because of poor chemical quality. In the southern and western parts of the area many springs discharge from te Kaibab, Redwall , and Muav Limestones. The quality of water from these formations generally is excellent. Information on the map (scale 1:125,000) includes the principal aquifer that furnishes water to individual wells and springs, depth to water, altitude of the water level, and chemical quality of the water. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Map showing ground-water conditions in the Bodaway Mesa area, Coconino County, Arizona; 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    The Bodaway Mesa area includes about 800 square miles in north-central Arizona, and most of the area is in the Navajo Indian Reservation. Ground-water development has been slight; in 1977 the estimated ground-water withdrawal was less than 5 acre-feet. The Chinle Formation is the principal aquifer tapped by wells, and in places the Moenkopi Formation and the Redwall and Muav Limestones yield water to wells and springs. Water levels in the Chinle Formation are 15 to 200 feet below the land surface. The water from one well completed in the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle Formation contained 1,210 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids; the dissolved-solids concentrations from two wells in the Shinarump Member of the Chinle were 1,000 and 1,110 milligrams per liter. Three wells penetrate the Moenkopi Formation, but only one yields water. One well obtains its water from the Redwall Limestone, and the water level is 2,200 feet below the land surface. About 60 cubic feet per second of water is discharged by springs that issue from the Redwall and Muav Limestones along the east wall of the canyon of the Little Colorado River. Information on the map includes depth to water, altitude of the water level, specific conductance, and fluoride concentrations. Scale 1:125,000. (Kosco-USGS)

  9. Use of IKONOS Data for Mapping Cultural Resources of Stennis Space Center, Mississippi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Giardino, Marco

    2002-01-01

    Cultural resource surveys are important for compliance with Federal and State law. Stennis Space Center (SSC) in Mississippi is researching, developing, and validating remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) methods for aiding cultural resource assessments on the center's own land. The suitability of IKONOS satellite imagery for georeferencing scanned historic maps is examined in this viewgraph presentation. IKONOS data can be used to map historic buildings and farmland in Gainsville, MS, and plan archaeological surveys.

  10. Comparison of interferometric and stereo-radargrammetric 3D metrics in mapping of forest resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karila, K.; Karjalainen, M.; Yu, X.; Vastaranta, M.; Holopainen, M.; Hyyppa, J.

    2015-04-01

    Accurate forest resources maps are needed in diverse applications ranging from the local forest management to the global climate change research. In particular, it is important to have tools to map changes in forest resources, which helps us to understand the significance of the forest biomass changes in the global carbon cycle. In the task of mapping changes in forest resources for wide areas, Earth Observing satellites could play the key role. In 2013, an EU/FP7-Space funded project "Advanced_SAR" was started with the main objective to develop novel forest resources mapping methods based on the fusion of satellite based 3D measurements and in-situ field measurements of forests. During the summer 2014, an extensive field surveying campaign was carried out in the Evo test site, Southern Finland. Forest inventory attributes of mean tree height, basal area, mean stem diameter, stem volume, and biomass, were determined for 91 test plots having the size of 32 by 32 meters (1024 m2). Simultaneously, a comprehensive set of satellite and airborne data was collected. Satellite data also included a set of TanDEM-X (TDX) and TerraSAR-X (TSX) X-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, suitable for interferometric and stereo-radargrammetric processing to extract 3D elevation data representing the forest canopy. In the present study, we compared the accuracy of TDX InSAR and TSX stereo-radargrammetric derived 3D metrics in forest inventory attribute prediction. First, 3D data were extracted from TDX and TSX images. Then, 3D data were processed as elevations above the ground surface (forest canopy height values) using an accurate Digital Terrain Model (DTM) based on airborne laser scanning survey. Finally, 3D metrics were calculated from the canopy height values for each test plot and the 3D metrics were compared with the field reference data. The Random Forest method was used in the forest inventory attributes prediction. Based on the results InSAR showed slightly better

  11. What do the data show? Knowledge map development for comprehensive environmental assessment.

    PubMed

    Painter, Kyle; McConnell, Emma R; Sahasrabudhe, Samir; Burgoon, Lyle; Powers, Christina M

    2014-01-01

    Environmental and human health risk assessments benefit from using data that cross multiple scientific domains. Although individual data points may often be readily understood, the total picture can be difficult to envision. This is especially true with gaps in the data (e.g., with emerging substances such as engineered nanomaterials [ENM]), such that simply presenting only known information can result in a skewed picture. This study describes a method for building knowledge maps (KM) to visually summarize factors relevant to risk assessment in a relatively easy to interpret format. The KMs were created in the context of the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) approach for research planning and risk management of environmental contaminants. Recent applications of CEA to emerging substances such as engineered nanomaterials that have numerous data gaps have suggested that a more visually based depiction of information would improve the approach. We developed KM templates as a pilot project, to represent pertinent aspects of conceptual domains, and to highlight gaps in available information for one particular portion of a specific CEA application: the comparison of environmental transport, transformation, and fate of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and decabromodiphenyl ether as flame retardants. The results are 3 KM templates representing Physical Properties, Transport, and Transformation. The 3 templates were applied to both substances, resulting in a total of 6 KMs. In addition to presenting the KMs, this paper details the process used to generate them, to aid KM development for other sections of CEA applied to MWCNTs, or to apply the process to new CEA applications. PMID:24327299

  12. Maps showing textural characteristics of benthic sediments in the Corpus Christi Bay estuarine system, south Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shideler, Gerald L.; Stelting, Charles E.; McGowen, Joseph H.

    1981-01-01

    Corpus Christi Bay is a heavily used estuary on the south Texas coast in the northwest Gulf of Mexico (fig. 1).  The Bay is stressed by diverse activities which could substantially affect its ecosystem.  Such activities include shipping, resource production (oil, gas, and construction aggregate), commercial and sport fishing, and recreation.  Shipping activities alone have had a substantial impact on the bay.  For example, the past maintenance of navigation channels has required extensive dredging and spoil disposal within the estuarine system.  Numerous subaqueous spoil disposal sites and subaerial spoil banks are present throughout the bay (fig. 1), and the selection of future spoil disposal sites is becoming a critical local problem.  As activities in the bay increase, the need for effective environmental management becomes increasingly important, and effective management necessitates a good understanding of the bay's physical characteristics.  The objective of this study is to provide detailed information about the textural composition of bottom sediments within the estuarine system, information which could be used in making environmental-management decisions.  Visual descriptions of bottom sediments in Corpus Christi Bay and adjacent areas have been presented by McGowen and Morton (1979).  Additionally, a study of the textures of sediments on the Inner Continental Shelf adjacent to the bay has been presented by Shideler and Berryhill (1977).

  13. Community Mapping in Action: Uncovering Resources and Assets for Young Children and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez-Jasis, Rosario; Myck-Wayne, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Community mapping is a promising practice that can assist early intervention/early childhood special education (EI/ECSE) professionals uncover the depth and diversity of community needs, resources, and learning opportunities, in the neighborhoods surrounding their schools. Community mapping is an inquiry-based method that situates learning in the…

  14. Map showing alpine debris flows triggered by a July 28, 1999 thunderstorm in the central Front Range of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godt, Jonathan W.; Coe, Jeffrey A.

    2003-01-01

    This 1:24,000-scale map shows an inventory of debris flows that were triggered above timberline by a thunderstorm in the central Front Range of Colorado. We have classified the debris flows into two categories based on the style of initiation processes in the debris-flow source areas: 1) soil slip, and 2) non-soil slip erosive processes. This map and associated digital data are part of a larger study of the debris-flow event, results of which we plan to present in a forthcoming paper.

  15. The Highway Map as a Social Studies Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehemann, Jane

    1977-01-01

    This learning exercise was designed for a seventh grade geography class in Western Pennsylvania using highway maps from a local service station. It is designed to provide practice in skills in using the key, the grid system, the mileage scale for finding distances, and to develop an appreciation for the variety of information a student can obtain…

  16. Use of airborne electromagnetic methods for resource mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacky, G. J.

    1993-11-01

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methods complement spaceborne remote sensing techniques. AEM surveys carried out from low flying aircraft are capable of detecting geological structures not visible on the surface. The flight height of AEM systems above the ground ranges from 30 to 120 m. Most systems generate primary EM fields by using a loop transmitter; conducting coils are used as antenna to measure the secondary magnetic field caused by conductive inhomogeneities in the ground. The frequency used in AEM surveys (100 Hz to 50 kHz) allows ground penetration in excess of 100 m. At present, two types of AEM systems are widely used: helicopter, frequency-domain, and fixed-wing, towed-bird, time-domain. The most common survey products are apparent conductivity maps. AEM methods are extensively used in prospecting for base and precious metal deposits, kimberlites, uranium, and also in geological mapping, groundwater exploration and environmental investigations.

  17. Genetic, Physical, Maps, and Database Resources for Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resources for maize genetics and genomics exist in great depth and breadth. They can be brought to bear on its productivity, on selected properties, and on studies of genetic functions, mechanisms of inheritance, phylogeny, and processes of change during domestication. Genetic materials available ...

  18. Maps showing distribution of copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, and silver in samples of minus-60-mesh (0.25-MM) stream sediment and nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrate, Walker Lake 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaffee, M.A.; Hill, R.H.; Sutley, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    This report is part of a folio of maps of the Walker Lake 1o x 2o quadrangle, California and Nevada, prepared under the Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program. The folio includes geological, geochemical, and geophysical maps, as well as mineral resources assessment maps, which identify selected known or possible mineral-deposit environments in the quadrangle. The geochemical maps show the distributions of selected individual elements (Chaffee and others, 1988 a, b, c) and the distributions of selected groups of elements (Chaffee, 1988a, b, c). Discussions accompanying the individual element maps are restricted to mineral residences of the individual elements as well as to what types of mineral deposits and environments may be represented by anomalies of a particular element. Discussions accompanying the multielemental maps describe the types of mineral deposits that may be related to each element group and indicate the most favorable localities for these deposits. 

  19. Maps showing distribution of anomalies based on the use of scoresum plots for selected groupings of elements in samples of nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrate, Walker Lake 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaffee, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report is part of a folio of maps of the Walker Lake 1o x 2o quadrangle, California and Nevada, prepared under the Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program. The folio includes geological, geochemical, and geophysical maps, as well as mineral resource assessment maps which identify selected known or possible mineral-deposit environments in the quadrangle. The geochemical maps show the distributioins of selected individual elements (Chaffee and others 1988a, b, c, d) and the distributions of selected groups of elements (Chaffee, 1988a, b). Discussions accompanying the individual element maps are restricted to possible mineral residences of the individual elements as well as to what types of mineral deposits and environments may be represented by anomalies of a particular element. Discussions accompanying the multielement maps describe the types of mineral deposits that may be related to each element group and indicate the most favorable localities for these deposits. 

  20. Maps showing distribution of anomalies based on the use of scoresum plots for selected groupings of elements in samples of minus-60-mesh (0.25-MM) stream sediment, Walker Lake 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaffee, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report is part of a folio of maps of the Walker Lake 1o x 2o quadrangle, California and Nevada, prepared under the Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program. The folio includes geological, geochemical, and geophysical maps, as well as mineral resources assessment maps, which identify selected known or possible mineral-deposit environments in the quadrangle. The geochemical maps show the distributions of selected individual elements (Chaffee and others, 1988 a, b, c) and the distributions of selected groups of elements (Chaffee, 1988a, b, c). Discussions accompanying the individual element maps are restricted to mineral residences of the individual elements as well as to what types of mineral deposits and environments may be represented by anomalies of a particular element. Discussions accompanying the multielemental maps describe the types of mineral deposits that may be related to each element group and indicate the most favorable localities for these deposits. 

  1. Map showing geochemical data for panned stream sediments from the Bread Loaf Further Planning Area, Addison and Washington counties, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grosz, A.E.; Schruben, P.G.; Atelsek, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    A geochemical survey of bedrock samples in the Bread Loaf Roadless Area (index map; fig. 1) was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during October, 1981 in order to outline areas that may contain undiscovered mineral deposits. This report describes the results of a geochemical analysis of panned concentrates collected from stream sediments, and complements other geologic and geochemical investigations of the area (Slack and Bitar, 1983). The present study has offered us a chance to identify sampling media and a technique most appropriate for the enhancement of certain metallic elements in samples of panned concentrate. This study is important to the resource evaluation of the Bread Loaf Roadless Area because it reveals that geochemical anomalies produced by this technique are not evident in the standard magnetic and nonmagnetic fractions of panned concentrates.

  2. Mapping and monitoring renewable resources with space SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Brisco, B.; Dobson, M. C.; Moezzi, S.

    1983-01-01

    The SEASAT-A SAR and SIR-A imagery was examined to evaluate the quality and type of information that can be extracted and used to monitor renewable resources on Earth. Two tasks were carried out: (1) a land cover classification study which utilized two sets of imagery acquired by the SEASAT-A SAR, one set by SIR-A, and one LANDSAT set (4 bands); and (2) a change detection to examine differences between pairs of SEASAT-A SAR images and relates them to hydrologic and/or agronomic variations in the scene.

  3. Detailed seafloor habitat mapping to enhance marine-resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zawada, David G.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    Pictures of the seafloor capture important information about the sediments, exposed geologic features, submerged aquatic vegetation, and animals found in a given habitat. With the emergence of marine protected areas (MPAs) as a favored tactic for preserving coral reef resources, knowledge of essential habitat components is paramount to designing effective management strategies. Surprisingly, detailed information on seafloor habitat components is not available in many areas that are being considered for MPA designation or that are already designated as MPAs. A task of the U.S. Geological Survey Coral Reef Ecosystem STudies (USGS CREST) project is addressing this issue.

  4. Genome-wide maps of recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes and embryos show selection for maternal recombination rates.

    PubMed

    Ottolini, Christian S; Newnham, Louise J; Capalbo, Antonio; Natesan, Senthilkumar A; Joshi, Hrishikesh A; Cimadomo, Danilo; Griffin, Darren K; Sage, Karen; Summers, Michael C; Thornhill, Alan R; Housworth, Elizabeth; Herbert, Alex D; Rienzi, Laura; Ubaldi, Filippo M; Handyside, Alan H; Hoffmann, Eva R

    2015-07-01

    Crossover recombination reshuffles genes and prevents errors in segregation that lead to extra or missing chromosomes (aneuploidy) in human eggs, a major cause of pregnancy failure and congenital disorders. Here we generate genome-wide maps of crossovers and chromosome segregation patterns by recovering all three products of single female meioses. Genotyping >4 million informative SNPs from 23 complete meioses allowed us to map 2,032 maternal and 1,342 paternal crossovers and to infer the segregation patterns of 529 chromosome pairs. We uncover a new reverse chromosome segregation pattern in which both homologs separate their sister chromatids at meiosis I; detect selection for higher recombination rates in the female germ line by the elimination of aneuploid embryos; and report chromosomal drive against non-recombinant chromatids at meiosis II. Collectively, our findings show that recombination not only affects homolog segregation at meiosis I but also the fate of sister chromatids at meiosis II. PMID:25985139

  5. Fusion of protegrin-1 and plectasin to MAP30 shows significant inhibition activity against dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Rothan, Hussin A; Bahrani, Hirbod; Mohamed, Zulqarnain; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah; Yusof, Rohana

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) broadly disseminates in tropical and sub-tropical countries and there are no vaccine or anti-dengue drugs available. DENV outbreaks cause serious economic burden due to infection complications that requires special medical care and hospitalization. This study presents a new strategy for inexpensive production of anti-DENV peptide-fusion protein to prevent and/or treat DENV infection. Antiviral cationic peptides protegrin-1 (PG1) and plectasin (PLSN) were fused with MAP30 protein to produce recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein (PG1-MAP30-PLSN) as inclusion bodies in E. coli. High yield production of PG1-MAP30-PLSN protein was achieved by solubilization of inclusion bodies in alkaline buffer followed by the application of appropriate refolding techniques. Antiviral PG1-MAP30-PLSN protein considerably inhibited DENV protease (NS2B-NS3pro) with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) 0.5±0.1 μM. The real-time proliferation assay (RTCA) and the end-point proliferation assay (MTT assay) showed that the maximal-nontoxic dose of the peptide-fusion protein against Vero cells is approximately 0.67±0.2 μM. The cell-based assays showed considerable inhibition of the peptide-fusion protein against binding and proliferating stages of DENV2 into the target cells. The peptide-fusion protein protected DENV2-challeged mice with 100% of survival at the dose of 50 mg/kg. In conclusion, producing recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein by combining short antiviral peptide with a central protein owning similar activity could be useful to minimize the overall cost of short peptide production and take advantage of its synergistic antiviral activities. PMID:24722532

  6. Map showing distribution and classification of felsic plutonic rocks in the eastern Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Bray, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    This 1:500,000-scale compilation shows the distribution of felsic plutonic rocks, lithologic types, and associated mineralization in an area between lat 21° and 24°30’ N., long 43°30’ and 46° E. It is part of a shieldwide compilation being done within the framework of Saudi Arabian Deputy Ministry for Mineral Resources projects 2.04 and 3.12.

  7. Advanced Systems Map, Monitor, and Manage Earth's Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    SpecTIR LLC, headquartered in Reno, Nevada, is recognized for innovative sensor design, on-demand hyperspectral data collection, and image-generating products for business, academia, and national and international governments. SpecTIR's current vice president of business development has brought a wealth of NASA-related research experience to the company, as the former principal investigator on a NASA-sponsored hyperspectral crop-imaging project. This project, made possible through a Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) contract with Goddard Space Flight Center, aimed to enhance airborne hyperspectral sensing and ground-truthing means for crop inspection in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Areas of application for such technology include precision farming and irrigation; oil, gas, and mineral exploration; pollution and contamination monitoring; wetland and forestry characterization; water quality assessment; and submerged aquatic vegetation mapping. Today, SpecTIR maintains its relationship with Goddard through programs at the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland, and at the U.S. Department of Agriculture campus in Beltsville, Maryland. Additionally, work continues on the integration of hyperspectral data with LIDAR systems and other commercial-off-the-shelf technologies.

  8. Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... palate - resources Colon cancer - resources Cystic fibrosis - resources Depression - resources Diabetes - resources Digestive disease - resources Drug abuse - resources Eating disorders - resources Elder care - resources Epilepsy - resources Family troubles - ...

  9. Remote Sensing Sensors and Applications in Environmental Resources Mapping and Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Melesse, Assefa M.; Weng, Qihao; S.Thenkabail, Prasad; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2007-01-01

    The history of remote sensing and development of different sensors for environmental and natural resources mapping and data acquisition is reviewed and reported. Application examples in urban studies, hydrological modeling such as land-cover and floodplain mapping, fractional vegetation cover and impervious surface area mapping, surface energy flux and micro-topography correlation studies is discussed. The review also discusses the use of remotely sensed-based rainfall and potential evapotranspiration for estimating crop water requirement satisfaction index and hence provides early warning information for growers. The review is not an exhaustive application of the remote sensing techniques rather a summary of some important applications in environmental studies and modeling.

  10. Integrating in silico resources to map a signaling network.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanqing; Beck, Tim N; Golemis, Erica A; Serebriiskii, Ilya G

    2014-01-01

    The abundance of publicly available life science databases offers a wealth of information that can support interpretation of experimentally derived data and greatly enhance hypothesis generation. Protein interaction and functional networks are not simply new renditions of existing data: they provide the opportunity to gain insights into the specific physical and functional role a protein plays as part of the biological system. In this chapter, we describe different in silico tools that can quickly and conveniently retrieve data from existing data repositories and we discuss how the available tools are best utilized for different purposes. While emphasizing protein-protein interaction databases (e.g., BioGrid and IntAct), we also introduce metasearch platforms such as STRING and GeneMANIA, pathway databases (e.g., BioCarta and Pathway Commons), text mining approaches (e.g., PubMed and Chilibot), and resources for drug-protein interactions, genetic information for model organisms and gene expression information based on microarray data mining. Furthermore, we provide a simple step-by-step protocol for building customized protein-protein interaction networks in Cytoscape, a powerful network assembly and visualization program, integrating data retrieved from these various databases. As we illustrate, generation of composite interaction networks enables investigators to extract significantly more information about a given biological system than utilization of a single database or sole reliance on primary literature. PMID:24233784

  11. Integrating In Silico Resources to Map a Signaling Network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hanqing; Beck, Tim N.; Golemis, Erica A.; Serebriiskii, Ilya G.

    2013-01-01

    The abundance of publicly available life science databases offer a wealth of information that can support interpretation of experimentally derived data and greatly enhance hypothesis generation. Protein interaction and functional networks are not simply new renditions of existing data: they provide the opportunity to gain insights into the specific physical and functional role a protein plays as part of the biological system. In this chapter, we describe different in silico tools that can quickly and conveniently retrieve data from existing data repositories and discuss how the available tools are best utilized for different purposes. While emphasizing protein-protein interaction databases (e.g., BioGrid and IntAct), we also introduce metasearch platforms such as STRING and GeneMANIA, pathway databases (e.g., BioCarta and Pathway Commons), text mining approaches (e.g., PubMed and Chilibot), and resources for drug-protein interactions, genetic information for model organisms and gene expression information based on microarray data mining. Furthermore, we provide a simple step-by-step protocol to building customized protein-protein interaction networks in Cytoscape, a powerful network assembly and visualization program, integrating data retrieved from these various databases. As we illustrate, generation of composite interaction networks enables investigators to extract significantly more information about a given biological system than utilization of a single database or sole reliance on primary literature. PMID:24233784

  12. Image of Fomalhaut Dust Ring at 350 Microns: The Relative Column Density Map Shows Pericenter-Apocenter Asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, K. A.; Velusamy, T.; Dowell, C. D.; Grogan, K.; Beichman, C. A.

    2005-01-01

    We have imaged the circumstellar disk of Fomalhaut at 350 mm wavelength, using SHARC II (Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II) at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The spatial resolution of the raw images (9") has been enhanced by a factor of 3 using the HiRes deconvolution procedure. We find that at this wavelength and signal-to-noise ratio (approx.12), the observed morphology is that of a simple inclined ring (i approx. 70 deg), with little or no other apparent structure--this is the first observation that shows clearly the ring morphology of the disk. We have combined our 350 mm data with Spitzer Space Telescope images at 24, 70, and 160 mm in order to estimate the two-dimensional spatial variation of relative column density ("tau map") using our DISKFIT procedure. The tau map is based on the following physical assumptions: (1) the wavelength variation of opacity is the same throughout the disk, (2) the radial variation of dust temperature is dictated by the energy balance of individual grains in the stellar radiation field, and (3) the vertical scale height of the disk follows a power-law radial variation. The results confirm the ringlike morphology but also show that the geometric center is displaced from the star by about 8 AU and that the ring has an apocentric enhancement of approximately 14% in integrated column density. If we interpret the displacement in terms of elliptical orbital motion due to gravitational perturbation by an unseen planet, then the implied forced eccentricity is 0.06; dynamical modeling then predicts an apocentric density enhancement consistent with that inferred from the tau map.

  13. Map Showing Principal Coal Beds and Bedrock Geology of the Ucross-Arvada Area, Central Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molnia, Carol L.

    2013-01-01

    The Ucross-Arvada area is part of the Powder River Basin, a large, north-trending structural depression between the Black Hills on the east and the Bighorn Mountains on the west. Almost all of the study area is within Sheridan and Johnson Counties, Wyoming. Most of the Ucross-Arvada area lies within the outcrop of the Wasatch Formation of Eocene age; the extreme northeast corner falls within the outcrop of the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation of Paleocene age. Within the Powder River Basin, both the Wasatch Formation and the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation contain significant coal resources. The map includes locations and elevations of coal beds at 1:50,000 scale for an area that includes ten 7½-minute quadrangles covering some 500 square miles. The Wasatch Formation coal beds shown (in descending order) are Monument Peak, Walters (also called Ulm 1), Healy (also called Ulm 2), Truman, Felix, and Arvada. The Fort Union Formation coal beds shown (in descending order) are Roland (of Baker, 1929) and Smith.

  14. World Eagle, The Monthly Social Studies Resource: Data, Maps, Graphs. 1990-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Eagle, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This document consists of the 10 issues of "World Eagle" issued during the 1990-1991 school year. World Eagle is a monthly social studies resource in which demographic and geographic information is presented in the forms of maps, graphs, charts, and text. Each issue of World Eagle has a section that focuses on a particular topic, along with other…

  15. RE Atlas: The U.S. Atlas of Renewable Resources (Interactive Map, GIS Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    This interactive data map allows a user to explore the locations across the U.S. of many different basic, renewable energy resources. The many layers can be activated one at a time or in multiple combinations and the GIS display draws from a rich combination of data collections.

  16. Mapping and Managing Knowledge and Information in Resource-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tergan, Sigmar-Olaf; Graber, Wolfgang; Neumann, Anja

    2006-01-01

    In resource-based learning scenarios, students are often overwhelmed by the complexity of task-relevant knowledge and information. Techniques for the external interactive representation of individual knowledge in graphical format may help them to cope with complex problem situations. Advanced computer-based concept-mapping tools have the potential…

  17. Reconnaissance geologic mapping in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica using the Earth Resources Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, R. S. (Principal Investigator); Zochol, F. W.; Smithson, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Reconnaissance geologic mapping can be done with 60-70% accuracy in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica using ERTS-1 imagery. Bedrock geology can be mapped much better than unconsolidated deposits of Quaternary age. Mapping of bedrock geology is facilitated by lack of vegetation, whereas mapping of Quaternary deposits is hindered by lack of vegetation. Antarctic images show remarkable clarity and under certain conditions (moderate relief, selection of the optimum band for specific rock types, stereo-viewing) irregular contacts can be mapped in local areas that are amazing like those mapped at a scale of 1:25,000, but, of course, lack details due to resolution limitations. ERTS-1 images should be a valuable aid to Antarctic geologists who have some limited ground truth and wish to extend boundaries of geologic mapping from known areas.

  18. Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diabetes - resources Digestive disease - resources Drug abuse - resources Eating disorders - resources Elder care - resources Epilepsy - resources Family troubles - resources Gastrointestinal disorders - resources Hearing impairment - resources ...

  19. Solar Resource Mapping of AL Duqm Industrial Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Hatmi, Yousuf; Tan, C. S.; Al-Yahyai, Sultan al; Al-Badi, Abdullah

    2016-03-01

    The Sultanate of Oman has one of the highest percentages of potential solar radiation in the world, which puts it in an outstanding position to horde electricity generation plants through photovoltaic solar systems. Oman consists of 11 governorates, and each governorate is divided into many Willyiah, which are made up of small villages. Willyiah of Al Duqm is located in Al Wusta Governorate (19°39’42”N 57°42’17”E) in central-eastern Oman. This paper proposes the use of a monthly average hourly diffuse illuminance from meteorological data and from a Geographic Information System (GIS) to identify the best plots suitable for installing photovoltaic solar farms in the Al Duqm Industrial Area. Solar data collected in this study shows that the highest average annual solar radiation data recorded is 5,764 Wh/m2 in the Al Duqm area. Solar radiation data from 2000 to 2012 has been collected for further analysis. The Annual Energy Production (AEP) simulated using ArcGIS ranges between 6,028 Wh/m2 and 3,668 Wh/m2. This shows a very close estimation between simulation results and the data collected from the meteorological department in Oman.

  20. A whole-genome, radiation hybrid mapping resource of hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vijay K; Heesacker, Adam; Riera-Lizarazu, Oscar; Gunn, Hilary; Wang, Shichen; Wang, Yi; Gu, Young Q; Paux, Etienne; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Kumar, Ajay; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Lazo, Gerard; Zemetra, Robert; Akhunov, Eduard; Friebe, Bernd; Poland, Jesse; Gill, Bikram S; Kianian, Shahryar; Leonard, Jeffrey M

    2016-04-01

    Generating a contiguous, ordered reference sequence of a complex genome such as hexaploid wheat (2n = 6x = 42; approximately 17 GB) is a challenging task due to its large, highly repetitive, and allopolyploid genome. In wheat, ordering of whole-genome or hierarchical shotgun sequencing contigs is primarily based on recombination and comparative genomics-based approaches. However, comparative genomics approaches are limited to syntenic inference and recombination is suppressed within the pericentromeric regions of wheat chromosomes, thus, precise ordering of physical maps and sequenced contigs across the whole-genome using these approaches is nearly impossible. We developed a whole-genome radiation hybrid (WGRH) resource and tested it by genotyping a set of 115 randomly selected lines on a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. At the whole-genome level, 26 299 SNP markers were mapped on the RH panel and provided an average mapping resolution of approximately 248 Kb/cR1500 with a total map length of 6866 cR1500 . The 7296 unique mapping bins provided a five- to eight-fold higher resolution than genetic maps used in similar studies. Most strikingly, the RH map had uniform bin resolution across the entire chromosome(s), including pericentromeric regions. Our research provides a valuable and low-cost resource for anchoring and ordering sequenced BAC and next generation sequencing (NGS) contigs. The WGRH developed for reference wheat line Chinese Spring (CS-WGRH), will be useful for anchoring and ordering sequenced BAC and NGS based contigs for assembling a high-quality, reference sequence of hexaploid wheat. Additionally, this study provides an excellent model for developing similar resources for other polyploid species. PMID:26945524

  1. Places, Spaces and Memory Traces: Showing Students with Learning Disabilities Ways to Remember Locations and Events on Maps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigham, Frederick J.

    This study examined the memory-enhancing effects of elaborative and mnemonic encoding of information presented with maps, compared to more traditional, non-mnemonic maps, on recall of locations of events and information associated with those events by 72 middle school students with learning disabilities. Subjects were presented with map-like…

  2. U.S. Geological Survey 2002 Petroleum Resource Assessment of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA): GIS Play Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrity, Christopher P.; Houseknecht, David W.; Bird, Kenneth J.

    2002-01-01

    This report provides digital GIS files of maps for each of the 24 plays evaluated in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 2002 petroleum resource assessment of the NPRA (Bird and Houseknecht, 2002a). These are the same maps released in pdf format by Bird and Houseknecht (2002b). The USGS released in 2002 a summary of the estimated volume of technically recoverable, undiscovered oil and nonassociated gas resources for 24 plays in NPRA (Bird and Houseknecht, 2002b). The NPRA assessment study area includes Federal and Native onshore land and adjacent State offshore areas. A map showing the areal extent of each play was prepared by USGS geologists as a preliminary step in the assessment process. Boundaries were drawn on the basis of a variety of information, including seismic reflection data, results of previous exploration drilling, and regional patterns of rock properties. Play boundary polygons were captured by digitizing the play maps prepared by USGS geologists. Federal, Native, and State areas were later clipped from the play boundary polygons, allowing for acreages to be calculated for entire plays and for various subareas within plays.

  3. Geochemical maps showing distribution and abundance of bismuth and beryllium in the nonmagnetic fraction of stream-sediment concentrates, Silver City 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, New Mexico and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, Kenneth C.; Hassemer, Jerry R.; Forn, Carl L.; Siems, David F.

    1986-01-01

    These maps (Maps A and B) show the distribution and abundance of bismuth and beryllium in the nonmagnetic fraction of heavy-mineral concentrates from stream sediments collected in the Silver City 1o x 2o quadrangle, New Mexico and Arizona. Geochemical maps showing the distribution and abundance of nine other selected key elements and the mineral flourite in the Silver City quadrangle are also part of this folio (Watts and Hassemer, 1980; Watts and others 1986a-i). These maps contribute to the assessment of mineral resources within Silver City 1o x 2o quadrangle by (1) showing regional patterns of elements enriched in heavy-mineral concentrates, thereby providing clues to regional patterns of mineralization; (2) showing new areas containing enriched metals, not previously known from mining activity; and (3) providing supportive data to the interpretive and summary maps (Watts and Hassmer, 1986) and the mineral resource assessment (Richter and others, 1983). Background information that pertains to published components of the Silver City Folio is also available (Richter and others, in press). 

  4. Map showing depth to pre-Cenozoic basement in the Death Valley ground-water model area, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, R.J.; Ponce, D.A.

    2002-03-12

    This map shows the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement in the Death Valley ground-water model area. It was prepared utilizing gravity (Ponce and others, 2001), geologic (Jennings and others, 1977; Stewart and Carlson, 1978), and drill-hole information. Geophysical investigations of the Death Valley ground-water model area are part of an interagency effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Department of Energy (Interagency Agreement DE-AI08-96NV11967) to help characterize the geology and hydrology of southwestern Nevada and parts of California. The Death Valley ground-water model is located between lat 35 degrees 00' and 38 degrees 15' N., and long 115 degrees and 118 degrees W.

  5. Map showing depth to bedrock of the Tacoma and part of the Centralia 30' x 60' quadrangles, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan-Banks, Jane M.; Collins, Donley S.

    1994-01-01

    The heavily populated Puget Sound region in the State of Washington has experienced moderate to large earthquakes in the recent past (Nuttli, 1952; Mullineaux and others, 1967). Maps showing thickness of unconsolidated sedimentary deposits are useful aids in delineating areas where damage to engineered structures can result from increased shaking resulting from these earthquakes. Basins containing thick deposits of unconsolidated materials can amplify earthquakes waves and cause far more damage to structures than the same waves passing through bedrock (Singh and others, 1988; Algermissen and others, 1985). Configurations of deep sedimentary basins can also cause reflection and magnification of earthquake waves in ways still not fully understood and presently under investigation (Frankel and Vidale, 1992).

  6. A reconnaissance method for delineation of tracts for regional-scale mineral-resource assessment based on geologic-map data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, G.L.; Mihalasky, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is proposing to conduct a global mineral-resource assessment using geologic maps, significant deposits, and exploration history as minimal data requirements. Using a geologic map and locations of significant pluton-related deposits, the pluton-related-deposit tract maps from the USGS national mineral-resource assessment have been reproduced with GIS-based analysis and modeling techniques. Agreement, kappa, and Jaccard's C correlation statistics between the expert USGS and calculated tract maps of 87%, 40%, and 28%, respectively, have been achieved using a combination of weights-of-evidence and weighted logistic regression methods. Between the experts' and calculated maps, the ranking of states measured by total permissive area correlates at 84%. The disagreement between the experts and calculated results can be explained primarily by tracts defined by geophysical evidence not considered in the calculations, generalization of tracts by the experts, differences in map scales, and the experts' inclusion of large tracts that are arguably not permissive. This analysis shows that tracts for regional mineral-resource assessment approximating those delineated by USGS experts can be calculated using weights of evidence and weighted logistic regression, a geologic map, and the location of significant deposits. Weights of evidence and weighted logistic regression applied to a global geologic map could provide quickly a useful reconnaissance definition of tracts for mineral assessment that is tied to the data and is reproducible. ?? 2002 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  7. Fuzzy cognitive maps for issue identification in a water resources conflict resolution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, R.; Passarella, G.; Uricchio, V. F.; Vurro, M.

    In water management, conflicts of interests are inevitable due to the variety in quality demands and the number of stakeholders, which are affected in different ways by decisions concerning the use of the resources. Ignoring the differences among interests involved in water resources management and not resolving the emerging conflicts could lead to controversial strategies. In such cases, proposed solutions could generate strong opposition, making these solutions unfeasible. In our contribution, a Community Decision Support System is proposed. Such a system is able to support discussion and collaboration. The system helps participants to structure their problem, to help them learn about possible alternatives, their constraints and implications and to support the participants in the specification of their own preferences. More in detail, the proposed system helps each user in representing and communicating problem perspectives. To reach this aim, cognitive maps are used to capture parts of the stakeholders’ point of view and to enhance negotiation among individuals and organizations. The aim of the negotiation process is to define a shared cognitive map with regard to water management problems. Such a map can be called a water community cognitive map. The system performance has been tested by simulating a real conflict on water resources management that occurred some years ago in a river basin in the south of Italy.

  8. a Framework for Capacity Building in Mapping Coastal Resources Using Remote Sensing in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamondong, A.; Cruz, C.; Ticman, T.; Peralta, R.; Go, G. A.; Vergara, M.; Estabillo, M. S.; Cadalzo, I. E.; Jalbuena, R.; Blanco, A.

    2016-06-01

    Remote sensing has been an effective technology in mapping natural resources by reducing the costs and field data gathering time and bringing in timely information. With the launch of several earth observation satellites, an increase in the availability of satellite imageries provides an immense selection of data for the users. The Philippines has recently embarked in a program which will enable the gathering of LiDAR data in the whole country. The capacity of the Philippines to take advantage of these advancements and opportunities is lacking. There is a need to transfer the knowledge of remote sensing technology to other institutions to better utilize the available data. Being an archipelagic country with approximately 36,000 kilometers of coastline, and most of its people depending on its coastal resources, remote sensing is an optimal choice in mapping such resources. A project involving fifteen (15) state universities and colleges and higher education institutions all over the country headed by the University of the Philippines Training Center for Applied Geodesy and Photogrammetry and funded by the Department of Science and Technology was formed to carry out the task of capacity building in mapping the country's coastal resources using LiDAR and other remotely sensed datasets. This paper discusses the accomplishments and the future activities of the project.

  9. Global-Scale Resource Survey and Performance Monitoring of Public OGC Web Map Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Zhipeng; Cao, Jun; Liu, Xiaojing; Cheng, Xiaoqiang; Wu, Huayi

    2016-06-01

    One of the most widely-implemented service standards provided by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) to the user community is the Web Map Service (WMS). WMS is widely employed globally, but there is limited knowledge of the global distribution, adoption status or the service quality of these online WMS resources. To fill this void, we investigated global WMSs resources and performed distributed performance monitoring of these services. This paper explicates a distributed monitoring framework that was used to monitor 46,296 WMSs continuously for over one year and a crawling method to discover these WMSs. We analyzed server locations, provider types, themes, the spatiotemporal coverage of map layers and the service versions for 41,703 valid WMSs. Furthermore, we appraised the stability and performance of basic operations for 1210 selected WMSs (i.e., GetCapabilities and GetMap). We discuss the major reasons for request errors and performance issues, as well as the relationship between service response times and the spatiotemporal distribution of client monitoring sites. This paper will help service providers, end users and developers of standards to grasp the status of global WMS resources, as well as to understand the adoption status of OGC standards. The conclusions drawn in this paper can benefit geospatial resource discovery, service performance evaluation and guide service performance improvements.

  10. An AFLP-based genetic linkage map of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) constructed by using an interspecific hybrid resource family.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhanjiang; Karsi, Attila; Li, Ping; Cao, Dongfeng; Dunham, R

    2003-01-01

    Catfish is the major aquaculture species in the United States. The hybrid catfish produced by crossing channel catfish females with blue catfish males exhibit a number of desirable production traits, but their mass production has been difficult. To introduce desirable genes from blue catfish into channel catfish through introgression, a genetic linkage map is helpful. In this project, a genetic linkage map was constructed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). A total of 607 AFLP markers were analyzed using 65 primer combinations and an interspecific backcross resource family. A total of 418 AFLP markers were assigned to 44 linkage groups. Among the remaining 189 markers, 101 were not used because of significant segregation distortion, 29 were unlinked, and 59 were eliminated because they span very large distances. The 418 AFLP markers covered 1593 cM Kosambi. The AFLP markers showed a high level of clustering that appears to be related to certain primer combinations. This linkage map will serve as the basis for mapping a greater number of markers to provide a map with high enough resolution for it to be useful for selective breeding programs using introgression. PMID:14573480

  11. Genome wide nucleosome mapping for HSV-1 shows nucleosomes are deposited at preferred positions during lytic infection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F; Chen, Eric Z; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W; Isett, R Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A; Fraser, Nigel W

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200 bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6 hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152 kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes. PMID:25710170

  12. Genome Wide Nucleosome Mapping for HSV-1 Shows Nucleosomes Are Deposited at Preferred Positions during Lytic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F.; Chen, Eric Z.; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W.; Isett, R. Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A.; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes. PMID:25710170

  13. Feasibility of using multiplexed SLAR imagery for water resources management and mapping vegetation communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, B.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    A two-wavelength (X band and L band) multiplexed synthetic aperture side-looking airborne radar (SLAR), providing parallel- and cross-polarized images, has been tested for application in mapping vegetation and water resources. Indications of the relative heights, densities, surface roughness and other parameters provided by the multiplexed radar imagery can be used to differentiate and map various types of vegetation. The multiplexed SLAR is superior to thermal IR imagery and aerial photography for determining heights of vegetation and water-land boundaries.

  14. Map showing distribution of cadmium and antimony in the nonmagnetic fraction of heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, shows the regional distribution of cadmium and antimony in the nonmagnetic fraction of drainage-sediment samples. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral-resource

  15. Geospatial Toolkits and Resource Maps for Selected Countries from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    NREL developed the Geospatial Toolkit (GsT), a map-based software application that integrates resource data and geographic information systems (GIS) for integrated resource assessment. A variety of agencies within countries, along with global datasets, provided country-specific data. Originally developed in 2005, the Geospatial Toolkit was completely redesigned and re-released in November 2010 to provide a more modern, easier-to-use interface with considerably faster analytical querying capabilities. Toolkits are available for 21 countries and each one can be downloaded separately. The source code for the toolkit is also available. [Taken and edited from http://www.nrel.gov/international/geospatial_toolkits.html

  16. An open-source computational and data resource to analyze digital maps of immunopeptidomes

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, Etienne; Espona, Lucia; Kowalewski, Daniel J.; Schuster, Heiko; Ternette, Nicola; Alpizar, Adan; Schittenhelm, Ralf B.; Ramarathinam, Sri Harsha; Lindestam-Arlehamn, Cecilia S.; Koh, Ching Chiek; Gillet, Ludovic; Rabsteyn, Armin; Navarro, Pedro; Kim, Sangtae; Lam, Henry; Sturm, Theo; Marcilla, Miguel; Sette, Alessandro; Campbell, David; Deutsch, Eric W.; Moritz, Robert L.; Purcell, Anthony; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanovic, Stevan; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-07-08

    We present a novel proteomics-based workflow and an open source data and computational resource for reproducibly identifying and quantifying HLA-associated peptides at high-throughput. The provided resources support the generation of HLA allele-specific peptide assay libraries consisting of consensus fragment ion spectra and the analysis of quantitative digital maps of HLA peptidomes generated by SWATH mass spectrometry (MS). This is the first community-based study towards the development of a robust platform for the reproducible and quantitative measurement of HLA peptidomes, an essential step towards the design of efficient immunotherapies.

  17. An open-source computational and data resource to analyze digital maps of immunopeptidomes.

    PubMed

    Caron, Etienne; Espona, Lucia; Kowalewski, Daniel J; Schuster, Heiko; Ternette, Nicola; Alpízar, Adán; Schittenhelm, Ralf B; Ramarathinam, Sri H; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S; Chiek Koh, Ching; Gillet, Ludovic C; Rabsteyn, Armin; Navarro, Pedro; Kim, Sangtae; Lam, Henry; Sturm, Theo; Marcilla, Miguel; Sette, Alessandro; Campbell, David S; Deutsch, Eric W; Moritz, Robert L; Purcell, Anthony W; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanovic, Stefan; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel mass spectrometry-based high-throughput workflow and an open-source computational and data resource to reproducibly identify and quantify HLA-associated peptides. Collectively, the resources support the generation of HLA allele-specific peptide assay libraries consisting of consensus fragment ion spectra, and the analysis of quantitative digital maps of HLA peptidomes generated from a range of biological sources by SWATH mass spectrometry (MS). This study represents the first community-based effort to develop a robust platform for the reproducible and quantitative measurement of the entire repertoire of peptides presented by HLA molecules, an essential step towards the design of efficient immunotherapies. PMID:26154972

  18. An open-source computational and data resource to analyze digital maps of immunopeptidomes

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, Etienne; Espona, Lucia; Kowalewski, Daniel J.; Schuster, Heiko; Ternette, Nicola; Alpízar, Adán; Schittenhelm, Ralf B.; Ramarathinam, Sri H.; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S.; Chiek Koh, Ching; Gillet, Ludovic C.; Rabsteyn, Armin; Navarro, Pedro; Kim, Sangtae; Lam, Henry; Sturm, Theo; Marcilla, Miguel; Sette, Alessandro; Campbell, David S.; Deutsch, Eric W.; Moritz, Robert L.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Rammensee, Hans -Georg; Stevanovic, Stefan; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-07-08

    We present a novel mass spectrometry-based high-throughput workflow and an open-source computational and data resource to reproducibly identify and quantify HLA-associated peptides. Collectively, the resources support the generation of HLA allele-specific peptide assay libraries consisting of consensus fragment ion spectra, and the analysis of quantitative digital maps of HLA peptidomes generated from a range of biological sources by SWATH mass spectrometry (MS). This study represents the first community-based effort to develop a robust platform for the reproducible and quantitative measurement of the entire repertoire of peptides presented by HLA molecules, an essential step towards the design of efficient immunotherapies.

  19. Grid-based modeling for land use planning and environmental resource mapping.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, J. A.

    1999-08-04

    Geographic Information System (GIS) technology is used by land managers and natural resource planners for examining resource distribution and conducting project planning, often by visually interpreting spatial data representing environmental or regulatory variables. Frequently, many variables influence the decision-making process, and modeling can improve results with even a small investment of time and effort. Presented are several grid-based GIS modeling projects, including: (1) land use optimization under environmental and regulatory constraints; (2) identification of suitable wetland mitigation sites; and (3) predictive mapping of prehistoric cultural resource sites. As different as the applications are, each follows a similar process of problem conceptualization, implementation of a practical grid-based GIS model, and evaluation of results.

  20. Environmental footprints show China and Europe’s evolving resource appropriation for soybean production in Mato Grosso, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathuillière, Michael J.; Johnson, Mark S.; Galford, Gillian L.; Couto, Eduardo G.

    2014-07-01

    Mato Grosso has become the center of Brazil’s soybean industry, with production located across an agricultural frontier expanding into savanna and rainforest biomes. We present environmental footprints of soybean production in Mato Grosso and resource flows accompanying exports to China and Europe for the 2000s using five indicators: deforestation, land footprint (LF), carbon footprint (CF), water footprint (WF), and nutrient footprints. Soybean production was associated with 65% of the state’s deforestation, and 14-17% of total Brazilian land use change carbon emissions. The decade showed two distinct production systems illustrated by resources used in the first and second half of the decade. Deforestation and carbon footprint declined 70% while land, water, and nutrient footprints increased almost 30% between the two periods. These differences coincided with a shift in Mato Grosso’s export destination. Between 2006 and 2010, China surpassed Europe in soybean imports when production was associated with 97 m2 deforestation yr-1 ton-1 of soybean, a LF of 0.34 ha yr-1 ton-1, a carbon footprint of 4.6 ton CO2-eq yr-1 ton-1, a WF of 1908 m3 yr-1 ton-1, and virtual phosphorous and potassium of 5.0 kg P yr-1 ton-1 and 0.0042 g K yr-1 ton-1. Mato Grosso constructs soil fertility via phosphorous and potassium fertilizer sourced from third party countries and imported into the region. Through the soybean produced, Mato Grosso then exports both water derived from its abundant, seasonal precipitation and nutrients obtained from fertilizer. In 2010, virtual water flows were 10.3 km3 yr-1 to China and 4.1 km3 yr-1 to Europe. The total embedded nutrient flows to China were 2.12 Mtons yr-1 and 2.85 Mtons yr-1 to Europe. As soybean production grows with global demand, the role of Mato Grosso’s resource use and production vulnerabilities highlight the challenges with meeting future international food security needs.

  1. Satellite SAR applied in offhore wind resource mapping: possibilities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasager, C. B.

    Satellite remote sensing of ocean wind fields from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) observations is presented. The study is based on a series of more than 60 ERS-2 SAR satellite scenes from the Horns Rev in the North Sea. The wind climate from the coastline and 80 km offshore is mapped in detail with a resolution of 400 m by 400 m grid cells. Spatial variations in wind speed as a function of wind direction and fetch are observed and discussed. The satellite wind fields are compared to in-situ observations from a tall offshore meteorological mast at which wind speed at 4 levels are analysed. The mast is located 14 km offshore and the wind climate is observed continously since May 1999. For offshore wind resource mapping the SAR-based wind field maps can constitute an alternative to in-situ observations and a practical method is developed for applied use in WAsP (Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program). The software is the de facto world standard tool used for prediction of wind climate and power production from wind turbines and wind farms. The possibilities and limitations on achieving offshore wind resource estimates using SAR-based wind fields in lieu of in-situ data are discussed. It includes a presentation of the footprint area-averaging techniques tailored for SAR-based wind field maps. Averaging techniques are relevant for the reduction of noise apparent in SAR wind speed maps. Acknowledgments: Danish Research Agency (SAT-WIND Sagsnr. 2058-03-0006) for funding, ESA (EO-1356, AO-153) for ERS-2 SAR scenes, and Elsam Engineering A/S for in-situ met-data.

  2. Map showing abundance and distribution of arsenic in oxide residues of stream-sediment samples, Medford 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Oregon-California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whittington, Charles L.; Leinz, Reinhard W.; Grimes, David J.

    1985-01-01

    Stream-sediment sampling in the Medford 1o x 2o quadrangle was undertaken to provide to aid in assessment of the mineral resource potential of the quadrangle. This map presents data on the abundance and distribution of copper in the oxide residues (oxalic-acid leachates) of stream sediments and in the minus-0.18-mm sieve fraction of selected stream sediments collected in the quadrangle. 

  3. Map showing abundance and distribution of copper in oxide residues of stream-sediment samples, Medford 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Oregon-California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whittington, Charles L.; Grimes, David J.; Leinz, Reinhard W.

    1985-01-01

    Stream-sediment sampling in the Medford 1o x 2o quadrangle was undertaken to provide to aid in assessment of the mineral resource potential of the quadrangle. This map presents data on the abundance and distribution of copper in the oxide residues (oxalic-acid leachates) of stream sediments and in the minus-0.18-mm sieve fraction of selected stream sediments collected in the quadrangle. 

  4. Vertical integration of cosmid and YAC resources for interval mapping on the X-chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, J.; Coffey, A.J.; Giannelli, F.; Bentley, D.R. )

    1993-02-01

    The vertical integration of cosmid and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) resources is of particular importance in the development of high-resolution maps of selected regions of the human genome. A resource of approximately 95,000 cosmids constructed using DNA from primary fibroblasts of karyotype 49,XXXXX was validated by detailed characterization of a 200-kb cosmid contig spanning exons 8-20 of the dystrophin gene. This resource was used to construct contigs in 0.65 Mb of Xq26 by hybridization of gel-purified YAC DNA to high-density gridded arrays of the cosmid library; positive cosmids were overlapped by fingerprinting. Contigs were oriented and ordered relative to existing YACs in the region using cross-hybridization. The overlaps between a representative set of cosmids define 54 intervals of 5-20 kb and were used to construct a high-resolution cosmid interval map of the region, locating markers, dinucleotide repeats, and candidate CpG islands. This approach can be applied rapidly to large regions of the genome and without recourse to subcloning of individual YACs. 49 refs., 5 figs.

  5. GeoMapApp, Virtual Ocean and Other Cutting-Edge Resources for Representing Geoscience Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Ryan, W. B.; Coplan, J.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; O'Hara, S.; Ferrini, V.; Bonczkowski, J.; Chan, S.; Weissel, R.; Morton, J. J.; de Leonardo, S.; Leung, A.

    2009-12-01

    GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org) and Virtual Ocean (http://www.virtualocean.org/) are free data exploration and visualisation tools that work on any computer and have wide application across the geosciences for both research and education. As map-based interactive tools, they allow users to plot, manipulate and represent data in an intuitive geographical reference frame. GeoMapApp contains a broad range of built-in and linked geoscience data sets, enabling users to rapidly and conveniently explore geo-referenced data from multiple sources, to generate compelling visualisations, and to create custom maps and grids. Data can be coloured and scaled, contoured, shaded, and graphed, and profiles can be taken. The lasso tool provides an easy way to select data from either the map window or from graphs. The layer manager allows multiple data sets to appear in the map window, instantly providing a convenient way to compare and contrast data. Such hands-on innovative functionality can be used effectively to highlight features and discern trends in data. Examples of available data sets include geophysical ship track profiles and multibeam swaths; earthquake, volcano and heatflow information; geochemical tables; plate tectonic data sets; physical oceanography water column profiles; lakes and rivers. Some data sets such as drill core profiles and single-/multi-channel seismics have a customised interface that enables enhanced functionality to aid intuitive visual representation. Users can also import their own data sets and grids. A user guide, multi-media tutorials, and webinar are available and contain many examples of using these resources. Virtual Ocean combines the versatility of GeoMapApp with a 3-D earth browser built using NASA WorldWind code. The base map for GeoMapApp and Virtual Ocean comprises the continuously-updated multi-resolution Global Multi-Resolution Topography (GMRT, http://www.marine-geo.org/portals/gmrt/). This synthesis incorporates multibeam swath

  6. Preliminary map showing freshwater heads for the Mission Canyon and Lodgepole limestones and equivalent rocks of Mississippian age in the Northern Great Plains of Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, W. Roger; Strausz, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    A potentiometric-surface map showing freshwater heads for the Mission Canyon and Lodgepole Limestones of Mississippian age has been prepared as part of a study to determine the water-resources potential of the Mississippian Madison Limestone and associated rocks in the Northern Great Plains of Montana, North and South Dakota, and Wyoming. Most of the data used to prepare the map are from drill-stem tests of exploration and development wells drilled by the petroleum industry from 1946 to 1978. Some data are also from cased oil wells, water-production wells, and springs. A short explanation describes the seven categories of reliability used to evaluate the drill-stem-test data and identifies several factors that might explain the apparent anomalous highs and lows on the potentiometric surface. The map is at a scale of 1:1,000,000 and the potentiometric contour intervals are 100, 200, and 500 feet. (USGS)

  7. Mapping imperviousness using TM data in water resources reservation area of Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongen; Qiu, Yanling; Tong, Xiaohua; Zhang, Yalei; Zhao, Jianfu

    2006-12-01

    The rapid growth of impervious land covers within urbanizing regions holds many negative implications for environmental quality. The study region is the drinking water conservation areas of Shanghai, which is very important to the megalopolis. Mapping of imperviousness has shown important potentials to acquire such information in great spatial detail but the actual mapping process has been challenged by the heterogeneity of urban and suburb environment and the spatial and spectra capabilities of the sensor. This study focused on mapping the imperviousness fraction using linear spectral unmixing in the area from Landsat satellite remote sensing data. Development of high-quality fraction images depends greatly on the selection of suitable endmembers. A multi-endmemer linear spectral unmixing were evaculated. In the approach, each of the class hold multi-image-endmember representing the heterogeneity of them. The best fraction images were chosen to determine the imperviousness. An unconstrained least-squares solution was used to unmix the MNF components into fraction images. The multi-endmember linear spectral unmixing is then used to map imperviousness fraction for the years of 1987, 1997 and 2006 in upper region of Huangpu River, respectively. In the water resources reservation of Shanghai, the impervious surface area increases approximately 3 times from 1987 to 2002.

  8. An ultra-high-density map as a community resource for discerning the genetic basis of quantitative traits in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we generated a linkage map containing 1,151,856 high quality SNPs between Mo17 and B73, which were verified in the maize intermated B73'×'Mo17 (IBM) Syn10 population. This resource is an excellent complement to existing maize genetic maps available in an online database (iPlant, http:...

  9. Investigations using data from LANDSAT-2. [earth resources program maps forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hossain, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. LANDSAT imageries have given positive indication of new land formation in the Bay of Bengal. A map of the bay region showing depth of new formations south of Patherghata test site was prepared. Winter crop estimation of the Sylhet-Mymensingh districts was made. This estimate shows an agreement of about 93% with 1973 data of the Agriculture Department. A preliminary land use map of the Sylhet-Mymensingh area using LANDSAT imageries in conjunction with aerial photographs and ground survey was also prepared.

  10. GeoMapApp and MARGINS Mini-Lessons: Cutting-Edge Resources for Modern Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Ryan, W. B.; Coplan, J.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; O'Hara, S.; Ferrini, V.; Bonczkowski, J.; Chan, S.; Weissel, R.; Morton, J. J.; de Leonardo, S.; Leung, A.

    2009-12-01

    The NSF MARGINS program, a decade-long multi-disciplinary investigation covering major scientific questions in the evolution of continental margins (http://www.margins-nsf.org), has produced a number of key results that are changing our view of these complex systems. Whilst it will be some time before these key findings are incorporated in next-generation undergraduate textbooks, MARGINS researchers and educators have created a broad suite of ready-to-use education modules to highlight some of these results. The hands-on undergraduate-level modules, called MARGINS mini-lessons, range from short interactive activities to multi-session units. Hosted by the Science Education Resource Centre at Carleton College, the mini-lessons (http://serc.carleton.edu/margins/collection.html) cover all four MARGINS initiatives. Examples include teaching activities on geochemical inputs and outputs at subduction zones; volcanoes of central America; insights from scientific drilling; sediment production across margins; margin morphology and earthquake/volcano locations; and, the tectonic factors behind historical earthquakes. Each mini-lesson includes a comprehensive educator guide, information on data sets and resources, and suggested assessment rubrics. GeoMapApp (www.geomapapp.org), a free data exploration and visualisation tool that works on any computer, has wide application across the geosciences for both research and education and is used in many of the MARGINS mini-lessons. GeoMapApp contains an extraordinary wealth of built-in and linked data sets, allowing users to rapidly and conveniently explore geo-referenced data from multiple sources, to generate compelling visualisations, and to create custom maps and grids. Developed by the group that hosts the MARGINS database (http://www.marine-geo.org/portals/margins/), GeoMapApp contains seamless links to MARGINS data and to information about MARGINS land and marine field programs. A user guide, multi-media tutorials, and webinar

  11. An open-source computational and data resource to analyze digital maps of immunopeptidomes

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Etienne; Espona, Lucia; Kowalewski, Daniel J; Schuster, Heiko; Ternette, Nicola; Alpízar, Adán; Schittenhelm, Ralf B; Ramarathinam, Sri H; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S; Chiek Koh, Ching; Gillet, Ludovic C; Rabsteyn, Armin; Navarro, Pedro; Kim, Sangtae; Lam, Henry; Sturm, Theo; Marcilla, Miguel; Sette, Alessandro; Campbell, David S; Deutsch, Eric W; Moritz, Robert L; Purcell, Anthony W; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanovic, Stefan; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel mass spectrometry-based high-throughput workflow and an open-source computational and data resource to reproducibly identify and quantify HLA-associated peptides. Collectively, the resources support the generation of HLA allele-specific peptide assay libraries consisting of consensus fragment ion spectra, and the analysis of quantitative digital maps of HLA peptidomes generated from a range of biological sources by SWATH mass spectrometry (MS). This study represents the first community-based effort to develop a robust platform for the reproducible and quantitative measurement of the entire repertoire of peptides presented by HLA molecules, an essential step towards the design of efficient immunotherapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07661.001 PMID:26154972

  12. Map showing potential sources of gravel and crushed-rock aggregate in the greater Denver area, Front Range urban corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trimble, D.E.; Fitch, H.R.

    1974-01-01

    Gravel and (or) crushed-rock aggregates are essential commodities for urban development, but supplies in many places are exhausted or otherwise eliminated by urban growth. Gravel resources may be exhausted by exploitation, covered by urban spread, or eliminated from production by zoning. this conflict between a growing need and a progressively reduced supply can be forestalled by informed land-use planning. Fundamental to intelligent decisions on land use is knowledge of the physical character, distribution, and quantity of the gravel resources of an area, and of the alternative resource of rock suitable for crushing. This map has been prepared to supply data basic to land-use planning in the Front Range Urban Corridor.

  13. Use of regression-based models to map sensitivity of aquatic resources to atmospheric deposition in Yosemite National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, David W.; Nanus, Leora; Huggett, Brian

    2010-01-01

    An abundance of exposed bedrock, sparse soil and vegetation, and fast hydrologic flushing rates make aquatic ecosystems in Yosemite National Park susceptible to nutrient enrichment and episodic acidification due to atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S). In this study, multiple linear regression (MLR) models were created to estimate fall-season nitrate and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in surface water in Yosemite wilderness. Input data included estimated winter N deposition, fall-season surface-water chemistry measurements at 52 sites, and basin characteristics derived from geographic information system layers of topography, geology, and vegetation. The MLR models accounted for 84% and 70% of the variance in surface-water nitrate and ANC, respectively. Explanatory variables (and the sign of their coefficients) for nitrate included elevation (positive) and the abundance of neoglacial and talus deposits (positive), unvegetated terrain (positive), alluvium (negative), and riparian (negative) areas in the basins. Explanatory variables for ANC included basin area (positive) and the abundance of metamorphic rocks (positive), unvegetated terrain (negative), water (negative), and winter N deposition (negative) in the basins. The MLR equations were applied to 1407 stream reaches delineated in the National Hydrography Data Set for Yosemite, and maps of predicted surface-water nitrate and ANC concentrations were created. Predicted surface-water nitrate concentrations were highest in small, high-elevation cirques, and concentrations declined downstream. Predicted ANC concentrations showed the opposite pattern, except in high-elevation areas underlain by metamorphic rocks along the Sierran Crest, which had relatively high predicted ANC (>200 μeq L-1). Maps were created to show where basin characteristics predispose aquatic resources to nutrient enrichment and acidification effects from N and S deposition. The maps can be used to help guide development of

  14. Physical mapping resources for large plant genomes: radiation hybrids for wheat D-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of a high quality reference sequence is a daunting task in crops like wheat with large (~17Gb), highly repetitive (>80%) and polyploid genome. To achieve complete sequence assembly of such genomes, development of a high quality physical map is a necessary first step. However, due to the lack of recombination in certain regions of the chromosomes, genetic mapping, which uses recombination frequency to map marker loci, alone is not sufficient to develop high quality marker scaffolds for a sequence ready physical map. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping, which uses radiation induced chromosomal breaks, has proven to be a successful approach for developing marker scaffolds for sequence assembly in animal systems. Here, the development and characterization of a RH panel for the mapping of D-genome of wheat progenitor Aegilops tauschii is reported. Results Radiation dosages of 350 and 450 Gy were optimized for seed irradiation of a synthetic hexaploid (AABBDD) wheat with the D-genome of Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78. The surviving plants after irradiation were crossed to durum wheat (AABB), to produce pentaploid RH1s (AABBD), which allows the simultaneous mapping of the whole D-genome. A panel of 1,510 RH1 plants was obtained, of which 592 plants were generated from the mature RH1 seeds, and 918 plants were rescued through embryo culture due to poor germination (<3%) of mature RH1 seeds. This panel showed a homogenous marker loss (2.1%) after screening with SSR markers uniformly covering all the D-genome chromosomes. Different marker systems mostly detected different lines with deletions. Using markers covering known distances, the mapping resolution of this RH panel was estimated to be <140kb. Analysis of only 16 RH lines carrying deletions on chromosome 2D resulted in a physical map with cM/cR ratio of 1:5.2 and 15 distinct bins. Additionally, with this small set of lines, almost all the tested ESTs could be mapped. A set of 399 most informative RH

  15. Map showing ground-water conditions in the Canyon Diablo area, Coconino and Navajo Counties, Arizona - 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Appel, Cynthia L.; Bills, Donald J.

    1980-01-01

    The Canyon Diablo area includes about 1,400 square miles in northeastern Arizona. The main source of ground water is the Coconino aquifer, which includes the Kaibab Limestone, the Cononino Sandstone, and the upper member of the Supai Formation. In places the alluvium and volcanic rocks yield water to wells and springs. Information on the map includes altitude of the water level, depth to water, and specific conductance and fluoride concentration in the water. Scale 1:125,000. (USGS)

  16. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the New Driver-Cave Creek area, Maricopa and Yavapai counties, Arizona; 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Littin, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The New River-Cave Creek area includes about 500 square miles in central Arizona. The ground-water conditions vary greatly owing to large differences in rock type and extent of fracturing. Information shown on the maps includes depth to water, altitude of the water level, well depth, and specific conductance and fluoride concentration in the water. Scale 1:125,000. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. An integrated approach shows different use of water resources from Mediterranean maquis species in a coastal dune ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereu, S.; Salvatori, E.; Fusaro, L.; Gerosa, G.; Muys, B.; Manes, F.

    2009-11-01

    An integrated approach has been used to analyse the dependence of three Mediterranean species, A. unedo L., Q. ilex L., and P. latifolia L. co-occurring in a coastal dune ecosystem on two different water resources: groundwater and rainfed upper soil layers. The approach included leaf level gas exchanges, sap flow measurements and structural adaptations between 15 May and 31 July 2007. During this period it was possible to capture different species-specific response patterns to an environment characterized by a sandy soil, with a low water retention capacity, and the presence of a water table. The latter did not completely prevent the development of a drought response and, combined with previous studies in the same area, response differences between species have been partially attributed to different root distributions. Sap flow of A. unedo decreased rapidly with the decline of soil water content, while that of Q. ilex decreased only moderately. Midday leaf water potential of P. latifolia and A. unedo ranged between -2.2 and -2.7 MPa throughout the measuring period, while in Q. ilex it decreased down to -3.4 MPa at the end of the season. A. unedo was the only species that responded to drought with a decrease of its leaf area to sapwood area ratio from 23.9±1.2 (May) to 15.2±1.5 (July). While A. unedo also underwent an almost stepwise loss on hydraulic conductivity, such a loss did not occur for Q. ilex, whereas P. latifolia was able to slightly increase its hydraulic conducitivity. These differences show how different plant compartments coordinate differently between species in their responses to drought. The different responses appear to be mediated by different root distributions of the species and their relative resistances to drought are likely to depend on the duration of the periods in which water remains extractable in the upper soil layers.

  18. Map showing landslides in California that have caused fatalities or at least $1,000,000 in damages from 1906 to 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Fred; Brabb, E.E.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding where landslide processes in California have been most severe is helpful in determining priorities for landslide mapping, mitigation measures, and preparedness planning. Although a few studies of landslide damage and fatalities have been published (see sources of data 12, 17, 34, 36, 40), and many more reports mention landslide damage and fatalities incidentally, our map is the first to show where the problem is most severe for the entire state.

  19. Mineral resource potential map of the Pyramid Roadless Area, El Dorado County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, Augustus K.; Chaffee, Maurice A.; Scott, Douglas F.

    1983-01-01

    Studies show., there is low potential for small deposits of gold, silver, and base metals in the Pyramid Roadless Area. There are two uranium claims (Cliff Ridge mining claims) located within the roadless area, but samples from this site showed no uranium. There are no indications of geothermal resources, coal, oil, or gas.

  20. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the northern part of the Chinle area, Apache County, Arizona, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levings, G.W.; Farrar, C.D.

    1977-01-01

    The northern part of the Chinle area includes about 3,000 sq mi in northeastern Arizona and is entirely in the Navajo Indian Reservation. The main source of water is from the several aquifers that are made up of one or more formations. The aquifers are stacked one on the other and generally are not hydraulically connected. Information on the maps includes depth to water, altitude of the water level, and chemical quality of the water. Scale 1:125,000. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Map showing ground failures from the Greenville/Mount Diablo earthquake sequence of January 1980, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, R.C.; Wieczorek, G.F.; Keefer, D.K.; Harp, E.L.; Tannaci, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    Information about the individual ground failures may be obtained from the map and the brief descriptions in table 1. The following text is a general discussion of the distribution and the mechanisms of the ground failures, followed by a discussion of the effects of wet winter conditions and of topographic amplification on the distribution and mechanisms of slope failure, and it concludes with a description of our (unsuccessful) efforts to locate any ground failures due to liquefaction. The discussion is intended not only to describe the GMDES slope failures but also to place them into the larger general context of seismically induced slope failures.

  2. Land use maps of the Tanana and Purcell Mountain areas, Alaska, based on Earth Resources Technology Satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS imagery in photographic format was used to make land use maps of two areas of special interest to native corporations under terms of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. Land selections are to be made in these areas, and the maps should facilitate decisions because of their comprehensive presentation of resource distribution information. The ERTS images enabled mapping broadly-defined land use classes in large areas in a comparatively short time. Some aerial photography was used to identify colors and shades of gray on the various images. The 14 mapped land use categories are identified according to the classification system under development by the U.S. Geological Survey. These maps exemplify a series of about a dozen diverse Alaskan areas. The principal resource depicted is vegetation, and clearly shown are vegetation units of special importance, including stands possibly containing trees of commercial grade and stands constituting wildlife habitat.

  3. A compendium of Caenhorabditis elegans regulatory transcription factors: a resource for mapping transcription regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Reece-Hoyes, John S; Deplancke, Bart; Shingles, Jane; Grove, Christian A; Hope, Ian A; Walhout, Albertha JM

    2005-01-01

    Background Transcription regulatory networks are composed of interactions between transcription factors and their target genes. Whereas unicellular networks have been studied extensively, metazoan transcription regulatory networks remain largely unexplored. Caenorhabditis elegans provides a powerful model to study such metazoan networks because its genome is completely sequenced and many functional genomic tools are available. While C. elegans gene predictions have undergone continuous refinement, this is not true for the annotation of functional transcription factors. The comprehensive identification of transcription factors is essential for the systematic mapping of transcription regulatory networks because it enables the creation of physical transcription factor resources that can be used in assays to map interactions between transcription factors and their target genes. Results By computational searches and extensive manual curation, we have identified a compendium of 934 transcription factor genes (referred to as wTF2.0). We find that manual curation drastically reduces the number of both false positive and false negative transcription factor predictions. We discuss how transcription factor splice variants and dimer formation may affect the total number of functional transcription factors. In contrast to mouse transcription factor genes, we find that C. elegans transcription factor genes do not undergo significantly more splicing than other genes. This difference may contribute to differences in organism complexity. We identify candidate redundant worm transcription factor genes and orthologous worm and human transcription factor pairs. Finally, we discuss how wTF2.0 can be used together with physical transcription factor clone resources to facilitate the systematic mapping of C. elegans transcription regulatory networks. Conclusion wTF2.0 provides a starting point to decipher the transcription regulatory networks that control metazoan development and function

  4. Maps showing distribution of pH, copper, zinc, fluoride, uranium, molybdenum, arsenic, and sulfate in water, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, J.B.; Miller, W.R.; Ficklin, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    These maps show the regional distribution of copper, zinc, arsenic, molybdenum, uranium, fluoride, sulfate, and pH in surface and ground water from the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle. This study supplements (Miller and others, 1984a-j) the regional drainage geochemical study done for the Richfield quadrangle under the U.S. Geological Survey’s Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP). Regional sampling was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends which can be used, along with geologic and geophysical data, to assess the mineral resource potential of the Richfield quadrangle. Analytical data used in compiling this report were published previously (McHugh and others, 1981). The Richfield quadrangle in west-central Utah covers the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt that extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 250 km into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range Province, and the eastern third in the High Plateaus of Utah subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of latest Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrane into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were deeply eroded and the resulting debris deposited in the adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed during igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time.

  5. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the lower Santa Cruz area, Pinal, Pima, and Maricopa Counties, Arizona, 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konieczki, A.D.; English, C.S.

    1979-01-01

    The lower Santa Cruz area includes about 5,400 square miles in south-central Arizona and is the second largest agricultural area in the State. The area depends mainly on ground water for irrigation, and in 1976 about 966,000 acre-feet of ground water was pumped from the area. As a result of the large-scale long-term withdrawal of ground water, water levels have declined , and the direction of ground-water flow has changed. Since 1923 , declines of nearly 500 feet have occurred near Stanfield. Information shown on the maps (scale 1:125,000) includes depth to water, altitude of the water level, specific conductance, fluoride concentration, change in water level (1923-77), and land use. Hydrographs of the water level in selected wells and a table of historical pumpage also are included. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the upper Verde River area, Yavapai and Coconino counties, Arizona; 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levings, Gary W.; Mann, Larry J.

    1980-01-01

    The upper Verde River area includes about 3,600 square miles in north-central Arizona. The area is underlain by a regional aquifer that consists of several formations. In places ground water also is present in the igneous rocks and basalt flows and in the alluvium along the channels and flood plains of the streams. Ground-water development has been slight; in 1978 about 8,000 acre-feet of ground water was withdrawn for domestic, public-supply, industrial, and irrigation uses. Information on the maps includes the principal geologic formation that furnishes water to wells and springs, depth to water, altitude of the water level, and chemical quality of the water. Scale 1:125,000. (USGS)

  7. Map showing the distribution and characteristics of plutonic rocks in the Tonopah 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The accompanying table includes the name (if any) of the pluton and its location, the age of the pluton (either a radiometric age or an age inferred from field relations), modal composition, texture, mineralogy, hydrothermal alteration and mineralization related to the pluton, the source of mapping shown on this map, and published references on the pluton. Radiometric ages are either published K-Ar and fission track ages or new whole-rock Rb-Sr ages determined by A. C. Robinson on samples collected either for this study or as part of regional Sr-isotope studies by R.W. Kistler and A.C. Robinson. K-Ar ages published prior to 1977 are corrected using the new I.U.C.S. constants (Steiger and Jager, 1977). Muscovite alteration ages are reported for several plutons and represent minimum ages for emplacement of these plutons. Compositional classification follows the T. J. G.S. system (“Streckeisen, 1976) and is based either on modal analyses of slabs or estimates from hand specimens. All modes, unless otherwise noted, were measured in this study. The number of modes determined is shown in parentheses, and the range in volume percent of major minerals is given. Where no modal data are available, the color index (percentage of mafic minerals) and major mafic minerals are given for most plutons. Data tabulated on hydrothermal alteration and mineralization related to plutons are based on observations made during field studies for this project. Clear genetic relation between granitic plutonism and several mineral deposits previously attributed to granitic plutonism were not substantiated, and these inconsistencies are noted in the table.

  8. Preliminary maps showing ground-water resources in the Lower Colorado River region, Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    This atlas was prepared to meet the need for information on the areal distribution, quantity, and availability of ground water in the lower Colorado River region, an area of about 140,000 square miles in parts of Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. The lower Colorado River region is divided into three water provinces--the Basin and Range lowlands province, the Plateau uplands province, and the Central highlands province. The annual precipitation in the region ranges from 3 inches near Yuma, Ariz., to as much as 35 inches on the highest peaks, such as those of the Chiricahua Mountains in Arizona. The precipitation in the lowlands ranges from about 10 to 12 inches per year. In the Basin and Range lowlands the hydraulic conductivity of the aquifers can be as much as 130 feet per day. In the Plateau uplands province most of the groundwater occurs in three multiple-aquifer systems. For the most part, the multiple-aquifer systems do not transmit water readily, and the hydraulic conductivity generally is less than 1.3 feet per day. The Central highlands province is a mountainous area that separates the Plateau uplands from the Basin and Range lowlands in most of the lower Colorado region. The principal discharge area for ground water in the highlands occurs along the base of the Mogollon Rim. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. 18 CFR 154.106 - Map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Map. 154.106 Section....106 Map. (a) The map must show the general geographic location of the company's principal pipeline... on a single map. In addition, a separate map should be provided for each zone. (b) (c) The map...

  10. 18 CFR 154.106 - Map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Map. 154.106 Section....106 Map. (a) The map must show the general geographic location of the company's principal pipeline... on a single map. In addition, a separate map should be provided for each zone. (b) (c) The map...

  11. 18 CFR 154.106 - Map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Map. 154.106 Section....106 Map. (a) The map must show the general geographic location of the company's principal pipeline... on a single map. In addition, a separate map should be provided for each zone. (b) (c) The map...

  12. 18 CFR 154.106 - Map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Map. 154.106 Section....106 Map. (a) The map must show the general geographic location of the company's principal pipeline... on a single map. In addition, a separate map should be provided for each zone. (b) (c) The map...

  13. 18 CFR 154.106 - Map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Map. 154.106 Section....106 Map. (a) The map must show the general geographic location of the company's principal pipeline... on a single map. In addition, a separate map should be provided for each zone. (b) (c) The map...

  14. Map showing geochemical summary for the Bald Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Areas, Butte and Plumas counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jocelyn A.; Sorensen, Martin L.

    1985-01-01

    The Bald Rock Roadless Area consists of 3,850 acres in Butte County, Calif. The Middle Rock Feather River Roadless Area consists of 29,300 acres ub Butte and Plumas Counties, Calif. Both roadless areas are in the Plumas National Forest and are on the west slope of the northern Sierra Nevada southwest of Quincy, Calif. (fig. 1). The two roadless areas are alined along the Middle Fork of the Feather River where they include the narrow canyon bottoms and precipitous sidewalls of the Middle Fork and several tributary drainages. Altitudes range from 800 ft in the canyon of the Middle Fork to approximately 6,600 ft at the northwest corner of the map area. The geology of the roadless areas has been briefly summarized by Sorenson and Pietropaoll (1982). This paper summarizes and interprets the semiquantitative emission spectrographic analyses of 106 rock sample and 165 samples of nonmagnetics heavy-mineral stream-sediment concentrates from the Blad Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area (Sorenson and others, 1982).

  15. Map showing ground-water conditions in the Kaibito and Tuba City areas, Coconino and Navajo counties, Arizona, 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    The Kaibito and Tuba City areas include about 2,500 square miles in north-central Arizona. Ground water is obtained from the N aquifer and from alluvium. The N aquifer consists of Navajo Sandstone, Kayenta Formation, Moenave Formation, and the Lukachukai Member of the Wingate Sandstone. The main source of ground water is the Navajo Sandstone. Ground-water development has been slight in the areas. In 1977 the estimated ground-water withdrawals were about 350 acre-feet in the Kaibito area and 650 acre-feet in the Tuba City area. Water levels ranged from flowing at the land surface to 1,360 feet below the land surface. The chemical quality of the water in the N aquifer does not vary greatly in the areas. Dissolved-solids concentrations in the water range from 101 to 669 milligrams per liter but generally are less than 300 milligrams per liter. Along some of the valleys in the Kaibito and Tuba City areas, the alluvium yields water to many shallow dug wells. The water levels generally are from 5 to 15 feet below the land surface. Dissolved-solids concentrations in water from the alluvium usually are less than 600 milligrams per liter. Information shown on the map (scale 1:125,000) includes depth to water, altitude of the water level, and specific conductance and fluoride concentrations. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Open access resources for genome-wide association mapping in rice.

    PubMed

    McCouch, Susan R; Wright, Mark H; Tung, Chih-Wei; Maron, Lyza G; McNally, Kenneth L; Fitzgerald, Melissa; Singh, Namrata; DeClerck, Genevieve; Agosto-Perez, Francisco; Korniliev, Pavel; Greenberg, Anthony J; Naredo, Ma Elizabeth B; Mercado, Sheila Mae Q; Harrington, Sandra E; Shi, Yuxin; Branchini, Darcy A; Kuser-Falcão, Paula R; Leung, Hei; Ebana, Kowaru; Yano, Masahiro; Eizenga, Georgia; McClung, Anna; Mezey, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Increasing food production is essential to meet the demands of a growing human population, with its rising income levels and nutritional expectations. To address the demand, plant breeders seek new sources of genetic variation to enhance the productivity, sustainability and resilience of crop varieties. Here we launch a high-resolution, open-access research platform to facilitate genome-wide association mapping in rice, a staple food crop. The platform provides an immortal collection of diverse germplasm, a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism data set tailored for gene discovery, well-documented analytical strategies, and a suite of bioinformatics resources to facilitate biological interpretation. Using grain length, we demonstrate the power and resolution of our new high-density rice array, the accompanying genotypic data set, and an expanded diversity panel for detecting major and minor effect QTLs and subpopulation-specific alleles, with immediate implications for rice improvement. PMID:26842267

  17. Geologic map and mineral-resources summary of the Baldwin Gap Quadrangle, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    This summary accompanies the geologic map of the Baldwin Gap quadrangle, which is bounded by 36/sup 0/22'30'' and 36/sup 0/30' N. Latitude and by 81/sup 0/37'30'' and 81/sup 0/45' W. Longitude. Mineral resources that are known to have been mined are sand and gravel from floodplain deposits, mica and feldspar from several small pegmatite bodies, and marble from a small area in the south-central part of the quadrangle. Iron has been prospected at several places. Stone, likely suitable for various construction purposes, is present at many places as are saprolite deposits that may be used for earth fill. Several minor pyrite occurrences were noted. All the quarries, pits, and prospects discussed in this report were either abandoned or inactive.

  18. Open access resources for genome-wide association mapping in rice

    PubMed Central

    McCouch, Susan R.; Wright, Mark H.; Tung, Chih-Wei; Maron, Lyza G.; McNally, Kenneth L.; Fitzgerald, Melissa; Singh, Namrata; DeClerck, Genevieve; Agosto-Perez, Francisco; Korniliev, Pavel; Greenberg, Anthony J.; Naredo, Ma. Elizabeth B.; Mercado, Sheila Mae Q.; Harrington, Sandra E.; Shi, Yuxin; Branchini, Darcy A.; Kuser-Falcão, Paula R.; Leung, Hei; Ebana, Kowaru; Yano, Masahiro; Eizenga, Georgia; McClung, Anna; Mezey, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Increasing food production is essential to meet the demands of a growing human population, with its rising income levels and nutritional expectations. To address the demand, plant breeders seek new sources of genetic variation to enhance the productivity, sustainability and resilience of crop varieties. Here we launch a high-resolution, open-access research platform to facilitate genome-wide association mapping in rice, a staple food crop. The platform provides an immortal collection of diverse germplasm, a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism data set tailored for gene discovery, well-documented analytical strategies, and a suite of bioinformatics resources to facilitate biological interpretation. Using grain length, we demonstrate the power and resolution of our new high-density rice array, the accompanying genotypic data set, and an expanded diversity panel for detecting major and minor effect QTLs and subpopulation-specific alleles, with immediate implications for rice improvement. PMID:26842267

  19. Photogeologic map showing distribution of sinkholes south of Fairplay, Park County, Colorado--a possible geologic hazard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shawe, D.R.; Steven, T.A.; Taylor, R.B.; Maxwell, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    A large group of at least 50, and perhaps significantly more, sinkholes partially surrounds Black Mountain 6-10 mi south Fairplay in South Park, Park County, Colorado. The sinkholes occur in bedrock in the evaporite facies of the Middle Pennsylvania Minturn Formation, and in Quaternary soil, alluvium, and glacial outwash gravels that overlie the evaporite beds. Sinkholes range in size from small depressions a few feet across to large holes several hundred feet across. Measured sinkholes range in size from about 25 ft in diameter and 2 ft deep to about 235 ft in diameter and 25 ft deep. In places, several sinkholes have coalesced to form depressions as much as 750 ft long and 400 ft wide. One large cluster of small craters is about 1,8000 ft long and 600 ft wide. As reported to us by a resident rancher, one small sinkhole collapsed about 10 years ago. The area of sinkholes extends into land now under development for residences, and the sinkholes thus pose a potential hazard that needs to be considered in future development. Also, they might jeopardize existing farmland, structures, ans roads (including U.S. Highway 285), as well as projected roads and airstrips. This report is not a comprehensive evaluation of the distribution and origin of the sinkholes; its intent is to call attention to their presence and to encourage further study. Many by not all of the sinkholes were visited; the geologic map is based mainly on the interpretation of aerial photographs by D.R. Shawe.

  20. Map of the Antelope Valley-East Kern Water Agency area, California, showing ground-water subunits and areas and well hydrographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, C.E.; McIntyre, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has released to the open file a map, scale 1:125,000, showing ground-water subunits and areas, and well hydrographs in the Antelope Valley-East Kern Water Agency area, California. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. The Alaskan Mineral Resource Assessment Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic and mineral resource maps of the Talkeetna Quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Bruce L.; Curtin, G.C.; Griscom, Andrew; Nelson, S.W.; Singer, D.A.; Steele, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    The Talkeetna 1? by 3? quadrangle, which consists of about 17,155 km 2 in south-central Alaska, was investigated by integrated field and laboratory studies in the disciplines of geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and Landsat data interpretation for the purpose of assessing its mineral resource potential. Past mineral production has been limited to gold from the Yentna district, but the quadrangle contains potentially significant resources of tin and silver and possibly a few other commodities including chromite and copper. The results of the mineral resource assessment are given in a folio of maps which are accompanied by descriptive texts, diagrams, tables, and pertinent references. This Circular provides background information on these investigations and integrates the component maps. A bibliography cites both specific and general references to the geology and mineral deposits of the quadrangle.

  2. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the Concho, St. Johns, and White Mountains areas, Apache and Navajo Counties, Arizona, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, R.W.; Anderson, Thomas Warren

    1976-01-01

    The Concho, St. Johns, and White Mountains areas cover about 2 ,300 sq mi in eastern Arizona. Ground water is present in several aquifers that are made up of one or more formations. The maps show ground-water conditions in the Coconini aquifer; in the Triassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary rocks; and in the alluvium and basaltic rocks. Information on the maps includes depth to water, altitude of the water level, chemical quality of the water, irrigated area, and hydrographs of the water level in selected wells. Scale 1:125,000. (Woodard-USGS).

  3. The age related markers lipofuscin and apoptosis show different genetic architecture by QTL mapping in short-lived Nothobranchius fish

    PubMed Central

    Ng'oma, Enoch; Reichwald, Kathrin; Dorn, Alexander; Wittig, Michael; Balschun, Tobias; Franke, Andre; Platzer, Matthias; Cellerino, Allesandro

    2014-01-01

    Annual fish of the genus Nothobranchius show large variations in lifespan and expression of age-related phenotypes between closely related populations. We studied N. kadleci and its sister species N. furzeri GRZ strain, and found that N.kadleci is longer-lived than the N. furzeri. Lipofuscin and apoptosis measured in the liver increased with age in N. kadleci with different profiles: lipofuscin increased linearly, while apoptosis declined in the oldest animals. More lipofuscin (P < 0.001) and apoptosis (P < 0.001) was observed in N. furzeri than in N. kadleci at 16w age. Lipofuscin and apoptotic cells were then quantified in hybrids from the mating of N. furzeri to N. kadleci. F1 individuals showed heterosis for lipofuscin but additive effects for apoptosis. These two age-related phenotypes were not correlated in F2 hybrids. Quantitative trait loci analysis of 287 F2 fish using 237 markers identified two QTL accounting for 10% of lipofuscin variance (P < 0.001) with overdominance effect. Apoptotic cells revealed three significant- and two suggestive QTL explaining 19% of variance (P < 0.001), showing additive and dominance effects, and two interacting loci. Our results show that lipofuscin and apoptosis are markers of different age-dependent biological processes controlled by different genetic mechanisms. PMID:25093339

  4. Development of a contour map showing generalized skew coefficients of annual peak discharges of rural, unregulated streams in New York, excluding Long Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lumia, Richard; Baevsky, Yvonne H.

    2000-01-01

    Flood-frequency relations that are developed by fitting the logarithms of annual peak discharges to a Pearson Type-III distribution are sensitive to skew coefficients. Estimates of population skew for a site are improved when computed from the weighted average of (1) the sample (station) skew, and (2) an unbiased, generalized skew estimate. A weighting technique based on the number of years of record at each of 226 sites was used to develop a contour map of unbiased, generalized skew coefficients for New York. An attempt was made to group (regionalize) the station skew coefficients into five hydrologically similar areas of New York, but the statewide version proved to be as accurate as the regionalized version and therefore was adopted as the final generalized skew-coefficient map for New York. An error analysis showed the statewide contour map to have lower MSE?s (mean square errors) than those computed from (1) the five regional skewcoefficient contour maps, (2) a previously used (1982) nationwide skew coefficient map, and (3) the weighted mean of skew coefficients for sites within each of five hydrologically uniform, but distinct areas of New York.

  5. Mapping Systematic Reviews on Atopic Eczema—An Essential Resource for Dermatology Professionals and Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Futamura, Masaki; Thomas, Kim S.; Grindlay, Douglas J. C.; Doney, Elizabeth J.; Torley, Donna; Williams, Hywel C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Many research studies have been published on atopic eczema and these are often summarised in systematic reviews (SRs). Identifying SRs can be time-consuming for health professionals, and researchers. In order to facilitate the identification of important research, we have compiled an on-line resource that includes all relevant eczema reviews published since 2000. Methods SRs were searched for in MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), PubMed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE and NHS Evidence. Selected SRs were assessed against the pre-defined eligibility criteria and relevant articles were grouped by treatment category for the included interventions. All identified systematic reviews are included in the Global Resource of EczemA Trials (GREAT) database (www.greatdatabase.org.uk) and key clinical messages are summarised here. Results A total of 128 SRs reviews were identified, including three clinical guidelines. Of these, 46 (36%) were found in the Cochrane Library. No single database contained all of the SRs found. The number of SRs published per year has increased substantially over the last thirteen years, and reviews were published in a variety of clinical journals. Of the 128 SRs, 1 (1%) was on mechanism, 37 (29%) were on epidemiology, 40 (31%) were on eczema prevention, 29 (23%) were on topical treatments, 31 (24%) were on systemic treatments, and 24 (19%) were on other treatments. All SRs included searches of MEDLINE in their search methods. One hundred six SRs (83%) searched more than one electronic database. There were no language restrictions reported in the search methods of 52 of the SRs (41%). Conclusions This mapping of atopic eczema reviews is a valuable resource. It will help healthcare practitioners, guideline writers, information specialists, and researchers to quickly identify relevant up-to-date evidence in the field for improving patient care. PMID:23505516

  6. Map showing ground-water levels in the Columbia River Basalt Group and overlying materials, spring 1983, southeastern Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, H.H.; Vaccaro, John J.; Lane, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    A 2 1/2-year study of the Columbia Plateau in Washington was begun in March 1982 to define spatial and temporal variations in dissolved sodium in aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group and to relate these variations to the groundwater system and its geologic framework. This report is part of that study and describes groundwater level contours for four major geohydrologic units in southeastern Washington, constructed from water-level data collected from approximately 1,100 wells during the spring of 1983, data from U.S. Geological Survey studies in the area, and other indirect methods. Configuration of the groundwater level contours is controlled by: (1) extent of a geohydrologic unit and geologic structure, (2) recharge from precipitation and surface water bodies, (3) rivers, lakes, and coulees that drain the groundwater system, and (4) hydraulic conductivities of each unit. Upgradient flexures of water level contours north of Connel, Washington, show effects of prolonged irrigation while downgradient flexures in an area south of Potholes Reservoir, in the vicinity of the East Low Irrigation Canal, show the effects of increased man-induced recharge. (USGS)

  7. Mouse BMD Quantitative Trait Loci Show Improved Concordance With Human Genome-wide Association Loci When Recalculated on a New, Common Mouse Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Karasik, David; Li, Qian; Smith, Randy V; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Churchill, Gary A; Paigen, Beverly J; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern

    2010-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a heritable trait, and in mice, over 100 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been reported, but candidate genes have been identified for only a small percentage. Persistent errors in the mouse genetic map have negatively affected QTL localization, spurring the development of a new, corrected map. In this study, QTLs for BMD were remapped in 11 archival mouse data sets using this new genetic map. Since these QTLs all were mapped in a comparable way, direct comparisons of QTLs for concordance would be valid. We then compared human genome-wide association study (GWAS) BMD loci with the mouse QTLs. We found that 26 of the 28 human GWAS loci examined were located within the confidence interval of a mouse QTL. Furthermore, 14 of the GWAS loci mapped to within 3 cM of a mouse QTL peak. Lastly, we demonstrated that these newly remapped mouse QTLs can substantiate a candidate gene for a human GWAS locus, for which the peak single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) fell in an intergenic region. Specifically, we suggest that MEF2C (human chromosome 5, mouse chromosome 13) should be considered a candidate gene for the genetic regulation of BMD. In conclusion, use of the new mouse genetic map has improved the localization of mouse BMD QTLs, and these remapped QTLs show high concordance with human GWAS loci. We believe that this is an opportune time for a renewed effort by the genetics community to identify the causal variants regulating BMD using a synergistic mouse-human approach. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20200990

  8. Neighborhood-level hot spot maps to inform delivery of primary care and allocation of social resources.

    PubMed

    Hardt, Nancy S; Muhamed, Shehzad; Das, Rajeeb; Estrella, Roland; Roth, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Challenges to health care access in the US are forcing local policymakers and service delivery systems to find novel ways to address the shortage of primary care clinicians. The uninsured and underinsured face the greatest obstacles in accessing services. Geographic information systems mapping software was used to illustrate health disparities in Alachua County, FL; galvanize a community response; and direct reallocation of resources. The University of Florida Family Data Center created "hot spot" density maps of important health and social indicators to highlight the location of disparities at the neighborhood level. Maps were produced for Medicaid births, teen births, low birth weight, domestic violence incidents, child maltreatment reports, unexcused school absences, and juvenile justice referrals. Maps were widely shared with community partners, including local elected officials, law enforcement, educators, child welfare agencies, health care providers, and service organizations. This data sharing resulted in advocacy efforts to bring resources to the greatest-need neighborhoods in the county. Novel public-private partnerships were forged between the local library district, children and family service providers, and university administrators. Two major changes are detailed: a family resource center built in the neighborhood of greatest need and a mobile clinic staffed by physicians, nurses, physician assistants, health educators, and student and faculty volunteers. Density maps have several advantages. They require minimal explanation. Anyone familiar with local geographic features can quickly identify locations displaying health disparities. Personalizing health disparities by locating them geographically allows a community to translate data to action to improve health care access. PMID:23596361

  9. Neighborhood-Level Hot Spot Maps to Inform Delivery of Primary Care and Allocation of Social Resources

    PubMed Central

    Hardt, Nancy S; Muhamed, Shehzad; Das, Rajeeb; Estrella, Roland; Roth, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Challenges to health care access in the US are forcing local policymakers and service delivery systems to find novel ways to address the shortage of primary care clinicians. The uninsured and underinsured face the greatest obstacles in accessing services. Geographic information systems mapping software was used to illustrate health disparities in Alachua County, FL; galvanize a community response; and direct reallocation of resources. The University of Florida Family Data Center created “hot spot” density maps of important health and social indicators to highlight the location of disparities at the neighborhood level. Maps were produced for Medicaid births, teen births, low birth weight, domestic violence incidents, child maltreatment reports, unexcused school absences, and juvenile justice referrals. Maps were widely shared with community partners, including local elected officials, law enforcement, educators, child welfare agencies, health care providers, and service organizations. This data sharing resulted in advocacy efforts to bring resources to the greatest-need neighborhoods in the county. Novel public-private partnerships were forged between the local library district, children and family service providers, and university administrators. Two major changes are detailed: a family resource center built in the neighborhood of greatest need and a mobile clinic staffed by physicians, nurses, physician assistants, health educators, and student and faculty volunteers. Density maps have several advantages. They require minimal explanation. Anyone familiar with local geographic features can quickly identify locations displaying health disparities. Personalizing health disparities by locating them geographically allows a community to translate data to action to improve health care access. PMID:23596361

  10. Global forest cover mapping for the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization forest resources assessment 2000 program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Z.; Waller, E.

    2003-01-01

    Many countries periodically produce national reports on the status and changes of forest resources, using statistical surveys and spatial mapping of remotely sensed data. At the global level, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations has conducted a Forest Resources Assessment (FRA) program every 10 yr since 1980, producing statistics and analysis that give a global synopsis of forest resources in the world. For the year 2000 of the FRA program (FRA2000), a global forest cover map was produced to provide spatial context to the extensive survey. The forest cover map, produced at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) EROS Data Center (EDC), has five classes: closed forest, open or fragmented forest, other wooded land, other land cover, and water. The first two forested classes at the global scale were delineated using combinations of temporal compositing, modified mixture analysis, geographic stratification, and other classification techniques. The remaining three FAO classes were derived primarily from the USGS global land cover characteristics database (Loveland et al. 1999). Validated on the basis of existing reference data sets, the map is estimated to be 77% accurate for the first four classes (no reference data were available for water), and 86% accurate for the forest and nonforest classification. The final map will be published as an insert to the FAO FRA2000 report.

  11. Maps showing distribution of iron, cobalt, barium, strontium, arsenic, antimony, and bismuth in samples of minus-60-mesh (0.25-MM) stream sediment and (or) nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrate, Walker Lake 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaffee, M.A.; Hill, R.H.; Sutley, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    This report is part of a folio of maps of the Walker Lake 1o x 2o quadrangle, California and Nevada, prepared under the Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program. The folio includes geological, geochemical, and geophysical maps, as well as mineral resources assessment maps, which identify selected known or possible mineral-deposit environments in the quadrangle. The geochemical maps show the distributions of selected individual elements (Chaffee and others, 1988 a, b, c) and the distributions of selected groups of elements (Chaffee, 1988a, b, c). Discussions accompanying the individual element maps are restricted to mineral residences of the individual elements as well as to what types of mineral deposits and environments may be represented by anomalies of a particular element. Discussions accompanying the multielemental maps describe the types of mineral deposits that may be related to each element group and indicate the most favorable localities for these deposits. 

  12. Resource Needs and Pedagogical Value of Web Mapping for Spatial Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manson, Steven; Shannon, Jerry; Eria, Sami; Kne, Len; Dyke, Kevin; Nelson, Sara; Batra, Lalit; Bonsal, Dudley; Kernik, Melinda; Immich, Jennifer; Matson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Web mapping involves publishing and using maps via the Internet, and can range from presenting static maps to offering dynamic data querying and spatial analysis. Web mapping is seen as a promising way to support development of spatial thinking in the classroom but there are unanswered questions about how this promise plays out in reality. This…

  13. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the lower Big Chino Valley and Williamson Valley areas, Yavapai and Coconino Counties, Arizona--1975-76

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, B.L.; Laney, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    Arizona is divided into 67 ground-water areas, and individual areas are selected for intensive data collection once every 6 years. The data collected in the lower Big Chino Valley and Williamson Valley areas are given on maps that show depth to water, well depth, and altitude of the water level, 1975-76; pumpage, 1950-74; and specific conductance, fluoride concentration, and irrigated area, 1974. Scale 1:125,000. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  15. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3770, Faizabad (217) and Parkhaw (218) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  16. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3468, Chak-e Wardak-Siyahgird (509) and Kabul (510) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  17. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3262, Farah (421) and Hokumat-e-pur-Chaman (422) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  18. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3466, La`l wa Sar Jangal (507) and Bamyan (508) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  19. Hyperspectral Surface Materials Map of Quadrangle 3566, Sangcharak (501) and Sayghan-o-Kamard (502) Quadrangles, Afghanistan, Showing Carbonates, Phyllosilicates, Sulfates, Altered Minerals, and Other Materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  20. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3568, Pul-e Khumri (503) and Charikar (504) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  1. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3166, Jaldak (701) and Maruf-Nawa (702) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  2. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3268, Khayr Kot (521) and Urgun (522) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  3. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3162, Chakhansur (603) and Kotalak (604) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  4. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3564, Jowand (405) and Gurziwan (406) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  5. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3362, Shindand (415) and Tulak (416) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  6. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3368, Ghazni (515) and Gardez (516) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  7. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3464, Shahrak (411) and Kasi (412) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  8. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3266, Uruzgan (519) and Moqur (520) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  9. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3570, Tagab-e-Munjan (505) and Asmar-Kamdesh (506) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  10. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3264, Naw Zad-Musa Qala (423) and Dihrawud (424) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  11. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3164, Lashkar Gah (605) and Kandahar (606) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  12. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3562, Khawja-Jir (403) and Murghab (404) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  13. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3462, Herat (409) and Chishti Sharif (410) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  14. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3670, Jurm-Kishim (223) and Zebak (224) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  15. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3364, Pasaband (417) and Markaz-e Kajiran (418) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  16. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3366, Gizab (513) and Nawer (514) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  17. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3364, Pasaband (417) and Markaz-e Kajiran (418) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  18. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3266, Uruzgan (519) and Moqur (520) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  19. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3770, Faizabad (217) and Parkhaw (218) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  20. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3362, Shindand (415) and Tulak (416) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  1. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3562, Khawja-Jir (403) and Murghab (404) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  2. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3568, Pul-e Khumri (503) and Charikar (504) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  3. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3366, Gizab (513) and Nawer (514) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  4. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3564, Jowand (405) and Gurziwan (406) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  5. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3570, Tagab-e-Munjan (505) and Asmar-Kamdesh (506) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  6. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3264, Naw Zad-Musa Qala (423) and Dihrawud (424) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  7. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3368, Ghazni (515) and Gardez (516) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  8. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3162, Chakhansur (603) and Kotalak (604) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  9. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3566, Sangcharak (501) and Sayghan-o-Kamard (502) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  10. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3260, Dasht-e-Chah-e-Mazar (419) and Anar Darah (420) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  11. Hyperspectral Surface Materials Map of Quadrangle 3268, Khayr Kot (521) and Urgun (522) Quadrangles, Afghanistan, Showing Iron-bearing Minerals and Other Materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  12. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3262, Farah (421) and Hokumat-e-pur-Chaman (422) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  13. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3166, Jaldak (701) and Maruf-Nawa (702) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  14. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3164, Lashkar Gah (605) and Kandahar (606) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  15. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3462, Herat (409) and Chishti Sharif (410) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  16. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3464, Shahrak (411) and Kasi (412) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  17. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3466, La`l wa Sar Jangal (507) and Bamyan (508) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  18. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3468, Chak-e Wardak-Siyahgird (509) and Kabul (510) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  19. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3670, Jurm-Kishim (223) and Zebak (224) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  20. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3470, Jalalabad (511) and Chaghasaray (512) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  1. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3470, Jalalabad (511) and Chaghasaray (512) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  2. Maps Showing Inundation Depths, Ice-Rafted Erratics, and Sedimentary Facies of Late Pleistocene Missoula Floods in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minervini, J.M.; O'Connor, J. E.; Wells, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    Glacial Lake Missoula, impounded by the Purcell Trench lobe of the late Pleistocene Cordilleran Icesheet, repeatedly breached its ice dam, sending floods as large as 2,500 cubic kilometers racing across the Channeled Scabland and down the Columbia River valley to the Pacific Ocean. Peak discharges for some floods exceeded 20 million cubic meters per second. At valley constrictions along the flood route, floodwaters temporarily ponded behind each narrow zone. One such constriction at Kalama Gap-northwest of Portland-backed water 120-150 meters high in the Portland basin, and backflooded 200 km south into Willamette Valley. Dozens of floods backed up into the Willamette Valley, eroding 'scabland' channels, and depositing giant boulder gravel bars in areas of vigorous currents as well as bedded flood sand and silt in backwater areas. Also, large chunks of ice entrained from the breached glacier dam rafted hundreds of 'erratic' rocks, leaving them scattered among the flanking foothills and valley bottom. From several sources and our own mapping, we have compiled information on many of these features and depict them on physiographic maps derived from digital elevation models of the Portland Basin and Willamette Valley. These maps show maximum flood inundation levels, inundation levels associated with stratigraphic evidence of repeated floodings, distribution of flood deposits, and sites of ice-rafted erratics. Accompanying these maps, a database lists locations, elevations, and descriptions of approximately 400 ice-rafted erratics-most compiled from early 20th-century maps and notes of A.M. Piper and I.S. Allison.

  3. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, P.

    2012-12-12

    This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the theoretical resource, as well as estimates, termed the technically recoverable resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The technically recoverable resource does not account for all technical constraints on energy capture and conversion.

  4. Thematic mapping, land use, geological structure and water resources in central Spain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delascuevas, N. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The images can be positioned in an absolute reference system (geographical coordinates or polar stereographic coordinates) by means of their marginal indicators. By digital analysis of LANDSAT data and geometric positioning of pixels in UTM projection, accuracy was achieved for corrected MSS information which could be used for updating maps at scale 1:200,000 or smaller. Results show that adjustment of the UTM grid was better obtained by a first order, or even second order, algorithm of geometric correction. Digital analysis of LANDSAT data from the Madrid area showed that this line of study was promising for automatic classification of data applied to thematic cartography and soils identification.

  5. Development of a SNP resource and a genetic linkage map for Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is a species with increasing economic significance for the aquaculture industry. The genetic improvement of cod will play a critical role in achieving successful large-scale aquaculture. While many microsatellite markers have been developed in cod, the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is currently limited. Here we report the identification of SNPs from sequence data generated by a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) program, focusing on fish originating from Canadian waters. Results A total of 97976 ESTs were assembled to generate 13448 contigs. We detected 4753 SNPs that met our selection criteria (depth of coverage ≥ 4 reads; minor allele frequency > 25%). 3072 SNPs were selected for testing. The percentage of successful assays was 75%, with 2291 SNPs amplifying correctly. Of these, 607 (26%) SNPs were monomorphic for all populations tested. In total, 64 (4%) of SNPs are likely to represent duplicated genes or highly similar members of gene families, rather than alternative alleles of the same gene, since they showed a high frequency of heterozygosity. The remaining polymorphic SNPs (1620) were categorised as validated SNPs. The mean minor allele frequency of the validated loci was 0.258 (± 0.141). Of the 1514 contigs from which validated SNPs were selected, 31% have a significant blast hit. For the SNPs predicted to occur in coding regions (141), we determined that 36% (51) are non-synonymous. Many loci (1033 SNPs; 64%) are polymorphic in all populations tested. However a small number of SNPs (184) that are polymorphic in the Western Atlantic were monomorphic in fish tested from three European populations. A preliminary linkage map has been constructed with 23 major linkage groups and 924 mapped SNPs. Conclusions These SNPs represent powerful tools to accelerate the genetic improvement of cod aquaculture. They have been used to build a genetic linkage map that can be applied to quantitative trait

  6. Global mapping of Al, Cu, Fe, and Zn in-use stocks and in-ground resources

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Jason N.

    2009-01-01

    Human activity has become a significant geomorphic force in modern times, resulting in unprecedented movements of material around Earth. An essential constituent of this material movement, the major industrial metals aluminium, copper, iron, and zinc in the human-built environment are mapped globally at 1-km nominal resolution for the year 2000 and compared with the locations of present-day in-ground resources. While the maps of in-ground resources generated essentially combine available databases, the mapping methodology of in-use stocks relies on the linear regression between gross domestic product and both in-use stock estimates and the Nighttime Lights of the World dataset. As the first global maps of in-use metal stocks, they reveal that a full 25% of the world's Fe, Al, Cu, and Zn in-use deposits are concentrated in three bands: (i) the Eastern seaboard from Washington, D.C. to Boston in the United States, (ii) England, Benelux into Germany and Northern Italy, and (iii) South Korea and Japan. This pattern is consistent across all metals investigated. In contrast, the global maps of primary metal resources reveal these deposits are more evenly distributed between the developed and developing worlds, with the distribution pattern differing depending on the metal. This analysis highlights the magnitude at which in-ground metal resources have been translocated to in-use stocks, largely from highly concentrated but globally dispersed in-ground deposits to more diffuse in-use stocks located primarily in developed urban regions. PMID:19858486

  7. The Irish Seabed Mapping Programme: INFOMAR - Integrated Mapping Survey for the Sustainable Developments of Ireland's Marine Resources. Progress to Date.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, F.; Benetti, S.; Fitzpatrick, F.

    2006-12-01

    During the last six years, the Geological Survey of Ireland and the Marine Institute of Ireland worked together on the multimillion Irish National Seabed Survey project with the purpose of mapping the Irish marine territory using a suite of remote sensing equipment, from multibeam to seismic, achieving 87% coverage of the marine zone. Ireland was the first country in the world to carry out an extensive mapping project of their extended Exclusive Economic Zone. The Irish National Seabed Survey is now succeeded by the multiyear INFOMAR Programme. INFOMAR will concentrate initially on mapping twenty-six selected priority bays, three sea areas and the fisheries-protection "Biologically Sensitive Area", and then will complete 100% mapping of the remainder of the EEZ. Designed to incorporate all elements of an integrated mapping programme, the key data acquisition will include hydrography, oceanographic, geological and heritage data. These data sets discharge Ireland's obligations under international treaties to which she is signatory and the uses of these data are vast and multipurpose: from management plans for inshore fishing, aquaculture, coastal protection and engineering works, to environmental impact assessments related to licensing activity and support to the evolving needs of integrated coastal zone management. INFOMAR also includes a data management, exchange and integration programme for the establishment of a National Marine Data Discovery and Exchange Service; providing improved dissemination of information to researchers, policy makers, the public and private sector and the adoption of standard operating procedures in data management to facilitate inter-agency data integration. During the first year of activity, INFOMAR carried out an integrated survey from the national research vessel, the RV Celtic Explorer, acquiring hydrographic, geophysical and groundtruthing data from Bantry and Dunmanus Bays, located off the South West coast of Ireland. Airborne Li

  8. Individual voxel-based analysis of brain magnetization transfer maps shows great variability of gray matter injury in the first stage of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jure, Lorena; Zaaraoui, Wafaa; Rousseau, Celia; Reuter, Françoise; Rico, Audrey; Malikova, Irina; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Cozzone, Patrick J; Pelletier, Jean; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Audoin, Bertrand

    2010-08-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), it seems likely that the variability of the long-term disability might be partly due to the variability of the early gray matter (GM) injury. In the present study, we assessed the variability of GM injury in early MS, using a method designed to determine individual pathological GM patterns. Eighteen patients presenting with a clinically isolated syndrome and 24 healthy matched control subjects were included in this study. Patients were explored using a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner (Magnetom Vision Plus; Siemens). Brain MR protocol included magnetization transfer ratio imaging (MTR). Statistical mapping analyses were performed to compare each subject's GM MTR maps with those of the whole group of control subjects (SPM5). The statistical threshold was taken to be the maximum P value showing no significant cluster when any control individual was compared with the whole control population. GM abnormalities were observed in 83% of the patients, ranging in size from 0.3 to 125 cm(3). Among the patients with GM abnormalities, 87% had abnormalities located in the temporal cortex, 80% in the frontal cortex, 80% in the limbic cortex, 73% in the posterior fossa, 53% in the deep GM, 47% in the parietal cortex, and 47% in the occipital cortex. Individual statistical mapping of MTR data, which gives a quantitative assessment of individual GM lesions, demonstrates great variability of grey matter injury in the first stage of multiple sclerosis. PMID:20677272

  9. Mapping Water Resources, Allocation and Consumption in the Mills River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodes, J.; Jeuland, M. A.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Mountain basins and the headwaters of river basins along the foothills of major mountain ranges are undergoing rapid environmental change due to urban development, land acquisition by investors, population increase, and climate change. Classical water infrastructure in these regions is primarily designed to meet human water demand associated with agriculture, tourism, and economic development. Often overlooked and ignored is the fundamental interdependence of human water demand, ecosystem water demand, water rights and allocation, and water supply. A truly sustainable system for water resources takes into account ecosystem demand along with human infrastructure and economic demand, as well as the feedbacks that exist between them. Allocation policies need to take into account basin resilience that is the amount of stress the system can handle under varying future scenarios. Changes in stress on the system can be anthropogenic in the form of population increase, land use change, economic development, or may be natural in the form of climate change and decrease in water supply due to changes in precipitation. Mapping the water rights, supply, and demands within the basin can help determine the resiliency and sustainability of the basin. Here, we present a coupled natural human system project based in the French Broad River Basin, in the Southern Appalachians. In the first phase of the project, we are developing and implementing a coupled hydro-economics modeling framework in the Mills River Basin (MRB), a tributary of the French Broad. The Mills River Basin was selected as the core basin for implementing a sustainable system of water allocation that is adaptive and reflects the interdependence of water dependent sectors. The headwaters of the Mills River are in the foothills of the Appalachians, and are currently under substantial land use land cover (LULC) change pressure for agricultural purposes. In this regard, the MRB is representative of similar headwater

  10. A high-resolution map of the Nile tilapia genome: a resource for studying cichlids and other percomorphs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) is the second most farmed fish species worldwide. It is also an important model for studies of fish physiology, particularly because of its broad tolerance to an array of environments. It is a good model to study evolutionary mechanisms in vertebrates, because of its close relationship to haplochromine cichlids, which have undergone rapid speciation in East Africa. The existing genomic resources for Nile tilapia include a genetic map, BAC end sequences and ESTs, but comparative genome analysis and maps of quantitative trait loci (QTL) are still limited. Results We have constructed a high-resolution radiation hybrid (RH) panel for the Nile tilapia and genotyped 1358 markers consisting of 850 genes, 82 markers corresponding to BAC end sequences, 154 microsatellites and 272 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). From these, 1296 markers could be associated in 81 RH groups, while 62 were not linked. The total size of the RH map is 34,084 cR3500 and 937,310 kb. It covers 88% of the entire genome with an estimated inter-marker distance of 742 Kb. Mapping of microsatellites enabled integration to the genetic map. We have merged LG8 and LG24 into a single linkage group, and confirmed that LG16-LG21 are also merged. The orientation and association of RH groups to each chromosome and LG was confirmed by chromosomal in situ hybridizations (FISH) of 55 BACs. Fifty RH groups were localized on the 22 chromosomes while 31 remained small orphan groups. Synteny relationships were determined between Nile tilapia, stickleback, medaka and pufferfish. Conclusion The RH map and associated FISH map provide a valuable gene-ordered resource for gene mapping and QTL studies. All genetic linkage groups with their corresponding RH groups now have a corresponding chromosome which can be identified in the karyotype. Placement of conserved segments indicated that multiple inter-chromosomal rearrangements have occurred between Nile tilapia

  11. Detailed Regional Resource Mapping in Nevada Using Natural and Mining Seismic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibuleac, I. M.; Biasi, G.; Jha, S.; Preston, L.; Louie, J.

    2008-12-01

    Our objective is to contribute to geothermal resource assessment in Nevada and the Great Basin by providing uniform, high-resolution, regional maps of seismic velocity in the crust and shallow mantle. We analyze earthquakes and mining explosions of local magnitude greater than 2.5 recorded from 2005 to 2008 by the Earthscope Transportable Array (TA) seismic network, by the Nevada Seismic Network, and by the Southern Great Basin Digital Seismic Network. We use two complementary tomographic methods: 1) P- and S-body-wave arrival times image the mid- to- deep crust and shallow mantle with a block size of 10 km or smaller; 2) surface waves image the shallow to deep crust, with depth sensitivity depending on wave frequency. To identify surface waves, we use improved Rayleigh-wave detection algorithms based on wavelet transforms. Surface-wave detector improvements include solving for Love-Rayleigh interference and the capability to identify and analyze higher-mode Rayleigh waves. Once a Rayleigh phase is identified, group-velocity dispersion curves are determined using a multiple-filter analysis technique. With the advent of the TA station deployment, group-velocity dispersion for the path between two stations in line with the source may be estimated from the dispersion between the two stations. This technique eliminates the need to correct for earthquake source phase. The results of our study will be integrated with previous seismic data compilations and interpreted in terms of parameters of interest to the geothermal community, such as crustal thickness and seismic velocities.

  12. Identification of mineral resources in Afghanistan-Detecting and mapping resource anomalies in prioritized areas using geophysical and remote sensing (ASTER and HyMap) data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : King, Trude V. V., (Edited By); Johnson, Michaela R.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Drenth, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    During the independent analysis of the geophysical, ASTER, and imaging spectrometer (HyMap) data by USGS scientists, previously unrecognized targets of potential mineralization were identified using evaluation criteria most suitable to the individual dataset. These anomalous zones offer targets of opportunity that warrant additional field verification. This report describes the standards used to define the anomalies, summarizes the results of the evaluations for each type of data, and discusses the importance and implications of regions of anomaly overlap between two or three of the datasets.

  13. Microsatellite primers resource developed from the mapped sequence scaffolds of Nisqually-1 genome. Submitted to New Phytologist

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Tongming; ZHANG, Dr. XINYE; Gunter, Lee E; Li, Shuxian; Wullschleger, Stan D; Huang, Prof. Minren; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2009-01-01

    In this study, 148 428 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs were designed from the unambiguously mapped sequence scaffolds of the Nisqually-1 genome. The physical position of the priming sites were identified along each of the 19 Populus chromosomes, and it was specified whether the priming sequences belong to intronic, intergenic, exonic or UTR regions. A subset of 150 SSR loci were amplified and a high amplification success rate (72%) was obtained in P. tremuloides, which belongs to a divergent subgenus of Populus relative to Nisqually-1. PCR reactions showed that the amplification success rate of exonic primer pairs was much higher than that of the intronic/intergenic primer pairs. Applying ANOVA and regression analyses to the flanking sequences of microsatellites, the repeat lengths, the GC contents of the repeats, the repeat motif numbers, the repeat motif length and the base composition of the repeat motif, it was determined that only the base composition of the repeat motif and the repeat motif length significantly affect the microsatellite variability in P. tremuloides samples. The SSR primer resource developed in this study provides a database for selecting highly transferable SSR markers with known physical position in the Populus genome and provides a comprehensive genetic tool to extend the genome sequence of Nisqually-1 to genetic studies in different Populus species.

  14. Rural food insecurity and poverty mappings and their linkage with water resources in the Limpopo River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magombeyi, M. S.; Taigbenu, A. E.; Barron, J.

    2016-04-01

    The mappings of poverty and food insecurity were carried out for the rural districts of the four riparian countries (Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe) of the Limpopo river basin using the results of national surveys that were conducted between 2003 and 2013. The analysis shows lower range of food insecure persons (0-40%) than poverty stricken persons (0-95%) that is attributable to enhanced government and non-government food safety networks in the basin countries, the dynamic and transitory nature of food insecurity which depends on the timings of the surveys in relation to harvests, markets and food prices, and the limited dimension of food insecurity in relation to poverty which tends to be a more structural and pervasive socio-economic condition. The usefulness of this study in influencing policies and strategies targeted at alleviating poverty and improving rural livelihoods lies with using food insecurity mappings to address short-term socio-economic conditions and poverty mappings to address more structural and long-term deprivations. Using the poverty line of 1.25/day per person (2008-2013) in the basin, Zimbabwe had the highest percentage of 68.7% of its rural population classified as poor, followed by Mozambique with 68.2%, South Africa with 56.1% and Botswana with 20%. While average poverty reduction of 6.4% was observed between 2003 and 2009 in Botswana, its population growth of 20.1% indicated no real poverty reduction. Similar observations are made about Mozambique and Zimbabwe where population growth outstripped poverty reductions. In contrast, both average poverty levels and population increased by 4.3% and 11%, respectively, in South Africa from 2007 to 2010. While areas of high food insecurity and poverty consistently coincide with low water availability, it does not indicate a simple cause-effect relationship between water, poverty and food insecurity. With limited water resources, rural folks in the basin require stronger

  15. The Alaskan mineral resource assessment program; background information to accompany folio of geologic and mineral resource maps of the Nabesna Quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, Donald H.; Albert, N.R.D.; Barnes, D.F.; Griscom, Andrew; Marsh, S.P.; Singer, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    The Nabesna quadrangle in south-central Alaska is the first of the l:250,000-scale Alaskan quadrangles to be investigated by an interdisciplinary research team in order to furnish a mineral resource assessment of the State. The assessment of the 17,600-km 2 16,800-mi21 quadrangle is based on field and laboratory investigations of the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and satellite imagery. The results of the investigations are published as a folio of maps, diagrams, and accompanying discussions. This report provides background information on the investigations and integrates the published components of the resource assessment. A comprehensive bibliography cites both specific and general references to the geology and mineral deposits of the Nabesna quadrangle.

  16. Evaluation of ERTS-1 imagery in mapping and managing soil and range resources in the Sand Hills region of Nebraska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drew, J. V. (Principal Investigator); Seevers, P. M.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Interpretations of imagery from the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1) indicate that soil associations and attendant range sites can be identified on the basis of vegetation and topography using multitemporal imagery. Optical density measurements of imagery from the visible red band of the multispectral scanner(MSS band 5) obtained during the growing season were related to field measurements of vegetative biomass, a factor that closely parallels range condition class on specific range sites. ERTS-1 imagery also permitted inventory and assessment of center-pivot irrigation systems in the Sand Hills region in relation to soil and topographic conditions and energy requirements. Four resource maps of the Upper Loup Natural Resource District located entirely within the Sand Hills region were prepared from ERTS-1 imagery.

  17. U.S. Geological Survey 2002 petroleum resource assessment of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA): play maps and technically recoverable resource estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, Kenneth J.; Houseknecht, David W.

    2002-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the estimated volume of technically recoverable undiscovered oil and nonassociated gas resources for each of the 24 plays evaluated in the U.S. Geological Survey 2002 petroleum resource assessment of the NPRA (Bird and Houseknecht, 2002). It also provides a set of illustrations showing the stratigraphic and geographic location of each play. Additional details of this assessment will follow in later publications.

  18. Development of Solar Resources Map using Satellites and Numerical Prediction Data on Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, J.-B.; Jeon, S.-H.; Choi, Y.-J.; Lee, K.-T.

    2012-04-01

    results are verified and validated with ground observations from 22 KMA solar sites. Correlation coefficient is 0.95 and RMSE (Root Mean Square Error) is 67.53 W/m2. Then these hourly results are accumulated by month and year. Finally, the solar resources map is represented with mean accumulated solar radiation with and without topographic effect through 11 years. Regions with the strongest solar radiation are distributed across Andong, Daegu and Jinju which are low latitude and cloudless regions in Korea. Jeju island is located on the lowest latitude in Korean peninsula, but it is low solar energy region because it is abundant in water vapour and clouds.

  19. Maps showing altitude of the potentiometric surface and changes in water level of the Sparta sand and Memphis sand aquifers in Eastern Arkansas, spring 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edds, Joe; Fitzpatrick, Daniel J.

    1984-01-01

    The Sparta Sand and the Memphis Sand aquifers are a major source of industrial and public water supply and a minor but locally significant source of water for agricultural purposes in eastern and south-central Arkansas. The potentiometric surface map for this aquifer, compiled from water-level measurements made during the spring of 1983, indicates a generally southward potentiometric gradient. The potentiometric surface also illustrates the existence of three major cones of depression; one centered in Columbia County, one in Union County, and one in Jefferson County. Within the cones of depression, the majority of water withdrawn is utilized for industrial and public supply. The water-level change map for the Sparta Sand and the Memphis aquifer for the period between the springs of 1982 and 1983 shows overall a rise in water levels across the study area, including the cones of depression in Jefferson and Union Counties; however, water levels within the cone depression in Columbia County generally declined. (USGS)

  20. The application of minisatellite variant repeat mapping by PCR (MVR-PCR) in a paternity case showing false exclusion due to STR mutation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Tamaki, K; Huang, X L; Yoshimoto, T; Mizutani, M; Uchihi, R; Katsumata, Y; Jeffreys, A J

    2001-03-01

    A boy and a girl with their mother brought a paternity suit against an alleged but deceased father. We tested six conventional genetic markers, the AmpliType PM+ DQA1 and twelve STR loci the children and mother together with the alleged paternal grandparents. We also DNA typed the bloodstain found later in the alleged father's medical record. Only the result at D3S1358 in a nineplex STR system excluded the alleged father from parentage of the boy, whereas all markers were inclusive for the girl. Accordingly, we performed sequence analysis at D3S1358 to confirm the presence of a paternal exclusion or mutation. The sequence analysis indicated that the boy's allele 17 could have originated from either of the alleged father's allele 16 or 18 by a single-step mutation associated with slippage mutation in STR loci. We carried out minisatellite variant repeat mapping by PCR (MVR-PCR) at loci D1S8 (MS32) and D7S21 (MS31A) and mapped allele haplotypes of all individuals except the deceased alleged father. The MVR-PCR analysis showed that the boy has no inconsistency with the relationship between the alleged grandparents, and was very effective at increasing the paternity index (PI) value. We conclude that there is biological relationship between not only the girl but also the boy and the alleged father. PMID:11305445

  1. NATIONAL CARTOGRAPHIC INFORMATION CENTER: AN INFORMATION RESOURCE ON MAPPING PRODUCTS FOR THE NATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Alan R.

    1985-01-01

    Since its inception in 1974 the National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC), US Geological Survey, has rapidly developed to become a focal point for providing information on the availability of cartographic data, including maps/charts, aerial photographs, satellite imagery, geodetic control, digital mapping data, map materials and related cartographic products. In early years NCIC concentrated its efforts on encoding and entering several major National Mapping Division record collections into its systems. NCIC is now stressing the acquisition of data from sources outside the National Mapping Division, including 37 Federal agencies and more than a thousand State and private institutions. A critical review has recently been conducted by NCIC of its systems with the aim of improving its efficiency and levels of operation. Several activities which resulted include improving its existing networks, refinement of digital data distribution, study of new storage media and related projects.

  2. Atlas of Cancer Signalling Network: a systems biology resource for integrative analysis of cancer data with Google Maps

    PubMed Central

    Kuperstein, I; Bonnet, E; Nguyen, H-A; Cohen, D; Viara, E; Grieco, L; Fourquet, S; Calzone, L; Russo, C; Kondratova, M; Dutreix, M; Barillot, E; Zinovyev, A

    2015-01-01

    Cancerogenesis is driven by mutations leading to aberrant functioning of a complex network of molecular interactions and simultaneously affecting multiple cellular functions. Therefore, the successful application of bioinformatics and systems biology methods for analysis of high-throughput data in cancer research heavily depends on availability of global and detailed reconstructions of signalling networks amenable for computational analysis. We present here the Atlas of Cancer Signalling Network (ACSN), an interactive and comprehensive map of molecular mechanisms implicated in cancer. The resource includes tools for map navigation, visualization and analysis of molecular data in the context of signalling network maps. Constructing and updating ACSN involves careful manual curation of molecular biology literature and participation of experts in the corresponding fields. The cancer-oriented content of ACSN is completely original and covers major mechanisms involved in cancer progression, including DNA repair, cell survival, apoptosis, cell cycle, EMT and cell motility. Cell signalling mechanisms are depicted in detail, together creating a seamless ‘geographic-like' map of molecular interactions frequently deregulated in cancer. The map is browsable using NaviCell web interface using the Google Maps engine and semantic zooming principle. The associated web-blog provides a forum for commenting and curating the ACSN content. ACSN allows uploading heterogeneous omics data from users on top of the maps for visualization and performing functional analyses. We suggest several scenarios for ACSN application in cancer research, particularly for visualizing high-throughput data, starting from small interfering RNA-based screening results or mutation frequencies to innovative ways of exploring transcriptomes and phosphoproteomes. Integration and analysis of these data in the context of ACSN may help interpret their biological significance and formulate mechanistic hypotheses

  3. Atlas of Cancer Signalling Network: a systems biology resource for integrative analysis of cancer data with Google Maps.

    PubMed

    Kuperstein, I; Bonnet, E; Nguyen, H-A; Cohen, D; Viara, E; Grieco, L; Fourquet, S; Calzone, L; Russo, C; Kondratova, M; Dutreix, M; Barillot, E; Zinovyev, A

    2015-01-01

    Cancerogenesis is driven by mutations leading to aberrant functioning of a complex network of molecular interactions and simultaneously affecting multiple cellular functions. Therefore, the successful application of bioinformatics and systems biology methods for analysis of high-throughput data in cancer research heavily depends on availability of global and detailed reconstructions of signalling networks amenable for computational analysis. We present here the Atlas of Cancer Signalling Network (ACSN), an interactive and comprehensive map of molecular mechanisms implicated in cancer. The resource includes tools for map navigation, visualization and analysis of molecular data in the context of signalling network maps. Constructing and updating ACSN involves careful manual curation of molecular biology literature and participation of experts in the corresponding fields. The cancer-oriented content of ACSN is completely original and covers major mechanisms involved in cancer progression, including DNA repair, cell survival, apoptosis, cell cycle, EMT and cell motility. Cell signalling mechanisms are depicted in detail, together creating a seamless 'geographic-like' map of molecular interactions frequently deregulated in cancer. The map is browsable using NaviCell web interface using the Google Maps engine and semantic zooming principle. The associated web-blog provides a forum for commenting and curating the ACSN content. ACSN allows uploading heterogeneous omics data from users on top of the maps for visualization and performing functional analyses. We suggest several scenarios for ACSN application in cancer research, particularly for visualizing high-throughput data, starting from small interfering RNA-based screening results or mutation frequencies to innovative ways of exploring transcriptomes and phosphoproteomes. Integration and analysis of these data in the context of ACSN may help interpret their biological significance and formulate mechanistic hypotheses

  4. Geochemical, aeromagnetic, and generalized geologic maps showing distribution and abundance of molybdenum and zinc, Golconda and Iron Point quadrangles, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, R.L.; Marsh, S.P.

    1972-01-01

    This series of maps shows the distribution and abundance of mercury, arsenic, antimony, tungsten, gold, copper, lead, and silver related to a geologic and aeromagnetic base in the Golconda and Iron Point 7½-minute quadrangles. All samples are rock samples; most are from shear or fault zones, fractures, jasperoid, breccia reefs, and altered rocks. All the samples were prepared and analyzed in truck-mounted laboratories at Winnemucca, Nevada. Arsenic, tungsten, copper, lead, and silver were determined by semiquantitative spectrographic methods by D.F. Siems and E.F. Cooley. Mercury and gold were determined by atomic absorption methods and antimony was determined by wet chemical methods by R.M. O'Leary, M.S. Erickson, and others.

  5. Alteration Map Showing Major Faults and Veins and Associated Water-Quality Signatures of the Animas River Watershed Headwaters Near Silverton, Southwest Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bove, Dana J.; Yager, Douglas B.; Mast, M. Alisa; Dalton, J. Brad

    2007-01-01

    This map was produced to provide hard-copy and digital data for alteration assemblages in the historical mining area centered on the Tertiary San Juan and Silverton calderas. The data have direct application to geoenvironmental and mineral exploration objectives. This dataset represents alteration mapping for the upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colorado. The map is based on detailed 1:12,000-scale field mapping, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, mineral mapping by remote sensing (AVIRIS) data, and 1:24,000-scale aerial photographic interpretation. Geologic structures were compiled and generalized from multiple published and unpublished sources (Burbank and Luedke, 1964; Steven and others, 1974; Luedke and Burbank 1975a, b; Lipman, 1976; Luedke and Burbank, 1987; Luedke, 1996) (see Index Map). Unpublished mapping of the Ironton quadrangle by D.J. Bove and J.P. Kurtz in 1997-1999 was included.

  6. 30 CFR 783.24 - Maps: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maps: General requirements. 783.24 Section 783.24 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... RESOURCES § 783.24 Maps: General requirements. The permit application shall include maps showing: (a)...

  7. Map showing geologic terranes of the Hailey 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangle and the western part of the Idaho Falls 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangle, south-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worl, R.G.; Johnson, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper version of Map Showing Geologic Terranes of the Hailey 1x2 Quadrangle and the western part of the Idaho Falls 1x2 Quadrangle, south-central Idaho was compiled by Ron Worl and Kate Johnson in 1995. The plate was compiled on a 1:250,000 scale topographic base map. TechniGraphic System, Inc. of Fort Collins Colorado digitized this map under contract for N.Shock. G.Green edited and prepared the digital version for publication as a geographic information system database. The digital geologic map database can be queried in many ways to produce a variety of geologic maps.

  8. The Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program; background information to accompany geologic and mineral-resource maps of the Cordova and Middleton Island quadrangles, southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winkler, Gary R.; Plafker, George; Goldfarb, R.J.; Case, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    report summarizes recent results of integrated geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in the Cordova and Middleton Island 1?x3 ? quadrangles of coastal southern Alaska. Published open-file reports and maps accompanied by descriptive and interpretative texts, tables, diagrams, and pertinent references provide background information for a mineral-resource assessment of the two quadrangles. Mines in the Cordova and Middleton Island quadrangles produced copper and byproduct gold and silver in the first three decades of the 20th century. The quadrangles may contain potentially significant undiscovered resources of precious and base metals (gold, silver, copper, zinc, and lead) in veins and massive sulfide deposits hosted by Cretaceous and Paleogene sedimentary and volcanic rocks. Resources of manganese also may be present in the Paleogene rocks; uranium resources may be present in Eocene granitic rocks; and placer gold may be present in beach sands near the mouth of the Copper River, in alluvial sands within the canyons of the Copper River, and in smaller alluvial deposits underlain by rocks of the Valdez Group. Significant coal resources are present in the Bering River area, but difficult access and structural complexities have discouraged development. Investigation of numerous oil and gas seeps near Katalla in the eastern part of the area led to the discovery of a small, shallow field from which oil was produced between 1902 and 1933. The field has been inactive since, and subsequent exploration and drilling onshore near Katalla in the 1960's and offshore near Middleton Island on the outer continental shelf in the 1970's and 1980's was not successful.

  9. Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B)-deficient neurons show structural presynaptic deficiencies in vitro and altered presynaptic physiology.

    PubMed

    Bodaleo, Felipe J; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Henríquez, Daniel R; Court, Felipe A; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) is expressed predominantly during the early stages of development of the nervous system, where it regulates processes such as axonal guidance and elongation. Nevertheless, MAP1B expression in the brain persists in adult stages, where it participates in the regulation of the structure and physiology of dendritic spines in glutamatergic synapses. Moreover, MAP1B expression is also found in presynaptic synaptosomal preparations. In this work, we describe a presynaptic phenotype in mature neurons derived from MAP1B knockout (MAP1B KO) mice. Mature neurons express MAP1B, and its deficiency does not alter the expression levels of a subgroup of other synaptic proteins. MAP1B KO neurons display a decrease in the density of presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals, which involves a reduction in the density of synaptic contacts, and an increased proportion of orphan presynaptic terminals. Accordingly, MAP1B KO neurons present altered synaptic vesicle fusion events, as shown by FM4-64 release assay, and a decrease in the density of both synaptic vesicles and dense core vesicles at presynaptic terminals. Finally, an increased proportion of excitatory immature symmetrical synaptic contacts in MAP1B KO neurons was detected. Altogether these results suggest a novel role for MAP1B in presynaptic structure and physiology regulation in vitro. PMID:27425640

  10. Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B)-deficient neurons show structural presynaptic deficiencies in vitro and altered presynaptic physiology

    PubMed Central

    Bodaleo, Felipe J.; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Henríquez, Daniel R.; Court, Felipe A.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) is expressed predominantly during the early stages of development of the nervous system, where it regulates processes such as axonal guidance and elongation. Nevertheless, MAP1B expression in the brain persists in adult stages, where it participates in the regulation of the structure and physiology of dendritic spines in glutamatergic synapses. Moreover, MAP1B expression is also found in presynaptic synaptosomal preparations. In this work, we describe a presynaptic phenotype in mature neurons derived from MAP1B knockout (MAP1B KO) mice. Mature neurons express MAP1B, and its deficiency does not alter the expression levels of a subgroup of other synaptic proteins. MAP1B KO neurons display a decrease in the density of presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals, which involves a reduction in the density of synaptic contacts, and an increased proportion of orphan presynaptic terminals. Accordingly, MAP1B KO neurons present altered synaptic vesicle fusion events, as shown by FM4-64 release assay, and a decrease in the density of both synaptic vesicles and dense core vesicles at presynaptic terminals. Finally, an increased proportion of excitatory immature symmetrical synaptic contacts in MAP1B KO neurons was detected. Altogether these results suggest a novel role for MAP1B in presynaptic structure and physiology regulation in vitro. PMID:27425640

  11. Application of Association Mapping to Understanding the Genetic Diversity of Plant Germplasm Resources

    PubMed Central

    Abdurakhmonov, Ibrokhim Y.; Abdukarimov, Abdusattor

    2008-01-01

    Compared to the conventional linkage mapping, linkage disequilibrium (LD)-mapping, using the nonrandom associations of loci in haplotypes, is a powerful high-resolution mapping tool for complex quantitative traits. The recent advances in the development of unbiased association mapping approaches for plant population with their successful applications in dissecting a number of simple to complex traits in many crop species demonstrate a flourish of the approach as a “powerful gene tagging” tool for crops in the plant genomics era of 21st century. The goal of this review is to provide nonexpert readers of crop breeding community with (1) the basic concept, merits, and simple description of existing methodologies for an association mapping with the recent improvements for plant populations, and (2) the details of some of pioneer and recent studies on association mapping in various crop species to demonstrate the feasibility, success, problems, and future perspectives of the efforts in plants. This should be helpful for interested readers of international plant research community as a guideline for the basic understanding, choosing the appropriate methods, and its application. PMID:18551188

  12. Mineral resource potential map of the James River Face Wilderness, Bedford and Rockbridge counties, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C. Erwin; Gazdik, Gertrude C.

    1982-01-01

    The rocks in the James River Face Wilderness are shales and quartzites that overlie a meta-igneous basement. They are folded into a large southwestward-plunging anticline that is cut off on the east and south by an extensive thrust fault that brings old basement rocks over the younger sedimentary rocks. Geochemical studies of stream sediments, soils, and rocks do not reveal any unusually high metal concentrations, but a large resource of metallurgical-grade quartzite and shale suitable for structural clay products and lightweight aggregate is in the wilderness. Antietam (Erwin) Quartzite has been quarried at three sites in the wilderness as raw material for silicon used in the manufacture of ferrosilicon. Other uses included crushed rock for concrete aggregate, road metal, and railroad ballast, and sand for cement and mortar. Potential uses include ganister for silica brick and specialty sands such as filter and furnace sand. Firing tests on samples of shale from the Harpers (Hampton) Formation show that it could be used for the manufacture of brick and as lightweight aggregate. Of marginal economic interest are heavy-mineral layers in the basal Unicoi (Weverton) Formation.

  13. GeoMapApp, Virtual Ocean, and other Free Data Resources for the 21st Century Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Ryan, W.; Carbotte, S.; Melkonian, A.; Coplan, J.; Arko, R.; Ferrini, V.; O'Hara, S.; Leung, A.; Bonckzowski, J.

    2008-12-01

    With funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS) (http://www.marine-geo.org/) is developing GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org) - a computer application that provides wide-ranging map-based visualization and manipulation options for interdisciplinary geosciences research and education. The novelty comes from the use of this visual tool to discover and explore data, with seamless links to further discovery using traditional text-based approaches. Users can generate custom maps and grids and import their own data sets. Built-in functionality allows users to readily explore a broad suite of interactive data sets and interfaces. Examples include multi-resolution global digital models of topography, gravity, sediment thickness, and crustal ages; rock, fluid, biology and sediment sample information; research cruise underway geophysical and multibeam data; earthquake events; submersible dive photos of hydrothermal vents; geochemical analyses; DSDP/ODP core logs; seismic reflection profiles; contouring, shading, profiling of grids; and many more. On-line audio-visual tutorials lead users step-by-step through GeoMapApp functionality (http://www.geomapapp.org/tutorials/). Virtual Ocean (http://www.virtualocean.org/) integrates GeoMapApp with a 3-D earth browser based upon NASA WorldWind, providing yet more powerful capabilities. The searchable MGDS Media Bank (http://media.marine-geo.org/) supports viewing of remarkable images and video from the NSF Ridge 2000 and MARGINS programs. For users familiar with Google Earth (tm), KML files are available for viewing several MGDS data sets (http://www.marine-geo.org/education/kmls.php). Examples of accessing and manipulating a range of geoscience data sets from various NSF-funded programs will be shown. GeoMapApp, Virtual Ocean, the MGDS Media Bank and KML files are free MGDS data resources and work on any type of computer. They are currently used by educators, researchers, school

  14. Preparation of magnetic anomaly profile and contour maps from DOE-NURE aerial survey data. Volume I: processing procedures. [National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tinnel, E.P.; Hinze, W.J.

    1981-09-01

    Total intensity magnetic anomaly data acquired as a supplement to radiometric data in the DOE National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program are useful in preparing regional profile and contour maps. Survey-contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data are subjected to a multiprocess, computer-based procedure which prepares these data for presentation. This procedure is used to produce the following machine plotted maps of National Topographic Map Series quadrangle units at a 1:250,000 scale: (1) profile map of contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data, (2) profile map of high-cut filtered data with contour levels of each profile marked and annotated on the associated flight track, (3) profile map of critical-point data with contour levels indicated, and (4) contour map of filtered and selected data. These quadrangle maps are supplemented with a range of statistical measures of the data which are useful in quality evaluation.

  15. A Method for Catchment Scale Mapping of Groundwater-Dependent Ecosystems to Support Natural Resource Management (Queensland, Australia).

    PubMed

    Glanville, K; Ryan, T; Tomlinson, M; Muriuki, G; Ronan, M; Pollett, A

    2016-02-01

    Immediate and foreseeable threats to groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs) are widely acknowledged, many linked to altered groundwater regimes including changes in groundwater flow, flux, pressure, level and/or quality (Eamus et al. in Aust J Bot 54:97-114, 2006a). Natural resource managers and other decision-makers often lack sufficient information at an appropriate scale to understand the groundwater dependency of ecosystems and ensure that GDEs are adequately considered in decision-making processes. This paper describes a new catchment scale mapping method for GDEs based on the integration of local expert knowledge with detailed spatial datasets to delineate GDEs at a scale compatible with management and planning activities. This overcomes one of the key criticisms often levelled at broader scale mapping methods-that information from local and regional experts, with significant understanding of landscape processes and ecosystems, is not incorporated into the datasets used by decision-makers. Expert knowledge is conveyed in the form of pictorial conceptual models representing the components, processes and interrelationships of groundwater within a catchment and the ecosystems dependent on it. Each mapped GDE is linked to a pictorial conceptual model and a mapping rule-set to provide decision-makers with valuable information about where, how and why GDEs exist in a landscape. PMID:26404433

  16. A Method for Catchment Scale Mapping of Groundwater-Dependent Ecosystems to Support Natural Resource Management (Queensland, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glanville, K.; Ryan, T.; Tomlinson, M.; Muriuki, G.; Ronan, M.; Pollett, A.

    2016-02-01

    Immediate and foreseeable threats to groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs) are widely acknowledged, many linked to altered groundwater regimes including changes in groundwater flow, flux, pressure, level and/or quality (Eamus et al. in Aust J Bot 54:97-114, 2006a). Natural resource managers and other decision-makers often lack sufficient information at an appropriate scale to understand the groundwater dependency of ecosystems and ensure that GDEs are adequately considered in decision-making processes. This paper describes a new catchment scale mapping method for GDEs based on the integration of local expert knowledge with detailed spatial datasets to delineate GDEs at a scale compatible with management and planning activities. This overcomes one of the key criticisms often levelled at broader scale mapping methods—that information from local and regional experts, with significant understanding of landscape processes and ecosystems, is not incorporated into the datasets used by decision-makers. Expert knowledge is conveyed in the form of pictorial conceptual models representing the components, processes and interrelationships of groundwater within a catchment and the ecosystems dependent on it. Each mapped GDE is linked to a pictorial conceptual model and a mapping rule-set to provide decision-makers with valuable information about where, how and why GDEs exist in a landscape.

  17. Geologic, aeromagnetic and mineral resource potential maps of the Whisker Lake Wilderness, Florence County, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, Klaus J.

    1983-01-01

    The mineral resource potential of the Whisker Lake Wilderness in the Nicolet National Forest, Florence County, northeastern Wisconsin, was evaluated in 1982. The bedrock consists of recrystallized and deformed volcanic and sedimentary rocks of Early Proterozoic age. Sand and gravel are the only identified resources in the Whisker Lake Wilderness. However, the area is somewhat isolated from current markets and both commodities are abundant regionally. The wilderness also has low potential for peat in swampy lowlands. The southwestern part of the wilderness has a low to moderate mineral resource potential for stratabound massive-sulfide (copper-zinc-lead) deposits.

  18. Habitat mapping as a tool for conservation and sustainable use of marine resources: Some perspectives from the MAREANO Programme, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhl-Mortensen, L.; Buhl-Mortensen, P.; Dolan, M. J. F.; Gonzalez-Mirelis, G.

    2015-06-01

    One of the main goals of marine spatial management is to promote a sustainable use of marine resources without putting biodiversity and habitats at risk. Environmental status assessments of benthic habitats have traditionally been conducted on soft bottom infauna communities. These communities represent only a limited part of the total diversity of seabed environments. Large and habitat forming organisms that are particularly vulnerable to physical disturbance of the seabed are in general associated with mixed or hard substrates. Together with mobile benthos these large organisms have been poorly mapped with the traditional approach. In accordance with a demand for information on all aspects of benthic habitats there is an increasing interest in a broader mapping approach for assessments of the distribution and status of benthos.

  19. Integrative Literature Review: Concept Mapping--A Strategy to Support the Development of Practice, Research, and Theory within Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Barbara J.; Conceicao, Simone C. O.; Mina, Liliana; Altman, Brian A.; Baldor, Maria; Brown, James

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this integrative literature review is to summarize research on concept mapping and to offer ideas on how concept mapping can facilitate practice, research, and theory development within human resource development. In this review, more than 300 articles, written in both English and Spanish, presented at two different concept mapping…

  20. Land use survey and mapping and water resources investigation in Korea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, J. H.; Kim, W. I.; Son, D. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Land use imagery is applicable to land use classification for small scale land use mapping less than 1:250,000. Land use mapping by satellite is more efficient and more cost-effective than land use mapping from conventional medium altitude aerial photographs. Six categories of level 1 land use classification are recognizable from MSS imagery. A hydrogeomorphological study of the Han River basin indicates that band 7 is useful for recognizing the soil and the weathering part of bed rock. The morphological change of the main river is accurately recognized and the drainage system in the area observed is easily classified because of the more or less simple rock type. Although the direct hydrological characteristics are not obtained from the MSS imagery, the indirect information such as the permeability of the soil and the vegetation cover, is helpful in interpreting the hydrological aspects.

  1. Machine processing of S-192 and supporting aircraft data: Studies of atmospheric effects, agricultural classifications, and land resource mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, F.

    1975-01-01

    Two tasks of machine processing of S-192 multispectral scanner data are reviewed. In the first task, the effects of changing atmospheric and base altitude on the ability to machine-classify agricultural crops were investigated. A classifier and atmospheric effects simulation model was devised and its accuracy verified by comparison of its predicted results with S-192 processed results. In the second task, land resource maps of a mountainous area near Cripple Creek, Colorado were prepared from S-192 data collected on 4 August 1973.

  2. Map showing the altitude and configuration of the water level in the shallow aquifer, January 1975, Roswell Basin, Chaves and Eddy counties, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welder, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    The altitude and gradient of the water table in the ' shallow aquifer ' of the Roswell basin in Chaves and Eddy Counties, New Mexico, for January 1975 is shown on a map, scale of 1/2-inch per mile. The map was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the New Mexico State Engineer Office. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Map showing the altitude and configuration of the water level in the shallow aquifer, January 1964, Roswell Basin, Chaves and Eddy counties, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welder, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    The altitude and gradient of the water table in the ' shallow aquifer ' of the Roswell basin in Chaves and Eddy Counties, New Mexico, for January 1964 is shown on a map, scale of 1/2-inch per mile. The map was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the New Mexico State Engineer Office. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Identification and Mapping of Soils, Vegetation, and Water Resources of Lynn County, Texas, by Computer Analysis of ERTS MSS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, M. F.; Kristof, S. J.; Henderson, J. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Results of the analysis and interpretation of ERTS multispectral data obtained over Lynn County, Texas, are presented. The test site was chosen because it embodies a variety of problems associated with the development and management of agricultural resources in the Southern Great Plains. Lynn County is one of ten counties in a larger test site centering around Lubbock, Texas. The purpose of this study is to examine the utility of ERTS data in identifying, characterizing, and mapping soils, vegetation, and water resources in this semiarid region. Successful application of multispectral remote sensing and machine-processing techniques to arid and seminarid land-management problems will provide valuable new tools for the more than one-third of the world's lands lying in arid-semiarid regions.

  5. 30 CFR 75.1505 - Escapeway maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Escapeway maps. 75.1505 Section 75.1505 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Mine Emergencies § 75.1505 Escapeway maps. Escapeway maps. (a) Content and accessibility. An escapeway map shall show the designated escapeways from the working...

  6. Map of the Carpinteria area and vicinity, Santa Barbara County, California, showing water-level contours for March 1983, and net change in water level between March 1982 and March 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyle, W.R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A water-level contour map of the Carpinteria area, California, was constructed using 34 water-level measurements made by the Carpinteria County Water District in March 1983. Also shown on the map are five hydrographs that show water-level fluctuations in each well between 1978 and 1983. In addition, a water-level net-change map for March 1982 to March 1983 is shown. (USGS)

  7. Resource mapping and analysis of UK farm livestock manures: Assessing the opportunities for biomass-to-energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Dagnall, S.P.

    1995-11-01

    Livestock farms produce wastes with a high potential for pollution. Alternative, environmentally acceptable disposal routes might lie in biomass-to-energy schemes, generating revenue from the energy produced and fertiliser as a by-product; these are currently being developed, or assessed, for the UK under DTI/MAFF collaborative programmes; two options are being considered-direct combustion (12-14MW{sub e}) and centralised anaerobic digestion (0.1-1MW{sub e} CHP). One of the barriers to initiating such schemes is establishing where feedstocks are located in order that they may be exploited in a cost effective manner. Resource mapping and analysis using a Geographical Information System has been used to establish the opportunities for England and Wales. This work was carried out in two parts: produce spatially distributed resource data, of agro-industrial wastes and farm livestock manures, expressed in tonnes dry solids, from which energy production figures were derived; and develop algorithms to establish how much of this resource could be feasibly exploited. By comparing these resource data with other appropriate information (e.g., road networks, environmentally sensitive areas, grid interconnections), the optimum location and size of potential biomass-to-energy plants were determined. Whilst interest in such schemes is anticipated to grow further over the next few years, their future will be heavily dependent upon the level of concern for wider environmental issues.

  8. An integrated resource for barley linkage map and malting quality QTL alignment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare subsp. vulgare) is an economically important model plant for genetics research that is currently served by a comprehensive set of tools for genetic analysis. High density genetic linkage maps constructed from the inheritance of robust gene-based Single Nucleotide Polymorphism...

  9. Linkage mapping of domestication loci in a large maize-teosinte backcross resource

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ultimate objective of QTL mapping is cloning genes responsible for quantitative traits. However, projects seldom go beyond segments narrower than 5 cM without subsequent breeding and genotyping lines to identify additional crossovers in a genomic region of interest. We report on a QTL analysis ...

  10. Evaluating alternative methods for biophysical and cultural ecosystem services hotspot mapping in natural resource planning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Semmens, Darius J.; Ancona, Zachary H.; Sherrouse, Ben C.

    2016-01-01

    Statistical hotspot methods of intermediate conservatism (i.e., Getis-Ord Gi*, α = 0.10 significance) may be most useful for ecosystem service hot/coldspot mapping to inform landscape scale planning. We also found spatially explicit evidence in support of past findings about public attitudes toward wilderness areas.

  11. Maps showing anomalous copper concentrations in stream sediments and heavy-mineral concentrates from the Ajo and Lukeville 1 degree by 2 degrees quadrangles, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theobald, P.K.; Barton, H.N.

    1987-01-01

    This map is part of a folio of maps of the Ajo and Lukeville 1 ° x 2° quadrangles, Arizona, prepared under the Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other publications in this folio include U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Maps MF-1831-A and MF-1831-B and Open-File Reports 82-119, 82–599, and 83–734. Open-File Reports 82-119 and 83–731 constitute the basic data and initial interpretation on which this discussion is predicated.

  12. Maps of the Bonsall area of the San Luis Rey River valley, San Diego County, California, showing geology, hydrology, and ground-water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.

    1985-01-01

    In November 1984, 84 wells and 1 spring in the Bonsall area of the San Luis Rey River valley were inventoried by U.S. Geological Survey personnel. Depth to water in 38 wells ranged from 1.3 to 38 ft and 23 wells had depths to water less than 10 feet. Dissolved solids concentration of water from 29 wells and 1 spring sampled in autumn 1983 and spring 1984 ranged from 574 to 2,370 mgs/L. Groundwater with a dissolved solids concentration less than 1,000 mgs/L was generally restricted to the eastern part of the aquifer. The total volume of alluvial fill in the Bonsall area is 113,000 acre-feet; the amount of groundwater storage available in the alluvial aquifer is 18,000 acre-feet. The alluvial aquifer is, in part, surrounded and underlain by colluvium and weathered crystalline rock that add some additional groundwater storage capacity to the system. Data in this report are presented on five maps showing well locations , thickness of alluvial fill, water level contours in November 1983 and hydrographs of selected wells, groundwater quality in spring 1960 and graphs showing changes in dissolved solids concentrations of water from selected wells with time, and groundwater quality in spring 1984. This report is part of a larger cooperative project between the Rainbow Municipal Irrigation District and the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of the larger project is to develop an appropriate groundwater management plan for the Bonsall area of the San Luis Rey River valley. (USGS)

  13. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Paul T; Hagerman, George; Scott, George

    2011-12-01

    This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables wave diffraction to substantially reestablish wave power densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available wave energy resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge, based on accumulating unit circle wave power densities, is estimated to be 2,640 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 590 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 240 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 80 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 1570 TWh/yr for Alaska, 130 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 30 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico. The total recoverable wave energy resource, as constrained by an array capacity packing density of 15 megawatts per kilometer of coastline, with a 100-fold operating range between threshold and maximum operating conditions in terms of input wave power density available to such arrays, yields a total recoverable resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge of 1,170 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 250 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 160 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 60 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 620 TWh/yr for Alaska, 80 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 20 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico.

  14. Water Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, V. V.

    1973-01-01

    Uses of ERTS-1 imagery and data for water resources surveys and management are summarized. Areas discussed are: (1) land use and geology; (2) flood plain and flood inundation mapping; (3) snow cover mapping; (4) glacier observations; (5) data collection systems; (6) surface waters; (7) wetlands mapping; (8) water quality; (9) soil mapping; (10) phreatophyte and riparian vegetation mapping; and (11) evapotranspiration.

  15. A GIS wind resource map with tabular printout of monthly and annual wind speeds for 2,000 towns in Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, M.C.; Factor, T.

    1997-12-31

    The Iowa Wind Energy Institute, under a grant from the Iowa Energy Center, undertook in 1994 to map wind resources in Iowa. Fifty-meter met towers were erected at 13 locations across the state deemed promising for utility-scale wind farm development. Two years of summarized wind speed, direction, and temperature data were used to create wind resource maps incorporating effects of elevation, relative exposure, terrain roughness, and ground cover. Maps were produced predicting long-term mean monthly and annual wind speeds on a one-kilometer grid. The estimated absolute standard error in the predicted annual average wind speeds at unobstructed locations is 9 percent. The relative standard error between points on the annual map is estimated to be 3 percent. These maps and tabular data for 2,000 cities and towns in Iowa are now available on the Iowa Energy Center`s web site (http.//www.energy.iastate.edu).

  16. Development of resources and tools for mapping genetic sources of phenotypic variation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial and experimental genetic resources were established and investigated for a range of reproductive and disease susceptibility phenotypes. The phenotyping efforts were accompanied with RNA and whole genome sequencing and novel assemblies of the swine genome. The efforts were complemented wit...

  17. Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability Distribution of Water Resources in a Regional Water Supply System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Tung, C.; Li, M.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, the threat of increasing frequency of extreme weather rise up human attention on climate change. It is important to know how climate change might effect regional water resources, however, there is not much information to help government understanding how climate change will effect the water resources locally. To a regional water supply system, there might be some hotspots more vulnerable to climate. For example, the water supply of some area is from the water of river. When the storm occurred, the water can't be treated due to high density of suspended sediment in the river. Then the water supply in this area is more vulnerable to climate. This study used an integrated tool - TaiWAP (Taiwan Water Resources Assessment Program) for climate change vulnerability assessment on water resources, which includes 10 GCMs output of SRES A2, A1B, B2 scenarios, weather generator, GWLF model, and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) tool. A water supply system is very complex which needs dynamic modeling to determine the vulnerability distribution. This study used a system dynamics model- VENSIM connected with TaiWAP to simulate a water supply system and evaluate vulnerability of each unit in a water supply system. The vulnerable hotspots will be indicated in the system and the adaptive strategies will be applied to strengthen the local vulnerable area. The adaptive capacity will be enhanced to mitigate climate change impacts on water supply system locally to achieve sustainable water uses.

  18. Integration of Open Educational Resources in Undergraduate Chemistry Teaching--A Mapping Tool and Lecturers' Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman-Maggor, Yael; Rom, Amira; Tuvi-Arad, Inbal

    2016-01-01

    This study examines chemistry lecturers' considerations for using open educational resources (OER) in their teaching. Recent technological developments provide innovative approaches for teaching chemistry and visualizing chemical phenomena. End users' improved ability to upload information online enables integration of various pedagogical models…

  19. A study of the utilization of ERTS-1 data from the Wabash River Basin. [soil mapping, crop identification, water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. In soil association mapping, computerized analysis of ERTS-1 MSS data has yielded images which will prove useful in the ongoing Cooperative Soil Survey program, involving the Soil Conservation Service of USDA and other state and local agencies. In the present mode of operation, a soil survey for a county may take up to 5 years to be completed. Results indicate that a great deal of soils information can be extracted from ERTS-1 data by computer analysis. This information is expected to be very valuable in the premapping conference phase of a soil survey, resulting in more efficient field operations during the actual mapping. In the earth surface features mapping effort it was found that temporal data improved the classification accuracy of forest classification in Tippecanoe County, Indiana. In water resources study a severe scanner look angle effect was observed in the aircraft scanner data of a test lake which was not present in ERTS-1 data of the same site. This effect was greatly accentuated by surface roughness caused by strong winds. Quantitative evaluation of urban features classification in ERTS-1 data was obtained. An 87.1% test accuracy was obtained for eight categories in Marion County, Indiana.

  20. A new gene mapping resource: Interspecies hybrids between Pere David`s deer (Elaphurus davidianus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus)

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, M.L.; Mathias, H.C.; Penty, J.M.; Hill, D.F.; Fennessy, P.F.; Dodds, K.G.

    1995-03-01

    Three male F{sub 1} hybrids between Pere David`s deer and red deer were mated to red deer to produce 143 backcross calves. The pedigrees are a rare example of a fertile hybrid between evolutionarily divergent species. We examined the use of these families for genetic mapping of evolutionarily conserved (Type I) loci by testing for genetic linkage between five species-specific protein variants and 12 conserved DNA probes. Two probes were homologous, and the remainder syntenic, to the protein coding loci in cattle or humans. Using six restriction enzymes, each DNA probe detected one or more restriction fragments specific to Pere David`s deer. Linkage analyses among the species-specific variants placed the loci into four linkage groups within which linkage between adjacent loci and gene order was supported by a LOD > 3. Southern and protein analysis of LDHA and ALB provided identical segregation data. These linkage groups were consistent with the cattle gene map and provide new information for comparing the gene maps of ruminants, humans and mice. The deer hybrids are an important new resource that can contribute to the comparative analysis of the mammalian genome. 68 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The aging brain shows less flexible reallocation of cognitive resources during dual-task walking: A mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI) study.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Brenda R; Foxe, John J; Butler, John S; De Sanctis, Pierfilippo

    2015-08-15

    Aging is associated with reduced abilities to selectively allocate attention across multiple domains. This may be particularly problematic during everyday multitasking situations when cognitively demanding tasks are performed while walking. Due to previous limitations in neuroimaging technology, much remains unknown about the cortical mechanisms underlying resource allocation during locomotion. Here, we utilized an EEG-based mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI) technique that integrates high-density event-related potential (ERP) recordings with simultaneously acquired foot-force sensor data to monitor gait patterns and brain activity concurrently. To assess effects of motor load on cognition we evaluated young (N=17; mean age=27.2) and older adults (N=16; mean age=63.9) and compared behavioral and ERP measures associated with performing a Go/No-Go response inhibition task as participants sat stationary or walked on a treadmill. Stride time and variability were also measured during task performance and compared to stride parameters obtained without task performance, thereby assessing effects of cognitive load on gait. Results showed that older, but not young adults' accuracy dropped significantly when performing the inhibitory task while walking. Young adults revealed ERP modulations at relatively early (N2 amplitude reduction) and later (earlier P3 latency) stages within the processing stream as motor load increased while walking. In contrast, older adults' ERP modulations were limited to later processing stages (increased P3 amplitude) of the inhibitory network. The relative delay and attenuation of ERP modulations accompanied by behavioral costs in older participants might indicate an age-associated loss in flexible resource allocation across multiple tasks. Better understanding of the neural underpinnings of these age-related changes may lead to improved strategies to reduce fall risk and enhance mobility in aging. PMID:25988225

  2. Establishing Vulnerability Map of Water Resources in Regional Water Supply System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. M.; Tung, C. P.; Li, M. H.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, the threat of increasing frequency of extreme weather rise up human attention on climate change. To reduce the threat of water scarcity, it is important to know how climate change might affect regional water resources and where the hotspots, the vulnerability points, are. However, there is not much information to help government understanding how climate change will affect the water resources locally. To a regional water supply system, there might be some hotspots more vulnerable to climate due to the lack of water treatment plants or tape water pipe system. And also, there might be some hotspots more vulnerable due to high population and high industrial product value when they expose to the same threat of water scarcity. This study aims to evaluate the spatial vulnerability distribution of water resources and propose the adaptive plan for southern region of Taiwan. An integrated tool - TaiWAP (Taiwan Water Resources Assessment Program) for climate change vulnerability assessment on water resources, which includes 10 GCMs output of SRES A2, A1B, B2 scenarios, weather generator, GWLF model, and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) tool is used for climate impact assessment. For the simulation of the complex water supply system, the system dynamics model- VENSIM which is connected with TaiWAP is adopted to simulate a water supply system and evaluate vulnerability of each unit in a water supply system. The vulnerable hotspots will be indicated in the system and the adaptive strategies will be applied to strengthen the local vulnerable area. The adaptive capacity will be enhanced to mitigate climate change impacts on water supply system locally to achieve sustainable water uses.

  3. Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Ravens, Thomas M.; Cunningham, Keith W.; Scott, George

    2012-12-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National

  4. Transferability and fine-mapping of glucose and insulin quantitative trait loci across populations: CARe, the Candidate Gene Association Resource

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C.-T.; Ng, M. C. Y.; Rybin, D.; Adeyemo, A.; Bielinski, S. J.; Boerwinkle, E.; Borecki, I.; Cade, B.; Chen, Y. D. I.; Djousse, L.; Fornage, M.; Goodarzi, M. O.; Grant, S. F. A.; Guo, X.; Harris, T.; Kabagambe, E.; Kizer, J. R.; Liu, Y.; Lunetta, K. L.; Mukamal, K.; Nettleton, J. A.; Pankow, J. S.; Patel, S. R.; Ramos, E.; Rasmussen-Torvik, L.; Rich, S. S.; Rotimi, C. N.; Sarpong, D.; Shriner, D.; Sims, M.; Zmuda, J. M.; Redline, S.; Kao, W. H.; Siscovick, D.; Florez, J. C.; Rotter, J. I.; Dupuis, J.; Wilson, J. G.; Bowden, D. W.; Meigs, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Hyperglycaemia disproportionately affects African-Americans (AfAs). We tested the transferability of 18 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with glycaemic traits identified in European ancestry (EuA) populations in 5,984 non-diabetic AfAs. Methods We meta-analysed SNP associations with fasting glucose (FG) or insulin (FI) in AfAs from five cohorts in the Candidate Gene Association Resource. We: (1) calculated allele frequency differences, variations in linkage disequilibrium (LD), fixation indices (Fsts) and integrated haplotype scores (iHSs); (2) tested EuA SNPs in AfAs; and (3) interrogated within ±250 kb around each EuA SNP in AfAs. Results Allele frequency differences ranged from 0.6% to 54%. Fst exceeded 0.15 at 6/16 loci, indicating modest population differentiation. All iHSs were <2, suggesting no recent positive selection. For 18 SNPs, all directions of effect were the same and 95% CIs of association overlapped when comparing EuA with AfA. For 17 of 18 loci, at least one SNP was nominally associated with FG in AfAs. Four loci were significantly associated with FG (GCK, p=5.8 × 10-8; MTNR1B, p=8.5 × 10-9; and FADS1, p=2.2 × 10-4) or FI (GCKR, p=5.9 × 10-4). At GCK and MTNR1B the EuA and AfA SNPs represented the same signal, while at FADS1, and GCKR, the EuA and best AfA SNPs were weakly correlated (r2<0.2), suggesting allelic heterogeneity for association with FG at these loci. Conclusions/interpretation Few glycaemic SNPs showed strict evidence of transferability from EuA to AfAs. Four loci were significantly associated in both AfAs and those with EuA after accounting for varying LD across ancestral groups, with new signals emerging to aid fine-mapping. PMID:22893027

  5. MicroMAPS: Leveraging Federal and Universities' Resources for Atmospheric Sciences Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandy, M.; Companion, J. A.; Connors, V. S.

    2007-05-01

    NASA Langley Research Center approached the Virginia Space Grant Consortium, a NASA-sponsored coalition of universities, NASA research centers and state agencies with the opportunity to develop a scientific mission and flight opportunities for an un-flown atmospheric composition remote sensor, MicroMAPS. The resulting partnership led to new life for this instrument from a space-borne carbon monoxide remote sensor to an high altitude airborne instrument that measures tropospheric carbon monoxide in the near infrared portion of the spectrum. The five year effort to date has leveraged the existing instrument with work by student teams overseen by faculty and NASA advisors, with both NASA and industry contributions. The result is a viable instrument system that has flown in four international scientific field campaigns aboard the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, generating 300 plus hours of CO data to date over North America, Italy, the Mediterranean, England, the North Sea, Darwin, Northern Australia, the Atlantic Ocean, the Indian Ocean, and the Pacific Ocean between Australia and California. A relatively small investment by NASA and contributions by 56 students and nine faculty members, both active and retired NASA engineers and scientists, as well as a Canadian aerospace research company (which designed and built the MicroMAPS instrument) yielded successful results that go well beyond the instrument and data retrieved. The effort provided a valuable educational research experience for students from three universities whose work included contributions in: 1) Development of the instrument system and pod design for the Proteus flights; 2) Development of assessment strategy and analysis of instrument performance; 3) Development of the operations and data management strategy; 4) Contributions to development of design, implementation, and analysis of sensor calibration at Resonance Ltd., Barrie, Canada 5) Development of a new data reduction strategy for the airborne

  6. Sea floor maps showing topography, sun-illuminated topography, and backscatter intensity of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region off Boston, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, P.C.; Middleton, T.J.; Fuller, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    This data set contains the sea floor topographic contours, sun-illuminated topographic imagery, and backscatter intensity generated from a multibeam sonar survey of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region off Boston, Massachusetts, an area of approximately 1100 square nautical miles. The Stellwagen Bank NMS Mapping Project is designed to provide detailed maps of the Stellwagen Bank region's environments and habitats and the first complete multibeam topographic and sea floor characterization maps of a significant region of the shallow EEZ. Data were collected on four cruises over a two year period from the fall of 1994 to the fall of 1996. The surveys were conducted aboard the Candian Hydrographic Service vessel Frederick G. Creed, a SWATH (Small Waterplane Twin Hull) ship that surveys at speeds of 16 knots. The multibeam data were collected utilizing a Simrad Subsea EM 1000 Multibeam Echo Sounder (95 kHz) that is permanently installed in the hull of the Creed.

  7. Maps showing the development of the Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha flow field, June 1984-February 1987, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heliker, Christina; Ulrich, George E.; Margriter, Sandy C.; Hoffmann, John P.

    2001-01-01

    The Pu'u 'O'o - Kupaianaha eruption on the middle east rift zone of Kilauea began in January 1983 with intermittent activity along several fissures. By June 1983, the eruption had localized at the Pu'u 'O'o vent, and the activity settled into an increasingly regular pattern of brief eruptive episodes characterized by high lava fountains. The first 18 months of this eruption are chronicled in Wolfe and others (1988), which includes maps of the flows erupted in episodes 1-20. The maps presented here extend this series through the beginning of episode 48.

  8. Preliminary map of the conterminous United States showing depth to and quality of shallowest ground water containing more than 1,000 parts per million dissolved solids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feth, John Henry Frederick

    1965-01-01

    This atlas was prepared to meet needs for information on the distribution and availability of mineralized water as expressed by Government agencies, private industries, and consultants. The maps are one step in providing an inventory of mineralized water of the Nation and will serve as a planning guide for further investigations and for development. They are necessarily generalized in many places owing to the complexity of the occurrence of the mineralized water, lack of detailed information for parts of the nation, and the difficulties inherent in attempts to put three-dimensional information on maps.

  9. Maps showing bathymetry and modern sediment thickness on the inner continental shelf offshore of Fire Island, New York, pre-Hurricane Sandy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwab, William C.; Denny, Jane F.; Baldwin, Wayne E.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey mapped approximately 336 square kilometers of the lower shoreface and inner continental shelf offshore of Fire Island, New York, in 2011 by using interferometric sonar and high-resolution chirp seismic-reflection systems. This report presents maps of bathymetry, acoustic backscatter, the coastal plain unconformity, the Holocene marine transgressive surface, and modern sediment thickness. These spatial data support research on the Quaternary evolution of the Fire Island coastal system and provide baseline information for research on coastal processes along southern Long Island.

  10. Maps showing the change in modern sediment thickness on the Inner Continental Shelf offshore of Fire Island, New York, between 1996-97 and 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwab, William C.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Denny, Jane F.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey mapped approximately 336 square kilometers of the lower shoreface and inner continental shelf offshore of Fire Island, New York, in 1996 and 1997, using high-resolution sidescan-sonar and seismic-reflection systems, and again in 2011, using interferometric sonar and high-resolution chirp seismic-reflection systems. This report presents a comparison of sediment thickness and distribution as mapped during these two investigations. These spatial data support research on the Quaternary evolution of the Fire Island coastal system and provide baseline information for research on coastal processes along southern Long Island.

  11. Mineral resource assessment map of the Big Gum Swamp Roadless Area, Columbia and Baker counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathcart, J.B.; Cameron, C.C.; Patterson, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    The geology of the Big Cum Swamp Roadless Area, which is discussed briefly in this report, is covered in somewhat more detail in a report by Patterson, Cathcart, Cameron, and Schruben (1984). The mineral resource potential is quite similar to that in the Natural Area Roadless Area outlined by Cathcart, Patterson and Crandall (1983). The Natural Area, which is east of the eastern boundary of the Big Gum Swamp (fig. 1), also was designated a Wilderness Study Area by Public Law 98-430, September 28, 1984.

  12. Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, John; MacDonald, Ian

    1980-01-01

    Presents a guide to resources on television drama available to teachers for classroom use in television curriculum. Lists American and British television drama videorecordings of both series and individual presentations and offers a bibliography of "one-off" single fiction plays produced for British television. (JMF)

  13. Geologic mapping and mineral resource inventory by ERTS-1 satellite data in South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, W. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 data clearly provide significant contribution of new information on the remote areas of South America. Salar deposits have been measured and compared with those shown on World Navigation Charts; remarkable differences have been found in shape, size, number, and distribution. Repetitive coverage should enable us to develop an index of seasonal and annual environmental trends that can be compared with those of the Northern Hemisphere. New lineations, many of which are probably faults, have been found in Venezuela, Bolivia, and northern Argentina. Circular features, some of volcanic origin, have been recognized that are not shown on existing maps. The courses of several rivers have been revised and our Venezuelan counterparts report that a major new river has been recognized and charted. Large mining operations, such as the open pit copper mine of Chuquicamata in northern Chile, are recognizable and can be studied in their regional context.

  14. Evaluation of Thematic Mapper data for mapping forest, agricultural and soil resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degloria, S.; Benson, A.; Dummer, K.; Fakhoury, E.

    1985-01-01

    Color composite TM film products which include TM5, TM4, and a visible band (TM1, TM2, or TM3) are superior to composites which exclude TM4 for discriminating most forest and agricultural cover types and estimating area proportions for inventory and sampling purposes. Clustering a subset of TM data results in a spectral class map which groups diverse forest cover types into spectrally and ecologically similar areas suitable for use as a stratification base in traditional forest inventory practices. Analysis of simulated Thematic Mapper data indicate that the location and number of TM spectral bands are suitable for detecting differences in major soil properties and characterizing soil spectral curve form and magnitude.

  15. Mapping the Mineral Resource Base for Mineral Carbon-Dioxide Sequestration in the Conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krevor, S.C.; Graves, C.R.; Van Gosen, B. S.; McCafferty, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This database provides information on the occurrence of ultramafic rocks in the conterminous United States that are suitable for sequestering captured carbon dioxide in mineral form, also known as mineral carbon-dioxide sequestration. Mineral carbon-dioxide sequestration is a proposed greenhouse gas mitigation technology whereby carbon dioxide (CO2) is disposed of by reacting it with calcium or magnesium silicate minerals to form a solid magnesium or calcium carbonate product. The technology offers a large capacity to permanently store CO2 in an environmentally benign form via a process that takes little effort to verify or monitor after disposal. These characteristics are unique among its peers in greenhouse gas disposal technologies. The 2005 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage suggested that a major gap in mineral CO2 sequestration is locating the magnesium-silicate bedrock available to sequester the carbon dioxide. It is generally known that silicate minerals with high concentrations of magnesium are suitable for mineral carbonation. However, no assessment has been made in the United States that details their geographical distribution and extent, nor has anyone evaluated their potential for use in mineral carbonation. Researchers at Columbia University and the U.S. Geological Survey have developed a digital geologic database of ultramafic rocks in the conterminous United States. Data were compiled from varied-scale geologic maps of magnesium-silicate ultramafic rocks. The focus of our national-scale map is entirely on ultramafic rock types, which typically consist primarily of olivine- and serpentine-rich rocks. These rock types are potentially suitable as source material for mineral CO2 sequestration.

  16. Map showing recent (1997-98 El Nino) and historical landslides, Crow Creek and vicinity, Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, Jeffrey A.; Godt, Jonathan; Tachker, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the spatial distribution of 3,800 landslides caused by 1997-98 El Ni?o winter rainfall in the vicinity of Crow Creek in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California. The report also documents 558 historical (pre-1997-98) landslides. Landslides were mapped from 1:12,000-scale aerial photographs and classified as either debris flows or slides. Slides include rotational and translational slides, earth flows, and complex slope movements. Debris flows and slides from the 1997-98 winter modified 1 percent of the surface of the 148.6 km2 study area. Debris flows were scattered throughout the area, regardless of the type of underlying bedrock geology. Slides, however, were concentrated in a soft sandstone, conglomerate, and clayey group of rock units. Digital map files accompany the report.

  17. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the southern part of the Black Mesa area, Navajo, Apache, and Coconino Counties, Arizona, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levings, G.W.; Farrar, C.D.

    1977-01-01

    The southern part of the Black Mesa area includes about 2,500 sq mi in northeastern Arizona and is entirely in the Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations. The main source of water is from the several aquifers are stacked one on the other and generally are not hydraulically connected. Information on the maps includes depth to water, altitude of the water level, and chemical quality of the water. Scale 1:125,000. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Cross-sections and maps showing double-difference relocated earthquakes from 1984-2000 along the Hayward and Calaveras faults, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Robert W.; Graymer, Russell W.; Jachens, Robert C.; Ponce, David A.; Wentworth, Carl M.

    2004-01-01

    We present cross-section and map views of earthquakes that occurred from 1984 to 2000 in the vicinity of the Hayward and Calaveras faults in the San Francisco Bay region, California. These earthquakes came from a catalog of events relocated using the double-difference technique, which provides superior relative locations of nearby events. As a result, structures such as fault surfaces and alignments of events along these surfaces are more sharply defined than in previous catalogs.

  19. Taxonomic classification of world map units in crop producing areas of Argentina and Brazil with representative US soil series and major land resource areas in which they occur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huckle, H. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The most probable current U.S. taxonomic classification of the soils estimated to dominate world soil map units (WSM)) in selected crop producing states of Argentina and Brazil are presented. Representative U.S. soil series the units are given. The map units occurring in each state are listed with areal extent and major U.S. land resource areas in which similar soils most probably occur. Soil series sampled in LARS Technical Report 111579 and major land resource areas in which they occur with corresponding similar WSM units at the taxonomic subgroup levels are given.

  20. Reconnaissance geological and mineral resource map of northern Sierra Madre Occidental, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    The northern Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) map (scale 1:500,000) comprises 305,000 km/sup 2/ in the states of Chihuahau and Sonora. The centrally-located plateau section is divided into an upper, predominantly rhyolitic sequence, overlying an andesite-rich interval, directly correlatable with Tertiary volcanic units in central and southern SMO, respectively (Clark, 1983; 1984). Precambrian rocks occur in both flanks of SMO, either in the subsurface or surface exposures. They are succeeded by Early and Late Paleozoic sedimentary strata in Sonora and by a more discontinuous sequence in western Chihuahua. Mesozoic strata are dominated by Cretaceous carbonate sequences in central Chihuahua, and by late Triassic - Early Jurassic continental and Jurassic magmatic arc deposits in Sonora. Late Mesozoic - Early Cenozoic batholiths were emplaced in numerous localities in Sonora, whereas only isolated granitoid stocks are exposed in Chihuahua. Widespread lavas of basaltic composition are Late Tertiary to Quaternary in age. Late Cenozoic unconsolidated clastic deposits fill basins and constitute the coastal plain on the west. The main mineralizing epoch occurred in Late Cretaceous - Early Tertiary time, is aligned in northwesterly-trending belts and included numerous porphyry (Cu-Mo) deposits, scattered contact metasomatic (Cu-W) ores and a fissure-vein (Ag-Au) assemblage in the western margin; a (Pb-Zn-Ag) assemblage in fissure-veins and manto-chimney deposits, manganese and volcanogenic uranium ores in the eastern flank. Important industrial minerals and rocks include graphite, fluorspar and building materials.

  1. Regional Mapping and Resource Assessment of Shallow Gas Hydrates of Japan Sea - METI Launched 3 Years Project in 2013.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, R.

    2014-12-01

    Agency of Natural Resources and Energy of METI launched a 3 years shallow gas hydrate exploration project in 2013 to make a precise resource assessment of shallow gas hydrates in the eastern margin of Japan Sea and around Hokkaido. Shallow gas hydrates of Japan Sea occur in fine-grained muddy sediments of shallow subsurface of mounds and gas chimneys in the form of massive nodular to platy accumulation. Gas hydrate bearing mounds are often associated with active methane seeps, bacterial mats and carbonate concretions and pavements. Gases of gas hydrates are derived either from deep thermogenic, shallow microbial or from the mixed gases, contrasting with totally microbial deep-seated stratigraphically controlled hydrates. Shallow gas hydrates in Japan Sea have not been considered as energy resource due to its limited distribution in narrow Joetsu basin. However recently academic research surveys have demonstrated regional distribution of gas chimney and hydrate mound in a number of sedimentary basins along the eastern margin of Japan Sea. Regional mapping of gas chimney and hydrate mound by means of MBES and SBP surveys have confirmed that more than 200 gas chimneys exist in 100 km x 100 km area. ROV dives have identified dense accumulation of hydrates on the wall of half collapsed hydrate mound down to 30 mbsf. Sequential LWD and shallow coring campaign in the Summer of 2014, R/V Hakurei, which is equipped with Fugro Seacore R140 drilling rig, drilled through hydrate mounds and gas chimneys down to the BGHS (base of gas hydrate stability) level and successfully recovered massive gas hydrates bearing sediments from several horizons.

  2. Mineral resource potential map of the Raywood Flat Roadless Areas, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matti, Jonathan C.; Cox, Brett F.; Iverson, Stephen R.

    1983-01-01

    The area having moderate potential for base-metal resources forms a small zone in the eastern part of the recommended wilderness (A5-187). Within this zone, evidence provided by stream-sediment geochemistry suggests that crystalline bedrocks in several drainages contain concentrations of metallic elements. Because the terrain is inaccessible and covered with dense brush, most of the bedrock in the specific drainages containing the geochemical anomalies could not be examined. Thus, although we infer that mineral occurrences exist in the drainage basins, we have little data on which to base an estimate of their extent and quality. Locally, the crystalline rocks probably contain hydrothermal veins or disseminated occurrences where lead, copper, molybdenum, tin, cobalt, bismuth, and arsenic have been concentrated. However, the geochemical anomalies for these metals are small, and the stream drainages also are relatively small. Therefore, the inferred occurrences of metallic minerals probably are small scale, scattered, and low grade. There is only low probability that the inferred mineral occurrences are large scale.

  3. Mineral resource potential map of the Savannah Roadless Area, Liberty County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, Sam H.; Schmidt, Walter; Crandall, Thomas M.

    1982-01-01

    The Savannah Roadless Area is underlain by sedimentary rocks having low potential for oil and gas and minerals. The low potential for oil or gas notwithstanding, the possibilities for discovery cannot be ruled out because the area and nearby lands have not been thoroughly explored. No minerals have been mined within the Savannah Roadless Area, and the only production nearby has been the digging of clayey sand used in stabilizing U.S. Forest Service roads. Fuller's earth, quartz sand and gravel, clayey sand, and common clay presently are produced elsewhere in the region, and limestone and peat have been produced in the past. No clay suitable for structural clay products or fuller's earth is present in the roadless area; however, a bed of quartz sand and gravel of excellent quality was penetrated at a depth interval of 37-50 ft by one drill hole. Although this bed is coarser grained-and therefore is more suitable for many uses-than the sand deposits worked elsewhere in the Big Bend region, its mineral resource potential is reduced by the thickness of overburden above it and by its distance from markets in population centers. The Apalachicola National Forest has been explored for phosphate and reconnoitered for heavy minerals, but no valuable deposits of either have been found.

  4. Mineral resource potential map of the Natural Area Roadless Area, Baker County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathcart, James B.; Patterson, Sam H.; Crandall, Thomas M.

    1983-01-01

    The Natural Area Roadless Area, which is in the Osceola National Forest in Baker County, Fla., is underlain by sedimentary rocks containing phosphate deposits that are not a potential mineral resource by todays standards. The region has a low potential for oil and gas and virtually no potential for other valuable minerals. The phosphate deposits are either slightly low in tonnage and P2O5 content, high in MgO and/or Fe2O3 + Al2O3, or the ratio of CaO to P2O5 is too high for deposits that can be mined profitably at the present time. A low potential for oil and gas is indicated by the numerous dry holes in the region and the absence of the formations that contain these hydrocarbons in southern and westernmost Florida. The only mineral material that has been produced in the study area is clayey sand, used in stabilizing Forest Service roads. This type of clayey sand has no particular value because there are virtually unlimited quantities in the surrounding region. The peaty material in the area is too high in ash content to be mined. Large quantities of limestone underlie the area but are too deeply buried to be quarried. Heavy-mineral and clay deposits, which are mined elsewhere in northern peninsular Florida, are not present in the study area.

  5. A study of the utilization of ERTS-1 data from the Wabash River Basin. [crop identification, water resources, urban land use, soil mapping, and atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The most significant results were obtained in the water resources research, urban land use mapping, and soil association mapping projects. ERTS-1 data was used to classify water bodies to determine acreages and high agreement was obtained with USGS figures. Quantitative evaluation was achieved of urban land use classifications from ERTS-1 data and an overall test accuracy of 90.3% was observed. ERTS-1 data classifications of soil test sites were compared with soil association maps scaled to match the computer produced map and good agreement was observed. In some cases the ERTS-1 results proved to be more accurate than the soil association map.

  6. Maps showing altitude of the potentiometric surface and changes in water levels in the aquifer in the Sparta and Memphis Sands in eastern Arkansas, spring 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edds, Joe; Fitzpatrick, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Aquifers in the Tertiary Sparta and Memphis Sands are a major source of water supply for much of eastern and south-central Arkansas. Major withdrawals occur from the aquifer for industrial and public supply, with generally lesser but locally significant amounts withdrawn for agricultural uses. Water level data from wells tapping the artesian aquifer in the Sparta and Memphis Sands indicate steadily declining water levels in some areas where relatively large withdrawals occur. In addition, a simulation of water levels using projected withdrawals to the year 1990 indicated increasing water level declines in the aquifer. Because of the potential quantity and quality problems, the continual monitoring of water levels in the aquifer in the Sparta and Memphis Sands is essential for proper aquifer management and the continuation of the use of the aquifer as a major source of water for much of eastern and south-central Arkansas. The U.S. Geological Survey with the cooperation of the Arkansas Geological Commission has been monitoring water levels in the aquifer in the Sparta and Memphis Sands annually throughout the aquifer 's extent within the State of Arkansas. This report, prepared in cooperation with the Arkansas Geological Commission and the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission interprets water level data through hydrologic maps of the potentiometric surface and water level changes. The potentiometric surface map is based on water levels collected in the spring of 1985. The water level change map is based on a comparison of water levels collected in the spring of 1980 and 1985. This report includes the Sparta Sand and most of the Memphis Sand aquifer within the State of Arkansas. Little or no data are available in the northeastern part of the State where limited withdrawals from the aquifer occur. (Lantz-PTT)

  7. Maps Showing Locations of Damaging Landslides Caused by El Nino Rainstorms, Winter Season 1997-98, San Francisco Bay Region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godt, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. Reports of landsliding began in early January 1998 and continued throughout the winter and spring. On February 9, President Clinton declared all 10 counties eligible for Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) disaster assistance. In April and May of 1998, personnel from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a field reconnaissance in the area to provide a general overview of landslide damage resulting from the 1997-98 sequence of El Nino-related storms. Seven scientists from the USGS Landslide Hazards Program based in Reston, Virginia; Golden, Colorado; and Menlo Park, California; and five scientists from the USGS Geologic Mapping Program?s San Francisco Bay Mapping Team based in Menlo Park, California, cooperated in the landslide-damage assessments. The assessments were done for 10 counties in the Bay area: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, San Mateo, Solano, and Sonoma. USGS Maps in this series include: MF-2325-A (Napa County), MF-2325-B (Alameda County), MF-2325-C (Marin County), MF-2325-D (Santa Cruz County), MF-2325-E (Contra Costa County), MF-2325-F (Sonoma County), MF-2325-G (San Francisco City and County), MF-2325-H (San Mateo County), MF-2325-I (Solano County), MF-2325-J (Santa Clara County). In addition to USGS scientists providing data from the field evaluation, each of the counties, many consultants, and others cooperated fully in providing the landslide-damage information compiled here.

  8. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the Monument Valley and northern part of the Black Mesa areas, Navajo, Apache, and Coconino counties, Arizona, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levings, G.W.; Farrar, C.D.

    1977-01-01

    The Monument Valley and the northern part of the Black Mesa areas include about 2,700 sq mi in northeastern Arizona and are entirely in the Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations. The main source of water is from the several aquifers that are made up of one or more formations. The aquifers are stacked one on the other and generally are not hydraulically connected. Information on the maps includes depth to water, altitude of the water level , and chemical quality of the water. Scale 1:125,000. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Geothermal resources of Utah, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This map shows heat flow, Known Geothermal Resources Areas, thermal springs and wells, and areas of low-temperature geothermal waters. Also shown are Indian reservations, military reservation, national or state forests, and parks, wildlife refuges, wilderness areas, etc. (MHR)

  10. Seabed maps showing topography, ruggedness, backscatter intensity, sediment mobility, and the distribution of geologic substrates in Quadrangle 6 of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary Region offshore of Boston, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, Page C.; Gallea, Leslie B.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Marine Sanctuary Program, has conducted seabed mapping and related research in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (SBNMS) region since 1993. The area is approximately 3,700 square kilometers (km2) and is subdivided into 18 quadrangles. Seven maps, at a scale of 1:25,000, of quadrangle 6 (211 km2) depict seabed topography, backscatter, ruggedness, geology, substrate mobility, mud content, and areas dominated by fine-grained or coarse-grained sand. Interpretations of bathymetric and seabed backscatter imagery, photographs, video, and grain-size analyses were used to create the geology-based maps. In all, data from 420 stations were analyzed, including sediment samples from 325 locations. The seabed geology map shows the distribution of 10 substrate types ranging from boulder ridges to immobile, muddy sand to mobile, rippled sand. Mapped substrate types are defined on the basis of sediment grain-size composition, surface morphology, sediment layering, the mobility or immobility of substrate surfaces, and water depth range. This map series is intended to portray the major geological elements (substrates, topographic features, processes) of environments within quadrangle 6. Additionally, these maps will be the basis for the study of the ecological requirements of invertebrate and vertebrate species that utilize these substrates and guide seabed management in the region.

  11. Geologic strip map along the Hines Creek Fault showing evidence for Cenozoic displacement in the western Mount Hayes and northeastern Healy quadrangles, eastern Alaska Range, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nokleberg, Warren J.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Bundtzen, Thomas K.; Hanshaw, Maiana N.

    2013-01-01

    Geologic mapping of the Hines Creek Fault and the adjacent Trident Glacier and McGinnis Glacier Faults to the north in the eastern Alaska Range, Alaska, reveals that these faults were active during the Cenozoic. Previously, the Hines Creek Fault, which is considered to be part of the strike-slip Denali Fault system (Ridgway and others, 2002; Nokleberg and Richter, 2007), was interpreted to have been welded shut during the intrusion of the Upper Cretaceous Buchanan Creek pluton (Wahrhaftig and others, 1975; Gilbert, 1977; Sherwood and Craddock, 1979; Csejtey and others, 1992). Our geologic mapping along the west- to west-northwest-striking Hines Creek Fault in the northeastern Healy quadrangle and central to northwestern Mount Hayes quadrangle reveals that (1) the Buchanan Creek pluton is truncated by the Hines Creek Fault and (2) a tectonic collage of fault-bounded slices of various granitic plutons, metagabbro, metabasalt, and sedimentary rock of the Pingston terrane occurs south of the Hines Creek Fault.

  12. Physical mapping of the pink-eyed dilution complex in mouse chromosome 7 shows that Atp10c is the only transcript between Gabrb3 and Ube3a.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Madhu S; Hauser, Loren J; Nicholls, Robert D; Johnson, Dabney K

    2004-08-01

    Phenotypic analyses of a set of homozygous-lethal deletion mutants at the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus has resulted in the identification of p-linked obesity locus 1 (plo 1), distal to the p locus, as a locus involved in the modulation of body fat and/or affecting lipid metabolism in these mice. The plo 1 region maps to mouse chromosome 7 (MMU 7) between two genes, Gabrb3 and Ube3a, which have been used as anchor points to generate an integrated deletion and physical map of plo 1 that encompasses about 1.2-1.3 Mb. A deletion/physical map was constructed and the genomic DNA between the two loci was sequenced to identify genes mapping to this region. Data show that Atp10c, a novel type IV ATPase a putative phospholipid transporter, is the only coding unit in this region of the chromosome. PMID:15620220

  13. Mapping Soil Organic Carbon Resources Across Agricultural Land Uses in Highland Lesotho Using High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J.; Adam, E.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping spatial patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC) using high resolution satellite imagery is especially important in inaccessible or upland areas that have limited field measurements, where land use and land cover (LULC) are changing rapidly, or where the land surface is sensitive to overgrazing and high rates of soil erosion and thus sediment, nutrient and carbon export. Here we outline the methods and results of mapping soil organic carbon in highland areas (~2400 m) of eastern Lesotho, southern Africa, across different land uses. Bedrock summit areas with very thin soils are dominated by xeric alpine grassland; terrace agriculture with strip fields and thicker soils is found within river valleys. Multispectral Worldview 2 imagery was used to map LULC across the region. An overall accuracy of 88% and kappa value of 0.83 were achieved using a support vector machine model. Soils were examined in the field from different LULC areas for properties such as soil depth, maturity and structure. In situ soils in the field were also evaluated using a portable analytical spectral device (ASD) in order to ground truth spectral signatures from Worldview. Soil samples were examined in the lab for chemical properties including organic carbon. Regression modeling was used in order to establish a relationship between soil characteristics and soil spectral reflectance. We were thus able to map SOC across this diverse landscape. Results show that there are notable differences in SOC between upland and agricultural areas which reflect both soil thickness and maturity, and land use practices such as manuring of fields by cattle. Soil erosion and thus carbon (nutrient) export is significant issue in this region, which this project will now be examining.

  14. Notes for the improvement of the spatial and spectral data classification method. [automatic classification and mapping of earth resources satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    This report examines the spatial and spectral clustering technique for the unsupervised automatic classification and mapping of earth resources satellite data, and makes theoretical analysis of the decision rules and tests in order to suggest how the method might best be applied to other flight data such as Skylab and Spacelab.

  15. Map of Western Copper River Basin, Alaska, Showing Lake Sediments and Shorelines, Glacial Moraines, and Location of Stratigraphic Sections and Radiocarbon-Dated Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John R.; Galloway, John P.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to make available basic data on radiocarbon dating of 61 organic samples from 40 locations in the western Copper River Basin and adjacent uplands and in the uppermost Matanuska River Valley. The former distribution of late Quaternary glacial lakes and of glaciers as mapped from field work and photo interpretation is provided as background for interpretation of the radiocarbon dates and are the basic data needed for construction of the late Quaternary chronology. The glacial boundaries, formed and expressed by moraines, ice-contact margins, marginal channels, deltas, and other features, are obscured by a drape of glaciolacustrine deposits in a series of glacial lakes. The highest lake, represented by bottom sediments as high as 914 m to 975 m above sea level, extends from Fog Lakes lowland on Susitna River upstream into the northwestern part of the Copper River Basin (the part now draining to Susitna River) where it apparently was held in by an ice border. It was apparently dammed by ice from the Mt. McKinley area, by Talkeetna G1acier, and may have had a temporary drainage threshold at the headwaters of Chunilna Creek. No shorelines have been noted within the map area, although Nichols and Yehle (1961) reported shorelines within the 914-975 m range in the Denali area to the north of that mapped. Recent work by geologic consultants for the Susitna Hydroelectric Project has confirmed the early inferences (Karlstrom, 1964) about the existence of a lake in the Susitna canyon, based originally on drilling by the Bureau of Reclamation about 35 years ago. According to dating of deposits at Tyone Bluff (map locations 0, P), Thorson and others (1981) concluded that a late Wisconsin advance of the glaciers between 11,535 and 21,730 years ago was followed by a brief interval of lacustrine sedimentation, and was preceded by a long period of lake deposition broken by a lowering of the lake between 32,000 and about 25,000 years ago. An alternate

  16. Geochemical, aeromagnetic, and generalized geologic maps showing distribution and abundance of antimony and tungsten, Golconda and Iron Point quadrangles, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, R.L.; Marsh, S.P.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed geologic and geochemical studies of the four 7 1/2-minute quadrangles that make up the Edna Mountain 15-minute quadrangle in Humboldt County, Nevada, were begun during the 1969 summer field season. The objectives of the project are to map the geology of this structurally complex area at 1:24,000 scale and to determine the regional distribution and abundance of metals in rocks of the area and the factors that control the distribution and abundance of those metals. Tungsten-bearing hot-spring tufa, metalliferous black shale in Ordovician rocks , base-metal and barite deposits in Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, and copper molydbenum in granodiorite plutons of Cretaceous age occur in the Edna Mountain area. None of these deposits have been of much economic significance, although tungsten was mined from the hot-spring deposits during World War II. 

  17. Geochemical, aeromagnetic, and generalized geologic maps showing distribution and abundance of gold and copper, Golconda and Iron Point quadrangles, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, R.L.; Marsh, S.P.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed geologic and geochemical studies of the four 7 1/2-minute quadrangles that make up the Edna Mountain 15-minute quadrangle in Humboldt County, Nevada, were begun during the 1969 summer field season.  The objectives of the project are to map the geology of this structurally complex area at 1:24,000 scale and to determine the regional distribution and abundance of metals in rocks of the area and the factors that control the distribution and abundance of those metals.  Tungsten-bearing hot-spring tufa, metalliferous black shale in Ordovician rocks, base-metal and barite deposits in Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, and copper-molybdenum in granodiorite plutons of Cretaceous age occur in the Edna Mountain area.  None of these deposits have been of much economic signigicance, although tungsten was mined from the hot-spring deposits during World War II.

  18. Geochemical, aeromagnetic, and generalized geologic maps showing distribution and abundance of mercury and arsenic, Golconda and Iron Point quadrangles, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, R.L.; Marsh, S.P.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed geologic and geochemical studies of the four 7 1/2-minute wuadrangles that make up the Edna Mountain 15-minute quadrangle in Humboldt County, Nevada, were begun druring the 1969 summer field season. The objectives of the project are to map the geology of this structurally complex area at 1:24,000 scale and to determine the regional distribution and abundance of metals in rocks of the area and the factors that control the distribution and abundance of those metals. Tungsten-bearing hot-spring tufa, metalliferous black shale in Ordovician rocks, base-metal and barite deposits in Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, and copper-molybdenum in granodiorite plutons of Creataceous age occur in the Edna Mountain dare. None of these deposits have been of much economic significance, although tungsten was mined from the hot-spring deposits during World War II. 

  19. Maps Showing Sea Floor Topography, Sun-Illuminated Sea Floor Topography, and Backscatter Intensity of Quadrangles 1 and 2 in the Great South Channel Region, Western Georges Bank

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, Page C.; Middleton, Tammie J.; Malczyk, Jeremy T.; Fuller, Sarah J.

    2002-01-01

    The Great South Channel separates the western part of Georges Bank from Nantucket Shoals and is a major conduit for the exchange of water between the Gulf of Maine to the north and the Atlantic Ocean to the south. Water depths range mostly between 65 and 80 m in the region. A minimum depth of 45 m occurs in the east-central part of the mapped area, and a maximum depth of 100 m occurs in the northwest corner. The channel region is characterized by strong tidal and storm currents that flow dominantly north and south. Major topographic features of the seabed were formed by glacial and postglacial processes. Ice containing rock debris moved from north to south, sculpting the region into a broad shallow depression and depositing sediment to form the irregular depressions and low gravelly mounds and ridges that are visible in parts of the mapped area. Many other smaller glacial featuresprobably have been eroded by waves and currents at worksince the time when the region, formerly exposed bylowered sea level or occupied by ice, was invaded by the sea. The low, irregular and somewhat lumpy fabric formed by the glacial deposits is obscured in places by drifting sand and by the linear, sharp fabric formed by modern sand features. Today, sand transported by the strong north-south-flowing tidal and storm currents has formed large, east-west-trending dunes. These bedforms (ranging between 5 and 20 m in height) contrast strongly with, and partly mask, the subdued topography of the older glacial features.

  20. 30 CFR 75.1505 - Escapeway maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Escapeway maps. 75.1505 Section 75.1505 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Mine Emergencies § 75.1505 Escapeway maps. (a) Content and accessibility. An escapeway map shall show the designated escapeways from the working sections or the...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1505 - Escapeway maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Escapeway maps. 75.1505 Section 75.1505 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Mine Emergencies § 75.1505 Escapeway maps. (a) Content and accessibility. An escapeway map shall show the designated escapeways from the working sections or the...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1505 - Escapeway maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Escapeway maps. 75.1505 Section 75.1505 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Mine Emergencies § 75.1505 Escapeway maps. (a) Content and accessibility. An escapeway map shall show the designated escapeways from the working sections or the...

  3. 30 CFR 75.1505 - Escapeway maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Escapeway maps. 75.1505 Section 75.1505 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Mine Emergencies § 75.1505 Escapeway maps. (a) Content and accessibility. An escapeway map shall show the designated escapeways from the working sections or the...

  4. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the state's best…

  5. Map Showing Inventory and Regional Susceptibility for Holocene Debris Flows, and Related Fast-Moving Landslides in the Conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brabb, Earl E.; Colgan, Joseph P.; Best, Timothy C.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction Debris flows, debris avalanches, mud flows and lahars are fast-moving landslides that occur in a wide variety of environments throughout the world. They are particularly dangerous to life and property because they move quickly, destroy objects in their paths, and often strike without warning. This map represents a significant effort to compile the locations of known debris flows in United Stated and predict where future flows might occur. The files 'dfipoint.e00' and 'dfipoly.e00' contain the locations of over 6600 debris flows from published and unpublished sources. The locations are referenced by numbers that correspond to entries in a bibliography, which is part of the pamphlet 'mf2329pamphlet.pdf'. The areas of possible future debris flows are shown in the file 'susceptibility.tif', which is a georeferenced TIFF file that can be opened in an image editing program or imported into a GIS system like ARC/INFO. All other databases are in ARC/INFO export (.e00) format.

  6. Map showing abundance and distribution of silver in stream-sediment samples, Medford 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Oregon-California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whittington, Charles L.; Grimes, David J.; Leinz, Reinhard W.

    1985-01-01

    The Medford quadrangle is located in mountainous southwestern Oregon adjacent to the California border and a short distance east of the Pacific coast. Various parts of this area lie in different geologic provinces. Most of the western half of the quadrangle is underlain by pre-Tertiary rocks of the Klamath Mountains province. However, the Coast Range province is represented by the Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the northwest corner. Much of the eastern half of the quadrangle lies in the Cascade Range. In Oregon, because of differences in physiographic expression and age of rocks, this province is commonly divided into the more rugged High Cascade Range on the east and the more subdued Western Cascade Range on the west. This division is approximated on the map by the contact between the Quaternary and Tertiary volcanic rocks of the High Cascade Range and the Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Western Cascade Range. The geology shown is generalized from a more detailed compilation by Smith and others (1982).

  7. Map showing abundance and distribution of chromium in stream-sediment samples, Medford 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Oregon-California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whittington, Charles L.; Grimes, David J.; Leinz, Reinhard W.

    1985-01-01

    The Medford quadrangle is located in mountainous southwestern Oregon adjacent to the California border and a short distance east of the Pacific coast. Various parts of this area lie in different geologic provinces. Most of the western half of the quadrangle is underlain by pre-Tertiary rocks of the Klamath Mountains province. However, the Coast Range province is represented by the Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the northwest corner. Much of the eastern half of the quadrangle lies in the Cascade Range. In Oregon, because of differences in physiographic expression and age of rocks, this province is commonly divided into the more rugged High Cascade Range on the east and the more subdued Western Cascade Range on the west. This division is approximated on the map by the contact between the Quaternary and Tertiary volcanic rocks of the High Cascade Range and the Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Western Cascade Range. The geology shown is generalized from a more detailed compilation by Smith and others (1982).

  8. A scheme for the uniform mapping and monitoring of earth resources and environmental complexes using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulton, C. E. (Principal Investigator); Welch, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Progress on plans for the development and testing of a practical procedure and system for the uniform mapping and monitoring of natural ecosystems and environmental complexes from space-acquired imagery is discussed. With primary emphasis on ERTS-1 imagery, but supported by appropriate aircraft photography as necessary, the objectives are to accomplish the following: (1) Develop and test in a few selected sites and areas of the western United States a standard format for an ecological and land use legend for making natural resource inventories on a simulated global basis. (2) Based on these same limited geographic areas, identify the potentialities and limitations of the legend concept for the recognition and annotation of ecological analogs and environmental complexes. An additional objective is to determine the optimum combination of space photography, aerial photography, ground data, human data analysis, and automatic data analysis for estimating crop yield in the rice growing areas of California and Louisiana.

  9. Demographic Mapping via Computer Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banghart, Frank W.; And Others

    A computerized system, developed at Florida State University, is designed to locate students and resources on a geographic network. Using addresses of resources and students as input, the system quickly and accurately locates the addresses on a grid and creates a map showing their distribution. This geographical distribution serves as an…

  10. Maps showing anomalous concentrations of zinc, silver, antimony, manganese, barium and strontium in stream sediment and heavy-mineral concentrate from parts of the Ajo and Lukeville 1 degree by 2 degrees quadrangles, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theobald, P.K.; Barton, H.N.

    1988-01-01

    This map is part of a folio of maps of the Ajo and Lukeville 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangles, Arizona, prepared under the Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other publications in this folio include U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Reports 82-419 (Barton and others, 1982), 82-599 (Klein, 1982), and 830734 (Theobald and Barton, 1983), and Miscellaneous Field Studies Maps MF-1834-A (Peterson and Tosdal, 1986), MF-1834-B (Peterson and others, 1987), MF-1834-C (Theobald and Barton, 1987), and MF-1834-D (Theobald and Barton, 1988). Open-File Reports 82-419 and 83-734 constitute the basic data and initial interpretation on which this discussion is predicated. MF-1834-C and D show the distributions of anomalous concentrations of copper, lead, molybdenum, bismuth, and tungsten.

  11. Maps showing interpretation, using R-mode factor analysis, of trace-element abundances in heavy-mineral concentrate samples, Delta 1° x 2° Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimbelman, David R.

    1994-01-01

    A set of heavy-mineral concentrate data for the Delta 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah Conterminous U.S. Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP) project was compiled from results of analyses of samples collected during the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program (SURE), as well as results obtained from samples collected more recently by the USGS. Data results, sampling methods, and analytical methods are provided in Abrogast and others, 1993; 1990; 1988a; 1988b). A similar report, discussing results obtained from stream-sediment samples, is presented in Zimbelman (1993a). The Delta 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah (figure 1) contains a variety of hydrothermal mineral deposit types, including porphyry-, vein-, replacement-, and Carlin-type deposits. These deposit types have been worked for commodities including gold, silver, beryllium, uranium, lead, zinc, copper, manganese, and cadmium (Lindsey, 1977; Morris and Mogensen, 1978; Zimbelman and others, 1990; Zimbelman and others, 1988). Heavy-mineral concentrate and stream-sediment samples derived from these hydrothermally altered rocks typically contain many geochemical anomalies (for example, see Zimbelman 1993b, c, d). Element associations characterizing lithology and hydrothermal mineral deposits can be distinguished using R-mode factor analysis. This tool often is useful in reconnaissance-scale surveys where sample anomalies are often weak. and single-element distributions may not help to delineate targets. R-mode factors analysis can help identify geologic trends and areas most likely to contain the mineral deposits. R-mode factor analysis was performed on a data set of results of analyses for 19 elements in 643 samples and produced a six-factor model. These six factors represent the geochemical contributions to the data set provided by lithologic and mineralization processes, The distribution of samples that contain high scores for mineralization-related factors is widespread in the Delta quadrangle. These sample sites

  12. Transferability and fine mapping of type 2 diabetes loci in African Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource Plus Study.

    PubMed

    Ng, Maggie C Y; Saxena, Richa; Li, Jiang; Palmer, Nicholette D; Dimitrov, Latchezar; Xu, Jianzhao; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Zmuda, Joseph M; Siscovick, David S; Patel, Sanjay R; Crook, Errol D; Sims, Mario; Chen, Yii-Der I; Bertoni, Alain G; Li, Mingyao; Grant, Struan F A; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B; Psaty, Bruce M; Pankow, James S; Langefeld, Carl D; Freedman, Barry I; Rotter, Jerome I; Wilson, James G; Bowden, Donald W

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) disproportionally affects African Americans (AfA) but, to date, genetic variants identified from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are primarily from European and Asian populations. We examined the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and locus transferability of 40 reported T2D loci in six AfA GWAS consisting of 2,806 T2D case subjects with or without end-stage renal disease and 4,265 control subjects from the Candidate Gene Association Resource Plus Study. Our results revealed that seven index SNPs at the TCF7L2, KLF14, KCNQ1, ADCY5, CDKAL1, JAZF1, and GCKR loci were significantly associated with T2D (P < 0.05). The strongest association was observed at TCF7L2 rs7903146 (odds ratio [OR] 1.30; P = 6.86 × 10⁻⁸). Locus-wide analysis demonstrated significant associations (P(emp) < 0.05) at regional best SNPs in the TCF7L2, KLF14, and HMGA2 loci as well as suggestive signals in KCNQ1 after correction for the effective number of SNPs at each locus. Of these loci, the regional best SNPs were in differential linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the index and adjacent SNPs. Our findings suggest that some loci discovered in prior reports affect T2D susceptibility in AfA with similar effect sizes. The reduced and differential LD pattern in AfA compared with European and Asian populations may facilitate fine mapping of causal variants at loci shared across populations. PMID:23193183

  13. Pan-cancer subtyping in a 2D-map shows substructures that are driven by specific combinations of molecular characteristics.

    PubMed

    Taskesen, Erdogan; Huisman, Sjoerd M H; Mahfouz, Ahmed; Krijthe, Jesse H; de Ridder, Jeroen; van de Stolpe, Anja; van den Akker, Erik; Verheagh, Wim; Reinders, Marcel J T

    2016-01-01

    The use of genome-wide data in cancer research, for the identification of groups of patients with similar molecular characteristics, has become a standard approach for applications in therapy-response, prognosis-prediction, and drug-development. To progress in these applications, the trend is to move from single genome-wide measurements in a single cancer-type towards measuring several different molecular characteristics across multiple cancer-types. Although current approaches shed light on molecular characteristics of various cancer-types, detailed relationships between patients within cancer clusters are unclear. We propose a novel multi-omic integration approach that exploits the joint behavior of the different molecular characteristics, supports visual exploration of the data by a two-dimensional landscape, and inspection of the contribution of the different genome-wide data-types. We integrated 4,434 samples across 19 cancer-types, derived from TCGA, containing gene expression, DNA-methylation, copy-number variation and microRNA expression data. Cluster analysis revealed 18 clusters, where three clusters showed a complex collection of cancer-types, squamous-cell-carcinoma, colorectal cancers, and a novel grouping of kidney-cancers. Sixty-four samples were identified outside their tissue-of-origin cluster. Known and novel patient subgroups were detected for Acute Myeloid Leukemia's, and breast cancers. Quantification of the contributions of the different molecular types showed that substructures are driven by specific (combinations of) molecular characteristics. PMID:27109935

  14. Pan-cancer subtyping in a 2D-map shows substructures that are driven by specific combinations of molecular characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Taskesen, Erdogan; Huisman, Sjoerd M. H.; Mahfouz, Ahmed; Krijthe, Jesse H.; de Ridder, Jeroen; van de Stolpe, Anja; van den Akker, Erik; Verheagh, Wim; Reinders, Marcel J. T.

    2016-01-01

    The use of genome-wide data in cancer research, for the identification of groups of patients with similar molecular characteristics, has become a standard approach for applications in therapy-response, prognosis-prediction, and drug-development. To progress in these applications, the trend is to move from single genome-wide measurements in a single cancer-type towards measuring several different molecular characteristics across multiple cancer-types. Although current approaches shed light on molecular characteristics of various cancer-types, detailed relationships between patients within cancer clusters are unclear. We propose a novel multi-omic integration approach that exploits the joint behavior of the different molecular characteristics, supports visual exploration of the data by a two-dimensional landscape, and inspection of the contribution of the different genome-wide data-types. We integrated 4,434 samples across 19 cancer-types, derived from TCGA, containing gene expression, DNA-methylation, copy-number variation and microRNA expression data. Cluster analysis revealed 18 clusters, where three clusters showed a complex collection of cancer-types, squamous-cell-carcinoma, colorectal cancers, and a novel grouping of kidney-cancers. Sixty-four samples were identified outside their tissue-of-origin cluster. Known and novel patient subgroups were detected for Acute Myeloid Leukemia’s, and breast cancers. Quantification of the contributions of the different molecular types showed that substructures are driven by specific (combinations of) molecular characteristics. PMID:27109935

  15. Digital map data, text, and graphical images in support of the 1995 National assessment of United States oil and gas resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, William R., (compiler); Obuch, Raymond C.; Brewton, James D.

    1996-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains files in support of the 1995 USGS National assessment of United States oil and gas resources (DDS-30), which was published separately and summarizes the results of a 3-year study of the oil and gas resources of the onshore and state waters of the United States. The study describes about 560 oil and gas plays in the United States--confirmed and hypothetical, conventional and unconventional. A parallel study of the Federal offshore is being conducted by the U.S. Minerals Management Service. This CD-ROM contains files in multiple formats, so that almost any computer user can import them into word processors and mapping software packages. No proprietary data are released on this CD-ROM. The complete text of DDS-30 is also available, as well as many figures. A companion CD-ROM (DDS-36) includes the tabular data, the programs, and the same text data, but none of the map data.

  16. Geologic, geochemical and mineral resource potential map of the Piney Creek Wilderness, Stone and Barry counties, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Walden P.; Erickson, Ralph L.; Thomson, Kenneth C.; Ellis, Clarence

    1982-01-01

    There is no evidence of significant metallic-mineral deposits in the rock units that are exposed at the surface in the wilderness, but there may be some potential for mineral deposits of two different types at depths from 400ft (120 m) to more than 2,100 ft (640 m) below the surface. Analyses of rock samples from a drill hole 15 mi (24 km) south of the area showed anomalous amounts of several metals in the Derby-Doerun (usage of the Missouri Geological Survey), Potosi, and Eminence Dolomites, which suggests that these units as well as the subsurface Ordovician carbonate units may have a potential for zinc-lead mineralization in the wilderness. Also, a high-amplitude magnetic anomaly along the northwest side of the wilderness suggests a potential for a small to moderate-sized magnetite (iron ore) deposit in the Precambrian basement rocks at a depth of at least 2,100 ft (640 m) below the surface, probably at least partly outside the boundary of the wilderness. In both cases the significance of the potential cannot be evaluated without deep drilling. In the case of the possible magnetite deposit, drilling should be preceded by a detailed magnetic survey to delineate the anomaly more clearly. The wilderness has little potential for resources of industrial minerals because they are readily available elsewhere in the region, and no known potential for energy resources.

  17. Mineral resource potential map of the Great Rift Instant Study Area, Blaine, Butte, Minidoka, and Power counties, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridenour, James; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.; Kuntz, Mel A.; Mabey, Don R.; Champion, Duane E.; Lefebvre, Richard H.; Stanley, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    Locating speculative resources (uraniferous sediment, auriferous gravel, and geothermal reservoirs) and hypothetical resources (oil and gas) that may underlie the geologically young lava flows of the study area would require extensive geophysical exploration and drilling.

  18. Participatory mapping in low-resource settings: Three novel methods used to engage Kenyan youth and other community members in community-based HIV prevention research.

    PubMed

    Green, Eric P; Warren, Virginia Rieck; Broverman, Sherryl; Ogwang, Benson; Puffer, Eve S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the link between health and place can strengthen the design of health interventions, particularly in the context of HIV prevention. Individuals who might one day participate in such interventions - including youth - may further improve the design if engaged in a meaningful way in the formative research process. Increasingly, participatory mapping methods are being used to achieve both aims. We describe the development of three innovative mapping methods for engaging youth in formative community-based research: 'dot map' focus groups, geocaching games, and satellite imagery-assisted daily activity logs. We demonstrate that these methods are feasible and acceptable in a low-resource, rural African setting. The discussion outlines the merits of each method and considers possible limitations. PMID:27064073

  19. Examining Geospatial Technology Tools to Compensate for Limited Exposures and Integrate Diverse Map and Data Resources in Geological Studies of the Southern Blue Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, N.; Ryan, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    Constraining the tectonic and metamorphic history of rock units in the southern Blue Ridge of western North Carolina is complicated by limited exposures and extensive vegetative cover, as well as burial by human development. Integrating varied data sources for field relations using cyberinformation tools may provide a means around such difficulties. We are examining several different Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tools as a means for effectively integrating available map data, both toward meeting research objectives as well as to facilitate classroom and field instruction. Commercial GIS platforms like ArcGIS and associated software can effectively integrate diverse geoscience information resources within a single platform. The Internet provides free access to databases ranging from geochemical datasets to topographical and structural data. Public domain geochemical databases like EarthChem provide spatially controlled elemental data on rock samples collected by many researchers over extended periods. Once incorporated within the ArcGIS template, this information can then be exported into free geospatial visualization applications such as Goggle Earth, as well as 3D manipulation programs like Fledermaus. Geospatially controlled USGS and NCGS geologic maps and geophysical datasets provide a useful base for examining mafic and ultramafic rock exposures in the Blue Ridge. One can resolve the exposures of specific rock types from these map resources within ArcGIS, as well as fault locations, and magnetics and gravity data. High-resolution DEMs permit data-intensive focusing on areas of interest, and Fledermaus manipulations permit 3D visualization. The output maps and visualizations are of publishable quality, and permit the manipulation of data across a region to infer contact trends and/or chemical or mineralogical, as well as to identify discontinuities that may be geologically relevant. “All-in-one” GIS applications like GeoMapApp have many of these

  20. An evaluation of the utility of ERTS-1 data for mapping and developing natural resources of Iran

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebtehadj, K. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Significant results are reported in the creation of an Iranian photomosaic from ERTS-1 imagery; in tectonic and structural mapping and interpretation, including discovery of significant new fault patterns in Iran; in river and lake mapping; in wetlands and fisheries nursery delineation and mapping; in range and agricultural surveys and inventories using multi-stage sample methods; and in the computer analysis of ERTS-1 digital tapes for urban land use.

  1. Mapping wetlands in the Lower Mekong Basin for wetland resource and conservation management using Landsat ETM images and field survey data.

    PubMed

    MacAlister, Charlotte; Mahaxay, Manithaphone

    2009-05-01

    The Mekong River Basin is considered to be the second most species rich river basin in the world. The 795,000 km(2) catchment encompasses several ecoregions, incorporating biodiverse and productive wetland systems. Eighty percent of the rapidly expanding population of the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB), made up in part by Lao PDR, Thailand, Cambodia and Viet Nam, live in rural areas and are heavily reliant on wetland resources. As the populations of Cambodia and Lao PDR will double in the next 20 years, pressure on natural resources and particularly wetlands can only increase. For development planning, resource and conservation management to incorporate wetland issues, information on the distribution and character of Mekong wetlands is essential. The existing but outdated wetland maps were compiled from secondary landuse-landcover data, have limited coverage, poor thematic accuracy and no meta-data. Therefore the Mekong River Commission (MRC) undertook to produce new wetland coverage for the LMB. As resources, funding and regional capacity are limited, it was determined that the method applied should use existing facilities, be easily adaptable, and replicable locally. For the product to be useful it must be accepted by local governments and decision makers. The results must be of acceptable accuracy (>75%) and the methodology should be relatively understandable to non-experts. In the first stage of this exercise, field survey was conducted at five pilot sites covering a range of typical wetland habitats (MRC wetland classification) to supply data for a supervised classification of Landsat ETM images from the existing MRC archive. Images were analysed using ERDAS IMAGINE and applying Maximum Likelihood Classification. Field data were reserved to apply formal accuracy assessment to the final wetland habitat maps, with resulting accuracy ranging from 77 to 94%. The maps produced are now in use at a Provincial and National level in three countries for resource and

  2. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3666 and 3766, Balkh (219), Mazar-e Sharif (220), Qarqin (213), and Hazara Toghai (214) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  3. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 2962 and 3062, Gawdezereh (615), Galachah (616), Chahar Burjak (609), and Khan Neshin (610) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  4. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3668 and 3768, Baghlan (221), Taluqan (222), Imam Sahib (215), and Rustaq (216) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  5. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3360 and 3460, Kawir-e Naizar (413), Kohe-Mahmudo-Esmailjan (414), Kol-e Namaksar (407), and Ghoriyan (408) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  6. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3664 and 3764, Char Shengo (123), Shibirghan (124), Jalajin (117), and Kham-Ab (118) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  7. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3260, Dasht-e-Chah-e-Mazar (419) and Anar Darah (420) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  8. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 2962 and 3062, Gawdezereh (615), Galachah (616), Chahar Burjak (609), and Khan Neshin (610) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoefen, Todd M.; King, Trude V.V.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  9. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3668 and 3768, Baghlan (221), Taluqan (222), Imam Sahib (215), and Rustaq (216) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  10. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3666 and 3766, Balkh (219), Mazar-e Sharif (220), Qarqin (213), and Hazara Toghai (214) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  11. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3664 and 3764, Char Shengo (123), Shibirghan (124), Jalajin (117), and Kham-Ab (118) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  12. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3360 and 3460, Kawir-e Naizar (413), Kohe-Mahmudo-Esmailjan (414), Kol-e Namaksar (407), and Ghoriyan (408) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  13. Genetic mapping to 10q23.3-q24.2, in a large Italian pedigree, of a new syndrome showing bilateral cataracts, gastroesophageal reflux, and spastic paraparesis with amyotrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Seri, M; Cusano, R; Forabosco, P; Cinti, R; Caroli, F; Picco, P; Bini, R; Morra, V B; De Michele, G; Lerone, M; Silengo, M; Pela, I; Borrone, C; Romeo, G; Devoto, M

    1999-01-01

    We have recently observed a large pedigree with a new rare autosomal dominant spastic paraparesis. In three subsequent generations, 13 affected individuals presented with bilateral cataracts, gastroesophageal reflux with persistent vomiting, and spastic paraparesis with amyotrophy. Bilateral cataracts occurred in all affected individuals, with the exception of one patient who presented with a chorioretinal dystrophy, whereas clinical signs of spastic paraparesis showed a variable expressivity. Using a genomewide mapping approach, we mapped the disorder to the long arm of chromosome 10 on band q23.3-q24.2, in a 12-cM chromosomal region where additional neurologic disorders have been localized. The spectrum of phenotypic manifestations in this family is reminiscent of a smaller pedigree, reported recently, confirming the possibility of a new syndrome. Finally, the anticipation of symptoms suggests that an unstable trinucleotide repeat may be responsible for the condition. PMID:9973297

  14. An evaluation of the utility of ERTS-1 data for mapping and developing natural resources of Iran

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebtehadj, K. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Results are reported in structural mapping leading to tectonic interpretation; in surficial deposits mapping; in analysis of salt diapirism in southwest Iran; in updating and correcting existing hydrological maps; in monitoring fluctuations of water in some intermittent lakes; in the delineation of wetland areas and the study of fluvial suspended load of the head of the Persian Gulf in relation to the fishing industry; in exercises in soil mapping; in range and agricultural surveys and inventory using multistage sampling methods, and in the computer analysis of ERTS-1 digital tapes for urban land use. The completion of a 1:1,000,000 false color photomosaic of Iran is also discussed.

  15. Computer-aided analysis of Skylab scanner data for land use mapping, forestry and water resource applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Skylab data were obtained over a mountainous test site containing a complex association of cover types and rugged topography. The application of computer-aided analysis techniques to the multispectral scanner data produced a number of significant results. Techniques were developed to digitally overlay topographic data (elevation, slope, and aspect) onto the S-192 MSS data to provide a method for increasing the effectiveness and accuracy of computer-aided analysis techniques for cover type mapping. The S-192 MSS data were analyzed using computer techniques developed at Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing (LARS), Purdue University. Land use maps, forest cover type maps, snow cover maps, and area tabulations were obtained and evaluated. These results compared very well with information obtained by conventional techniques. Analysis of the spectral characteristics of Skylab data has conclusively proven the value of the middle infrared portion of the spectrum (about 1.3-3.0 micrometers), a wavelength region not previously available in multispectral satellite data.

  16. Mineral resources potential map of the Lost Cove and Harper Creek Roadless Areas, Avery and Caldwell counties, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crandall, T.M.; Ross, R.B.; Whitlow, J.W.; Griffitts, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Mineral resources having low to moderate potential are gold and minerals of thorium, beryllium, niobium, and copper. Stone has a low economic potential; lead, molybdenum, and titanium have low resource potential. These conclusions are based on results of prospect examination, radiometric survey, geochemical survey of stream sediments, saprolite, and bedrock.

  17. GeoMapApp: A free, on-line resource for plate margins research and education (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Ryan, W. B.; Coplan, J.; Chan, S.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; O'Hara, S.; Arko, R. A.; Nitsche, F. O.; Bonczkowski, J.; Weissel, R.; Morton, J. J.; Leung, A.

    2010-12-01

    A wide range of plate boundary data sets compiled over the years has been augmented more recently by data collected through the 1999-2010 NSF MARGINS program and through the on-going Ridge 2000 program. GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), a free, map-based data discovery and visualisation tool has been developed as part of the MARGINS and Ridge 2000 integrated database system. As a result, GeoMapApp contains many of the data sets of interest to MARGINS-R2k researchers and educators and has been widely adopted by those communities. The intuitive GeoMapApp interface allows users to quickly locate, interrogate and download geospatial data, to layer multiple data sets that aid data comparisons, and to create useful images and maps. The backbone of GeoMapApp is a global elevation base map, called the Global Multi-Resolution Topography (GMRT) Synthesis, that is compiled from many sources including much multibeam swath bathymetry data and that is updated regularly. Examples of built-in data sets include bathymetry and backscatter grids; EarthChem and PetDB geochemical sample analyses; the locations of samples and instruments from major NSF-funded field programs; and, seafloor photos and Alvin dive video images. Portals within GeoMapApp offer enhanced data functionality and include multi-channel seismics, drill core logs and photos, and earthquake catalogues. Users can import their own tabular data sets and spreadsheets and perform all of the standard GeoMapApp functionality upon them - the data symbols can be coloured, scaled, graphed, and points can be selected with an interactive lasso tool. Imported grids can be profiled, shaded, contoured and viewed in 3-D. GeoMapApp is used in the majority of MARGINS undergraduate-level mini-lessons (http://serc.carleton.edu/margins/collection.html). These self-contained learning activities range from short interactive illustrations for in-class use to in-depth multi-lab modules. Each mini-lesson contains learning goals and

  18. Computer-composite mapping for geologists

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Driel, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program for overlaying maps has been tested and evaluated as a means for producing geologic derivative maps. Four maps of the Sugar House Quadrangle, Utah, were combined, using the Multi-Scale Data Analysis and Mapping Program, in a single composite map that shows the relative stability of the land surface during earthquakes. Computer-composite mapping can provide geologists with a powerful analytical tool and a flexible graphic display technique. Digitized map units can be shown singly, grouped with different units from the same map, or combined with units from other source maps to produce composite maps. The mapping program permits the user to assign various values to the map units and to specify symbology for the final map. Because of its flexible storage, easy manipulation, and capabilities of graphic output, the composite-mapping technique can readily be applied to mapping projects in sedimentary and crystalline terranes, as well as to maps showing mineral resource potential. ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  19. Human Mind Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  20. pseudoMap: an innovative and comprehensive resource for identification of siRNA-mediated mechanisms in human transcribed pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wen-Ling; Yang, Wen-Kuang; Huang, Hsien-Da; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing process within living cells, which is controlled by the RNA-induced silencing complex with a sequence-specific manner. In flies and mice, the pseudogene transcripts can be processed into short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that regulate protein-coding genes through the RNAi pathway. Following these findings, we construct an innovative and comprehensive database to elucidate siRNA-mediated mechanism in human transcribed pseudogenes (TPGs). To investigate TPG producing siRNAs that regulate protein-coding genes, we mapped the TPGs to small RNAs (sRNAs) that were supported by publicly deep sequencing data from various sRNA libraries and constructed the TPG-derived siRNA-target interactions. In addition, we also presented that TPGs can act as a target for miRNAs that actually regulate the parental gene. To enable the systematic compilation and updating of these results and additional information, we have developed a database, pseudoMap, capturing various types of information, including sequence data, TPG and cognate annotation, deep sequencing data, RNA-folding structure, gene expression profiles, miRNA annotation and target prediction. As our knowledge, pseudoMap is the first database to demonstrate two mechanisms of human TPGs: encoding siRNAs and decoying miRNAs that target the parental gene. pseudoMap is freely accessible at http://pseudomap.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/. Database URL: http://pseudomap.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/ PMID:23396300

  1. A study of the usefulness of Skylab EREP data for earth resources study in Australia. [thematic mapping landforms, land use and vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, N. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Cursory examination shows that the Skylab photos alone would provide all the pictorial information needed for surveys in arid and semiarid regions according to the pattern of the Alice Springs survey (mapping at a scale of 1:1 million).

  2. A program for the conversion of The National Map data from proprietary format to resource description framework (RDF)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bulen, Andrew; Carter, Jonathan J.; Varanka, Dalia E.

    2011-01-01

    To expand data functionality and capabilities for users of The National Map of the U.S. Geological Survey, data sets for six watersheds and three urban areas were converted from the Best Practices vector data model formats to Semantic Web data formats. This report describes and documents the conver-sion process. The report begins with an introduction to basic Semantic Web standards and the background of The National Map. Data were converted from a proprietary format to Geog-raphy Markup Language to capture the geometric footprint of topographic data features. Configuration files were designed to eliminate redundancy and make the conversion more efficient. A SPARQL endpoint was established for data validation and queries. The report concludes by describing the results of the conversion.

  3. Mineral resource potential map of the Spanish Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Huerfano and Las Animas counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Budding, Karin E.; Kluender, Steven E.

    1983-01-01

    The depth of several thousand feet at which coal may underlie the surface rocks of the study area makes it a resource with little likelihood of development. The potential for oil and gas appears low because of the apparent lack of structural traps and the intense igneous activity in the area.

  4. Geologic characterization of shelf areas using usSEABED for GIS mapping, modeling processes and assessing marine sand and gravel resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, S.J.; Bliss, J.D.; Arsenault, M.A.; Jenkins, C.J.; Goff, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Geologic maps depicting offshore sedimentary features serve many scientific and applied purposes. Such maps have been lacking, but recent computer technology and software offer promise in the capture and display of diverse marine data. Continental margins contain landforms which provide a variety of important functions and contain important sedimentary records. Some shelf areas also contain deposits regarded as potential aggregate resources. Because proper management of coastal and offshore areas is increasingly important, knowledge of the framework geology and marine processes is critical. Especially valuable are comprehensive and integrated digital databases based on high-quality information from original sources. Products of interest are GIS maps containing thematic information, such as sediment character and texture. These products are useful to scientists modeling nearshore and shelf processes as well as planners and managers. The U.S. Geological Survey is leading a national program to gather a variety of extant marine geologic data into the usSEABED database system. This provides centralized, integrated marine geologic data collected over the past 50 years. To date, over 340,000 sediment data points from the U.S. reside in usSEABED, which combines an array of physical data and analytical and descriptive information about the sea floor and are available to the marine community through three USGS data reports for the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific published in 2006, and the project web sites: (http://woodshole.er.usg s.gov/project-pages/aggregates/ and http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/usseabed/)

  5. Application of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission data to regional geologic analysis for mineral and energy resource evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, K. (Principal Investigator); Hummer-Miller, S.; Knepper, D. H., Jr.; Krohn, M. D.; Podwysocki, M. H.; Pohn, H. H.; Raines, G. L.; Rowan, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Heat Capacity Mapping Mission thermal-inertia images of a diversity of terrains and geologic settings were examined in conjunction with topographic, geologic, geophysical, and LANDSAT data. The images were found to have attributes similar to bedrock maps. In the Cascades region, two new features were identified and a method was developed to characterize regional terranes using linear feature data. Two northeast-trending Lineaments were discovered in the Overthrust Belt of Montana and Idaho. The longer of the two extends from the Idaho-Oregon border, through the Idaho batholith and across the Lewis thrust. It coincides, along segments, with mapped faults and an aeromagnetic pattern change. A major lineament crossing the Colorado Plateau and the Southern Rocky Mountians was detected on several thermal-inertial images and evidence was found for the existence of a geologic discontinuity. Vegetation-covered areas in Richfield and the Silver City quadrangle (Arizona and New Mexico) displayed thermal-inertia differences within heavily vegetation areas although no apreciable correlation was found between vegetation cover and thermal inertia. Resistant ridges and knolls have high thermal inertias and thermal-inertia contrasts occurred at lithologic and fault contacts. In the heavy vegetated Pinaleno Mountains, Arizona, a Lithologic unit obscured on LANDSAT MSS data due to the vegetation cover, exhibited a thermal-inertia contrast with its surroundings.

  6. Geology and mineral resource assessment of the Venezuelan Guayana Shield at 1:500,000 scale; a digital representation of maps published by the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schruben, Paul G.; Wynn, J.C.; Gray, Floyd; Cox, D.P.; Sterwart, J.H.; Brooks, W.E.

    1997-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains vector-based digital maps of the geology and resource assessment of the Venezuela Guayana Shield originally published as paper maps in 1993 in U. S. Geological Survey Bulletin 2062, at a scale of 1:1 million and revised in 1993-95 as separate maps at a scale of 1:500,000. Although the maps on this disc can be displayed at different scales, they are not intended to be used at any scale more detailed than 1:500,000.

  7. Remote sensing of potential lunar resources. 2: High spatial resolution mapping of spectral reflectance ratios and implications for nearside mare TiO2 content`

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melendrez, David E.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Larson, Stephen M.; Singer, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    High spatial resolution maps illustrating variations in spectral reflectance 400/560 nm ratio values have been generated for the following mare regions: (1) the border between southern Mare Serenitatis and northern Mare Tranquillitatis (including the MS-2 standard area and Apollo 17 landing site), (2) central Mare Tranquillitatis, (3) Oceanus Procellarum near Seleucus, and (4) southern Oceanus Procellarum and Flamsteed. We have also obtained 320-1000 nm reflectance spectra of several sites relative to MS-2 to facilitate scaling of the images and provide additional information on surface composition. Inferred TiO2 abundances for these mare regions have been determined using an empirical calibration which relates the weight percent TiO2 in mature mare regolith to the observed 400/560 nm ratio. Mare areas with high TiO2 abundances are probably rich in ilmenite (FeTiO3) a potential lunar resource. The highest potential TiO2 concentrations we have identified in the nearside maria occur in central Mare Tranquillitatis. Inferred TiO2 contents for these areas are greater than 9 wt% and are spatially consistent with the highest-TiO2 regions mapped previously at lower spatial resolution. We note that the morphology of surface units with high 400/560 nm ratio values increases in complexity at higher spatial resolutions. Comparisons have been made with previously published geologic maps, Lunar Orbiter IV, and ground-based images, and some possible morphologic correlatins have been found between our mapped 400/560 nm ratio values and volcanic landforms such as lava flows, mare domes, and collapse pits.

  8. Remote sensing of potential lunar resources. 2: High spatial resolution mapping of spectral reflectance ratios and implications for nearside mare TiO2 content`

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melendrez, D. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Larson, S. M.; Singer, R. B.

    1994-03-01

    High spatial resolution maps illustrating variations in spectral reflectance 400/560 nm ratio values have been generated for the following mare regions: (1) the border between southern Mare Serenitatis and northern Mare Tranquillitatis (including the MS-2 standard area and Apollo 17 landing site), (2) central Mare Tranquillitatis, (3) Oceanus Procellarum near Seleucus, and (4) southern Oceanus Procellarum and Flamsteed. We have also obtained 320-1000 nm reflectance spectra of several sites relative to MS-2 to facilitate scaling of the images and provide additional information on surface composition. Inferred TiO2 abundances for these mare regions have been determined using an empirical calibration which relates the weight percent TiO2 in mature mare regolith to the observed 400/560 nm ratio. Mare areas with high TiO2 abundances are probably rich in ilmenite (FeTiO3) a potential lunar resource. The highest potential TiO2 concentrations we have identified in the nearside maria occur in central Mare Tranquillitatis. Inferred TiO2 contents for these areas are greater than 9 wt% and are spatially consistent with the highest-TiO2 regions mapped previously at lower spatial resolution. We note that the morphology of surface units with high 400/560 nm ratio values increases in complexity at higher spatial resolutions. Comparisons have been made with previously published geologic maps, Lunar Orbiter IV, and ground-based images, and some possible morphologic correlatins have been found between our mapped 400/560 nm ratio values and volcanic landforms such as lava flows, mare domes, and collapse pits.

  9. Geologic and aeromagnetic maps and mineral resource potential survey of the Blackjack Springs Wilderness, Vilas County, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, Klaus J.

    1983-01-01

    The mineral resource potential of the Blackjack Springs Wilderness in the Nicolet National Forest, Vilas County, Wisc., was evaluated in 1982.  No bedrock exposures are known in or near the wilderness.  Geophysical data and regional geologic relations suggest that the area consists mostly of recrystallized and deformed mafic volcanic rocks and associated mafic intrusives of Early Proterozoic age.  The only identified mineral resources in the Blackjack Springs Wilderness are sand and gravel, but these commodities are abundant regionally.  While the occurrence of stratabound massive-sulfide (cooper-zinc-lead) and (or) magmatic sulfide (copper and (or) nickel)-type deposits are possible in the wilderness, their occurrence is not probable.

  10. Mineral and geothermal resource potential of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Clackamas and Hood River Counties, Oregon. Summary report and map

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The potential for near-surface mineral resources in the Mount Hood Wilderness is low. Geochemical data suggest two areas of weak epithermal mineralization in the Zigzag Mountain part of the wilderness: (1) the Lost Creek-Burnt Lake-Cast Creek-Short Creek area on the north side of Zigzag Mountain where vein-type lead-zinc-silver mineralization occurs; and (2) the Lady Creek-Laurel Hill area on the south side of Zigzag Mountain where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has associated propylitic alteration resulting in some porphyry-type copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc mineralization. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248/sup 0/F, 120/sup 0/C) hot-water systems in the wilderness is moderate to high. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA) and two parts have been included in geothermal lease areas. Rock and gravel sources are present within the wilderness; however, quantities of similar and more accessible deposits are available outside the wilderness. Deposits outside the wilderness are large enough to supply local demand in the foreseeable future.

  11. The Use of Social Ecological Hotspots Mapping: Co-Developing Adaptation Strategies for Resource Management by Communities and Policy Makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessa, L.

    2014-12-01

    Ultimately, adaptation is based on a set of trade-offs rather than optimal conditions, something that is rarely seen in messy social ecological systems (SES). In this talk, we discuss the role of spatial hot-spot mapping using social and biophysical data to understand the feedbacks in SES. We review the types of data needed, their means of acquisition and the analytic methods involved. In addition, we outline the challenges faced in co-developing this type of inquiry based on lessons learned from several long-term programs. Finally, we present the utility of SES hotspots in developing adaptation strategies on the ground by communities and policy makers.

  12. The Alaskan Mineral Resource Assessment Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic and mineral resource maps of the Big Delta Quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Helen Laura; Albert, N.R.D.; Griscom, Andrew; Hessin, T.D.; Menzie, W.D.; Turner, D.L.; Wilson, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    The geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and Landsat imagery of the Big Delta quadrangle, 16,335 km 2 in the Yukon-Tanana Upland of east-central Alaska, were investigated, and maps and reports were prepared by an interdisciplinary research team for the purpose of assessing the mineral potential. The quadrangle is dominantly a complex terrane of greenschist- to amphibolitefacies metamorphic rocks that have been intruded by Mesozoic and Tertiary dioritic to granitic rocks and are overlain by Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic rocks. Serpentinized peridotite and associated greenstone, graywacke, and chert crop out in some places. The quadrangle is bisected by the northeastward-trending Shaw Creek fault, which, on the basis of aeromagnetic interpretation and geologic data, is postulated to have left-lateral offset of as much as 48 km. On the northwest side of the Shaw Creek fault, metamorphic rock units have a northwesterly regional trend, and the oldest rocks could be Precambrian in age. Gneiss and schist in the southwestern part of the quadrangle are derived from both igneous and sedimentary protoliths, some of which may be as old as Precambrian. Other rock units, which include calcareous schist and thin-layered marble, black quartzite, semischist, and cataclastic rocks, are considered to be of probable Paleozoic age, although no fossils have yet been found in these rocks. Radiolarians and conodonts in chert associated with greenstone and ultramafic rocks indicate that the chert is of Permian age. Potassium-argon ages on igneous rocks of the Big Delta quadrangle fall into two groups: those with biotite, muscovite, hornblende, and sanidine ages between 50 to 69 m.y.; and those with biotite, hornblende, and sanidine ages between 88 to 105 m.y. The younger of these two groups appears to indicate the time of a plutonic event marked by intrusion of mostly small, isolated plutons, including hypabyssal stocks, and the eruption of silicic volcanic rocks. Most of the plutons are

  13. Taking in a Show.

    PubMed

    Boden, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    Many medical practices have cut back on education and staff development expenses, especially those costs associated with conventions and conferences. But there are hard-to-value returns on your investment in these live events--beyond the obvious benefits of acquired knowledge and skills. Major vendors still exhibit their services and wares at many events, and the exhibit hall is a treasure-house of information and resources for the savvy physician or administrator. Make and stick to a purposeful plan to exploit the trade show. You can compare products, gain new insights and ideas, and even negotiate better deals with representatives anxious to realize returns on their exhibition investments. PMID:27249887

  14. Application of ERTS-1 imagery in mapping and managing soil and range resources in the Sand Hills region of Nebraska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seevers, P. M.; Lewis, D. T.; Drew, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Interpretations of imagery from the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1) indicate that soil associations and attendant range sites can be identified on the basis of vegetation and topography using multi-temporal imagery. Optical density measurements of imagery from the visible red band of the multispectral scanner (MSS band 5) obtained during the growing season were related to field measurements of vegetative biomass, a factor that closely parallels range condition class on specific range sites. ERTS-1 imagery also permitted inventory and assessment of center-pivot irrigation systems in the Sand Hills region in relation to soil and topographic conditions and energy requirements.

  15. Hydrologic Unit Map - 1974, state of Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1976-01-01

    This map and accompanying table show Hydrologic Units that are basically hydrographic in nature.  The Cataloging Units shown will supplant the Cataloging Units previously used by the U.S. Geological Survey in its Catalog of Informaiton on Water Data (1966-72).  The previous U.S. Geological Survey Catalog-Indexing System was by map number and letter, such as 49M.  The boundaries as shown have been adapted from "The Catalog of Information on Water Data" (1972), "Water Resources Regions and Subregions for the National Assessment of Water and Related Land Resources" by the U.S. Water Reseources Council (1970), "River Basins of the United States" by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service ((1963, 1970), "River Basin Maps Showing Hydrologic Stations" by the Inter-Agency Committee on Water Resources, Subcommittee on Hydrology (1961), and State planning maps.

  16. Kentucky map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A wall-sized geological map of Kentucky, the product of 18 years of work, has just been released. Produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) at the University of Kentucky, the map is unique, according to state geologist Donald Haney, because it is the first and only state map ever produced in detailed form from geologic quadrangle maps already available from the KGS.At a scale of 1:250,000, the map shows the surface distribution of various types of rock throughout the state, as well as geologic structure, faults, and surface coal beds. Numerous geologic sections, stratigraphic diagrams, correlation charts, and structure sections accompany the map. Compiled by R. C. McDowell and S. L. Moore of the USGS and by G. J . Grabowski of the KGS, the map was made by photoreducing and generalizing the detailed geologic quadrangle maps.

  17. Maps showing anomalous concentrations of lead, molybdenum, bismuth, and tungsten in stream sediment and heavy-mineral concentrate from parts of the Ajo and Lukeville 1 degree by 2 degrees quadrangles, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theobald, P.K.; Barton, H.N.

    1988-01-01

    These maps are part of a folio of maps of the Ajo and Lukeville 1° x 2° quadrangles, Arizona, prepared under the Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other publications in this folio include U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Maps MF-1834-A, 1834–B, and 1834–C and U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Reports 82–419, 82–599, and 83–734. Open-File Reports 82–419 and 83–734 constitute the basic data and initial interpretation on which this discussion is predicated. Open-File Report 82–599 is an aeromagnetic map.

  18. 5D Modelling: An Efficient Approach for Creating Spatiotemporal Predictive 3D Maps of Large-Scale Cultural Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doulamis, A.; Doulamis, N.; Ioannidis, C.; Chrysouli, C.; Grammalidis, N.; Dimitropoulos, K.; Potsiou, C.; Stathopoulou, E.-K.; Ioannides, M.

    2015-08-01

    Outdoor large-scale cultural sites are mostly sensitive to environmental, natural and human made factors, implying an imminent need for a spatio-temporal assessment to identify regions of potential cultural interest (material degradation, structuring, conservation). On the other hand, in Cultural Heritage research quite different actors are involved (archaeologists, curators, conservators, simple users) each of diverse needs. All these statements advocate that a 5D modelling (3D geometry plus time plus levels of details) is ideally required for preservation and assessment of outdoor large scale cultural sites, which is currently implemented as a simple aggregation of 3D digital models at different time and levels of details. The main bottleneck of such an approach is its complexity, making 5D modelling impossible to be validated in real life conditions. In this paper, a cost effective and affordable framework for 5D modelling is proposed based on a spatial-temporal dependent aggregation of 3D digital models, by incorporating a predictive assessment procedure to indicate which regions (surfaces) of an object should be reconstructed at higher levels of details at next time instances and which at lower ones. In this way, dynamic change history maps are created, indicating spatial probabilities of regions needed further 3D modelling at forthcoming instances. Using these maps, predictive assessment can be made, that is, to localize surfaces within the objects where a high accuracy reconstruction process needs to be activated at the forthcoming time instances. The proposed 5D Digital Cultural Heritage Model (5D-DCHM) is implemented using open interoperable standards based on the CityGML framework, which also allows the description of additional semantic metadata information. Visualization aspects are also supported to allow easy manipulation, interaction and representation of the 5D-DCHM geometry and the respective semantic information. The open source 3DCity

  19. The use of LANDSAT-1 imagery in mapping and managing soil and range resources in the Sand Hills region of Nebraska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seevers, P. M. (Principal Investigator); Drew, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Evaluation of ERTS-1 imagery for the Sand Hills region of Nebraska has shown that the data can be used to effectively measure several parameters of inventory needs. (1) Vegetative biomass can be estimated with a high degree of confidence using computer compatable tape data. (2) Soils can be mapped to the subgroup level with high altitude aircraft color infrared photography and to the association level with multitemporal ERTS-1 imagery. (3) Water quality in Sand Hills lakes can be estimated utilizing computer compatable tape data. (4) Center pivot irrigation can be inventoried from satellite data and can be monitored regarding site selection and relative success of establishment from high altitude aircraft color infrared photography. (5) ERTS-1 data is of exceptional value in wide-area inventory of natural resource data in the Sand Hills region of Nebraska.

  20. Resources, resources, resources....

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    Several resources provided by different types of organizations are available to transgender people in the New York area. Some of these organizations include the Gender Identity Project, Harlem United Community AIDS Center, Hetrick Martin Institute, SafeSpace and Youth Enrichment Services (YES). Organization telephone numbers, addresses, and their targeted audiences are provided. PMID:11364801

  1. Lymphatic Filariasis in Nigeria; Micro-stratification Overlap Mapping (MOM) as a Prerequisite for Cost-Effective Resource Utilization in Control and Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Okorie, Patricia N.; Ademowo, George O.; Saka, Yisa; Davies, Emmanuel; Okoronkwo, Chukwu; Bockarie, Moses J.; Molyneux, David H.; Kelly-Hope, Louise A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nigeria has a significant burden of lymphatic filariasis (LF) caused by the parasite Wuchereria bancrofti. A major concern to the expansion of the LF elimination programme is the risk of serious adverse events (SAEs) associated with the use of ivermectin in areas co-endemic with Loa filariasis. To better understand this, as well as other factors that may impact on LF elimination, we used Micro-stratification Overlap Mapping (MOM) to highlight the distribution and potential impact of multiple disease interventions that geographically coincide in LF endemic areas and which will impact on LF and vice versa. Methodology/Principal findings LF data from the literature and Federal Ministry of Health (FMoH) were collated into a database. LF prevalence distributions; predicted prevalence of loiasis; ongoing onchocerciasis community-directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTi); and long-lasting insecticidal mosquito net (LLIN) distributions for malaria were incorporated into overlay maps using geographical information system (GIS) software. LF was prevalent across most regions of the country. The mean prevalence determined by circulating filarial antigen (CFA) was 14.0% (n = 134 locations), and by microfilaria (Mf) was 8.2% (n = 162 locations). Overall, LF endemic areas geographically coincided with CDTi priority areas, however, LLIN coverage was generally low (<50%) in areas where LF prevalence was high or co-endemic with L. loa. Conclusions/Significance The extensive database and series of maps produced in this study provide an important overview for the LF Programme and will assist to maximize existing interventions, ensuring cost effective use of resources as the programme scales up. Such information is a prerequisite for the LF programme, and will allow for other factors to be included into planning, as well as monitoring and evaluation activities given the broad spectrum impact of the drugs used. PMID:24040432

  2. Map showing locations of mines, prospects, and patented mining claims, and classification of mineral deposits in the Silver City 7 1/2-minute Quadrangle, Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Ed; Buscher, David; Wilson, A.B.; Johnson, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    This map is one in a set of 26 maps (see index map) at 1:24,000 scale of the Black Hills region of South Dakota and Wyoming om which are shown a geologic classification of mines, a bibliography of mineral deposits, and locations of active and inactive mines, prospects, and patented mining claims. Some of these maps are published as U. S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Maps (MF series) and some as U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Reports (QF series); see index map. An earlier unpublished version of this set of maps was the data base from which plate 4 (scale 1:250,000) of DeWitt and others (1986) was compiled. Subsequent to that publication, the set has been revised and updated, and prospects and patented claims have been added. These revised and more detailed 1:24,000-scale maps should be used for the equivalent areas of plate 4 of DeWitt and others (1986).

  3. Mapping Genetic Diversity of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.): Application of Spatial Analysis for Conservation and Use of Plant Genetic Resources

    PubMed Central

    van Zonneveld, Maarten; Scheldeman, Xavier; Escribano, Pilar; Viruel, María A.; Van Damme, Patrick; Garcia, Willman; Tapia, César; Romero, José; Sigueñas, Manuel; Hormaza, José I.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing call for inventories that evaluate geographic patterns in diversity of plant genetic resources maintained on farm and in species' natural populations in order to enhance their use and conservation. Such evaluations are relevant for useful tropical and subtropical tree species, as many of these species are still undomesticated, or in incipient stages of domestication and local populations can offer yet-unknown traits of high value to further domestication. For many outcrossing species, such as most trees, inbreeding depression can be an issue, and genetic diversity is important to sustain local production. Diversity is also crucial for species to adapt to environmental changes. This paper explores the possibilities of incorporating molecular marker data into Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to allow visualization and better understanding of spatial patterns of genetic diversity as a key input to optimize conservation and use of plant genetic resources, based on a case study of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.), a Neotropical fruit tree species. We present spatial analyses to (1) improve the understanding of spatial distribution of genetic diversity of cherimoya natural stands and cultivated trees in Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru based on microsatellite molecular markers (SSRs); and (2) formulate optimal conservation strategies by revealing priority areas for in situ conservation, and identifying existing diversity gaps in ex situ collections. We found high levels of allelic richness, locally common alleles and expected heterozygosity in cherimoya's putative centre of origin, southern Ecuador and northern Peru, whereas levels of diversity in southern Peru and especially in Bolivia were significantly lower. The application of GIS on a large microsatellite dataset allows a more detailed prioritization of areas for in situ conservation and targeted collection across the Andean distribution range of cherimoya than previous studies could do, i.e. at

  4. Mapping genetic diversity of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.): application of spatial analysis for conservation and use of plant genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Zonneveld, Maarten van; Scheldeman, Xavier; Escribano, Pilar; Viruel, María A; Van Damme, Patrick; Garcia, Willman; Tapia, César; Romero, José; Sigueñas, Manuel; Hormaza, José I

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing call for inventories that evaluate geographic patterns in diversity of plant genetic resources maintained on farm and in species' natural populations in order to enhance their use and conservation. Such evaluations are relevant for useful tropical and subtropical tree species, as many of these species are still undomesticated, or in incipient stages of domestication and local populations can offer yet-unknown traits of high value to further domestication. For many outcrossing species, such as most trees, inbreeding depression can be an issue, and genetic diversity is important to sustain local production. Diversity is also crucial for species to adapt to environmental changes. This paper explores the possibilities of incorporating molecular marker data into Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to allow visualization and better understanding of spatial patterns of genetic diversity as a key input to optimize conservation and use of plant genetic resources, based on a case study of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.), a Neotropical fruit tree species. We present spatial analyses to (1) improve the understanding of spatial distribution of genetic diversity of cherimoya natural stands and cultivated trees in Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru based on microsatellite molecular markers (SSRs); and (2) formulate optimal conservation strategies by revealing priority areas for in situ conservation, and identifying existing diversity gaps in ex situ collections. We found high levels of allelic richness, locally common alleles and expected heterozygosity in cherimoya's putative centre of origin, southern Ecuador and northern Peru, whereas levels of diversity in southern Peru and especially in Bolivia were significantly lower. The application of GIS on a large microsatellite dataset allows a more detailed prioritization of areas for in situ conservation and targeted collection across the Andean distribution range of cherimoya than previous studies could do, i.e. at

  5. GIS INTERNET MAP SERVICE FOR DISPLAYING SELENIUM CONTAMINATION DATA IN THE SOUTHEASTERN IDAHO PHOSPHATE MINING RESOURCE AREA

    SciTech Connect

    Roger Mayes; Sera White; Randy Lee

    2005-04-01

    Selenium is present in waste rock/overburden that is removed during phosphate mining in southeastern Idaho. Waste rock piles or rock used during reclamation can be a source of selenium (and other metals) to streams and vegetation. Some instances (in 1996) of selenium toxicity in grazing sheep and horses caused public health and environmental concerns, leading to Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) involvement. The Selenium Information System Project is a collaboration among the DEQ, the United States Forest Service (USFS), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the Idaho Mining Association (IMA), Idaho State University (ISU), and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL)2. The Selenium Information System is a centralized data repository for southeastern Idaho selenium data. The data repository combines information that was previously in numerous agency, mining company, and consultants’ databases and web sites. These data include selenium concentrations in soil, water, sediment, vegetation and other environmental media, as well as comprehensive mine information. The Idaho DEQ spearheaded a selenium area-wide investigation through voluntary agreements with the mining companies and interagency participants. The Selenium Information System contains the results of that area-wide investigation, and many other background documents. As studies are conducted and remedial action decisions are made the resulting data and documentation will be stored within the information system. Potential users of the information system are agency officials, students, lawmakers, mining company personnel, teachers, researchers, and the general public. The system, available from a central website, consists of a database that contains the area-wide sampling information and an ESRI ArcIMS map server. The user can easily acquire information pertaining to the area-wide study as well as the final area-wide report. Future work on this project includes creating custom tools to increase the

  6. Mineral resource potential map of the Mount Eddy and Castle Crags Roadless Areas, Shasta, Siskiyou, and Trinity counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jocelyn A.; Caress, Mary E.; Denton, David K.; Spear, James M.

    1983-01-01

    Although ultramafic terranes such as that underlying the Mount Eddy and Castle Crags Roadless Areas may contain chromite, nickel, platinum-group metals, cobalt, and asbestos, there are no significant identified concentrations of these resources within the roadless areas. Platinum-group metals were sought but not detected in stream-sediment concentrates, although this does not rule out their possible occurrence. Nickel and cobalt did not occur in anomalous amounts although slightly higher nickel values in the northern part of the Mount Eddy Roadless Area may indicate low-grade mineralization within small dunite bodies, if the nickel occurs in sulfide phases rather than in olivine. The region has been examined on the surface for chromite and asbestos. Although both minerals are ubiquitous there is probably only a low potential for asbestos on the basis of the small size of veins at the surface. Only a few small areas of chromite were noted in the Mount Eddy Roadless Area; without subsurface data, however, any dunite body must be considered to have potential for chromite. The geochemical data for boron, barium, and mercury plus abundant quartz veining in gabbro and hornblende diorite suggest pervasive hydrothermal alteration, which could have formed mercury or vein gold deposits. Sand and gravel deposits occur in the Castle Crags Roadless Area but they cannot compete with superior deposits closer to markets. At a borrow pit northwest of the Mount Eddy Roadless Area, sheared serpentinite is quarried for road metal; similar rock occurs in the roadless area; however, better material is more readily available elsewhere.

  7. Mapping human resources for eye health in 21 countries of sub-Saharan Africa: current progress towards VISION 2020

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of human resources for eye health (HReH) is a major focus of the Global Action Plan 2014 to 2019 to reduce the prevalence of avoidable visual impairment by 25% by the year 2019. The eye health workforce is thought to be much smaller in sub-Saharan Africa than in other regions of the world but data to support this for policy-making is scarce. We collected HReH and cataract surgeries data from 21 countries in sub-Sahara to estimate progress towards key suggested population-based VISION 2020 HReH indicators and cataract surgery rates (CSR) in 2011. Methods Routinely collected data on practitioner and surgery numbers in 2011 was requested from national eye care coordinators via electronic questionnaires. Telephone and e-mail discussions were used to determine data collection strategies that fit the national context and to verify reported data quality. Information was collected on six practitioner cadres: ophthalmologists, cataract surgeons, ophthalmic clinical officers, ophthalmic nurses, optometrists and ‘mid-level refractionists’ and combined with publicly available population data to calculate practitioner to population ratios and CSRs. Associations with development characteristics were conducted using Wilcoxon rank sum tests and Spearman rank correlations. Results HReH data was not easily available. A minority of countries had achieved the suggested VISION 2020 targets in 2011; five countries for ophthalmologists/cataract surgeons, four for ophthalmic nurses/clinical officers and two for CSR. All countries were below target for optometrists, even when other cadres who perform refractions as a primary duty were considered. The regional (sample) ratio for surgeons (ophthalmologists and cataract surgeons) was 2.9 per million population, 5.5 for ophthalmic clinical officers and nurses, 3.7 for optometrists and other refractionists, and 515 for CSR. A positive correlation between GDP and CSR as well as many practitioner ratios was observed

  8. Rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy due to portacaval shunt show differential increase of translocator protein (18 kDa) binding in different brain areas, which is not affected by chronic MAP-kinase p38 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Agusti, Ana; Dziedzic, Jennifer L; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Guilarte, Tomas R; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-12-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a main role in neurological deficits in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) due to portacaval shunt (PCS). Treating PCS rats with SB239063, an inhibitor of MAP-kinase-p38, reduces microglial activation and brain inflammatory markers and restores cognitive and motor function. The translocator protein-(18-kDa) (TSPO) is considered a biomarker of neuroinflammation. TSPO is increased in brain of PCS rats and of cirrhotic patients that died in hepatic coma. Rats with MHE show strong microglial activation in cerebellum and milder in other areas when assessed by MHC-II immunohistochemistry. This work aims were assessing: 1) whether binding of TSPO ligands is selectively increased in cerebellum in PCS rats; 2) whether treatment with SB239063 reduces binding of TSPO ligands in PCS rats; 3) which cell type (microglia, astrocytes) increases TSPO expression. Quantitative autoradiography was used to assess TSPO-selective (3)H-(R)-PK11195 binding to different brain areas. TSPO expression increased differentially in PCS rats, reaching mild expression in striatum or thalamus and very high levels in cerebellum. TSPO was expressed in astrocytes and microglia. Treatment with SB239063 did not reduces (3)[H]-PK11195 binding in PCS rats. SB239063 reduces microglial activation and levels of inflammatory markers, but not binding of TSPO ligands. This indicates that SB239063-induced neuroinflammation reduction in PCS rats is not mediated by effects on TSPO. Also, enhanced TSPO expression is not always associated with cognitive or motor deficits. If enhanced TSPO expression plays a role in mechanisms leading to neurological alterations in MHE, SB239063 would interfere these mechanisms at a later step. PMID:24307181

  9. Rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy due to portacaval shunt show differential increase of translocator protein (18 kDa) binding in different brain areas, which is not affected by chronic MAP-kinase p38 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Agusti, Ana; Dziedzic, Jennifer L.; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a main role in neurological deficits in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) due to portacaval shunt (PCS). Treating PCS rats with SB239063, an inhibitor of MAP-kinase-p38, reduces microglial activation and brain inflammatory markers and restores cognitive and motor function. The translocator protein-(18-kDa) (TSPO) is considered a biomarker of neuro-inflammation. TSPO is increased in brain of PCS rats and of cirrhotic patients that died in hepatic coma. Rats with MHE show strong microglial activation in cerebellum and milder in other areas when assessed by MHC-II immunohistochemistry. This work aims were assessing: 1) whether binding of TSPO ligands is selectively increased in cerebellum in PCS rats; 2) whether treatment with SB239063 reduces binding of TSPO ligands in PCS rats; 3) which cell type (microglia, astrocytes) increases TSPO expression. Quantitative autoradiography was used to assess TSPO-selective 3H-(R)-PK11195 binding to different brain areas. TSPO expression increased differentially in PCS rats, reaching mild expression in striatum or thalamus and very high levels in cerebellum. TSPO was expressed in astrocytes and microglia. Treatment with SB239063 did not reduces 3[H]-PK11195 binding in PCS rats. SB239063 reduces microglial activation and levels of inflammatory markers, but not binding of TSPO ligands. This indicates that SB239063-induced neuroinflammation reduction in PCS rats is not mediated by effects on TSPO. Also, enhanced TSPO expression is not always associated with cognitive or motor deficits. If enhanced TSPO expression plays a role in mechanisms leading to neurological alterations in MHE, SB239063 would interfere these mechanisms at a later step. PMID:24307181

  10. Construction of genome-wide physical BAC contigs using mapped cDNA as probes: Toward an integrated BAC library resource for genome sequencing and analysis. Annual report, July 1995--January 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.C.; Bocskai, D.; Cao, Y.

    1997-12-31

    The goal of human genome project is to characterize and sequence entire genomes of human and several model organisms, thus providing complete sets of information on the entire structure of transcribed, regulatory and other functional regions for these organisms. In the past years, a number of useful genetic and physical markers on human and mouse genomes have been made available along with the advent of BAC library resources for these organisms. The advances in technology and resource development made it feasible to efficiently construct genome-wide physical BAC contigs for human and other genomes. Currently, over 30,000 mapped STSs and 27,000 mapped Unigenes are available for human genome mapping. ESTs and cDNAs are excellent resources for building contig maps for two reasons. Firstly, they exist in two alternative forms--as both sequence information for PCR primer pairs, and cDoreen genomic libraries efficiently for large number of DNA probes by combining over 100 cDNA probes in each hybridization. Second, the linkage and order of genes are rather conserved among human, mouse and other model organisms. Therefore, gene markers have advantages over random anonymous STSs in building maps for comparative genomic studies.

  11. A Course To Understand Maps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, E. A.

    Secondary students in Tasmania, Australia, can develop their skills in social studies and geography by solving the problems involving map use that this resource book provides. Several different types of maps are covered including: building plans, sketch maps, contours maps, world-grids, atlases, and urban maps. (DB)

  12. Getting Results with Curriculum Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Heidi Hayes

    2004-01-01

    This helpful resource will speed the mapping effort along and apply curriculum mapping to special situations. In this book teachers and administrators offer concrete advice on how to get the most out of curriculum mapping in districts and schools: (1) Steps to implementing mapping procedures and leading the mapping process; (2) Tools and resources…

  13. Mapping spatial resources with GPS animal telemetry: foraging manatees locate seagrass beds in the Ten Thousand Islands, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slone, Daniel H.; Reid, James P.; Kenworthy, W. Judson

    2013-01-01

    Turbid water conditions make the delineation and characterization of benthic habitats difficult by traditional in situ and remote sensing methods. Here, we develop and validate modeling and sampling methodology for detecting and characterizing seagrass beds by analyzing GPS telemetry records from radio-tagged manatees. Between October 2002 and October 2005, 14 manatees were tracked in the Ten Thousand Islands (TTI) in southwest Florida (USA) using Global Positioning System (GPS) tags. High density manatee use areas were found to occur off each island facing the open, nearshore waters of the Gulf of Mexico. We implemented a spatially stratified random sampling plan and used a camera-based sampling technique to observe and record bottom observations of seagrass and macroalgae presence and abundance. Five species of seagrass were identified in our study area: Halodule wrightii, Thalassia testudinum, Syringodium filiforme, Halophila engelmannii, and Halophila decipiens. A Bayesian model was developed to choose and parameterize a spatial process function that would describe the observed patterns of seagrass and macroalgae. The seagrasses were found in depths <2 m and in the higher manatee use strata, whereas macroalgae was found at moderate densities at all sampled depths and manatee use strata. The manatee spatial data showed a strong association with seagrass beds, a relationship that increased seagrass sampling efficiency. Our camera-based field sampling proved to be effective for assessing seagrass density and spatial coverage under turbid water conditions, and would be an effective monitoring tool to detect changes in seagrass beds.

  14. Development of a Genomic Resource and Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping of Male Calling Traits in the Lesser Wax Moth, Achroia grisella

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Jennifer M.; Zhou, Yihong; Hackett, Jennifer L.; Harris, Bethany R.; Greenfield, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    In the study of sexual selection among insects, the Lesser Waxmoth, Achroia grisella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), has been one of the more intensively studied species over the past 20 years. Studies have focused on how the male calling song functions in pair formation and on the quantitative genetics of male song characters and female preference for the song. Recent QTL studies have attempted to elucidate the genetic architecture of male song and female preference traits using AFLP markers. We continued these QTL studies using SNP markers derived from an EST library that allowed us to measure both DNA sequence variation and map loci with respect to the lepidopteran genome. We report that the level of sequence variation within A. grisella is typical among other Lepidoptera that have been examined, and that comparison with the Bombyx mori genome shows that macrosynteny is conserved. Our QTL map shows that a QTL for a male song trait, pulse-pair rate, is situated on the Z chromosome, a prediction for sexually selected traits in Lepidoptera. Our findings will be useful for future studies of genetic architecture of this model species and may help identify the genetics associated with the evolution of its novel acoustic communication. PMID:26807910

  15. Development of a Genomic Resource and Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping of Male Calling Traits in the Lesser Wax Moth, Achroia grisella.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Jennifer M; Zhou, Yihong; Hackett, Jennifer L; Harris, Bethany R; Greenfield, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    In the study of sexual selection among insects, the Lesser Waxmoth, Achroia grisella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), has been one of the more intensively studied species over the past 20 years. Studies have focused on how the male calling song functions in pair formation and on the quantitative genetics of male song characters and female preference for the song. Recent QTL studies have attempted to elucidate the genetic architecture of male song and female preference traits using AFLP markers. We continued these QTL studies using SNP markers derived from an EST library that allowed us to measure both DNA sequence variation and map loci with respect to the lepidopteran genome. We report that the level of sequence variation within A. grisella is typical among other Lepidoptera that have been examined, and that comparison with the Bombyx mori genome shows that macrosynteny is conserved. Our QTL map shows that a QTL for a male song trait, pulse-pair rate, is situated on the Z chromosome, a prediction for sexually selected traits in Lepidoptera. Our findings will be useful for future studies of genetic architecture of this model species and may help identify the genetics associated with the evolution of its novel acoustic communication. PMID:26807910

  16. SNP2Structure: A Public and Versatile Resource for Mapping and Three-Dimensional Modeling of Missense SNPs on Human Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Difei; Song, Lei; Singh, Varun; Rao, Shruti; An, Lin; Madhavan, Subha

    2015-01-01

    One of the long-standing challenges in biology is to understand how non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) change protein structure and further affect their function. While it is impractical to solve all the mutated protein structures experimentally, it is quite feasible to model the mutated structures in silico. Toward this goal, we built a publicly available structure database resource (SNP2Structure, https://apps.icbi.georgetown.edu/snp2structure) focusing on missense mutations, msSNP. Compared with web portals with similar aims, SNP2Structure has the following major advantages. First, our portal offers direct comparison of two related 3D structures. Second, the protein models include all interacting molecules in the original PDB structures, so users are able to determine regions of potential interaction changes when a protein mutation occurs. Third, the mutated structures are available to download locally for further structural and functional analysis. Fourth, we used Jsmol package to display the protein structure that has no system compatibility issue. SNP2Structure provides reliable, high quality mapping of nsSNPs to 3D protein structures enabling researchers to explore the likely functional impact of human disease-causing mutations. PMID:26949480

  17. Mapping resource use over a Russian landscape: an integrated look at harvesting of a non-timber forest product in central Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitztaler, Stephanie K.; Bergen, Kathleen M.

    2013-12-01

    Small-scale resource use became an important adaptive mechanism in remote logging communities in Russia at the onset of the post-Soviet period in 1991. We focused on harvesting of a non-timber forest product, lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), in the forests of the Kamchatka Peninsula (Russian Far East). We employed an integrated geographical approach to make quantifiable connections between harvesting and the landscape, and to interpret these relationships in their broader contexts. Landsat TM images were used for a new classification; the resulting land-cover map was the basis for linking non-spatial data on harvesters’ gathering behaviors to spatial data within delineated lingonberry gathering sites. Several significant relationships emerged: (1) mature forests negatively affected harvesters’ initial choice to gather in a site, while young forests had a positive effect; (2) land-cover type was critical in determining how and why gathering occurred: post-disturbance young and maturing forests were significantly associated with higher gathering intensity and with the choice to market harvests; and (3) distance from gathering sites to villages and main roads also mattered: longer distances were significantly correlated to more time spent gathering and to increased marketing of harvests. We further considered our findings in light of the larger ecological and social dynamics at play in central Kamchatka. This unique study is an important starting point for conservation- and sustainable development-based work, and for additional research into the drivers of human-landscape interactions in the Russian Far East.

  18. The current status of mapping karst areas and availability of public sinkhole-risk resources in karst terrains of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Weary, David J.; Kaufmann, James E.

    2016-05-01

    Subsidence from sinkhole collapse is a common occurrence in areas underlain by water-soluble rocks such as carbonate and evaporite rocks, typical of karst terrain. Almost all 50 States within the United States (excluding Delaware and Rhode Island) have karst areas, with sinkhole damage highest in Florida, Texas, Alabama, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Pennsylvania. A conservative estimate of losses to all types of ground subsidence was 125 million per year in 1997. This estimate may now be low, as review of cost reports from the last 15 years indicates that the cost of karst collapses in the United States averages more than 300 million per year. Knowing when a catastrophic event will occur is not possible; however, understanding where such occurrences are likely is possible. The US Geological Survey has developed and maintains national-scale maps of karst areas and areas prone to sinkhole formation. Several States provide additional resources for their citizens; Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Pennsylvania maintain databases of sinkholes or karst features, with Florida, Kentucky, Missouri, and Ohio providing sinkhole reporting mechanisms for the public.

  19. The current status of mapping karst areas and availability of public sinkhole-risk resources in karst terrains of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Weary, David J.; Kaufmann, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Subsidence from sinkhole collapse is a common occurrence in areas underlain by water-soluble rocks such as carbonate and evaporite rocks, typical of karst terrain. Almost all 50 States within the United States (excluding Delaware and Rhode Island) have karst areas, with sinkhole damage highest in Florida, Texas, Alabama, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Pennsylvania. A conservative estimate of losses to all types of ground subsidence was $125 million per year in 1997. This estimate may now be low, as review of cost reports from the last 15 years indicates that the cost of karst collapses in the United States averages more than $300 million per year. Knowing when a catastrophic event will occur is not possible; however, understanding where such occurrences are likely is possible. The US Geological Survey has developed and maintains national-scale maps of karst areas and areas prone to sinkhole formation. Several States provide additional resources for their citizens; Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Pennsylvania maintain databases of sinkholes or karst features, with Florida, Kentucky, Missouri, and Ohio providing sinkhole reporting mechanisms for the public.

  20. The current status of mapping karst areas and availability of public sinkhole-risk resources in karst terrains of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Weary, David J.; Kaufmann, James E.

    2015-11-01

    Subsidence from sinkhole collapse is a common occurrence in areas underlain by water-soluble rocks such as carbonate and evaporite rocks, typical of karst terrain. Almost all 50 States within the United States (excluding Delaware and Rhode Island) have karst areas, with sinkhole damage highest in Florida, Texas, Alabama, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Pennsylvania. A conservative estimate of losses to all types of ground subsidence was 125 million per year in 1997. This estimate may now be low, as review of cost reports from the last 15 years indicates that the cost of karst collapses in the United States averages more than 300 million per year. Knowing when a catastrophic event will occur is not possible; however, understanding where such occurrences are likely is possible. The US Geological Survey has developed and maintains national-scale maps of karst areas and areas prone to sinkhole formation. Several States provide additional resources for their citizens; Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Pennsylvania maintain databases of sinkholes or karst features, with Florida, Kentucky, Missouri, and Ohio providing sinkhole reporting mechanisms for the public.

  1. Evaluation of ERTS-1 data applications to geologic mapping, structural analysis and mineral resource inventory of South America with special emphasis on the Andes Mountain region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, W. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 data is ideally suited for small-scale geologic mapping and structural analysis of remote, inaccessible areas such as the Andes of South America. The synoptic view of large areas, low sun-angle and multispectral nature of the images provide the right ingredients for improving existing geologic and other maps of the regions. In most areas it has been possible to compile geologic, drainage, and cultural interpretive overlays to individual scenes mainly using MSS bands 4, 5, and 7. A test image mosaic using MSS band 6 is being compiled for Test Area 7 (La Paz, Bolivia). It will be at a scale of 1:1,000,000 and cover 4 x 6 degrees of latitude and longitude and will serve as a compilation base on which to join the overlays. Repetitive data shows changes in river channels and sedimentation plumes, changes in lake shorelines, and surface moisture distribution. Vegetation and snow line changes in the Andes have been recognized. A year of seasonal data, however, has not yet been acquired due to tape recorder failure.

  2. Digital topographic map showing the extents of glacial ice and perennial snowfields at Mount Rainier, Washington, based on the LiDAR survey of September 2007 to October 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.; Sisson, Thomas W.; Swinney, Darin D.

    2010-01-01

    In response to severe flooding in November 2006, the National Park Service contracted for a high-resolution aerial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topographic survey of Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Due to inclement weather, this survey was performed in two stages: early September 2007 and September-October 2008. The total surveyed area of 241,585 acres includes an approximately 100-m-wide buffer zone around the Park to ensure complete coverage and adequate point densities at survey edges. Final results averaged 5.73 laser first return points/m2 over forested and high-elevation terrain, with a vertical accuracy of 3.7 cm on bare road surfaces and mean relative accuracy of 11 cm, based on comparisons between flightlines. Bare-earth topography, as developed by the contractor, is included in this release. A map of the 2007-2008 limits of glaciers and perennial snowfields was developed by digitizing 1:2,000 to 1:5,000 slope and shaded-relief images derived from the LiDAR topography. Edges of snow and exposed ice are readily seen in such images as sharp changes in surface roughness and slope. Ice mantled by moraine can be distinguished by the moraine's distinctly high roughness due to ice motion and melting, local exposures of smooth ice, and commonly by the presence of crevasses and shear boundaries. A map of the 1970 limits of ice and perennial snow was also developed by digitizing the snow and ice perimeters as depicted on the hydrologic separates used to produce the 1:24,000 topographic maps of the Mount Rainier region. These maps, produced in 1971, were derived from September 1970 aerial photographs. Boundaries between adjacent glacier systems were estimated and mapped from drainage divides, including partly emergent rock ridges, lines of diverging slope, and medial moraines. This data release contains the bare-earth LiDAR data as an ESRI grid file (DS549-Rainier_LiDAR.zip), the glacial limits derived from the USGS 1970 aerial photographs of the

  3. "Show" Them "the Money!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Al

    2009-01-01

    This article describes ways of measuring the monetary value of resource sharing across jurisdictional boundaries, using the same "buy once, use many times" logic that is the basic underpinning of libraries. (Contains 4 notes.)

  4. Producing Talent and Variety Shows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabo, Chuck

    1995-01-01

    Identifies key aspects of producing talent shows and outlines helpful hints for avoiding pitfalls and ensuring a smooth production. Presents suggestions concerning publicity, scheduling, and support personnel. Describes types of acts along with special needs and problems specific to each act. Includes a list of resources. (MJP)

  5. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resource maps of the Choteau 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Earhart, Robert L.; Grimes, David J.; Leinz, Reinhard W.; Kleinkopf, M. Dean

    1981-01-01

    The Choteau l? x 2? quadrangle in northwest Montana was studied by an interdisciplinary research team in order to appraise its mineral resource and hydrocarbon potential The appraisal is based on field and laboratory investigations of the geology, geochemistry, and geophysics. The results of the investigations are published as a folio of maps, figures, tables, and accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the published components of the resource appraisal. A comprehensive bibliography cites both specific and general references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Choteau l? x 2? quadrangle.

  6. Mapping the seafloor geology offshore of Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, Walter A.; Andrews, Brian D.

    2006-01-01

    Geologic and bathymetric maps help us understand the evolutionary history of the Massachusetts coast and the processes that have shaped it. The maps show the distribution of bottom types (for example, bedrock, gravel, sand, mud) and water depths over large areas of the seafloor. In turn, these two fundamental parameters largely determine the species of flora and fauna that inhabit a particular area. Knowledge of bottom types and water depths provides a framework for mapping benthic habitats and managing marine resources. The need for coastal–zone mapping to inform policy and management is widely recognized as critical for mitigating hazards, creating resource inventories, and tracking environmental changes (National Research Council, 2004; U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, 2004).

  7. The Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, remote sensing, and mineral resources maps of the Butte 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, James E.; Trautwein, C.M.; Wallace, C.A.; Lee, G.K.; Rowan, L.C.; Hanna, W.F.

    1993-01-01

    The Butte 1?x2 ? quadrangle in west-central Montana was investigated as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP). These investigations included geologic mapping, geochemical surveys, gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, examinations of mineral deposits, and specialized geochronologic and remote-sensing studies. The data collected during these studies were compiled, combined with available published and unpublished data, analyzed, and used in a mineral-resource assessment of the quadrangle. The results, including data, interpretations, and mineral-resource assessments for nine types of mineral deposits, are published separately as a folio of maps. These maps are accompanied by figures, tables, and explanatory text. This circular provides background information on the Butte quadrangle, summarizes the studies and published maps, and lists a selected bibliography of references pertinent to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral resources of the quadrangle. The Butte quadrangle, which includes the world-famous Butte mining district, has a long history of mineral production. Many mining districts within the quadrangle have produced large quantities of many commodities; the most important in dollar value of production were copper, gold, silver, lead, zinc, manganese, molybdenum, and phosphate. At present, mines at several locations produce copper, molybdenum, gold, silver, lead, zinc, and phosphate. Exploration, mainly for gold, has indicated the presence of other mineral deposits that may be exploited in the future. The results of the investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey indicate that many areas of the quadrangle are highly favorable for the occurrence of additional undiscovered resources of gold, silver, copper, molybdenum, tungsten, and other metals in several deposit types.

  8. Praxisorientierter Ansatz zur kartographischen Darstellung von Karst-Grundwasserressourcen. Erfahrungen aus dem SWISSKARST-Projekt A practical approach for mapping karst groundwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malard, Arnauld; Jeannin, Pierre-Yves; Sinreich, Michael; Weber, Eric; Vouillamoz, Jonathan; Eichenberger, Urs

    2014-12-01

    In spite of their abundant water resources, in Switzerland as well as in other countries, the location and extent of karst aquifers have not yet been systematically studied and documented - mainly due to the lack of systematic and dedicated approaches for their characterization. In the framework of a project aiming at documenting the karst aquifers in Switzerland (SWISSKARST Project) the pragmatic KARSYS approach has been developed to systematically assess the main characteristics of karst aquifers and karst systems. One part of this project deals with the development of a practical method for mapping 2D hydrogeological karst systems, which is designed to address both scientific and applied issues. A series of maps based on the approach is proposed to describe the main characteristics of karst groundwater systems resulting in a synthesized map which suitably combines all relevant information.

  9. Geology and resource assessment of Costa Rica at 1:500,000 scale; a digital representation of maps of the U.S. Geological Survey's 1987 folio I-1865

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schruben, Paul G.

    1997-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains digital versions of the geology and resource assessment maps of Costa Rica originally published in USGS Folio I-1865 (U.S. Geological Survey, the Direccion General de Geologia, Minas e Hidrocarburos, and the Universidad de Costa Rica, 1987) at a scale of 1:500,000. The following layers are available on the CD-ROM: geology and faults; favorable domains for selected deposit types; Bouguer gravity data; isostatic gravity contours; mineral deposits, prospects, and occurrences; and rock geochemistry sample points. For DOS users, the CD-ROM contains MAPPER, a user-friendly map display program. Some of the maps are also provided in the following additional formats on the CD-ROM: (1) ArcView 1 and 3, (2) ARC/INFO 6.1.2 Export, (3) Digital Line Graph (DLG) Optional, and (4) Drawing Exchange File (DXF.)

  10. Annual water-level measurements in observation wells, 1951-1955, and atlas of maps showing changes in water levels for various periods from beginning of record through 1954, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeder, Harold O.

    1959-01-01

    This report tabulates the annual measurements of water level in the observation wells in the various irrigated areas, primarily from 1951 through 1955. It summarizes changes in water level by discussion and with an atlas of nearly all the maps of change of water level for the period of record to 1955 for each area in which observations are being made. Included also are hydrographs for the period of record through 1954 of several selected wells in the various areas irrigated from ground-water sources. The annual measurements of water level before 1951, seasonal measurements, and daily records of water levels in wells equipped with recording gages have been published in an annual series of U. S. Geological Survey water-supply papers.

  11. Proposal to evaluate the use of ERTS-A imagery in mapping and managing soil and range resources in the Sand Hills Region of Nebraska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drew, J. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Visual examination of RB-57F color infrared imagery of range sites within Test Site 313 indicates that early season imagery will show significant differences in appearance of sub-irrigated sites as compared to dry valley sites. Differences appear to be significant also when comparing the previous two sites to sands sites. Comparison of existing soil map soils delineations with vegetative growth patterns shows reasonably good agreement between the two patterns over rather broad areas. Visual examination of ERTS-1 imagery has also shown that rangeland burned by prairie fire within the last six months can be distinguished. Three confirmed fire areas have been shown on the imagery. Since only broad estimates of burned acres are available, more accurate acreage measurements will be attempted. Known acreage of burned areas will be of value to those agencies responsible for deferred grazing payments to land owners. The relative speed with which this acreage information would become available to these agencies through ERTS-1 imagery would be of much benefit.

  12. Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; George, R.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Scott, G.; McCarthy, E.

    2001-03-06

    This report contains the results of a wind resource analysis and mapping study for the Philippine archipelago. The study's objective was to identify potential wind resource areas and quantify the value of those resources within those areas. The wind resource maps and other wind resource characteristic information will be used to identify prospective areas for wind-energy applications.

  13. United States Offshore Wind Resource Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, M.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.

    2008-12-01

    The utilization of the offshore wind resource will be necessary if the United States is to meet the goal of having 20% of its electricity generated by wind power because many of the electrical load centers in the country are located along the coastlines. The United States Department of Energy, through its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), has supported an ongoing project to assess the wind resource for the offshore regions of the contiguous United States including the Great Lakes. Final offshore maps with a horizontal resolution of 200 meters (m) have been completed for Texas, Louisiana, Georgia, northern New England, and the Great Lakes. The ocean wind resource maps extend from the coastline to 50 nautical miles (nm) offshore. The Great Lake maps show the resource for all of the individual lakes. These maps depict the wind resource at 50 m above the water as classes of wind power density. Class 1 represents the lowest available wind resource, while Class 7 is the highest resource. Areas with Class 5 and higher wind resource can be economical for offshore project development. As offshore wind turbine technology improves, areas with Class 4 and higher resource should become economically viable. The wind resource maps are generated using output from a modified numerical weather prediction model combined with a wind flow model. The preliminary modeling is performed by AWS Truewind under subcontract to NREL. The preliminary model estimates are sent to NREL to be validated. NREL validates the preliminary estimates by comparing 50 m model data to available measurements that are extrapolated to 50 m. The validation results are used to modify the preliminary map and produce the final resource map. The sources of offshore wind measurement data include buoys, automated stations, lighthouses, and satellite- derived ocean wind speed data. The wind electric potential is represented as Megawatts (MW) of potential installed capacity and is based on the square

  14. Genome survey and high-density genetic map construction provide genomic and genetic resources for the Pacific White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Yuan, Jianbo; Li, Fuhua; Chen, Xiaohan; Zhao, Yongzhen; Huang, Long; Zheng, Hongkun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei is the dominant crustacean species in global seafood mariculture. Understanding the genome and genetic architecture is useful for deciphering complex traits and accelerating the breeding program in shrimp. In this study, a genome survey was conducted and a high-density linkage map was constructed using a next-generation sequencing approach. The genome survey was used to identify preliminary genome characteristics and to generate a rough reference for linkage map construction. De novo SNP discovery resulted in 25,140 polymorphic markers. A total of 6,359 high-quality markers were selected for linkage map construction based on marker coverage among individuals and read depths. For the linkage map, a total of 6,146 markers spanning 4,271.43 cM were mapped to 44 sex-averaged linkage groups, with an average marker distance of 0.7 cM. An integration analysis linked 5,885 genome scaffolds and 1,504 BAC clones to the linkage map. Based on the high-density linkage map, several QTLs for body weight and body length were detected. This high-density genetic linkage map reveals basic genomic architecture and will be useful for comparative genomics research, genome assembly and genetic improvement of L. vannamei and other penaeid shrimp species. PMID:26503227

  15. Genome survey and high-density genetic map construction provide genomic and genetic resources for the Pacific White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Yuan, Jianbo; Li, Fuhua; Chen, Xiaohan; Zhao, Yongzhen; Huang, Long; Zheng, Hongkun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei is the dominant crustacean species in global seafood mariculture. Understanding the genome and genetic architecture is useful for deciphering complex traits and accelerating the breeding program in shrimp. In this study, a genome survey was conducted and a high-density linkage map was constructed using a next-generation sequencing approach. The genome survey was used to identify preliminary genome characteristics and to generate a rough reference for linkage map construction. De novo SNP discovery resulted in 25,140 polymorphic markers. A total of 6,359 high-quality markers were selected for linkage map construction based on marker coverage among individuals and read depths. For the linkage map, a total of 6,146 markers spanning 4,271.43 cM were mapped to 44 sex-averaged linkage groups, with an average marker distance of 0.7 cM. An integration analysis linked 5,885 genome scaffolds and 1,504 BAC clones to the linkage map. Based on the high-density linkage map, several QTLs for body weight and body length were detected. This high-density genetic linkage map reveals basic genomic architecture and will be useful for comparative genomics research, genome assembly and genetic improvement of L. vannamei and other penaeid shrimp species. PMID:26503227

  16. The Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resource maps of the Ajo and Lukeville 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangles, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Floyd; Tosdal, R.M.; Peterson, J.A.; Cox, D.P.; Miller, R.J.; Klein, D.P.; Theobald, P.K.; Haxel, G.B.; Grubensky, M.J.; Raines, G.L.; Barton, H.N.; Singer, D.A.; Eppinger, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    Encompassing about 21,000 km 2 in southwestern Arizona, the Ajo and Lukeville 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangles have been the subject of mineral resource investigations utilizing field and laboratory studies in the disciplines of geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and Landsat imagery. The results of these studies are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. Past mineral production has been limited to copper from the Ajo Mining District. In addition to copper, the quadrangles contain potentially significant resources of gold and silver; a few other commodities, including molybdenum and evaporites, may also exist in the area as appreciable resources. This circular provides background information on the mineral deposits and on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The bibliography cites references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the two quadrangles.

  17. Water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, V. V.; Rango, A.

    1973-01-01

    The application of ERTS-1 imagery to the conservation and control of water resources is discussed. The effects of exisiting geology and land use in the water shed area on the hydrologic cycle and the general characteristics of runoff are described. The effects of floods, snowcover, and glaciers are analyzed. The use of ERTS-1 imagery to map surface water and wetland areas to provide rapid inventorying over large regions of water bodies is reported.

  18. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the northern part of the Gila River drainage from Painted Rock Dam to Texas Hill area, Maricopa, Pima, and Yuma counties, Arizona; 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Natalie D.; Leake, S.A.; Clay, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The Gila River drainage from Painted Rock Dam to Texas Hill area includes about 3,000 square miles in southwestern Arizona. Ground-water development has taken place only in the northern part of the area, and only this part is included in the report. The southwestward-flowing Gila River drains the 1 ,900-square-mile northern part of the area. The main water-bearing unit is the valley-fill deposits. Since 1967, the estimated ground-water pumpage has exceeded 100,000 acre-feet per year, and in 1977 the ground-water pumpage was 210,000 acre-feet; the ground water is used mainly for irrigation. The ground-water withdrawals have resulted in general water-level declines in most of the area. Information shown on the maps includes change in water level, 1965-78 and 1973-78, and irrigated area; depth to water, altitude of the water level, and well depth; and specific conductance and fluoride concentration in the water. Hydrographs of the water level in selected wells and a table of historical pumpage also are included. Scale 1:250 ,000. (Kosco-USGS)

  19. DAM - detection and mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Integrated set of manual procedures, computer programs, and graphic devices processes multispectral scanner data from orbiting Landsat into precisely registered and formatted maps of surface water and other resources at variety of scales, sheet formats, and tick intervals.

  20. The Map Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheyney, Arnold B.; Capone, Donald L.

    This teaching resource is aimed at helping students develop the skills necessary to locate places on the earth. Designed as a collection of map skill exercises rather than a sequential program of study, this program expects that students have access to and some knowledge of how to use globes, maps, atlases, and encyclopedias. The volume contains 6…

  1. Mapping of Outdoor Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Victor G.

    Mapping symbols adopted by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources are presented with their explanations. In an effort to provide standardization and familiarity teachers and other school people involved in an outdoor education program are encouraged to utilize the same symbols in constructing maps. (DK)

  2. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  3. Geology and resource assessment of Costa Rica at 1:500,000 scale; a digital representation of maps of the U.S. Geological Survey's 1987 Folio I-1865

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schruben, Paul G.

    1996-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains digital versions of the geology and resource assessment maps of Costa Rica originally published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Direccion General de Geologia, Minas e Hidrocarburos, and the Universidad de Costa Rica in 1987 at a scale of 1:500,000 in USGS Folio I-1865. The following layers of the map are available on the CD-ROM: geology, favorable domains for selected deposit types, Bouguer gravity, isostatic gravity, mineral deposits, and rock geochemistry sample points. Some of the layers are provided in the following formats: ArcView 1 for Windows and UNIX, ARC/INFO 6.1.2 Export, Digital Line Graph (DLG) Optional, and Drawing Exchange File (DXF). This CD-ROM was produced in accordance with the ISO 9660 and Apple Computer's HFS standards.

  4. Porphyry copper deposit tract definition - A global analysis comparing geologic map scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, G.L.; Connors, K.A.; Chorlton, L.B.

    2007-01-01

    Geologic maps are a fundamental data source used to define mineral-resource potential tracts for the first step of a mineral resource assessment. Further, it is generally believed that the scale of the geologic map is a critical consideration. Previously published research has demonstrated that the U.S. Geological Survey porphyry tracts identified for the United States, which are based on 1:500,000-scale geology and larger scale data and published at 1:1,000,000 scale, can be approximated using a more generalized 1:2,500,000-scale geologic map. Comparison of the USGS porphyry tracts for the United States with weights-of-evidence models made using a 1:10,000,000-scale geologic map, which was made for petroleum applications, and a 1:35,000,000-scale geologic map, which was created as context for the distribution of porphyry deposits, demonstrates that, again, the USGS US porphyry tracts identified are similar to tracts defined on features from these small scale maps. In fact, the results using the 1:35,000,000-scale map show a slightly higher correlation with the USGS US tract definition, probably because the conceptual context for this small-scale map is more appropriate for porphyry tract definition than either of the other maps. This finding demonstrates that geologic maps are conceptual maps. The map information shown in each map is selected and generalized for the map to display the concepts deemed important for the map maker's purpose. Some geologic maps of small scale prove to be useful for regional mineral-resource tract definition, despite the decrease in spatial accuracy with decreasing scale. The utility of a particular geologic map for a particular application is critically dependent on the alignment of the intention of the map maker with the application. ?? International Association for Mathematical Geology 2007.

  5. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Tonopah 1 by 2 degree Quadrangle, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; Nash, J.T.; Plouff, Donald; Whitebread, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    The Tonopah 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle in south-central Nevada was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The appraisal is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The selected bibliography lists references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Tonopah 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle.

  6. The Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Project; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Reno 1 by 2 degree Quadrangle, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; Stewart, John H.; Hendricks, J.D.; Rowan, L.C.; Plouff, Donald

    1992-01-01

    The Reno 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle in west-central Nevada was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The assessment is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, reports, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The selected bibliography lists references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Reno 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle.

  7. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Walker Lake 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, John Harris; Chaffee, M.A.; Dohrenwend, J.C.; John, D.A.; Kistler, R.W.; Kleinhampl, F.J.; Menzie, W.D.; Plouff, Donald; Rowan, L.C.; Silberling, Norman J.

    1984-01-01

    The Walker Lake 1? by 2? quadrangle in eastern California and western Nevada was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The appraisal is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The selected bibliography lists selected references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Walker Lake 1? by 2? quadrangle.

  8. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Medford 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, Oregon and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, James G.; Blakely, R.J.; Johnson, M.G.; Page, N.J.; Peterson, J.A.; Singer, D.A.; Whittington, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Medford 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle in southern Oregon and northern California was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The appraisal is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The bibliography lists selected references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Medford 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle.

  9. AN INTEGRATED MAP FOR MAIZE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Maize Mapping Project (MMP) is focused on developing genetic, physical, and database resources for the maize genome. A key resource being developed by the MMP is a well-integrated genetic and physical map that will expedite the identification of DNA sequences underlying key traits that have been...

  10. The Wordpath Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderton, Alice

    The Intertribal Wordpath Society is a nonprofit educational corporation formed to promote the teaching, status, awareness, and use of Oklahoma Indian languages. The Society produces "Wordpath," a weekly 30-minute public access television show about Oklahoma Indian languages and the people who are teaching and preserving them. The show aims to…

  11. Mexico Wind Resource Assessment Project

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    A preliminary wind energy resource assessment of Mexico that produced wind resource maps for both utility-scale and rural applications was undertaken as part of the Mexico-U.S. Renewable Energy Cooperation Program. This activity has provided valuable information needed to facilitate the commercialization of small wind turbines and windfarms in Mexico and to lay the groundwork for subsequent wind resource activities. A surface meteorological data set of hourly data in digital form was utilized to prepare a more detailed and accurate wind resource assessment of Mexico than otherwise would have been possible. Software was developed to perform the first ever detailed analysis of the wind characteristics data for over 150 stations in Mexico. The hourly data set was augmented with information from weather balloons (upper-air data), ship wind data from coastal areas, and summarized wind data from sources in Mexico. The various data were carefully evaluated for their usefulness in preparing the wind resource assessment. The preliminary assessment has identified many areas of good-to-excellent wind resource potential and shows that the wind resource in Mexico is considerably greater than shown in previous surveys.

  12. Rapidly calculated density functional theory (DFT) relaxed Iso-potential Phi Si Maps: Beta-cellobiose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New cellobiose Phi-H/Si-H maps are rapidly generated using a mixed basis set DFT method, found to achieve a high level of confidence while reducing computer resources dramatically. Relaxed iso-potential maps are made for different conformational states of cellobiose, showing how glycosidic bond dihe...

  13. A Holographic Road Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Larry D.; Rugheimer, Mac

    1979-01-01

    Describes the viewing sessions and the holograms of a holographic road show. The traveling exhibits, believed to stimulate interest in physics, include a wide variety of holograms and demonstrate several physical principles. (GA)

  14. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 2964, 2966, 3064, and 3066, Shah-Esmail (617), Reg-Alaqadari (618), Samandkhan-Karez (713), Laki-Bander (611), Jahangir-Naweran (612), and Sreh-Chena (707) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  15. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 2964, 2966, 3064, and 3066, Shah-Esmail (617), Reg-Alaqadari (618), Samandkhan-Karez (713), Laki-Bander (611), Jahangir-Naweran (612), and Sreh-Chena (707) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoefen, Todd M.; King, Trude V.V.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  16. Show What You Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eccleston, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Big things come in small packages. This saying came to the mind of the author after he created a simple math review activity for his fourth grade students. Though simple, it has proven to be extremely advantageous in reinforcing math concepts. He uses this activity, which he calls "Show What You Know," often. This activity provides the perfect…

  17. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  18. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  19. Talk Show Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  20. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  1. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  2. Resource Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Jon M.

    1999-10-01

    Resource Economics is a text for students with a background in calculus, intermediate microeconomics, and a familiarity with the spreadsheet software Excel. The book covers basic concepts, shows how to set up spreadsheets to solve dynamic allocation problems, and presents economic models for fisheries, forestry, nonrenewable resources, stock pollutants, option value, and sustainable development. Within the text, numerical examples are posed and solved using Excel's Solver. Through these examples and additional exercises at the end of each chapter, students can make dynamic models operational, develop their economic intuition, and learn how to set up spreadsheets for the simulation of optimization of resource and environmental systems.

  3. A Hierarchical and Distributed Approach for Mapping Large Applications to Heterogeneous Grids using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanyal, Soumya; Jain, Amit; Das, Sajal K.; Biswas, Rupak

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a distributed approach for mapping a single large application to a heterogeneous grid environment. To minimize the execution time of the parallel application, we distribute the mapping overhead to the available nodes of the grid. This approach not only provides a fast mapping of tasks to resources but is also scalable. We adopt a hierarchical grid model and accomplish the job of mapping tasks to this topology using a scheduler tree. Results show that our three-phase algorithm provides high quality mappings, and is fast and scalable.

  4. For multidisciplinary research on the application of remote sensing to water resources problems. [including crop yield, watershed soils, and vegetation mapping in Wisconsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, R. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    Research on the application of remote sensing to problems of water resources was concentrated on sediments and associated nonpoint source pollutants in lakes. Further transfer of the technology of remote sensing and the refinement of equipment and programs for thermal scanning and the digital analysis of images were also addressed.

  5. Object-based classification of hyperspatial digital mapping camera (DMC) imagery for potential integration into the National Resource Inventory (NRI) of grazing lands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land management agencies such as the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) are required to monitor and assess vegetation conditions across millions of acres of rangelands and grazing lands. Field-based assessments are very costly and inefficient over l...

  6. Using knowledge discovery with data mining from the Australian Soil Resource Information System database to inform soil carbon mapping in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Elisabeth; Henderson, Brent; Viergever, Karin

    2009-12-01

    We present a piecewise linear decision tree model for predicting percent of soil organic C (SOC) in the agricultural zones of Australia generated using a machine learning approach. The inputs for the model are a national database of soil data, national digital surfaces of climate, elevation, and terrain variables, Landsat multispectral scanner data, lithology, land use, and soil maps. The model and resulting map are evaluated, and insights into biogeological surficial processes are discussed. The decision tree splits the overall data set into more homogenous subsets, thus in this case, it identifies areas where SOC responds closely to climatic and other environmental variables. The spatial pattern of SOC corresponds well to maps of estimated primary productivity and bioclimatic zones. Topsoil organic C levels are highest in the high rainfall, temperate regions of Tasmania, Victoria, and Western Australia, along the coast of New South Wales and in the wet tropics of Queensland; and lowest in arid and semiarid inland regions. While this pattern broadly follows continental vegetation, soil moisture, and temperature patterns, it is governed by a spatially variable hierarchy of different climatic and other variables across bioregions of Australia. At the continental scale, soil moisture level, rather than temperature, seems most important in controlling SOC.

  7. Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Assess Estuary Health and Enhance Management of Water Resources in Coastal Texas through Land Cover and Precipitation Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepps, G.; Gonsoroski, E.; Lynn, T.; Schick, R.; Pereira da Silva, R.

    2015-12-01

    This project partnered with the National Park Service (NPS) to help analyze the correlation between mesquite trees and the salinity of the Laguna Madre of Padre Island National Seashore. The lagoon is a hypersaline estuary; however, there is historical evidence that this was not always the case. It is hypothesized that the increase in the number of honey mesquite trees (Prosopis grandulosa var. glandulosa) in the area has contributed to the Laguna Madre's increased salinity by decreasing the groundwater inflow to the lagoon. These mesquite trees have long taproots capable of extracting significant amounts of groundwater. This project utilized Earth observation data in ERDAS IMAGINE and ArcGIS software to create map time series and analyze the data. Landsat 5, 7, and 8 data were used to create land use/land cover (LULC) maps in order to analyze the change in the occurrence of mesquite trees over time. Thermal maps of the lagoon were generated using Landsat 5, 7, and 8 data to understand changes in groundwater inflow. In addition, TRMM and GRACE derived changes in root zone soil moisture content data were compared over the study period. By investigating the suspected positive correlation between the mesquite trees and the salinity of the Laguna Madre, the NPS can improve future land management practices.

  8. 30 CFR 75.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mine map. 75.1200 Section 75.1200 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1200 Mine map. The operator of a coal mine shall...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mine map. 75.1200 Section 75.1200 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1200 Mine map. The operator of a coal mine shall...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mine map. 75.1200 Section 75.1200 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1200 Mine map. The operator of a coal mine shall...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mine map. 75.1200 Section 75.1200 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1200 Mine map. The operator of a coal mine shall...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mine map. 75.1200 Section 75.1200 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1200 Mine map. The operator of a coal mine shall...

  13. Mapping for Success: Mapping and Aligning the Curriculum To Improve Student Learning. A Guide for Facilitators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jennifer L.; Sowers, Jayne

    2005-01-01

    Mapping for Success: Mapping and Aligning the Curriculum To Improve Student Learning, A Guide for Facilitators serves as both a training manual for future mapping facilitators and a facilitator?s primary resource for implementing the mapping process in a school. In the mapping process, teachers outline, analyze, and change a school?s curriculum…

  14. Globally mapping baseflow characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-12-01

    Characterizing baseflow, the slowly varying portion of streamflow, is important for water resources management, hydropower generation, tracking contaminant transport, and other applications. Most previous studies of baseflow have analyzed small groups of catchments with similar characteristics. Now, to develop globally applicable models of baseflow characteristics, Beck et al. studied observations from 3394 catchments around the world with a variety of climatic, hydrological, and physiographic characteristics. Their novel approach investigates the relationship between catchment characteristics and baseflow characteristics, showing how baseflow is related to annual potential evaporation, mean snow water equivalent depth, abundance of surface water bodies, and other landscape characteristics. Their global maps of baseflow characteristics—which could be useful for benchmarking and calibrating hydrological models and for a variety of other hydrological applications—are freely available at http://www.hydrology-amsterdam.nl.

  15. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show. PMID:23631336

  16. Mineral resource potential map of the lower San Francisco Wilderness study area and contiguous roadless area, Greenlee County, Arizona and Catron and Grant Counties, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratte, James C.; Hassemer, Jerry R.; Martin, Ronny A.; Lane, Michael

    1982-01-01

    The Lower San Francisco Wilderness Study Area consists of a narrow strip 1-2 mi (2-3 km) wide between the rims of the San Francisco River canyon. The wilderness study area has a moderately high potential for geothermal resources, a low to moderate potential for base metal or precious metal resources in middle to upper Tertiary volcanic rocks, essentially no oil, gas, or coal potential, and a largely unassessable potential for metal deposits related to Laramide igneous intrusions in pre-Tertiary or lower Tertiary rocks that underlie the area. The contiguous roadless area, which borders the New Mexico half of the wilderness study area, mainly on the north side of the San Francisco River, has a low to moderate potential for molybdenum or copper deposits related to intrusive igneous rocks in the core of a volcano of dacitic composition at Goat Basin.

  17. Geologic Mapping and Mineral Resource Assessment of the Healy and Talkeetna Mountains Quadrangles, Alaska Using Minimal Cloud- and Snow-Cover ASTER Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, Bernard E.; Rowan1, Lawrence C.; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Eppinger, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    On July 8, 2003, ASTER acquired satellite imagery of a 60 km-wide swath of parts of two 1:250,000 Alaska quadrangles, under favorable conditions of minimal cloud- and snow-cover. Rocks from eight different lithotectonic terranes are exposed within the swath of data, several of which define permissive tracts for various mineral deposit types such as: volcanic-hosted massive sulfides (VMS) and porphyry copper and molybdenum. Representative rock samples collected from 13 different lithologic units from the Bonnifield mining district within the Yukon-Tanana terrane (YTT), plus hydrothermally altered VMS material from the Red Mountain prospect, were analyzed to produce a spectral library spanning the VNIR-SWIR (0.4 - 2.5 ?m) through the TIR (8.1 - 11.7 ?m). Comparison of the five-band ASTER TIR emissivity and decorrelation stretch data to available geologic maps indicates that rocks from the YTT display the greatest range and diversity of silica composition of the mapped terranes, ranging from mafic rocks to silicic quartzites. The nine-band ASTER VNIR-SWIR reflectance data and spectral matched-filter processing were used to map several lithologic sequences characterized by distinct suites of minerals that exhibit diagnostic spectral features (e.g. chlorite, epidote, amphibole and other ferrous-iron bearing minerals); other sequences were distinguished by their weathering characteristics and associated hydroxyl- and ferric-iron minerals, such as illite, smectite, and hematite. Smectite, kaolinite, opaline silica, jarosite and/or other ferric iron minerals defined narrow (< 250 m diameter) zonal patterns around Red Mountain and other potential VMS targets. Using ASTER we identified some of the known mineral deposits in the region, as well as mineralogically similar targets that may represent potential undiscovered deposits. Some known deposits were not identified and may have been obscured by vegetation- or snow-cover, or were too small to be resolved.

  18. Significant applications of ERTS-1 data to resource management activities at the state level in Ohio. [strip mining and land use mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, D. C.; Pincura, P. G.; Meier, C. J.; Garrett, G. B.; Herd, L.; Wukelic, G. E.; Stephan, J. G.; Smail, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Described are techniques utilized and the progress made in applying ERTS-1 data to (1) detecting, inventorying, and monitoring surface mining activities, particularly in relation to recently passed strip mine legislation in Ohio; (2) updating current land use maps at various scales for multiagency usage, and (3) solving other real-time problems existing throughout the various Ohio governmental agencies. General conclusions regarding current user views as to the opportunities and limitations of operationally using ERTS-1 data at the state level are also noted.

  19. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre. PMID:25273491

  20. Execution models for mapping programs onto distributed memory parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sussman, Alan

    1992-01-01

    The problem of exploiting the parallelism available in a program to efficiently employ the resources of the target machine is addressed. The problem is discussed in the context of building a mapping compiler for a distributed memory parallel machine. The paper describes using execution models to drive the process of mapping a program in the most efficient way onto a particular machine. Through analysis of the execution models for several mapping techniques for one class of programs, we show that the selection of the best technique for a particular program instance can make a significant difference in performance. On the other hand, the results of benchmarks from an implementation of a mapping compiler show that our execution models are accurate enough to select the best mapping technique for a given program.