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1

Marco Polo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you yell out Marco Polo, will your phone appear? It might if you elect to download this attractive, interactive app. Designed by Matt Wiechec, users can simply shout "Marco!" and wait for their phone to reply "Polo!â from wherever it is hiding. It's quite easy to use and it is compatible with Apple devices running iOS 7.0 or later.

Wiechec, Matt

2014-06-05

2

76 FR 72369 - Safety Zone; Marco Island Marriott Charity Fireworks Display, Gulf of Mexico, Marco Island, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Marco Island Marriott Charity Fireworks Display, Gulf of Mexico, Marco Island, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Gulf of Mexico in the vicinity of Marco Island Marriott Beach Resort in Marco...

2011-11-23

3

The Mark 15 Marco Library and Recent Updating of the Marco Code  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses two tasks: (1) introduction of the Mark 15-MARCO library within the context of an overview of the methodology of MARCO and (2) assessment of the accuracy of MARCO calculations of the Mark 15 MOC at beginning of cycle.

Parks, P.B.

2001-08-09

4

Water chemistry of San Marcos area, Guatemala  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two well-equilibrated Na?Cl geothermal liquids are recognizable in the San Marcos area. Both have the same Cl concentration (540 mg\\/kg) and the same isotopic composition (?D of ?66.5‰ and ?18O of ?9‰) under reservoir conditions, but they come from two distinct aquifers with different temperatures, i.e. 240°C below La Cimarrona and 185°C below La Castalia. The numerous thermal Na?Cl to

Luigi Marini; Roberto Cioni; Massimo Guidi

1998-01-01

5

MarcoPolo: Internet Content for the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

MarcoPolo: Internet Content for the Classroom is a nonprofit consortium of education organizations and the MCI Foundation "dedicated to providing the highest quality Internet content and professional development to teachers and students throughout the United States." The website began as a collection of standards-based, discipline-specific websites for K-12 teachers and now offers lesson plans, student interactive content, downloadable worksheets, links to panel-reviewed websites and additional resources. The website also provides information on the "scalable professional development program" and the "network of states partners dedicated to rolling out MarcoPolo to all teachers and aligning the content to state education standards." Visitors to the website can search the educational resources created by or reviewed by the MarcoPolo Partners, or browse the most recent and featured postings. The MarcoPolo Calendar provides information on historic events and associates them with related MarcoPolo lessons, and a monthly newsletter, MarcoGrams, highlights "common themes from space exploration to family culture" and includes "motivating warm-ups for classroom discussion" and links to other resources. Another section links to MarcoPolo websites across the nation that provide teachers with MarcoPolo content aligned to their state standards. Some resources require free registration, such as information on how to use the MarcoPolo program, free web-based training, and technology tips. The program is so comprehensive, there is even research on the impact of the MarcoPolo program so far.

6

Opening - Matthew Meyerson and Marco Marra, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2014  

Cancer.gov

Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Opening - Matthew Meyerson and Marco Marra Opening - Matthew Meyerson and Marco Marra, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2014 You will need Adobe Flash Player 8 or later and JavaScript enabled to view this video. You

7

History of the Italian San Marco equatorial mobile range  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Events leading to the development of the San Marco Equatorial Range are presented. Included are background information leading to the cooperative space program between the United States and Italy, conceptual planning, training activities, equipment design and fabrication, and range utilization. The technical support provided the San Marco Program by Scout Project Office, and other NASA installations is described.

Nesbitt, H. N.

1971-01-01

8

SETA-Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer for Marco Polo mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Marco Polo NEO sample return M-class mission has been selected for assessment study within the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program. The Marco Polo mission proposes to do a sample return mission to Near Earth Asteroid. With this mission we have the opportunity to return for study in Earth-based laboratories a direct sample of the earliest record of how our

M. Cristina de Sanctis; Gianrico Filacchione; Fabrizio Capaccioni; Giuseppe Piccioni; Eleonora Ammannito; M. Teresa Capria; Angioletta Coradini; Alessandra Migliorini; Enrico Battistelli; Giampaolo Preti

2010-01-01

9

MarcoPolo-R near earth asteroid sample return mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

MarcoPolo-R is a sample return mission to a primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) proposed in collaboration with NASA. It will\\u000a rendezvous with a primitive NEA, scientifically characterize it at multiple scales, and return a unique sample to Earth unaltered\\u000a by the atmospheric entry process or terrestrial weathering. MarcoPolo-R will return bulk samples (up to 2 kg) from an organic-rich\\u000a binary asteroid to

Maria Antonietta Barucci; A. F. Cheng; P. Michel; L. A. M. Benner; R. P. Binzel; P. A. Bland; H. Böhnhardt; J. R. Brucato; A. Campo Bagatin; P. Cerroni; E. Dotto; A. Fitzsimmons; I. A. Franchi; S. F. Green; L.-M. Lara; J. Licandro; B. Marty; K. Muinonen; A. Nathues; J. Oberst; A. S. Rivkin; F. Robert; R. Saladino; J. M. Trigo-Rodriguez; S. Ulamec; M. Zolensky

2011-01-01

10

Magnetostratigraphy of the Lower Cretaceous San Marcos Formation, Coahuila, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Continental hematitic strata of the Lower Cretaceous San Marcos Formation, in central Coahuila, were deposited on and along the margins of the Coahuila Island, a prominent paleogeographic element in NE Mexico. It contains the stratigraphic record of activity along the San Marcos fault, the southern margin of the Sabinas basin. It is overlain by marine limestones of the Cupido Formation, and the contact is transitional. It rests on ammonite bearing strata of Tithonian age, but the contact is not well exposed. We sampled the San Marcos Formation at localities in Potrero Colorado and Valle de San Marcos, for a total of 34 paleomagnetic sites in three sections (one site=one bed). The beds dip gently to the north to northwest at all three sections.The characteristic magnetization is a dual-polarity, high coercivity, and high unblocking temperature (>650 °C), northwest directed moderately positive component, overprinted by a north directed magnetization of lower stability. Occasionally, the reverse polarity magnetization (south-southwest to southeast directed) is only revealed by demagnetization trajectories. Dual polarity magnetizations within two sites suggest that the remanence acquisition process is of long duration relative to the duration of reversals. A composite section defines 9 magnetozones, and it is characterized by reversed zones of short duration relative to normal intervals. We thus correlate the magnetic polarity sequence of the San Marcos Formation with the M5 to M0 chron sequence of the Barremian to early Aptian GPTS. Site means are relatively well grouped. Tilt corrected means for each of the sections samples vary from discordant (191.7°, -54.9°; k=40.5, ?95=9.6°; 7 accepted sites) at the base of the section to concordant (333.6°, 58.3°; k=28.3, ?95=12.6°; 7 accepted sites) at the top of the section. The discordance at the base of the section is interpreted in terms of a small clockwise rotation related to activity along the San Marcos fault.

Molina-Garza, R. S.; Arvizu, I.; González, G.

2007-05-01

11

The midnight density maximum in the S. Marco V and the S. Marco III equatorial density data sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a previous paper we showed some systematic deviations of the S. Marco V drag balance equatorial density data with respect to the MSIS86 model. We interpreted these deviations as due, at least in part, to the presence of a variable ``Midnight Density Maximum'' (MDM). In the data, there was in fact evidence of some altitude and seasonal variation of this pattern. In the present paper we consider, besides the S. Marco V data base (density measured during 1988), the S. Marco III data base, collected in 1971 almost in the same seasonal period and altitude range, with an instrument very similar to that of the S. Marco V. The use of both data sets is allowing a rather detailed description of the phenomenon as seen by the DBI instrument, for what concerns both the ``seasonal'' and altitude variations. In addition also some longitude effects are evidenced, for instance, by the MITS and QUITO data subsets of S. Marco III, taken respectively around 40 deg and 280 deg East longitude. Notice in addition that S. M. III data refer to the year 1971 (descending part of solar cycle 20) while SMV was launched in 1988 (ascending part of solar cycle 22); the comparison is thus allowing to evidence the persistence of the phenomenon and of its main characteristics. The observed data are consistent ``at large'' for both S. Marco III and V, while the differences in the details are providing hints on the mechanisms of the thermospheric dynamics (tidal theory and neutral-charged interactions). The paper presents the above said features together with a discussion on the characteristics of the two data bases and on their possible relevance for modeling the considered MDM feature.

Arduini, C.; Laneve, G.; Ponzi, U.

12

SYMBOLISM IN THE GENESIS MOSAICS OF SAN MARCO  

Microsoft Academic Search

Throughout early Christian art, the work of the mosaic is prominently used to adorn the ceilings of basilicas, especially in the apse of the churches. Being an especially rich medium of expression, this is symbolic because the apse was associated with the vault of heaven (Hetherington 14). Within San Marco's basilica of Venice, this tradition is no different. The vaulted

Joni Harrison

13

OHMSETT 'HIGH SEAS' PERFORMANCE TESTING: MARCO CLASS V OIL SKIMMER  

EPA Science Inventory

A MARCO Class V oil skimmer was tested at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's OHMSETT facility to determine the device's 'high seas' performance characteristics. Performance data was obtained for several simulated offshore wave conditions at various collection speeds. Skim...

14

Políticas Española e Italiana según la Directiva Marco del Agua  

Microsoft Academic Search

RESUMEN Se ha elaborado un análisis de la evolución de la política internacional y europea, en relación a la gestión de los recursos hídricos, para identificar y comparar principios, objetivos y métodos de actuación en dos países mediterráneos miembros de la Unión Europea: Italia y España. La comparativa obtenida se hace tomando como referencia esencial la Directiva Marco del Agua,

Luis Miguel Valenzuela Montes; Anna Rigossi

2009-01-01

15

SETA: An Imaging Spectrometer for Marco Polo Mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of the SETA experiment is to perform imaging spectroscopy in the spectral range 400-3300 nm for a complete mapping of the Marco Polo target with a spectral sampling of at least 20 nm and a spatial resolution on the order of meters.

de Sanctis, M. C.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Piccioni, G.; Ammannito, E.; Capria, M. T.; Coradini, A.; Migliorini, A.; Battistelli, E.; Preti, G.

2010-03-01

16

Closing Remarks - Matthew Meyerson and Marco Marra, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2014  

Cancer.gov

Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Closing Remarks - Matthew Meyerson and Marco Marra Closing Remarks - Matthew Meyerson and Marco Marra, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2014 You will need Adobe Flash Player 8 or later and JavaScript enabled

17

MarcoPolo-R near earth asteroid sample return mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

MarcoPolo-R is a sample return mission to a primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) proposed in collaboration with NASA. It will rendezvous with a primitive NEA, scientifically characterize it at multiple scales, and return a unique sample to Earth unaltered by the atmospheric entry process or terrestrial weathering. MarcoPolo-R will return bulk samples (up to 2 kg) from an organic-rich binary asteroid to Earth for laboratory analyses, allowing us to: explore the origin of planetary materials and initial stages of habitable planet formation; identify and characterize the organics and volatiles in a primitive asteroid; understand the unique geomorphology, dynamics and evolution of a binary NEA. This project is based on the previous Marco Polo mission study, which was selected for the Assessment Phase of the first round of Cosmic Vision. Its scientific rationale was highly ranked by ESA committees and it was not selected only because the estimated cost was higher than the allotted amount for an M class mission. The cost of MarcoPolo-R will be reduced to within the ESA medium mission budget by collaboration with APL (John Hopkins University) and JPL in the NASA program for coordination with ESA's Cosmic Vision Call. The baseline target is a binary asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3, which offers a very efficient operational and technical mission profile. A binary target also provides enhanced science return. The choice of this target will allow new investigations to be performed more easily than at a single object, and also enables investigations of the fascinating geology and geophysics of asteroids that are impossible at a single object. Several launch windows have been identified in the time-span 2020-2024. A number of other possible primitive single targets of high scientific interest have been identified covering a wide range of possible launch dates. The baseline mission scenario of MarcoPolo-R to 1996 FG3 is as follows: a single primary spacecraft provided by ESA, carrying the Earth Re-entry Capsule, sample acquisition and transfer system provided by NASA, will be launched by a Soyuz-Fregat rocket from Kourou into GTO and using two space segment stages. Two similar missions with two launch windows, in 2021 and 2022 and for both sample return in 2029 (with mission duration of 7 and 8 years), have been defined. Earlier or later launches, in 2020 or 2024, also offer good opportunities. All manoeuvres are carried out by a chemical propulsion system. MarcoPolo-R takes advantage of three industrial studies completed as part of the previous Marco Polo mission (see ESA/SRE (2009)3, Marco Polo Yellow Book) and of the expertise of the consortium led by Dr. A.F. Cheng (PI of the NASA NEAR Shoemaker mission) of the JHU-APL, including JPL, NASA ARC, NASA LaRC, and MIT.

Barucci, Maria Antonietta; Cheng, A. F.; Michel, P.; Benner, L. A. M.; Binzel, R. P.; Bland, P. A.; Böhnhardt, H.; Brucato, J. R.; Campo Bagatin, A.; Cerroni, P.; Dotto, E.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Franchi, I. A.; Green, S. F.; Lara, L.-M.; Licandro, J.; Marty, B.; Muinonen, K.; Nathues, A.; Oberst, J.; Rivkin, A. S.; Robert, F.; Saladino, R.; Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Ulamec, S.; Zolensky, M.

2012-04-01

18

Marco Polo: Near-Earth Object Sample Return Mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

MARCO POLO is a joint European-Japanese sample return mission to a Near-Earth Object (NEO), selected by ESA in the framework of COSMIC VISION 2015-2025 for an assessment study scheduled to last until October 2009. This Euro-Asian mission will go to a primitive Near-Earth Object (NEO), such as C or D-type, scientifically characterize it at multiple scales, and bring samples back to Earth for detailed scientific investigation. NEOs are part of the small body population in the Solar System, which are leftover building blocks of the Solar System formation process. They offer important clues to the chemical mixture from which planets formed about 4.6 billion years ago. The scientific objectives of Marco Polo will therefore contribute to a better understanding of the origin and evolution of the Solar System, the Earth, and the potential contribution of primitive material to the formation of Life. Marco Polo is based on a launch with a Soyuz Fregat and consists of a Mother Spacecraft (MSC), possibly carrying a lander. The MSC would approach the target asteroid and spend a few months for global characterization of the target to select a sampling site. Then, the MSC would then descend to retrieve several samples which will be transferred to a Sample Return Capsule (SRC). The MSC would return to Earth and release the SRC into the atmosphere for ground recovery. The sample of the NEO will then be available for detailed investigation in ground-based laboratories. In parallel to JAXA considering how to perform the mission, ESA has performed a Marco Polo study in their Concurrent Design Facility (CDF). Two parallel industrial studies will start in September 2008 to be conducted in Europe for one year. The scientific objectives addressed by the mission and the current status of the mission study (ESA-JAXA) will be presented and discussed.

Antonieta Barucci, Maria; Yoshikawa, M.; Koschny, D.; Boehnhardt, H.; Brucato, J. R.; Coradini, M.; Dotto, E.; Franchi, I. A.; Green, S. F.; Josset, J. L.; Kawagushi, J.; Michel, P.; Muinonen, K.; Oberst, J.; Yano, H.; Binzel, R. P.; Marco Polo Science Team

2008-09-01

19

MARCO POLO: near earth object sample return mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

MARCO POLO is a joint European–Japanese sample return mission to a Near-Earth Object. This Euro-Asian mission will go to a\\u000a primitive Near-Earth Object (NEO), which we anticipate will contain primitive materials without any known meteorite analogue,\\u000a scientifically characterize it at multiple scales, and bring samples back to Earth for detailed scientific investigation.\\u000a Small bodies, as primitive leftover building blocks of

M. A. Barucci; M. Yoshikawa; P. Michel; J. Kawagushi; H. Yano; J. R. Brucato; I. A. Franchi; E. Dotto; M. Fulchignoni; S. Ulamec

2009-01-01

20

Uranium minerals from the San Marcos District, Chihuahua, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mineralogy of the two uranium deposits (Victorino and San Marcos I) of Sierra San Marcos, located 30 km northwest of Chihuahua City, Mexico, was studied by optical microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction with Rietveld analysis, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, and gamma spectrometry. At the San Marcos I deposit, uranophane Ca(UO2)2Si2O7·6(H2O) (the dominant mineral at both deposits) and metatyuyamunite Ca(UO2)(V2O8)·3(H2O) were observed. Uranophane, uraninite (UO2+x), masuyite Pb(UO2)3O3(OH)·3(H2O), and becquerelite Ca(UO2)6O4(OH)6 ·(8H2O) are present at the Victorino deposit. Field observations, coupled with analytical data, suggest the following sequence of mineralization: (1) deposition of uraninite, (2) alteration of uraninite to masuyite, (3) deposition of uranophane, (4) micro-fracturing, (5) calcite deposition in the micro-fractures, and (6) formation of becquerelite. The investigated deposits were formed by high-to low-temperature hydrothermal activity during post-orogenic evolution of Sierra San Marcos. The secondary mineralization occurred through a combination of hydrothermal and supergene alteration events. Becquerelite was formed in situ by reaction of uraninite with geothermal carbonated solutions, which led to almost complete dissolution of the precursor uraninite. The Victorino deposit represents the second known occurrence of becquerelite in Mexico, the other being the uranium deposits at Peña Blanca in Chihuahua State.

Reyes-Cortés, Manuel; Fuentes-Cobas, Luis; Torres-Moye, Enrique; Esparza-Ponce, Hilda; Montero-Cabrera, María Elena

2010-05-01

21

MarcoPolo-R: Asteroid Sample Return Mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

MarcoPolo-R is a sample return mission to a primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) selected for the assessment study in the framework of ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-25 program. MarcoPolo-R is an European-led mission with a proposed NASA contribution. MarcoPolo-R will rendezvous with a primitive carbon-rich NEA, scientifically characterize it at multiple scales, and return a unique sample to Earth unaltered by the atmospheric entry process or terrestrial weathering. The baseline target is a binary asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3, which offers a very efficient operational and technical mission profile. A binary target also provides enhanced science return. The choice of this target will allow new investigations to be performed more easily than at a single object, and also enables investigations of the fascinating geology and geophysics of asteroids that are impossible at a single object. Several launch windows have been identified in the time-span 2020-2024. The baseline mission scenario of MarcoPolo-R to 1996 FG3 foresees a single primary spacecraft, carrying the Earth re-entry capsule and sample acquisition and transfer system, launched by a Soyuz-Fregat rocket from Kourou. The scientific payload includes state-of-the-art instruments, e.g. a camera system for high resolution imaging from orbit and on the surface, spectrometers covering visible, near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths, a neutral-particle analyser, a radio science experiment and optional laser altimeter. If resources are available, an optional Lander will be added to perform in-situ characterization close to the sampling site, and internal structure investigations. MarcoPolo-R will allow us to study the most primitive materials available to investigate early solar system formation processes. The main goal of the MarcoPolo-R mission is to return unaltered NEA material for detailed analysis in ground-based laboratories. Only in the laboratory can instruments with the necessary precision and sensitivity be applied to individual components of the complex mixture of materials that forms an asteroid regolith, in orer to determine their precise chemical, mineralogical and isotopic composition. Such measurements are vital for revealing the evidence of stellar, interstellar medium, pre-solar nebula and parent body processes that are retained in primitive asteroidal material. In addition to addressing the exciting science goals, the MarcoPolo-R mission also involves technologies for which technical development programmes are well under way. It is the ideal platform to (i) demonstrate innovative capabilities such as: accurate planetary navigation and landing, sample return operational chain; (ii) prepare the next generation of curation facilities for extra-terrestrial sample storage and analysis; (iii) develop high speed re-entry capsule; (iv) pave the way as a pathfinder mission for future sample returns from bodies with high surface gravity.

Brucato, John Robert

2012-07-01

22

MARCO POLO: near earth object sample return mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

MARCO POLO is a joint European-Japanese sample return mission to a Near-Earth Object. This Euro-Asian mission will go to a primitive Near-Earth Object (NEO), which we anticipate will contain primitive materials without any known meteorite analogue, scientifically characterize it at multiple scales, and bring samples back to Earth for detailed scientific investigation. Small bodies, as primitive leftover building blocks of the Solar System formation process, offer important clues to the chemical mixture from which the planets formed some 4.6 billion years ago. Current exobiological scenarios for the origin of Life invoke an exogenous delivery of organic matter to the early Earth: it has been proposed that primitive bodies could have brought these complex organic molecules capable of triggering the pre-biotic synthesis of biochemical compounds. Moreover, collisions of NEOs with the Earth pose a finite hazard to life. For all these reasons, the exploration of such objects is particularly interesting and urgent. The scientific objectives of MARCO POLO will therefore contribute to a better understanding of the origin and evolution of the Solar System, the Earth, and possibly Life itself. Moreover, MARCO POLO provides important information on the volatile-rich (e.g. water) nature of primitive NEOs, which may be particularly important for future space resource utilization as well as providing critical information for the security of Earth. MARCO POLO is a proposal offering several options, leading to great flexibility in the actual implementation. The baseline mission scenario is based on a launch with a Soyuz-type launcher and consists of a Mother Spacecraft (MSC) carrying a possible Lander named SIFNOS, small hoppers, sampling devices, a re-entry capsule and scientific payloads. The MSC leaves Earth orbit, cruises toward the target with ion engines, rendezvous with the target, conducts a global characterization of the target to select a sampling site, and delivers small hoppers (MINERVA type, JAXA) and SIFNOS. The latter, if added, will perform a soft landing, anchor to the target surface, and make various in situ measurements of surface/subsurface materials near the sampling site. Two surface samples will be collected by the MSC using “touch and go” manoeuvres. Two complementary sample collection devices will be used in this phase: one developed by ESA and another provided by JAXA, mounted on a retractable extension arm. After the completion of the sampling and ascent of the MSC, the arm will be retracted to transfer the sample containers into the MSC. The MSC will then make its journey back to Earth and release the re-entry capsule into the Earth’s atmosphere.

Barucci, M. A.; Yoshikawa, M.; Michel, P.; Kawagushi, J.; Yano, H.; Brucato, J. R.; Franchi, I. A.; Dotto, E.; Fulchignoni, M.; Ulamec, S.

2009-03-01

23

Video Gallery: Drs. Charles Liu & Orsola De Marco  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online video gallery is from the Museum's Seminars on Science, a series of distance-learning courses designed to help educators meet the new national science standards. Part of the Frontiers in Physical Science seminar, the gallery features two videos, available in broadband and modem formats, and with printable PDF transcripts. Dr. Charles Liu gives a quick look at his research on galaxies and the wide range in galaxy size. Dr. Orsola De Marco provides a brief overview of the "life cycle of stars" and the museum's Scales of the Universe Exhibit.

24

Characterization of immortalized MARCO and SR-AI\\/II-deficient murine alveolar macrophage cell lines  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Alveolar macrophages (AM) avidly bind and ingest unopsonized inhaled particles and bacteria through class A scavenger receptors (SRAs) MARCO and SR-AI\\/II. Studies to characterize the function of these SRAs have used AMs from MARCO or SR-AI\\/II null mice, but this approach is limited by the relatively low yield of AMs. Moreover, studies using both MARCO and SR-AI\\/II-deficient (MS-\\/-) mice

Hongwei Zhou; Amy Imrich; Lester Kobzik

2008-01-01

25

Role of Lysosomes in Silica-Induced Inflammasome Activation and Inflammation in Absence of MARCO  

PubMed Central

MARCO is the predominant scavenger receptor for recognition and binding of silica particles by alveolar macrophages (AM). Previously, it was shown that mice null for MARCO have a greater inflammatory response to silica, but the mechanism was not described. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between MARCO and NLRP3 inflammasome activity. Silica increased NLRP3 inflammasome activation and release of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1?, to a greater extent in MARCO?/? AM compared to wild type (WT) AM. Furthermore, in MARCO?/? AM there was greater cathepsin B release from phagolysosomes, Caspase-1 activation, and acid sphingomyelinase activity compared to WT AM, supporting the critical role played by lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) in triggering silica-induced inflammation. The difference in sensitivity to LMP appears to be in cholesterol recycling since increasing cholesterol in AM by treatment with U18666A decreased silica-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and cells lacking MARCO were less able to sequester cholesterol following silica treatment. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MARCO contributes to normal cholesterol uptake in macrophages; therefore, in the absence of MARCO, macrophages are more susceptible to a greater inflammatory response by particulates known to cause NLRP3 inflammasome activation and the effect is due to increased LMP.

Biswas, Rupa; Hamilton, Raymond F.

2014-01-01

26

San Marcos and Comal Springs and Associated Aquatic Ecosystems (Revised) Recovery Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This plan addresses recovery actions for the fountain darter, San Marcos salamander, San Marcos gambusia, Texas blind salamander, and Texas wild-rice. The recovery goal is to secure the survival of all five species and the ecosystem upon which they depend...

1996-01-01

27

SETA-Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer for Marco Polo mission.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Marco Polo NEO sample return M-class mission has been selected for assessment study within the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program. The Marco Polo mission proposes to do a sample return mission to Near Earth Asteroid. With this mission we have the opportunity to return for study in Earth-based laboratories a direct sample of the earliest record of how our solar system formed. The landing site and sample selection will be the most important scientific decision to make during the course of the entire mission. The imaging spectrometer is a key instrument being capable to characterize the mineralogical composition of the entire asteroid and to analyze the of the landing site and the returned sample in its own native environment. SETA is a Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer able to perform imaging spectroscopy in the spectral range 400-3300 nm for a complete mapping of the target in order to characterize the mineral properties of the surface. The spectral sampling is of at least 20 nm and the spatial resolution of the order of meter. SETA shall be able to return a detailed determination of the mineralogical composition for the different geologic units as well as the overall surface mineralogy with a spatial resolution of the order of few meters. These compositional characterizations involve the analysis of spectral parameters that are diagnostic of the presence and composition of various mineral species and materials that may be present on the target body. Most of the interesting minerals have electronic and vibrational absorption features in their VIS-NIR reflectance spectra. The SETA design is based on a pushbroom imaging spectrometer operating in the 400-3300 nm range, using a 2D array HgCdTe detector. This kind of instrument allows a simultaneous measurement of a full spectrum taken across the field of view defined by the slit's axis (samples). The second direction (lines) of the hyperspectral image shall be obtained by using the relative motion of the orbiter with respect to the target or by using a scan mirror. The SETA optical concept is mostly inherited from the SIMBIO-SYS/VIHI (Visible Infrared Hyperspectral Imager) imaging spectrometer aboard Bepi Colombo mission but also from other space flying imaging spectrometers, such as VIRTIS (on Rosetta and Venus Express, VIR on DAWN).

de Sanctis, M. Cristina; Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Ammannito, Eleonora; Capria, M. Teresa; Coradini, Angioletta; Migliorini, Alessandra; Battistelli, Enrico; Preti, Giampaolo

2010-05-01

28

Marco Polo : an Italian Mission Scoring a lot of Records  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first astronaut of the European Astronaut Corps of Italian nationality, Roberto Vittori, will fly on a Soyuz capsule at the end of April 2002, opening a new era of space flight. The mission, sponsored by the Italian Space Agency, has been developed in the framework of an ESA- ROSAVIAKOSMOS agreement, reached in order to give European astronauts additional possibilities to fly. It's the first mission of this kind. In addition to that, this is the real first time in which a Soyuz mission is in the hands of two cosmonauts, and one of them is non Russian. On the same flight, in fact, Mark Shuttleworth, the second tourist in the history of space activities, is going to fly, performing also a set of scientific experiments. Marco Polo is also the first mission in which the two Agencies, ASI and ESA, are developing a joint commercialisation program, devoted to attire sponsors for improving research and development activities in the Human Spaceflight area. This will allow the two agencies to improve also the quality of life on Earth. A comprehensive scientific program is also foreseen accompanying Vittori on board, mainly in the field of life science. Experiments devoted to neurophysiology, arms rehabilitation, test of new materials for dressing in space, evaluation of the behaviour of the Nobel Prize Montalcini discovery named NGF (Nerve Growth Factor) will be performed on board. A R&D payload for Blood Pressure Measurements could have in the future commercial spin-off. In addition, a possible institutional sponsorship of the World Health Organization is under discussion. It will be the real first time in which a space mission gets this kind of sponsorship, and this strictly related to the World Health Day this year, devoted in promoting health throughout movement, i.e. "Move for Health". The Italian Space Agency proposed a joint combination of the two slogans, coupling the "Move for Health" message with the Italian "Space for Health" one. This is because of the Marco Polo scientific program, and because of an advanced training and rehabilitation protocol we have studied, to be applied to old population in order to improve their quality of life, through the parallelism between astronauts (in microgravity conditions) and aging population. The mission, at the time of the World Space Congress, will be already performed and the results can be presented.

di Pippo, Simonetta; Bracciaferri, Fabio M.

2002-01-01

29

Preflight study of San Marco D/L GaAs solar cell panels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The solar array for the San Marco D/L spacecraft is described and the performance of 4 GaAs solar cell panels are examined. In comparison to the typical Si solar cell panel for San Marco D/L, it is shown that each GaAs solar cell panel provides at least 23 percent more specific power at maximum output and 28 deg C. Also described here, are several measurements that will be made to evaluate the relative performance of Si and GaAs solar cell panels during the San Marco D/L flight.

Day, J. H., Jr.

1984-01-01

30

Near-Earth Object Exploration and Marco Polo-R  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A major goal for NASA's human spaceflight program is to send astronauts to near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) in the coming decades. Missions to NEAs would undoubtedly provide a great deal of technical and engineering data on spacecraft operations for future human space exploration while conducting in-depth scientific examinations of these primitive objects. However, prior to sending human explorers to NEAs, robotic investigations of these bodies would be required in order to maximize operational efficiency and reduce mission risk. These precursor missions to NEAs would fill crucial strategic knowledge gaps concerning their physical characteristics that are relevant for human exploration of these relatively unknown destinations. Therefore robotic investigations of NEAs, such as ESA's Marco Polo-R sample return mission to 2008 EV5, would allow NASA and its international partners to gain critical operational experience in performing complex tasks (e.g., close proximity operations, surface sample collection, etc.) under microgravity conditions at or near the surface of a potential human destination. This would provide an important synergy between the worldwide Science and Exploration communities, which will be crucial for development of future international deep space exploration architectures and has potential benefits for future exploration of other destinations beyond low-Earth orbit.

Abell, Paul

2013-01-01

31

MARCO is the major binding receptor for unopsonized particles and bacteria on human alveolar macrophages.  

PubMed

Alveolar macrophages (AMs) avidly bind and ingest inhaled environmental particles and bacteria. To identify the particle binding receptor(s) on human AMs, we used functional screening of anti-human AM hybridomas and isolated a mAb, PLK-1, which inhibits AM binding of unopsonized particles (e.g., TiO2, latex beads; 63 +/- 5 and 67 +/- 4% inhibition, respectively, measured by flow cytometry; n = 11) and unopsonized bacteria ( approximately 84 and 41% inhibition of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus binding by mAb PLK-1, respectively). The PLK-1 Ag was identified as the human class A scavenger receptor (SR) MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure) by observing specific immunolabeling of COS cells transfected with human MARCO (but not SR-AI/II) cDNA and by immunoprecipitation by PLK-1 of a protein of appropriate molecular mass (approximately 70 kDa) from both normal human bronchoalveolar lavage cells (>90% AMs) and human MARCO-transfected COS cells. PLK-1 also specifically inhibited particle binding by COS cells, only after transfection with human MARCO cDNA. Immunostaining showed specific labeling of AMs within human lung tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage samples, as well as macrophages in other sites (e.g., lymph node and liver). Using COS transfectants with different truncated forms of MARCO, allowed epitope mapping for the PLK-1 Ab to MARCO domain V between amino acid residues 420 and 431. A panel of Abs to various SRs identified expression on AMs, but failed to inhibit TiO2 or S. aureus binding. The data support a dominant role for MARCO in the human AM defense against inhaled particles and pathogens. PMID:16237101

Arredouani, Mohamed S; Palecanda, Aiyappa; Koziel, Henry; Huang, Yuh-Ching; Imrich, Amy; Sulahian, Timothy H; Ning, Yao Yu; Yang, Zhiping; Pikkarainen, Timo; Sankala, Marko; Vargas, Sara O; Takeya, Motohiro; Tryggvason, Karl; Kobzik, Lester

2005-11-01

32

Radar Tomography of Asteroids ASSERT / Marco Polo-R  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The internal structure of NEAs remains largely unknown. It is a key point for the understanding of asteroid accretion and dynamical evolution. From a science point of view, the internal structure is also a key point for the understanding of asteroid accretion and dynamical evolution. For risk management and mitigation, it is required to characterize whether a small asteroid will survive the transit through the atmosphere and also to define a deflection policy. There are some indirect evidences that a rubble pile structure is really common at least for objects larger than a few hundreds of meters in diameter. But a more precise characterisation of the internal structure is required, such as the size and the structure of the main blobs and their distribution within the NEAs main body as well as a statistical characterisation of the surface regolith in term of density and size distribution. Radar tomography is the only way to image the internal structure from decimetric to global scale in order to better understand the nature of the primary object and its posterior alterations. It is also a way to estimate the ratio between micro- and macro-porosity. Bistatic radar tomography is an original technique, developed with the CONSERT Experiment (Rosetta / ESA) to image ant characterize the internal structures of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimeko with a signal transmitted from the Orbiter to the Lander. By regards to a more classical monostatic radar like Marsis (MarsExpress/ESA), this bistatic configuration requires limited resources (mass, power and dataflow) and increases the capacity of deep sounding. So ASSERT (ASteroid Sounding Experiment by Radiowave Transmission) is proposed to instrument a MASCOT-type lander e.g. as payload of the ESA Marco Polo R mission (ESA). The first addressed question is a rubble pile or a monolithic body: For a rubble pile, the tomography will allow to estimate the size distribution of the boulders by direct imaging or statistical analysis of the scattered signal. The estimation of the mean permittivity of the blobs is a way to estimate the macro- versus micro-porosity. Its spatial variations highlight the heterogeneity of the parent bodies and segregation mechanism during reaccretion. - And for a monolithic object, we can expect only micro-porosity. Then images of the body interior and spatial distributions of the permittivity give the heterogeneity. In a further analysis, the characterization of the heterogeneity by statistical or imagery approach is a key point to understand asteroid accretion and evolution: - is this body accreted or re-accreted from the same material or not, from similar parent bodies or not? - is there some evidence of collisional metamorphism with change in the porosity and or mineralogy? - is there some evidence of metamorphism per hydration? This advanced interpretation will be based on the sample return analysis and constitutes a complete recontextualization of the analyzed samples at the global body scale

Herique, A.; Zine, S.; Barucci, A.; Biele, J.; Ho, T.; Kofman, W. W.; Krause, C.; Michel, P.; Plettemeier, D.; Prado, J.; Souyris, J.; Ulamec, S.; Assert Team

2011-12-01

33

The San Marcos River Habitat Conservation Plan: Using HCP's as a Tool for Ecological Restoration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The San Marcos River in San Marcos, Hays County, Texas is a biologically unique system with several listed species found in the headwaters. Flowing from the Edwards Aquifer and the second largest spring system in Texas, the water is clear and thermally constant. The physical and biological character of the habitat within and surrounding the river has been severely degraded by human activity. As a means of dealing with the continued disturbance and finding a balance between human needs and conservation, the San Marcos River Habitat Conservation Plan was written as provided by Section 10(a) of the Endangered Species Act. The plan provides habitat mitigation for the fountain darter (Etheostoma fonticola), Comal Springs riffle beetle, (Heterelmis comalensis), and San Marcos salamander (Eurycea nana), while allowing for incidental take resulting from specific restoration and management projects. We used a science-based ecological/experimental approach to address some of the problems and optimize solutions, including restoration of stream banks damaged from overuse, planning for permanent access points and trails, removal of silt deposits caused by extensive flood control structures, wet-pond construction, managing flow, and the control of submerged and emergent non-native vegetation to improve habitat and enhance recreation.

Winters, J. M.; Howard, M. S.; Arsuffi, T. L.

2005-05-01

34

Orbital stability during the mapping and approach phases of the MarcoPolo-R spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In support of the Marco-Polo-R mission we are analyzing the motion of the spacecraft in the vicinity of its primary target, the binary asteroid system 175706 (1996 FG3). We ran simulations in order to support the general mapping, the approach, and the sampling phase

Wickhusen, K.; Hussmann, H.; Oberst, J.; Luedicke, F.

2012-09-01

35

Stability and Evolution of Orbits around Binary Asteroids: Applications to the Marco Polo Mission Scenario  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have analyzed the orbit stability of a spacecraft moving around a small Near-Earth-Asteroid (NEA), focusing on the primary target of the Marco Polo Mission: 175706 (1996 FG3). The simulation showed that most orbits are unstable over time but under certain conditions the S/C stays in orbit without crashing or escaping into space.

Wickhusen, K.; Oberst, J.; Hussmann, H.; Shi, X.; Damme, F.

2011-10-01

36

Evaluation of Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meters to Quantify Flow From Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are the two largest springs in Texas, are major discharge points for the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and provide habitat for several Federally listed endangered species that depend on adequate springflo...

M. O. Gary R. H. Gary W. H. Asquith

2008-01-01

37

Thorium isotopes in colloidal fraction of water from San Marcos Dam, Chihuahua, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main interest of this stiidy is to assess the contents and distribution of Th-series isotopes in colloidal fraction of surface water from San Marcos dam, because the suspended particulate matter serves as transport medium for several pollutants. The aim of this work was to assess the distribution of thorium isotopes (232Th and 230Th) contained in suspended matter. Samples were taken from three surface points along the San Marcos dam: water input, midpoint, and near to dam wall. In this last point, a depth sampling was also carried out. Here, three depth points were taken at 0.4, 8 and 15 meters. To evaluate the thorium behavior in surface water, from every water sample the colloidal fraction was separated, between 1 and 0.1 ?m. Thorium isotopes concentraron in samples were obtained by alpha spectrometry. Activity concentrations obtained of 232Th and 230Th in surface points ranged from 0.3 to 0.5 Bq . L-1, whereas in depth points ranged from 0.4 to 3.2 Bq . L-1, respectively. The results show that 230Th is in higher concentration than 232Th in colloidal fraction. This can be attributed to a preference of these colloids to adsorb uranium. Thus, the activity ratio 230Th/232Th in colloidal fraction showed values from 2.3 to 10.2. In surface points along the dam, 230Th activity concentration decreases while 232Th concentration remains constant. On the other hand, activity concentrations of both isotopes showed a pointed out enhancement with depth. The results have shown a possible lixiviation of uranium from geological substrate into the surface water and an important fractionation of thorium isotopes, which suggest that thorium is non-homogeneously distributed along San Marcos dam.

Cabral-Lares, M.; Melgoza, A.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.

2013-07-01

38

Aeronomic studies with the San Marco D/Itg: ODA and ASSI  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contributions to the study of the aeronomy of the terrestrial thermosphere using the research satellite San Marco D/Itg were made. The aim was to explore the time-space behavior of thermosphere and ionosphere during interaction with solar radiation and solar wind. The software experiment ODA determines the gas density in the perigee of the satellite orbit from the orbit change. The solar spectrometer ASSI measures solar radiation from the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) to the visible range, as well as airglow in the EUV to determine the space-time behavior of oxygen and nitrogen.

Roemer, M.

1990-12-01

39

Evaluation of Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meters to Quantify Flow From Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are the two largest springs in Texas, are major discharge points for the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and provide habitat for several Federally listed endangered species that depend on adequate springflows for survival. It is therefore imperative that the Edwards Aquifer Authority have accurate and timely springflow data to guide resource management. Discharge points for Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are submerged in Landa Lake and in Spring Lake, respectively. Flows from the springs currently (2008) are estimated by the U.S Geological Survey in real time as surface-water discharge from conventional stage-discharge ratings at sites downstream from each spring. Recent technological advances and availability of acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) now provide tools to collect data (stream velocity) related to springflow that could increase accuracy of real-time estimates of the springflows. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Edwards Aquifer Authority, did a study during May 2006 through September 2007 to evaluate ADVMs to quantify flow from Comal and San Marcos Springs. The evaluation was based on two monitoring approaches: (1) placement of ADVMs in important spring orifices - spring run 3 and spring 7 at Comal Springs, and diversion spring at San Marcos Springs; and (2) placement of ADVMs at the nearest flowing streams - Comal River new and old channels for Comal Springs, Spring Lake west and east outflow channels and current (2008) San Marcos River streamflow-gaging site for San Marcos Springs. For Comal Springs, ADVM application at spring run 3 and spring 7 was intended to indicate whether the flows of spring run 3 and spring 7 can be related to total springflow. The findings indicate that velocity data from both discharge features, while reflecting changes in flow, do not reliably show a direct relation to measured streamflow and thus to total Comal Springs flow. ADVMs at the Comal River new channel and old channel sites provide data that potentially could yield more accurate real-time estimates of total Comal Springs flow than streamflow measured at the downstream Comal River site. For San Marcos Springs, the findings indicate shortcomings with ADVM installations at diversion spring and in the west and east outflow channels. However, the accuracy of streamflow measured at the San Marcos River gage as an estimate of real-time San Marcos Springs flow could potentially be increased through use of ADVM data from that site.

Gary, Marcus O.; Gary, Robin H.; Asquith, William H.

2008-01-01

40

Solar measurements from the Airglow-Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) on the San Marco 5 satellite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The analysis of the solar spectral irradiance from the Airglow-Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) on the San Marco 5 satellite is the focus for this research grant. A pre-print copy of the paper describing the calibrations of and results from the San Marco ASSI is attached to this report. The calibration of the ASSI included (1) transfer of photometric calibration from a rocket experiment and the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME), (2) use of the on-board radioactive calibration sources, (3) validation of the ASSI sensitivity over its field of view, and (4) determining the degradation of the spectrometers. We have determined that the absolute values for the solar irradiance needs adjustment in the current proxy models of the solar UV irradiance, and the amount of solar variability from the proxy models are in reasonable agreement with the ASSI measurements. This research grant also has supported the development of a new solar EUV irradiance proxy model. We expected that the magnetic flux is responsible for most of the heating, via Alfen waves, in the chromosphere, transition region, and corona. From examining time series of solar irradiance data and magnetic fields at different levels, we did indeed find that the chromospheric emissions correlate best with the large magnetic field levels.

Woods, Thomas N.

1994-01-01

41

Sample return from a Near Earth Object: Future perspectives from Marco Polo.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are entering in a new era of space exploration defined by sample return missions. The study of extraterrestrial samples in the laboratory has given us many insights to Solar System formation and evolution, but is hampered by having to rely on the arrival of meteorites -fairly random samples from asteroids, the Moon and Mars. There is now increased interest from the scientific community in the acquisition of samples from specific parent-bodies; this is reflected by proposals for an increasing number of sample return missions within international programs of Solar System exploration. The study of extraterrestrial samples in laboratory provides new opportunities to advance fun-damental issues on the origin and evolution of the Solar System, on primordial cosmochemistry and on nature of the building blocks of terrestrial planets. Samples returned from primitive carbonaceous small bodies could help us in deciphering relevant clues on the origin and early evolution of life on Earth. Once returned on Earth, samples will undergo preliminary charac-terization and classification within dedicated sample curation facilities before being delivered to worldwide laboratories for detailed investigation of the elemental and isotopic compositions, mineralogy, petrology, organic and interstellar grain inventories, etc. The samples returned from the surface of a primitive NEO will contain material more primitive than currently avail-able from meteorites as this is generally lost during atmospheric entry, with only more coherent meteorites, the product of asteroidal modification, surviving to be collected on the surface of the Earth. Marco Polo was shortlisted for the assessment phase of ESA's Cosmic Vision program to perform a sample return from a primitive Near-Earth Object (NEO), such as a C-or D-type asteroid or extinct comet. Although the scientific objectives were very highly rated it was not selected for mission development as an ESA-only Medium Mission because it exceeded cost envelope. However, in view of the evolving international context, Marco Polo has gathered the interest of a huge scientific community and it is now proposed as a potential participation in missions currently under discussion within other agencies. In this talk Marco Polo's scientific case and future perspectives will be presented.

Brucato, John Robert; Barucci, M. A.; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Dotto, Elisabetta; Franchi, Ian; Green, Simon F.; Josset, Jean-Luc; Michel, Patrick; Muinonen, Karri; Oberst, Juergen; Binzel, Richard P.; Koschny, Detlef; Agnolon, David; Romstedt, Jens

42

Uranium in the surrounding of San Marcos-Sacramento River environment (Chihuahua, Mexico).  

PubMed

The main interest of this study is to assess whether uranium deposits located in the San Marcos outcrops (NW of Chihuahua City, Mexico) could be considered as a source of U-isotopes in its surrounding environment. Uranium activity concentrations were determined in biota, ground, and surface water by either alpha or liquid scintillation spectrometries. Major ions were analyzed by ICP-OES in surface water and its suspended matter. For determining uranium activity in biota, samples were divided in parts. The results have shown a possible lixiviation and infiltration of uranium from geological substrate into the ground and surface water, and consequently, a transfer to biota. Calculated annual effective doses by ingestion suggest that U-isotopes in biota could not negligibly contribute to the neighboring population dose. By all these considerations, it is concluded that in this zone there is natural enhancement of uranium in all environmental samples analyzed in the present work. PMID:22536148

Rentería-Villalobos, Marusia; Cortés, Manuel Reyes; Mantero, Juan; Manjón, Guillermo; García-Tenorio, Rafael; Herrera, Eduardo; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena

2012-01-01

43

[The Hospital of the people of San Marcos. First in Aguascalientes, Mexico].  

PubMed

For centuries, the major hospital of San Juan de Dios has been historically considered the first hospital in Aguascalientes,Mexico, founded on 1685. However, in this paper we report that the Hospital of the people of San Marcos, in operation at least since 1630, was really the first hospital in the state in functions and which services to the needy population continued until today’s last notice, as of 1728. As evidence, we offer various first-hand documentary sources obtained in different archive files, which give credit to this modest charity institution. The aforementioned for the memory and pride of the history of health care in Aguascalientes and Mexico. PMID:23435083

López de la Peña, Xavier A

2013-01-01

44

THERMAP : a mid-infrared spectro-imager for the Marco Polo R mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present THERMAP, a mid-infrared (8-16 ?m) spectro-imager based on uncooled micro-bolometer detector arrays. Due to the recent technological development of these detectors, which have undergone significant improvements in the last decade, we wanted to test their performances for a space mission to small bodies in the inner Solar System. THERMAP was selected by ESA in January 2012 for a one year assessment study, in the framework of a call for declaration of interest in science instrumentation for the Marco Polo R Cosmic Vision mission. In this paper, we present some results of this study and in particular demonstrate that the new generation of uncooled micro-bolometer detectors has all the imaging and spectroscopic capabilities to fulfill the scientific objectives of the Marco Polo R mission. THERMAP scientific objectives - The midinfrared instrument of the Marco Polo R mission must be able i) to determine the surface temperature by mapping the entire surface with an absolute accuracy of at least 5 K (goal 1 K) above 200 K, ii) to determine the thermal inertia with an accuracy of 10% and iii) to determine the surface composition by mapping the entire surface with a spectral resolution of 70 between 8 and 16 ?m. The above mappings should be performed with a spatial resolution of 10 m for the entire surface (global characterization) and 10 cm for the sampling sites (local characterization). THERMAP imaging capabilities - In order to test the imaging capabilities of the THERMAP uncooled microbolometer detector, we set up an experiment based on a 640x480 ULIS micro-bolometer array, a germanium objective and a black body. Using the results of this experiment, we show that calibrated radiometric images can be obtained down to at least 258 K (lower limit of our experiment), and that two calibration points are sufficient to determine the absolute scene temperature with an accuracy better than 1.5 K. An extrapolation to lower temperatures provides an accuracy of about 5 K at 180 K, the lowest temperature the detector can measure. THERMAP spectroscopic capabilites - In order to test the spectroscopic performances of the detector, we added flux attenuating neutral density mid-infrared filters (transmittance: 50%, 10%, 1%) to our experiment. Our results show that we can perform spectroscopic measurements with a spectral resolution R=40-80 in the wavelength range 8-16 ?m for a scene temperature larger than 300 K, the typical surface temperature of a Near Earth Asteroid at 1 AU from the Sun. THERMAP preliminary design - From the above results, we defined a preliminary design for the instrument. THERMAP is a mid-infrared (8-16 ?m) spectro-imager based on two uncooled microbolometer arrays. It is composed of two channels, one for imaging and one for spectroscopy. A flip mirror allows switching between the two channels. Calibration is performed using deep space and two black bodies at known temperature. The design of the THERMAP instrument has a strong heritage from the MERTIS instrument on board Bepi-Colombo [1], which guarantees its feasibility and reliability. Our design is very flexible in term of operations, which is fundamental for a mission to a binary asteroid system (1996 FG3). The THERMAP instrument will be proposed for Marco Polo R and any future space missions to small bodies in the inner solar system.

Groussin, O.; Brageot, E.; Reynaud, J.-L.; Lamy, P.; Jorda, L.; Licandro, J.; Helbert, J.; Knollenberg, J.; Kührt, E.; Delbó, M.

2012-09-01

45

Automation of the Telescope in the Observatory at Texas State University-San Marcos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The telescope in the Observatory at Texas State University - San Marcos is automated by means of off the shelf parts with a budget of 300.00. This telescope retrofit is to replace obsolete and malfunctioning hardware and update software. The telescope upgrade entailed the removal of all of the timeworn hardware and thorough testing of the motors and encoders to insure proper functionality. From a less expensive telescope a new motor control board is acquired that is capable of performing tasks beyond the capabilities of the old board. A Schmitt Trigger and a set of four capacitors in series are used to lessen the noise produced by the older model motors and encoders. All of the retrofitted hardware is tested to insure proper functionality for the final product before installation into the telescope. After final installation a problem with the communication between software and hardware was found and remedied.

Smith, Cary

2012-03-01

46

Equatorial composition in the 137- to 225-km region from the San Marco 3 mass spectrometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The neutral atmospheric composition experiment (Nace) carried by the San Marco 3 (SM 3) satellite measured the equatorial atmospheric composition during the reentry period of Nov. 21-28, 1971. The mass density and molecular nitrogen density measured by the Nace are in agreement with values measured by rocket experiments and inferred from satellite experiments. The average total oxygen content measured by Nace is 30% below the value suggested by von Zahn at 150-km altitude. When it is assumed that his value for the molecular oxygen density at 150 km represents averaged rocket results applicable to the equatorial thermosphere, the Nace total oxygen content results in an atomic oxygen concentration comparable to the mean value of Cira (1965). The Nace helium measurements interpreted in terms of an altitude profile have an altitude distribution similar to that of molecular nitrogen below 165 km.

Newton, G. P.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Pelz, D. T.

1974-01-01

47

Geochemical evaluation of the geothermal resources in the San Marcos region, Guatemala  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The chemical and isotopic compositions of hot springs in the San Marcos region of Guatemala are internally consistent with a hydrologic model in which a deep 240??C reservoir and one or more shallow 195-200??C reservoirs are present. Variations in hot-spring water compositions results from a combination of boiling, mixing with cold, dilute water, and chemical re-equilibration with decreasing temperature. The recharge water for the deep 240??C reservoir is isotopically heavier than the local meteoric water and probably comes from many kilometers to the west or southwest. The water in the shallow reservoir is a mixture of the 240??C water with about 20 ?? 5% of cold, locally derived meteoric water. After mixing, the water in the shallow reservoir re-equilibrates with reservoir rock at 195-200??C. In some places additional mixing with cold water occurs after water leaves the shallow reservoir. ?? 1986.

Fournier, R. O.; Hanshaw, B. B.

1986-01-01

48

Lifetime predictions for the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and San Marco spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lifetime prediction techniques developed by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) are described. These techniques were developed to predict the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft orbit, which is decaying due to atmospheric drag, with reentry predicted to occur before the end of 1989. Lifetime predictions were also performed for the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), which was deployed on the 1984 SMM repair mission and is scheduled for retrieval on another Space Transportation System (STS) mission later this year. Concepts used in the lifetime predictions were tested on the San Marco spacecraft, which reentered the Earth's atmosphere on December 6, 1988. Ephemerides predicting the orbit evolution of the San Marco spacecraft until reentry were generated over the final 90 days of the mission when the altitude was less than 380 kilometers. The errors in the predicted ephemerides are due to errors in the prediction of atmospheric density variations over the lifetime of the satellite. To model the time dependence of the atmospheric densities, predictions of the solar flux at the 10.7-centimeter wavelength were used in conjunction with Harris-Priester (HP) atmospheric density tables. Orbital state vectors, together with the spacecraft mass and area, are used as input to the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS). Propagations proceed in monthly segments, with the nominal atmospheric drag model scaled for each month according to the predicted monthly average value of F10.7. Calibration propagations are performed over a period of known orbital decay to obtain the effective ballistic coefficient. Progagations using plus or minus 2 sigma solar flux predictions are also generated to estimate the despersion in expected reentry dates. Definitive orbits are compared with these predictions as time expases. As updated vectors are received, these are also propagated to reentryto continually update the lifetime predictions.

Smith, E. A.; Ward, D. T.; Schmitt, M. W.; Phenneger, M. C.; Vaughn, F. J.; Lupisella, M. L.

1989-01-01

49

Herschel observations of the Marco Polo-R asteroid 175706 (1996 FG3).  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Background: The Marco Polo-R mission has been selected for the assessment study phase of the ESA M3 missions. This ESA-led sample return mission to the binary asteroid 1996 FG3 (launch window between 2020 and 2024) is proposed with a design that allows it to fit within the pre-defined cost cap of a M-class mission. The binary nature of the target will allow more precise measurements of mass, gravity, and density than for a single object, as well as additional insights into the geology and geophysics of the system. The asteroid has been classified by Binzel et al. [1] as a C-type. It is considered to be a typical example of a primitive object [2]. Dynamically, this is an Apollo asteroid with semimajor axis a of 1.054 AU, eccentricity e of 0.35, and and inclination i of 1.98 degrees. Measurements of the albedo derived from thermal infrared observations give a value of pV = 0.042 (+0.035 -0.017), and a combined diameter of D = 1.84 (+0.56 -0.47) km [3]. The Herschel observations : The MACH-11 (Measurements of 11 Asteroids & Comets) Programme observed this binary asteroid in two occasions in November of 2012. The observations performed had a duration of 0.6 hours with the asteroid pair moving rapidly at 6'/hr thus making removal of the background quite straightforward. The observations were performed in two observing blocks; the first block consisted of a 2 repetition blue/red map, the second block consisted of a 2 repetition green/red map, with the intention to observe the target at different phase angles. Our Results : Our measurements will serve to update the known radiometric properties for this binary asteroid through their inclusion into a thermophysical model (TPM) [4] which has been validated against a large database of asteroids including targets of other spacecraft mission e.g. Lutetia [5], Itokawa [6]. Using existing sets of published thermal observations (Spitzer, TNG NICS), combined with our Herschel observations, applied within this thermophysical model, we will derive the radiometric properties of this target pair. The calculations are to be performed for the full range of possible shape and spin-vector solutions derived from the available sample of visual lightcurve observations, taking into account the implications of the asteroid satellites impact on the derived flux. The output of our model will aid in deriving the asteroids thermal inertia, as well as provide important information on the surface properties of this binary asteroid; important due to their relevance in the preparation of the future Marco Polo-R spacecraft.

O'Rourke, L.; Barucci, A.; Gònzalez-Garcìa, B.; Dotto, E.; Küppers, M.

2012-09-01

50

Macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) is a dynamic adhesive molecule that enhances uptake of carbon nanotubes by CHO-K1 Cells  

SciTech Connect

The toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a highly promising nanomaterial, is similar to that of asbestos because both types of particles have a fibrous shape and are biopersistent. Here, we investigated the characteristics of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), a membrane receptor expressed on macrophages that recognizes environmental or unopsonized particles, and we assessed whether and how MARCO was involved in cellular uptake of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs). MARCO-transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells took up polystyrene beads irrespective of the particle size (20 nm–1 ?m). In the culture of MARCO-transfected CHO-K1 cells dendritic structures were observed on the bottom of culture dishes, and the edges of these dendritic structures were continually renewed as the cell body migrated along the dendritic structures. MWCNTs were first tethered to the dendritic structures and then taken up by the cell body. MWCNTs appeared to be taken up via membrane ruffling like macropinocytosis, rather than phagocytosis. The cytotoxic EC{sub 50} value of MWCNTs in MARCO-transfected CHO-K1 cells was calculated to be 6.1 ?g/mL and transmission electron microscopic observation indicated that the toxicity of MWCNTs may be due to the incomplete inclusion of MWCNTs by the membrane structure. -- Highlights: ?Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were tethered to MARCO in vitro. ?CNTs were taken up rapidly into the cell body via MARCO by membrane ruffling. ?The incomplete inclusion of CNTs by membranes caused cytotoxicity.

Hirano, Seishiro, E-mail: seishiro@nies.go.jp [Environmental Nanotoxicology Project, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan)] [Environmental Nanotoxicology Project, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Fujitani, Yuji; Furuyama, Akiko [Environmental Nanotoxicology Project, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan)] [Environmental Nanotoxicology Project, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Kanno, Sanae [Department of Legal Medicine, St. Marianna School of Medicine (Japan)] [Department of Legal Medicine, St. Marianna School of Medicine (Japan)

2012-02-15

51

The Silk Road, Marco Polo, a Bible and its proteome: a detective story.  

PubMed

Around the end of XIII century (at the time of young Marco Polo's first trip to China at the court of Khubilai Khan in Khan Baliq) a pocket Bible was delivered by a Franciscan friar to the Mogul Emperor, in the framework of the evangelization program of the Far East. Four centuries later, in 1685, this Bible was rediscovered by the Jesuit Philippe Couplet in the house of a rich Chinese in Nanchin and donated to Cosimo III, Grand Duke of Tuscany. This Bible was recently "unearthed" in the Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana in Florence, wrapped up in a precious yellow silk cloth, in a rather ruined state. After two years of restoration, the Bible will return to China in 2012 for a celebration of its >700years of life and of its remarkable return trip on the Silk Road. On account of the thinness of the parchment (barely 80?m thickness, the size of each foil being 16.5×11cm) it was widely held that the pages were produced from foetal lambskins. On tiny fragments of the margins of a foil, after several unsuccessful attempts at digesting the vellum, we were able to obtain a tryptic peptide mixture, which, upon mass spectrometry analysis, yielded the identity of 8 unique proteins, belonging to the genus Bos taurus, thus confirming the origin of the vellum from calfskins rather than from foetal lambskins. Our results prove that it is possible to obtain reliable protein extraction and IDs from ancient parchment documents. PMID:22504796

Toniolo, Lucia; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Saccenti, Riccardo; Gulotta, Davide; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

2012-06-18

52

Experimental exposure of adult San Marcos salamanders and larval leopard frogs to the cercariae of Centrocestus formosanus.  

PubMed

The gill parasite Centrocestus formosanus (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) is an exotic parasite of concern in Texas because it has been shown to infect multiple threatened and endangered fish species. The purpose of this study was to determine if C. formosanus could present a threat to larval anurans, as well as threatened neotenic salamanders endemic to the spring-fed systems of Texas. We exposed adults of the San Marcos salamander Eurycea nana (Caudata: Plethodontidae) and tadpoles of the Rio Grande leopard frog Lithobates berlandieri (Anura: Ranidae) to the cercariae of C. formosanus . The San Marcos salamander showed no signs of metacercarial infection, suggesting that E. nana may be refractory to C. formosanus cercariae. Centrocestus formosanus readily infects the gills of leopard frog tadpoles, but the metacercariae apparently died prior to reaching maturity in our tadpoles. PMID:24303882

Huston, D C; Cantu, V; Huffman, D G

2014-04-01

53

FANTINA: Fathom Asteroids Now: Tomography and Imagery of a NEA- Payload For Marco Polo R CV3 / ESA mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The internal structure of small bodies is still poorly known and has never been measured directly. There is no way to determine from ground based observation whether the body is a monolithic piece of rock or a rubble-pile, an aggregate of boulders held together by gravity and how much porosity it contains, both in the form of micro-scale or macro-scale porosity. Knowing this structure is a key point for a better understanding of the asteroid accretion and dynamical evolution. It is the main objective of the FANTINA experience proposed Payload for Marco Polo R CV3 / ESA mission: FANTINA (Marco Polo's Daughter) for Fathom Asteroids Now: Tomography and Imagery of a NEA is to provide measurement capabilities and science data which are not accessible by remote sensing of the asteroid from the Marco-Polo R spacecraft alone and which complement the analysis of the returned samples. The FANTINA payload is a Lander carrying the ASSERT experiment and a complementary payload to be defined: ASSERT is a bistatic CONSERT/Rosetta-like radar to achieve the tomography both in transmission and in reflexion of the asteroid in order to characterise its composition and its heterogeneity from decimetric to global scale. The lander is a long-lived bus in the 10-kg class derived from MASCOT/Hayabusa 2. This paper reviews the science rationale of FANTINA in the context of the Marco Polo R mission to 1996FG3. The surface package concept will be reviewed including the radar tomography principles. So a preliminary design and budget will be done.

Herique, A.; Biele, J.; Bousquet, P.; Ciarletti, V.; Ho, T. M.; Issler, J. L.; Kofman, W.; Michel, P.; Plettemeier, D.; Puget, P.; Souyris, J. C.; Ulamec, S.; van Zoest, T.; Zine, S.

2012-04-01

54

Surface Lipoprotein PpiA of Streptococcus mutans Suppresses Scavenger Receptor MARCO-Dependent Phagocytosis by Macrophages ?  

PubMed Central

Streptococcus mutans is associated with the initiation and progression of human dental caries and is occasionally isolated from the blood of patients with bacteremia and infective endocarditis. For the pathogen to survive in the infected host, surface lipoproteins of S. mutans are likely to play important roles in interactions with the innate immune system. To clarify the role that a putative lipoprotein, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerase (PpiA), of S. mutans plays in the macrophage response, we investigated the response of THP-1-derived macrophages to S. mutans challenge. The deletion of the gene encoding Lgt eliminated PpiA on the cell surface of S. mutans, which implies that PpiA is a lipoprotein that is lipid anchored in the cell membrane by Lgt. Human and murine peritoneal macrophages both showed higher phagocytic activities for the ppiA and lgt mutants than the wild type, which indicates that the presence of PpiA reduces S. mutans phagocytosis. In addition, infection with S. mutans markedly induced mRNAs of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) and scavenger receptor A (SR-A) in human macrophages. In particular, transcriptional and translational levels of MARCO in human macrophages infected with the ppiA mutant were higher than those in macrophages infected with the wild type. Phagocytosis of S. mutans by human macrophages markedly decreased after treatment with anti-MARCO IgG. These results demonstrate that the S. mutans lipoprotein PpiA contributes to suppression of MARCO-mediated phagocytosis of this bacterium by macrophages.

Mukouhara, Tadashi; Arimoto, Takafumi; Cho, Kasei; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Igarashi, Takeshi

2011-01-01

55

The narrow angle camera of the MPCS suite for the MarcoPolo ESA Mission: requirements and optical design solutions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Possible optical designs of a Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) suitable for being the high resolution channel of the MarcoPolo Camera System for the MarcoPolo ESA mission are presented. The MarcoPolo mission objective is the rendezvous with a Near Earth Asteroid in order to fully characterize the body, to land on the surface and to return to Earth a sample of the asteroid soil. Science goals for the NAC are global mapping of the object, detailed investigations of the surface at high spatial resolution (order of millimeters), and deep examination of possible landing sites from a close distance. The instrument has a 3"/pixel scale factor, corresponding to 80 mm/px at 5 km from the surface, on a 1.75° × 1.75° FoV; imaging in 5 to 8 different spectral bands (panchromatic and broadband), in the range between 400 and 900 nm, is foreseen. Since the target is an extended low contrast object, to avoid image contrast degradation, only off-axis unobstructed optical layouts have been considered. Solutions with two mirrors plus a refractive corrector, or all-reflective three mirrors ones, have been studied, both allowing to reach good aberration balancing over all the field of view: the diffraction Ensquared Energy inside one pixel of the detector is of the order of 70%. To cope with the hazardous radiation environment in which the spacecraft will be immersed in during the mission, all the glasses selected for the design are rad-hard type.

da Deppo, Vania; Cremonese, Gabriele; Naletto, Giampiero

2010-07-01

56

Average equatorial zonal and vertical ion drifts determined from San Marco D electric field measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

San Marco D electric field measurements have been averaged in terms of their equivalent ion drift to produce an average pattern of equatorial zonal and vertical ion drifts. Variations with season, solar activity, Kp, lunar phase and longitude have been analyzed. Similarities and some differences from previous Jicamarca, DE 2 and AE-E results are seen. Confirmation is given of the dominance of the F region dynamo in the 1900-2100 local time region. The daytime zonal ion drift is larger for high F 10.7 values than that for low values. There is little variation between high and low values of Kp. Superrotation is evident in this data set and is larger at equinox compared to solstice. At the June solstice there are significant differences between the average ion drifts in the longitude sector where the geomagnetic equator is north of the geographic equator (Indian sector) and the sector where the geomagnetic equator is south of the geographic equator (Peruvian sector). The daytime upward velocity is larger in the Indian sector than in the Peruvian sector, and it reverses later in the evening in the Indian sector. Daytime westward zonal velocities are larger and the nighttime eastward velocities are smaller in the Indian sector. A presunrise enhancement is seen in the downward velocity in the Indian sector but not in the Peruvian sector. Significant variations are also seen with the phase of the moon. In light of current theory, the lunar variations suggest a complex interaction of E and F region dynamo sources with conductivity, changing in phase and character with latitude.

Maynard, Nelson C.; Aggson, Thomas L.; Herrero, Federico A.; Liebrecht, M. Carmen; Saba, Jack L.

1995-09-01

57

CAMAM instrument suite for MarcoPolo-R mission to an asteroid  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CAMAM (Composition And Morphology of Asteroid's Material) is an analytical instrument suite developed for investigation of composition and morphology of asteroidal matter for the MarcoPolo-R sample return mission from a primitive near-Earth asteroid. The instrument combines a microscope-camera system (MCS), a laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LMS), and a regolith particle trap (PT). PT uses a charged metallic foil to attract mm-sized or smaller regolith particles from a dust cloud that will be lifted up during the sampling phase. A translational mechanism will deliver the samples to the measurement location inside the CAMAM instrument. CAMAM will conduct measurements by complementary methodologies in a symbiotic way and will allow characterisation of regolith samples by optical investigation and mass spectrometry. MCS will identify and characterise sample components, such as chondrules, matrix, refractory inclusions, down to individual micro-metre-sized grains and particles. Surface features larger than a few µm will be characterised by multicolour imagery, imagery of fluorescence induced by UV sample irradiation, and polarisation analysis of light reflected from the surface. The microscope will yield structural details and morphology of a sample including sample shape, size and texture. Investigation of optical spectral properties of the sample surface will also provide an insight to surface mineralogy and help in identification of organic compound deposits. LMS will conduct measurements of the elemental composition of a sample down to a level of ppm, the isotopic distribution of elements, and also will investigate the molecular compounds that are located on the sample surface. CAMAM studies will allow a comprehensive investigation of the interrelationship between grains, their structure, chemical composition, mineralogy, and adsorbed molecules. We will discuss concepts underlying CAMAM instrument operation and demonstrate instrumental performance. References 1) N. Thomas et al., "The microscope for Beagle 2", Planet. Sp. Sci., 52, pp. 853—866, 2004. 2) U. Rohner, J. Whitby, and P. Wurz, "A miniature laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer for in situ planetary exploration", Meas. Sci. Technol., 14, pp. 2159—2164, 2003. 3) M. Tulej, M. Iakovleva, I. Leya, and P. Wurz, "A miniature mass analyser for in situ elemental analysis of planetary material - performance studies", Anal. and Bioanal. Chem. 399, pp. 2185—2200, 2011. 4) A. Riedo, A. Bieler, M. Neuland, M. Tulej, and P. Wurz, "Performance evaluation of a miniature laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer designed for in situ investigations in planetary space research", J. Mass. Spectrom., 2013, DOI 10.1002/jms.3104.

Tulej, Marek; Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike; Meyer, Stefan; Wurz, Peter; Thomas, Nicolas

2013-04-01

58

MarcoPolo-R: Near-Earth Asteroid sample return mission selected for the assessment study phase of the ESA program cosmic vision  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the sample return mission to a primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) MarcoPolo-R proposed to the European Space Agency in December 2010. MarcoPolo-R was selected in February 2011 with three other missions addressing different science objectives for the two-year Assessment Phase of the Medium-Class mission competition of the Cosmic Vision 2 program for launch in 2022. The baseline target of MarcoPolo-R is the binary NEA (175706) 1996 FG3, which offers an efficient operational and technical mission profile. A binary target also provides enhanced science return. The choice of a binary target allows several scientific investigations to occur more easily than through a single object, in particular regarding the fascinating geology and geophysics of asteroids. MarcoPolo-R will rendezvous with a primitive, organic-rich NEA, scientifically characterize it at multiple scales, and return a bulk sample to Earth for laboratory analyses. The MarcoPolo-R sample will provide a representative sample from the surface of a known asteroid with known geologic context, and will contribute to the inventory of primitive material that is probably missing from the meteorite collection. The MarcoPolo-R samples will thus contribute to the exploration of the origin of planetary materials and initial stages of habitable planet formation, to the identification and characterization of the organics and volatiles in a primitive asteroid and to the understanding of the unique geomorphology, dynamics and evolution of a binary asteroid that belongs to the Potentially Hazardous Asteroid (PHA) population.

Michel, P.; Barucci, M. A.; Cheng, A. F.; Böhnhardt, H.; Brucato, J. R.; Dotto, E.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Franchi, I. A.; Green, S. F.; Lara, L.-M.; Marty, B.; Koschny, D.; Agnolon, D.

2014-01-01

59

Importance du volcanisme calco-alcalin miocène sur la marge sud-ouest de la Corse (campagne MARCO)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the MARCO cruise, systematic exploration along the western and northern Corsican margins was carried out by dredging. The compositions of the dredged rocks range from basalt to amphibole-biotite bearing andesite with a broad calc-alkaline character. A Miocene age has been obtained for the amphibole-biotite andesite sample DR02 both by 40Ar- 39Ar dating on hornblende (16.0 ± 0.4 My) and using fission-track method on apatite (17.2 ± 0.8 My). The south-western Corsican volcanic zone represents the direct extension of the Miocene Sardinian graben volcanism north of 42 °00 N. It could either be synchronous with or post-date the oceanic opening event. Such an arc volcanism probably results from the subduction to the north of the Liguro-Piemont ocean beneath Europe, the Provençal-Ligurian basin being in back-arc position with respect to the studied volcanic centres.

Rossi, Philippe; Guennoc, Pol; Réhault, Jean-Pierre; Arnaud, Nicolas; Jakni, Bouchra; Poupeau, Gérard; Tegyey, Monique; Ferrandini, Jean; Sosson, Marc; Beslier, Marie-Odile; Rollet, Nadège; Gloaguen, Richard

1998-09-01

60

The Cretaceous sediment-hosted copper deposits of San Marcos (Coahuila, Northeastern Mexico): An approach to ore-forming processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the San Marcos ranges of Cuatrociénegas, NE Mexico, several sediment-hosted copper deposits occur within the boundary between the Coahuila Block, a basement high mostly granitic in composition and Late Paleozoic to Triassic in age, and the Mesozoic Sabinas rift basin. This boundary is outlined by the regional-scale synsedimentary San Marcos Fault. At the basin scale, the copper mineralization occurs at the top of a ˜1000 m thick red-bed succession (San Marcos Formation, Berrisian), a few meters below a conformable, transitional contact with micritic limestones (Cupido Formation, Hauterivian to Aptian). It consists of successive decimeter-thick roughly stratiform copper-rich horizons placed just above the red-beds, in a transitional unit of carbonaceous grey-beds grading to micritic limestones. The host rocks are fine- to medium-grained arkoses, with poorly sorted and subangular to subrounded grains. The detrital grains are cemented by quartz and minor calcite; besides, late iron oxide grain-coating cement occurs at the footwall unmineralized red-beds. The source area of the sediments, indicated by their modal composition, is an uplifted basement. The contents of SiO 2 (40.70-87.50 wt.%), Al 2O 3 (5.91-22.00 wt.%), K 2O (3.68-12.50 wt.%), Na 2O (0.03-2.03 wt.%) and CaO (0.09-3.78 wt.%) are within the ranges expected for arkoses. Major oxide ratios indicate that the sedimentary-tectonic setting was a passive margin. The outcropping copper mineralization essentially consists in a supergene assemblage of chrysocolla, malachite and azurite. All that remains of the primary mineralization are micron-sized chalcocite grains shielded by quartz cement. In addition, pyrite subhedral grains occur scattered throughout the copper-mineralized horizons. In these weathered orebodies copper contents range between 4.24 and 7.72 wt.%, silver between 5 and 92 ppm, and cobalt from 8 to 91 ppm. Microthermometric measurements of fluid inclusions in quartz and calcite crystals from footwall barren veinlets gave temperatures of homogenization between 98 °C and 165 °C, and ice-melting temperatures between -42.5 °C and -26.1 °C. The primary copper mineralization formed during the early diagenesis, contemporary with the active life of the Sabinas Basin. The mineralizing fluids were dense, near neutral, moderately oxidized brines that originally formed from seawater that, driven by gravity, infiltrated to the deepest parts of the basin and dissolved evaporites. As a result, they became hydrothermal fluids of moderate temperature capable of leaching high amounts of copper. The source of this metal could be mafic detrital grains and iron oxides of the underlying Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous red-beds. Copper precipitation took place when the brines passed through the redox boundary marked by the transition from red- to grey-beds. The upward movement of the brines was promoted by a high heat flow that allowed their convective circulation and their ascent along the synsedimentary San Marcos Fault.

García-Alonso, Donají; Canet, Carles; González-Partida, Eduardo; Villanueva-Estrada, Ruth Esther; Prol-Ledesma, Rosa María; Alfonso, Pura; Caballero-Martínez, Juan Antonio; Lozano-Santa Cruz, Rufino

2011-04-01

61

A novel genotoxicity assay of carbon nanotubes using functional macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO)-expressing chicken B lymphocytes.  

PubMed

Although carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising nanomaterials, their potential carcinogenicity is a major concern. We previously established a genetic method of analyzing genotoxicity of chemical compounds, where we evaluated their cytotoxic effect on the DT40 lymphoid cell line comparing DNA-repair-deficient isogenic clones with parental wild-type cells. However, application of our DT40 system for the cytotoxic and genotoxic evaluation of nanomaterials seemed to be difficult, because DT40 cells only poorly internalized nanoparticles. To solve this problem, we have constructed a chimeric gene encoding a trans-membrane receptor consisting of the 5' region of the transferrin receptor (TR) gene (to facilitate internalization of nanoparticles) and the 3' region of the macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) gene (which is a receptor for environmental particles). We expressed the resulting MARCO-TR chimeric receptor on DNA-repair-proficient wild-type cells and mutants deficient in base excision repair (FEN1 (-/-)) and translesion DNA synthesis (REV3 (-/-)). We demonstrated that the chimera mediates uptake of particles such as fluorescence-tagged polystyrene particles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), with very poor uptake of those particles by DT40 cells not expressing the chimera. MWCNTs were cytotoxic and this effect was greater in FEN1 (-/-)and REV3 (-/-) cells than in wild-type cells. Furthermore, MWCNTs induced greater oxidative damage (measured as 8-OH-dG formation) and a larger number of mitotic chromosomal aberrations in repair-deficient cells compared to repair-proficient cells. Taken together, our novel assay system using the chimeric receptor-expressing DT40 cells provides a sensitive method to screen for genotoxicity of CNTs and possibly other nanomaterials. PMID:23963510

Mohiuddin; Keka, Islam Shamima; Evans, Terry John; Hirota, Kouji; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Kono, Koichi; Takeda, Shunichi; Hirano, Seishiro

2014-01-01

62

Arecibo and Goldstone Radar Observations of Binary Near-Earth Asteroid and Marco Polo-R Mission Target (175706) 1996 FG3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report Arecibo (2380 MHz), 13-cm) and Goldstone (8560 MHz, 3.5-cm) delay-Doppler radar observations of binary near-Earth asteroid and Marco Polo-R mission target (175706) 1996 FG3 that were obtained on nine dates November-December, 2011.

Benner, L. A. M.; Brozovic, M.; Giorgini, J. D.; Lawrence, K. J.; Taylor, P. A.; Nolan, M. C.; Howell, E. S.; Busch, M. W.; Margot, J. L.; Naidu, S. P.; Magri, C.; Shepard, M. K.

2012-05-01

63

MarcoPolo: Internet Content for the Classroom, providing professional development and lesson plans based on K-12 curriculum standards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Telecommunications giant MCI has partnered with scholarly organizations to develop MarcoPolo, a navigational tool/gateway for teachers, parents and students who are trying to find educational web resources in the fields of science, the humanities, geography and economics. Science NetLinks utilizes the subject expertise of the American Association for the Advancement of Science to provide links to quality science web sites. EDSITEment (Reviewed in the October 31, 1997 Scout Report), a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Council of the Great City Schools provides a gateway to humanities sites offering materials for learning and teaching history, social studies, English, foreign languages and art history. Developed by the National Geographic Society, Xpeditions brings rich geography content to teachers and students. The MCI/EconomicsAmerica Technology Education Program combines MCI's technological expertise and the National Council on Economic Education's materials and experience to offer students and teachers web-based opportunities to integrate current events, economics and technology into lessons to boost economic literacy.

1998-01-01

64

Europa Jupiter System Mission and Marco Polo Mission: Italian partecipation in studies of laser altimeters for Jovian moons and asteroids exploration.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CO.RI.S.T.A. (Consortium for Research on Advanced Remote Sensing Systems) is member of international science teams devoted to the studies of laser altimeters to fly on Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) and Marco Polo Mission, currently under study of ESA's Cosmic Vision program as L-class and M-class mission respectively. Both the studies will focus on the assessment of alternative technical approaches that would reduce the mass, size and power requirements. In particular a Single Photon Counting (SPC) device will be studied taking into account the robustness against false detections due to harsh radiation environment in the Jupiter system. Innovative technical aspects which will characterize the studies of laser altimeters in the scenarios of EJSM and MarcoPolo, which will permit us to make major contributions to the science goals of the two missions.

Santovito, M. R.; Hussman, H.; Oberst, J.; Lingenauber, K.

65

THERMAP: a mid-infrared spectro-imager based on an uncooled micro-bolometer for the Marco Polo R mission.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on an on-going feasibility study of a midinfrared (8-18 ?m) spectro-imager for the Marco Polo R mission (THERMAP). Based on the recent development of uncooled micro-bolometer technology, we can now use these detectors for planetary missions. We present our results on using this detector to perform calibrated radiometric images, and a preliminary assessment of its performances for spectroscopic measurements of a Near Earth Asteroid (NEA).

Brageot, E.; Groussin, O.; Lamy, P.; Reynaud, J. L.; Fargant, G.

2011-10-01

66

The Marco Polo space mission: sample return from a primitive Near-Earth Object under assessment study in the Cosmic Vision Program of the European Space Agency  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Marco Polo is a joint European-Japanese mission study to perform a sample return from a primitive Near-Earth Object (NEO). On October 2007, this mission project passed the first evaluation process in the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision Programme 2015-2025. The aim of Marco Polo is to reach a primitive NEO, to perform a multiple scale characterization of its physical properties, and to bring samples back to the Earth for detailed analysis in laboratory. The NEO population is composed by asteroids and comets that are thought to be the primitive leftover building blocks of the Solar System formation process. Due to their small sizes, their chemical composition is believed to have kept some memory of the original chemical composition of the solar nebula, contrary to larger planetary bodies who experienced major thermal processes in their interior. They may also carry some important information related to life formation as current exobiological scenarios invoke an exogeneous delivery of organic matter to the early Earth for the origin of terrestrial life. Finally, the hazard caused by these small bodies needs mitigation strategies which efficiency relies on our understanding of their physical properties. Marco Polo will give us the first opportunity for detailed laboratory study of the most primitive materials. This sample return space mission has therefore the potential to revolutionize our understanding of primitive materials, essential to undestand the conditions for planet formation and emergency of life. Current mission studies and expected results will be presented and discussed.

Michel, P.

2008-09-01

67

New observations of asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3, primary target of the ESA Marco Polo-R mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. Near-Earth asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3 is the primary target of the ESA Marco Polo-R mission, which was selected for the assessment study phase of ESA M3 missions. This is a primitive (C-type), binary asteroid that will allow new research to be performed. The primary is a rapidly rotating (3.6 h) small asteroid (1.4 km diameter) that is almost spherical and has a satellite of ~400 m. Aims: We analyse new ground-based spectroscopic data of 1996 FG3 to help us characterise its surface composition and prepare for the mission. Methods: We obtained a near-infrared spectrum covering the range 0.8-2.5 ?m, using the camera-spectrograph NICS at the 3.6 m telescope TNG (Telescopio Nazionale Galileo), located at "El Roque de los Muchachos" Observatory on La Palma, Spain. We combine our near-infrared spectrum with previously published data, and compare all the available spectra of this asteroid with the spectra of meteorites to constrain the mineralogy of the asteroid. Results: Our spectrum of FG3 differs remarkably from previously published ones. Spectral classification performed using the complete visible and near-infrared range yields more than one result, varying from C to Xk types. However, all the possible spectral types indicate that this asteroid is a primitive object. The comparison with meteorites behaves in the same way, providing several good matches to our new near-infrared spectrum (CM2 carbonaceous chondrite, and L6 and H4 ordinary chondrites), and only one match in the case of the previously published spectra (weakly shocked H4 ordinary chondrite, dark vein). The albedo of the asteroid (~0.04), is typical of a primitive object, and is consistent with the reflectance value at 0.55 ?m of the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite. Further observations will be essential to help us characterise more clearly the mineralogy of this asteroid.

de León, J.; Mothé-Diniz, T.; Licandro, J.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Campins, H.

2011-06-01

68

Stability and Evolution of Orbits Around the Binary Asteroid 175706 (1996 FG3) and Asteroids 162173 (1999 JU3) and 101955 (1999 RQ36): Implications for the MARCO-POLO-R Mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In support of the Marco-Polo-R mission, we have carried out numerical simulations of spacecraft trajectories searching for stable orbits about the asteroids 175706(1996 FG3), 1999 RQ36 and 1999 JU3 under the influence of solar radiation pressure.

Hussmann, H.; Oberst, J.; Wickhusen, K.; Shi, X.; Damme, F.; Luedicke, F.; Lupovka, V.; Bauer, S.

2012-05-01

69

Strategies, Programs and Projects 2008 of the Astrophysical Group "SPACE-Universidad Nacional Mayor De San Marcos, Peru" - Preparing for the IYA2009  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a review of our efforts to introduce astronomy as scientific career in Peru, showing how our astronomy outreach programs have been one of the most important keys to reach our national astronomical scientific goals, remarking the crucial role that the celebration of the IYA2009 must play, in order to promote PhD programmes in astronomy in developing countries. We show the importance of the creation of the Seminario Permanente de Astronomía y Ciencias Espaciales (SPACE) in the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, as an academic scientific and cultural center in Peru, to support our 26 years-old "Astronomical Fridays” which are addressed to wide range of public, from schoolchildren to scientists. We also show how important was to rediscover our ancient astronomical cultural past of Incas in order to promote the construction of a Astronomical Center located near Cusco city over 4000 meters above sea level, which includes a tourist-educational observatory, a scientific optical observatory and a solar radio observatory.

Vera, Victor; Aguilar, M.; Huisacayna, J.

2008-05-01

70

Deployment of a lander on the binary asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3, potential target of the european MarcoPolo-R sample return mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The idea of deploying a lander on the secondary body of the binary primitive asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3 is investigated. 1996 FG3 is the backup target of the European sample return space mission MarcoPolo-R under assessment study at the European Space Agency in the framework of the M3 Medium-Class mission competition. The launch will take place in 2022-2024, depending on its selection at the end of 2013. A lander is indicated as an optional payload, depending on mass availability on the spacecraft. Obviously, the possible complexity of a lander deployment is also an important parameter to take into account. Here we demonstrate that, considering worst case scenarios and low requirements on the spacecraft GNC and deployment mechanism, the operations are easy to implement and safe for the main spacecraft. The concept of operations is to deploy a light lander from the L2 Lagrange point of the binary system, on a ballistic trajectory that will impact the secondary asteroid. The fundamental principles of this strategy are briefly presented and a detailed model of 1996 FG3 is considered, to which the strategy is applied. We show that the deployment is successful in 99.94% of cases.

Tardivel, Simon; Michel, Patrick; Scheeres, Daniel J.

2013-08-01

71

Arecibo and Goldstone Radar Observations of Binary Near-Earth Asteroid and Marco Polo-R Mission Target (175706) 1996 FG3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report Arecibo (2380 MHz), 13-cm) and Goldstone (8560 MHz, 3.5-cm) delay-Doppler radar observations of binary near-Earth asteroid and Marco Polo-R mission target (175706) 1996 FG3 that were obtained on nine dates between November 6-December 17, 2011. The images achieve resolutions as fine as 75 m in range and place hundreds of pixels on the primary. The images provide thorough rotational coverage by the primary and reveal a rounded, slightly elongated object with a visible extent of 0.9 km. If the visible extent is about ½ of the actual extent, which would be true for a sphere, then the equatorial diameter is about 1.8 km. The primary has features along its leading edge that resemble the signature of the pronounced ridge on the equator of binary asteroid (66391) 1999 KW4. The images sample a wide range of orbital positions by the secondary, resolve it in range and Doppler frequency, show that it is elongated and roughly 500 m in diameter, and suggest that its rotation is synchronous (or nearly so) with the orbital period of 16.1 h estimated by Scheirich and Pravec (2009, Icarus 200, 531-547). We observe a maximum range separation of 2.5 km that, combined with the nearly circular eccentricity found by Scheirich and Pravec from inversion of lightcurves, establishes a lower bound on the semimajor axis. 1996 FG3 has a circular polarization ratio SC/OC = 0.34±0.02 that is comparable to that of 25143 Itokawa (0.28±0.04), suggesting similar degrees of near-surface roughness. The radar data will yield a 3D model of the primary, possibly a coarse-resolution model of the secondary, more precise orbit fitting, and estimates of the system’s mass and bulk density.

Benner, Lance A. M.; Brozovic, M.; Giorgini, J. D.; Lawrence, K. J.; Taylor, P. A.; Nolan, M. C.; Howell, E. S.; Busch, M. W.; Margot, J.; Naidu, S. P.; Magri, C.; Shepard, M. K.

2012-10-01

72

Concentrations of urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and 8-isoprostane in women exposed to woodsmoke in a cookstove intervention study in San Marcos, Peru.  

PubMed

Nearly half of the world's population is exposed to household air pollution (HAP) due to long hours spent in close proximity to unvented cooking fires. The effect of woodsmoke exposure on oxidative stress was examined by investigating the association between woodsmoke exposure and biomarkers of DNA oxidation (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG]) and lipid peroxidation (8-isoprostane) among control and intervention stove users. HAP exposure assessment was conducted within the framework of a community-randomized controlled trial of 51 communities in San Marcos Province, Cajamarca Region, Peru. The first morning urine voids after 48h HAP exposure assessment from a subset of 45 control and 39 intervention stove users were analyzed for 8-OHdG and 8-isoprostane. General linear models and correlation analyses were performed. Urinary oxidative stress biomarkers ranged from 11.2 to 2270.0?g/g creatinine (median: 132.6?g/g creatinine) for 8-OHdG and from 0.1 to 4.5?g/g creatinine (median: 0.8?g/g creatinine) for 8-isoprostane among all study subjects (n=84). After controlling for the effects of traffic in the community and eating food exposed to fire among all subjects, cooking time was weakly, but positively associated with urinary 8-OHdG (r=0.29, p=0.01, n=80). Subjects' real-time personal CO exposures were negatively associated with 8-OHdG, particularly the maximum 30-second CO exposure during the sampling period (r=-0.32, p=0.001, n=73). 48h time integrated personal PM2.5 was negatively, but marginally associated with urinary 8-isoprostane (r=-0.21, p=0.09, n=69) after controlling for the effect of distance of homes to the road. Urinary 8-isoprostane levels reported in the available literature are comparable to results found in the current study. However there were relatively high levels of urinary 8-OHdG compared to data in the available literature for 8-OHdG excretion. Results suggest a sustained systemic oxidative stress among these Peruvian women chronically exposed to wood smoke. PMID:24041735

Commodore, Adwoa A; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Chang, Yan; Hartinger, Stella M; Lanata, Claudio F; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Gil, Ana I; Hall, Daniel B; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Vena, John E; Wang, Jia-Sheng; Naeher, Luke P

2013-10-01

73

[The role of the class A scavenger receptors, SR-A and MARCO, in the immune system. Part 1. The structure of receptors, their ligand binding repertoires and ability to initiate intracellular signaling].  

PubMed

Recognition of pathogens by innate immune cells is mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRR), which include scavenger receptors (SR). The class A SR, SR-A/CD204 and MARCO, are characterized by the presence of collagenous and SR cysteine-rich domains in their extracellular portions. Both receptors are expressed mainly on macrophages and dendritic cells. Thanks to their ability to bind to a wide range of polyanionic ligands, the class A SR may participate in numerous functions of these cells, such as endocytosis, and adhesion to extracellular matrix and to other cells. Among SR-A ligands are oxidized lipoproteins and ?-amyloid fibrils, which link SR-A to the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Despite the demonstration of class A SR involvement in so many processes, the lack of selective ligands precluded reaching definite conclusions concerning their signaling abilities. Using specific receptor ligation with antibodies, we showed that SR-A and MARCO trigger intracellular signaling, modulating pro-inflammatory and microbicidal activities of macrophages. Surprisingly, despite similarities in structure and ligand binding repertoires, SR-A and MARCO exert opposite effects on interleukin-12 (IL-12) production in macrophages. SR-A ligation also stimulated H?O? and IL-10 production, but had no effect on the release of several other cytokines. These limited effects of specific SR-A ligation contrast with generalized enhancement of immune responses observed in SR-A-deficient mice. Recent studies have revealed that many of these effects of SR-A deficiency may be caused by compensatory changes in the expression of other receptors and/or disinhibition of signal transduction from receptors belonging to the Toll/IL-1R family, rather than by the loss of the receptor function of SR-A. PMID:22470185

Józefowski, Szczepan

2012-01-01

74

"Takahashi Winn Birome Silio Martinelli Marcos York Coury R. G. Lopes S. A. Garcia and Amiret Gaza Lippe. Assessment of serum lipids in pregnant women aged over 35 years and their relation with pre-eclampsia. einstein 6 (2008): 63-7."  

EPA Pesticide Factsheets

Did you mean: "Takahashi Winn Birome Silio Martinelli Marcos York Coury R. G. Lopes S. A. Garcia and Amiret Gaza Lippe. Assessment of serum lipids in pregnant women aged over 35 years and their relation with pre-eclampsia. einstein 6 (2008): 63-7." ?

75

Ultraviolet to near-infrared spectroscopy of the potentially hazardous, low delta-V asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3. Backup target of the sample return mission MarcoPolo-R  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. Primitive near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) are important subjects of study for current planetary research. Their investigation can provide crucial information on topics such as the formation of the solar system, the emergence of life, and the mitigation of the risk of asteroid impact. Sample return missions from primitive asteroids have been scheduled or are being studied by space agencies, including the MarcoPolo-R mission selected for the assessment study phase of ESA M3 missions. Aims: We want to improve our knowledge of the surface composition and physical nature of the potentially hazardous, low delta-V asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3, backup target of MarcoPolo-R. This intriguing object shows an as-yet unexplained spectral variability. Methods: We performed spectroscopic observations of 1996 FG3 using the visible spectrograph DOLORES at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), and the UV-to-NIR X-Shooter instrument at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). Results: We find featureless spectra and we classify 1996 FG3 as a primitive Xc-type in the Bus-DeMeo taxonomy. Based on literature comparison, we confirm the spectral variability of this object at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths, and find that spectral variations exist also for the visible spectral region. Phase reddening cannot explain such variations. Obtained with the same observational conditions for the whole 0.3-2.2 ?m range, our X-Shooter spectrum allowed a proper comparison with the RELAB meteorite database. A very good fit is obtained with the very primitive C2 Tagish Lake carbonaceous chondrite (pressed powder), confirming 1996 FG3 as a suitable target for a sample return mission from primitive NEAs. Conclusions: We hypothesize a compacted/cemented surface for 1996 FG3, like that observed by the Hayabusa mission on (25143) Itokawa, with the possible presence of regions showing different degrees of surface roughness. This variegation could be related to the binary nature of 1996 FG3, but to check this hypothesis further observations are necessary. Based on observations carried out at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), Chile (programme 088.C-0695), and with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundacion Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (programme AOT25/TAC13).

Perna, D.; Dotto, E.; Barucci, M. A.; Fornasier, S.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; Gourgeot, F.; Brucato, J. R.; Rossi, A.

2013-07-01

76

uvby photometry in NGC 7419 (Marco+, 2013)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The open cluster NGC 7419 is known to contain five red supergiants and a very high number of Be stars. However, there are conflicting reports about its age and distance that prevent a useful comparison with other clusters. We intend to obtain more accurate parameters for NGC 7419, using techniques different from those of previous authors, so that it may be used as a calibrator for more obscured clusters. We obtained Stroemgren photometry of the open cluster NGC 7419, as well as classification spectroscopy of ~20 stars in the area. We then applied standard analysis and classification techniques. (3 data files).

Marco, A.; Negueruela, I.

2013-02-01

77

An obscured cluster associated with RCW173 (Marco+, 2011)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

UBV photometry for roughly 600 stars in the vicinity of the HII region RCW 173 obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope (La Palma) and reduced with IRAF version of DAOPHOT. The stars are distributed in three partially overlapping frames (A, B and C). Table 2 contains stars in frame A. Table 3 contains stars in frame B. Table 4 contains stars in frame C. Stars present in more than one frame are listed only once. We list X and Y positions with respect to each frame shown in Fig. 1 for all the stars in each frame, and their identification with objects in the 2MASS catalogue, together with their coordinates (right ascension (RA) and declination (DEC) in J2000). A few stars have no obvious corresponding source in the 2MASS catalogue. We identified these objects in the GLIMPSE catalogue (Benjamin et al., 2003PASP..115..953B) and assume their RA and DEC coordinates to be those assigned in this catalogue. A few stars have no counterparts in any of the two catalogues. The designation of each star is given by the letter that identifies the frame on which it is detected, plus a sequential number. Stars observed in more than one frame receive the designation corresponding to the frame with the highest number of measurements. (3 data files).

Marco, A.; Negueruela, I.

2011-09-01

78

Microautonomous Robotic Ostraciiform (MARCO): Hydrodynamics, Design, and Fabrication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boxfish with multiple fins can maneuver in confined spaces with a near zero turning radius, and it has been found that its unusual boxy shape is responsible for a self-correcting mechanism that makes its trajectories immune to water disturbances. The microautonomous robotic ostraciiform aims to apply these features in a novel underwater vehicle design. Miniature underwater vehicles with these characteristics

Parasar Kodati; Jonathan Hinkle; Aaron Winn; Xinyan Deng

2008-01-01

79

A Murine Scavenger Receptor MARCO Recognizes Polystyrene Nanoparticles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent toxicological studies indicate that nanoparticles or ultrafine particles ( < 100 nm) are more toxic than fine particles ( < 2 mm) because of their greater surface area. It is well known that alveolar macrophages play an important role in the first defense against various environmental particles and microorgan- isms. This is accomplished by binding to a macrophage receptor

Sanae Kanno; Akiko Furuyama; Seishiro Hirano

2007-01-01

80

Latino Hillbilly: An Interview with Marcos McPeek Villatoro.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Novelist and faculty member McPeek Villatoro, son of a Salvadoran mother and an Appalachian father, discusses his childhood in Tennessee and San Francisco, racism encountered for being Latino or Appalachian, embracing his Latino roots, similarities between Appalachian and rural Central American cultures, the importance of teachers raising…

Minick, Jim; McPeek Villatoro, Marcos

2001-01-01

81

Conocimientos maternos sobre signos de peligro en diarrea aguda en el marco de la estrategia AIEPI  

Microsoft Academic Search

de hidratación. Métodos: Estudio descriptivo por medio de una encuesta. Se aplicó un instrumento de investigaciones operativas de AIEPI, a 204 cuidadores elegidos consecutivamente que asistieron por primera vez a la consulta de crecimiento y desarrollo de un hospital de nivel I en Popayán, Colombia. Se midieron variables: edad materna, sexo, edad del niño, área (rural-urbana), estrato socioeconómico, vínculo al

MARIO FRANCISCO DELGADO; CARLOS HERNÁN S IERRA; JOSÉ ANDRÉS CALVACHE; ÁNGELA MARÍA RÍOS; CATALINA MOSQUERA; INGRID SALAS; FRANCISCO AGREDO; RUBIEL MENESES

2006-01-01

82

A passively controlled appendage deployment system for the San Marco D/L spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The analytical simulation of deployment dynamics of these two axis concepts as well as the evolution of practical designs for the add on deployable inertia boom units is described. With the boom free to swing back in response to Coriolis forces as well as outwards in response to centrifugal forces, the kinematics of motion are complex but admit the possibility of absorbing deployment energy in frictional or other damping devices about the radial axis, where large amplitude motions can occur and where the design envelope allows more available volume. An acceptable range is defined for frictional damping for any given spin rate. Inadequate damping allows boom motions which strike the spacecraft; excessive damping causes the boom to swing out and latch with damaging violence. The acceptable range is a design parameter and must accommodate spin rate tolerance and also the tolerance and repeatability of the damping mechanisms.

Lang, W. E.; Frisch, H. P.; Schwartz, D. A.

1984-01-01

83

IR reflectance spectra of pristine Antarctic CM chondrites to characterize Marco Polo-R mission target  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The hydrated groups of carbonaceous chondrites (hereafter CCs) exhibit different degrees of aqueous alteration. Primary minerals were transformed in their parent bodies by the action of the water. Most of the water was probably accreted as ice or bounded in hydrated minerals. Moderate heating associated with residual radioactivity or collisional compaction released that water to soak temporarily the materials forming these asteroids. Evidence for static and dynamic aqueous mineral products has been described [1, 2], at the same time that the different degrees of alteration exhibited for members of the CM group were characterized [3, 4]. We apply here a new IR spectroscopic technique that allows to assess the amount of adsorbed water present in minerals forming carbonaceous chondrites.

Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Moyano-Cambero, C. E.; Llorca, J.; Alonso-Azcárate, J.; Fornasier, S.; Belskaya, I.; Binzel, R.; Rivkin, A. S.

2012-09-01

84

Gestión de los costos medioambientales, en un marco de mejora continua  

Microsoft Academic Search

El mundo necesita que se proteja el medio ambiente. Diferentes empresas y organizaciones destinan grandes recursos financieros y humanos, para este fin. El desarrollo sostenible es la aspiración máxima para cualquier país u organización. Se hace, entonces, imprescindible determinar cuánta importancia le confieren las entidades al medio ambiente, teniendo en cuenta que éstas tienen un contrato implícito con la sociedad

Keitel Becerra Suárez; Reynier Reyes Hernández; Grisel Pérez Falco; Elizabeth Gómez Alfonso

2009-01-01

85

The Spandrels of San Marco and the Panglossian Paradigm: A Critique of the Adaptationist Programme  

Microsoft Academic Search

An adaptationist programme has dominated evolutionary thought in England and the United States during the past 40 years. It is based on faith in the power of natural selection as an optimizing agent. It proceeds by breaking an organism into unitary 'traits' and proposing an adaptive story for each considered separately. Trade-offs among competing selective demands exert the only brake

S. J. Gould; R. C. Lewontin

1979-01-01

86

75 FR 41983 - Establishment of Class D Airspace; San Marcos, TX  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Tuesday, July 20, 2010)] [Rules and Regulations] [Pages 41983-41984...FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule...action necessary to enhance the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rule (IFR) operations at the...

2010-07-20

87

Los Derechos Fundamentales del Trabajo en el Marco de las Reformas del Nuevo Orden Económico  

Microsoft Academic Search

* Resumo: A nova ordem econômica internacional atua sobre as relações de trabalho, ao mesmo tempo em que o quadro normativo da regulamentação trabalhista passa por intenso processo de desregulamentação e flexibilização. A perda de centralidade no trabalho subordinado constitui um fenômeno próprio de um sistema econômico que destrói mais postos de trabalho do que gera, fazendo com que, no

Jorge Rosenbaum Rimolo

88

APPLICATION OF COMPUTER-AIDED TOMOGRAPHY (CAT) AS A POTENTIAL INDICATOR OF MARINE MARCO BENTHIC ACTIVITY ALONG POLLUTION GRADIENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Sediment cores were imaged using a local hospital CAT scanner. These image data were transferred to a personal computer at our laboratory using specially developed software. Previously, we reported an inverse correlation (r2 = 0.98, P...

89

JAPÓN: EVOLUCIÓN DE LA POLÍTICA DE SEGURIDAD EN EL MARCO DE LA ALIANZA ESTRATÉGICA CON LOS EE.UU  

Microsoft Academic Search

Japón quedó devastado al concluir la Segunda Guerra Mundial. En ese entonces, una de las vías que encontró para salir de la crisis en que había quedado inmerso, fue dedicarse por completo a la recuperación económica. Para ello, en 1951, firma el Tratado de Seguridad con los EE.UU., a partir de la Doctrina Yoshida, que consistía, en la concentración de

Yunyslka González Vaguéz

2009-01-01

90

Marco Polo-R Target Asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3: Possible Evidence for an Annual Thermal Wave  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pre- and post-perihelion spectral measurements (0.8-2.5 µm) of 1996 FG3 show substantially different thermal fluxes. We may be detecting deep absorption and re-radiation of the annual thermal wave rather than just diurnal thermal flux balance.

Binzel, R. P.; Polishook, D.; DeMeo, F. E.; Emery, J. P.; Rivkin, A. S.

2012-03-01

91

PREFACE: DISCRETE 2010: Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Symposium DISCRETE2010 on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries was held at the Sapienza Universitàa di Roma, Italy from 6-11 December 2010. This second edition, after the successful one in Valencia in 2008, covered all theoretical and experimental progress in the field, and aimed at a thorough discussion on the latest developments. The topics covered included: T, C, P, CP symmetries; accidental symmetries (B, L conservation); CPT symmetry, decoherence, Lorentz symmetry breaking; neutrino mass and mixing; cosmology and astroparticles, dark matter searches; experimental prospects at LHC, Super flavor factories, and new facilities. The Symposium was organized in plenary sessions with a total of 23 invited talks, and parallel sessions with a total of 80 talks including both invited and selected contributions from the submitted abstracts. The speakers of the plenary sessions were: Achille Stocchi, Andreas Weiler, Kevin Pitts, Tim Gershon, Marco Sozzi, Neal Weiner, Vasiliki Mitsou, Bernard Sadoulet, Gianfranco Bertone, J. Eric Grove, Mauro Mezzetto, Alexei Yu Smirnov, Oliviero Cremonesi, Antonio Riotto, Reno Mandolesi, Brett Altschul, Jose Bernabeu, Lawrence Hall, Marco Grassi, Yannis K. Semertzidis, Riccardo Barbieri, Gigi Rolandi, Luciano Maiani. The Symposium venue was the CNR (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche) headquarter building, close to the Sapienza University. At the end of the Symposium a special open session, devoted to a wider audience, was held at the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross, in the historical center of Rome. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants, about half coming from Italy, and the rest mainly from other European countries and United States. Among the social events was a concert at the Aula Magna of the Sapienza University, and a social dinner in the historical Palazzo Pallavicini-Rospigliosi on the Quirinale Hill. The next symposium of the series will be organised by IST, Universidade Tàecnica de Lisboa, Portugal, from 3 to 7 December 2012. Roma, November 2011 The Editors Antonio Di Domenico Cesare Bini Caterina Bloise Fabio Bossi Riccardo Faccini Paolo Gauzzi Gino Isidori Paolo Lipari Lucio Ludovici Luca Silvestrini The PDF file also contains committee, secretariat, sponsor and participant lists, plus the conference poster and photograph.

Di Domenico, Antonio; Bini, Cesare; Bloise, Caterina; Bossi, Fabio; Faccini, Riccardo; Gauzzi, Paolo; Isidori, Gino; Lipari, Paolo; Ludovici, Lucio; Silvestrini, Luca

2011-12-01

92

PREFACE: DISCRETE 2012 - Third Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Third Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries (DISCRETE 2012) was held at Instituto Superior Técnico, Portugal, from 3-7 December 2012 and was organised by Centro de Física Teórica de Partículas (CFTP) of Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa. This is the sequel to the Symposia that was successfully organised in Valéncia in 2008 and in Rome in 2010. The topics covered included: T, C, P, CP symmetries CPT symmetry, decoherence, Lorentz symmetry breaking Discrete symmetries and models of flavour mixing Baryogenesis, leptogenesis Neutrino physics Electroweak symmetry breaking and physics beyond the Standard Model Accidental symmetries (B, L conservation) Experimental prospects at LHC Dark matter searches Super flavour factories, and other new experimental facilities The Symposium was organised in plenary sessions with a total of 24 invited talks, and parallel sessions with a total of 70 talks, including both invited and selected contributions from the submitted abstracts. The speakers of the plenary sessions were: Ignatios Antoniadis, Abdelhak Djouadi, Rabindra Mohapatra, André Rubbia, Alexei Yu Smirnov, José Bernabéu, Marco Cirelli, Apostolos Pilaftsis, Antonio Di Domenico, Robertus Potting, João Varela, Frank Rathmann, Michele Gallinaro, Dumitru Ghilencea, Neville Harnew, John Walsh, Patrícia Conde Muíño, Juan Aguilar-Saavedra, Nick Mavromatos, Ulrich Nierste, Ferruccio Feruglio, Vasiliki Mitsou, Masanori Yamauchi, and Marcello Giorgi. The Symposium was attended by about 140 participants. Among the social events, there was a social dinner in the historical Associação Comercial de Lisboa, which included a musical performance of 'Fado', the traditional music from Lisbon. The next symposium of the series will be organised by King's College, London University, UK, from 1-5 December 2014. Guest Editors G C Branco, D Emmanuel-Costa, R González Felipe, F R Joaquim, L Lavoura, S Palomares-Ruiz, M N Rebelo, J C Romão, J P Silva and J I Silva-Marcos International Advisory CommitteeLocal Organising Committee Francisco del Águila (Granada)From CFTP Jose Bernabéu (Valencia) Francisco Botella (Valencia)G C Branco Andrzej Buras (Munich)D Emmanuel-Costa Marcos Cerrada (Madrid)R González Felipe Pierluigi Campana (CERN)F R Joaquim Antonio Di Domenico (Rome)L Lavoura John Ellis (CERN)S Palomares-Ruiz Fernando Ferroni (Rome)M N Rebelo Luis Garrido (Barcelona)J C Romão Marcello Giorgi (Pisa)J P Silva Neville Harnew (Oxford)J I Silva-Marcos Maria José Herrero (Madrid) David Hitlin (Caltech)From LIP Gino Isidori (Frascati) Guido Martinelli (Rome)G Barreira Antonio Masiero (Padua)J Varela Nickolaos Mavromatos (London) Vasiliki Mitsou (Valencia) Hitoshi Murayama (Berkeley) Tatsuya Nakada (Lausanne) Antonio Pich (Valencia) Apostolos Pilaftsis (Manchester) Stefan Pokorski (Warsaw) Fabio Zwirner (Padua) Secretariat Dulce Conceição Sandra Oliveira Cláudia Romão discrete2012@cftp.ist.utl.pt http://indico.cern.ch/event/discrete2012 Sponsors CFTP - Centro de Física Teórica de Partículas LIP - Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas IST - Instituto Superior Técnico FCT - Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia Group picture The PDF also contains the conference poster and a list of participants.

Branco, G. C.; Emmanuel-Costa, D.; González Felipe, R.; Joaquim, F. R.; Lavoura, L.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Rebelo, M. N.; Romão, J. C.; Silva, J. P.

2013-07-01

93

PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting, Trieste 2013  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

YRM logo The Young Researcher Meeting (www.yrmr.it) has been a rapidly growing event for the last few years. Together with other initiatives which have emerged in several research areas, the young researcher meeting marks the awareness and the desire of PhD students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers to play a major role in scientific progress. Devoted to the discussion and the interchange of new developments and ideas in physics, the meeting is primarily aimed at graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, who are encouraged to present their work in an informal atmosphere. One of the main purposes of the conference is to create an international network of young researchers, both experimentalists and theorists, and fruitful collaborations across the different branches of physics. Born in Rome in 2009, after three editions that strengthened it, the Young Researcher Meeting 2013 was held in Trieste. Propelled by the past success, the fourth meeting was a two-day conference on 3-4June. It was sponsored by the International School for Advanced Studies - SISSA - and the University of Padova, thus acquiring an even further international drive. In this volume, we collect some of the contributions that were presented at the conference. They cover topics in astrophysics and cosmology, particle and theoretical physics, soft and condensed matter, biophysics and medical physics. YRM Organising and Editorial Committee Fabio Agostini (fabio.agostini@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma, Italy Claudia Antolini (claudia.antolini@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste, Italy Rossella Aversa (raversa@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste, Italy Giordano Cattani (giordano.cattani@gmail.com) Matteo Martinelli (mmartin@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste, Italy Luca Mazzaferro (luca.mazzaferro@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma, Italy Marina Migliaccio (mm858@ast.cam.ac.uk) Institute of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Cosmology Madingley Road, CB3 0HA Cambridge, United Kingdom Francesco Paci (fpaci@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste, Italy Davide Pietrobon (davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov) California Institute of Technology - Jet Propulsion Laboratory 4800 Oak Grove Drive 169-237 91109 Pasadena, CA, USA Daniel Ricci Pacifici (Daniel.Ricci.Pacifici@pd.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Padova INFN, Sezione di Padova Via Marzolo 8, 35131, Padova, Italy Francesco Stellato (francesco.stellato@cfel.de) Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY Notkestrase 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany Marcella Veneziani (marcella@ipac.caltech.edu) Infrared Processing and Analysis Center California Institute of Technology 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA SISSA logoPadua logo Acknowledgments The organizers of the 4th Young Researcher Meeting, held in Trieste, would like to thank all the scientists who participated in the meeting. We thank the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) for hosting the conference, covering the organization costs and allowing some travel grants for the speakers. We are greateful to Professor Guido Martinelli, director of SISSA, for his valuable support and advice. The publication of the proceedings of the conference is sponsored by the Padova university project CPDA119349 (P I Professor Marco Matone). The event was broadcast live by OggiScienza (http://oggiscienza.wordpress.com).

Agostini, F.; Antolini, C.; Aversa, R.; Cattani, G.; Martinelli, M.; Mazzaferro, L.; Migliaccio, M.; Paci, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Ricci Pacifici, D.; Stellato, F.; Veneziani, M.

2013-12-01

94

[Agueda of Catania: the patron saint of patients with breast diseases].  

PubMed

For those suffering from breast cancer, Agatha is their patron saint. She was a beautiful Christian maiden, from Catania, Sicily, who dedicated her life to God. As she rejected the love proposals of consul Quintiliano, she suffered cruel tortures. One of the tortures she suffered was to have her breast cut off, with iron shears, a detail that furnished to the Christian medieval iconography, the peculiar characteristic of Agatha. Catania honors Agatha as her patron saint and throughout the region around Mt. Etna. Saint Agatha's feast day is February 5. All of those dedicated to the treatment and prevention of breast cancer are known as "the soldiers of Saint Agatha". PMID:22089679

Ortiz-Hidalgo, Carlos

2011-01-01

95

Beyond the Reference Desk: A Study on the Effectiveness of Low-Cost Distance Library Services at California State University San Marcos  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many of our reference interactions are face-to-face at a desk or in our offices. Unfortunately, not all of our students are on campus. Whether a non-traditional student or a traditional undergraduate, more of our patrons are attending online classes or attending satellite campuses with no librarians on site. It's difficult to reach these…

Olivas, Antonia P.; Chan, Ian

2013-01-01

96

EMPRESAS Y ONG EN EL MARCO DE LA RESPONSABILIDAD SOCIAL DE LA EMPRESA: UN ANÁLISIS EMPÍRICO DE SU RELACIÓN EN LA ESFERA PRIVADA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is the result of two observed phenomena: a) the increasing social demand for and concern about ethical corporate behaviour has lead to the development of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) discipline, and b) civil society organizations has rocketed in the last decade playing a vital role in that development. Therefore, the main goal of this work is to

AMPARO MERINO; CARMEN VALOR; Amparo Merino de Diego; Carmen Valor Martínez; CÓDIGO UNESCO

97

VULNERABILIDAD DE ESTRUCTURAS CON BASE EN MARCOS DE CONCRETO REFORZADO EN EL VALLE DE MÉXICO ANTE UN ESCENARIO SIMILAR AL SISMO DE SEPTIEMBRE DE 1985ô  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents vulnerability maps for reinforced concrete moment frames (RCMFs) in Mexico City's metropolitan area for a Ms=8.1 earthquake scenario assessing peak nonlinear dynamic responses using the concept of displacement ductility demand spectra (DDDS). The considered earthquake scenario is an equivalent scenario to the Ms=8.1 September 19, 1985 Michoacán Earthquake that severely affected Mexico City. The Takeda model was

Eber Alberto; Godínez Domínguez; Arturo Tena Colunga; Luis Eduardo; Pérez Rocha

98

MARCO CONCEPTUAL DE UNA CULTURA SISTÉMICA EN LAS REDES VIRTUALES DE FABRICACIÓN GLOBAL \\/ CONCEPTUAL FRAME OF A SYSTEMIC CULTURE IN GLOBAL MANUFACTURING VIRTUAL NETWORKS  

Microsoft Academic Search

En este trabajo se analizan los factores más relevantes de la cultura organizacional que aparecen en las redes virtuales de fabricación global (RVFG). Estas organizaciones están formadas por empresas muy dinámicas que fabrican todo tipo de productos o servicios, las cuales establecen entre sí relaciones de tipo horizontal y vertical, pudiendo incluso ser competidores, donde no es necesario mantener internamente

J. R Vilana Arto; C. Rodríguez Monroy

2010-01-01

99

ORGANIZACIONES EN EL MARCO DE UNA CULTURA SOCIAL INNOVADORA: PROPUESTA DE FACTORES EXPLICATIVOS \\/ ORGANIZATIONS IN A SOCIAL INNOVATION FRAMEWORK: PROPOSAL OF EXPLICATIVE FACTORS  

Microsoft Academic Search

En la era de la innovación, la dotación de la infraestructura tecnológica necesaria y otras inversiones en I+D no son suficientes para configurar un ecosistema en el que la innovación sea todo un referente. El verdadero reto reside probablemente en promover y alcanzar un cambio cultural que potencie e interiorice capacidades, valores y relaciones facilitadoras de comportamientos proclives a la

Arturo Rodríguez Castellanos; Jon Hoyos Iruarrizaga; Julen Izaguirre Olaizola; M. Azucena Vicente Molina

2011-01-01

100

Comparison of the San Marco 3 Nace neutral composition data with the extrapolated Ogo 6 empirical model. [Neutral Atmospheric Composition Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation is conducted concerning the feasibility to extrapolate the data of the Ogo 6 empirical composition model to altitudes which are lower than 450 km. Extrapolated Ogo 6 model densities are, therefore, compared with data obtained in the Neutral Atmospheric Composition Experiment (Nace) carried out during the time from April to November 1971. The results of the investigation support the conclusions of an earlier comparison of Ogo 6 and Nace data conducted by Newton et al. (1973).

Kasprzak, W. T.; Newton, G. P.

1976-01-01

101

Archive of post-Hurricane Charley coastal oblique aerial photographs collected during U.S. Geological Survey field activity 04CCH01 from Marco Island to Fort DeSoto, Florida, August 15, 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The photographs provided here are JPEG scanned images of the analog slides. The metadata values for photo creation time, GPS latitude, GPS longitude, GPS position, keywords, credit, artist, caption, copyright, and contact were added to each photograph's EXIF header using EXIFtools (see the Software page). Photographs can be opened directly with any JPEG-compatible image viewer by clicking on a thumbnail on the contact sheet, or, when viewi

Subino, Janice A.; Morgan, Karen L. M.; Krohn, M. Dennis; Miller, Gregory K.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Forde, Arnell S.

2012-01-01

102

La implementación de acuerdos comerciales preferenciales en América Latina: Las experiencias de CH, CR, ES, PE en la implementación de las disposiciones sobre acceso a mercados en el marco de los tratados de libre comercio con Estados Unidos  

Microsoft Academic Search

Este estudio abordará los desafíos y dificultades asociadas con la implementación y administración de las disposiciones sobre acceso a mercados, con especial énfasis en aquellas relacionadas con aduanas y facilitación del comercio. El análisis se realizará para los Tratados de Libre Comercio de Chile - EE.UU; Perú - EE.UU y para el Tratado de Libre Comercio entre Estados Unidos, Centroamérica

Juan Luis Zuñiga; Brian Rankin Staples

2011-01-01

103

Elevated H 2 O 2 production via overexpression of a chloroplastic Cu\\/ZnSOD gene of lily ( Lilium oriental hybrid ‘Marco Polo’) triggers ethylene synthesis in transgenic potato  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transgenic potato plants (SS2 and SS4) that overexpressed a chloroplastic copper\\/zinc superoxide dismutase lily gene were\\u000a utilized as an H2O2-inducible system in order to study the role of H2O2 as a signaling molecule in the biosynthesis of ethylene. SS2 and SS4 plants grown in vitro under sealed microenvironment\\u000a (SME) conditions displayed anomalous phenotypes including reduction of stem elongation, radial stem

Yoon-Sik Kim; Hyun-Soon Kim; Yong-Hwa Lee; Mi-Sun Kim; Hyun-Woo Oh; Kyu-Woong Hahn; Hyouk Joung; Jae-Heung Jeon

2008-01-01

104

PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS), held from 29 July-2 August 2008 at the University of Camerino. Camerino is an ancient hill-top town located in the Apennine mountains of Italy, 200 kilometres northeast of Rome, with a university dating back to 1336. The Camerino conference was the 11th in a series which started in 1977: 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (hosted by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (hosted by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, New York, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) 2005: Moscow, Russia (hosted by Vladimir E Fortov and Vladimir Vorob'ev). The name of the series was changed in 1996 from Strongly Coupled Plasmas to Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems to reflect a wider range of topics. 'Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems' encompasses diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. The purpose of the conferences is to provide a regular international forum for the presentation and discussion of research achievements and ideas relating to a variety of plasma, liquid and condensed matter systems that are dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphases that have followed new discoveries and new techniques. The field has continued to see new experimental tools and access to new strongly coupled conditions, most recently in the areas of warm matter, dusty plasmas, condensed matter and ultra-cold plasmas. One hundred and thirty participants came from twenty countries and four continents to participate in the conference. Those giving presentations were asked to contribute to this special issue to make a representative record of an interesting conference. We thank the International Advisory Board and the Programme Committee for their support and suggestions. We thank the Local Organizing Committee (Stefania De Palo, Vittorio Pellegrini, Andrea Perali and Pierbiagio Pieri) for all their efforts. We highlight for special mention the dedication displayed by Andrea Perali, by Rocco di Marco for computer support, and by our tireless conference secretary Fiorella Paino. The knowledgeable guided tour of the historic centre of Camerino given by Fiorella Paino was appreciated by many participants. It is no exaggeration to say that without the extraordinary efforts put in by these three, the conference could not have been the success that it was. For their sustained interest and support we thank Fulvio Esposito, Rector of the University of Camerino, Fabio Beltram, Director of NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, and Daniel Cox, Co-Director of ICAM, University of California at Davis. We thank the Institute of Complex and Adaptive Matter ICAM-I2CAM, USA for providing a video record of the conference on the web (found at http://sccs2008.df.unicam.it/). Finally we thank the conference sponsors for their very generous support: the University of Camerino, the Institute of Complex and Adaptive Matter ICAM-I2CAM, USA, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics ICTP Trieste, and CNR-INFM DEMOCRITOS Modeling Center for Research in Atomistic Simulation, Trieste. Participants at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS) (University of Camerino, Italy, 29 July-2 August 2008).

Neilson, David; Senatore, Gaetano

2009-05-01

105

PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2010)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held at Academia Sinica in Taipei from 18-22 October 2010. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the worldwide High Energy and Nuclear Physics community, Computer Science, and Information Technology. The CHEP conference provides an international forum to exchange information on computing progress and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. CHEP conferences are held at roughly 18 month intervals, alternating between Europe, Asia, America and other parts of the world. Recent CHEP conferences have been held in Prauge, Czech Republic (2009); Victoria, Canada (2007); Mumbai, India (2006); Interlaken, Switzerland (2004); San Diego, California(2003); Beijing, China (2001); Padova, Italy (2000) CHEP 2010 was organized by Academia Sinica Grid Computing Centre. There was an International Advisory Committee (IAC) setting the overall themes of the conference, a Programme Committee (PC) responsible for the content, as well as Conference Secretariat responsible for the conference infrastructure. There were over 500 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited speakers, a number of parallel sessions comprising around 260 oral and 200 poster presentations, and industrial exhibitions. We thank all the presenters, for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Software Engineering, Data Stores, and Databases, Distributed Processing and Analysis, Computing Fabrics and Networking Technologies, Grid and Cloud Middleware, and Collaborative Tools. The conference included excursions to various attractions in Northern Taiwan, including Sanhsia Tsu Shih Temple, Yingko, Chiufen Village, the Northeast Coast National Scenic Area, Keelung, Yehliu Geopark, and Wulai Aboriginal Village, as well as two banquets held at the Grand Hotel and Grand Formosa Regent in Taipei. The next CHEP conference will be held in New York, the United States on 21-25 May 2012. We would like to thank the National Science Council of Taiwan, the EU ACEOLE project, commercial sponsors, and the International Advisory Committee and the Programme Committee members for all their support and help. Special thanks to the Programme Committee members for their careful choice of conference contributions and enormous effort in reviewing and editing about 340 post conference proceedings papers. Simon C Lin CHEP 2010 Conference Chair and Proceedings Editor Taipei, Taiwan November 2011 Track Editors/ Programme Committee Chair Simon C Lin, Academia Sinica, Taiwan Online Computing Track Y H Chang, National Central University, Taiwan Harry Cheung, Fermilab, USA Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Event Processing Track Fabio Cossutti, INFN Trieste, Italy Oliver Gutsche, Fermilab, USA Ryosuke Itoh, KEK, Japan Software Engineering, Data Stores, and Databases Track Marco Cattaneo, CERN, Switzerland Gang Chen, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China Stefan Roiser, CERN, Switzerland Distributed Processing and Analysis Track Kai-Feng Chen, National Taiwan University, Taiwan Ulrik Egede, Imperial College London, UK Ian Fisk, Fermilab, USA Fons Rademakers, CERN, Switzerland Torre Wenaus, BNL, USA Computing Fabrics and Networking Technologies Track Harvey Newman, Caltech, USA Bernd Panzer-Steindel, CERN, Switzerland Antonio Wong, BNL, USA Ian Fisk, Fermilab, USA Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Grid and Cloud Middleware Track Alberto Di Meglio, CERN, Switzerland Markus Schulz, CERN, Switzerland Collaborative Tools Track Joao Correia Fernandes, CERN, Switzerland Philippe Galvez, Caltech, USA Milos Lokajicek, FZU Prague, Czech Republic International Advisory Committee Chair: Simon C. Lin , Academia Sinica, Taiwan Members: Mohammad Al-Turany , FAIR, Germany Sunanda Banerjee, Fermilab, USA Dario Barberis, CERN & Genoa University/INFN, Switzerland Lothar Bauerdick, Fermilab, USA Ian Bird, CERN, Switzerland

Lin, Simon C.; Shen, Stella; Neufeld, Niko; Gutsche, Oliver; Cattaneo, Marco; Fisk, Ian; Panzer-Steindel, Bernd; Di Meglio, Alberto; Lokajicek, Milos

2011-12-01

106

78 FR 25679 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Revision of Critical Habitat for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...salamander (Eurycea nana), and Texas wild-rice (Zizania texana). Comal Springs...San Marcos salamander, and Texas wild- rice. The Comal Springs invertebrate...San Marcos salamander, and Texas wild-rice. In addition, groundwater...

2013-05-02

107

A Theoretical and Empirical Framework for Analyzing the Term Structure of Exchange Rate Expectations (Cadre théorique et empirique pour une analyse de l'évolution probable de la structure des taux de change) (Un marco teórico y empírico para analizar la estructura cronológica de las expectativas de tipos de cambio)  

Microsoft Academic Search

La présente étude élabore un cadre simple en vue d'analyser à un certain moment l'évolution probable du taux de change des monnaies de deux pays. Dans l'hypothèse d'une situation de certitude absolue et d'intégration parfaite du marché des capitaux et en étendant la théorie de la parité des taux d'intérêt à un nombre n de périodes, il est possible d'établir

Michael G. Porter

1971-01-01

108

Quantitative Controls and Unofficial Markets in Foreign Exchange: A Theoretical Framework (Contrôles quantitatifs et marchés non officiels de change: un cadre théorique) (Controles cuantitativos y mercados no oficiales de divisas: Un marco téorico)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the effects of monetary, fiscal, and exchange rate policy in a dual exchange rate regime that has arisen in response to exchange controls in the official market. A key feature distinguishing this arrangement from other dual exchange systems is the absence of an automatic mechanism, such as reserve movements or exchange rate changes, to ensure that the

Michael Nowak

1984-01-01

109

Monitoracao ambiental (fase operacional) da Usina de Enriquecimento de Uranio Almirante Alvaro Alberto. Relatorio quadrimestral das medidas por espectroscopia gama: marco a junho de 1988. (Environmental monitoring (operational period) of the uranium enrichment facility Almirante Alvaro Alberto. Quadrimonthly report of gamma spectroscopy measurements: march to june 1988).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this report we present the assessment of the environmental monitoring radiation levels during the operation period of the Uranium Enrichment Facility Almirante Alvaro Alberto from March to July 1988. The purpose was achieved by sampling and analyzing u...

L. Venturini B. R. S. Pecequilo

1990-01-01

110

New Journal Editors Appointed  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New editors have been appointed for Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR)-Solid Earth, Reviews of Geophysics, JGR-Space Physics, Paleoceanography, and Tectonics. At GRL, new editors Noah Diffenbaugh (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), Paolo D’Odorico (University of Virginia, Charlottesville), Ruth Harris (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Menlo Park, Calif.), Wolfgang Knorr (University of Bristol, Bristol, UK), Geoffrey Tyndall (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.), and Michael Wysession (Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.) have joined Editor-in-Chief Eric Calais and other editors Margaret Chen, Fabio Florindo, Anne Müller, Nikolai Ostgaard, Eric Rignot, and Meric Srokosz.

Major, Barbara

2009-11-01

111

Redescription of Cystidicoloides fischeri based on specimens from piranhas in Brazil, and erection of a new genus (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae).  

PubMed

The cystidicolid nematode Cystidicoloides fischeri (Travassos, Artigas and Pereira, 1928) is redescribed from specimens collected from the stomach of the San Francisco piranha, Pygocentrus piraya (Cuvier), and the white piranha, Serrasalmus brandtii (Lütken) (both Characidae, Characiformes) (new host records), from the Três Marias Reservoir, Upper São Francisco River, Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The morphology of this type species of Cystidicoloides Skinker, 1931, studied with both light and scanning electron microscopy, is characterized by some taxonomically important, previously unreported features, such as the presence of a cephalic cuticular collarette, subdorsal and subventral cephalic spikes, cuticular tooth-like elevations inside the prostom, deirids, area rugosa, and details in the structure of the cephalic end. Heliconema izecksohni Fabio, 1982 is transferred to Cystidicoloides as C. izecksohni (Fabio, 1982) n. comb. Cystidicoloides uniseriata Valovaya and Valter, 1988 is considered a species inquirenda with uncertain generic appurtenance. The presence of subdorsal and subventral cephalic spikes and the collarette are characteristic of Cystidicoloides, comprising only species parasitizing Neotropical fishes. The species from salmonids in the Holarctic, hitherto reported mostly as Cystidicoloides ephemeridarum (Linstow, 1872), belongs to a different, newly erected genus, for which the name Salmonema n. gen. (type species S. ephemeridarum) is now proposed. Cystidicoloides prevosti (Choquette, 1951) is transferred to Salmonema as S. prevosti (Choquette, 1951) n. comb. Sterliadochona ssavini Skryabin, 1948 and Sterliadochona Skryabin, 1948 are considered as species inquirenda and a genus inquirendum, respectively. A key to species of Cystidicoloides is provided. PMID:18576775

Moravec, Frantisek; Santos, Michelle D; Brasil-Sato, Marília C

2008-08-01

112

Larval Pseudoproleptus sp. (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) found in the Amazon river prawn Macrobrachium amazonicum (Decapoda: Palaemonidae) in Brazil.  

PubMed

Previously undescribed infective larvae of the cystidicolid nematode Pseudoproleptus sp. (probably conspecific with the nematode originally described as Heliconema izecksohni Fabio, 1982, a parasite of freshwater fish in Brazil), were found encapsulated in the hemocel of the Amazon river prawn Macrobrachium amazonicum (Heller) (Decapoda: Palaemonidae) from the natural canals on the Mexiana Island (Amazon River Delta), Pardá State, Brazil. The prevalence in prawns (body length 48-110 mm) examined in January and March 2008 (n = 44) was 32%, with an intensity of 1-6 (mean 2) larvae per crustacean. The nematode larvae (body length 19.7-25.7 mm), characterized by the cephalic end provided with a helmet-like cuticular structure having a thickened free posterior margin, are described based on light and scanning electron microscopy. Apparently prawns play a role as intermediate hosts for this nematode species. This is the first record of a larval representative of Cystidicolidae in South America and the first record of a species of Pseudoproleptus Khera, 1955, in the Neotropics. Heliconema izecksohni is transferred to Pseudoproleptus as Pseudoproleptus izecksohni (Fabio, 1982) n. comb. PMID:19014207

Moravec, Frantisek; Santos, Cláudia P

2009-06-01

113

Resolución de problemas basada en el análisis. Hacer del análisis y del razonamiento el foco de la enseñanza de la física  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resumen. Usando los resultados provenientes de la investigación educativa en áreas tales como concepciones alternativas, diferencias entre expertos y novatos, adquisición de esquemas, sobrecarga cognitiva y análisis jerárquico, hemos desarrollado un marco para pensar sobre la organización del conocimiento y su uso para la comunicación, y sobre el razonamiento y la resolución de problemas. Basados en este marco y en

J. Leonard William; William J. Gerace; Robert J. Dufresne

2002-01-01

114

El sacrificio necesario para sostener la deuda externa: un ejercicio de simulación  

Microsoft Academic Search

En el presente artículo se desarrolla inicialmente el marco teórico que está implícito en la restricción presupuestaria intertemporal a la cual está sometida una economía. Luego, se realiza una panorámica sobre la evolución reciente de la deuda externa colombiana y la carga que ésta ha ejercido sobre la economía. Dado un primer marco netamente descriptivo, se pasa a realizar varios

Andrés Ramírez Hassan; Humberto Franco Gonzáles

2005-01-01

115

Salinity Variations and Chemical Compositions of Waters in the Frio Formation, Texas Gulf Coast. Annual Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Waters produced from sandstone reservoirs of the deep Frio Formation exhibit spatial variations in chemical composition that roughly coincide with the major tectonic elements (Houston and Rio Grande Embayments, San Marcos Arch) and corresponding depositio...

R. A. Morton C. M. Garrett J. S. Posey J. H. Han L. A. Jirik

1981-01-01

116

77 FR 59193 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...License. Walmay Logistics Inc. (NVO), 5171 Via Marcos, Yorba Linda, CA 92887, Officers: Shifeng Hou, President (QI), Song Yang, Managing Director, Application Type: New NVO License. By the Commission. Dated: September 21, 2012. Rachel...

2012-09-26

117

1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis C. Page, Jr., Photographer ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis C. Page, Jr., Photographer January 20, 1934 VIEW FROM SOUTH (FRONT). - French Legation to Republic of Texas, Seventh & San Marcos Streets, Austin, Travis County, TX

118

5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis C. Page, Jr., Photographer ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis C. Page, Jr., Photographer April 4, 1934 RECENT ADDITION FROM EAST. - French Legation to Republic of Texas, Seventh & San Marcos Streets, Austin, Travis County, TX

119

2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis C. Page, Jr., Photographer ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis C. Page, Jr., Photographer January 20, 1934 VIEW FROM WEST (FRONT). - French Legation to Republic of Texas, Seventh & San Marcos Streets, Austin, Travis County, TX

120

3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis C. Page, Jr., Photographer ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis C. Page, Jr., Photographer February 10, 1934 VIEW FROM SOUTH (FRONT). - French Legation to Republic of Texas, Seventh & San Marcos Streets, Austin, Travis County, TX

121

4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis C. Page, Jr., Photographer ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis C. Page, Jr., Photographer January 20, 1934 VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST (FRONT). - French Legation to Republic of Texas, Seventh & San Marcos Streets, Austin, Travis County, TX

122

Review of the Mindanao Peace Processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the Mindanao peace processes starting from the Marcos to the Ramos period. It discusses issues and problems highlighting some of the constant features that have characterized the peace processes.

Carmen A. Abubakar

2004-01-01

123

33 CFR 385.7 - Concurrency statements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...OF DEFENSE PROGRAMMATIC REGULATIONS FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE EVERGLADES RESTORATION PLAN General Provisions § 385.7 Concurrency...Jacksonville District, 701 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville, Florida 32207, or by accessing the programmatic regulations Web...

2013-07-01

124

75 FR 52965 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...TE-236730 Applicant: Timothy Bonner, San Marcos, Texas. Applicant requests an amendment to a current...Springs riffle beetle (Heterelmis comalensis), Texas wild-rice (Zizania texana), and Texas blind salamander (Eurycea rathbuni)...

2010-08-30

125

Stress studies at Kennedy Space Center: A backward and forward look  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Possible relationships between occupational and other stresses on ischemic heart disease are explored. Three procedures were used: (1) double master 2-step test, (2) dynamic ECG technique using avionics equipment, and (3) submaximal stress testing with Marco bicycle ergometer.

Decker, A. I.

1971-01-01

126

Synchronizing optics and X-rays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Capturing the dynamics of atoms and molecules using X-ray free-electron laser pulses requires femtosecond timing between the pump and probe beams. Nature Photonics spoke with Marion Harmand and Marco Cammarata about their progress.

2013-03-01

127

Asteroid electrostatic instrumentation and modelling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Asteroid surface material is expected to become photoelectrically charged, and is likely to be transported through electrostatic levitation. Understanding any movement of the surface material is relevant to proposed space missions to return samples to Earth for detailed isotopic analysis. Motivated by preparations for the Marco Polo sample return mission, we present electrostatic modelling for a real asteroid, Itokawa, for which detailed shape information is available, and verify that charging effects are likely to be significant at the terminator and at the edges of shadow regions for the Marco Polo baseline asteroid, 1999JU3. We also describe the Asteroid Charge Experiment electric field instrumentation intended for Marco Polo. Finally, we find that the differing asteroid and spacecraft potentials on landing could perturb sample collection for the short landing time of 20min that is currently planned.

Aplin, K. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Urbak, E.; Keane, D.; Sawyer, E. C.

2011-06-01

128

Women in Physics in Perú  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The numbers of women receiving undergraduate and master's degrees in physics from San Marcos National University and undergraduate physics degrees from San Luis Gonzaga National University in Perú are reported. The number of undergraduate degrees in physics has increased for women in San Marcos University, but not for women earning master's degrees. Why don't women complete their post-degree studies? Economics and gender stereotypes are factors that women in Perú have to fight each day. Perú does not have a good scholar program in science, so few students are interested in beginning their university careers in science. Improvements in science education are needed for our country to reach its potential.

Loayza, María Luisa Cerón; Vásquez, Yezeña Huaypar; Cabrejos, Jorge Aurelio Bravo

2009-04-01

129

Workmanship vibration test of the SAS-B spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The occurrence of a technical problem made it necessary to remove the transmitter from the SAS-B spacecraft. The transmitter was repaired and reinstalled in the spacecraft. After this operation it was necessary to test the mechanical properties of the reassembled spacecraft in a vibration test to be conducted near the spacecraft launching place on the San Marco Range in the Indian Ocean. A vibration system was, therefore, sent to San Marco. The design of the vibration system is discussed, giving attention also to alternative solutions for conducting the required tests.

Demas, L. J.

1974-01-01

130

Efecto antiulceroso del extracto hidroalcohólico liofilizado de hojas de Bixa orellana (achiote), en ratas Antiulcer effect of lyophilized hydroalcoholic extract of Bixa orellana (annatto) leaves in rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To identify the secondary metabolites present in Bixa orellana leaves extract, to evaluate the extract protection against ethanol injury, and histopathology study of the stomach glandular region. Design: Prospective, experimental and analytical research. Setting: Biochemistry and Nutrition Research Center laboratories, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Biological material: Bixa orellana leaves extract and male albino rats. Interventions: Secondary metabolites

Oscar Huamán; Miguel Sandoval; Inés Arnao; Elsa Béjar

131

The production of cytokines by polymorphonuclear neutrophils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cytokines orchestrate the complex network of cellullar interactions that regulate effector cell functions of natural and immune resistance. Although T cells, natural killer (NK) cells and monocytes\\/macrophages are the main producers of cytokines, a number of reports in the last few years have demonstrated that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) also have the ability to synthesize and release immunoregulatory cytokines. Here, Marco

Marco A. Cassatella

1995-01-01

132

Small Steps, Big Changes: Eight Essential Practices for Transforming Schools through Mathematics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the past two decades, Chris Confer and Marco Ramirez have worked to deepen and improve mathematics instruction at schools around the country. Wherever they go, they find the raw ingredients for success already present: "The potential for positive change lies within each school. Abundance is present in the form of capable children, teachers,…

Confer, Chris; Ramirez, Marco

2012-01-01

133

Racionalidad ilimitada y provisión voluntaria de bienes públicos: Imposibilidad de alcanzar soluciones endógenas\\/Unbounded Rationality and the Voluntary Provision of Public Goods: Impossibility to reach endogenous solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Este artículo revisa las condiciones a cumplir para alcanzar soluciones endógenas dirigidas a lograr niveles superiores de provisión voluntaria del bien público que nos alejen del subóptimo inicial en un marco de racionalidad ilimitada. Partiendo del modelo original de Cornes y Sandler, se describen las limitaciones de los supuestos de cooperación individual convencionales sobre los que aquél se estructura. A

F. GARCÍA-SOBRECASES; J. de D. MONTORO PONS

2004-01-01

134

Creating a Successful Summer Physics Camp  

Microsoft Academic Search

The summer physics camp hosted by the Texas State University San Marcos Society of Physics Students chapter is geared toward middle school children aged 9 to 12 years. Camp administrators aim to create an environment that is both conducive to learning and fun. Our overarching goal is to provide local youth a basic knowledge of physical concepts as well as

Amanda Gregory

2009-01-01

135

845 THE LITTLE FISH THAT ROARED: THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT, STATE GROUNDWATER LAW, AND PRIVATE PROPERTY RIGHTS COLLIDE OVER THE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Edwards Aquifer is the sole source of water for San Antonio, Texas. The Aquifer contributes surface water flow in the Guadalupe River through Comal and San Marcos Springs, both of which are home to endangered aquatic species, including the fountain darter. In 1993, a U.S. district court ruled that the Secretary of the Interior allowed takings under the Endangered

TEXAS EDWARDS AQUIFER

1999-01-01

136

Theory to Practice: Developmental Mathematics Program--A Model for Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Developmental Mathematics Program (DMP) at Texas State University-San Marcos in central Texas has undergone systemic, significant changes over the past ten years. These changes primarily resulted from the alignment to the American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges' (AMATYC) Crossroads in Mathematics: Standards for Introductory…

Vasquez Mireles, Selina

2010-01-01

137

Schooling and Bilingualization in a Highland Guatemalan Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To examine the process of language shift (bilingualization) in an area where there is a local dialect equivalent to a "language of solidarity" and a national language equivalent to a "language of power," language interactions in the impoverished village of San Marcos in the highlands of Guatemala were examined. Although Spanish is the national…

Richards, Julia Becker

138

Neurodevelopmental performance among school age children in rural Guatemala is associated with prenatal and postnatal exposure to carbon monoxide, a marker for exposure to woodsmoke  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated whether early life chronic exposure to woodsmoke, using personal passive 48-h carbon monoxide (CO) as an indicator, is associated with children's neurodevelopmental and behavioral performance. CO measures were collected every 3 months from 2002 to 2005 among mother–child dyads during the Randomized Exposure Study of Pollution Indoors and Respiratory Effects (RESPIRE) stove intervention trial in San Marcos, Guatemala.

Linda Dix-Cooper; Brenda Eskenazi; Carolina Romero; John Balmes; Kirk R. Smith

139

Early Childhood in the New China: Suzhou  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suzhou is one hour to the West of Shanghai, and one of China's most interesting cities, famous for its silks, canals, and scholar gardens. According to a popular legend, Marco Polo is reputed to have said, "In heaven there is paradise, and on earth, Hangzhou and Suzhou." As the city rapidly expands, the issue of early childhood education is a…

Kalinowski, Michael

2010-01-01

140

School Subtracts Math Texts to Add E-Lessons, Tests  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses how math teachers at San Marcos High School turned to an online curriculum and in-class assessments to increase student achievement. Setting aside their 7-year-old textbooks, teachers filled the void largely with an online math curriculum, called Agile Mind, that comes equipped with an array of assessment tools. The idea was…

Trotter, Andrew

2007-01-01

141

TEMA V TENDENCIAS RECIENTES EN EL MERCADO DE TRABAJO (I): LA CONSTRUCCIÓN SOCIOHISTÓRICA DEL MERCADO DE TRABAJO CONTEMPORÁNEO: DEL FORDISMO AL POSFORDISMO  

Microsoft Academic Search

Este tema presenta un conjunto de cuestiones relacionadas con las transformaciones históricas más recientes del trabajo y del empleo. Intentaremos aquí seguir su trayectoria en la segunda mitad del siglo XX para poder analizar las tendencias más recientes del mercado de trabajo que se proyectan hacia el siglo XXI y que sirven de contexto y de marco de explicación al

Antonio Santos Ortega

142

Another Way of Knowing: Visualizing the Ancient Silk Routes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One way that people learn, remember and communicate is visually. We combine past experiences with new visual information to construct meaning. In this study, elementary teachers introduced their students to the peoples and places of the ancient silk routes using illustrations from two children's picture books, "Marco Polo," written by Gian Paolo…

Bisland, Beverly Milner

2010-01-01

143

Constructing Knowledge with Silk Road Visuals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study a group of elementary teachers use illustrations, rather than written text, to introduce their students to the peoples and places of the ancient silk routes. The illustrations are from two picture books; "Marco Polo," written by Gian Paolo Cesaerani and illustrated by Piero Ventura (1977), and "We're Riding on a Caravan: An Adventure…

Bisland, Beverly Milner

2008-01-01

144

Ancient Media in Literature: Golden Printers and Golden Authors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seal printing is explored as a literary topic in 28 works dating from the third millennium B.C. to A.D. 1613 (from Sumerian times through Shakespeare's). This ancient printing method is mentioned in the literature of the Egyptians, Greeks, Hebrews, and Arabians. It occurs in the works of Herodotus, Plutarch, and Marco Polo, as well as Chaucer and…

Mooradian, Karlen

145

Las municipalidades en Costa Rica: Evaluación del sistema tributario y la administración presupuestaria y financiera de los gobiernos locales: Alternativas para su fortalecimiento  

Microsoft Academic Search

Este documento analiza el sistema tributario y la administración presupuestaria y financiera de los gobiernos locales en Costa Rica. El trabajo presenta, asimismo, una serie de recomendaciones de políticas y medidas administrativas en el marco de la política de fortalecimiento del régimen municipal a los fines de mejorar la gestión administrativa y tributaria de las municipalidades. Éstas pueden servir de

Marcos Morales

2010-01-01

146

Spread of an exotic fish-gill trematode  

Microsoft Academic Search

Centrocestus formosanus, the gill trematode, has caused serious losses among fish raised by tropical fish producers since the early 1980s and is believed to be harmful to wild fish populations, including the federally listed endangered fountain darter (Etheostoma fonticola), in the Comal River near San Marcos, Texas. The parasite appears to infect in many fishes from Hawaii, Florida, Texas, and

Andrew J. Mitchell; Robin M. Overstreet; Andrew E. Goodwin; Thomas M. Brandt

2005-01-01

147

Fugacity based modeling for pollutant fate and transport during floods. Preliminary results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fugacity based modeling for pollutant fate and transport during floods. Preliminary results Miranda Deda, Mattia Fiorini, Marco Massabò, Roberto Rudari One of the concerns that arises during floods is whether the wide-spreading of chemical contamination is associated with the flooding. Many potential sources of toxics releases during floods exists in cities or rural area; hydrocarbons fuel storage system, distribution facilities,

M. Deda; M. Fiorini; M. Massabo; R. Rudari

2010-01-01

148

The Role of Macrophage Class A Scavenger Receptors in a Laser-Induced Murine Choroidal Neovascularization Model  

PubMed Central

Purpose. Laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a widely used model to mimic many features of CNV resulting from wet AMD. Macrophages have been implicated in the pathogenesis of AMD. Class A scavenger receptors, scavenger receptor-A (SR-A) and macrophage receptor with collagenous domain (MARCO), are expressed on macrophages and are associated with macrophage function. The goal of this study is to examine the role of macrophage scavenger receptors in immune cell recruitment and the formation of CNV. Methods. Laser photocoagulation was performed in wild-type and knockout mice with deletion of SR-A (SR-A?/?), MARCO (MARCO?/?), or both SR-A and MARCO double knockout (DKO). Immune cell recruitment at different time points and CNV lesions at 14 days after laser treatment were evaluated through immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Microarray analysis was performed in eyes 1 day after laser injury. Results. Wild-type eyes showed higher chemokine/receptor expression compared with knockout eyes after laser injury. Scavenger receptor deficiency markedly impaired the recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages to CNV lesions at 1- and 3-days post laser injury, respectively. Significantly reduced CNV volumes were found in the eyes from scavenger receptor knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. Conclusions. The deficiency of scavenger receptors impairs the formation of CNV and immune cell recruitment. Our findings suggest a potential role for scavenger receptors in contributing to CNV formation and inflammation in AMD.

Jawad, Shayma; Liu, Baoying; Li, Zhiyu; Katamay, Robert; Campos, Mercedes; Wei, Lai; Sen, H. Nida; Ling, Diamond; Martinez Estrada, Fernando; Amaral, Juan; Chan, Chi-Chao; Fariss, Robert; Gordon, Siamon; Nussenblatt, Robert B.

2013-01-01

149

Community Interactions and the Logic of Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

What are the problems challenging communities in everyday interactions? How could a radical constructivist theory of knowledge shed new light on these interactions? And what measures of success would help balance humanity and efficiency in the business world? In this article Marco Bettoni develops an unexplored connection between constructivist knowledge theory and successful community interactions. He gives seven practical recommendations

Marco Bettoni

2005-01-01

150

Equatorial electric field observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper reports both dc and ac measurements of equatorial electric fields from the San Marco D satellite. These measurements were performed with double floating probe sensors and have yielded a surprising number of new phenomena and effects in regions of equatorial spread-F. Among the phenomena observed are unexpected large-amplitude Rayleigh-Taylor updrafting velocities in equatorial bubbles.

Aggson, T. L.; Hanson, W. B.; Herrero, F. A.; Maynard, N. C.; Pfaff, R. F.; Saba, J. L.; Tsunoda, R. T.

1993-01-01

151

Hepatoprotección antioxidante de la cáscara y semilla de Vitis vinifera L. (uva)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine by TBARS test (substances reactive to thiobarbituric acid) the antioxidant and liver protection effect induced by Vitts vinifera L. grape skin and seeds in animals of experimentation with alcoholic aggression. Design: Experimental study. Setting: Alberto Guzman Barron Biochemistry and Nutrition Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Peru. Biologic material: Albino male

Miguel Sandoval; Karen Lazarte; Inés Arnao

152

Una Metodología para Ajustar y Compensar las Diferencias de Riesgo entre el Sistema Público y Privado de Salud en Chile  

Microsoft Academic Search

En el marco conceptual de seguros de salud y ajuste de riesgo y a la luz de la experiencia internacional en Fondos de Compensación de Riesgos, este documento explora el problema del «descreme» que afecta al sistema de seguros Chileno. Se presenta una metodología para estimar diferencias de riesgo entre el sector público y privado de salud en Chile y

Verónica Vargas; Camilo Cid; Mauricio Matus; Iris Delgado; José Miguel Sánchez; Beatriz Heyermann; José Angulo

153

Estudio bioinformático del metabolismo de Mycobacterium tuberculosis bajo condiciones de hipoxia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To predict by using bioinformatic tools Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) metabolic pathways under hypoxic conditions. Design: Biology analysis. Setting: Instituto de Química Biológica, Microbiología y Biotecnología Marco Antonio Garrido Malo Biological, Microbiologic and Biotechnologic Chemistry Institute, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, UNMSM. Biologic material: Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes. Methods: The study began with the selection of 355 genes of MT H37Rv

Christian Solís; Luisa Negrón

2008-01-01

154

Panel fabrication utilizing GaAs solar cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of the GaAs solar cells for space applications is described. The activities in the fabrication of GaAs solar panels are outlined. Panels were fabricated while introducing improved quality control, soldering laydown and testing procedures. These panels include LIPS II, San Marco Satellite, and a low concentration panel for Rockwells' evaluation. The panels and their present status are discussed.

Mardesich, N.

1984-01-01

155

Co-operative Education and Industrial Training: DMMMSU Experience.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through its cooperative education and industrial training program, Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University (DMMMSU) in the Philippines provides 250-800 hours of work-based education to students enrolled in 3-, 4-, and 5-year programs of training for such occupations as professional engineer, technologist, teacher, and technician. At the…

Tiangson, Francisco S.

156

Asimetría de la información, inestabilidad financiera y la crisis bancaria venezolana: Una visión crítica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resumen La función de las instituciones financieras es la de servir como intermediarios entre las unidades excendentarias (ahorristas) y las deficitarias de fondos (empresa- rioslinversionistas). Para ello, es necesario que operen con un nivel mínimo de eficiencia, ¡.e., maximicen beneficios al mismo tiempo que minimizan riesgos. Sin embargo, en situaciones caracterizadas por un marco macroeconómico adverso, ineficiencia institucional y escasez

Daniel Anido

157

SLICE/MARC-O: Description of Services. Second Revised Edition.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Following the discussions of: what is SLICE, what is MARC, what is MARC-O, and what is SLICE/MARC-O are descriptions of the five services offered by SLICE/MARC-O. These services are: (1) cataloging data search and print, (2) MARC record search and copy, (...

1972-01-01

158

Anchor Test Type and Population Invariance: An Exploration across Subpopulations and Test Administrations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exploratory study was built on research spanning three decades. Petersen, Marco, and Stewart (1982) conducted a major empirical investigation of the efficacy of different equating methods. The studies reported in Dorans (1990) examined how different equating methods performed across samples selected in different ways. Recent population…

Dorans, Neil J.; Liu, Jinghua; Hammond, Shelby

2008-01-01

159

Modelling step-families  

Microsoft Academic Search

A combined marco-micro model is applied to a population similar to that forecast for 2035 in the Netherlands in order to simulate the effect on kinship networks of a mating system of serial monogamy. The importance of incorporating a parameter for the degree of concentration of childbearing over the female population is emphasized. The inputs to the model are vectors

Jan Bartlema

1988-01-01

160

76 FR 75897 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...75897-75898] [FR Doc No: 2011-31107...Wildlife Service [FWS-R2-ES-2011-N247; FXES11130200000F5-123-FF02ENEH00...TE-57473A Applicant: Stephen Ramirez, San Marcos, Texas. Applicant...seq.) Dated: November 23, 2011. Joy E. Nicholopoulos,...

2011-12-05

161

MÚSICA Y AGRUPACIONES DE CARNAVAL A FINALES DEL SIGLO XX EN ANDALUCÍA OCCIDENTAL. LA REVITALIZACIÓN FESTIVA Y EL RENACIMIENTO DEL CARNAVAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Con este trabajo pretendemos acercarnos al Carnaval de Andalucía occidental a partir de su recuperación durante la Transición y los gobiernos socialistas en la década de los años ochenta del pasado siglo XX. Este proceso tuvo lugar en un marco de participación ciudadana, modernización económica, estado del bienestar, constitución de las comunidades autónomas, sociedad del espectáculo y del entretenimiento, y

Francisco José García Gallardo

2005-01-01

162

Turned on by Tutoring.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ninth graders in a six-week reading improvement class at San Marcos High School (Texas) acted as tutors in an elementary school. The ninth graders' self-confidence, attitude, and attendance improved dramatically, but their own progress in reading did not, because of the short duration of the project. (DM)

Pino, Carol

1990-01-01

163

David Hurst Thomas and the Historical Archaeology of the Spanish Borderlands.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses David Hurst Thomas' archaeological work on the Spanish borderlands, which integrates field archaeology and documentary history. Focuses on locating and studying the Santa Catalina de Guale. Addresses his project on the Pueblo San Marcos that will further test his ideas about the Spanish mission period. (CMK)

Snead, James E.

2000-01-01

164

Middle and upper atmosphere results; Proceedings of the Topical Meeting of the Interdisciplinary Scientific Commission C (Meetings C2 and C3) of the COSPAR 28th Plenary Meeting, The Hague, Netherlands, June 25-July 6, 1990  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Papers are first presented on atmospheric trace species, with particular attention given to stratospheric trace species and possible improvements to reference atmospheres. The equatorial thermosphere and aeronomy are considered with reference to models and San Marco satellite/ground-based observations. Papers on the coupling of dynamic, radiative, and chemical processes in the middle atmosphere are also presented.

Keating, G. M. (editor); Herrero, F. A. (editor); Chakrabarti, S. (editor); Gray, L. J. (editor)

1993-01-01

165

Can Family Planning Programs Serve the Reproductive Health Needs of Special Groups of High Risk Women.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper is the final report of an operations research project to prevent the spread of HIV infection among registered prostitutes in Callao, the port suburb of Lima, Peru. The project was conducted by the San Marcos University Institute of Tropical Medi...

J. Alarcon O. Palacios

1990-01-01

166

Information Seeking Behavior of Business Students: A Research Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a study of library use and research behavior, 91 undergraduate and 68 graduate business students at California State University San Marcos were surveyed and observed for query formulation and task assignments, prereference process expectations, and postreference process responses. Findings support past research by pointing to user impatience…

Atkinson, Joseph D., III; Figueroa, Miguel

1997-01-01

167

The College & Financial Aid Guide for: AB540 Undocumented Immigrant Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the passage of California Assembly Bill 540 in 2001, authored by the late Assemblyman, Marco Antonio Firebaugh, more than 5,000 undocumented students in California have had improved financial access to higher education. AB 540 has become a pinnacle in the lives of students, who because of their immigration status, have historically been…

Oliverez, Paz M., Ed.; Chavez, Maria Lucia, Ed.; Soriano, Mayra, Ed.; Tierney, William G., Ed.

2006-01-01

168

La croissance française à l'horizon de 1992 : des besoins d'investissement encore importants à financer  

Microsoft Academic Search

[spa] El crecimiento de la economía francesa en el horizonte de 1992 : Subsisten aún necesidades importantes de inversión para financiar - Según las proyecciones llevadas a cabo en el marco de la preparación del X Plan, el ritmo medio de expansion de la economía francesa sería del orden de un 3% desde ahora hasta 1992, es decir un ritmo

Laurence Bloch

1989-01-01

169

Criterion-Referenced Exit Examinations: An Institution's Internal Process for Psychometric Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Texas State University-San Marcos undergraduate healthcare administration program requires all bachelors of health administration (BHA) students to pass a comprehensive examination to demonstrate their knowledge of specific core competencies. This also demonstrates completion of their didactic coursework in order to enter a practical…

Lieneck, Cristian; Morrison, Eileen; Price, Larry

2013-01-01

170

EL AMBIENTE DE CONTROL INTERNO. UN ACERCAMIENTO TEÓRICO METODOLÓGICO  

Microsoft Academic Search

El presente artículo presenta una propuesta de un modelo y procedimiento para la implantación del ambiente de control, componente básico del sistema de control interno. El marco teórico referencial de esta investigación, se sustenta en el análisis realizado de los criterios de algunos autores acerca de que el ambiente de control es el andamiaje del sistema de control interno, así

Any Flor Nieves Julbe; Reynaldo Velázquez Zaldívar

2009-01-01

171

Proceso y métodos de evaluación integrada participativa de degradación en agroecosistemas semiáridos. Un caso de estudio en un área protegida en el trópico seco nicaragüense  

Microsoft Academic Search

Los procesos de evaluación integrada y participativa son un buen marco metodológico-operativo para la toma de decisiones frente a cuestiones ambientales complejas que conciernen a socio-agroecosistemas de alto dinamismo e impredecibilidad a cambios y con intereses conflictivos de los actores implicados en su gestión. La finalidad del artículo es mostrar el potencial de la aplicación de un enfoque interdisciplinar e

Federica Ravera; David Tarrasón; Pilar Andrés Pastor; Rafael Grasa

2009-01-01

172

Contribución a los sistemas integrados de gestión desde la perspectiva del directivo  

Microsoft Academic Search

El presente artículo tiene como objetivo mostrar una propuesta de un modelo y procedimiento para la implantación de un sistema integrado de gestión. Sustenta el marco teórico referencial de esta investigación, el análisis realizado de los criterios de algunos autores sobre el concepto de integración y sistema integrado de gestión (SIG), así como en las concepciones teóricas actuales sobre algunas

Elizabeth Guilarte Barinaga

2011-01-01

173

El Biomanizales: Política ambiental local  

Microsoft Academic Search

La documentación de la experiencia en Gestión Ambiental Urbana de la ciudad de Manizales, Colombia ha sido realizada entre los años 1999 y 2000, dentro del marco de implementación del proyecto de Apoyo para la Implementación de Planes Nacionales de Acción –HABITAT II (SINPA), sigla que corresponde a su nombre en el idioma inglés: Support for the Implementation of National

Marulanda L

2000-01-01

174

Functional Assesment of Symptomatic Snapping Scapula after Scapulothoracic Arthroscopy: A Prospective Study Protocol  

PubMed Central

Principal investigator and promoter: Giovanni Merolla Co-investigator: Giuseppe Porcellini Investigation performed at Biomechanics Laboratory “Marco Simoncelli”, D. Cervesi Hospital, Cattolica - Italy Plan of clinical investigation (PCI): Version 1.0 of December 10, 2012 Approved by AV/IRST Ethical Committee (Comitato Etico Area Vasta Romagna) Reg. Sperimentazioni 914 Prot. N°: 1785/2013/I.5/46

Merolla, Giovanni; Cerciello, Simone; Porcellini, Giuseppe

2014-01-01

175

Experimentos de Política Fiscal por el Lado de la Oferta en un Modelo Monetario de Crecimiento Endógeno  

Microsoft Academic Search

En este trabajo nos preguntamos, en el marco de un modelo de crecimiento endógeno con acumulación de capital humano, en un contexto determinista, si es posible reducir el tipo impositivo de diferentes impuestos financiadores de una senda predeterminada de gasto de modo que se permita equilibrar el presupuesto en el largo plazo (sin incrementar en períodos posteriores los impuestos). Si

Jesús Ruiz

2002-01-01

176

Efecto protector del Aloe vera (sábila) en lesiones gástricas inducidas con etanol en ratas Protective effect of Aloe vera in injuries gastric  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the cytoprotective effect of Aloe Vera (Sabila) on gastric mucosa and compare them with those produced by sucralfate in the experimentation animals. Design: Experimental study. Setting: San Marcos University Institute of Pathology. Lima, Perú. Materials: thirty six albino female rats were evaluated, of the specie Ratus norvegicus strain Holtzman of Instituto Nacional de Salud, Lima-Perú Interventions: Following

Ronald Arce; Janet Molina-Ordóñez; Fiorella Morán; José Moreno-Lozano

2007-01-01

177

The German scientific balloon and sounding rocket program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sounding rocket projects in astronomy, aeronomy, magnetospheric research, material sciences, and life sciences under microgravity are described. Balloon projects in astronomy and aeronomy are presented. Satellite projects including AMPTE, SOHO, Cluster, San Marco-D, HELIOS, Giotto, Ulysses, CRAF, ISOPHOT, Rosat, and the Gamma Ray Observatory are mentioned.

A. F. Dahl; M. Otterbein

1987-01-01

178

The German scientific balloon and sounding rocket program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sounding rocket projects in astronomy, aeronomy, magnetospheric research, material sciences, and life sciences under microgravity are described. Balloon projects in astronomy and aeronomy are presented. Satellite projects including AMPTE, SOHO, Cluster, San Marco-D, HELIOS, Giotto, Ulysses, CRAF, ISOPHOT, Rosat, and the Gamma Ray Observatory are mentioned.

Dahl, A. F.; Otterbein, M.

1987-08-01

179

Gestión de Recursos Humanos en Cooperativas Chilenas: Estudio de Casos  

Microsoft Academic Search

RESUMENEste trabajo consiste en un estudio de tres casos de coope- rativas chilenas donde se analiza y compara la gestión de recursos hu- manos. Se plantea un marco teórico que en su aspecto principal destaca cómo las organizaciones pueden conseguir una ventaja com- petitiva en sus estrategias al distinguirse en la forma en que se organiza y administra la fuerza

Eduardo Acuña Aguirre

2005-01-01

180

Learning Languages: The Journal of the National Network for Early Language Learning, 2001-2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These three journal issues contain the following articles: "Japanese at Mimosa Elementary School" (Azusa Uchihara); "A Successful Keypal Project Using Varied Technologies" (Jean L. Pacheco); "Promoting a Language-Proficient Society: What You Can Do" (Kathleen M. Marcos and Joy Kreeft Peyton); "Journal Reflections of a First-Year Teacher" (Sarah…

Rosenbusch, Marcia H., Ed.

2002-01-01

181

Bilingualism and bilingual education in a complex context  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is based on results from a baseline study for an intended intervention project in bilingual-intercultural education in the Municipality of San Miguel Ixtahuacan, in the Department of San Marcos, Guatemala. To a great extent the article deals with issues of bilingual education from the perspective of social justice. It analyses the various components underpinning attempts to develop comprehensive

Lázaro Moreno Herrera; Åsa Wedin

2010-01-01

182

PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting in Rome 2012  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Conference logo At its third edition, the Young Researcher Meeting in Rome (YRMR) proves to be a growing event in the Italian scientific panorama. The high-quality content of the abstracts submitted to the scientific committee resulted in an exciting conference, held, for the second time, at the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' on 20 January 2012. A busy schedule covered a large variety of cutting-edge science topics: fundamental interactions, particle physics, cosmology, astrophysics, condensed matter and biomedical physics. The broad range of the subjects discussed is the distinctive feature of the YRMR, a meeting aimed at enhancing the synergy among complementary branches of science by stimulating a fruitful exchange between theoretical, experimental and computational physics. Promoting collaborations between PhD students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers creates a solid scientific network with an open-minded approach to discovery. In this volume, we collect the contributions that have been presented both in the form of talks and of posters. YRMR Organising and Editorial Committee Fabio Agostini (fabio.agostini@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma Italy Giordano Cattani (giordano.cattani@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' INFN sezione di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma Italy Luca Mazzaferro (luca.mazzaferro@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' INFN sezione di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma Italy Marina Migliaccio (migliaccio@ifca.unican.es) Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Edificio Juan Jorda, Avenida de los Castros, E-39005 Santander, Cantabria Spain Davide Pietrobon (davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov) Jet Propulsion Laboratory - California Institute of Technology 4800 Oak Grove Drive 169-237 91109 Pasadena, CA USA Daniel Ricci Pacifici (Daniel.Ricci.Pacifici@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' INFN sezione di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma Italy Francesco Stellato (francesco.stellato@cfel.de) Center for Free Electron Laser science c/o DESY 22607 Hamburg Germany Marcella Veneziani (marcella.veneziani@caltech.edu) California Institute of Technology 1200 California Blvd, Pasadena, 91125, CA USA Institution logos Acknowledgments The organizers of the 3rd Young Researcher Meeting in Rome would like to thank all the scientists who participated in the meeting. We thank the Science Faculty of the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' for hosting the conference. The 'Tor Vergata' Division of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) and the Department of Physics of the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' who have sponsored the event, covering the organization costs and allowing for travel grants to the speakers. We are grateful to Professor Francesco Fucito, Professor Piergiorgio Picozza, Professor Rinaldo Santonico, Dr Jose Francisco Morales and Ms Francesca Luna for their valuable support.

Agostini, Fabio; Cattani, Giordano; Mazzaferro, Luca; Migliaccio, Marina; Pietrobon, Davide; Ricci Pacifici, Daniel; Stellato, Francesco; Veneziani, Marcella

2012-10-01

183

Central Dark Matter Distribution In Dwarf Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Central dark matter distribution in dwarf galaxies Se-Heon Oh, Chris Brook, Fabio Governato, Elias Brinks, Lucio Mayer, W.J.G. de Blok, Alyson Brooks and Fabian Walter We present high-resolution mass models of 7 nearby dwarf galaxies from "The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey” (THINGS) and compare these with those from hydrodynamic simulations of dwarf galaxies assuming a ?CDM cosmology. The simulations include the effect of baryonic feedback processes, such as gas cooling, star formation, cosmic UV background heating and most importantly, physically motivated gas outflows driven by supernovae (SNe). For the THINGS dwarf galaxies, we derive the mass models for the dark matter component by subtracting the contribution from baryons, derived from our HI observations and using the "Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey” (SINGS) 3.6?m data, from the total kinematics, leaving only the contribution by the Dark Matter halo. In parallel, we perform dark matter mass modeling of the simulated dwarf galaxies in exactly the same way as the observed THINGS dwarf galaxies. From a direct comparison between the observations and simulations, we find that the dark matter rotation curves of the simulated dwarf galaxies rise less steeply in the inner regions than those of dark-matter-only simulations based on the ?CDM paradigm, and are more consistent with those of the THINGS dwarf galaxies. In addition, the mean value of the logarithmic inner dark matter density slopes, ?, of the simulated galaxies is approximately -0.4 ± 0.1, which is in good agreement with ? = -0.29 ± -0.07 of the THINGS dwarf galaxies. This shows that the baryonic feedback processes in the simulations are efficient in flattening the initial cusps with ? = -1.0 to -1.5 predicted from dark-matter-only simulations, and render the dark matter halo mass distribution more similar to that observed in nearby dwarf galaxies.

Oh, Se-Heon; Brook, C.; Governato, F.; Brinks, E.; Mayer, L.; de Blok, E.; Brooks, A.; Walter, F.

2012-01-01

184

Contribution of soil moisture in summer heat waves amplitude in MED-CORDEX simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contribution of soil moisture in summer heat wave amplitude in MED-CORDEX simulations Marc Stéfanon(1), Philippe Drobinski(1), Fabio D'Andrea(1), Cindy-Lebeaupin Brossier(1,2), (1) IPSL/LMD, France; (2) CNRM, France ; Heat waves and droughts are extreme weather events intrinsically linked, through strong coupling between the Earth's energy and water cycles. Their impact in short and medium term can be considerable on our societies in terms of health, socio-economic and ecological damage, as in 2003 in Western Europe or Russia in 2010. They are even more affected by climate change than the average state of the atmosphere and could be more frequent, more intense and more extended in the future. Besides this effect could be enhanced by the fact that Mediterranean, a vulnerable area of important geographic and climatic contrasts, is among the most responsive to global warming. If triggering of heat waves is determined by the large scale, land surface-related processes and feedbacks can amplify or inhibit heat trough several feedback mechanism. In regional climate models (RCMs) the land surface model (LSM) plays a key role in energy and water exchanges between land and atmosphere and determine the partitioning of surface fluxes (the relationship of latent heat flux to sensible heat flux). In the frame of the HyMeX and MED-CORDEX programs, two simulations at 20-km grid resolution have been performed over 1989-2008 with 2 different LSMs (RUC and 5-layer diffusive schemes) on a Mediterranean domain. The control simulation (CTL) corresponds to the RUC configuration, whereas experiment with perturbed soil moisture (WET) corresponds to the 5-layer diffusive scheme. CTL is able to correctly simulates temporal and spatial variations of soil moisture, as drought conditions. WET has a high soil moisture value, constant through time and land use dependant. These simulations are inter-compared to provide an estimate of the soil moisture contribution to heat wave amplitude.

Stéfanon, M.

2012-04-01

185

PREFACE: International Workshop: Meson Production at Intermediate and High Energies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The International Workshop 'Meson Production at Intermediate and High Energies' was held in the 'Capo Peloro Resort' Hotel in Messina, Italy on November 10-11, 2011. The workshop was organized by the University of Messina and 'Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo', in the wonderful setting of the confluence between the Ionian and Tyrrhenian seas, the center of the ancient historical and mythological civilizations of the Mediterranean countries. The main purpose of this workshop was to deal with aspects of electromagnetic and strong forces by meson photoproduction and the electron-positron collider, and to search for dark energy. The subjects covered at the workshop in Messina involved the main activities of the laboratories of Europe and countries overseas. The topics included: Baryon spectroscopy and 'missing resonances' Polarization observables Pseudoscalar and vector meson production through e.m. and hadronic reactions Hadron cross section measurements Measurements with polarized target and/or beam Editors: Giorgio GiardinaUniversity of Messina Fabio BossiINFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati Paolo Levi SandriINFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati Paolo PedroniINFN - Sezione di Pavia Hartmut SchmiedenUniversity of Bonn Organizing Committee: Chairman:G GiardinaMessina, Italy Co-Chairman:F BossiFrascati, Italy Co-Chairman:P Levi SandriFrascati, Italy Co-Chairman:P PedroniPavia, Italy Co-Chairman:H SchmiedenBonn, Germany Scientific Secretary:G MandaglioUniversity of Messina, Italy Local Organizing Committee: F Curciarello, V De Leo, G Fazio, G Giardina, G Mandaglio and M Romaniuk Organizing Institutions: Messina logoFBP logo University of MessinaFondazione Bonino-Pulejo (Messina) Sponsored by: University of Messina, Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo (Messina) and INFN Sezione di Catania http://newcleo.unime.it/workshop2011/ Group Photo 1 Group Photo 2

Giardina, Giorgio; Bossi, Fabio; Levi Sandri, Paolo; Pedroni, Paolo; Schmieden, Hartmut

2012-03-01

186

Investigation of the role of gravity waves in the generation of equatorial bubbles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The following areas of interest in this progress report are: (1) the continuation of software development in the examination of F-region gravity-wave power using in-situ data from the Atmosphere Explorer (AE-E); (2) the inquiry into the use of the San Marco data for the study of the initiation and growth of bubbles, particularly when the satellite passes through the early evening hours at relatively high altitudes, and the development of bubbles using not only the San Marco data but includes the use of airglow observations made in Hawaii; and (3) the promising development in the observation of distinct well formed waves at about 400 km altitude in the equatorial region. These waves look very much like waves seen over the polar cap that are attributed to internal gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere driving ionization up and down the magnetic field lines. These equatorial waves show no modulation of the total ion concentration.

Johnson, Francis S.; Coley, William R.

1995-01-01

187

Investigation of the role of gravity waves in the generation of equatorial bubbles. Technical progress report, 1 May 1994-28 February 1995  

SciTech Connect

The following areas of interest in this progress report are: (1) the continuation of software development in the examination of F-region gravity-wave power using in-situ data from the Atmosphere Explorer (AE-E); (2) the inquiry into the use of the San Marco data for the study of the initiation and growth of bubbles, particularly when the satellite passes through the early evening hours at relatively high altitudes, and the development of bubbles using not only the San Marco data but includes the use of airglow observations made in Hawaii; and (3) the promising development in the observation of distinct well formed waves at about 400 km altitude in the equatorial region. These waves look very much like waves seen over the polar cap that are attributed to internal gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere driving ionization up and down the magnetic field lines. These equatorial waves show no modulation of the total ion concentration.

Johnson, F.S.; Coley, W.R.

1995-02-01

188

Initial sequence characterization of the rhabdoviruses of squamate reptiles, including a novel rhabdovirus from a caiman lizard (Dracaena guianensis)  

PubMed Central

Rhabdoviruses infect a variety of hosts, including non-avian reptiles. Consensus PCR techniques were used to obtain partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene sequence from five rhabdoviruses of South American lizards; Marco, Chaco, Timbo, Sena Madureira, and a rhabdovirus from a caiman lizard (Dracaena guianensis). The caiman lizard rhabdovirus formed inclusions in erythrocytes, which may be a route for infecting hematophagous insects. This is the first information on behavior of a rhabdovirus in squamates. We also obtained sequence from two rhabdoviruses of Australian lizards, confirming previous Charleville virus sequence and finding that, unlike a previous sequence report but in agreement with serologic reports, Almpiwar virus is clearly distinct from Charleville virus. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis revealed that most known rhabdoviruses of squamates cluster in the Almpiwar subgroup. The exception is Marco virus, which is found in the Hart Park group.

Wellehan, James F.X.; Pessier, Allan P.; Archer, Linda L.; Childress, April L.; Jacobson, Elliott R.; Tesh, Robert B.

2012-01-01

189

Initial sequence characterization of the rhabdoviruses of squamate reptiles, including a novel rhabdovirus from a caiman lizard (Dracaena guianensis).  

PubMed

Rhabdoviruses infect a variety of hosts, including non-avian reptiles. Consensus PCR techniques were used to obtain partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene sequence from five rhabdoviruses of South American lizards; Marco, Chaco, Timbo, Sena Madureira, and a rhabdovirus from a caiman lizard (Dracaena guianensis). The caiman lizard rhabdovirus formed inclusions in erythrocytes, which may be a route for infecting hematophagous insects. This is the first information on behavior of a rhabdovirus in squamates. We also obtained sequence from two rhabdoviruses of Australian lizards, confirming previous Charleville virus sequence and finding that, unlike a previous sequence report but in agreement with serologic reports, Almpiwar virus is clearly distinct from Charleville virus. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis revealed that most known rhabdoviruses of squamates cluster in the Almpiwar subgroup. The exception is Marco virus, which is found in the Hart Park group. PMID:22397930

Wellehan, James F X; Pessier, Allan P; Archer, Linda L; Childress, April L; Jacobson, Elliott R; Tesh, Robert B

2012-08-17

190

Rocket borne solar eclipse experiment to measure the temperature structure of the solar corona via lyman-. cap alpha. line profile observations  

SciTech Connect

A rocket borne experiment to measure the temperature structure of the inner solar corona via the doppler broadening of the resonance hydrogen Lyman-..cap alpha.. (lambda1216A) radiation scattered by ambient neutral hydrogen atoms was attempted during the 16 Feb 1980 solar eclipse. Two Nike-Black Brant V sounding rockets carrying instrumented payloads were launched into the path of the advancing eclipse umbra from the San Marco satellite launch platform 3 miles off the east coast of Kenya.

Argo, H.V.

1981-01-01

191

High connectivity among argali sheep from Afghanistan and adjacent countries: Inferences from neutral and candidate gene microsatellites  

Microsoft Academic Search

We quantified population connectivity and genetic variation in the Marco Polo subspecies of argali mountain sheep (Ovis ammon polii) by genotyping 9 neutral and 8 candidate gene microsatellite loci in 172 individuals noninvasively sampled across five study\\u000a areas in Afghanistan, China, and Tajikistan. Heterozygosity and allelic richness were generally high (mean H = 0.67, mean\\u000a A = 6.1), but were significantly lower in the

G. Luikart; S. J. Amish; J. Winnie; A. Beja-Pereira; R. Godinho; F. W. Allendorf; R. B. Harris

2011-01-01

192

Efecto del glicerol sobre la catálisis por fosfatasa ácida de bajo peso molecular de hígado de alpaca (Lama pacos)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the effect of glycerol on hydrolisis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate at pH 5,0 by low molecular weight acid phosphatase from alpaca liver. Design: Experimental analytical study. Setting: Biochemistry and Nutrition Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Peru. Materials: Disodic p-nitrophenyl phosphate salt, glacial acetic acid, glycerol, tricloroacetic acid, sulfuric acid, ammonium molibdate,

Emilio Guija; Fernando Arauco; Hielke Haak-Mares; Mercedes Soberón

2007-01-01

193

Stationary Star Formation in Disk Galaxies  

Microsoft Academic Search

RESUMEN Se present an trazas evolutivas para galaxias de disco en el marco de un regimen de formaci6n estelar estacionaria. Se comparan estas trazas con las propiedades integrales observadas de galaxias compiladas de la literatura. La comparaci6n involucra fundamentalmente la historia de la formaci6n estelar de las galaxias. Se obtiene una concordancia razonable en los casos de las correlaciones de

C. Firmani; A. V. Tutukov

1993-01-01

194

Briefly noted  

Microsoft Academic Search

Archie R. Crouch, Scholars’ Guide to China Mission Resources in the Libraries and Archives of the United States, Fascicle 1: Pennsylvania, Princeton Theological Seminary\\/Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey, 1983. 84 pp. US$19.50.Kibbey M. Horne, Chinese Food For The Modern Marco Polo, Chinese Materials Center Publications, Asian Library Series No. 43, San Francisco, 1986. viii, 270 pp. Paper: n.p.g.Luke S.K.

Paul Rule; David Birch; I. Y. Wong; M. N. Pearson; Greg Bailey; Paul T. Cohen; A. C. Milner; R. A. F. Paul Webb; M. L. Lyon; Harold Crouch; Ruth Daroesman; David G. Marr; Suphat Suphachalasi; Norman G. Owen

1987-01-01

195

Committees  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR POSITRON WORKSHOP Roberto S Brusa (Italy) Michael Charlton (UK) Arnab S Ghosh (India) Franco A Gianturco (Italy) Gleb F Gribakin (UK) John Humberston (UK) Helge Knudsen (Denmark) Akos Kover (Hungary) Gaetana Laricchia (UK) Marco AP Lima (Brazil) Allen Mills (USA) Yasuyuki Nagashima (Japan) Clifford M Surko (USA) James Walters (UK) Sandra Ward (USA) LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE FOR POSITRON WORKSHOP Radu I Campeanu (York, Chairman) Jurij W Darewych (York) Allan D Stauffer (York) Cody Storry (York)

2010-01-01

196

I. Impact Spallation Experiments: Fracture Patterns and Spall Velocities. I. Craters in Carbonate Rocks: AN Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Analysis of Shock Damage  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work is divided into two independent papers. Paper 1. Spall velocities were measured for nine experimental impacts into San Marcos gabbro targets. Impact velocities ranged from 1 to 6.5 km\\/sec. Projectiles were iron, aluminum, lead, and basalt of varying sizes. The projectile masses ranged from a 4 g lead bullet to a 0.04 g aluminum sphere. The velocities of

Carol Ann Polanskey

1988-01-01

197

Spall velocity measurements from laboratory impact craters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spall velocities were measured for a series of impacts into San Marcos gabbro. Impact velocities ranged from 1 to 6.5 km\\/sec. Projectiles varied in material and size with a maximum mass of 4g for a lead bullet to a minimum of 0.04 g for an aluminum sphere. The spall velocities were calculated both from measurements taken from films of the

Carol A. Polanskey; Thomas J. Ahrens

1986-01-01

198

Thermosphere and F-region plasma dynamics in the equatorial region  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The dynamics of the equatorial thermosphere and the F-region plasma are reviewed, highlighting some features observed with the San Marco satellite, the AE-E, and the DE-2, as well as with ground-based facilities at Arecibo and Jicamarca. Particular attention is given to the midnight temperature maximum and related phenomena, and to results on zonal neutral and plasma flows at F-region heights.

Herrero, F. A.; Spencer, N. W.; Mayr, H. G.

1993-01-01

199

Capturing genetic diversity of wild populations for ex situ conservation: Texas wild rice ( Zizania texana ) as a model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genebanks complement other conservation programs because they preserve genetic diversity needed for future breeding and restoration.\\u000a We evaluated efficiency of capturing genetic diversity, using endangered Zizania texana (Texas wild rice) as a model for plants with recalcitrant seeds. This perennial aquatic grass is restricted to 4 km of the\\u000a San Marcos River in Texas. An early conservation collection included plants from

Christopher M. Richards; Michael F. Antolin; Ann Reilley; Jackie Poole; Christina Walters

2007-01-01

200

Water Loss and Viability in Zizania (Poaceae) Seeds During Short-Term Desiccation  

Microsoft Academic Search

How Texas wild rice, Zizania texana, became isolated in the San Marcos River of Central Texas, hundreds of kilometres from other wild rice populations is not known. Zizania seeds are intolerant of short-term desiccation. Seeds desiccated at 14% relative humidity (RH) and 75% RH do not survive after only 5-6 d and 2-3 wk of drying. Water loss is rapid

Francis R. Horne; Ari Kahn

2000-01-01

201

A quantitative study of the determinants of fertility behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Resumen  En los últimos años la literatura revela un gran interés en el estudio cuantitativo de los determinantes de la fecundidad.\\u000a Becker presenta bastantes evidencias en un invalorable marco teórico. Mincer provee evidencias e ideas adicionales. Silver\\u000a ha estudiado la respuesta de las tasas de natalidad a los ciclos económicos, para diferentes paises y varios grupos de población\\u000a en Estados Unidos.

Stanley Friedlander; Morris Silver

1967-01-01

202

Science Signaling Podcast: 8 March 2011  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Podcast features a conversation with the authors of a Research Article published in the 4 March 2011 issue of Science. Marcos González-Gaitán and Frank Jülicher discuss their mathematical description of how the graded concentration of the morphogen Dpp induces homogeneous cellular proliferation across the fly wing and haltere imaginal discs. They propose a mechanism by which changes in activation of the Dpp signaling pathway over time account for the observed growth of discs.

Marcos Gonzalez-Gaitan (Geneva University;Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology REV); Frank Julicher (Dresden;Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems REV); Annalisa M. VanHook (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science Signaling REV)

2011-03-08

203

Developing experiment instrument packages  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ground-Support Equipment (GSE) system supports development, calibration, and testing of experiment packages. It is also used for "quick look" processing and in-progress data analysis. User interacts with incoming telemetry data, performs computations, and controls execution of procedures using versatile Experiment Command Interactive Language (ECIL). Program is implemented many ways with minimal modification. It is written in MARCO II and FORTRAN for DEC PDP-11/34 using the RSX-11M operating system.

Herreid, R.

1981-01-01

204

Program and Abstracts, Boron Americas IX Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Scientific and Technical Information (STI) submitted includes the final report and a collection of abstracts for the Ninth Boron in the Americas Conference which was held May 19-22, 2004, in San Marcos, Texas. The topics covered in the abstracts include: Application in Medicine, Application in Organic Synthesis and Catalysis, Boranes and Carboranes, Materials and Polymers, Metallaboranes and Metallacarboranes, Organoboron Compounds, Synthesis and Catalysis, and Theoretical Studies. Attendees represented researchers from government, industry, and academia.

Feakes, Debra A.

2006-08-09

205

Photoelastic determination of stresses in a cylindrical shell  

Microsoft Academic Search

The frozen stress photoelastic technique is used to determine the surface stresses and deformations of a cylinder with flat disk head (2.7 in bore, 0.380 in wall thickness) under internal pressure. The material used was Marco Resin SB.26.C; the technique of casting, machining, freezing and slicing of the models is described. The observed stresses and deformations are compared with values

H. Fessler; R. T. Rose

1953-01-01

206

Scavenger receptor family proteins: roles for atherosclerosis, host defence and disorders of the central nervous system  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   In this review, we summarize the structure and function of the scavenger receptor family of proteins including class A (type\\u000a I and II macrophage scavenger receptors, MARCO), class B (CD36, scavenger receptor class BI), mucinlike (CD68\\/macrosialin,\\u000a dSR-CI) and endothelial (LOX-1) receptors. Two motifs have been identified as ligand-binding domains a charged collagen structure\\u000a of type I and II receptors,

Y. Yamada; T. Doi; T. Hamakubo; T. Kodama

1998-01-01

207

Water loss and viability in Zizania (Poaceae) seeds during short-term desiccation.  

PubMed

How Texas wild rice, Zizania texana, became isolated in the San Marcos River of Central Texas, hundreds of kilometres from other wild rice populations is not known. Zizania seeds are intolerant of short-term desiccation. Seeds desiccated at 14% relative humidity (RH) and 75% RH do not survive after only 5-6 d and 2-3 wk of drying. Water loss is rapid and reaches a maximum at the time of seed death due to drying. And although all Zizania seeds germinate well following a long, cold dormancy period, Z. texana seeds readily germinate in the isothermic water (22°C) of the San Marcos River and Springs without an obligate, cold dormant period. Within 30-60 d of collection, Z. texana seeds germinate in substantial numbers, unlike seeds of Z. palustris, which require a long, cold dormant period. The Texas population of Z. texana may represent a relict population of a once more widely dispersed wild rice population, since the San Marcos springs probably have never gone dry. PMID:11080122

Horne, F R; Kahn, A

2000-11-01

208

Special issue on coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects Special issue on coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to coherent states. The motivation behind this special issue is to gather in a single comprehensive volume the main aspects (past and present), latest developments, different viewpoints and directions being followed in this multidisciplinary field. Given the impressive development of the field in the past two decades, the topicality of such a volume can hardly be overemphasized. We strongly believe that such a special issue could become a particularly valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics, as well as in signal processing and mathematics. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue will be Syed Twareque Ali, Jean-Pierre Antoine, Fabio Bagarello and Jean-Pierre Gazeau. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, developments in the theory and applications of coherent states in: quantum optics, optomechanics, Bose-Einstein condensates quantum information, quantum measurement signal processing quantum gravity pseudo-Hermitian quantum mechanics supersymmetric quantum mechanics non-commutative quantum mechanics quantization theory harmonic and functional analysis operator theory Berezin-Toeplitz operators, PT-symmetric operators holomorphic representation theory, reproducing kernel spaces generalization of coherent states All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Papers should report original and significant research that has not already been published. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers will be 31 October 2011. This deadline will allow the special issue to appear before the end of May 2012 There is a nominal page limit of 15 printed pages per contribution (invited review papers can be longer). For papers exceeding this limit, the Guest Editors reserve the right to request a reduction in length. Further advice on publishing your work in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical may be found at iopscience.iop.org/jphysa. Contributions to the special issue should be submitted by web upload via authors.iop.org/, or by email to jphysa@iop.org, quoting `JPhysA Special issue on coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects'. Submissions should ideally be in standard LaTeX form. Please see the website for further information on electronic submissions. All contributions should be accompanied by a read-me file or covering letter giving the postal and e-mail addresses for correspondence. The Publishing Office should be notified of any subsequent change of address. The special issue will be published in the print and online versions of the journal.

Twareque Ali, Syed; Antoine, Jean-Pierre; Bagarello, Fabio; Gazeau, Jean-Pierre

2011-06-01

209

Special issue on coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects Special issue on coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to coherent states. The motivation behind this special issue is to gather in a single comprehensive volume the main aspects (past and present), latest developments, different viewpoints and directions being followed in this multidisciplinary field. Given the impressive development of the field in the past two decades, the topicality of such a volume can hardly be overemphasized. We strongly believe that such a special issue could become a particularly valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics, as well as in signal processing and mathematics. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue will be Syed Twareque Ali, Jean-Pierre Antoine, Fabio Bagarello and Jean-Pierre Gazeau. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, developments in the theory and applications of coherent states in: quantum optics, optomechanics, Bose-Einstein condensates quantum information, quantum measurement signal processing quantum gravity pseudo-Hermitian quantum mechanics supersymmetric quantum mechanics non-commutative quantum mechanics quantization theory harmonic and functional analysis operator theory Berezin-Toeplitz operators, PT-symmetric operators holomorphic representation theory, reproducing kernel spaces generalization of coherent states All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Papers should report original and significant research that has not already been published. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers will be 31 October 2011. This deadline will allow the special issue to appear before the end of May 2012 There is a nominal page limit of 15 printed pages per contribution (invited review papers can be longer). For papers exceeding this limit, the Guest Editors reserve the right to request a reduction in length. Further advice on publishing your work in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical may be found at iopscience.iop.org/jphysa. Contributions to the special issue should be submitted by web upload via authors.iop.org/, or by email to jphysa@iop.org, quoting `JPhysA Special issue on coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects'. Submissions should ideally be in standard LaTeX form. Please see the website for further information on electronic submissions. All contributions should be accompanied by a read-me file or covering letter giving the postal and e-mail addresses for correspondence. The Publishing Office should be notified of any subsequent change of address. The special issue will be published in the print and online versions of the journal.

Twareque Ali, Syed; Antoine, Jean-Pierre; Bagarello, Fabio; Gazeau, Jean-Pierre

2011-07-01

210

Preliminary results from Submarine Ring of Fire 2012 - NE Lau: First explorations of hydrothermally active volcanoes across the supra-subduction zone and a return to the West Mata eruption site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several expeditions in the past few years have shown that the NE Lau basin has one of the densest concentrations of volcanically and hydrothermally active volcanoes on the planet. In 2008 two active submarine volcanic eruptions were discovered during a one week period and subsequent dives with the Jason remotely operated vehicle at one of the sites (West Mata) revealed an active boninite eruption taking place at 1200 m depth. Two dives at the other revealed evidence for recent eruption along the NE Lau Spreading Center. Several more expeditions in 2010-11 discovered additional evidence about the extent and types of hydrothermal activity in this area. Data from CTDO (conductivity, temperature, depth, optical) vertical casts, tow-yos, and towed camera deployments revealed more than 15 hydrothermal sites at water depths from ~800 to 2700 m that include sites from the magmatic arc, the "rear arc," and the back arc spreading centers. These sites range from high temperature black smoker sulfide-producing systems to those dominated by magmatic degassing. Dives by remotely operated vehicle (Quest 4000) in September 2012 will explore these sites and return samples for chemical, biological and geologic studies. One of the dives will be a return visit to West Mata volcano, the site of the deepest submarine eruption yet observed (in 2009). Recent multibeam data reveal large changes in West Mata's summit, suggesting that the nature of the eruption and the location of the erupting vents may have changed. In addition to the preliminary results from the science team, we will also discuss our use and experience with continuous live video transmission (through the High Definition video camera on the Quest 4000) back to shore via satellite and through the internet. Submarine Ring of Fire 2012 Science Team: Bradley Tebo, Bill Chadwick, Ed Baker, Ken Rubin, Susan Merle, Timothy Shank, Sharon Walker, Andra Bobbitt, Nathan Buck, David Butterfield, Eric Olson, John Lupton, Richard Arculus, Fabio Caratori-Tontini, Rick Davis, Kevin Roe, Edward Mitchell, Paula Keener-Chavis Carolyn Sheehan, Peter Crowhurst, Simon Richards,and Volker Ratmeyer along with the Quest-4000 team. .

Resing, J.; Embley, R. W.

2012-12-01

211

Global Time Variability in the Thermal Plasma Composition of the Saturnian Magnetosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Saturnian magnetosphere is characterized by strong coupling between the charged particles and the neutral gas cloud emitted from Enceladus and the rings. Besides the mass-loading effect due to ionization of the water-group gas, the charge transfer process leading to the generation of energetic neutral atoms is a key process of particle loss and atmospheric precipitation. Detailed measurements by the plasma instruments like CAPS and MIMI have provided many insights to the magnetospheric composition and dynamics driven by such plasma-gas interaction. For example, a statistical study of the CAPS measurements by Thomsen et al. (2010) has shown the relative abundances and radial profiles of different ion species in the corotating thermal plasma disc. Another interesting result has to do with the seasonal variability of the suprathermal O2+ molecular ions detected by the CHEMS/MIMI experiment (Christon et al., 2013) which might have to do with the extended oxygen atmosphere of the ring system (Tseng et al., 2010). In this work, we will use a time-dependent radial diffusion transport model coupled with ion chemistry calculation (Ip, 2000) to simulate the global distributions of various ions (H+, H2+, O+, OH+, H2O+, H3O+, and O2+ )between the outer edge of the A ring to the orbit of Titan. Our parametric study will examine how the thermal ion composition of the Saturnian magnetosphere would be affected by solar cycle effect, seasonal variation of the ring atmosphere, and the suprathermal electron flux. Christon, S.P., Hamilton, D.C., DiFabio, R.D., Mitchell, D.G., Krimigis, S.M., and Jontof-Hutter, D.S., J. Geophys. Res., 118, 3446-3462, 2013. Ip, W.-H., Planet. Space Sci., 48, 775-783, 2000. Thomsen, M.F., Reisenfeld, D.B., Delapp, D.M., Tokar, R.C., Young, D.T., Crary, F.J., Sittler, E.C., McGraw, M.A., and Williams, J.D., J. Geophys. Res., 115, A10220, 2010. Tseng, W.-L., Ip, W.-H., Johnson, R.E., Cassidy, T.A., and Elrod, M.K., Icarus, 206, 382-389, 2010.

Ip, W.

2013-12-01

212

Dynamical effects of vegetation on the 2003 summer heat waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dynamical effects of vegetation on the 2003 summer heat waves Marc Stéfanon(1), Philippe Drobinski(1), Fabio D'Andrea(1), Nathalie de Noblet(2) (1) IPSL/LMD, France; (2) IPSL/LSCE, France The land surface model (LSM) in regional climate models (RCMs) plays a key role in energy and water exchanges between land and atmosphere. The vegetation can affect these exchanges through physical, biophysical and bio-geophysical mechanisms. It participates to evapo-transpiration process which determines the partitioning of net radiation between sensible and latent heat flux, through water evaporation from soil throughout the entire root system. For seasonal timescale leaf cover change induced leaf-area index (LAI) and albedo changes, impacting the Earth's radiative balance. In addition, atmospheric chemistry and carbon concentration has a direct effect on plant stomatal structure, the main exchange interface with the atmosphere. Therefore the surface energy balance is intimately linked to the carbon cycle and vegetation conditions and an accurate representation of the Earth's surface is required to improve the performance of RCMs. It is even more crucial for extreme events as heat waves and droughts which display highly nonlinear behaviour. If triggering of heat waves is determined by the large scale, local coupled processes over land can amplify or inhibit heat trough several feedback mechanism. One set of two simulation has been conducted with WRF, using different LSMs. They aim to study drought and vegetation effect on the dynamical and hydrological processes controlling the occurrence and life cycle of heat waves In the MORCE plateform, the dynamical global vegetation model (DGVM) ORCHIDEE is implemented in the atmospheric module WRF. ORCHIDEE is based on three different modules. The first module, called SECHIBA, describes the fast processes such as exchanges of energy and water between the atmosphere and the biosphere, and the soil water budget. The phenology and carbon dynamics of the terrestrial biosphere are simulated by the STOMATE module. STOMATE essentially simulates processes as photosynthesis, carbon allocation, litter decomposition, soil carbon dynamics, maintenance and growth respiration, and phenology. Finally, the long-term processes, including vegetation dynamics, fire, sapling establishment, light competition, and tree mortality are simulated according to the global vegetation model LPJ. Two MORCE simulations are performed at 15-km grid resolution, driven by ERA-INTERIM for 2002-2003. The first, called CTL, was conducted using an LAI prescribed after that of year 2002. The second simulation called MORCE, uses LAI explicitly calculated. These simulations are inter-compared to provide an estimate of the dynamical vegetation contribution to the two distinct heat wave during the summer 2003.

Stéfanon, M.

2012-04-01

213

Multi-walled carbon nanotubes injure the plasma membrane of macrophages  

SciTech Connect

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging nanotechnology materials which are likely to be mass-produced in the near future. However, prior to mass-production, certain health-related concerns should first be addressed. For example, when inhaled, the thin-fibrous shape and the biopersistent characteristics of CNTs may cause pulmonary diseases, in a manner similar to asbestos. In the present study, mouse macrophages (J774.1) were exposed to highly-purified multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs, 67 nm) or to UICC crocidolite in order to evaluate the toxicity of these nano-size fibers. The cytotoxicity of MWCNTs was found to be higher than that of crocidolite. The toxic effect of MWCNTs was not affected by N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, or buthionine sulfoximine, a glutathione synthesis inhibitor. cDNA microarray analyses suggested that the cytotoxicity of MWCNTs could not be explained satisfactorily by either an increase or decrease of gene expression, although mRNA levels of some cytokines were slightly increased by MWCNTs. Moreover, MWCNTs did not significantly activate either MAP kinases such as ERK, JNK and p38, nor common apoptosis pathways such as caspase 3 and PARP. Electron microscopic studies indicated that MWCNTs associate with the plasma membrane of macrophages and disrupt the integrity of the membrane. Several proteins were found to adsorb onto MWCNTs when MWCNT-exposed macrophages were gently lysed. One of these proteins was macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO). MARCO-transfected CHO-K1 cells associated with MWCNTs more rapidly than mock-transfected cells. These results indicate that MWCNTs probably trigger cytotoxic effects in phagocytotic cells by reacting with MARCO on the plasma membrane and rupturing the plasma membrane.

Hirano, Seishiro [Environmental Nanotoxicology Section, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan)], E-mail: seishiro@nies.go.jp; Kanno, Sanae; Furuyama, Akiko [Environmental Nanotoxicology Section, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan)

2008-10-15

214

Concept of Operations for Deploying a Lander on the Secondary Body of Binary Asteroid 1996 FG3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The European Space Agency is currently performing an assessment study of the MarcoPolo-R space mission, in the framework of the M3 class competition of its Cosmic Vision Program. MarcoPolo-R is a sample return mission to a primitive asteroid, whose baseline target is the binary asteroid 1996FG3. The baseline mission, including the sample, is focused on the primary of the binary system. To date, little has yet been considered for the investigation of the secondary, apart from remote observations from the spacecraft. However, MarcoPolo-R may carry an optional lander, and if such a lander could be accommodated it may be relevant to use it for a more detailed investigation of the secondary. This poster presents a strategy for deploying a lander using an unpowered trajectory towards the secondary. This ballistic deployment allows for the design of a light lander with minimum platform overhead and maximum payload. The deployment operations are shown to be very simple and require minimum preparation. The main spacecraft is set on an orbit that reaches a specific point near the binary system L2 Lagrange Point facing the far side of the secondary, about 220 meters from the secondary surface, with a relative speed of about 10cm/s. The lander is then jettisoned using a spring-release mechanism that sets it on an impact trajectory that robustly intersects with the secondary surface. On impact, the lander only needs to dissipate a small amount of kinetic energy in order to ensure that it is energetically and dynamically trapped on the surface. Considering errors on spacecraft GNC and on the spring-release mechanism, and very large uncertainties on the gravity field of the asteroids, the strategy presented here yields a successful landing in more than 99.9% of cases, while ensuring the absolute safety of the spacecraft before, during and after deployment operations.

Tardivel, Simon; Michel, P.; Scheeres, D.

2012-10-01

215

Protective or deleterious role of scavenger receptors SR-A and CD36 on host resistance to Staphylococcus aureus depends on the site of infection.  

PubMed

Staphylococcus aureus is a major human opportunistic pathogen responsible for a broad spectrum of infections ranging from benign skin infection to more severe life threatening disorders (e.g. pneumonia, sepsis), particularly in intensive care patients. Scavenger receptors (SR-A and CD36) are known to be involved in S. aureus recognition by immune cells in addition to MARCO, TLR2, NOD2 and ?5?1 integrin. In the present study, we further deciphered the contribution of SR-A and CD36 scavenger receptors in the control of infection of mice by S. aureus. Using double SR-A/CD36 knockout mice (S/C-KO) and S. aureus strain HG001, a clinically relevant non-mutagenized strain, we showed that the absence of these two scavenger receptors was protective in peritoneal infection. In contrast, the deletion of these two receptors was detrimental in pulmonary infection following intranasal instillation. For pulmonary infection, susceptible mice (S/C-KO) had more colony-forming units (CFU) in their broncho-alveolar lavages fluids, associated with increased recruitment of macrophages and neutrophils. For peritoneal infection, susceptible mice (wild-type) had more CFU in their blood, but recruited less macrophages and neutrophils in the peritoneal cavity than resistant mice. Exacerbated cytokine levels were often observed in the susceptible mice in the infected compartment as well as in the plasma. The exception was the enhanced compartmentalized expression of IL-1? for the resistant mice (S/C-KO) after peritoneal infection. A similar mirrored susceptibility to S. aureus infection was also observed for MARCO and TLR2. Marco and tlr2 -/- mice were more resistant to peritoneal infection but more susceptible to pulmonary infection than wild type mice. In conclusion, our results show that innate immune receptors can play distinct and opposite roles depending on the site of infection. Their presence is protective for local pulmonary infection, whereas it becomes detrimental in the peritoneal infection. PMID:24498223

Blanchet, Charlène; Jouvion, Gregory; Fitting, Catherine; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Adib-Conquy, Minou

2014-01-01

216

Creating a Successful Summer Physics Camp  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The summer physics camp hosted by the Texas State University San Marcos Society of Physics Students chapter is geared toward middle school children aged 9 to 12 years. Camp administrators aim to create an environment that is both conducive to learning and fun. Our overarching goal is to provide local youth a basic knowledge of physical concepts as well as encourage their continued interest in physics. Physical concepts are taught through a combination of short lectures, group activities, and entertaining demonstrations. This presentation will discuss the basic curriculum, activities and demonstrations that have been performed in past camps, as well as plans for future curricula and expansions.

Gregory, Amanda

2009-10-01

217

BioEssays 8?2014.  

PubMed

Spatial coordination of phosphorylation during mitotic entry. In mitosis most eukaryotic cells undergo striking structural rearrangements, such as chromosome condensation or nuclear envelope breakdown. On pages 757-765 of this issue, Mónica Alvarez-Fernández and Marcos Malumbres review recent data on the spatial regulation of mitotic kinases and phosphatases, and its link with the control of the structural changes required for mitosis. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of cell cycle regulators, such as the recently identified Greatwall kinase, is essential for preparing cells for the physical contact between nucleus and cytoplasm in mitosis upon nuclear envelope breakdown. The cover depicts the dynamic interplay between both compartments required for entry into mitosis. PMID:25043413

2014-08-01

218

APL workers install CRIS on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in SAEF-2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Workers from the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) install the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). From left, are Al Sadilek, Marcos Gonzalez and Cliff Willey. CRIS is one of nine instruments on ACE, which will investigate the origin and evolution of solar phenomenon, the formation of the solar corona, solar flares and the acceleration of the solar wind. ACE was developed for NASA by the APL. The spacecraft is scheduled to be launched Aug. 21 aboard a two-stage Delta II 7920-8 rocket from Space Launch Complex 17, Pad A.

1997-01-01

219

Is the Common Envelope Ejection Efficiency a Function of the Binary Parameters?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We reconstruct the common envelope (CE) phase for the observed sample of white dwarf-main sequence post-common envelope binaries, with and without considering the internal energy of the progenitor giants' envelope. Using multi-regression analysis in the former case, we can model the CE ejection efficiency, ?CE, in terms of the orbital period of the progenitor binary at the start of the CE phase. Considering the latter, ?CE can be modelled in terms of the white dwarf mass. Finally, we compare our work with similar studies by Zorotovic et al. (2010) and De Marco et al. (2011).

Davis, P. J.; Kolb, U.; Knigge, C..

2011-09-01

220

The Origin of Near-Earth Asteroid 1999 JU3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Near-Earth asteroid 161273 (1999 JU3) is the primary target of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's Hyabusa-2 sample return mission. This object is also considered a potential target for two other sample return missions: the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's OSIRISREx and the European Space Agency's Marco Polo- R. This asteroid is likely to have originated in the main-belt and in this work. Our initial dynamical considerations indicate that the source of 1999 JU3 is in the inner-belt (a < 2.5 AU). We are in the process of using spectral information and albedo to constrain the source further.

Campins, H.; Morbidelli, A.; de León, J.; Tsiganis, K.; Licandro, J.

2011-10-01

221

Environmental statement for National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Space Science, launch vehicle and propulsion programs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA OSS Launch Vehicle and Propulsion Programs are responsible for the launch of approximately 20 automated science and applications spacecraft per year. These launches are for NASA programs and those of other U. S. government agencies, private organizations, such as the Comsat Corporation, foreign countries, and international organizations. Launches occur from Cape Kennedy, Florida; Vandenberg Air Force Base, California; Wallops Island, Virginia; and the San Marco Platform in the Indian Ocean off Kenya. Spacecraft launched by this program contribute in a variety of ways to the control of and betterment of the environment. Environmental effects caused by the launch vehicles are limited in extent, duration, and intensity and are considered insignificant.

1972-01-01

222

Observations of an apparent SN in NGC 2276  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Federico Manzini (SAS obs., IAUC A12) report the observation by Alessandro Dimai, Cortina (Italy), and Marco Migliardi, Tour Tour (France), of an apparent SN in NGC 2276 (m. = +17.1), on four unfiltered CCD images taken on 2005 august 25.1 (lim. magn. about +19,5) with the 0.5-m "Ullrich" telescope of the Col Druscié observatory (Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy). The observation is confirmed by other three unfiltered CCD images, taken on 2005 august 26.13 (m = +16.8 and limiting magnitude about +19.8), with the same telescope on behalf of the CROSS (Col drusciè Remote Observatory Supernovae Search) program.

Manzini, F.; Dimai, A.; Migliardi, M.

2005-08-01

223

Nitrogen-Helium-Argon and Nitrogen Isotope Relationships in Geothermal Fluids from the Central American Volcanic Arc: Mapping Subducted and Crustal Contributions to Volatile Output  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volcanic arcs are locations where elements are recycled from the subducted slab, the mantle wedge and the overlying arc crust to the atmosphere and hydrosphere. A fundamental aim of arc-related studies and the MARGINS initiative is to quantify this flux and compare it with subduction zone parameters, such as sediment compositions and subduction rates. As part of the Central American arc study, we report N2, He, and Ar abundance relationships and N-isotope ratios for 7 volcanic centers in Guatemala to complement on-going studies in Costa Rica (see previous abstract). In Guatemala, the arc crust is thicker and older than in Costa Rica and the entire sedimentary sequence on the down-going plate is likely to contribute to the slab flux. The Guatemalan volcanic centers of Amatitlan-Pacaya, Fuego, Moyuta, Tecuamburro, Amatitlan, Zunil and San Marcos have N2/He ratios ranging from 2200 to 8100, typical for arc-related fluids. N2/Ar ratios (40 - 500) and the high N2/He indicate addition of N2 from subducted sediments or arc crust to a mantle derived component (N2/He < 200). The high N2/He ratios of Guatemala, are in contrast to the mantle-derived N2/He ratios measured at Poas, Costa Rica. Nitrogen isotope ratios for the Guatemalan volcanic centers range from ? 15N = +1.0‰ for San Marcos to +5.8‰ for Fuego (? 15Nair = 0.0‰ ), indicating a sedimentary nitrogen signature. The mantle-derived N2/He ratio for Poas is consistent with a more mantle-like ? 15N of - 1.0‰ . In Guatemala, the highest 3He/4He ratios (7.6 for Pacaya and 7.3 RA for Fuego) correlate with the lowest N2/He ratios (1500 and 2100) and high ? 15N values (+3.8‰ and +5.8‰ ). Lower 3He/4He ratios for Zunil (4.7 RA) and San Marcos (2.2 RA) correlate with N2/He of 5000 and 6600, and lower ? 15N values of +2.3‰ and +1.0‰ , respectively. These N-He relationships suggest that the nitrogen at Pacaya and Fuego is primarily of subducted organic sedimentary origin, with only minor crustal contributions. Additional nitrogen is supplied by the arc crust at Zunil and San Marcos, resulting in elevated N2/He ratios. This is in contrast to the situation in Costa Rica, where lower N2/He ratios and lower ? 15N values suggest possible loss of sediment by underplating and where higher 3He/4He indicate only minor crustal contributions to the discharging volatiles.

Fischer, T.; Sharp, Z.; Hilton, D. R.

2001-12-01

224

Infraspinatus Strength Assessment and Ultrasound Evaluation of Posterior Capsulotenodesis after Arthroscopic Hill-Sachs Remplissage in Traumatic Anterior Glenohumeral Instability: A Retrospective Controlled Study Protocol  

PubMed Central

Principal investigator and promoter: Giovanni Merolla Co-investigator: Giuseppe Porcellini Investigation performed at the Biomechanics Laboratory “Marco Simoncelli”, D. Cervesi Hospital, Cattolica - Italy Plan of clinical investigation (PCI): Version 1.0 of June 12, 2012 Approved by AV/IRST Ethical Committee (Comitato Etico Area Vasta Romagna) and authorized by AUSL RN (“Determina AUSL Rimini numero 326 del 29/03/2013: Remplissage U.O Chirurgia della Spalla – Valutazione clinica ed ultrasonografica dell’infraspinato dopo capsulo-tenodesi artroscopica (remplissage) nell’instabilità anteriore traumatica di spalla con lesione di Bankart e difetto omerale di Hill-Sachs”)

Merolla, Giovanni; Porcellini, Giuseppe

2014-01-01

225

Economic impact of stimulated technological activity. Part 1: Overall economic impact of technological progress: Its measurement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Investigations were performed at the national economic level to explore the aggregate effects of technological progress on economic growth. Inadequacies in existing marco-economic yardsticks forced the study to focus on the cost savings effects achieved through technological progress. The central questions discussed in this report cover: (1) role of technological progress in economic growth, (2) factors determining the rate of economic growth due to technological progress; (3) quantitative measurements of relationships between technological progress, its determinants, and subsequent economic growth; and (4) effects of research and development activities of the space program. For Part 2, see N72-32174.

1971-01-01

226

Clinical applications of sequencing take center stage  

PubMed Central

A report on the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) meeting, Marco Island, Florida, USA, February 20-23, 2013. This year's Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) meeting reflected the current state of 'next generation' sequencing (NGS) technologies: significantly reduced competition and innovation, and a strong focus on standardization and application. Announcements of technological breakthroughs - a hallmark of previous AGBT meetings - were markedly absent, but existing technologies continued to improve following the now expected exponential curve. Although applications ranged widely, there was a strong emphasis on clinical diagnosis.

2013-01-01

227

Spent filter packaging for long term storage and disposal  

SciTech Connect

This paper will discuss filter packaging experience using spent filter transfer casks, a filter shear and the NUKEM macro-encapsulation process. Marco-encapsulation of spent filters in cement has provided sufficient shielding to enable filter containers to be shipped in less expensive IP-2 casks. The lower dose rate and higher density also off-sets disposal rates at Barnwell based on mass. No re-dewatering of encapsulated filter containers is required after a period of long term storage and encapsulation eliminates the possibility of gas generation from filters during storage. Encapsulation can be performed on filters loaded into poly HICs or carbon steel liners. (authors)

Duberville, T.M. [NUKEM Corporation, Columbia, SC (United States); Miller, C. [Pacific Gas and Electric, Diablo Canyon Power Plant, Avila Bach, CA (United States)

2007-07-01

228

Macrophages overloaded with tissue debris in Wegener's granulomatosis  

PubMed Central

Methods: Immunohistochemical staining of lung, nasopharynx, and skin for macrophage markers related to scavenging (macrophage scavenger receptor MARCO, collagenase-1 and gelatinase-B), formation of multinuclear foreign body giant cells (ADAM 9/meltrin-? and ADAM 12/meltrin-?), and cell debris derived from neutrophils, endothelial cells and mast cells (specific granule protein 28 (SGP28), von Willebrand factor (vWF) and mast cell tryptase, respectively). TechMate staining robot and biotin-streptavidin protocol were used. Results: Some macrophages were activated and expressed collagenase-1 and gelatinase-B. Approximately 5% of macrophages expressed scavenger receptor, whereas 20–30% were meltrin positive. Interstitial and granuloma associated macrophages and giant cells contained partly undigested, immunoreactive SGP28-, vWF- and tryptase-positive cell rests and collagenous matrix. Lymphocytic follicles with germinal centres were found in the same areas. Conclusion: In WG tissue lesions macrophage and giant cells seem to be overwhelmed by the bulk to be scavenged. Despite cellular activation and continuing maturation to professional scavenger receptor (MARCO) and meltrin positive multinuclear giant cells combined with an organisation into granulomas, macrophages still contain partially undigested cell and tissue rests. This necrotic and damaged self may be the driving force for the formation of giant cell ("foreign body") granulomas. This, together with the local formation of secondary lymphatic follicles (with germinal centres), indicates active local antigen processing and presentation.

Mackiewicz, Z; Rimkevicius, A; Petersen, J; Andersen, C; Dudek, E; Vytrasova, M; Konttinen, Y

2005-01-01

229

An unusual Messinian succession in the Sinis Peninsula, western Sardinia, Italy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently completed sedimentological and palaeontological analyses of the Messinian deposits of western Sardinia yielded dating, palaeoenvironmental and new sequence stratigraphic interpretations. The Basal Marls and the Capo San Marco Formation are referred to the Messinian. Both formations were deposited in a ramp setting, whereas the overlaying Sinis Limestone Formation is interpreted as a carbonate platform of wide extent, probably equivalent to part of the Terminal Carbonate Complex. All these deposits are considered to have formed under normal marine conditions. The three formations developed during one and a half cycles of progradation-retrogradation. Compared with other Messinian Mediterranean carbonate platforms, the Sinis Peninsula exhibits several unusual features: The notable absence of scleractinian coral reefs is related to dominantly cool seawater in this area. The Capo San Marco Formation contains widespread microbial-bryozoan-serpulid carbonate buildups, partially associated with upwelling currents. The breccias at the top of the Sinis Limestone Formation are regarded as resulting from a major seismic shock over the whole peninsula.

André, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Jean-Paul Saint; Moissette, Pierre; Garcia, Frédéric; Cornée, Jean-Jacques; Ferrandini, Michelle

2004-05-01

230

Dynamics and History of Mars Trojans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mars is the only terrestrial planet known to have long-term stable Trojan coorbitals. Recently, Christou (2013) and De la Fuente Marcos & De la Fuente Marcos (2013) have shown that several smaller Mars Trojans belong to a dynamical cluster centered on (5261) Eureka. While some of non-cluster Mars Trojans have colors distinct from Eureka (Rivkin et al. 2007), it is not clear if the cluster itself is compositionally homogeneous. Given that cluster member orbits should diverge over the age of the Solar System (Scholl et al. 2005), a recent origin of the cluster is likely. Our preliminary work indicates that the cluster could not have been formed through the slow dissipation of the Yarkovsky effect, in agreement with past results of Fleming & Hamilton (2000). Hence, our current expectation is that the cluster is collisional, and we expect to present an estimate of the age of the cluster at the meeting, based on long-term integrations of the cluster's dynamical diffusion. We will also discuss possible origin scenarios for Mars Trojans. It is now known that the Mars-crosser population was significantly larger in the past (Cuk 2012), and some Mars-crossers can spend time as temporary Trojans. Mechanisms of temporary Trojan stabilization include dynamical chaos and collisions (with some fragments of temporary Trojans becoming long-term stable). These and other routes will be tested using analytical arguments and numerical simulations. This work is supported by NASA PGG award NNX12AO41G.

Cuk, Matija; Hamilton, D. P.

2013-10-01

231

User Satisfaction with Costar V  

PubMed Central

COSTAR V (COmputer-STored Ambulatory Record) is a computer-based medical information system designed to replace the document-based medical record with a centralized and integrated information system that serves the clinical, administrative and educational needs of a practice. It is an operational system being demonstrated at nine sites nationwide. Two of these sites at Baltimore, Maryland and San Marcos, California are federally funded demonstrations of the public domain COSTAR V. In this paper, the author examines user satisfaction with COSTAR V in light of design objectives of its developers, and problems in the installation, transition and operational phases of the system. The observations and conclusions are drawn from field experience gained during these two site installations and from communications with the developers and installers at other major sites. This work was performed under the auspices of The MITRE Corporation which is providing technical assistance to North County Health Services, San Marcos, California under a grant from the Health Underserved Rural Areas Program of the Bureau of Community Health Services, DHEW.

Kerlin, Barbara D.

1979-01-01

232

The Effect of Size on Ag Nanosphere Toxicity in Macrophage Cell Models and Lung Epithelial Cell Lines Is Dependent on Particle Dissolution  

PubMed Central

Silver (Ag) nanomaterials are increasingly used in a variety of commercial applications. This study examined the effect of size (20 and 110 nm) and surface stabilization (citrate and PVP coatings) on toxicity, particle uptake and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in a variety of macrophage and epithelial cell lines. The results indicated that smaller Ag (20 nm), regardless of coating, were more toxic in both cell types and most active in the THP-1 macrophages. TEM imaging demonstrated that 20 nm Ag nanospheres dissolved more rapidly than 110 nm Ag nanospheres in acidic phagolysosomes consistent with Ag ion mediated toxicity. In addition, there were some significant differences in epithelial cell line in vitro exposure models. The order of the epithelial cell lines’ sensitivity to Ag was LA4 > MLE12 > C10. The macrophage sensitivity to Ag toxicity was C57BL/6 AM > MARCO null AM, which indicated that the MARCO receptor was involved in uptake of the negatively charged Ag particles. These results support the idea that Ag nanosphere toxicity and NLRP3 inflammasome activation are determined by the rate of surface dissolution, which is based on relative surface area. This study highlights the importance of utilizing multiple models for in vitro studies to evaluate nanomaterials.

Hamilton, Raymond F.; Buckingham, Sarah; Holian, Andrij

2014-01-01

233

Increased sugarcane water productivity in Brazil avoids land use change and related environmental impacts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fábio V. Scarparea, Marcelo V. Galdosa, Oriel T. Kollna, Glauber J.C. Gavab, Henrique J. Francoa, Paulo C.O. Trivelinc a Laboratório Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do Bioetanol - CTBE/CNPEM, C.P. 6170, Campinas, SP, 13083-970, Brazil. E-mail: fabio.scarpare@bioetanol.org.br b APTA - Polo Centro Oeste. Rod. SP 304, km 304, CP 66, Jaú, SP, 17201-970, Brazil. c Laboratório de Isótopos Estáveis, Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, CENA/USP, C.P. 9, Piracicaba, SP, 13418-900, Brazil. Increasing crop water productivity is a key factor where water is scarce compared with land and other resources. A widespread method for water use assessment is the water productivity (WP) approach which is the ratio between biomass production per unit of water utilized. WP is useful to evaluate water utilization and to identify where and when water can be saved in an irrigation system. Traditionally, field experiments are conducted to quantify and evaluate water management practices in irrigation systems. This field trial was conducted in Jaú - São Paulo State (Lat 22.17° S, Long 48.32° W) during first and second ratoon cycles. Four treatments were appraised; rainfed only (R0); rainfed + 150 kg ha-1 of N (RN); irrigation only (I0) and irrigation + 150 kg ha-1 of N (IN). The subsurface drip irrigation was carried out considering the crop evapotranspiration (ETc) to restore 100% of evapotranspired water. The irrigation frequency was considered the water supply to the soil by precipitation and the atmospheric demand for sugarcane ETc, with a maximum soil storage capacity of 70 mm. Our results point that the WP in irrigated condition was 13% higher than rainfed field whereas for N application, WP reached even higher values, 40%. WP among all treatments showed better results for IN (~28 kg mm-1) followed by RN (~23 kg mm-1); I0 (~16 kg mm-1) and R0 (~15 kg mm-1). Those results are in agreement with some studies which suggest high synergy between water and nitrogen for the ratoon cane cycle. In order to demonstrate the potential effect of avoided land use change by increased productivity, we calculated the avoided GHG emissions related to land use change in a hypothetical fertirrigation project over a ten-year period (2010-2020). A conservative scenario for increased demand for sugarcane was selected, assuming a 20% increase in total production over the ten-year period. The current area under sugarcane in the municipality of Jaú is 42,500 ha. A 5,000 ha fertirrigation project, assuming the 40% increase in sugarcane productivity described above for the IN treatment, would avoid the conversion of 2,000 ha of other land uses in to sugarcane. Landsat data covering the region in the 2008/2009 crop year demonstrated that most conversion occurred over pasture areas (91%), with the remaining being converted from annual crops. Using IPCC biomass and soil carbon stock change factors and emission factors, the LUC-related emissions avoided by the fertirrigation project in the period were calculated as 53,199 Mg CO2 eq. A more comprehensive life cycle assessment of both the fertirrigation system and the reference case would be necessary to evaluate the actual GHG mitigation potential, but the preliminary results indicate that the increased productivity will bring environmental benefits under these conditions.

Scarpare, F. V.; Galdos, M. V.; Kolln, O.; Gava, G.; Franco, H.; Trivelin, P.

2012-12-01

234

Testimonies to the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) and to the L'Aquila process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lot of confusions, misinformation, false solidarity, efforts to misuse geoethics and other unethical activities in favour of the top Italian seismologists responsible for a bad and superficial evaluation of the situation 6 days prior to the earthquake - that is a general characteristics for the whole period of 5 years separating us from the horrible morning of April 6, 2009 in L'Aquila with 309 human victims. The first author of this presentation as a seismologist had unusual opportunity to visit the unfortunate city in April 2009. He got all "first-hand" information that a real scientifically based prediction did exist already for some shocks in the area on March 29 and 30, 2009. The author of the prediction Gianpaolo Giuliani was obliged to stop any public information diffused by means of internet. A new prediction was known to him on March 31 - in the day when the "Commission of Great Risks" offered a public assurance that any immediate earthquake can be practically excluded. In reality the members of the commission completely ignored such a prediction declaring it as a false alarm of "somebody" (even without using the name of Giuliani). The observations by Giuliani were of high quality from the scientific point of view. G. Giuliani predicted L'Aquila earthquake in the professional way - for the first time during many years of observations. The anomalies, which preceded L'Aquila earthquake were detected on many places in Europe in the same time. The question is, what locality would be signed as potential focal area, if G. Giuliani would know the other observations in Europe. The deformation (and other) anomalies are observable before almost all of global M8 earthquakes. Earthquakes are preceded by deformation and are predictable. The testimony of the second author is based on many unfortunate personal experiences with representatives of the INGV Rome and their supporters from India and even Australia. In July 2010, prosecutor Fabio Picuti charged the Commission members with manslaughter and negligence for failing to warn the public of the impending risk. Many international organizations were falsely interpreting the accusation and sentence at the first stage as a problem of impossibility to predict earthquakes. The same situation appeared when the verdict at the 1st stage was pronounced in October 2012. But this verdict is exclusively based on the personal behaviour of the sentenced persons in the course of ONE HOUR SESSION of the Great Risk Board in L'Aquila on March 31, 2009 and on the fact that two of them presented results of the session immediately to media and local population after the session. Terrible consequences of this irresponsible behavior initiated the final accusation shared by a relatively small but intellectually advanced number of families associated with victims of the earthquake. They all had a deep confidence to the top Italian seismologists who attended the meeting of the Commission. Special INGV web site founded by the "decreto INGV n.641 del 19/12/2012" asking for support letters contains the trial documentation (http://processoaquila.wordpress.com/) including the Italian version of the verdict unfortunately with incomplete or incorrect and mostly MISSING English translations.

Kalenda, Pavel; Nemec, Vaclav

2014-05-01

235

PREFACE: International Conference "Trends in Spintronics and Nanomagnetism" (TSN-2010)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Conference banner The International Conference "Trends in Spintronics and Nanomagnetism" (TSN-2010), was organized by partners of the EU-project SpiDME and held in the historical city of Lecce, Italy from 23-27 May 2010, at the Ecotekne Campus, University of Salento. The conference provided an international forum to discuss recent progress and future trends in the field. In particular, the aim was to bring together the community of more conventional spin-transport, with that of molecular and nano-magnetism. The main topics of TSN-2010 were: MATERIALSSPIN-PHYSICS AND THEORY - Molecular Magnets- Spin injection - Magnetic nanoparticles and nanowires- Domain walls, spin torque and vortex dynamics - Magnetic semiconductors- Numerical modeling of organic nanomagnetism - Multiferroics and transition metal oxides APPLICATIONSADVANCES IN CHARACTERIZATION - Magnetic Multilayers- Magneto-optical characterization and spin manipulation - Spin-photonics- Intrinsic spin transport mechanism in organics - Molecular and nano-spintronics- Organometallic molecules on surfaces - Spin-based quantum computation- Single molecular magnets on surfaces - Magnetism for sensing and nanomedicine- Nanoscale characterization and spin-sensitive SPM The scientific programme started on Monday 24 May and ended on Thursday 27 May. The Nobel Laureate A Fert attended the conference giving a plenary talk and the programme also featured invited presentations by (in alphabetical order): M Aeschlimann, M Affronte, N Atodiresei, P A Bobbert, A Dediu, N Kioussis, L W Molenkamp, J Moodera, V Prigodin, M Ruben, R Sessoli, R Tan, and H Wende. TSN2010 had 150 attendees who came from around the globe to present their latest research in 100 oral presentations. Contributed talks were selected by the program committee, composed of Giuseppe Maruccio, Ross Rinaldi, Valentina Arima, Fabio Della Sala, Maurizio Martino (Universitá del Salento, NNL Institute Nanoscience-CNR, Lecce, Italy), Stefano Sanvito (Trinity College Dublin, Ireland), Germar Hoffmann and Roland Wiesendanger (Institute for Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Germany), and Alan Rowan (NSRIM Institute Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands). This group also acted as the Publication Committee and managed all the submitted papers that were reviewed by expert referees in order to meet the standards of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Conference photographNobel Laureate A Fert with some members of the organizing committee. The conference would not have been possible without the support from the local organizing committee at the University of Salento and NNL Institute Nanoscience-CNR, including Anna Paola Caricato, Luigi Martina and the Conference Secretaries Maria Concetta Gerardi, Adriana Amato, and Gabriella Zammillo. We are grateful for the technical assistance of Michele Linciano, Antonio Guerrieri, Carmine Mangia, Luciano Carluccio, and Tommaso Moscara e Francesco Sabetta. We also gratefully acknowledge Serena Chiriacó, Anna Grazia Mondeduro and Massimo Corrado who helped to run the conference. The conference was made possible by the financial support from the European Commission through the SpiDME project (EU-FP6-029002), the Italian Ministry for Foreign Affairs, the University of Lecce and its Department of Physics, and all of the sponsors (Lot Oriel, Attocube, Schaefer, Cryogenic Ltd, Oxford Instruments, MTI Corporation, Cantele, Monte dei Paschi di Siena). Conference Chair and Co-Chairs Giuseppe MaruccioStefano SanvitoGermar HoffmannRoland WiesendangerAlan Rowan Logos

Maruccio, Giuseppe; Sanvito, Stefano; Hoffmann, Germar; Wiesendanger, Roland; Rowan, Alan

2011-03-01

236

PREFACE: 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP2012)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP 2012) took place in Winchester, UK, from the 16-21 September. It gathered students as well as people active in the top quark sector and provided a framework to highlight the newest results and matters related to top quark physics. Discovered in 1995, the top quark is the sixth and heaviest of all quarks, and it is the only one with a lifetime short enough to be observed 'naked'. This makes it an important testing ground in the search for new physics. In fact, the fact of its mass being so much larger than the other quarks, hints at its special role in the Higgs mechanism. For the same reason, in many models of New Physics, new heavy resonances are expected to couple mostly with top quarks. Even if no new particles are observed, the direct correlation between its angular momentum and that of its detectable decay products allows us to probe indirectly New Physics in action when top quarks are created. In this edition of the TOP conference series, for the first time, the agenda was equally balanced between 'traditional' measurements and the now vast number of searches for physics BSM in the top quark sector, thanks mostly to the amount of data collected at the LHC in its Run I. New results were presented by both the Tevatron and the LHC collaborations: improved ttbar and single top cross-section measurements, refined techniques to measure the top quark mass and a large number of results on properties such as spin correlation and W boson polarization in top quark decays were shown. More technical discussions on the experimental issues, both from the detector and the simulation side also took place, drawing together experimentalists and theorists. Reviews of the latest results on ttbar asymmetry both from CDF and D0 and from ATLAS and CMS were shown, and theorists active in the field made some interesting points on this hot topic. Additionally, results on the search for fourth generation fermions and new resonances in the boosted top regime were also provided. Finally, a set of dedicated talks on the interplay between the top sector and other hot subjects, like the Higgs and SUSY, were given both at the theory and experimental level. Furthermore, ad hoc student sessions were organized to allow younger colleagues to pose questions to the senior experts in the field and contribute with their more recent studies. The conference has been a definitive success, not just scientifically: about 130 participants from all over the world created a collegiate spirit which culminated in the social events at Winchester Hall below King Arthur's table; and in a cosy 16th century barn for the social dinner. The Local Organizing Committee would like to thank all participants, and in particular the speakers, for their high level contributions to TOP 2012 and for making this a very fruitful and pleasant time together. We conclude by wishing the Organizing Committee of TOP 2013 all the best for a successful conference. We look forward to seeing everyone in Germany in 2013. Giuseppe Salamanna Local Organizing Committee London, June 2013 Local Organising Committee Veronique Boisvert (Chair, Royal Holloway, University of London) Lucio Cerrito (Queen Mary, University of London) Akram Khan (Brunel University, London) Stefano Moretti (University of Southampton) Mark Owen (University of Manchester) Giuseppe Salamanna (Queen Mary, University of London) Christian Schwanenberger (University of Manchester) International Advisory Committee Roberto Tenchini (INFN, Pisa) Martine Bosman (IFAE, Barcelona) Michelangelo Mangano (CERN) Scott Willenbrock (University of Illinois, Urbana) Werner Bernreuther (RWTH, Aachen) Jorgen D'Hondt (VUB, Brussels) Antonio Onofre (LIP, University Minho) Fabio Maltoni (UCL, Louvain) Eric Laenen (NIKHEF) Fabrizio Margaroli (INFN, Roma 1) Juan Antonio Aguilar Saavedra (University of Granada) Yvonne Peters (University of Manchester) Roberto Chierici (CERN) Markus Cristinziani (University of Bonn) Group picture

Salamanna, G.; Boisvert, V.; Cerrito, L.; Khan, A.; Moretti, S.; Owen, M.; Schwanenberger, C.

2013-07-01

237

Controllable Quantum States Mesoscopic Superconductivity and Spintronics (MS+S2006)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mesoscopic effects in superconductors. Tunneling measurements of charge imbalance of non-equilibrium superconductors / R. Yagi. Influence of magnetic impurities on Josephson current in SNS junctions / T. Yokoyama. Nonlinear response and observable signatures of equilibrium entanglement / A. M. Zagoskin. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage with a Cooper pair box / Giuseppe Falci. Crossed Andreev reflection-induced giant negative magnetoresistance / Francesco Giazotto -- Quantum modulation of superconducting junctions. Adiabatic pumping through a Josephson weak link / Fabio Taddei. Squeezing of superconducting qubits / Kazutomu Shiokawa. Detection of Berrys phases in flux qubits with coherent pulses / D. N. Zheng. Probing entanglement in the system of coupled Josephson qubits / A. S. Kiyko. Josephson junction with tunable damping using quasi-particle injection / Ryuta Yagi. Macroscopic quantum coherence in rf-SQUIDs / Alexey V. Ustinov. Bloch oscillations in a Josephson circuit / D. Esteve. Manipulation of magnetization in nonequilibrium superconducting nanostructures / F. Giazotto -- Superconducting qubits. Decoherence and Rabi oscillations in a qubit coupled to a quantum two-level system / Sahel Ashhab. Phase-coupled flux qubits: CNOT operation, controllable coupling and entanglement / Mun Dae Kim. Characteristics of a switchable superconducting flux transformer with a DC-SQUID / Yoshihiro Shimazu. Characterization of adiabatic noise in charge-based coherent nanodevices / E. Paladino -- Unconventional superconductors. Threshold temperatures of zero-bias conductance peak and zero-bias conductance dip in diffusive normal metal/superconductor junctions / Iduru Shigeta. Tunneling conductance in 2DEG/S junctions in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling / T. Yokoyama. Theory of charge transport in diffusive ferromagnet/p-wave superconductor junctions / T. Yokoyama. Theory of enhanced proximity effect by the exchange field in FS bilayers / T. Yokoyama. Theory of Josephson effect in diffusive d-wave junctions / T. Yokoyama. Quantum dissipation due to the zero energy bound states in high-T[symbol] superconductor junctions / Shiro Kawabata. Spin-polarized heat transport in ferromagnet/unconventional superconductor junctions / T. Yokoyama. Little-Parks oscillations in chiral p-wave superconducting rings / Mitsuaki Takigawa. Theoretical study of synergy effect between proximity effect and Andreev interface resonant states in triplet p-wave superconductors / Yasunari Tanuma. Theory of proximity effect in unconventional superconductor junctions / Y. Tanaka -- Quantum information. Analyzing the effectiveness of the quantum repeater / Kenichiro Furuta. Architecture-dependent execution time of Shor's algorithm / Rodney Van Meter -- Quantum dots and Kondo effects. Coulomb blockade properties of 4-gated quantum dot / Shinichi Amaha. Order-N electronic structure calculation of n-type GaAs quantum dots / Shintaro Nomura. Transport through double-dots coupled to normal and superconducting leads / Yoichi Tanaka. A study of the quantum dot in application to terahertz single photon counting / Vladimir Antonov. Electron transport through laterally coupled double quantum dots / T. Kubo. Dephasing in Kondo systems: comparison between theory and experiment / F. Mallet. Kondo effect in quantum dots coupled with noncollinear ferromagnetic leads / Daisuke Matsubayashi. Non-crossing approximation study of multi-orbital Kondo effect in quantum dot systems / Tomoko Kita. Theoretical study of electronic states and spin operation in coupled quantum dots / Mikio Eto. Spin correlation in a double quantum dot-quantum wire coupled system / S. Sasaki. Kondo-assisted transport through a multiorbital quantum dot / Rui Sakano. Spin decay in a quantum dot coupled to a quantum point contact / Massoud Borhani -- Quantum wires, low-dimensional electrons. Control of the electron density and electric field with front and back gates / Masumi Yamaguchi. Effect of the array distance on the magnetization configuration of submicron-sized ferromagnetic rings / Tetsuya Miya

Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku; Nakano, Hayato

2008-10-01

238

Preface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This special issue contains the Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Non-equilibrium Phenomena in Supercooled Fluids, Glasses and Amorphous Materials which was held in Pisa, Italy from 22 to 27 September 2002. This was the third of a series of workshops on this theme which started in 1995 as a joint initiative of the University of Pisa and of the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. The history of the subject goes back to at least the times of J C Maxwell, whose basic formula ? = ?/G? has been taken as the symbol of these workshops. The dynamical processes occurring in supercooled fluids and other disordered materials in non-equilibrium states involve different length and time scales. Fast and ultra-slow molecular rearrangements occur in the presence of microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic organization of the system. These phenomena are of particular relevance in several branches of science, technology and engineering, and their characterization appeals to a variety of experimental techniques and to simulational and theoretical studies. The underlying conceptual unity of the field provides a common ground for the scientific community working in its various areas. As for the earlier workshops on the same theme, the main objective of the third workshop was to bring together liquid state physicists, chemists and engineers to comparatively discuss experimental facts and theoretical predictions. In this edition the main themes included topics such as the phenomena of ageing, relaxation processes in materials ranging from systems of low molecular weight and oligomers to polymers, the dependence of relaxation processes on material thickness, the behaviour of multicomponent systems, and several others. Special attention was devoted to features and potentialities for applications of disordered systems. Round table discussions covered two presently hot topics: `Recent developments in potential energy landscape description of slow dynamics' and `Vibrational excitations in glasses at terahertz frequencies'. The core of the workshop was a set of general lectures followed by more specific presentations on current issues in the main areas of the field. These were covered in sessions devoted sequentially to viscous flow and microscopic relaxation, theoretical aspects, numerical simulation, rheology, glassy materials, confined materials, heterogeneities and energy landscape, polymers, and ageing. Three poster sessions further dealt with the above subjects. The structure of the workshop has been preserved in this publication, in which the set of papers from the plenary lectures is followed by topical contributions in the order in which they were presented. Five contributions to the proceedings come from a selection of the posters. The proceedings end with the round table contributions. We wish here to thank all participants in the workshop, who made it enjoyable and scientifically profitable, and all referees who worked in preparing this special issue of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. We also wish to acknowledge the generous support that we have received from our institutions and the sponsorship and support given by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia and by its section Fisica dei Liquidi e Sistemi Disordinati. The Cassa di Risparmio di Pisa hosted the workshop in the splendid location provided by the Convento delle Benedettine. On the behalf of the international scientific community we express our gratitude to all these institutions as well as to those individuals-we mention here in particular Dr Massimo Faetti, Dr Diego Palazzuoli, Dr Fabio Zulli, Ms Beatrice Pistoresi and Ms Patrizia Pucci-who have contributed to organizing and running the workshop.

Andreozzi, Laura; Giordano, Marco; Leporini, Dino; Tosi, Mario

2003-03-01

239

Using DInSAR as a tool to detect unstable terrain areas in an Andes region in Ecuador (South America)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using DInSAR as a tool to detect unstable terrain areas in an Andes region in Ecuador (South America) 1. INTRODUCTION Monitoring landslides is a mandatory task in charge on the National Institute of Geological Research (INIGEMM) in Ecuador. It is a small country, supposedly will be faster doing monitoring, but what about its geographic characteristics? Lamentably, due to human and financial resources is not possible to put monitoring systems in unstable terrain areas. However, getting ALOS data to accessible price and using open source software to produce interferograms, could be a first step to know steep areas covered by vegetation and where mass movements are not visible. Under this statement, this study is part of the final research in a master study developed at CONAE during 2009-2011, with oral defense in August 2013. As a new technique used in Ecuador, the study processed radar data from ERS-1/2 and ALOS sensor PALSAR for getting differential interferograms, using ROI_PAC software. Stacking DInSAR is applied to get an average of displacement that indicates uplift and subsidence in the whole radar scene that covers two provinces in the Andes region. 2. PROBLEM Mass movements are present in the whole territory, independently of their magnitude and dynamic (slow or fast), they are a latent threat in winter season specially. There are registers of monitoring, such as two GPS's campaigns and artisanal extensometers, which are used to contrast with DInSAR results. However, the campaigns are shorter and extensometers are no trust on all. 3. METHODOLOGY Methodology has four phases of development: (1) Pre-processing of RAW data; (2) Processing of RAW data in ROI_PAC; (3) Post-processing for getting interferograms in units of cm per year; (4) Analysis of the results and comparison with ground truth. Sandwell & Price (1998) proposed Stacking technique to increase the fringes and decrease errors due to the atmosphere, to average several interferograms. L band penetrates deeper into vegetation cover than C band (Raucoules et al., 2007). The study processed ERS with descending orbit and ALOS with ascending orbit, due to the availability of data. Ferretti et al. (2007) said that ERS looks to the right and a slope mainly oriented to the west could have foreshortening effect in ascending orbit. Wei & Sandwell (2010) mention that ALOS in ascending orbit identifies vertical mass movements along fault systems; however, descending data has better geometry to measure mass movements. The study has fewer scenes in descending orbit. For further work, ALOS 2 will let to have more data in descending orbit. 4. CENTRAL CONCLUSIONS For mass movement having high-resolution radar is the best option; however, this data is not useful on all due to cover vegetation. Characterizing mass movements in Ecuador in necessary to put monitoring systems to avoid economic and human lost. Processing ERS and ALOS data was very useful because penetration band results were clearly identified in coherence masks. The result of Stacking DInSAR did not show clearly fringes, indeed the amount of interferograms were no enough for this technique. Researching other DInSAR techniques is necessary due to the singular characteristics of Ecuador. 5. REFERENCES Ferretti Alessandro, Monti-Guarnieri Andrea, Prati Claudio, Rocca Fabio, Massonnet Didier (2007). InSAR Principles: Guidelines for SAR Interferometry Processing and Interpretation (TM-19, Febrero 2007). K. Fletcher, Agencia Espacial Europea Publicaciones. ESTEC. Postbus 2009. 2200 AG Noordwijk. The Netherlands. Raucoules Daniel, Colesanti Carlo, Carnec Claudie (2007). "Use of SAR interferometry for detecting and assessing ground subsidence." C. R. Geoscience 339(289-302): 14. Sandwell David T., Price Evelyn J. (1998). "Phase gradient approach to stacking interferograms." Journal of Geophysical Research 103(N. B12): 30, 183-30, 204. Wei Meng, Sandwell David T (2010). "Decorrelation of L-Band and C-Band Interferometry Over Vegetated Areas in California." Geoscience and Remote Sensin

Mayorga Torres, Tannia

2014-05-01

240

Seismic velocities - density relationship for the Earth's crust: effects of chemical compositions, amount of water, and implications on gravity and topography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismic velocities - density relationship for the Earth's crust: effects of chemical compositions, amount of water, and implications on gravity and topography Mattia Guerri and Fabio Cammarano Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, Section of Geology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. A good knowledge of the Earth's crust is not only important to understand its formation and dynamics, but also essential to infer mantle seismic structure, dynamic topography and location of seismic events. Global and local crustal models available (Bassin et al., 2000; Nataf & Ricard, 1996; Molinari & Morelli, 2011) are based on VP-density empirical relationships that do not fully exploit our knowledge on mineral phases forming crustal rocks and their compositions. We assess the effects of various average crustal chemical compositions on the conversion from seismic velocities to density, also testing the influence of water. We consider mineralogies at thermodynamic equilibrium and reference mineral assemblages at given P-T conditions to account for metastability. Stable mineral phases at equilibrium have been computed with the revised Holland and Powell (2002) EOS and thermodynamic database implemented in PerpleX (Connolly 2005). We have computed models of physical properties for the crust following two approaches, i) calculation of seismic velocities and density by assuming the same layers structure of the model CRUST 2.0 (Bassin et al., 2000) and a 3-D thermal structure based on heat-flow measurements; ii) interpretation of the Vp model reported in CRUST 2.0 to obtain density and shear wave velocity for the crustal layers, using the Vp-density relations obtained with the thermodynamic modeling. The obtained density models and CRUST 2.0 one have been used to calculate isostatic topography and gravity field. Our main results consist in, i) phase transitions have a strong effect on the physical properties of crustal rocks, in particular on seismic velocities; ii) models based on different crustal chemical compositions show strong variations on both seismic properties and density; iii) the amount of water is a main factor in determining the physical properties of crustal rocks, drastically changing the phase stability in the mineralogical assemblages; iii) the differences between the various density models that we obtained, and the variations between them and CRUST2.0, translate into strong effects for the calculated isostatic topography and gravity field. Our approach, dealing directly with chemical compositions, is suitable to quantitatively investigate compositional heterogeneity in the Earth's crust. References ? Bassin, C., Laske, G. & Masters, G., 2000. The current limits of resolution for surface wave tomography in North America, EOS, Trans. Am. Geophys. Un., 81, F897. ? Nataf, H. & Ricard, Y., 1996. 3SMAC: an a priori tomographic model of the upper mantle based on geophysical modeling, Phys. Earth planet. Inter., 95(1-2), 101-122. ? Molinari, I. & Morelli, A., 2011. Epcrust: a reference crustal model for the European Plate, Gepohys. J. Int., 185, 352-364. ? Connolly JAD (2005) Computation of phase equilibria by linear programming: a tool for geodynamic modeling and its application to subduction zone decarbonation. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 236:524-541.

Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio

2014-05-01

241

A case study of ethanol water demand during industrial phase in Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thayse A. D. Hernandesb, Fábio V. Scarparea, Marjorie M. Guarenghib, Tássia P. Pereirab, Marcelo V. Galdosa a Laboratório Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do Bioetanol - CTBE/CNPEM, Caixa Postal 6170, 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, E-mail: fabio.scarpare@bioetanol.org.br b Faculdade de Engenharia Mecânica, Unicamp, Cidade Universitária "Zeferino Vaz", CEP 13083-860, Campinas, SP, Brazil In São Paulo State, the water resources have being used by sugarcane industry responsibly, through high reuse rates that may reach 95% during industrial process. The average amount of catchment water stays around 2.0 m3 Mg 1 of industrial sugarcane stalk. However, in some modern mills which use higher technical level of closed water circuit, the standard goal for sugarcane industry, 1.0 m3 Mg 1 can be reached. In some regions where the uptake water for industrial segment is high as in São Paulo State, water use assessment is desired for sustainable ethanol production. Thus, two regions in São Paulo State with two plants each were taken as a case study aiming to assess ethanol water demand during the industrial phase. Araraquara was the first study region where the water demand was classified as in critical condition in 2010 according to the Water and Electrical Energy Department of São Paulo State (DAEE). The industrial activities were responsible for 50% of the water catchment. Araçatuba was the second study region where water demand was classified as being of concern (DAEE) due to high percentage of catchment water for industrial activities, around 90%. Data regarding the amount of millable cane processed, days of the plant operation, ratio of cane used for ethanol production in 2010/2011 season were used for direct water demand estimation considering different water catchment scenarios of 2.0, 1.0 and 0.7 (technological development prediction scenario) m3 Mg-1 of millable cane. For indirect water demand estimation, data regarding installed capacity of each unit and ethanol production efficiency (number of liters per millable ton of cane) were used considering the same water catchment scenarios. In terms of absolute values, mills in Araçatuba showed higher water consumption than in Araraquara (0.24 and 0.17 m3 s-1 respectively) for water catchment scenarios of 2.0 m3 Mg-1. Regarding the water use per ethanol produced (liter of water use per liter of ethanol produced), mills in Araçatuba also showed higher values, 0.035 than in Araraquara, 0.014 around 60%. Considering all scenarios, the industrial water demand for ethanol production was always the double for Araçatuba due a higher amount of collected water in that region. In the current water uptake scenario (2.0 m3 Mg-1), the mills involvement in industrial water demand was 22% in Araçatuba and 10% in Araraquara. Taking into account the total water demand in both regions, the amount of water demand for ethanol production was 21% and 5% respectively for Araçatuba and Araraquara. In the future, when the water uptake scenario will reach 0.7 m3 Mg-1 it will provide a 65% saving of water in both regions. Our results suggest that the ethanol industry did not represent high pressure on water resources in those analyzed regions.

Hernandes, T.; Scarpare, F. V.; Guarenghi, M.; Pereira, T.; Galdos, M. V.

2012-12-01

242

Geoethical suggestions for reducing risk of next (not only strong) earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three relatively recent examples of earthquakes can be used as a background for suggesting geoethical views into any prediction accompanied by a risk analysis. ?Aquila earthquake (Italy - 2009): ?Aquila was largely destroyed by earthquakes in 1315, 1319, 1452, 1461, 1501, 1646, 1703 (until that time altogether about 3000 victims) and 1786 (about 6000 victims of this event only). The city was rebuilt and remained stable until October 2008, when tremors began again. From January 1 through April 5, 2009, additional 304 tremors were reported. When after measuring increased levels of radon emitted from the ground a local citizen (for many years working for the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics) predicted a major earthquake on Italian television, he was accused of being alarmist. Italy's National Commission for Prediction and Prevention of Major Risks met in L'Aquila for one hour on March 31, 2009, without really evaluating and characterising the risks that were present. On April 6 a 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck Aquila and nearby towns, killing 309 people and injuring more than 1,500. The quake also destroyed roughly 20,000 buildings, temporarily displacing another 65,000 people. In July 2010, prosecutor Fabio Picuti charged the Commission members with manslaughter and negligence for failing to warn the public of the impending risk. Many international organizations joined the chorus of criticism wrongly interpreting the accusation and sentence at the first stage as a problem of impossibility to predict earthquakes. - The Eyjafjallajokull volcano eruption (Iceland - 2010) is a reminder that in our globalized, interconnected world because of the increased sensibility of the new technology even a relatively small natural disaster may cause unexpected range of problems. - Earthquake and tsunami (Japan - 2011) - the most powerful known earthquake ever to have hit Japan on March 11. Whereas the proper earthquake with the magnitude of 9.0 has caused minimum of deaths (incomparably lower than tragic events from 1923) the tsunami has broken any known record. The existing anti-tsunami measures have appeared to be appropriate to expectations given by unsatisfactory safety limits extended to the human memory experience. Conclusions of geoethics: a) a new legal interpretation of "false alarms" and reasonable risk and danger levels is to be established (up-dating internationally acceptable definitions and protection measures); b) any positive prediction for any known real natural disaster (whoever made it) is to be precisely analysed by competent institutes avoiding any underestimation of "incompetent" researchers and amateurs and respecting diversity of scientific research "schools"; c) a reciprocal respect between scientists and the population is to be based on the use of a reciprocally understandable language; d) scientists as well as media are obliged to respect and publish the complete truth about facts with clearly defined words to avoid any misinterpretation of results; e) consequences of relatively "minor" earthquakes are no more limited only to an adjacent local area; f) the appropriate programs for computerized predictions are to be under a permanent control of validity (using alternative parameters and incorporating verified or supposed time-tables of events from the past); g) any scientist when accepting a function in a State organ has to accept his role with high personal responsibility for and respect to the goals, work and results of such a commission; h) any effective prevention of the population is to be based on a mutual consensus preferring in any stage the common good instead of particular or personal interests and respecting human lives as the top value priority.

Nemec, Vaclav

2013-04-01

243

Nondecoupling of Heavy Fermions and a Special Yukawa Texture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Talk based on work entitled “Yukawa textures, new physics and nondecoupling,” done in collaboration with G. C. Branco and J. I. Silva-Marcos, arXiv:hep-ph/0612252, to appear in Phys. Rev. D. In this work we pointed out that New Physics can play an important rôle in rescuing some of the Yukawa texture zero ansätze which would otherwise be eliminated by the recent, more precise measurements of VCKM. We have shown that the presence of an isosinglet vector-like quark which mixes with standard quarks, can render viable a particularly interesting four texture zero Yukawa ansatz. The crucial point is the nondecoupling of the effects of the isosinglet quark, even for arbitrary large values of its mass.

Rebelo, M. N.

244

Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis and Quantum Thermodynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the open questions in quantum thermodynamics reads: how can linear quantum dynamics provide chaos necessary for thermalization of an isolated quantum system? To this end, we perform an ab initio numerical analysis of a system of hard-core bosons on a lattice and show [Marcos Rigol, Vanja Dunjko & Maxim Olshanii, Nature 452, 854 (2008)] that the above controversy can be resolved via the Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis suggested independently by Deutsch [J. M. Deutsch, Phys. Rev. A 43, 2046 (1991)] and Srednicki [M. Srednicki, Phys. Rev. E 50, 888 (1994)]. According to this hypothesis, in quantum systems thermalization happens in each individual eigenstate of the system separately, but it is hidden initially by coherences between them. In course of the time evolution the thermal properties become revealed through (linear) decoherence that needs not to be chaotic.

Olshanii, Maxim

2009-03-01

245

La historia orbital de Deimos y la oblicuidad de Marte  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recientemente, se ha demostrado mediante extensas integraciones numéricas, que la rotación de Marte pasó repetidamente por estados caóticos de movimiento, debido al pasaje por zonas de resonancia spin - órbita. En dichas circunstancias, la oblicuidad marciana pudo haber sufrido grandes excursiones de varias decenas de grados. Las consecuencias de dichas variaciones son de extrema importancia en el contexto de la búsqueda de manifestaciones de vida fósil en dicho planeta. El estudio de la dinámica orbital del satélite más exterior de Marte, Deimos, nos ha permitido comprobar, en el marco de las distintas teorías sobre su orígen, que la oblicuidad de Marte dificilmente pudo haber sufrido variaciones que la aparten más de 10o respecto de actual valor. Este resultado parece ser mucho más robusto que las simulaciones numéricas de Touma y Wisdom asi como las de Laskar y Robutel, lo que permite poner cotas más severas a la evolución paleoclimática de Marte.

Brunini, A.; Yokoyama, T.

246

Evaluation of multi-dimensional flux models for radiative transfer in combustion chambers: A review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, flux methods have been widely employed as alternative, albeit intrinsically less accurate, procedures to the zone or Monte Carlo methods in complete prediction procedures. Flux models of radiation fields take the form of partial differential equations, which can conveniently and economically be solved simultaneously with the equations representing flow and reaction. The flux models are usually tested and evaluated from the point of view of predictive accuracy by comparing their predictions with "exact' values produced using the zone or Monte Carlo models. Evaluations of various multi-dimensional flux-type models, such as De Marco and Lockwood, Discrete-Ordinate, Schuster-Schwarzschild and moment, are reviewed from the points of view of both accuracy and computational economy. Six-flux model of Schuster-Schwarzschild type with angular subdivisions related to the enclosure geometry is recommended for incorporation into existing procedures for complete mathematical modelling of rectangular combustion chambers.

Selcuk, N.

1984-01-01

247

Cover image, volume 35, issue 17.  

PubMed

The concept of "electron deformation orbitals" (EDOs) is used by Marcos Mandado and Nicola's Ramos-Berdullas on page 1261 (DOI: 10.1002/jcc.23595) to investigate the electric response of conducting metals and oligophenyl chains. The cover represents the electron transfer and the external electric voltage in a gold cluster (top figure) in an oligophenyl chain, which is attached to gold atoms (bottom figure), and a hybrid structure formed by the same oligophenyl chain, which is linked to gold chains at both sides (central figure). The electron deformation density associated with the main EDOs is shown, indicating positive and negative regions (accumulation and depletion of the electron charge) for the central figure and the direction of the electron transfer. PMID:24854486

2014-06-30

248

Colorado Upper Division Electrostatics (CUE) Assessment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Colorado Upper Division Electrostatics (CUE) Asssessment is designed to test student understanding of core learning goals in junior-level E&M. It consists of a 17-item open-ended test with optional 9-item pretest. The test has good inter-rater reliability and has been validated using multiple measures. The test provided here is version 22 of the CUE which was attached as Appendix B to the article: Stephanie V. Chasteen, Rachel E. Pepper, Marcos D. Caballero, Steven J. Pollock, and Katherine K. Perkins, Colorado Upper-Division Electrostatics diagnostic: A conceptual assessment for the junior level, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 8 (2), 020108 (2012), doi:10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.8.020108. To receive a copy of the most recent version of the test to use in your course, contact Steven Pollock at steven.pollock@colorado.edu.

Pollock, Steven J.; Chasteen, Stephanie V.

2013-05-28

249

Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop  

ScienceCinema

The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

None

2011-10-06

250

A study of the Civic Tower in Ravenna as an example of medieval towers' preservation problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Structuralstabilityis a major item when considering very high masonry buildings made of stones, bricks, etc., that can start sudden structural failures and collapses, often without any obvious signs of warning. A famous example is the collapse of the belfry of the Basilica of San Marco in Venice --the implementation of it began in the ninth century-- which took place in July 1902 a few days after the appearanceof a fissure. This paper discusses the scientific investigation performed on the Torre Civica (Civic Tower) in Ravenna (North-East Italy), in order to characterize its constituent materials, namely bricks and mortar. All this information and relevant data merge in a multimedia database which will help to design appropriate conservation and restoration works, mainly concerning the reconstruction of the apical part of the tower, that was foreshortened ten years ago for safety reasons, starting from the original materials catalogued and preserved up to the present day.

Bruni, Stefania; Maino, Giuseppe; Marrocchino, Elena; Vaccaro, Carmela; Volpe, Lisa

2013-03-01

251

Toward Understanding Student Conceptions of the Photoelectric Effect  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The photoelectric effect is part of a group of phenomena that provide the experimental basis for the photon model of light. Most students pursuing a degree in physics or a related field first study the photoelectric effect and the photon model of light in a "modern physics" course following directly after the introductory physics sequence. It has been documented that many students have trouble understanding the photoelectric effect itself, and its connection to the photon model of light. In an attempt to better understand student preconceptions and misconceptions of this topic, we conducted a study of students in a modern physics class at California State University, San Marcos. In this paper we will provide preliminary results of our research with specific emphasis on the knowledge base required to understand the photoelectric effect.

De Leone, Charles; Oberem, Graham

2005-10-26

252

(Hydroelectric project in Costa Rican rural electric generation and transmission)  

SciTech Connect

On November 6, 1989, I left for San Jose, Costa Rica. My visit was set to accomplish two activities. The first activity was a follow-on mission to gather additional information on a newly identified small hydroelectric project, in support of a rural electric generation and transmission cooperative performed for the Renewable Energy Applications and Training project. Data on stream flows, soils, geologic, and topographic information was gathered for Rio San Lorenzo, near Quesada. A reconnaissance level survey was performed for Rio Naranjillo, a river near San Marcos. The second part of the visit was dedicated to interaction with ICE, the electric utility, discussing plans to establish a comprehensive efficiency program in Costa Rica. I returned to Oak Ridge on November 16, 1989.

Waddle, D.B.

1989-11-28

253

Graphical representations of vector functions in upper-division E&M  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In upper division electricity and magnetism, the manipulation and interpretation of vector functions is pervasive and a significant challenge to students. At CSU San Marcos, using in-class activities adapted from the Oregon State University Paradigms in Physics Curriculum, studentsâ difficulties with vector functions become evident in two types of in-class activities: sketching vector functions and relating vector and scalar functions (e.g., electric field and electric potential). For many students, the cause of these difficulties is a failure to fully distinguish between the components of a vector function and its coordinate variables. To address this difficulty, we implement an additional in-class activity requiring students to translate between graphical and algebraic representations of vector functions. We present our experience with these issues, how to address them, and how in-class activities can provide evidence of student thinking that facilitates curricular refinement.

Gire, Elizabeth; Price, Edward

2012-05-15

254

Electric field observations of equatorial bubbles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results from the double floating probe experiment performed on the San Marco D satellite are presented, with emphasis on the observation of large incremental changes in the convective electric field vector at the boundary of equatorial plasma bubbles. Attention is given to isolated bubble structures in the upper ionospheric F regions; these observed bubble encounters are divided into two types - type I (live bubbles) and type II (dead bubbles). Type I bubbles show varying degrees of plasma depletion and large upward velocities range up to 1000 km/s. The geometry of these bubbles is such that the spacecraft orbit may cut them where they are tilting either eastward or (more often) westward. Type II bubbles exhibit plasma density depletion but no appreciable upward convection. Both types of events are usually surrounded by a halo of plasma turbulence, which can extend considerably beyond the region of plasma depletion.

Aggson, T. L.; Maynard, N. C.; Hanson, W. B.; Saba, Jack L.

1992-01-01

255

ArtsEdge  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

ArtsEdge is the National Arts and Education Network, a program of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, and partner of MarcoPolo, (last mentioned in the March 26, 2004 NSDL Scout Report for Math, Engineering, and Technology, http://scout.wisc.edu/Reports/NSDL/MET/2004/met-040326-education.php#1). ArtsEdge exists to support visual and performing arts education and "creative use of technology to enhance the K-12 educational experience." To achieve its mission, the ArtsEdge web site offers over 350 lesson plans, such as A Tribute to Miro, which provides everything teachers need to conduct a class project for fifth- to eighth-graders to create paintings in the style of Miro: a detailed instructional plan, links to museum images of Miro's work, and an interactive display of five Miro paintings. The site also offers How-To's and guides, multimedia, resources for families and more.

256

Statistical panorama of female physics graduate students for 2000-2010 in Peru  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the results of a statistical study on the number of women entering the undergraduate and master's programs of physics at Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Peru. From 2006 through 2010, 13 female students entered the master's degree program but no females graduated with the degree. Considering that Peru is a developing country, a career in physics is not considered an attractive professional choice even for male students because it is thought that there are no work centers to practice this profession. We recommend that the causes preventing female physics students from completing their studies and research work be analyzed, and that strategies be planned to help women complete their academic work. We are considering getting help from the Peruvian Physics Society (SOPERFI) in order to draw more attention for our plan.

Cerón Loayza, María Luisa; Bravo Cabrejos, Jorge Aurelio

2013-03-01

257

Surface elements and landing strategies for small bodies missions - Philae and beyond  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The investigation of small bodies, comets and asteroids, can contribute substantially to our understanding of the formation and history of the Solar System. In-situ observations by Landers play a prominent role in this field. The Rosetta Lander - Philae - is currently on its way to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. It will land in November 2014 and perform numerous experiments with a suite of 10 scientific instruments. Philae has been designed to cope with a wide range of possible comet properties. The considerations taken during its development are relevant for future Lander missions to small bodies in the Solar System. In addition the paper provides a review of alternative concepts, studied or developed for various missions like Phobos, Hayabusa/Minerva or Géocroiseur/Leonard. Various missions to small bodies in the Solar System, including Landers, are currently studied (e.g., Marco Polo). The paper will address the mission options and compare applicable technologies with the solutions chosen for Philae.

Ulamec, Stephan; Biele, Jens

2009-10-01

258

Newly discovered Wolf-Rayet and weak emission-line central stars of planetary nebulae  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the spectra of 32 previously unpublished confirmed and candidate Wolf-Rayet ([WR]) and weak emission-line (WELS) central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe). 18 stars have been discovered in the Macquarie/AAO/Strasbourg H? (MASH) PN survey sample, and we have also uncovered 14 confirmed and candidate [WR]s and WELS among the CSPNe of previously known PNe. Spectral classifications have been undertaken using both Acker & Neiner and Crowther, De Marco & Barlow schemes. 22 members in this sample are identified as probable [WR]s; the remaining 10 appear to be WELS. Observations undertaken as part of the MASH spectroscopic survey have now increased the number of known [WR]s by ˜30 per cent. This will permit a better analysis of [WR] subclass distribution, metallicity effects and evolutionary sequences in these uncommon objects.

Depew, K.; Parker, Q. A.; Miszalski, B.; De Marco, O.; Frew, D. J.; Acker, A.; Kovacevic, A. V.; Sharp, R. G.

2011-07-01

259

Some properties of an infinite family of deformations of the harmonic oscillator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In memory of Marcos Moshinsky, who promoted the algebraic study of the harmonic oscillator, some results recently obtained on an infinite family of deformations of such a system are reviewed. This set, which was introduced by Tremblay, Turbiner, and Winternitz, consists in some Hamiltonians Hk on the plane, depending on a positive real parameter k. Two algebraic extensions of Hk are described. The first one, based on the elements of the dihedral group D2k and a Dunkl operator formalism, provides a convenient tool to prove the superintegrability of Hk for odd integer k. The second one, employing two pairs of fermionic operators, leads to a supersymmetric extension of Hk of the same kind as the familiar Freedman and Mende super-Calogero model. Some connection between both extensions is also outlined.

Quesne, Christiane

2010-12-01

260

Palomar College: Wayne's Word-Biology 101 Lecture Topics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website was developed by Professor Wayne P. Armstrong as part of his online Biology 101 course at Palomar College in San Marcos, Calif. This site is also part of Professor Armstrong's larger website: Wayne's Word: An Online Natural History Textbook. The Biology 101 Lecture Topics site organizes lectures into five major categories: The Kingdoms of Life; Biochemistry and Cell Structure & Function; Mitosis, Meiosis & Life Cycle Patterns; Mendelian Genetics and Immunology; and Ecology, Adaptations & Population Growth. Lecture pages are well-written, and include a list of references as well as excellent photographs, diagrams, and illustrations. Examples of lecture topics include Plant Cells vs. Animal Cells; Archaebacteria & Life on Mars; The Five Kingdoms of Life; and Biomes of North America. Site visitors can also link to other sections of Wayne's Word including Botany lectures, and in-depth information about Duckweeds.

261

Dynamics of trapped two-component Fermi gas: Temperature dependence of the transition from collisionless to collisional regime  

SciTech Connect

We develop a numerical method to study the dynamics of a two-component atomic Fermi gas trapped inside a harmonic potential at temperature T well below the Fermi temperature T{sub F}. We examine the transition from the collisionless to the collisional regime down to T=0.2 T{sub F} and find a good qualitative agreement with the experiments of B. DeMarco and D.S. Jin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 040405 (2002)]. We demonstrate a twofold role of temperature on the collision rate and on the efficiency of collisions. In particular, we observe a hitherto unreported effect, namely, the transition to hydrodynamic behavior is shifted towards lower collision rates as temperature decreases.

Toschi, F. [Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo, CNR, Viale del Policlinico 137, I-00161 Rome (Italy); INFM, Sezione di Roma 'Tor Vergata', Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Vignolo, P.; Tosi, M.P. [NEST-INFM and Classe di Scienze, Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Succi, S. [Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo, CNR, Viale del Policlinico 137, I-00161 Rome (Italy); NEST-INFM and Classe di Scienze, Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)

2003-04-01

262

A global thermospheric model based on mass spectrometer and incoherent scatter data MSIS. II - Composition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurements of O, He, and Ar from neutral gas mass spectrometers on four satellites (Ogo 6, San Marco 3, Aeros A, and AEC-C) and inferred oxygen and hydrogen densities from an ion mass spectrometer on AE-C have been combined with a neutral temperature and nitrogen density model to produce a global model of thermospheric composition in terms of inferred variations at 120 km. The data set covers the time period from mid-1969 to mid-1975. The MSIS (mass spectrometer and incoherent scatter data) model is compared with the Ogo 6 model (Hedin et al., 1974). Ar variations at 120 km tend to be in phase with temperature variations and inverse to the He, O, and H variations.

Hedin, A. E.; Reber, C. A.; Newton, G. P.; Spencer, N. W.; Brinton, H. C.; Mayr, H. G.; Potter, W. E.

1977-01-01

263

Fabrication of Nanowire Arrays for Molecular Electronics and Chemical Sensing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recently developed technique of superlattice nanowire pattern transfer (SNAP) allows for the fabrication of arrays of nanowires at wire diameter, regularity, aspect ratio, and pitch that exceeds that of currently available techniques [1]. These arrays have potential applications in the fabrication of ultra-dense nanoscale circuits including FET based logic, molecular memory, and chemical sensing with commensurate constraints on nanowire geometry, conductivity, and chemical reactivity. For example, room temperature transport measurements of semiconducting wires show both Ohmic conductivity as well as a pronounced gating response. This enables the construction of a multiplexer with geometric scaling, effectively bridging the macroscopic and mesoscopic size regimes with a scalable architecture. Similar applications for molecular memory and chemical sensing will also be discussed. This work supported by the DARPA Moletronics Program, the Semiconductor Research Corporation, and MARCO Center funding. [1] N. Melosh, et al., Science 300, 112 (2003).

Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Beckman, R.; Melosh, N.; Luo, Y.; Green, J. E.; Boukai, A.; Heath, J. R.

2004-03-01

264

Acknowledgements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ackowledgement logos The organizers of the Young Researchers' Meeting in Rome would like to thank all the scientists who participated in the meetings. We thank the Universities of Roma "Tor Vergata" and "La Sapienza" for hosting the first two editions of the conference, and the Physics and Astronomy Doctoral Schools of "La Sapienza" for sponsoring the 2nd meeting. We are grateful to Prof. Roberto Capuzzo-Dolcetta (Univ. "La Sapienza"), Prof. Enzo Marinari (Univ. "La Sapienza"), Prof. Pasquale Mazzotta (Univ. "Tor Vergata"), Prof. Giancarlo Ruocco (Univ. "La Sapienza"), Sig.ra Fernanda Lupinacci (Univ. "La Sapienza"), Dott. Marco Veneziani (Lessico Intellettuale Europeo-CNR), Dott.sa Rossella Cossu (Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo-CNR) and Dott. Paolo Cabella (University of Rome "Tor Vergata") for logistical and technical support, and useful discussions. Conference photographs

2011-02-01

265

New Study Suggests Weight Loss from Gastric Bypass Might be Partly Due to Dietary Fat Aversion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Press release on a recent study finding that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery leads to a significant reduction in dietary fat intake, and that this reduction may be due to digestive consequences and the hormone GLP-1. This study, ÃÂGastric Bypass Reduces Fat Intake and Preference,àwas conducted by Carel le Roux, Marco Bueter, Torsten Olbers, Hutan Ashrafian, Thanos Athanasious and Stephen Bloom, all of Imperial Weight Centre, Imperial College London, UK; Nadine Theis, Christian Löwenstein, and Thomas A. Lutz, the Institute of Veterinary Physiology Zurich, Switzerland; Malin Werling, Goteborg University, Goteborg, Sweden; and Alan Spector, Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee. The study is published in the American Journal of Physiology àRegulatory, Integrative, and Comparative Physiology.

APS Communications Office (American Physiological Society Communications Office)

2011-07-27

266

A global thermospheric model based on mass spectrometer and incoherent scatter data MSIS. I - N2 density and temperature  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurements of neutral nitrogen density from mass spectrometers on five satellites (AE-B, Ogo 6, San Marco 3, Aeros A, and AE-C) and neutral temperatures inferred from incoherent scatter measurements at four ground stations are combined to produce a model of thermospheric neutral temperatures and nitrogen densities similar to the Ogo 6 empirical model (Hedin et al., 1974). This global model is designated MSIS (mass spectrometer and incoherent scatter). The global average temperature, the annual temperature variation, lower bound density, and lower bound temperature are discussed. The data set covers the time period from the end of 1965 to mid-1975 and also a wide range of solar activities. Diurnal and semidiurnal variations in lower bound density and temperature are considered, as is magnetic activity.

Hedin, A. E.; Reber, C. A.; Newton, G. P.; Spencer, N. W.; Salah, J. E.; Evans, J. V.; Kayser, D. C.; Alcayde, D.; Bauer, P.; Cogger, L.

1977-01-01

267

Vertical neutral wind in the equatorial F-region deduced from electric field and ion density measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Direct current (DC) electric field and ion density measurements near density depletion regions (that is, equatorial plasma bubbles) are used to estimate the vertical neutral wind speed. The measured zonal electric field in a series of density depletions crossed by the San Marco D satellite at 01.47-01.52 Universal Time (UT) on 25 October 1988, can be explained if a downward neutral wind of 15-30 m/s exists. Simultaneously, the F-region plasma was moving downward at a speed of 30-50 m/s. These events appear in the local time sector of 23.00-23.15 in which strong downward neutral winds may occur. Indeed, airglow measurements suggest that downward neutral velocities of 25-50 m/s are possible at time near midnight in the equatorial F-region.

Laakso, Harri; Aggson, Thomas L.; Herrero, F. A.; Pfaff, Robert F.; Hanson, William B.

1995-05-01

268

Astronomía en la cultura  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

La Astronomía en la Cultura es el estudio interdisciplinario a nivel global de la astronomía prehistórica, antigua y tradicional, en el marco de su contexto cultural. Esta disciplina abarca cualquier tipo de estudios o líneas de investigación en que se relacione a la astronomía con las ciencias humanas o sociales. En ella se incluyen tanto fuentes escritas, relatos orales como fuentes arqueológicas, abarcando entre otros, los siguientes temas: calendarios, observación práctica, cultos y mitos, representación simbólica de eventos, conceptos y objetos astronómicos, orientación astronómica de tumbas, templos, santuarios y centros urbanos, cosmología tradicional y la aplicación ceremonial de tradiciones astronómicas, la propia historia de la astronomía y la etnoastronomía (Krupp, 1989) (Iwaniszewski, 1994). En nuestro trabajo abordamos la historia y situación actual de esta disciplina, sus métodos y sus relaciones con otras áreas de investigación.

López, A.; Giménez Benitez, S.; Fernández, L.

269

[Uriel García Cáceres, prominent leader and teacher of public health in Peru].  

PubMed

Dr. Uriel García Cáceres, prominent physician, researcher and Peruvian historian, was born in the city of Cusco in 1922. He studied medicine at Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos (1942-1950). He was influenced by Dr. Pedro Weiss and as a result he worked in the field of Pathological Anatomy, where he made substantial discoveries such as the description of kidney nodules associated with the verrucous stage of bartonellosis or Carrion?s disease. His most important contributions are in the paleopathology field, in which he helped create a better understanding of Peruvian ancient pathology. Dr. García Cáceres also participated in the political arena; he was Peru?s Minister of Health, a position in which he served selflessly and always working for the good of the health of all Peruvians. At 91 years old, he is always tenacious and cheerful, and above all, he is a teacher with a readiness to learn. PMID:24718543

Ugarte Ubilluz, Oscar

2014-03-01

270

Adaptation and Implementation of a Radically Reformed Introductory Physics Course for Biological Science Majors: Assessing Success and Prospects for Future Implementation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The physics department at California State University San Marcos has nearly completed work on an NSF CCLI-A&I funded project to adapt and implement UC Davis' reformed introductory physics course for students in the biological sciences. As part of the project, a group of physics instructors met to discuss criteria for measuring the implementation's success and the feasibility of implementing the course at other institutions. Criteria for measuring success fell into three areas-student outcomes, institutionalization of the course, and adherence to the original course's core philosophy. This paper describes the criteria in more detail, presents data for outcomes already measured, and discusses the challenges of measuring other outcomes. Finally, the paper briefly discusses the likelihood of instructors at other institutions meeting with the same or better success at implementing the course.

de Leone, Charles; Marion, Robin; Ishikawa, Catherine

2007-01-01

271

List of Participants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Armani Paolo (Università di Trento) Benhar Omar (INFN Roma) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonanno Luca (Università di Ferrara) Catara Francesco (Università di Catania) Cò Giampaolo (Università di Lecce) Colonna Maria (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN Catania) Colonna Nicola (INFN Bari) Conti Francesco (Università di Pavia) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Cristoforetti Marco (Technische Universität München, Germania) Cuofano Carmine (Università di Ferrara) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) Drago Alessandro (Università di Ferrara) Faccioli Pietro (Università di Trento) Farina Nicola (INFN Roma) Finelli Paolo (Università di Bologna) Fiorentini Giovanni (Università di Ferrara) Fortunato Lorenzo (Università di Padova) Gambacurta Danilo (Università di Catania) Gandolfi Stefano (Università di Trento) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (INFN Pisa) Giusti Carlotta (INFN Pavia) Illarionov Alexei (SISSA Trieste) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Leidemann Winfried (Università di Trento) Lenzi Silvia (Università di Padova) Lipparini Enrico (Università di Trento) Lissia Marcello (Università di Cagliari) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Maieron Chiara (Università di Lecce) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Millo Raffaele (Università di Trento) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pastore Alessandro (Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Finlandia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pisent Gualtiero (Università di Padova) Prete Gianfranco (INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro) Quarati Piero (Politecnico di Torino) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Salmè Giovanni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Traini Marco (Università di Trento) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Vitturi Andrea (Università di Padova) Viviani Michele (INFN Pisa)

Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

2009-07-01

272

Mélanges and olistostromes in the Puerto Plata area (northern Dominican Republic) as a record of subduction and collisional processes between the Caribbean and North-American plates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cordillera Septentrional records the oblique subduction and collisional processes between the Caribbean and North American plates during Late Cretaceous to early Palaeogene times. The Puerto Plata basement complex of this range is considered to represent a fragment of the frontal part of the Great Arc of the Caribbean in Hispaniola that originated during thrusting of the Caribbean plate onto the North American shelf. This paper describes and interprets mélange-type formations spatially related to this basement complex and its associated sedimentary cover, the Imbert Fm. Such formations include the San Marcos olistostromic Fm and a unit of Serpentinic Breccias located at the base and interbedded in the lower section of the former. Both units are Eocene in age, have been mainly deposited by syntectonic subaqueous mass-transport processes and typically host a varied mixture of blocks of known and unknown origin, including high-P metamorphic rocks (knockers). Cartoon models of palaeotectonic reconstructions depicting the final stages of subduction and the onset of collisional process in Early and Middle Eocene times respectively, are proposed in order to show the original relationships among all geological units involved in the study area. The Serpentinic Breccias are interpreted as being the result of extensive sedimentary recycling of peridotite and serpentinite massive bodies or subduction related mélanges when exposed at the surface by return flow during early exhumation stages of the accretionary complex, coevally with the end of island-arc volcanism. This process is inferred to be the triggering mechanism for the feeding of originally deep-sited knockers, probably in combination with strike-slip tectonics and associated mud diapirism The slightly younger San Marcos Fm records the collision event and main exhumation stage, while displaying the typical features present in olistostromes and other mass-wasting, gravitationally-driven deposits recognized in extensive areas of forearc and accretionary complexes involved in arc-continent collisional processes.

Hernaiz Huerta, P. P.; Pérez-Valera, F.; Abad, M.; Monthel, J.; Diaz de Neira, A.

2012-09-01

273

THERMAP: a mid-infrared spectro-imager based on an uncooled micro-bolometer for space missions to small bodies of the solar system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the feasibility study of a mid-infrared (8-18 ?m) spectro-imager called THERMAP, based on an uncooled microbolometer detector array. Due to the recent technological developments of these detectors, which have undergone significant improvements in the last decade, we wanted to test their capabilities for the Marco Polo R ESA Cosmic Vision mission. In this study, we demonstrate that the new generation of uncooled microbolometer detectors has all the imaging and spectroscopic capabilities to fulfill the scientific objectives of this mission. To test the imaging capabilities of the detector, we built an experiment based on a 640x480 ULIS microbolometer array, a germanium lense and a black body. Using this experiment, we show that calibrated radiometric images can be obtained down to at least 258 K (lower limit of our experiment), and that two calibration points are sufficient to determine the absolute scene temperature with an accuracy better than 1 K. Extrapolation to lower temperature should allow to measure the temperature down to 180 K with an accuracy of ~5 K. Adding flux attenuating neutral density mid-infrared filters (transmittance : 50%, 10%, 1%) to our experiment, we were able to evaluate the spectroscopic performances of the detector. Our results show that we can perform spectroscopic measurements with a spectral resolution of R~100 at 350 K, the typical surface temperature of a Near Earth Asteroid at 1 AU from the Sun. The mid-infrared spectro-imager THERMAP, based on the above detector, is therefore well suited to the Marco Polo R mission.

Brageot, E.; Groussin, O.; Lamy, P.; Reynaud, J.-L.; Fargant, G.

2012-04-01

274

THERMAP: a mid-infrared spectro-imager based on an uncooled micro-bolometer for space missions to small bodies of the solar system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the feasibility study of a mid-infrared (8-18 µm) spectro-imager called THERMAP, based on an uncooled micro-bolometer detector array. Due to the recent technological development of these detectors, which have undergone significant improvements in the last decade, we wanted to test their performances for the Marco Polo R ESA Cosmic Vision mission. In this study, we demonstrate that the new generation of uncooled micro-bolometer detectors has all the imaging and spectroscopic capabilities to fulfill the scientific objectives of this mission. In order to test the imaging capabilities of the detector, we set up an experiment based on a 640x480 ULIS micro-bolometer array, a germanium objective and a black body. Using the results of this experiment, we show that calibrated radiometric images can be obtained down to at least 255 K (lower limit of our experiment), and that two calibration points are sufficient to determine the absolute scene temperature with an accuracy better than 1.5 K. Adding flux attenuating neutral density mid-infrared filters (transmittance: 50%, 10%, 1%) to our experiment, we were able to evaluate the spectroscopic performances of the detector. Our results show that we can perform spectroscopic measurements in the wavelength range 8-16 µm with a spectral resolution of R~40-80 for a scene temperature <300 K, the typical surface temperature of a Near Earth Asteroid at 1 AU from the Sun. The mid-infrared spectro-imager THERMAP, based on the above detector, is therefore well suited for the Marco Polo R mission.

Brageot, E.; Groussin, O.; Lamy, P.; Reynaud, J.-L.; Fargant, G.; Licandro, J.; Helbert, J.; Knollenberg, J.; Kührt, E.

2012-09-01

275

Developmental variation among Cochliomyia macellaria Fabricius (Diptera: Calliphoridae) populations from three ecoregions of Texas, USA.  

PubMed

Forensic entomologists rely on published developmental datasets to estimate the age of insects developing on human remains. Currently, these datasets only represent populations of targeted insects from specific locations. However, recent data indicate that populations can exhibit genetic variation in their development, including signatures of local adaptation demonstrated by regionally distinct plastic responses to their environments. In this study, three geographically distinct populations of the secondary screwworm, Cochliomyia macellaria Fabricius (Diptera: Calliphoridae; College Station, Longview, and San Marcos, TX, USA), a common blow fly collected from human remains in the southern USA, were reared in two distinct environments (cool 21 °C, 65 % relative humidity (RH); and warm 31 °C, 70 % RH) over 2 years (2011 and 2012) in order to determine differences in development time and mass. Significant differences in immature and pupal development time, as well as pupal mass, were shown to exist among strains derived from different populations and years. For immature development times, there was evidence of only an environmental effect on phenotype, while genotype by environment interactions was observed in pupal development times and pupal mass. College Station and San Marcos populations exhibited faster pupal development and smaller pupal sizes in the cooler environment relative to the Longview population, but showed an opposite trend in the warm environment. Rank order for College Station and Longview populations was reversed across years. Failure to take genetic variation into consideration when making such estimates can lead to unanticipated error and bias. These results indicate that genetics will have little impact on error when working with Texas genotypes of C. macellaria at ~30 °C and 70 % RH, but will have a more meaningful impact on error in postmortem interval estimates with this species in cooler, drier environments. PMID:24811885

Owings, Charity G; Spiegelman, Cliff; Tarone, Aaron M; Tomberlin, Jeffery K

2014-07-01

276

Combination of gene expression patterns in whole blood discriminate between tuberculosis infection states  

PubMed Central

Background Genetic factors are involved in susceptibility or protection to tuberculosis (TB). Apart from gene polymorphisms and mutations, changes in levels of gene expression, induced by non-genetic factors, may also determine whether individuals progress to active TB. Methods We analysed the expression level of 45 genes in a total of 47 individuals (23 healthy household contacts and 24 new smear-positive pulmonary TB patients) in Addis Ababa using a dual colour multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (dcRT-MLPA) technique to assess gene expression profiles that may be used to distinguish TB cases and their contacts and also latently infected (LTBI) and uninfected household contacts. Results The gene expression level of BLR1, Bcl2, IL4d2, IL7R, FCGR1A, MARCO, MMP9, CCL19, and LTF had significant discriminatory power between sputum smear-positive TB cases and household contacts, with AUCs of 0.84, 0.81, 0.79, 0.79, 0.78, 0.76, 0.75, 0.75 and 0.68 respectively. The combination of Bcl2, BLR1, FCGR1A, IL4d2 and MARCO identified 91.66% of active TB cases and 95.65% of household contacts without active TB. The expression of CCL19, TGFB1, and Foxp3 showed significant difference between LTBI and uninfected contacts, with AUCs of 0.85, 0.82, and 0.75, respectively, whereas the combination of BPI, CCL19, FoxP3, FPR1 and TGFB1 identified 90.9% of QFT- and 91.6% of QFT+ household contacts. Conclusions Expression of single and especially combinations of host genes can accurately differentiate between active TB cases and healthy individuals as well as between LTBI and uninfected contacts.

2014-01-01

277

Wireless data communication alternatives for small public safety agencies: how one community cost-effectively solved its expanding field data requirements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A growing number of Public Safety agencies have begun leveraging wireless data communication technology to improve tactical response capabilities as well as overall productivity. For years police departments subscribed to CDPD (Cellular Digital Packet Data) services to provide officers with basic dispatch data and criminal database access. Now as cellular carriers have deactivated CDPD and shifted to 2.5G and 3G data services such as 1xRTT, GPRS and EDGE, police departments are scrambling to fill the void. Not surprisingly, the extraordinary investments cellular carriers made to upgrade their infrastructures have been transferred to the customer, with monthly fees running as high as $80 a month per user. It's no wonder public safety agencies have been reluctant to adopt these services. Lost in the fray are those smaller police departments which account for nearly 90% of the nation's total. This group has increasingly sought out alternative data communication solutions that are not predicated on budget-busting monthly access fees. One such example is the Marco Island Police Department (MIPD) in Southwestern Florida that received a Federal grant to augment its existing voice communications with data. After evaluating several different technologies and vendors, MIPD chose a 900 MHz ad hoc mesh network solution based on its ability to provide reliable, high-speed and secure IP-based data communications over extensive distances. This paper will discuss technical details of Marco Island's mobile mesh network implementation; including: coverage area with 900 MHz spread spectrum radios, strategic repeater tower placement, interference, throughput performance, and the necessity for application-persistence software.

Canning, Ryan M.; Lefebvre, Eric

2005-06-01

278

Human lung tissue explants reveal novel interactions during Legionella pneumophila infections.  

PubMed

Histological and clinical investigations describe late stages of Legionnaires' disease but cannot characterize early events of human infection. Cellular or rodent infection models lack the complexity of tissue or have nonhuman backgrounds. Therefore, we developed and applied a novel model for Legionella pneumophila infection comprising living human lung tissue. We stimulated lung explants with L. pneumophila strains and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) to analyze tissue damage, bacterial replication, and localization as well as the transcriptional response of infected tissue. Interestingly, we found that extracellular adhesion of L. pneumophila to the entire alveolar lining precedes bacterial invasion and replication in recruited macrophages. In contrast, OMVs predominantly bound to alveolar macrophages. Specific damage to septa and epithelia increased over 48 h and was stronger in wild-type-infected and OMV-treated samples than in samples infected with the replication-deficient, type IVB secretion-deficient DotA(-) strain. Transcriptome analysis of lung tissue explants revealed a differential regulation of 2,499 genes after infection. The transcriptional response included the upregulation of uteroglobin and the downregulation of the macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO). Immunohistochemistry confirmed the downregulation of MARCO at sites of pathogen-induced tissue destruction. Neither host factor has ever been described in the context of L. pneumophila infections. This work demonstrates that the tissue explant model reproduces realistic features of Legionnaires' disease and reveals new functions for bacterial OMVs during infection. Our model allows us to characterize early steps of human infection which otherwise are not feasible for investigations. PMID:24166955

Jäger, Jens; Marwitz, Sebastian; Tiefenau, Jana; Rasch, Janine; Shevchuk, Olga; Kugler, Christian; Goldmann, Torsten; Steinert, Michael

2014-01-01

279

IL-1? and complement cooperate in triggering local neutrophilic inflammation in response to adenovirus and eliminating virus-containing cells.  

PubMed

Inflammation is a highly coordinated host response to infection, injury, or cell stress. In most instances, the inflammatory response is pro-survival and is aimed at restoring physiological tissue homeostasis and eliminating invading pathogens, although exuberant inflammation can lead to tissue damage and death. Intravascular injection of adenovirus (Ad) results in virus accumulation in resident tissue macrophages that trigger activation of CXCL1 and CXCL2 chemokines via the IL-1?-IL-1RI signaling pathway. However, the mechanistic role and functional significance of this pathway in orchestrating cellular inflammatory responses to the virus in vivo remain unclear. Resident metallophilic macrophages expressing macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO+) in the splenic marginal zone (MZ) play the principal role in trapping Ad from the blood. Here we show that intravascular Ad administration leads to the rapid recruitment of Ly-6G+7/4+ polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in the splenic MZ, the anatomical compartment that remains free of PMNs when these cells are purged from the bone marrow via a non-inflammatory stimulus. Furthermore, PMN recruitment in the splenic MZ resulted in elimination of virus-containing cells. IL-1?-IL-1RI signaling is only partially responsible for PMN recruitment in the MZ and requires CXCR2, but not CXCR1 signaling. We further found reduced recruitment of PMNs in the splenic MZ in complement C3-deficient mice, and that pre-treatment of IL-1?-deficient, but not wild-type mice, with complement inhibitor CR2-Crry (inhibits all complement pathways at C3 activation) or CR2-fH (inhibits only the alternative complement activation pathway) prior to Ad infection, abrogates PMN recruitment to the MZ and prevents elimination of MARCO+ macrophages from the spleen. Collectively, our study reveals a non-redundant role of the molecular factors of innate immunity--the chemokine-activating IL-1?-IL-1RI-CXCR2 axis and complement--in orchestrating local inflammation and functional cooperation of PMNs and resident macrophages in the splenic MZ, which collectively contribute to limiting disseminated pathogen spread via elimination of virus-containing cells. PMID:24651866

Di Paolo, Nelson C; Baldwin, Lisa K; Irons, Eric E; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Tomlinson, Stephen; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M

2014-03-01

280

Micro-facies analyses of late Holocene sediments from the Ein Gedi site (Dead Sea)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Late Holocene Dead Sea sediments of the Ein Gedi profile at the western Dead Sea shore provide high-resolution information about small-scale climatic variations in the Levant. Earlier investigations by Migowski et al. (2004, 2006) demonstrated the high potential of the Ein Gedi site for reconstructing the paleoenvironment of this climate-sensitive region, but also the need for high-resolution analyses. In the study presented here, a multi-proxy approach of micro-facies analyses from thin sections, µXRF element scanning and further magnetic susceptibility measurements allowed detailed analyses of a 2.75m long section from the DSEn composite profile spanning the time from approximately 2 to 4 ka BP. The analysed DSEn sequence of the Dead Sea margin is characterised by a continuous succession of evaporitic varves, composed of alternating detrital and aragonite and/or gypsum layers with intercalated earthquake-induced mixed layers (Marco et al., 1996). In the lower part of the investigated interval a sand deposit is associated to lake-level decline around 3.3 ka BP (Bookman (Ken-Tor) et al., 2004) in the Late Bronze Age. The aim of this study is to establish a detailed high-resolution time series of extreme events and decadal-scale variations in the eastern Mediterranean climate system. Using this data set will further enable determining the influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation and solar irradiation changes on that region. Another objective will be to synchronise the DSEn interval with the new ICDP Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP) cores from the northern deep basin in order to compare sedimentation processes at the Dead Sea shore with those from the deep basin. Bookman (Ken-Tor), R., Enzel, Y., Agnon, A., Stein, M., 2004. Late Holocene lake levels of the Dead Sea. Geological Society of America Bulletin, May/June, 555-571. Marco, S., Stein, M., Agnon, A., 1996. Long-term earthquake clustering: A 50,000-year paleoseismic record in the Dead Sea Graben. Journal of Geophysical Research 101, 6179-6191. Migowski, C., Agnon, A., Bookman, R., Negendank, J.F.W., Stein, M., 2004. Recurrence pattern of Holocene earthquakes along the Dead Sea transform revealed by varve-counting and radiocarbon dating of lacustrine sediments. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 222, 301-314. Migowski, C., Stein, M., Prasad, S., Negendank, J.F.W., 2006. Holocene climate variability and cultural evolution in the Near East. Quaternary Research 66(3), 421-431.

Neugebauer, I.; Brauer, A.; Schwab, M. J.; Frank, U.; Dulski, P.

2012-04-01

281

Multi-Cell High Latitude Density Structure Induced by Ion Drag during Active Periods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During active periods two-cell convection patterns can produce four-cell density structure in the high-latitude thermosphere. During these periods density perturbations approaching 50% are possible. The occurrence of density structures that are more complex than the forcing itself suggests that the structure is caused by a profound change in the balance of forces. Using a General Circulation Model of the thermosphere, we compare the balance of forces in the upper and lower thermosphere during active and quiet times. We also examine the thermal structure caused by the dynamical adjustment to ion-drag forcing in relation to the other terms as a balanced state is approached. Simulations reveal that where ion drag is unable to accelerate the atmosphere into rapid motion (during quiet times or at low thermospheric altitudes) the Coriolis force is the dominant inertial term, and for fixed pressure levels centers of cyclonic motion are (per the usual meteorology relations) colder and denser than the surrounding air, while centers of anticyclonic motion are warmer and less dense. At fixed heights, densities are high in the evening anticyclonic gyre, and low in the dawn cyclonic gyre. However, this situation is radically changed during active periods when the atmosphere is spun up to rapid motion and the centrifugal force resulting from curved trajectories is the dominant inertial force. When this occurs, the high latitude anticyclones and cyclones both become centers of relatively cold high density air at fixed height. Cold low-density centers are found on both the dawn and dusk sides with a trough of low density air over the pole connecting them. This intrusion of low density splits the evening high density region that exists under quiet conditions giving the four cell pattern found by Crowley et al. [1989; 1996a, b]. Crowley, G., J. Schoendorf, R. G. Roble, F. A. Marcos (1996a). Cellular structures in the high latitude lower thermosphere, J. Geophys. Res. 101, 211-223 Crowley, G., J. Schoendorf, R. G. Roble, F. A. Marcos (1996b). Neutral density cells in the lower thermosphere at high latitudes, Adv. Space Res., 18 (3). 69-74 Crowley, G., D. J. Knipp, K. A. Drake, J. Lei, E. Sutton, and H. Lühr (2010), Thermospheric density enhancements in the dayside cusp region during strong BY conditions, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L07110, doi:10.1029/2009GL042143.

Walterscheid, R. L.; Crowley, G.

2012-12-01

282

In the Footsteps of Roger Revelle: a Partnership between SIO, ONR and Middle School Science Students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Now in its seventh year, “In the Footsteps of Roger Revelle” (IFRR) is a middle school science education program that draws student interest, scientific content and coherence with National Science Standards from real-time research at sea in fields of physical science. As a successful collaboration involving Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), National Science Foundation (NSF),Office of Naval Research (ONR), and San Marcos Middle School (SMMS), IFRR brings physical oceanography and related sciences to students at the San Marcos Middle School in real-time from research vessels at sea using SIO's HiSeasNet satellite communication system. With a generous grant from ONR, students are able to tour the SIO ships and spend a day at sea doing real oceanographic data collection and labs. Through real-time and near-realtime broadcasts and webcasts, students are able to share data with scientists and gain an appreciation for the value of biogeochemical research in the field as it relates to their classroom studies. The primary impact on these students is an appreciation of ocean science as it relates to their lives. Interaction with scientists and researchers as well as crew members gives students insights into not only possible career paths, but the vital importance of cutting edge oceanographic research on our society. With their science teacher on the ship as an education outreach specialist or ashore guiding students in their interactions with selected scientists at sea, students observe shipboard research being carried out live via videoconference, Skype, daily e-mails, interviews, digital whiteboard sessions, and web interaction. Students then research, design, develop, deploy, and field-test their own data-collecting physical oceanography instruments in their classroom. The online interactive curriculum encourages active inquiry with intellectually stimulating problem- solving, enabling students to gain critical insight and skill while investigating some of the most provocative questions of our time, and seeing scientists as role-models. Over the last seven years science test scores with IFRR students have shown significant increases in classes where this curriculum has been implemented as compared to other classes where the traditional curriculum has been used. IFRR has provided students in the San Diego area with a unique opportunity for learning about oceanographic research, which could inspire students to become oceanographers or at least scientifically literate citizens, a benefit for a country that depends increasingly on technically proficient personnel, and a benefit for society at large.

Brice, D.; Appelgate, T. B.; Foley, S.; Knox, R. A.; Mauricio, P.

2010-12-01

283

Dynamic Tensile Strength of Crustal Rocks and Application to Impact Cratering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dynamic tensile strengths of two crustal rocks, San Marcos gabbro and Coconino sandstone (Meteor Crater, Arizona), were determined by carrying out flat plate impact experiments. Porosity of San Marcos gabbro is very low, and the reported porosity for Coconino sandstone is approx. 25%. Aluminum flyer plates were used for gabbro with impact velocities of 13 to 50 m/s, which produce tensile stresses in the range of 120 to 450 MPa. PMMA flyer plates were used for sandstone with impact velocities of 5 to 25 m/s, resulting tensile stresses in the range of approx. 13 to 55 MPa. Impact was normal to the bedding of sandstone. Tensile duration times for two cases were approx. 1 and approx. 2.3 microns, respectively. Pre-shot and post-shot ultrasonic P and S wave velocities were measured for the targets. Velocity reduction for gabbro occurred at approx. 150 MPa, very close to the earlier result determined by microscopic examination. The reduction of S wave is slightly higher than that of P wave. This indicates that the impact-induced cracks were either aligned, or there were residual fluids within cracks, or both. Data for sandstone velocity reduction was few and scattered caused by its high porosity. The range of dynamic tensile strength of Coconino sandstone is within 25 and 30 MPa. Obvious radial cracks at certain stresses indicate that deformation was not restricted to one dimensional strain as being assumed. Spall fragmentation occurred above 40 MPa. The combination of impact velocities, U (km/s), and impactor radii, a0)(m, are constrained by Meteor Crater fracture depth, approx. 850 m, and the dynamic tensile fracture strength from our experiments, 40 MPa. Volume of the crater for each impact was calculated using V = 0.009mU1.65, where V is crater volume (cu m), m is the mass of the impactor (kg). Volume of impact with U = 28 km/s, a0 = 10 m is close to the real Meteor Crater volume, 7.6e7 cu m. Impact energy for this case is 3.08 Mt., which agrees well with theoretical calculation (3.3 to 7.4 Mt.).(1 Mt. = 4.18e 15J).

Ai, H.; Ahrens, T. J.

2003-01-01

284

IL-1? and Complement Cooperate in Triggering Local Neutrophilic Inflammation in Response to Adenovirus and Eliminating Virus-Containing Cells  

PubMed Central

Inflammation is a highly coordinated host response to infection, injury, or cell stress. In most instances, the inflammatory response is pro-survival and is aimed at restoring physiological tissue homeostasis and eliminating invading pathogens, although exuberant inflammation can lead to tissue damage and death. Intravascular injection of adenovirus (Ad) results in virus accumulation in resident tissue macrophages that trigger activation of CXCL1 and CXCL2 chemokines via the IL-1?-IL-1RI signaling pathway. However, the mechanistic role and functional significance of this pathway in orchestrating cellular inflammatory responses to the virus in vivo remain unclear. Resident metallophilic macrophages expressing macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO+) in the splenic marginal zone (MZ) play the principal role in trapping Ad from the blood. Here we show that intravascular Ad administration leads to the rapid recruitment of Ly-6G+7/4+ polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in the splenic MZ, the anatomical compartment that remains free of PMNs when these cells are purged from the bone marrow via a non-inflammatory stimulus. Furthermore, PMN recruitment in the splenic MZ resulted in elimination of virus-containing cells. IL-1?-IL-1RI signaling is only partially responsible for PMN recruitment in the MZ and requires CXCR2, but not CXCR1 signaling. We further found reduced recruitment of PMNs in the splenic MZ in complement C3-deficient mice, and that pre-treatment of IL-1?-deficient, but not wild-type mice, with complement inhibitor CR2-Crry (inhibits all complement pathways at C3 activation) or CR2-fH (inhibits only the alternative complement activation pathway) prior to Ad infection, abrogates PMN recruitment to the MZ and prevents elimination of MARCO+ macrophages from the spleen. Collectively, our study reveals a non-redundant role of the molecular factors of innate immunity – the chemokine-activating IL-1?-IL-1RI-CXCR2 axis and complement – in orchestrating local inflammation and functional cooperation of PMNs and resident macrophages in the splenic MZ, which collectively contribute to limiting disseminated pathogen spread via elimination of virus-containing cells.

Di Paolo, Nelson C.; Baldwin, Lisa K.; Irons, Eric E.; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Tomlinson, Stephen; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M.

2014-01-01

285

Streamflow Conditions in the Guadalupe River Basin, South-Central Texas, Water Years 1987-2006 - An Assessment of Streamflow Gains and Losses and Relative Contribution of Major Springs to Streamflow  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Edwards Aquifer Authority, assessed available streamflow data in the Guadalupe River Basin to determine streamflow gains and losses and the relative contribution of flow from major springs - Comal Springs, San Marcos Springs, and Hueco Springs - to streamflow in reaches of the Guadalupe River and its tributaries. The assessment is based primarily on long-term (1987-2006) and short-term (January 1999, August 1999, August 2000, and August 2006) streamflow conditions. For each analysis period, the ratio of flow from the major springs (measured at the spring source) to the sum of inflows (measured at the source of inflow to the river system) is computed for reaches of the Comal River and San Marcos River that include springflows from major springs, and for Guadalupe River reaches downstream from Canyon Dam. The ratio of springflow to the sum of inflows to the reach is an estimate of the contribution of flows from major springs to streamflow. For 1987-2006, the ratio of springflow from the major springs to the sum of inflows for the most upstream reach that includes inflow from all three major springs, Guadalupe River - above Comal River to Gonzales, is 27 percent. At the lowermost downstream reach, Guadalupe River - Bloomington to the San Antonio River, the percentage of the sum of inflows attributed to springflow is 18 percent. At that lowermost reach, the ratio of Canyon Lake releases to the sum of inflows was 20 percent. For the short-term periods August 2000 and August 2006 (periods of relatively low flow), springflow in the reach Guadalupe River - above Comal River to Gonzales accounted for 77 and 78 percent, respectively, of the sum of inflows in that reach. At the lowermost reach Guadalupe River - Bloomington to San Antonio River, springflow was 52 and 53 percent of the sum of inflows, respectively, during August 2000 and August 2006 (compared with 18 percent during 1987-2006); and during August 2000 and August 2006, the ratios of Canyon Lake releases to the sum of inflows were less than 10 percent (compared with 20 percent during 1987-2006)

Ockerman, Darwin J.; Slattery, Richard N.

2008-01-01

286

Philippines. Church vs. state: Fidel Ramos and family planning face "Catholic Power".  

PubMed

Catholic groups and individuals united in a public rally in Manila's Rizal Park to decry a "cultural dictatorship," which promotes abortion, homosexuality, lesbianism, sexual perversion, condoms, and artificial contraception. Government spokesmen responded that condoms and contraception were part of government policy to spread family planning knowledge and informed choices among the population. Cardinal Jaime Sin and former president Corazon Aquino joined forces to lead the movement against the national family planning program in the largest demonstration since the ouster of Ferdinand Marcos in 1986. Also criticized was the 85-page draft action plan for the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) scheduled for September 1994. Cardinal Sin accused President Clinton of using the action plan to promote worldwide abortion. Under the administration of President Fidel Ramos, family planning funding has quintupled and the number of family planning workers has increased from 200 to 8000. President Ramos has gone the farthest of any administration in opposing the Church's positions on contraception and abortion, although years ago Fidel Ramos and Cardinal Sin were allies in the effort to push out Ferdinand Marcos. The population of the Philippines is 85% Catholic, and laws reflect the Church's doctrine against divorce and abortion. The current growth rate is 2.3%, and the goal is to reduce growth to 2.0% by 1998, the end of Ramos's term in office. The population target is in accord with demographic goals proposed in the UN draft action plan. The Vatican has opposed the language in the plan and may have encouraged other religious leaders to join those opposed to the "war against our babies and children." Sin said that contraceptive distribution was "intrinsically evil" and should be stopped now. Ramos's administration stated that their policies and programs are not "in the hands of the devil" and there is support for the Church on family values and abortion. Health minister Flavier has indicated that illegal abortion has become very common, and control of abortion is through family planning. The Protestant president will oppose abortion at ICDP. PMID:12345705

1994-08-24

287

XMM-Newton detects X-ray 'solar cycle' in distant star  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sun as observed by SOHO hi-res Size hi-res: 708 Kb The Sun as observed by SOHO The Sun as observed by the ESA/NASA SOHO observatory near the minimum of the solar cycle (left) and near its maximum (right). The signs of solar activity near the maximum are clearly seen. New XMM-Newton observations suggest that this behaviour may be typical of stars like the Sun, such as HD 81809 in the constellation Hydra. Solar flare - 4 November 2003 The huge flare produced on 4 November 2003 This image of the Sun, obtained by the ESA/NASA SOHO observatory, shows the powerful X-ray flare that took place on 4 November 2003. The associated coronal mass ejection, coming out of the Sun at a speed of 8.2 million kilometres per hour, hit the Earth several hours later and caused disruptions to telecommunication and power distribution lines. New XMM-Newton observations suggest that this behaviour may be typical of stars like the Sun, such as HD 81809 in the constellation Hydra. Since the time Galileo discovered sunspots, in 1610, astronomers have measured their number, size and location on the disc of the Sun. Sunspots are relatively cooler areas on the Sun that are observed as dark patches. Their number rises and falls with the level of activity of the Sun in a cycle of about 11 years. When the Sun is very active, large-scale phenomena take place, such as the flares and coronal mass ejections observed by the ESA/NASA solar observatory SOHO. These events release a large amount of energy and charged particles that hit the Earth and can cause powerful magnetic storms, affecting radio communications, power distribution lines and even our weather and climate. During the solar cycle, the X-ray emission from the Sun varies by a large amount (about a factor of 100) and is strongest when the cycle is at its peak and the surface of the Sun is covered by the largest number of spots. ESA's X-ray observatory, XMM-Newton, has now shown for the first time that this cyclic X-ray behaviour is common to other stars as well. A team of astronomers, led by Fabio Favata, from ESA's European Space Research and Technology Centre, The Netherlands, has monitored a small number of solar-type stars since the beginning of the XMM-Newton mission in 2000. The X-ray brightness of HD 81809, a star located 90 light years away in the constellation Hydra (the water snake), has varied by more than 10 times over the past two and a half years, reaching a well defined peak in mid 2002. The star has shown the characteristic X-ray modulation (brightening and dimming) typical of the solar cycle. "This is the first clear sign of a cyclic pattern in the X-ray emission of stars other than the Sun," said Favata. Furthermore, the data show that these variations are synchronised with the starspot cycle. If HD 81809 behaves like the Sun, its X-ray brightness can vary by a factor of one hundred over a few years. "We might well have caught HD 81809 at the beginning of an X-ray activity cycle," added Favata. The existence of starspot cycles on other stars had already been established long ago, thanks to observations that began in the 1950s. However, scientists did not know whether the X-ray radiation would also vary with the number of starspots. ESA's XMM-Newton has now shown that this is indeed the case and that this cyclic X-ray pattern is not typical of the Sun alone. "This suggests that our Sun's behaviour is probably nothing exceptional," said Favata. Besides its interest for scientists, the Sun's cyclical behaviour can have an influence on everyone on Earth. Our climate is known to be significantly affected by the high-energy radiation emitted by the Sun. For instance, a temporary disappearance of the solar cycle in the 18th century corresponded with an exceptionally cold period on Earth. Similarly, in the early phases of the lifetime of a planet, this high-energy radiation has a strong influence on the conditions of the atmosphere, and thus potentially on the development of life. Finding out whether the Sun's X-ray cycle is common among other solar-type sta

2004-05-01

288

PREFACE: XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The International Conferences on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (also known as the Calor Conference series, started in October 1990 at Fermilab) address all aspects of calorimetric particle detection and measurement, with an emphasis on high energy physics experiments. The XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (Calor 2010) was held at the campus of the Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China, from May 10-14, 2010. This conference brought together more than 110 participants from 20 countries, including senior scientists and young physicists. During the five days of the conference, 98 presentations were given in seven plenary sessions. The attendees had in-depth discussions on the latest developments and innovations in calorimetry, including the exciting new LHC results. From the presentations, 83 papers were published in this proceedings. The success of the conference was due to the participants' enthusiasm and the excellent talks given by the speakers, and to the conveners for organizing the individual sessions. We would like to thank the International Advisory Committee for giving us the opportunity to host this Conference in Beijing. Finally we would like to thank all the people involved in the organization of the Conference, who have provided valuable local support. Yifang WangChair of Local Organizing Committee International Advisory Committee M DanilovITEP Moscow M DiemozINFN Roma I A EreditatoBern F L FabbriINFN Frascati T KobayashiICEPP Tokyo M LivanPavia University & INFN P LubranoINFN Perugia S MagillANL Argonne A MaioLIPP Lisbon H OberlackMPI Munich A ParaFermilab R WigmansTTU Lubbock R YoshidaANL Argonne R ZhuCaltech Local Organizing Committee Y WangIHEP (Chair) Y GaoTshinghua University T HuIHEP (Scientific secretary) C LiUSTC W LiIHEP J LuIHEP P WangIHEP T XuIHEP L ZhouIHEP Session Conveners 1) Materials and detectors - Junguang Lu (IHEP), Francesca Nessi (CERN) 2) Algorithm and simulation - Nural Akchurin (Texas Tech University), Weidong Li (IHEP) 3) Readout techniques - Gerald Eigen (University of Bergen), Zheng Wang (IHEP) 4) Operating calorimeters and calibration - Marat Gataullin (CERN), Francesco Lanni (BNL) 5) Future calorimetry - Tohru Takeshita (Shinshu University), Lei Xia (Argonne National Laboratory) 6) Astrophysics and neutrino calorimetry - Giuliana Fiorillo (INFN), Hiro Tajima (SLAC) List of Participants AKCHURIN, NuralTexas Tech University AN, ZhenghuaIHEP AUFFRAY, EtiennetteCERN BANFI, DaniloUniversità degli Studi di Milano, INFN BASHARINA-FRESHVILLE, AnastasiaUniversity College London BEAUCHEMIN, Pierre-HuguesUniversity of Oxford BENAGLIA, Andrea DavideUniversity of Milano - Bicocca and INFN BIAN, JianminIHEP BIINO, CristinaINFN BILKI, BurakUniversity of Iowa BLAHA, JanLAPP BOUDRY, VincentLLR / CNRS-IN2P3 CAI, XiaoIHEP CAPONE, AntonioPhysics Department University "La Sapienza" and INFN CAVALLARI, FrancescaCERN and INFN Rome CECCHI, ClaudiaUniversity di Perugia e INFN CHANG, JinfanIHEP CHEN, HuchengBrookhaven National Laboratory CHILDERS, TaylorUniversität Heidelberg - Kirchhoff-Institut für Physik DAO, ValerioGeneva University - DPNC DE LA TAILLE, ChristopheIN2P3/OMEGA-LAL DIEMOZ, MarcellaINFN Roma DOTTI, AndreaCERN EIGEN, GeraldUniversity of Bergen EPIFANOV, DenisBudker Institute of Nuclear Physics FAIVRE, JulienLPSC Grenoble France FANG, JianIHEP FANG, ShuangshiIHEP FANTONI, AlessandraINFN - LNF FERRI, FedericoCEA/Saclay Irfu/SPP FERRONI, FernandoSapienza University & INFN Roma FISK, Henry EugeneFermilab GABALDON, CarolinaCERN GARUTTI, ErikaDESY GAUDIO, GabriellaIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Pavia GILLBERG, DagCarleton University GIOVANNINI, PaolaMax-Planck-Institut für Physik GLAZOV, AlexanderDESY GRACHOV, OlegUniversity of Kansas HAPPACHER, FabioINFN HE, MiaoIHEP HORI, YasutoUniversity of Tokyo, CNS HU, TaoIHEP HULTH, Per-OlofStockholm University JUN, Soon YungCarnegie Mellon University JURK, StefanISEG Spezialelektronik gmbH KAVATSYUK, MyroslavKVI, University of Groningen KHRAMOV, EvgenyJoint Institute

Wang, Yifang

2011-03-01

289

Detection of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in endemic salamander species from central Texas.  

PubMed

A nested PCR protocol was used to analyze five endemic salamander species from Central Texas for the presence of the emerging pathogen, chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis). Chytrid fungus was detected from samples of each of the five species sampled: with low abundance, in the Texas salamander (Eurycea neotenes) (1 positive out of 16 individuals tested; 1/16), the Blanco River Springs salamander (E. pterophila) (1/20), the threatened San Marcos salamander (E. nana) (1/17), and the endangered Barton Springs salamander (E. sosorum) (1/7); much higher abundance was obtained for the Jollyville Plateau salamander (E. tonkawae) (6/14), which has recently been petitioned for addition to the USA endangered species list. With one exception, sequences of PCR products were identical to the 5.8S rRNA gene, and nearly so for the flanking internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of B. dendrobatidis which confirmed the detection of chytrid fungus, and thus demonstrated the presence of this pathogen in populations of endangered species in Central Texas. These confirmations were obtained from nonconsumptive tail clippings which confirms the applicability of historically collected samples from other studies in the examination of the fungus across time. PMID:19424755

Gaertner, James P; Forstner, Michael R J; O'Donnell, Lisa; Hahn, Dittmar

2009-03-01

290

Constructing a time series for large landslides in Trentino (Italy) with 36Cl exposure dating  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Trentino province of NE Italy is characterized by numerous large landslides and rock avalanche deposits, notably in valleys that are rather densely inhabited. One may gain fundamental information for calculation of return times of slope collapses by surface exposure dating of boulders and scarp area bedrock. First investigations focus on the following landslides: Lavini di Marco (covering an area of 15.7 km2), Marocche di Dro (8.1 km2), Molveno (5.0 km2); Palone (2.5 km2), Castelpietra (0.4 km2), Marzola (12.5 km2). Field surveys that indicate multi-phase activity serve as a basis for sampling. Cosmogenic 36Cl was used due to the predominance of limestone and dolomite. In this presentation, interpretation of (in some cases scattered) age distributions at individual sites will be discussed, especially the frequency of pre-exposure. The distribution in time of the Trentino, mass movement events will be considered in light of what is known about paleoseismicity in the region, the timing of other large landslides in the Alps, and the sequence of climate variations during the Holocene.

Ivy-Ochs, S.; Martin, S.; Campedel, P.; Alfimov, V.; Andreotti, E.; Viganò, A.; Carugati, G.; Vockenhuber, C.; Cocco, S.

2012-04-01

291

Diffuse-Flow Conceptualization and Simulation of the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio Region, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A numerical ground-water-flow model (hereinafter, the conduit-flow Edwards aquifer model) of the karstic Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas was developed for a previous study on the basis of a conceptualization emphasizing conduit development and conduit flow, and included simulating conduits as one-cell-wide, continuously connected features. Uncertainties regarding the degree to which conduits pervade the Edwards aquifer and influence ground-water flow, as well as other uncertainties inherent in simulating conduits, raised the question of whether a model based on the conduit-flow conceptualization was the optimum model for the Edwards aquifer. Accordingly, a model with an alternative hydraulic conductivity distribution without conduits was developed in a study conducted during 2004-05 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System. The hydraulic conductivity distribution for the modified Edwards aquifer model (hereinafter, the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model), based primarily on a conceptualization in which flow in the aquifer predominantly is through a network of numerous small fractures and openings, includes 38 zones, with hydraulic conductivities ranging from 3 to 50,000 feet per day. Revision of model input data for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model was limited to changes in the simulated hydraulic conductivity distribution. The root-mean-square error for 144 target wells for the calibrated steady-state simulation for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model is 20.9 feet. This error represents about 3 percent of the total head difference across the model area. The simulated springflows for Comal and San Marcos Springs for the calibrated steady-state simulation were within 2.4 and 15 percent of the median springflows for the two springs, respectively. The transient calibration period for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model was 1947-2000, with 648 monthly stress periods, the same as for the conduit-flow Edwards aquifer model. The root-mean-square error for a period of drought (May-November 1956) for the calibrated transient simulation for 171 target wells is 33.4 feet, which represents about 5 percent of the total head difference across the model area. The root-mean-square error for a period of above-normal rainfall (November 1974-July 1975) for the calibrated transient simulation for 169 target wells is 25.8 feet, which represents about 4 percent of the total head difference across the model area. The root-mean-square error ranged from 6.3 to 30.4 feet in 12 target wells with long-term water-level measurements for varying periods during 1947-2000 for the calibrated transient simulation for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model, and these errors represent 5.0 to 31.3 percent of the range in water-level fluctuations of each of those wells. The root-mean-square errors for the five major springs in the San Antonio segment of the aquifer for the calibrated transient simulation, as a percentage of the range of discharge fluctuations measured at the springs, varied from 7.2 percent for San Marcos Springs and 8.1 percent for Comal Springs to 28.8 percent for Leona Springs. The root-mean-square errors for hydraulic heads for the conduit-flow Edwards aquifer model are 27, 76, and 30 percent greater than those for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model for the steady-state, drought, and above-normal rainfall synoptic time periods, respectively. The goodness-of-fit between measured and simulated springflows is similar for Comal, San Marcos, and Leona Springs for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model and the conduit-flow Edwards aquifer model. The root-mean-square errors for Comal and Leona Springs were 15.6 and 21.3 percent less, respectively, whereas the root-mean-square error for San Marcos Springs was 3.3 percent greater for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model compared to the conduit-flow Edwards aquifer model. The root-mean-square errors for San Antonio and San Pedro Springs were

Lindgren. R. J.

2006-01-01

292

Digital Watersheds and Water Observations Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A digital watershed requires both a description of the physical environment through which water flows and a description of the flow of the water itself. Geographic information systems are appropriate for describing the physical environment. The Arc Hydro geographic data models for surface and groundwater systems are one way by which the physical environment of a watershed can be described in a GIS, and OGC web feature services provide a mechanism for accessing such data through the internet.. The CUAHSI Observations data model is useful for describing time series of water observations measured at point locations, such as streamflow, water quality, groundwater levels and climate data. CUAHSI WaterML web services provide access to such time series data through the internet. The combination of web feature services and WaterML web services provides both geographic and observational data services for digital watersheds. This paper will present an example application of such services using the San Marcos river basin and its underlying Edwards Aquifer in Texas as an example.

Maidment, D. R.; Whiteaker, T. L.

2008-12-01

293

The ALTEA/ALTEINO projects: studying functional effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ALTEA project investigates the risks of functional brain damage induced by particle radiation in space. A modular facility (the ALTEA facility) is being implemented and will be operated in the International Space Station (ISS) to record electrophysiological and behavioral descriptors of brain function and to monitor their time dynamics and correlation with particles and space environment. The focus of the program will be on abnormal visual perceptions (often reported as "light flashes" by astronauts) and the impact on retinal and brain visual structures of particle in microgravity conditions. The facility will be made available to the international scientific community for human neurophysiological, electrophysiological and psychophysics experiments, studies on particle fluxes, and dosimetry. A precursor of ALTEA (the `Alteino' project) helps set the experimental baseline for the ALTEA experiments, while providing novel information on the radiation environment onboard the ISS and on the brain electrophysiology of the astronauts during orbital flights. Alteino was flown to the ISS on the Soyuz TM34 as part of mission Marco Polo. Controlled ground experiments using mice and accelerator beams complete the experimental strategy of ALTEA. We present here the status of progress of the ALTEA project and preliminary results of the Alteino study on brain dynamics, particle fluxes and abnormal visual perceptions.

Narici, L.; Belli, F.; Bidoli, V.; Casolino, M.; De Pascale, M. P.; Di Fino, L.; Furano, G.; Modena, I.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Reali, E.; Rinaldi, A.; Ruggieri, D.; Sparvoli, R.; Zaconte, V.; Sannita, W. G.; Carozzo, S.; Licoccia, S.; Romagnoli, P.; Traversa, E.; Cotronei, V.; Vazquez, M.; Miller, J.; Salnitskii, V. P.; Shevchenko, O. I.; Petrov, V. P.; Trukhanov, K. A.; Galper, A.; Khodarovich, A.; Korotkov, M. G.; Popov, A.; Vavilov, N.; Avdeev, S.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, W.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, N.; Mazzenga, G.; Ricci, M.; Spillantini, P.; Castellini, G.; Vittori, R.; Carlson, P.; Fuglesang, C.; Schardt, D.

2004-01-01

294

Diversity of Salmonella in biofilms and water in a headwater ecosystem.  

PubMed

The diversity of Salmonella was analysed in biofilm and water samples from the spring and slough arms of Spring Lake, the headwaters of the San Marcos River, Texas, during the drought of 2011, with only one potential run-off event at the beginning of the study. Salmonellae were detected in semiselective enrichment cultures by end-point PCR during the entire sampling period of (11 sampling events during 2 months). From the spring arm site, 73% of the biofilms and 41% of the water samples were positive for salmonellae, while only 9% of the biofilms and 23% of the water samples were positive from the slough arm site. Salmonellae could be isolated from all positive samples, with higher diversity in biofilms compared with water samples and more strains obtained from the spring arm than from the slough arm. Differences between sites were generally caused by less frequently detected isolates, while the majority of isolates that were present in both biofilms and water from both sites was represented by three strains only. Quantification attempts by quantitative PCR directly in samples without prior enrichment did not result in a reliable detection of salmonellae, suggesting that numbers in all samples were below the detection limit. PMID:23025800

Sha, Qiong; Forstner, Michael R J; Hahn, Dittmar

2013-03-01

295

Three-body recombination of fermionic atoms in the ultracold limit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While ultracold three-body recombination of bosons has been theoretically studied(B.D. Esry, C.H. Greene, and J.P. Burke, Jr., Phys. Rev. Lett. 83), 1751 (1999); E. Nielsen and J.H. Macek, ibid. 83, 1566 (1999); P.F. Bedaque, E. Braaten, and H.-W. Hammer, ibid. 85,908 (2000). because of its importance for Bose-Einstein condensates, similar studies have not been carried out for ultracold recombination of fermions. We will present the first such studies, examining the behavior of the recombination rate as a function of the p-wave scattering length(J.L. Bohn, Phys. Rev. A, 61) 053409 (2000). and comparing it with what is known about boson recombination. Implications for the many ongoing degenerate Fermi gas experiments(B. DeMarco and D.S. Jin, Science 285), 1703 (1999); K.M. O'Hara et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2092 (2000); A.G. Truscott et al., Science 291, 2750 (2001). will also be discussed.

Suno, H.; Esry, B. D.; Greene, Chris H.

2002-05-01

296

Analysis of a pollution problem of ambient noise and bases for a municipality inspection in the center of Talquepaque, Jalisco, Mexico, 2001  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The city of Tlaquepaque is delimited at the north by Guadalajara city, at the west side by Zapopan, at the south side by Tlajomulco and El Salto, and in its east side by Tonala. Our purpose in this study is to create the first noise map of Tlaquepaque, being the study area between the streets: Avenida Ninos Heroes, Revolucion, Florida, and Marcos Montero. We take 53 points of which 77.3% are above 65 dBA, the Leq average of the points was 69.7 dBA, having as a minium 44.8 dBA and as a maximum 108.6 dBA. Nowadays Tlaquepaque does not have any noise map, so we are trying to identify its more complex areas. The high dB levels found in the study show us how high the noise in the street is, and this is reflected by several citizen complaints about noise received by the municipality. Because of this it is necessary to have an ambient noise diagnostic program, and do the necessary modifications to the current inspection and monitoring system. The preliminary results of this first noise map show a really serious problem with ambient noise caused by vehicular traffic, bad urbanization, and the existence of commercial centers that raise the ambient noise.

Rodriguez, Erika; Orozco, Martha; Palafox, Lourdes

2002-11-01

297

A pilot study characterizing real time exposures to particulate matter and carbon monoxide from cookstove related woodsmoke in rural Peru  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nearly half of the world's population is exposed to household air pollution (HAP) due to long hours spent in close proximity to unvented cooking fires. We aimed to use PM2.5 and CO measurements to characterize exposure to cookstove generated woodsmoke in real time among control (n = 10) and intervention (n = 9) households in San Marcos, Cajamarca Region, Peru. Real time personal particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ?2.5 ?m (PM2.5), and personal and kitchen carbon monoxide (CO) samples were taken. Control households used a number of stoves including open fire and chimney stoves while intervention households used study-promoted chimney stoves. Measurements were categorized into lunch (9 am-1 pm) and dinner (3 pm-7 pm) periods, where applicable, to adjust for a wide range of sampling periods (2.8-13.1 h). During the 4-h time periods, mean personal PM2.5 exposures were correlated with personal CO exposures during lunch (r = 0.67 p = 0.024 n = 11) and dinner (r = 0.72 p = 0.0011 n = 17) in all study households. Personal PM2.5 exposures and kitchen CO concentrations were also correlated during lunch (r = 0.76 p = 0.018 n = 9) and dinner (r = 0.60 p = 0.018 n = 15). CO may be a useful indicator of PM during 4-h time scales measured in real time, particularly during high woodsmoke exposures, particularly during residential biomass cooking.

Commodore, Adwoa A.; Hartinger, Stella M.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Gil, Ana I.; Hall, Daniel B.; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Naeher, Luke P.

2013-11-01

298

Onshore to offshore reconstruction of the Messinian erosion surface in Western Sardinia, Italy: Implications for the Messinian salinity crisis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New outcrops in the Sinis peninsula (Sardinia, Italy) allow a detailed description of the Messinian erosion surface. The correlation between outcrops, industrial seismic data and data collected offshore Oristano from a recent cruise permits reconstruction of the geometry of this surface from presently emerged interfluves to the deep canyons offshore, with: onshore: an eroded karstic plateau presently cropping out over a 20 km × 5 km area. Well-preserved karst structures occur locally and can form several metres high reliefs. The southernmost edge of the plateau is limited by a cliff. The karstic plateau and the cliff are sealed by transgressive deposits of Pliocene age; offshore, an interfluve zone with a mostly flat and low-angle dipping plateau, westward dissected by paleovalleys which were identified down to a depth of 2000 m. In the Oristano Gulf, Messinian paleovalleys were also identified. The Capo San Marco paleocliff was probably located on the edge of a canyon. Onshore, only one major erosion surface was identified, located at the top the Messinian sequence. Offshore, this surface extends down to the abyssal plain. The surface was emplaced above deposits related to the Terminal Carbonate Complex. This indicates that the marginal evaporites are older than the major drawdown of the Mediterranean sea-level. The major drawdown is related to the deposition of the deep evaporites.

Cornée, Jean-Jacques; Maillard, Agnès; Conesa, Gilles; Garcia, Frédéric; Saint Martin, Jean-Paul; Sage, Françoise; Münch, P.

2008-10-01

299

TRIF Mediates Toll-Like Receptor 2-Dependent Inflammatory Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi  

PubMed Central

TRIF is an adaptor molecule important in transducing signals from intracellularly signaling Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR4. Recently, TLR2 was found to signal from intracellular compartments. Using a synthetic ligand for TLR2/1 heterodimers, as well as Borrelia burgdorferi, which is a strong activator of TLR2/1, we found that TLR2 signaling can utilize TRIF. Unlike TRIF signaling by other TLRs, TLR2-mediated TRIF signaling is dependent on the presence of another adaptor molecule, MyD88. However, unlike MyD88 deficiency, TRIF deficiency does not result in diminished control of infection with B. burgdorferi in a murine model of disease. This appears to be due to the effects of MyD88 on phagocytosis via scavenger receptors, such as MARCO, which are not affected by the loss of TRIF. In mice, TRIF deficiency did have an effect on the production of inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that regulation of inflammatory cytokines and control of bacterial growth may be uncoupled, in part through transduction of TLR2 signaling through TRIF.

Petnicki-Ocwieja, Tanja; Chung, Erin; Acosta, David I.; Ramos, Laurie T.; Shin, Ok S.; Ghosh, Sanjukta; Kobzik, Lester; Li, Xin

2013-01-01

300

Space and Earth sciences, computer systems, and scientific data analysis support, volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Final Progress Report covers the specific technical activities of Hughes STX Corporation for the last contract triannual period of 1 June through 30 Sep. 1993, in support of assigned task activities at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). It also provides a brief summary of work throughout the contract period of performance on each active task. Technical activity is presented in Volume 1, while financial and level-of-effort data is presented in Volume 2. Technical support was provided to all Division and Laboratories of Goddard's Space Sciences and Earth Sciences Directorates. Types of support include: scientific programming, systems programming, computer management, mission planning, scientific investigation, data analysis, data processing, data base creation and maintenance, instrumentation development, and management services. Mission and instruments supported include: ROSAT, Astro-D, BBXRT, XTE, AXAF, GRO, COBE, WIND, UIT, SMM, STIS, HEIDI, DE, URAP, CRRES, Voyagers, ISEE, San Marco, LAGEOS, TOPEX/Poseidon, Pioneer-Venus, Galileo, Cassini, Nimbus-7/TOMS, Meteor-3/TOMS, FIFE, BOREAS, TRMM, AVHRR, and Landsat. Accomplishments include: development of computing programs for mission science and data analysis, supercomputer applications support, computer network support, computational upgrades for data archival and analysis centers, end-to-end management for mission data flow, scientific modeling and results in the fields of space and Earth physics, planning and design of GSFC VO DAAC and VO IMS, fabrication, assembly, and testing of mission instrumentation, and design of mission operations center.

Estes, Ronald H. (editor)

1993-01-01

301

Web Services for Astronomical Databases: Connecting AIPS++ to the Virtual Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the year 2010, the NRAO will be operating four of the world's most powerful radio telescopes: GBT, EVLA, VLBA, and ALMA (with international partnership). Multi-Terabyte data sets will quickly accumulate with a rate of twenty-five to fifty Megabytes of data per second generated by ALMA and EVLA each. It will be imperative for scientists to possess software capable of automated data reduction, image synthesis, and archiving. With the evolution of AIPS++ and the recently developed concepts of the image pipeline, the participation of the NRAO in the virtual observatories of the future is now on the horizon giving birth to the need for fast archive access and web service development in AIPS++. When the software package began over 10 years ago, it was not designed for data transfer via the web. In response to the demands of the NVO, we have designed and implemented an application layer that will allow our system to communicate with others. Sponsored by the NRAO and California State University, San Marcos.

Douthit, M. C.

2002-12-01

302

Galahad: medium class asteroid sample return mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Galahad asteroid sample return mission proposal to the NASA New Frontiers solicitation met all of the objectives for the Asteroid Rover/Sample Return mission as defined in that announcement. Galahad is in many ways similar to the Marco Polo and the OSIRIS-Rex proposals. All three missions plan bulk sample returns from primitive, C or B class Near Earth asteroids. Galahad in particular will rendezvous with and orbit the binary C-asteroid 1996 FG3, making extensive orbital measurements. It will then land and collect over 60 g of well-documented samples with geologic context for return to Earth. The samples are expected to provide abundant materials from the early solar system, including chondrules and CAIs, as well as a primitive assemblage of organics, presolar grains and probably hydrated minerals. Analyses of these samples will yield new understanding of the early solar system, planetary accretion, and the nature and origins of prebiotic organic material. We will discuss scientific and technical approaches to characterization of, landing on, and sample collection from small primitive bodies.

Cheng, Andrew; Rivkin, Andrew; Adler, Mark

303

Middle-atmosphere positive ion measurements during solar eclipses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Solar effects on middle-atmosphere electrical parameters, as demonstrated by eclipse-associated responses of conductivity, ion mobility, and charge density, are considered for the total solar eclipses at Red Lake, Ontario, Canada on February 26, 1979 and at San Marco range, Kenya, on February 16, 1980. Negative-conductivity measurements for the Canadian eclipse and probe-current measurements for the Kenyan eclipse demonstrate a rapid loss of free electrons below 80 km at totality. During the Kenyan eclipse, positive-ion responses were different for each of two distinct ion mobility groups. Between 45 and 60 km, eclipse-related positive-ion responses are associated with the low-mobility ions. It is shown that these ions are lost at totality and that an excess buildup occurs following totality. Above 70 km, positive-ion loss at totality is associated with the more mobile ions and only low-mobility positive ions are measured in this region. The buildup in total ion density following totality is thought to result from a reduction in ion loss associated with weak-electron recovery in the region.

Mitchell, J. D.

1985-02-01

304

Middle-atmosphere positive ion measurements during solar eclipses  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Solar effects on middle-atmosphere electrical parameters, as demonstrated by eclipse-associated responses of conductivity, ion mobility, and charge density, are considered for the total solar eclipses at Red Lake, Ontario, Canada on February 26, 1979 and at San Marco range, Kenya, on February 16, 1980. Negative-conductivity measurements for the Canadian eclipse and probe-current measurements for the Kenyan eclipse demonstrate a rapid loss of free electrons below 80 km at totality. During the Kenyan eclipse, positive-ion responses were different for each of two distinct ion mobility groups. Between 45 and 60 km, eclipse-related positive-ion responses are associated with the low-mobility ions. It is shown that these ions are lost at totality and that an excess buildup occurs following totality. Above 70 km, positive-ion loss at totality is associated with the more mobile ions and only low-mobility positive ions are measured in this region. The buildup in total ion density following totality is thought to result from a reduction in ion loss associated with weak-electron recovery in the region.

Mitchell, J. D.

1985-01-01

305

A subpopulation of CD163-positive macrophages is classically activated in psoriasis.  

PubMed

Macrophages are important cells of the innate immune system, and their study is essential to gain greater understanding of the inflammatory nature of psoriasis. We used immunohistochemistry and double-label immunofluorescence to characterize CD163(+) macrophages in psoriasis. Dermal macrophages were increased in psoriasis compared with normal skin and were identified by CD163, RFD7, CD68, lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2), stabilin-1, and macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO). CD163(+) macrophages expressed C-lectins CD206/macrophage mannose receptor and CD209/DC-SIGN, as well as costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40. They did not express mature dendritic cell (DC) markers CD208/DC-lysosomal-associated membrane glycoprotein, CD205/DEC205, or CD83. Microarray analysis of in vitro-derived macrophages treated with IFN-? showed that many of the genes upregulated in macrophages were found in psoriasis, including STAT1, CXCL9, Mx1, and HLA-DR. CD163(+) macrophages produced inflammatory molecules IL-23p19 and IL-12/23p40 as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). These data show that CD163 is a superior marker of macrophages, and identifies a subpopulation of "classically activated" macrophages in psoriasis. We conclude that macrophages are likely to contribute to the pathogenic inflammation in psoriasis, a prototypical T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 disease, by releasing key inflammatory products. PMID:20555352

Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Zaba, Lisa C; Nograles, Kristine E; Pierson, Katherine C; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Pensabene, Cara A; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Krueger, James G; Lowes, Michelle A

2010-10-01

306

Macrophages control the retention and trafficking of B lymphocytes in the splenic marginal zone.  

PubMed

The marginal zone of the spleen is a precisely ordered region that contains specialized subsets of B lymphocytes and macrophages. Disruption of the negative signaling inositol phosphatase, SH2-containing inositol-5-phosphatase 1 (SHIP), results in the loss of marginal zone B cells (MZBs) with reorganization of marginal zone macrophages (MZMOs) to the red pulp of the spleen. This primary macrophage defect, as revealed by selectively depleting SHIP in myeloid cells shows that MZMOs are specifically required for the retention of MZBs. The MZMO phenotype was reverted in SHIP/Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) double knockout mice, thus identifying the Btk activating pathway as an essential component being regulated by SHIP. Furthermore, we identified a direct interaction between the MARCO scavenger receptor on MZMOs and MZBs. Activation or disruption of this interaction results in MZB migration to the follicle. The migration of the MZMOs was further studied after the response to Staphylococcus aureus, which induced MZMOs to move into the red pulp while MZBs migrated into the follicular zone. The marginal zone is therefore a dynamic structure in which retention and trafficking of B cells requires specific macrophage-B cell interactions. PMID:12874264

Karlsson, Mikael C I; Guinamard, Rodolphe; Bolland, Silvia; Sankala, Marko; Steinman, Ralph M; Ravetch, Jeffrey V

2003-07-21

307

Strain evaluation of strengthened concrete structures using FBG sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fibre-optic Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor presents a great deal of potential in monitoring the internal status of the concrete structures after repairing or strengthening by an external adhered reinforcement. It can be used in a variety of configurations ranging from pointwise to multi-point strain measurement in order to investigate the strain distribution of the structures. In this paper, an experimental investigation on the rectangular notched-concrete beam, which was strengthened by glass fibre composites with the embedment of multiplexing FBG sensors is presented. Three point bending test was performed to investigate the strain profile of the specimen. Frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) technique was used to measure the strain variation of the fibre-grating regions. The results give a good agreement with the electrical resistance strain gauge in early loading condition. The difference of the strain-measuring results between the strain-gauge and FBG sensor was increased when further increasing the applied load. It was suspected that the micro/marco cracks occurred on the concrete surface and that the externally bonded strain-measuring device cannot be detected.

Lau, Kin-Tak; Zhou, Li-Min; Ye, Lin

1999-12-01

308

Thermal denaturation and trypsin digestion of protein on a temperature controllable microchip for MALDI-TOF MS analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes thermal denaturation and trypsin digestion of protein on a microchip as an alternative application of a temperature controllable microchip. Analysis of the protein of small volume and low concentration, which is impossible in macro scale, could be possible with the fairly reduced process time using the proposed temperature controllable microchip. We optimized the parameters concerning thermal denaturation on a microchip such as thermal denaturation temperature, thermal denaturation time, digestion time and concentration of protein using BSA(bovine serum albumin) as a reference sample. Then we applied the optimized parameters to the other proteins (ovalbumin, myoglobin, hemoglobin, cytochrome C, Ubiquitin). The proposed method on a microchip in this paper needed an even shorter reaction time, smaller volume of sample and smaller concentration of sample compared to the previously presented marco scale thermal denaturation and trypsin digestion method. We could successfully acquire the thermally denatured protein in 1 minute at 85°C and the digested peptides in 10 minutes at 37°C with 3 ?l/0.2 ?M protein. The acquired average sequence coverages are range from 24 to 57% for the test proteins, which are sufficient for the protein identification in practical use.

Sim, Tae S.; Kim, Eun-Mi; Joo, Hwang S.; Kim, Byung G.; Kim, Hoseung; Kim, Yong-Kweon

2006-01-01

309

Sample Return Missions from Minor Bodies: Achievements, Future Plan and Observational Support  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are entering in a new era of space exploration signed by sample return missions. Since the Apollo and Luna Program, the study of extraterrestrial samples in laboratory is gathering an increased interest of the scientific community so that nowadays exploration program of the Solar System is characterized by swelling sample return missions. Beside lunar samples, the NASA Stardust mission was the first successful space mission that on 15 January 2006 brought to Earth solid extraterrestrial samples collected from comet 81P/Wild 2 coma. Grains were collected during cometary fly-by into aerogel and once on Earth have been extracted for laboratory analyses. In the coming two decades many space missions on going or under study will harvest samples from minor bodies. Measurements required for detailed analysis that cannot be performed from a robotic spacecraft, will be carried out on Earth laboratories with the highest analytical accuracy attainable so far. An intriguing objective for the next sample return missions is to understand the nature of organic compounds. Organic compounds found in Stardust grains even if processed to large extend during aerogel capturing are here reported. Major objectives of Marco Polo mission are reported. Various ground-based observational programs within the framework of general characterizations of families and classes, cometary-asteroid transition objects and NEOs with cometary albedo are discussed and linked to sample return mission.

Brucato, J. R.; Rotundi, A.; Epifani, E. Mazzotta

2009-09-01

310

Flight software development for the isothermal dendritic growth experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is a microgravity materials science experiment scheduled to fly in the cargo bay of the shuttle on the United States Microgravity Payload (USMP) carrier. The experiment will be operated by real-time control software which will not only monitor and control onboard experiment hardware, but will also communicate, via downlink data and uplink commands, with the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The software development approach being used to implement this system began with software functional requirements specification. This was accomplished using the Yourdon/DeMarco methodology as supplemented by the Ward/Mellor real-time extensions. The requirements specification in combination with software prototyping was then used to generate a detailed design consisting of structure charts, module prologues, and Program Design Language (PDL) specifications. This detailed design will next be used to code the software, followed finally by testing against the functional requirements. The result will be a modular real-time control software system with traceability through every phase of the development process.

Levinson, Laurie H.; Winsa, Edward A.; Glicksman, Martin E.

1989-01-01

311

Women in media in the Philippines: from stereotype to liberation.  

PubMed

The success of women in the Philippine print and electronic media is contrasted with the negative image in which they are presented in mass media such as television, radio, comics, tabloids and magazines. Philippine women began entering journalism early in the century, becoming established in the female oriented press by the 1960s. As the repression of the Marcos regime intensified, women journalists excelled in writing vanguard pieces, using allusion, allegory, indirection or metaphor, interviewing prisoners, founding alternative newspapers and even initiating the successful boycott of the 3 major crony papers when Aquino was killed. The participation of women in television journalism is parallel, but more limited due to the nature of the medium. Women's cultural role as multi-track organizers of family, finance and work is credited for this success. Dozens of names with titles and paper names are cited, as well as tabulated in an appendix. In contrast, women's image in the popular publications and electronic media is that of sex object, victim, ideal submissive wife-mother, or gracious lady shows little evidence of improving. This deleterious, backward and inaccurate image is likely due to all-male ownership, management and profit motive of these popular, vernacular mass media. PMID:12281075

Fernandez, D G

1987-01-01

312

Ozone Inhalation Promotes CX3CR1-dependent Maturation of Resident Lung Macrophages which Limit Oxidative Stress and Inflammation1, 2  

PubMed Central

Inhalation of ambient ozone alters populations of lung macrophages. However, the impact of altered lung macrophage populations on the pathobiology of ozone is poorly understood. We hypothesized that sub-populations of macrophages modulate the response to ozone. We exposed C57BL/6 mice to ozone (2 ppm × 3h) or filtered air. 24 h after the exposure, the lungs were harvested and digested and the cells underwent flow cytometry. Analysis revealed a novel macrophage subset present in ozone exposed mice, which were distinct from resident alveolar macrophages (AM) and identified by enhanced Gr-1+ expression (Gr-1 Macs). Further analysis identified that Gr-1+ Macs exhibited high expression of MARCO, CX3CR1, and NQO1. Gr-1+ Macs were present in the absence of CCR2, suggesting that they were not derived from a CCR2-dependent circulating intermediate. Using PKH26-PCL to label resident phagocytic cells, we demonstrated that Gr-1 Macs were derived from resident lung cells. This new subset was diminished in the absence of CX3CR1. Interestingly, CX3CR1-null mice exhibited enhanced responses to ozone, including increased airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), exacerbated neutrophil influx, accumulation of 8-isoprostanes and protein carbonyls, and increased expression of cytokines (CXCL2, IL-1?, IL-6, CCL2, and TNF-?). Our results identify a novel subset of lung macrophages, which are derived from a resident intermediate, dependent upon CX3CR1, and appear to protect the host from the biological response to ozone.

Tighe, Robert M.; Li, Zhuowei; Potts, Erin N.; Frush, Sarah; Liu, Ningshan; Gunn, Michael D.; Foster, W. Michael; Noble, Paul W.; Hollingsworth, John W.

2011-01-01

313

The Deep Impact Campaign at ESO: Observations of the Gas Component  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The high velocity impact of a projectile on the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1 could give for the first time access to pristine material preserved in the cometary interior. From two nights before impact to six nights after impact FORS2 at the VLT UT 1 is available every night to obtain low resolution optical spectra. These will be used to study the chemical composition of the coma by studying emissions from CN, C2, C3 and NH2, and to identify variations due to the impact. Possibly, a new surface of fresh ices in the impact crater will be present. We also intend to perform medium resolution near infrared spectroscopy using ISAAC at the VLT UT 1 to observe organic parent molecules directly instead of observing daughter products that can be addressed by optical observations. This contribution will present first results from the observations of the gas coma around the impact time. The project team comprises the following investigators: N. Ageores, M. A'Hearn, C. Arpigny, S. Bagnulo, H. Boehnhardt, T. Bonev, A. Cochran, C. Delahodde, Y. Fernandez, O. Hainaut, D. Hutsemekers, E. Jehin, H.U. Kaeufl, H. Kawakita, F. Kerber, J. Knollenberg, M. Kretlow, E. Kuehrt, M. Kueppers, L. Lara, J. Licandro, C. Lisse, J. Manfroid, O. Marco, K. Meech, H. Rauer, R. Schulz, G. Schwehm, C. Sterken, M. Sterzik, J.A. Stuewe, I. Surdej, G.P. Tozzi, M. Weiler, R. West, D. Wooden, J.-M. Zucconi

Rauer, H.; ESO DI Project Team

2005-08-01

314

Obsidian provenance determination by using the beam stability controlled BSC-XRF and the PIXE-alpha portable spectrometers of the LANDIS laboratory of the LNS-INFN and IBAM-CNR in Catania (Italy)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

About 1300 obsidian artefacts coming from various archaeological sites of Sicily were analyzed by using the BSC-XRF (Beam Stability Controlled - X-ray Fluorescence) and PIXE-alpha (Particle Induced X-ray Emission, using low energy alpha particles) portable spectrometers developed at the Landis laboratory at the LNS-INF and IBAM-CNR in Catania (Italy). The portable BSC-XRF system allows the non-destructive analysis of the Rb, Sr, Y, Zr and Nb trace concentrations, which are considered to be characteristic of the obsidian samples and consequently are indicative of the provenance quarries. Quantitative data on Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb trace element concentrations where deduced through the use of a method that makes use of a multi parameter linear regression, previously The portable PIXE-alpha spectrometer allows the quantitative determination of the matrix major elements, from Na to Zn. In the present work the two instrumental devices are presented. The data are from: Milena (Cl), Ustica (Pa), Rocchicella (Ct), Poggio dell'Acquila (Ct), San Marco (Ct), Villaggio del Petraro* (Sr) and Licodia Eubea* (Ct). Results on compositional data for trace elements and major elements allowed to identify Lipari and Pantelleria islands as the only two sources of the analysed samples. Analyses carried out on vitreous artefact found in Rocchicella, showed for the first time that the Palagonite was used as row material. *Preliminary data. Topic of conference: Application of XRS in archaeometry Kind of presentation: oral

Pappalardo, L.; Bracchitta, D.; Palio, O.; Pappalardo, G.; Rizzo, F.

2012-04-01

315

Analysis of polycrystalline SrRuO3 by TEM and EELS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analysis of polycrystalline SrRuO3 by TEM and EELS Y. Ito, P. W. Klamut , B. Dabrowski, M. Maxwell Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL Two polycrystalline SrRuO3 samples were prepared (1) in the conventional manner (Curie temperature TC = 165K) and (2) at high pressure of oxygen resulting in substantially lower TC (= 90K). The Mössbauer Ru (99) analysis of the sample (1) showed a unique hyperfine magnetic field and, corresponding to one Ru site (+4) and a broad single line above the TC (96K), indicating the presence of multiple sites and/or electric quadrupole interaction for the sample (2) [1]. Here, we investigate the microscopic origins of the above differences and the relationship between microstructure, composition, and electronic structure of these two polycrystalline SrRuO3 by using transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). [1] M. DeMarco, P.W. Klamut, B. Dabrowski, S. Toorongian and M. Haka, see abstract of this meeting. Supported by NSF-DMR-0105398, and HECA.

Ito, Yasuo; Klamut, Piotr; Dabrowski, Bogdan; Maxwell, Mike

2002-03-01

316

The Origin of Asteroid 162173 (1999 JU3)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Near-Earth asteroid (162173) 1999 JU3 (henceforth JU3) is a potentially hazardous asteroid and the target of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Hayabusa-2 sample return mission. JU3 is also a backup target for two other sample return missions: NASA’s OSIRIS-REx and the European Space Agency’s Marco Polo-R. We use dynamical information to identify an inner-belt, low-inclination origin through the ?6 resonance, more specifically the region with 2.15 AU < a < 2.5 AU and i < 8 degrees. The geometric albedo of JU3 is 0.07 ± 0.01, and this inner-belt region contains four well- defined low-albedo asteroid families (Clarissa, Erigone, Polana and Sulamitis), plus a recently identified background population of low-albedo asteroids outside these families. Only two of these five groups, the background and the Polana family, deliver JU3-sized asteroids to the ?6 resonance, and the background delivers significantly more JU3-sized asteroids. The available spectral evidence is also diagnostic; the visible and near-infrared spectra of JU3 indicate it is a C-type asteroid, which is compatible with members of the background, but not with the Polana family because it contains primarily of B-type asteroids. Hence, this background population of low-albedo asteroids is the most likely source of JU3.

Comfort, Christine; Campins, H.; de Leon, J.; Morbidelli, A.; Licandro, J.; Gayon-Markt, J.; Delbo, M.; Michel, P.

2013-10-01

317

The Origin of Asteroid 162173 (1999 JU3)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Near-Earth asteroid (162173) 1999 JU3 (henceforth JU3) is a potentially hazardous asteroid and the target of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's Hayabusa-2 sample return mission. JU3 is also a backup target for two other sample return missions: NASA's OSIRIS-REx and the European Space Agency's Marco Polo-R. We use dynamical information to identify an inner-belt, low-inclination origin through the ?6 resonance, more specifically, the region with 2.15 AU < a < 2.5 AU and i < 8°. The geometric albedo of JU3 is 0.07 ± 0.01, and this inner-belt region contains four well-defined low-albedo asteroid families (Clarissa, Erigone, Polana, and Sulamitis), plus a recently identified background population of low-albedo asteroids outside these families. Only two of these five groups, the background and the Polana family, deliver JU3-sized asteroids to the ?6 resonance, and the background delivers significantly more JU3-sized asteroids. The available spectral evidence is also diagnostic; the visible and near-infrared spectra of JU3 indicate it is a C-type asteroid, which is compatible with members of the background, but not with the Polana family because it contains primarily B-type asteroids. Hence, this background population of low-albedo asteroids is the most likely source of JU3.

Campins, Humberto; de León, Julia; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Licandro, Javier; Gayon-Markt, Julie; Delbo, Marco; Michel, Patrick

2013-08-01

318

Thermophysical properties of near-Earth asteroid (341843) 2008 EV5 from WISE data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aims: We derive the thermal inertia of 2008 EV5, the baseline target for the Marco Polo-R mission proposal, and infer information about the size of the particles on its surface. Methods: Values of thermal inertia were obtained by fitting an asteroid thermophysical model to NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) infrared data. Grain size was derived from the constrained thermal inertia and a model of heat conductivity that accounts for different values of the packing fraction (a measure of the degree of compaction of the regolith particles). Results: We obtain an effective diameter D = 370 ± 6 m, geometric visible albedo pV = 0.13 ± 0.05 (assuming H = 20.0 ± 0.4), and thermal inertia ? = 450 ± 60 J m-2 s-1/2 K-1 at the 1? level of significance for its retrograde spin-pole solution. The regolith particles radius is r = 6.6+1.3-1.3 mm for low degrees of compaction and r = 12.5+2.7-2.6 mm for the highest packing densities. Table of observed fluxes is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/561/A45

Alí-Lagoa, V.; Lionni, L.; Delbo, M.; Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.; Licandro, J.

2014-01-01

319

Light scattering of degenerate fermions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on progress in measuring the suppression of resonant light scattering in a gas of degenerate fermions. A gas of trapped degenerate fermions is expected to exhibit narrower optical linewidths and longer excited state lifetimes than single atoms when the Fermi energy is larger than the photon recoil energy [1-3]. In this case, the number of available states into which a scattered atom can recoil is significantly reduced due to the filling of the Fermi sea. We produce a degenerate gas of 4x10^4 ultra-cold fermionic ^40K atoms by sympathetic cooling with bosonic ^87Rb in a micro-magnetic chip trap. The atoms can then be loaded into a tight dipole trap just above the surface of the chip and probed with a near resonance laser pulse. [1] Th. Busch, J. R. Anglin, J. I. Cirac, and P. Zoller, Europhys. Lett. 44, 1 (1998). [2] B. DeMarco and D. S. Jin, Phys. Rev. A 58, R4267 (1998). [3] J. Javanainen and J. Ruostekosky, Phys. Rev. A 52, 3033 (1995). Work supported by NSERC, CFI, OIT, Research Corporation, and PRO.

Aubin, S.; Leblanc, L. J.; Myrskog, S.; Extavour, M. H. T.; McKay, D.; Stummer, A.; Thywissen, J. H.

2006-05-01

320

Stress wave attenuation in shock-damaged rock  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic stress waves in gabbroic rock samples (San Marcos, California) subjected to shock loading in the 2 GPa range were studied. Prom P wave velocity measurements we determined the damage parameter Dp and crack density ? of the samples and related these to the attenuation coefficient (quality factor) under dynamic strains of 2×10-7 and at a frequency of 2 MHz using the ultrasonic pulse-echo method. A fit to the data yields the P wave spatial attenuation coefficient at a frequency of 2 MHz, ?p(Dp) = 1.1 + 28.2DP (decibels per centimeter). From the relation between the attenuation coefficient and quality factor, the quality factor Q is given by Q-1 = 0.011(1 + 25.6Dp)(1 - Dp)½. Using O'Connell-Budiansky theory relating crack density to velocity, the parameter in Walsh's theory was determined based on experimental data. An approximate method is also proposed to estimate the average half-length of cracks based on the attenuation measurements.

Liu, Cangli; Ahrens, Thomas J.

1997-03-01

321

H2N: Part 2. Mixed spin-states and magnetic resonance transition probabilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the absence of nuclear spin-state mixing (i.e. each state pure mI) there are, e.g. 10 epr transitions in D2^15N and 15 in D2^14N, all ?mI = 0 fully allowed. In the presence of mixing there are 243 in D2^15N and 729 in D2^14N, with large differences in probability among transitions, many 0 or small. Because of numerous, at least partially allowed, overlapping transitions, useful information can be obscured in EPR spectra; Part 3 deals with experimental conditions to aid in extracting this information. In the literature there is quantitative disagreement among measured hyperfine splittings in H2N, and spectral features have the appearance of little nuclear spin-state mixing (L. G. DeMarco, A. S. Brill and D. G. Crabb, J. Chem. Phys. 108 1423 (1998) and references cited therein). With substantial spin-state mixing present, the latter behavior can be simulated over small ranges of a few parameters. Among these parameters is the HNH bond angle which affects both the M matrix elements discussed in Part 1 and how the contributions from the two H superpose. This bond angle is 104.4^o in the 6-31G* model, but is probably along a soft scissors mode.

Brill, Arthur S.

2005-11-01

322

Macrophages Control the Retention and Trafficking of B Lymphocytes in the Splenic Marginal Zone  

PubMed Central

The marginal zone of the spleen is a precisely ordered region that contains specialized subsets of B lymphocytes and macrophages. Disruption of the negative signaling inositol phosphatase, SH2-containing inositol-5-phosphatase 1 (SHIP), results in the loss of marginal zone B cells (MZBs) with reorganization of marginal zone macrophages (MZMOs) to the red pulp of the spleen. This primary macrophage defect, as revealed by selectively depleting SHIP in myeloid cells shows that MZMOs are specifically required for the retention of MZBs. The MZMO phenotype was reverted in SHIP/Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) double knockout mice, thus identifying the Btk activating pathway as an essential component being regulated by SHIP. Furthermore, we identified a direct interaction between the MARCO scavenger receptor on MZMOs and MZBs. Activation or disruption of this interaction results in MZB migration to the follicle. The migration of the MZMOs was further studied after the response to Staphylococcus aureus, which induced MZMOs to move into the red pulp while MZBs migrated into the follicular zone. The marginal zone is therefore a dynamic structure in which retention and trafficking of B cells requires specific macrophage–B cell interactions.

Karlsson, Mikael C.I.; Guinamard, Rodolphe; Bolland, Silvia; Sankala, Marko; Steinman, Ralph M.; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.

2003-01-01

323

Quark Matter 2011 (QM11) Quark Matter 2011 (QM11)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

International Advisory Committee Antinori, FedericoPaic, Guy Braun-Munzinger, PeterPajares, Carlos Cifarelli, LuisaPeitzmann, Thomas Erazmus, BarbaraRedlich, Krzysztof Eskola, KariRiccati, Lodovico Gaardhøje, Jens JørgenRoland, Gunther Gale, CharlesRoy, Christelle Gelis, FrancoisSchukraft, Jürgen Giubellino, PaoloSinha, Bikash Greiner, CarstenSrivastava, Dinesh Gyulassy, MiklosStachel, Johanna Harris, JohnSteinberg, Peter Hatsuda, TetsuoStroth, Joachim Heinz, UlrichSugitate, Toru Jacak, BarbaraTserruya, Itzhak Karsch, FrithjofVelkovska, Julia Kharzeev, DimaWang, Enke Kodama, TakeshiWang, Xin, Nian Lévai, PéterWessels, Johannes Manko, VladislavXu, Nu Müller, BerndtZajc, William Ollitrault, Jean-Yves Organizing Committee Arleo, FrancoisDupieux, Pascal Bastid, NicoleFurget, Christophe Bourgeois, Marie-LaureGranier de Cassagnac, Raphael Bregant, MarcoGuernane, Rachid Carminati, FedericoHervet, Carnita Castillo, JavierKuhn, Christian Cheynis, BrigitteOlivier, Nathalie Conesa, DelValle, Zaida Connor, MichelleRenshall, Lucy Crochet, PhilippeSuire, Christophe Delagrange, HuguesTihinen, Ulla Program Committee Schutz, Yves (Chair)Baldisseri, Alberto Wiedemann, Urs (co-Chair)Safarik, Karel Aurenche, Patrick

2011-12-01

324

Epidemiological and histopathological profile of cutaneous melanoma at a center in northeastern Brazil from 2000 to 2010*  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND While representing only 3-4% of malignant skin tumors, cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive and lethal. Statistical knowledge about the biological behavior of this tumor is essential for guiding daily outpatient practice and aiding public health policies. OBJECTIVES To analyze the profile of patients with cutaneous melanoma attending a pathology department in Teresina (state of Piauí) between 2000 and 2010. METHODS Retrospective study of melanoma patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2010 in the São Marcos Hospital in the city of Teresina. The pathology laboratory reports were studied and all the statistical analyses performed using SPSS 19.0. RESULTS A total of 25 in situ, 199 invasive and 89 metastatic melanomas of unknown primary site were observed. Histological types found were nodular (52.8%), superficial spreading melanoma (18.6%), acral (10.6%) and lentigo maligna (9.5%). In 144 (73.4%) cases the Breslow thickness was >1 mm. Metastasis was found in 28.6% of invasive melanomas and nodular melanoma, Clark IV/ V, Breslow > 1 mm, mitotic index ? 6 and ulcerated lesions were more likely to metastasize. CONCLUSION Most melanomas presented Breslow> 1mm. The main factors associated with metastasis were nodular type, Clark IV / V, Breslow> 1mm, mitotic index ? 6 and ulcerated lesions.

Vilanova, Camila Maria Arruda; Lages, Rafael Bandeira; Ribeiro, Sahamia Martins; Almeida, Isabella Parente; dos Santos, Lina Gomes; Vieira, Sabas Carlos

2013-01-01

325

1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch a demonstration as part of fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) get a close-up view of the tiles, part of the thermal protection system, on the underside of the orbiter Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Sunita L. Williams practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

328

1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On a raised platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft fuselage of the orbiter Atlantis. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

329

1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at displays in the Apollo/Saturn V Center at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters.

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1998 astronaut candidates tour CCAS facilities copy form; photos beginning with 99PD are only availa  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of what remains of the launch tower at Launch Complex 34 during a tour of the station's facilities. During the Apollo Program, Launch Complex 34 was the site of the first Saturn I and Saturn IB launches, as well as the tragic fire in which the Apollo I astronauts lost their lives. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

332

1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On their tour of KSC, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) stop at the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility for a close up look at a main shuttle engine. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Clayton C. Anderson practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) take part in fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Space Station Processing Facility, Ron Woods (left) shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) an Apollo-style space suit and how it differs from the current suits. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

337

1998 astronaut candidates tour CCAS facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of the Project Mercury monument at Launch Complex 14 during a tour of the station's facilities. This 13-foot-high astronomical symbol for the planet Mercury was constructed by General Dynamics, the Atlas airframe contractor, and dedicated in 1964 in honor of those who flew in the Mercury 7 capsule. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

338

1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Alan G. Poindexter practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, 1998 astronaut candidates (ASCAN) Barbara R. Morgan, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) and Bjarni V. Tryggvason look at the hardware exhibits, such as the engine actuator on the table. Tryggvason is with the Canadian Space Agency. The 1998 ASCAN class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. Other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the other international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the thermal protection system on the orbiters, such as Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, Larry Osheim (right), who is with United Space Alliance, shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) a sample of Felt Reusable Surface Insulation (FRSI) blankets used on the orbiters. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the use of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility. At left is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) gather in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing (SSMEP) Facility. In the foreground is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) are shown future components of the International Space Station, such as the Multi- Purpose Logistics Module at right. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSPF. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo while standing under the engines of the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters.

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1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) (right). The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

1999-01-01

348

1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo during a tour of facilities at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF and the crew headquarters.

1999-01-01

349

Cigarette smoke-exposed neutrophils die unconventionally but are rapidly phagocytosed by macrophages  

PubMed Central

Pulmonary accumulation of neutrophils is typical for active smokers who are also predisposed to multiple inflammatory and infectious lung diseases. We show that human neutrophil exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) leads to an atypical cell death sharing features of apoptosis, autophagy and necrosis. Accumulation of tar-like substances in autophagosomes is also apparent. Before detection of established cell death markers, CSE-treated neutrophils are effectively recognized and non-phlogistically phagocytosed by monocyte-derived macrophages. Blockade of LOX-1 and scavenger receptor A, but not MARCO or CD36, as well as pre-incubation with oxLDL, inhibited phagocytosis, suggesting that oxLDL-like structures are major phagocytosis signals. Specific lipid (?-carotene and quercetin), but not aqueous, antioxidants increased the pro-phagocytic effects of CSE. In contrast to non-phlogistic phagocytosis, degranulation of secondary granules, as monitored by lactoferrin release, was apparent on CSE exposure, which is likely to promote pulmonary inflammation and tissue degradation. Furthermore, CSE-exposed neutrophils exhibited a compromised ability to ingest the respiratory pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, which likely contributes to bacterial persistence in the lungs of smokers and is likely to promote further pulmonary recruitment of neutrophils. These data provide mechanistic insight into the lack of accumulation of apoptotic neutrophil populations in the lungs of smokers and their increased susceptibility to degradative pulmonary diseases and bacterial infections.

Guzik, K; Skret, J; Smagur, J; Bzowska, M; Gajkowska, B; Scott, D A; Potempa, J S

2011-01-01

350

Conference Committees: Conference Committees  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

International Programm Committee (IPC) Harald Ade NCSU Sadao Aoki University Tsukuba David Attwood Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/CXRO Christian David Paul Scherrer Institut Peter Fischer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Adam Hitchcock McMaster University Chris Jacobsen SUNY, Stony Brook Denis Joyeux Lab Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique Yasushi Kagoshima University of Hyogo Hiroshi Kihara Kansai Medical University Janos Kirz SUNY Stony Brook Maya Kiskinova ELETTRA Ian McNulty Argonne National Lab/APS Alan Michette Kings College London Graeme Morrison Kings College London Keith Nugent University of Melbourne Zhu Peiping BSRF Institute of High Energy Physics Francois Polack Soleil Christoph Quitmann Paul Scherrer Institut Günther Schmahl University Göttingen Gerd Schneider Bessy Hyun-Joon Shin Pohang Accelerator Lab Jean Susini ESRF Mau-Tsu Tang NSRRC Tony Warwick Lawrence Berkeley Lab/ALS Local Organizing Committee Christoph Quitmann Chair, Scientific Program Charlotte Heer Secretary Christian David Scientific Program Frithjof Nolting Scientific Program Franz Pfeiffer Scientific Program Marco Stampanoni Scientific Program Robert Rudolph Sponsoring, Financials Alfred Waser Industry Exhibition Robert Keller Public Relation Markus Knecht Computing and WWW Annick Cavedon Proceedings and Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Margrit Eichler Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Kathy Eikenberry Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Marlies Locher Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program

2009-09-01

351

Tissue-resident Macrophages Protect the Liver From Ischemia Reperfusion Injury via a Heme Oxygenase-1-Dependent Mechanism  

PubMed Central

Kupffer cells are the resident macrophage population of the liver and have previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatic ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI). Kupffer cells are the major site of expression of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which has been shown to have anti-inflammatory actions and to protect animals and cells from oxidative injury. Kupffer cells and circulating monocytes were selectively ablated using liposomal clodronate (LC) in the CD11b DTR mouse before induction of hepatic ischemia. Kupffer cell depletion resulted in loss of HO-1 expression and increased susceptibility to hepatic IRI, whereas ablation of circulating monocytes did not affect IRI phenotype. Targeted deletion of HO-1 rendered mice highly susceptible to hepatic IRI. In vivo, HO-1 deletion resulted in pro-inflammatory Kupffer cell differentiation characterized by enhanced Ly6c and MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure) expression as well as decreased F4/80 expression, mirrored by an expansion in immature circulating monocytes. In vitro, HO-1 inhibition throughout macrophage differentiation led to increased cell numbers, and pro-inflammatory Ly6c+ CD11c? F4/80? phenotype. These data support a critical role for tissue-resident macrophages in homeostasis following ischemic injury, and a co-dependence of HO-1 expression and tissue-resident macrophage differentiation.

Devey, Luke; Ferenbach, David; Mohr, Elodie; Sangster, Kathryn; Bellamy, Christopher O; Hughes, Jeremy; Wigmore, Stephen J

2008-01-01

352

Correlative gene expression and DNA methylation profiling in lung development nominate new biomarkers in lung cancer.  

PubMed

Although transcriptional control is key for proper lung development, little is known about the possible accompanying epigenetic modifications. Here, we have used gene expression profiling to identify 99 genes that are upregulated in fetal lung and 354 genes that are upregulated in adult lung. From the differentially expressed genes, we analyzed the accompanying 5'-UTR methylation profiles of 43 genes. Out of these, nine genes (COL11A1, MEOX2, SERPINE2, SOX9, FBN2, MDK, COL1A1, LAPTM5 and MARCO) displayed an inverse correlation of their 5'-UTR methylation and the cognate gene expression, suggesting that these genes are at least partially regulated by DNA methylation. Using the differential gene expression/DNA methylation profiles as a guidepost, we identified four genes (MEOX2, MDK, LAPTM5, FGFR3) aberrantly methylated in lung cancer. MEOX2 was uniformly higher methylated in all lung cancer samples (n=15), while the methylation of the other three genes was correlated with either the differentiation state of the tumor (MDK, LAPTM5) or the tumor type itself (FGFR3). PMID:18203646

Cortese, Rene; Hartmann, Oliver; Berlin, Kurt; Eckhardt, Florian

2008-01-01

353

Elemental characterization, sources and wind dependence of PM1 near Venice, Italy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, PM1 elemental composition and relative sources have been investigated near Venice (Eastern Po Valley, Italy). Considering the lack of information on PM1 composition in this area and the general poor knowledge of emission profiles, this study can give useful information to better understand the source profile and the dispersion of finer particles. A sampling campaign was carried out in two sampling sites located inside the "Marco Polo" international airport of Venice. Elemental composition on PM1 samples was characterized by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Five sources were identified and quantified by using the positive matrix factorization receptor model: heavy oil combustion, road traffic, airplane tire-wear, glassmaking and mixed combustions. The role of local atmospheric circulation was investigated by studying the source contributions as a function of wind velocity. Days characterized by low dispersion (lower wind speed and higher wind calm with respect to full period rose) showed a higher contribution for all sources, and a glassmaking contribution increase linked to wind blowing from South, where the artistic glass district of Venice is located.

Valotto, Gabrio; Squizzato, Stefania; Masiol, Mauro; Zannoni, Daniele; Visin, Flavia; Rampazzo, Giancarlo

2014-06-01

354

In Vivo Deficiency of Both C/EBP? and C/EBP? Results in Highly Defective Myeloid Differentiation and Lack of Cytokine Response  

PubMed Central

The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs) are transcription factors involved in hematopoietic cell development and induction of several inflammatory mediators. Here, we generated C/EBP? and C/EBP? double-knockout (bbee) mice and compared their phenotypes to those of single deficient (bbEE and BBee) and wild-type (BBEE) mice. The bbee mice were highly susceptible to fatal infections and died within 2–3 months. Morphologically, their neutrophils were blocked at the myelocytes/metamyelocytes stage, and clonogenic assays of bone marrow cells indicated a significant decrease in the number of myeloid colonies of the bbee mice. In addition, the proportion of hematopoietic progenitor cells [Lin(?)Sca1(+)c-Kit(+)] in the bone marrow of the bbee mice was significantly increased, reflecting the defective differentiation of the myeloid compartment. Furthermore, microarray expression analysis of LPS- and IFN?-activated bone marrow-derived macrophages from bbee compared to single knockout mice revealed decreased expression of essential immune response-related genes and networks, including some direct C/EBP-targets such as Marco and Clec4e. Overall, the phenotype of the bbee mice is distinct from either the bbEE or BBee mice, demonstrating that both transcription factors are crucial for the maturation of neutrophils and macrophages, as well as the innate immune system, and can at least in part compensate for each other in the single knockout mice.

George, Ann; Crooks, Gay; Song, Jee Hoon; Okamoto, Ryoko; Nowak, Daniel; Gombart, Adrian F.; Koeffler, H. Phillip

2010-01-01

355

Therapeutic inflammatory monocyte modulation using immune-modifying microparticles.  

PubMed

Inflammatory monocyte-derived effector cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous inflammatory diseases. However, no treatment option exists that is capable of modulating these cells specifically. We show that infused negatively charged, immune-modifying microparticles (IMPs), derived from polystyrene, microdiamonds, or biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid, were taken up by inflammatory monocytes, in an opsonin-independent fashion, via the macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO). Subsequently, these monocytes no longer trafficked to sites of inflammation; rather, IMP infusion caused their sequestration in the spleen through apoptotic cell clearance mechanisms and, ultimately, caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. Administration of IMPs in mouse models of myocardial infarction, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis, thioglycollate-induced peritonitis, and lethal flavivirus encephalitis markedly reduced monocyte accumulation at inflammatory foci, reduced disease symptoms, and promoted tissue repair. Together, these data highlight the intricate interplay between scavenger receptors, the spleen, and inflammatory monocyte function and support the translation of IMPs for therapeutic use in diseases caused or potentiated by inflammatory monocytes. PMID:24431111

Getts, Daniel R; Terry, Rachael L; Getts, Meghann Teague; Deffrasnes, Celine; Müller, Marcus; van Vreden, Caryn; Ashhurst, Thomas M; Chami, Belal; McCarthy, Derrick; Wu, Huiling; Ma, Jin; Martin, Aaron; Shae, Lonnie D; Witting, Paul; Kansas, Geoffrey S; Kühn, Joachim; Hafezi, Wali; Campbell, Iain L; Reilly, David; Say, Jana; Brown, Louise; White, Melanie Y; Cordwell, Stuart J; Chadban, Steven J; Thorp, Edward B; Bao, Shisan; Miller, Stephen D; King, Nicholas J C

2014-01-15

356

Albedo and size determination of (99942) Apophis from polarimetric observations*  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The near-Earth object (99942) Apophis will make an extremely close approach to the Earth in 2029, and has currently (June 2006) a one-in-23000 chance of impacting our planet in 2036. Accurate computation of the orbital evolution of this object is limited by insufficient knowledge of physical properties required to determine the role played by nongravitational effects (Chesley, 2005. IAU Symposium 229, 215). From polarimetric observations obtained with FORS1 at the ESO VLT, we have obtained the first reliable determination of the albedo of Apophis, which turns out to be 0.33'0.02. We also derive an updated value of the asteroid's absolute magnitude s H=19.7±0.2. Based on these results, we find that Apophis has a size of 250±20 meters. These results show that polarimetric observations are a very effective method to obtain accurate albedos and sizes of faint, potentially hazardous asteroids. * Based on observations performed at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) DDT request 276.C-5030. The work of Marco Delbo has been partially supported by the European Space Agency (ESA and and that of E. Tedesco by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under grant NNG04GK46G, issued through the Office of Space Science Research and Analysis Programs.

Cellino, A.; Delbo, M.; Tedesco, E. F.

357

Satellite observations of zonal electric fields near sunrise in the equatorial ionosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report here on a number of examples of anomalous enhancements of eastward electric fields near sunrise in the equatorial ionospheric F-region. These examples were selected from the data base of the equatorial satellite, San Marco D (1988), which measured ionospheric electric fields during a period of solar minimum. The eastward electric fields reported correspond to vertical plasma drifts. The examples studied here are similar in signature and polarity to the pre-reversal electric field enhancements seen near sunset from ground-based radar systems. The morphology of these sunrise events, which are observed on about 14% of the morning-side satellite passes, are studied as a function of local zonal velocity, magnetic activity, geographic longitude and altitude. The nine events studied occur at locations where the zonal plasma flow is generally measured to be eastward, but reducing as a function of local time and at satellite longitudes where the magnetic declination has the opposite polarity as the declination of the sunrise terminator.

Aggson, T. L.; Herrero, F. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Pfaff, R. F.; Laakso, H.; Maynard, N. C.; Moses, J. J.

1995-01-01

358

Effects of shock-induced cracks on the ultrasonic velocity and attenuation in granite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements of the compressional wave velocity and the attenuation coefficients of 1-cm cubes were conducted. Samples were taken at various radii and depths beneath a 20 × 20 × 15 cm San Marcos granite block, impacted by a lead bullet at a velocity of 1200 m/s. The damage parameters of the cubes are calculated from the measured preimpact and postimpact P wave velocities, Vp0 and Vp, and the crack density is inverted from the measured P wave velocities. The anisotropic orientation of cracks is more obvious from the attenuation than crack density and damage parameters calculated from the ultrasonic velocity. P wave velocity and the normalized distance from the impact point follow an exponential decay relation. Other properties, such as the damage parameter, crack density, and attenuation coefficient, are expressed by a power law decay with distance. The damage parameter and attenuation coefficients are approximately linearly related. The slope of the linear fitting results in directions normal to the crack orientation is about twice the value in direction along the crack orientation. The attenuation coefficient is found to be a more useful parameter than elastic velocity in describing the anisotropic orientation of cracks.

Ai, Huirong A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

2007-01-01

359

Formation of distinct chromatin conformation signatures epigenetically regulate macrophage activation.  

PubMed

Microbial-lipopolysacharide (LPS), interleukin 4 (IL-4) and interferon gamma (IFN-?) polarise macrophages into "innate", "alternative" and "classical", activation states by selective gene regulation. Expression of MARCO, CD200, CD200R1 (innate), MRC1 (alternative) and H2-Eb1 (classical) selectively marks these distinct activation states. Epigenetic events drive such activation upon stimuli and here we study one such mechanism, chromatin conformation signatures implicated in long-range chromatin interactions that regulate transcriptional switch and gene expression. The EpiSwitch™ technology was used to identify and analyse potential markers bordering such conformational signatures for these genes and juxtaposition of markers was compared between resting and activated macrophages. LPS, IL-4 and IFN-? selectively altered chromatin conformations of their responsive genes in wild type, but not in MyD88(-/-), IL-4R(-/-) and IFN-?R(-/-) macrophages. In addition, two distinct conformations were observed in CD200R1 after LPS and IFN-? stimulation. In summary, signal-specific alterations in chromatin conformation provide biomarkers that identify and determine distinct gene expression programmes during macrophage activation. PMID:24211766

Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Ramadass, Aroul Selvam; Akoulitchev, Alexandre; Gordon, Siamon

2014-01-01

360

TRIF mediates Toll-like receptor 2-dependent inflammatory responses to Borrelia burgdorferi.  

PubMed

TRIF is an adaptor molecule important in transducing signals from intracellularly signaling Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR4. Recently, TLR2 was found to signal from intracellular compartments. Using a synthetic ligand for TLR2/1 heterodimers, as well as Borrelia burgdorferi, which is a strong activator of TLR2/1, we found that TLR2 signaling can utilize TRIF. Unlike TRIF signaling by other TLRs, TLR2-mediated TRIF signaling is dependent on the presence of another adaptor molecule, MyD88. However, unlike MyD88 deficiency, TRIF deficiency does not result in diminished control of infection with B. burgdorferi in a murine model of disease. This appears to be due to the effects of MyD88 on phagocytosis via scavenger receptors, such as MARCO, which are not affected by the loss of TRIF. In mice, TRIF deficiency did have an effect on the production of inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that regulation of inflammatory cytokines and control of bacterial growth may be uncoupled, in part through transduction of TLR2 signaling through TRIF. PMID:23166161

Petnicki-Ocwieja, Tanja; Chung, Erin; Acosta, David I; Ramos, Laurie T; Shin, Ok S; Ghosh, Sanjukta; Kobzik, Lester; Li, Xin; Hu, Linden T

2013-02-01

361

The Equatorial Disk at the Center of the PN CPD-568032  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present N band observations of the planetary nebula CPD-568032 by VLTI/MIDI. The dusty environment of CPD-568032 exhibits a bright unresolved core and a diffuse environment evidenced by HST imaging. From MIDI 8.7?m acquisition images (dominated by PAHs emission), the extension and geometry of the core have been estimated and compared to the STIS/HST observations (De Marco et al., 1997 and 2002). The UT2 and UT3 telescopes were used providing projected baselines between 40 and 45 meters. The bright infrared core is almost fully resolved with these baselines although high SNR fringes at low level have been detected. This clear signal reveals a ring-like structure interpreted as the bright inner rim of the equatorial disk exposed to the flux from the Wolf-Rayet star at the center of the system. The geometrical parameters are well constrained by means of simple geometrical models and a radiative transfer model is under development to extract the physical parameters of the disk.

Chesneau, O.; Collioud, A.; De Marco, O.; Lagadec, E.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Wolf, S.; Acker, A.; Clayton, G. C.

2005-11-01

362

The Equatorial Disk at the Center of the Planetary Nebula CPD-568032  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present observations of the dusty emission from the planetary nebulae CPD-568032 by VLTI/MIDI. The dusty environment of CPD-568032 exhibits a bright unresolved core and a more diffuse environment. From MIDI acquisition images at 8.7 micron (dominated by PAHs emission), the extension and geometry of the core have been estimated and compared to the geometry of the nebula and the equatorial disk observed by the HST (De Marco et al., 1997 and 2002). The UT2 and UT3 telescopes were used providing projected baselines between 40 and 45 meters. The bright infrared core is almost fully resolved with these baselines although high SNR fringes at low level have been detected. This clear signal reveals a ring structure interpreted as the bright inner rim of the equatorial disk exposed to the flux from the Wolf-Rayet star at the center of the system. These observations bring a new insight of the mechanism at the origin of the dust observed at the center of some asymmetric planetary nebulae.

Chesneau, O.; Marco, O. De; Collioud, A.; Rothkopf, A.; Zijlstra, A.; Wolf, S.; Acker, A.; Clayton, G.

363

The equatorial disk at the center of the Planetary Nebula CPD-568032  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present N band observations of the planetary nebula CPD-568032 by VLTI/MIDI. The dusty environment of CPD-568032 exhibits a bright unresolved core and a diffuse environment evidenced by HST imaging. From MIDI 8.7?m acquisition images (dominated by PAHs emission), the extension and geometry of the core have been estimated and compared to the STIS/HST observations (De Marco et al., 1997 and 2002). The UT2 and UT3 telescopes were used providing projected baselines between 40 and 45 meters. The bright infrared core is almost fully resolved with these baselines although high SNR fringes at low level have been detected. This clear signal reveals a ring-like structure interpreted as the bright inner rim of the equatorial disk exposed to the flux from the Wolf-Rayet star at the center of the system. The geometrical parameters are well constrained by means of simple geometrical models and a radiative transfer model is under development to extract the physical parameters of the disk.

Chesneau, O.; Collioud, A.; De Marco, O.; Lagadec, E.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Wolf, S.; Acker, A.; Clayton, G. C.

2005-12-01

364

ALTEA/Alteino: studying functional effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ALTEA project is based on the development of a facility to be used in the experimental studies in the International Space Station (ISS), on particle flux, human electrophysiology and psychophysics, dosimetry. Aim of the project is to define and measure descriptors for the elctrophysiological brain functioning and to follow their dynamics and the correlations with space environments. A specific focus will be posed on the abnormal visual perceptions (such as the reported perception of phosphenes ("light flashes") in orbit) and the impact of particle in microgravity conditions. Other experiments could proficiently use the features of this facility. A precursor of ALTEA, project `Alteino' is helping in preparing the experimental baseline for the ALTEA experiments, while providing novel information on the radiation environment in the ISS and on the dynamics of the astronauts' electrophysiology during orbital flights. Alteino have flown in the ISS with mission Marco Polo, on the Soyuz TM34. We present here the results from the Alteino investigation on brain dynamics correlated with particle fluxes and anomalous phosphene perceptions. Preliminary electrophysiological works on the effects of transient heavy ion radiation of the eye/cortex, as obtained in in vivo on mice (ALTEA -MICE) are being conducted. Detailed accounts of particle fluences as measured by Alteino's telescope "SilEye3" and of ALTEA -MICE are given elsewhere in this conference.

Narici, L.; For

365

MoMA: SOUNDINGS  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Soundings is MoMA's first major exhibition of sound art, presenting work by 16 contemporary artists, all born in the 1960s, 70s, and 80s, who work with sound. The artists include: Luke Fowler, Toshiya Tsunoda, Marco Fusinato, Richard Garet, Florian Hecker, Christine Sun Kim, Jacob Kirkegaard, Haroon Mirza, Carsten Nicolai, Camille Norment, Tristan Perich, Susan Philipsz, Sergei Tcherepnin, Hong-Kai Wang, Jana Winderen, and Stephen Vitiello. Probably the best way to view the online exhibition is to skip right to the Artists section (URL listed above), where there is a list of linked artists names. Following the links will lead visitors to images of each artist's works, biographical information, and of course, sound. For example, look at and listen to Susan Philipsz's Study of Strings, 2012, an installation at Kassel Hauptbahnhof. This piece is a reinterpretation of a 1943 composition by Pavel Haas (Czech, 1899âÂÂ1944), who composed the score while imprisoned at the Theresienstadt concentration camp. A performance was filmed in 1944 for a Nazi propaganda film. Philipsz's piece omits the instruments - and musicians - who were executed at the camp.

2013-01-01

366

Salinity variations and chemical compositions of waters in the Frio Formation, Texas Gulf Coast. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

Waters produced from sandstone reservoirs of the deep Frio Formation exhibit spatial variations in chemical composition that roughly coincide with the major tectonic elements (Houston and Rio Grande Embayments, San Marcos Arch) and corresponding depositional systems (Houston and Norias deltas, Greta-Carancahua barrier/strandplain system) that were respectively active along the upper, lower, and middle Texas Coast during Frio deposition. Within an area, salinities are usually depth dependent, and primary trends closely correspond to pore pressure gradients and thermal gradients. Where data are available (mainly in Brazoria County) the increases in TDS and calcium with depth coincide with the zone of albitization, smectite-illite transition, and calcite decrease in shales. Waters have fairly uniform salinities when produced from the same sandstone reservoir within a fault block or adjacent fault blocks with minor displacement. In contrast, stratigraphically equivalent sandstones separated by faults with large displacement usually yield waters with substantially different salinities owing to the markedly different thermal and pressure gradients across the faults that act as barriers to fluid movement.

Morton, R.A.; Garrett, C.M. Jr.; Posey, J.S.; Han, J.H.; Jirik, L.A.

1981-11-01

367

Crustal Rock: Recorder of Oblique Impactor Meteoroid Trajectories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oblique impact experiments in which 2g lead bullets strike samples of San Marcos granite and Bedford limestone at 1.2 km/s induce zones of increased crack density (termed shocked damage) which result in local decreases in bulk and shear moduli that results in maximum decreases of 30-40% in compressional and shear wave velocity (Budianski and O'Connell). Initial computer simulation of oblique impacts of meteorites (Pierazzo and Melosh) demonstrate the congruence of peak shock stress trajectory with the pre-impact meteoroid trajectory. We measure (Ai and Ahrens) via multi-beam (˜ 300) tomographic inversion, the sub-impact surface distribution of damage from the decreases in compressional wave velocity in the 20 x 20 x 15 cm rock target. The damage profiles for oblique impacts are markedly asymmetric (in plane of pre-impact meteoroid pre-impact trajectory) beneath the nearly round excavated craters. Thus, meteorite trajectory information can be recorded in planetary surfaces. Asymmetric sub-surface seismic velocity profiles beneath the Manson (Iowa) and Ries (Germany) impact craters demonstrate that pre-impact meteoroid trajectories records remain accessible for at least ˜ 10 ^ 8 years.

Ahrens, Thomas J.

2005-07-01

368

Mass property control of a spin stabilized spacecraft with restrictive mission and weight constraints  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the primary experiment of the spin stabilized San Marco D/L spacecraft, the drag effects on a light spherical shell coupled to a relatively massive center body will be measured. To achieve the precise mass property control, the centroids of both the shell and the center body must coincide with each other and with the center of pressure of the shell. Precise spin balancing is needed for launch and orbital stability, and the deployable antennas need accurate alignment. Corrective measures, developed after the preliminary mass measurements showed flaws in the mass property control, are described in detail. Inertia booms and a yo-yo despin system were developed as add-on units, spin balance measurements about all three geometric axes were used to define weight minimized correction within the outer shell envelope, and boom tip mass differentials were optimized for the most favorable inertia ratio margin achievable within the mission weight constraints. The weight versus orbital lifetime trade-offs were also considered.

Lang, W. E.; Ardvini, C.

1985-01-01

369

EDITORIAL: Focus on Dark Matter and Particle Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quest for the nature of dark matter has reached a historical point in time, with several different and complementary experiments on the verge of conclusively exploring large portions of the parameter space of the most theoretically compelling particle dark matter models. This focus issue on dark matter and particle physics brings together a broad selection of invited articles from the leading experimental and theoretical groups in the field. The leitmotif of the collection is the need for a multi-faceted search strategy that includes complementary experimental and theoretical techniques with the common goal of a sound understanding of the fundamental particle physical nature of dark matter. These include theoretical modelling, high-energy colliders and direct and indirect searches. We are confident that the works collected here present the state of the art of this rapidly changing field and will be of interest to both experts in the topic of dark matter as well as to those new to this exciting field. Focus on Dark Matter and Particle Physics Contents DARK MATTER AND ASTROPHYSICS Scintillator-based detectors for dark matter searches I S K Kim, H J Kim and Y D Kim Cosmology: small-scale issues Joel R Primack Big Bang nucleosynthesis and particle dark matter Karsten Jedamzik and Maxim Pospelov Particle models and the small-scale structure of dark matter Torsten Bringmann DARK MATTER AND COLLIDERS Dark matter in the MSSM R C Cotta, J S Gainer, J L Hewett and T G Rizzo The role of an e+e- linear collider in the study of cosmic dark matter M Battaglia Collider, direct and indirect detection of supersymmetric dark matter Howard Baer, Eun-Kyung Park and Xerxes Tata INDIRECT PARTICLE DARK MATTER SEARCHES:EXPERIMENTS PAMELA and indirect dark matter searches M Boezio et al An indirect search for dark matter using antideuterons: the GAPS experiment C J Hailey Perspectives for indirect dark matter search with AMS-2 using cosmic-ray electrons and positrons B Beischer, P von Doetinchem, H Gast, T Kirn and S Schael Axion searches with helioscopes and astrophysical signatures for axion(-like) particles K Zioutas, M Tsagri, Y Semertzidis, T Papaevangelou, T Dafni and V Anastassopoulos The indirect search for dark matter with IceCube Francis Halzen and Dan Hooper DIRECT DARK MATTER SEARCHES:EXPERIMENTS Gaseous dark matter detectors G Sciolla and C J Martoff Search for dark matter with CRESST Rafael F Lang and Wolfgang Seidel DIRECT AND INDIRECT PARTICLE DARK MATTER SEARCHES:THEORY Dark matter annihilation around intermediate mass black holes: an update Gianfranco Bertone, Mattia Fornasa, Marco Taoso and Andrew R Zentner Update on the direct detection of dark matter in MSSM models with non-universal Higgs masses John Ellis, Keith A Olive and Pearl Sandick Dark stars: a new study of the first stars in the Universe Katherine Freese, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo and Douglas Spolyar Determining the mass of dark matter particles with direct detection experiments Chung-Lin Shan The detection of subsolar mass dark matter halos Savvas M Koushiappas Neutrino coherent scattering rates at direct dark matter detectors Louis E Strigari Gamma rays from dark matter annihilation in the central region of the Galaxy Pasquale Dario Serpico and Dan Hooper DARK MATTER MODELS The dark matter interpretation of the 511 keV line Céline Boehm Axions as dark matter particles Leanne D Duffy and Karl van Bibber Sterile neutrinos Alexander Kusenko Dark matter candidates Lars Bergström Minimal dark matter: model and results Marco Cirelli and Alessandro Strumia Shedding light on the dark sector with direct WIMP production Partha Konar, Kyoungchul Kong, Konstantin T Matchev and Maxim Perelstein Axinos as dark matter particles Laura Covi and Jihn E Kim

Aprile, Elena; Profumo, Stefano

2009-10-01

370

A quantitative synthesis of the medicinal ethnobotany of the Malink? of Mali and the Ash?ninka of Peru, with a new theoretical framework  

PubMed Central

Background Although ethnomedically and taxonomically guided searches for new medicinal plants can improve the percentage of plants found containing active compounds when compared to random sampling, ethnobotany has fulfilled little of its promise in the last few decades to deliver a bounty of new, laboratory-proven medicinal plants and compounds. It is quite difficult to test, isolate, and elucidate the structure and mechanism of compounds from the plethora of new medicinal plant uses described each year with limited laboratory time and resources and the high cost of clinical trials of new drug candidates. Methods A new quantitative theoretical framework of mathematical formulas called "relational efficacy" is proposed that should narrow down this search for new plant-derived medicines based on the hypothesis that closely related plants used to treat closely related diseases in distantly related cultures have a higher probability of being effective because they are more likely to be independent discoveries of similar plant compounds and disease mechanisms. A prerequisite to this hypothesis, the idea that empirical testing in traditional medicine will lead to choosing similar medicinal plants and therefore the medicinal flora of two distant cultures will prove to be more similar than their general flora, is tested using resampling statistics on cross-cultural field data of the plants used by the Malinké of Mali and the Asháninka of Peru to treat the diseases malaria, African sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease, leishmaniasis, diabetes, eczema, asthma, and uterine fibroids. Results In this case, the similarity of the medicinal floras is found to be significantly greater than the similarity of the general floras, but only when the diseases in question are grouped into the categories of parasitic and autoimmune diseases. Conclusion If the central theoretical framework of this hypothesis is shown to be true, it will allow the synthesis of medicinal plant information from around the world to pinpoint the species with the highest potential efficacy to take into the laboratory and analyze further, ultimately saving much field and laboratory time and resources. Spanish abstract Las búsquedas que utilizan la etnomedicina y la taxonomía para descubrir nuevas plantas medicinales, pueden aumentar la probabilidad de éxito de encontrar compuestos químicos activos en plantas, en comparación con las búsquedas aleatorias. A pesar de lo anterior, en las últimas décadas, la etnobotánica no ha cumplido con las expectativas de proveer numerosas plantas medicinales y químicos nuevos una vez examinados en el laboratorio. Cada año se describen una plétora de plantas medicinales y sus usos, sin embargo las limitaciones de tiempo y recursos en los laboratorios, unidos al alto coste de los ensayos clínicos de las drogas potenciales, hacen muy difícil probar, aislar, y elucidar la estructura y el mecanismo de los compuestos de estas plantas. Se propone un nuevo marco teórico cuantitativo cuyo fin es focalizar la búsqueda de nueva plantas medicinales. Este marco teórico está basado en la hipótesis que las plantas cercanamente relacionadas, usadas para tratar enfermedades cercanamente relacionadas en culturas distantemente relacionadas, tienen una eficacia potencial más alta, debido a que es más probable que estos hallazgos sean descubrimientos independientes de compuestos químicos similares. Parte de esta hipótesis, que las escogencias racionales se hacen para elegir plantas medicinales similares y que la flora medicinal de dos culturas distantes es más similar que su flora general, se probó usando métodos estadísticos de remuestreo con datos de campo de la comunidad Malinké de Malí y de la Asháninka de Perú, y las enfermedades de paludismo, enfermedad africana del sueño, enfermedad de Chagas, leishmania, diabetes, eczema, asma, y fibromas uterinos. Se encontró, en este caso, que

Bletter, Nathaniel

2007-01-01

371

Are regional projections of extreme sea levels based on uncertain future MSL scenarios reliable? A case study for the south-eastern North Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently a number of authors applied a method (offset method) to combine observations of present sea level extremes with projections of future sea level rise during the 21st century. The method provides a technique for estimating potential future exceedence probabilities based on the assumption that both variability and trends of extreme sea levels have been and will be driven by changes in MSL. This assumption has been confirmed for quasi-global (Woodworth et al. 2011) and regional data-sets (Marcos et al. 2009). However, if the assumption fails, the application of the method will result in large inaccuracies. In the present study, records from 13 tide gauges located in the German Bight, a part of the south-eastern North Sea, are investigated. Time series of extreme high sea levels, covering a period from 1900 to 2008, are analyzed relative to simultaneous changes in MSL. For that purpose in a first step only extreme sea levels have been analyzed, while in a second step MSL time series have been subtracted from the extremes to prove the evidence of trend and variability differences. The results point to a significantly stronger increase in extreme sea levels during the second half of the 20th century. While in the first half of the 20th century the evolution of extreme sea levels follows changes in MSL, in the second half a significant rise with values between 10 and 60 cm per century relative to the MSL has been observed. The divergent development varies seasonally. The largest deviations between extreme sea levels and the MSL have been detected during Season 1 [January to March], while considerably smaller but statistically significant changes have been observed during the remaining seasons. An investigation of reanalyzed datasets from the 20th century reanalysis project (20thCR) shows that large parts of the observed deviations are in phase with simultaneous changes in the local zonal extreme wind conditions and only small deviations remain. Using the above mentioned observations, a statistical model is introduced to reconstruct observed changes in extreme sea levels based on MSL and extreme zonal winds. Depending on the investigated season, these models are able to explain between ~46 and ~80% of the observed variability and between ~80 and ~100% of the observed long-term trends. Hence, to account for potential future changes in the local wind regime when estimating future sea level extremes, an extended technique should include both (uncertain) sea level rise and storminess. Regarding the main question of this study, the results therefore show that the offset method is not suitable for the application to tide gauges located in the German Bight. References: Marcos M, Tsimplis M (2009): Sea level extremes in southern Europe, J Geoph Res, Vol. 114, C01007, 16 PP. Woodworth PL, Menéndez M, Gehrels WR (2011): Evidence for Century-Timescale Acceleration in Mean Sea Levels and for Recent Changes in Extreme Sea Levels, Surv Geophys 32:603-618

Dangendorf, S.; Mudersbach, C.; Jensen, J.

2012-12-01

372

List of Participants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mohab Abou ZeidInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Ido AdamMax-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Henrik AdorfLeibniz Universität Hannover Mohammad Ali-AkbariIPM, Tehran Antonio Amariti Università di Milano-Bicocca Nicola Ambrosetti Université de Neuchâtel Martin Ammon Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Christopher AndreyÉcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Laura AndrianopoliPolitecnico di Torino David AndriotLPTHE, Université UPMC Paris VI Carlo Angelantonj Università di Torino Pantelis ApostolopoulosUniversitat de les Illes Balears, Palma Gleb ArutyunovInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Davide AstolfiUniversità di Perugia Spyros AvramisUniversité de Neuchâtel Mirela BabalicChalmers University, Göteborg Foday BahDigicom Ioannis Bakas University of Patras Igor BandosUniversidad de Valencia Jose L F BarbonIFTE UAM/CSIC Madrid Till BargheerMax-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Marco Baumgartl Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich James BedfordImperial College London Raphael BenichouLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Francesco Benini SISSA, Trieste Eric Bergshoeff Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Alice BernamontiVrije Universiteit, Brussel Julia BernardLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Adel Bilal Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Marco Billo' Università di Torino Matthias Blau Université de Neuchâtel Guillaume BossardAlbert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Leonardo BriziÉcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Johannes BroedelLeibniz Universität Hannover (AEI) Tom BrownQueen Mary, University of London Ilka BrunnerEidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Erling BrynjolfssonUniversity of Iceland Dmitri BykovSteklov Institute, Moscow and Trinity College, Dublin Joan CampsUniversitat de Barcelona Davide CassaniLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Alejandra CastroUniversity of Michigan Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Athanasios ChatzistavrakidisNational Technical University of Athens Wissam ChemissanyCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Eugen-Mihaita CioroianuUniversity of Craiova Andres CollinucciTechnische Universität Wien Paul CookUniversità di Roma, Tor Vergata Lorenzo CornalbaUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Aldo CotroneKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Riccardo D'AuriaPolitecnico di Torino Gianguido Dall'AgataUniversity of Padova Jose A de AzcarragaUniversidad de Valencia Jan de BoerInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Marius de LeeuwUtrecht University Frederik De RooVrije Universiteit, Brussel Jan De Rydt Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and CERN, Geneva Bernard de WitInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Stephane DetournayIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia Niels Bohr Institute, København Eugen DiaconuUniversity of Craiova Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Nick DoreyUniversity of Cambridge Hajar Ebrahim NajafabadiIPM, Tehran Federico Elmetti Università di Milano Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Francesco Fiamberti Università di Milano Davide Forcella SISSA, Trieste and CERN, Geneva Valentina Forini Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Marialuisa Frau Università di Torino Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Diego Gallego SISSA/ISAS, Trieste Maria Pilar Garcia del MoralIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Valentina Giangreco Marotta Pulet

2008-11-01

373

List of Participants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mohab Abou ZeidVrije Universiteit, Brussel Joke AdamKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Nikolas AkerblomMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Luis Fernando Alday Utrecht University Stelios Alexandris University of Patras Antonio Amariti Università di Milano-Bicocca Nicola Ambrosetti Université de Neuchâtel Pascal Anastasopoulos Università di Roma Tor Vergata Laura Andrianopoli Enrico Fermi Center Carlo Angelantonj Università di Torino Lilia Anguelova Queen Mary, University of London Daniel AreanUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Gleb ArutyunovUtrecht University Spyros Avramis NTU Athens—University of Patras Ioannis Bakas University of Patras Subrata Bal Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies Igor Bandos Valencia University Jessica Barrett University of Iceland Marco Baumgartl Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Jacopo Bechi Università di Firenze James Bedford Queen Mary, University of London Jorge Bellorin Universidad Autonoma de Madrid Francesco Benini SISSA, Trieste Eric Bergshoeff Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Gaetano BertoldiUniversity of Wales, Swansea Adel Bilal Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Superieure, Paris Matthias Blau Université de Neuchâtel Johannes BroedelUniversität Hannover Felix Brümmer Universität Heidelberg Julio Cesar Bueno de Andrade São Paulo State University—UNESP Cliff Burgess McMaster University Agostino Butti Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Superieure, Paris Marco Caldarelli Universitat de Barcelona Pablo G Camara Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Joan Camps Universitat de Barcelona Felipe Canoura FernandezUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Luigi Cappiello Università di Napoli Federico II Luca Carlevaro École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Roberto Casero Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Università di Torino Kang Sin Choi University of Bonn Michele Cirafici University of Patras Andres Collinucci Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Aldo Cotrone Universitat de Barcelona Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Gianguido Dall'Agata Padova University Sanjit Das Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Forcella Davide SISSA, Trieste Jose A de Azcarraga Valencia University and Instituto de Fìsica Corpuscular (CSIC-UVEG), Valencia Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Jean-Pierre Derendinger Université de Neuchâtel Stephane Detournay Università Degli Studi di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia NORDITA, København Oscar Dias Universitat de Barcelona Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Joel Ekstrand Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Federico Elmetti Università di Milano I Diaconu Eugen University of Craiova Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Bo Feng Imperial College, London Livia Ferro Università di Torino Pau Figueras Universitat de Barcelona Raphael Flauger University of Texas at Austin Valentina Forini Università di Perugia Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Lisa Freyhult Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Carlos Fuertes Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maria Pilar Garcia del Moral Università di Torino Daniel Gerber Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Valentina Giangreco Marotta Puletti Uppsala University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and École Normale Supérieure, Paris Michael Haack Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Alexander Haupt Imperial College, London Michal Heller Jagiellonian University, Krakow Samuli Hemming University of Iceland Yasuaki Hikida DESY,

2007-11-01

374

Preliminary investigation of the nature and origin of the Sierra Mojada Non-sulfide Zn deposits, Coahuila, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sierra Mojada district consists of multiple types of mineral concentrations ranging from polymetallic sulfide deposits, 'non-sulfide Zn' deposits (separate smithsonite and hemimorphite zones), and a Pb carbonate manto hosted by Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous carbonates. The district is typically grouped with other polymetallic carbonate replacement deposits of southwestern North America, but the intrusive rocks that commonly are associated with these types of deposits are not known at Sierra Mojada. The Sierra Mojada district located near the boundary of the Coahuila Platform and the Sabinas Basin that formed during Late Jurassic and Cretaceous tectonic extension. The east-trending San Marcos fault runs through the Sierra Mojada district and is thought to have acted as the major conduit for basinal fluids, responsible for local dolomitization, sulfide mineralization, and petroleum in the region. The polymetallic sulfides are the stratigraphically and structurally highest ore zone and occur north of the San Marcos fault. Non-sulfide Zn (hemimorphite, smithsonite and sauconite) and lead (cerussite) concentrations occur south of the fault in the Aurora and La Pena Formations. The Iron Oxide Manto consists of stratabound zones of dominantly of hemimorphite pore-filling in Fe-oxide rich dolostones giving the ore a distinct red to orange color. The Smithsonite Manto has distinct karst features, including internal sediments interbanded with smithsonite in the lower part of the orebody. The non-sulfide Zn ores are being studied to document their morphologies, growth patterns, and paragenetic relationships using conventional petrography, SEM, and CL-based ESEM. In the Smithsonite Manto, banded and colloform smithsonite consists of aggregates of rhombohedral crystals that grew into open space and also occurs within internal sediment bands with hemimorphite or Zn clays and Zn oxides. Black dendrites of Mn oxides with Fe oxides are encased in banded smithsonite. Euhedral hemimorphite is present in both mantos, although it is most abundant in the Iron Oxide Manto. Hemimorphite occurs in the Smithsonite Manto as layers with smithsonite suggesting that they may have precipitated together, although locally hemimorphite cross-cuts smithsonite bands. Locally, hemimorphite and smithsonite have been altered to sauconite and hydrozincite. Associated minerals include barite and calcite that seem to have formed later than the major Zn mineral formation. Preliminary isotope studies reveal that smithsonites from Sierra Mojada have ?18OVSMOW values ranging from 19.1 to 22.1 ‰ and ?13CVPDB values of -7.0 to +1.0 ‰. While the range of carbon isotope values is typical for supergene smithsonites, the oxygen isotope values are much lower than those recorded in most supergene deposits. The unusually low oxygen isotope values in smithsonite require either highly 18O- depleted waters of less than -12 ‰ if oxidation occurred at temperatures of less than 20C° or elevated temperatures (>40C°) during oxidation if waters had isotope compositions similar to present- day ground waters in the area. Studies are in progress to further constrain the paragenesis, mineralizing fluid character, and timing of mineralization in the Sierra Mojada district.

Ahn, H.; Kyle, J.; Gilg, H.; Kolvoord, R.

2009-05-01

375

PREFACE: XXXIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The attached PDF gives a full listing of contributors and organisation members. In the present volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series we publish the proceedings of the "XXXIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics", that was held from January 5-8, 2010 at the Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico. The proceedings contain the plenary talks that were presented during the conference. The abstracts of all contributions, plenary talks and posters, were published in the Conference Handbook. The Symposium on Nuclear Physics has a long and distinguished history. From the beginning it was intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in the field. Its most distinctive feature is to provide a forum for specialists in different areas of nuclear physics, both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists, in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. After the first meeting in Oaxtepec in 1978, the Symposium was organized every year without interruption which makes the present one the 33rd in a row. This year's meeting was dedicated to the memory of Marcos Moshinsky, who passed away on April 1, 2009. Dr. Moshinsky was the most distinguished pioneer and promoter of nuclear physics in Mexico and Latin America and holds the record of 31 (out of 32) participations at the Symposium. In the inaugural session, Alejandro Frank (ICN-UNAM), Peter Hess (ICN-UNAM) and Jorge Flores (IF-UNAM) spoke in his honor and recalled the virtues that characterized him as a teacher, scientist, founder of schools and academic institutions, colleague and friend. His generosity, excellence and honesty were emphasized as the personal qualities that characterized both his personal and academic life. moshinksky_photo "Marcos Moshinsky (1921-2009)" The scientific program consisted of 26 invited talks and 20 posters on a wide variety of hot topics in contemporary nuclear physics, ranging from the traditional fields of nuclear structure and reactions to radioactive beams, nuclear astrophysics, hadronic physics, fundamental symmetries, ultrarelativistic heavy ions, cosmic rays and quantum chaos. The high quality of the talks, the prestige of the speakers and the broad spectrum of subjects covered in the meeting, shows that nuclear physics is a very active area at the frontier of scientific research which establishes bridges between many different disciplines. One of the exciting new areas in nuclear physics is that of radioactive beams. It provides a powerful tool not only to study exotic nuclei close to the proton and neutron drip lines to obtain important information about the nature of the nucleon-nucleon interaction in stable and unstable nuclei, but also to address questions of fundamental importance in nuclear astrophysics as well as in various applications like mass spectroscopy, the production of radioactive isotopes and medical applications (Galindo-Uribarri). There was a presentation on the FRIB project which is currently under construction in the USA and its relevance for nuclear astrophysics and the limits of stability (Sherrill and Schatz) In the session on nuclear structure, there were several talks on the nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclei close to the proton and neutron drip lines, like neutron-proton pairing in nuclei with an equal number of protons and neutrons (Pittel), and studies of stable and unstable neutron-rich nuclei near the closed shells N = 82 and N = 50 using (d, p) transfer reactions and Coulomb excitation by means of radioactive beams (Cizewski and Padilla-Rodal). There were several talks on the importance of reaction rates for the excitation of spin-isospin resonances (Sakai), massive star evolution (Klapp) and nuclear synthesis and stellar evolution (Rolfs). In another presentation, the importance of rare isotopes for astrophysical processes was highlighted (Schatz). In addition, there were discussions about the importance of the Pauli exclusion principle and phase transitions

Barrón-Palos, Libertad; Bijker, Roelof; Fossion, Ruben; Lizcano, David

2010-04-01

376

PREFACE: 3rd Workshop on Theory, Modelling and Computational Methods for Semiconductors (TMCSIII)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

These conference proceedings contain the written papers of the contributions presented at the 3rd International Conference on Theory, Modelling and Computational Methods for Semiconductor materials and nanostructures. The conference was held at the School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK on 18-20 January 2012. The previous conferences in this series took place in 2010 at St William's College, York and in 2008 at the University of Manchester, UK. The development of high-speed computer architectures is finally allowing the routine use of accurate methods for calculating the structural, thermodynamic, vibrational, optical and electronic properties of semiconductors and their hetero- and nano-structures. The scope of this conference embraces modelling, theory and the use of sophisticated computational tools in semiconductor science and technology, where there is substantial potential for time-saving in R&D. Theoretical approaches represented in this meeting included: Density Functional Theory, Tight Binding, Semiempirical Pseudopotential Methods, Effective Mass Models, Empirical Potential Methods and Multiscale Approaches. Topics included, but were not limited to: Optical and Transport Properties of Quantum Nanostructures including Colloids and Nanotubes, Plasmonics, Magnetic Semiconductors, Graphene, Lasers, Photonic Structures, Photovoltaic and Electronic Devices. This workshop ran for three days, with the objective of bringing together UK and international leading experts in the theoretical modelling of Group IV, III-V and II-VI semiconductors, as well as students, postdocs and early-career researchers. The first day focused on providing an introduction and overview of this vast field, aimed particularly at students, with several lectures given by recognised experts in various theoretical approaches. The following two days showcased some of the best theoretical research carried out in the UK in this field, with several contributions also from representatives of renowned theoretical groups from many European countries (Spain, France, Ireland, Germany, Italy, Poland, Denmark, Sweden, Serbia, Greece, etc.), as well as Asia (India) and Africa (Algeria, Tunisia and South Africa). We would like to thank all participants for making this a very successful meeting and for their contribution to the conference programme and these proceedings. We would also like to acknowledge the financial support from the Institute of Physics (Computational Physics group and Semiconductor Physics group), and QuantumWise (distributors of Atomistix). The Editors Acknowledgments Conference Organising Committee: Marco Califano (University of Leeds) Max Migliorato (University of Manchester) Matt Probert (University of York) Programme Committee: Stewart Clark (University of Durham) Aldo Di Carlo (University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Italy) Ben Hourahine (University of Strathclyde) Lev Kantorovich (King's College London) Risto Nieminen (Helsinki University of Technology, Finland) Eoin O'Reilly (Tyndall Institute Cork, Republic of Ireland) Mauro Pereira (Sheffield Hallam University) John Robertson (University of Cambridge) Mervin Roy (University of Leicester) Stanko Tomic (University of Salford) David Whittaker (University of Sheffield) The proceedings were edited and compiled by Marco Califano, Max Migliorato and Matt Probert.

Califano, Marco; Migliorato, Max; Probert, Matt

2012-05-01

377

The influence of the macro-sediment from the mountainous area to the river morphology in Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chen, Su-Chin scchen@nchu.edu.tw Wu, Chun-Hung* chwu@mail.nchu.edu.tw Dept. Soil & Water Conservation, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan. The Chenyulan River was varied changed with the marco-sediment yielded source area, Shenmu watershed, with 10 debris flow events in the last decade, in Central Taiwan. Multi-term DEMs, the measurement data of the river topographic profile and aerial photos are adopted to analyze the decade influences of the marco-sediment to the river morphology in Chenyulan River. The changes of river morphology by observing the river pattern, calculating the multi-term braided index, and estimating the distribution of sediment deposition and main channel in the river. The response for the macro-sediment from the mountainous areas into the river in the primary stage is the increase in river width, the depth of sediment deposition and volume of sediment transport. The distribution of sediment deposition from upstream landslide and river bank erosion along the river dominates the change of river morphology in the primary stage. The river morphology achieves stable gradually as the river discharge gradually decreases in the later stage. Both of the braided index and the volume of sediment transport decrease, and the river flow maintains in a main channel instead of the braided pattern in this stage. The decade sediment deposition depth is estimated as > 0.5 m, especially > 3.5 m in the sections closed to the sediment-yield source areas, the mean river width increases 15%, and the sediment with a total volume of 8×107 tons has been transported in last decade in Chenyulan River. The river morphology in Chenyulan River maintains a short-term stable, i.e. 2 or 3 years, and changes again because of the flooding events with a large amount of sediment caused by frequently heavy rainfall events in Taiwan. Furthermore, the response of river morphology in Chenyulan River due to the heavy rainfall with a total precipitation of around 860 mm in 3 days in 2009 Typhoon Morakot is also discussed in the study. A extreme river discharge with the return period of 100 year transported the macro sediment with the total volume of around 3.2×107 m3 in 8 days during 2009 Typhoon Morakot, and it also resulted in 18.1% increase of the mean river width and 4 m increase of the mean scouring depth in Chenyulan River, especially the mean increase of 50 m in river width resulted from the total sediment volume of 1.9×107 m3 deposited within 8 km from the sediment-yielded area, i.e. Shenmu watershed. Furthermore, the distribution of sediment deposition in a narrow pass is also discussed in the research. Sediment deposited apparently in the upstream of a narrow pass and also results in the disordered river patterns. The high velocity flow due to the contraction of the river width in the narrow pass section also leads to the headwater erosion in the upstream of the narrow pass section. Contrarily, the unapparent sediment deposition in the downstream of the narrow pass section brings about the stable main channel and swinging flow patterns from our decade observation.

Chen, S. C.; Wu, C.; Shih, P.

2012-12-01

378

Composition of near-Earth Asteroid 2008 EV5: Potential target for robotic and human exploration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We observed Potentially Hazardous Asteroid (PHA) 2008 EV5 in the visible (0.30-0.92 ?m) and near-IR (0.75-2.5 ?m) wavelengths to determine its surface composition. This asteroid is especially interesting because it is a potential target for two sample return mission proposals (Marco Polo-R and Hayabusa-2) and human exploration due to its low delta-v for rendezvous. The spectrum of 2008 EV5 is essentially featureless with exception of a weak 0.48-?m spin-forbidden Fe3+ absorption band. The spectrum also has an overall blue slope. The albedo of 2008 EV5 remains uncertain with a lower limit at 0.05 and a higher end at 0.20 based on thermal modeling. The Busch et al. (Busch et al. [2011]. Icarus 212, 649-660) albedo estimate of 0.12 ± 0.04 is consistent with our thermal modeling results. The albedo and composition of 2008 EV5 are also consistent with a C-type taxonomic classification (Somers, J.M., Hicks, M.D., Lawrence, K.J. [2008]. Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 40, 440). The best spectral match is with CI carbonaceous chondrites similar to Orgueil, which also have a weak 0.48-?m feature and an overall blue slope. This 0.48-?m feature is also seen in the spectrum of magnetite. The albedo of CI chondrites is at the lower limit of our estimated range for the albedo of 2008 EV5.

Reddy, Vishnu; Corre, Lucille Le; Hicks, Michael; Lawrence, Kenneth; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Abell, Paul A.; Gaffey, Michael J.; Hardersen, Paul S.

2012-11-01

379

The Solar Probe Mission Study: 2004  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Solar Probe will experience first hand the processes and conditions in the solar atmosphere that ultimately impact our planet and shape the harsh solar system environment. It will be humanity's first visit to a star and will explore a previously inaccessible region of the inner heliosphere. The 2003 Space Science Enterprise Strategy called for study of a Solar Probe to "fly through the solar atmosphere to answer fundamental questions that can be answered in no other way." The mission received highest priority in the National Academy of Sciences' decadal research strategy in solar and space physics in 2002. Significant advances have been made in the areas of solar and solar wind science, instrument technology, mission resources, and the mission environment since the previous Solar Probe Science Definition Team reports of 1989, 1995, and 1999. Therefore, with the strong support from the international community, NASA's Office of Space Science (OSS) has formed a new Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) to develop an exciting and achievable new mission concept for a Solar Probe mission. It is hoped that this study will be completed this fall with a final report by the end of 2004. This talk provides an update on the progress of the STDT's efforts. *Solar Probe Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT): Loren Acton, Marianne Balat, Volker Bothmer, Ray Dirling, Bill Feldman, George Gloeckler, Shadia Habbal, Don Hassler, Geoffrey Landis, Ingrid Mann, Bill Matthaeus, Dave McComas, Ralph McNutt, Dick Mewaldt, Neil Murphy, Leon Ofman, Ed Sittler, Chuck Smith, Marco Velli, and Thomas Zurbuchen

Hassler, D. M.; Solar Probe Science and Technology Definition STDT* Team

2004-05-01

380

Emissivity and reflectance measurements of 10 meteoritic analogues in the 1 to 100 ?m spectral range, from PEL  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have measured the emissivity and reflectance spectra for a suite of analogues of relevance for asteroid studies. The suite consists of ten samples - 3 meteorites and 7 synthetic or terrestrial analogue materials. Meteorite Allende represents the CV group of the Carbonaceous Chondrites meteorites; Murchison meteorite is representing the CM group, while the meteorite Millbillillie represents achondritic eucrites. Synthetic and terrestrial enstatite, synthetic L-Chondrite and H-Chondrite, graphite and two phyllosilicates (montmorillonite and serpentine) complete the set of analogues. In the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) at the Institute for Planetary Research of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Berlin, we can measure bi-directional reflectance of samples in the whole 1 to 100 ?m spectral range, by using an evacuated (10-4 bar) Bruker Vertex 80V FTIR spectrometer and a Bruker A513 reflection unit, allowing phase angles between 26° and 170°. The same instrument, coupled with an external emissivity chamber, can be used to measure emissivity of samples under the same vacuum and in the same wide spectral range, for sample temperatures from low (50° C) to very high (above 500° C). Complementary purged Bruker IFS88 FTIR spectrometer equipped with a Harrick SeagullTM bi-conical reflection unit permits to cover the 0.4 to 1.1 ?m spectral range. For this study, when possible we measured the smaller available grain size separate (0-25 ?m) and kept the sample temperature to the minimum we could get. Our results can be important for support of future (sample return) missions to asteroids (i.e. Hayabusa II, MarcoPolo-R and OSIRIS-REx) as well as for the interpretation of ground based observations of asteroids and minor bodies.

Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; D'Amore, M.

2012-12-01

381

Quantifying Salmonella population dynamics in water and biofilms.  

PubMed

Members of the bacterial genus Salmonella are recognized worldwide as major zoonotic pathogens often found to persist in non-enteric environments including heterogeneous aquatic biofilms. In this study, Salmonella isolates that had been detected repeatedly over time in aquatic biofilms at different sites in Spring Lake, San Marcos, Texas, were identified as serovars Give, Thompson, Newport and -:z10:z39. Pathogenicity results from feeding studies with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as host confirmed that these strains were pathogenic, with Salmonella-fed C. elegans dying faster (mean survival time between 3 and 4 days) than controls, i.e., Escherichia coli-fed C. elegans (mean survival time of 9.5 days). Cells of these isolates inoculated into water at a density of up to 10(6)?ml(-1) water declined numerically by 3 orders of magnitude within 2 days, reaching the detection limit of our quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based quantification technique (i.e., 10(3) cells ml(-1)). Similar patterns were obtained for cells in heterogeneous aquatic biofilms developed on tiles and originally free of Salmonella that were kept in the inoculated water. Cell numbers increased during the first days to more than 10(7) cells cm(-2), and then declined over time. Ten-fold higher cell numbers of Salmonella inoculated into water or into biofilm resulted in similar patterns of population dynamics, though cells in biofilms remained detectable with numbers around 10(4) cells cm(-2) after 4 weeks. Independent of detectability by qPCR, samples of all treatments harbored viable salmonellae that resembled the inoculated isolates after 4 weeks of incubation. These results demonstrate that pathogenic salmonellae were isolated from heterogeneous aquatic biofilms and that they could persist and stay viable in such biofilms in high numbers for some time. PMID:22890729

Sha, Qiong; Vattem, Dhiraj A; Forstner, Michael R J; Hahn, Dittmar

2013-01-01

382

Population policy in the Philippines.  

PubMed

This article reviews population policies in the Philippines during five time periods. Policy changes occurred after family planning in 1969 shifted to government programming from private initiatives, during 1974-86 when family planning and total development were integrated, during 1986-92 when family planning was integrated within maternal and child health services, and during 1992 to the present when population concerns were balanced with resource and development issues. In 1971 the government mission was to further national development and to meet the grave challenge of a high rate of population growth. After martial law was imposed in 1972, policy emphasized benefits only for the first four children and noncoercive birth control. Multiagency participation and partnerships between the public and private sectors were administrative strategies and not policy changes. During the late 1970s and early 1980s population issues became part of formal development planning, and outreach programs were implemented in 1976 at the local level. By 1983 little progress was made in prevalence and in the growth rate. A special committee in 1978 discovered that the Population Program was only a fertility reduction program instead of being within the family welfare context. The new emphasis and increased government support began in 1982. The ouster of the Marcos dictatorship in 1986 and the democratizing regime of Aquino occurred simultaneously with the chaos in family planning statistics. The 1987-92 plan emphasized the goal of maternal and child development and thereafter the environment and sustainable development. The changing context over these 5 periods was due to international influences and domestic political requirements. Changes were evident in the organization and the personalities in the program. Religious bodies, culture, and history all placed a role in continuity of policy. Program obstacles were a lack of organizational continuity and a strong reliance on foreign funding. Political will was affected by the opposition by the Church. PMID:12320250

Carino, L V

1995-01-01

383

Relationships of Bexar shale, Hensel sandstone, and Hensel dolomite (basal upper Trinity, Comanchean Cretaceous) in south-central Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Bexar Shale has been considered the offshore equivalent of the Cow Creek Limestone, the overlying Hensel sandstone, or of the disconformity between them in outcropping sections. Cores and outcrops in Comal, Kendall, and northern Bexar Counties preserve calcitic and dolomitic caliche in the top of the Cow Creek Limestone. Above the caliche is 8-16 m(25-50 ft) of laminated or bioturbated, dolomitic siltstone and silty dolomite (Hensel dolomite). Dolomite is euhedral and silt-sized. The lower part contains collophane grains and oyster shells replaced partly by chalcedony. Carbonate grains within the upper part include angular and well-rounded mollusk and echinoid fragments; many are pyritic and coated by glauconite. Terrigenous grains in Hensel dolomite grade upward from silt to coarse subarkose sand from central Texas. In southern Bexar County, about 35 m (115 ft) of silt-, clay-, and calcite-mudstone referable to the Bexar Shale sharply overlie shallow marine Cow Creek Limestone, and grade abruptly upward into about 7 m (23 ft) of Hensel dolomite. Dolomite is overlain by calcarenite of the Glen Rose Formation containing subarkose sand grains. Similar distinctive sand grains occur in well cuttings of basal Glen Rose beds northeastward through Travis County. The Bexar represents a flood of clay-sized sediment from a distant source, spread across the San Marcos arch during a rapid transgression. Slightly younger sand, silt, and local clay of the Hensel sandstone were eroded from central Texas by a few flash floods during a major period of caliche formation in the area.

Amsbury, D.L.

1984-04-01

384

Computer aided instruction for the Shipboard Nontactical ADP Program (SNAP-I)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to provide a prototype that would enhance training and could be used as a shipboard refresher and retraining tool. The prototype system will be installed onboard ships where Navy personnel will have ready access to the training. Subsequent testing and evaluation of the prototype could provide the basis for a Navy-wide effort to implement computer aided instruction. The design and development stages of the project followed a rigorous structured analysis methodology based on the Yourdon/DeMarco techniques. Data flow diagrams and a data dictionary were developed, which served as guideposts for the analysts throughout the remainder of the project. Additionally, a method for automatically generating standardized COBOL code using a data management system was developed. When compiled, the generated code accounted for greater than half of the prototype system. The problems encountered during design and development revolved around requirements to use existing hardware, software, and programmer capabilities for development, implementation, and maintenance of the instructional software. Solutions were developed which will allow the software to exist in the given environment and still provide advanced features not available in commercial courseware systems, including: (1) a customized help option with diagrams and descriptions of the SNAP-1 terminal keyboard and a glossary of Navy terms and acronyms; (2) a security system which provides information to assist the course monitor in determining that the person assigned was actually the person who took the course; (3) an intelligent interface that enables the student to ask questions, make comments, and get replies, which simulate live student-teacher interaction; and (4) an online evaluation of the course by the student.

Duncan, L.D.; Christian, J.L.; Handler, B.H.; Huntley, A.F.; Bryant, R.A.; Hammons, C.E.; Hume, R.; Sparks, S.G.

1986-08-01

385

Second progress report on the cooperative investigation of springs and stream flow in the Tecolote Tunnel area of Santa Barbara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report represents the second of a series of progress reports giving the results of discharge measurements made at more than 100 locations in the Santa Ynez Mountains from the Refugio Canyon on the west to the San Marcos Pass and Painted Cave area on the east. The flow in all the developed springs and headwater streams within this area, here designated as the Tecolote Tunnel Area of the purpose of this report, is generally measured monthly. The primary purpose of this second progress report is to make available to the public all factual data regarding the flow at these locations obtained since the preparation of the first progress report, issued in May 1949. Near the mid-point of this area the Bureau of Reclamation and the Santa Barbara County Water Agency proposed a tunnel, known as Tecolote Tunnel, for the purpose of diverting a portion of the runoff of the Santa Ynez River drainage area into water-deficient Santa Barbara and the coastal areas to the east and west, Because the water users of the mountain springs in the Tecolote Tunnel Area are somewhat apprehensive as to the influence this tunnel may have on their present water supply, the Santa Barbara Water Agency has requested the Geological Survey to obtain records of flow in their springs at frequent and regular intervals. During the current fiscal year these observations have been made as a result of a cooperative agreement between the Geological Survey and the Santa Barbara County Water Agency whereby each paid half the cost of the investigation. During the previous fiscal year all the costs to the Geological Survey in obtaining these observations were completely reimbursed by the Bureau of Reclamation.

Troxell, Harold C.; Burgess, C. E.

1950-01-01

386

Observación y registro fotográfico del cometa HYAKUTAKE C/1996 B2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Desde el momento en que nos llega la información del descubrimiento, comenzamos la observación de forma detallada a fin de apreciar y seguir su creciente actividad. La primera observación se realizó el 17 de febrero de 1996 a las 4h20m UT con nuestro telescopio de 300mm newtoniano de f/6.5, con una muy buena transparencia atmosférica, estimando una magnitud de 8.5. Realizábamos observaciones casi todas las noches, mientras nos lo permitían las condiciones climáticas. Ya el 26 de febrero el cometa presentaba un aspecto muy particular, ligeramente distinto a las primeras observaciones, ya que comenzamos a notar su gran actividad. En primer lugar se destacaba la cola de iones mucho mas extensa que la cola de polvo. Magnitud estimada 7.5. El 19 de marzo ya era visible a simple vista y en especial su cola muy abierta y extensa (3 grados) y no quedaba duda alguna que la última noche de observación del cometa en el horizonte de la Ciudad de Funes, que fue el 24 de marzo de 1996, un día antes del acercamiento a la Tierra, tendríamos una apreciación del cometa en su máximo esplendor. El 24 de marzo de 1996 a las 4hs UT, asomó el cometa por el horizonte NE, con su cola espectacular, llegando a medir 23 grados de longitud, muy recta y brillante, y su cabellera muy estelar. A este marco de observación se sumaron mas de 600 personas que participaron usando instrumentos, siendo la mayoría de los concurrentes de la vecina Ciudad de Rosario, ya que su observación era a muy baja atura sobre el horizonte norte. Instrumentos utilizados : Telescopio Newtoniano 300mm f/6.5, Telescopio Schmidt-Cassegrain 200mm , Binoculares 10 x 50, 7 x 50, Lente normal 50mm a f/1.8, Película 100 - 400 ASA Lugar de Observación : Ciudad de Funes, zona rural, ``Estancia La Polola" Latitud: - 32o 55' Longitud: 60o 40' Oeste

Arquiola, A. P.; Arquiola, F. E.

387

The Fascinating Quest of Asteroids: The Remnants of Planetary Formation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Asteroids are the leftover building blocks of the terrestrial planets and offer clues to the chemical mixture from which the planets formed. Current studies suggest that asteroid impacts in the early history of our planet may have delivered the necessary material for the emergence of life. In our current epoch, collisions of asteroids with the Earth pose a finite hazard and the design of efficient mitigation strategies relies on our knowledge of their physical properties. For all these reasons, the exploration of asteroids is a fascinating quest. This presentation will provide a basic overview of our current knowledge of asteroids, thanks in particular to space missions, observations and numerical models that allow exploring the different processes that they undergo during their evolutions. What are asteroids? Are they our friends or enemies? Amazing real images and movies of asteroids, which are stunning in their diversity, will be shown and discussed, as well as movies of numerical simulations of collisions and surface evolutions. Among other things, the first detailed images of a Near-Earth Asteroid, Eros, obtained by NASA’s NEAR mission in 2000-2001, will be presented, as well as images of Vesta, the second largest asteroid, from NASA’s Dawn mission. The fantastic adventure of the Japanese mission Hayabusa , which successfully returned to Earth a sample from the smallest asteroid ever visited in 2010, will also be discussed. Missions under development at NASA (OSIRIS-Rex), JAXA (Hayabusa 2), and under study at ESA (MarcoPolo-R), each with the goal of returning a sample from a possibly organic-rich asteroid, will also be presented. This fascinating quest continues and it is already clear that the next visits to asteroids will keep turning our understanding on its head and provide a wealth of exciting data to future generations of researchers.

Michel, Patrick

2012-10-01

388

Preface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Fifth Latin American Conference on Applications of the Mössbauer Effect, LACAME '96, held in Cusco, Peru, September 9-14, 1996,was co-hosted by the Physics Sciences Faculty of the San Marcos Major University of Lima and the San Antonio Abad National University of Cusco. Contributions related to the traditional scientific subjects connected with applications of the Mössbauer Effect were presented in sixteen plenary talks, twenty-one selected contributions for oral presentation, and eighty-eight posters. The conference was attended by some eighty-five scientists from fourteen countries. The Proceedings of LACAME '96 consist of two parts. The first includes invited papers and selected contributed papers for oral presentations, which are published in a special issue of the journal Hyperfine Interactions. The second includes forty-eight selected papers for poster presentation, which are published in a special volume of Hyperfine Interactions C (Conferences).The Editor is grateful to the authors and to the referees for their joint effort, contributing to the scientific quality of both these proceedings. We remember that, since 1988, several Latin American research groups which work with Mössbauer spectroscopy have met at Latin American Conferences in Rio de Janeiro (1988), Havana (1990),Buenos Aires (1992), and Santiago de Chile (1994). LACAME '96 was the fifth of its kind in this series. The attendance at these meetings has been about one hundred physicists from Europe and North America. Presently, in the Latin American scientific community there are about twenty groups working with Mössbauer spectroscopy. In the last six years, the interactions among these different groups have increased due to these meetings. They have allowed the integration of this scientific community. However, we expect to strengthen these relations even more through future new collaborations. The Latin American scientists attending the Cusco meeting agreed that these conferences are extremely useful in the area and are committed to organizing the sixth LACAME '98 Conference in Columbia.

Peña Rodríguez, V. A.; Bravo Cebrejos, Jorge

1997-09-01

389

PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: THEORY STUDIES FOR POLARIZED PP SCATTERING (VOLUME 53)  

SciTech Connect

In the past two runs of RHIC, the first measurements with polarized proton beams have been performed. For many years to come, the RHIC spin program will offer exciting physics, exploring QCD and the nucleon in new ways. The aim of this small workshop was to attract several spin theorists to the center for about two weeks, in order to collaborate with both experimentalists and theorists at RBRC, and to initiate and/or complete studies of relevance to RHIC spin. A major focus of polarized-pp measurements at RHIC is on measuring the spin-dependent gluon density, {Delta}g. A channel for accessing {Delta}g is high-p{sub T} pion production. The unpolarized cross section for this reaction has been measured by PHENIX and was found in good agreement with a perturbative-QCD based (NLO) calculation. It was a remarkable and exciting coincidence that PHENIX presented also the first results for the spin asymmetry for {rvec p}{rvec p} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}X during this workshop. This sparked a lot of additional activity and discussion. First steps toward the interpretation of the data were taken. Marco Stratmann and Barbara Jager (Regensburg University) presented recent work on the NLO calculation of the polarized cross section and the spin asymmetry, setting the stage for future full analysis of the data in terms of {Delta}g. Applications to {rvec e}{rvec p} scattering, very relevant to eRHIC, were also worked out and published during this workshop. Stratmann also discussed the procedure of NLO calculations for the case of transverse polarization in pp scattering.

KRETZER,S.VOGELSANG,W.

2003-09-15

390

An evaluation of slot size in orthodontic brackets--are standards as expected?  

PubMed

The slots of five upper left central incisor brackets from 11 commercially available bracket systems (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif: Twin Torque Roth, Clarity MBT, and Victory Series MBT; Dentarum, Pforzheim, Germany: Discovery Roth (0.56 mm) and Elegance Plastic Roth; Forestadent, Pforzheim, Germany: Mini Mono MBT; TP LaPorte, Indiana: Nu-Edge Roth and Mxi Advant-Edge Roth; Ormco Corp., Orange, Calif: Damon II SL Roth; Ortho Organizers, San Marcos, Calif: Elite Mini Opti-MIM Roth and Elite Mini Opti-MIM MBT) were measured in the 0.022-inch (0.5588 mm) dimension. Measurements were taken after operator calibration, and a digital readout was produced. Results indicate that all bracket slots are oversized. Three bracket systems slots (Twin Torque, Clarity, and Mini Mono) were within 5% (+/-1.08, 1.655, 1.75) of their stated dimensions with essentially parallel slot walls. The Elegance Plastic slot was parallel sided but oversized by 12% (+/-1.15). The geometry of bracket slots was also variable. The Victory Series slot was slightly divergent with the top oversized by 6% (+/-1.035). The Nu-Edge slot was divergent and slot top oversized by 14% (+/-1.32). The Mxi Advant-Edge, Damon II SL, Elite Mini Opti-MIM Roth, and MBT were all convergent, and the base of the Damon slot was oversized by 17% (+/-1.79). The Discovery bracket was convergent, and the slot base was oversized by 24% (+/-1.255), which was the largest recorded variance. This bracket also had a 7% difference between the widths of the slot top and the base. Inaccurate machining of bracket slot dimensions and the use of undersized archwires may directly and adversely affect three-dimensional tooth positioning. PMID:15387021

Cash, A C; Good, S A; Curtis, R V; McDonald, F

2004-08-01

391

Nitrogen in Solar System Minor Bodies: Delivery Pathways to Primeval Earth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oxygen isotope data point towards enstatite and ordinary chondrites as presumable building blocks of primordial Earth. Nitrogen was incorporated as nitrides to these first building blocks and was outgassed in the early stages of chemical segregation. However, giant impacts with planetesimals played an important role in partially eroding the atmosphere of Earth, and promoting thermal escape of diverse components. As a consequence, the Earth's atmospheric composition could have been subjected to important changes along the eons. A last, and probably less massive, delivery of volatiles took place at the time of a gigantic cataclysm known as Late Heavy Bombardment. During a short interval roughly between 3.9 and 3.8 Gyr ago, a gravitational migration inwards of Jupiter and Saturn occurred, that perturbed hundreds of small bodies rich in water, ammonia, methane and organic compounds that were stored until then in the outer regions. Current atmospheric signatures suggest that by that mechanism a continuous shower of outer-disk primordial components enriched the volatile inventory of terrestrial planets. The relevance of such contribution is still debated, but significant progress has been made in the last decades from the study of undifferentiated bodies. Consequently, planetary scattering of undifferentiated bodies delivered to Earth a significant fraction of minerals, and light elements that could have played a key role in the volatile enrichment the terrestrial crust. I suggest some unexplored pathways to allow a safe delivery of organics to Earth's surface, following recent evidence on meteoroid fragmentation, fireball spectra and Antarctic micrometeorite discoveries. Recent compositional studies of asteroids, comets and meteorites corroborate the need of having more precise data on the abundance and isotopic ratios of N in these minor bodies. Future space missions to primitive bodies like Rosetta, OSIRIS-Rex, Hayabusa II, or Marco Polo-R could help us to complete the big picture, and this chapter tries to compile our present knowledge of its delivery to Earth along the eons.

Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M.

392

FANTINA instrument suite: A payload proposed to measure the asteroid's structure from deep interior to regolith  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our knowledge of the internal structure of asteroids is, so far, indirect - relying entirely on inferences from remote sensing observations of the surface, and theoretical modeling. What are the properties of the regolith and deep interior? And what are the physical processes that shape their internal structures? Is it a rubble pile or a monolith? In the first case: what is the size distribution of constituent blocks, and the spatial distribution of voids? Direct measurements are needed to provide answers to these fundamental questions that will directly improve our ability to understand the geologic context of the asteroid from which the returned samples will be collected. After a review of the science objectives, this paper presents the FANTINA instrument suite, proposed to instrument Marco Polo R mission and specifically designed to help to answer these questions and support sample acquisition and analysis. The FANTINA science package, in the form of a lander with a radar component onboard the orbiter, is aimed at understanding the physical structure and evolution of the building blocks of the planets at various scales. FANTINA will use radar sounding, a penetrating geophysical technique, to investigate the internal structure of the asteroid. A bistatic radar, FANTINA-B, utilizes a separate transmitter and receiver (on orbiter and lander, similar to the CONSERT radar on ROSETTA) to conduct tomographic investigations of the global deep interior. On the lander this method will be used in combination with a visible imaging system (Camera, FANTINA-C) and accelerometer (Accelerometric sensor, FANTINA-A) to characterize the structure and physical properties of the near surface. A monostatic radar (FANTINA-M, a WISDOM-like instrument) accommodated onboard the orbiter will probe the first ten meters of the regolith and provide an understanding of the transition from the surface environment, where samples are collected, to the deep interior.

Plettemeier, D.; Herique, A.

2013-12-01

393

Hugoniot Measurements on Dry and Water-Saturated Soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The shock response of soils is an important component of planetary cratering events, including deposition of ejecta blankets and secondary cratering. Here, we present a series of shock Hugoniot experiments on two types of soil samples in both dry and water-saturated states. We measured the shock states induced via planar impact experiments on the Harvard 40-mm gas gun. Shock wave velocities in the soil samples were measured using both VISAR and piezoelectric pins. A Monte Carlo technique was developed to accurately propagate formal error through the impedance match calculations and generate a 1-sigma error ellipse in shock-velocity (US) vs. particle velocity (up) space and pressure vs. volume space. The two soils were composed primarily of quartz with different mass fractions of phyllosilicates and amorphous material. Using initial particle sizes ranging from 150 to 300 microns, the samples were pressed to densities ranging from 1.89 to 1.93 g~cm-3 (about 25% porous). Water-saturated samples had densities ranging from 2.2 to 2.6 g~cm-3. We find that the dry soils have a linear US-u_p relation that is similar to dry quartz sand with the same initial density. The water-saturated samples are less compressible and have much greater scatter in shock velocities. The VISAR measurement records the dispersion around the mean shock state that arises from reflections between grains, and we compare the VISAR data to meso-scale hydrocode simulations of the experiment. These data will be used to generate more accurate rheological models for hydrocode simulations of the shock response of heterogeneous granular materials in the low-pressure regime (<10~GPa). We thank Marcos Hankin and Will Steinhardt for their technical support. We acknowledge support from Army Research Office grant #W911NF-10-1-037.

Newman, M.; Stewart, S. T.; Kraus, R. G.

2012-12-01

394

The Wandering Lake  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the area at the very far eastern corner of China's Taklimakan Desert, Lop Nor Lake was located up until some years ago. Lop Nor, also called the 'the heart of the heart' of Asia, was the place where the waters of the largest inner basin (i.e., not flowing into the sea) of the world-including the Tarim and Kum-daria Rivers-were collected. Depending on the balance between rainfall water yield and evaporation, both position and size of the lake were strongly variable, thus giving rise to the legend of the Wandering Lake. 'Lop City' was the place where Marco Polo took his last rest before facing the one-year long crossing of the Gobi Desert. Starting from the end of the 19th century, several explorers tried to find the legendary place. One such explorer was Sven Hedin, who was commissioned by the Governor of Nanjing to lead an expedition to find the lake. In 1937, the Swedish explorer published his book entitled The Wandering Lake. Comparing this very precise map from Sven Hedin's book with the above Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) false-color image (acquired on October 28, 2001), one can find a faint sign on the soil where the Lop Nor was located. This image, derived using a combination of MODIS' near-infrared and red channels (vegetation in red), shows where the Tarim River waters currently end their flow. The Wandering Lake does not exist anymore. The combination of climate change and human exploitation of water resources for agriculture caused the disappearance of the lake. This image was processed by Telespazio, Earth Observation division, new products development facility in Rome, Italy. The MODIS sensor flies aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft, launched in December 1999. Caption and image courtesy Luca Pietranera, Telespazio, Rome, Italy, based on data from the MODIS Science Team

2002-01-01

395

OPERATIONS REVIEW OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS - 11327  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is removing liquid radioactive waste from its Tank Farm. To treat waste streams that are low in Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides, SRS developed the Actinide Removal Process and implemented the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). The Actinide Removal Process contacts salt solution with monosodium titanate to sorb strontium and select actinides. After monosodium titanate contact, the resulting slurry is filtered to remove the monosodium titanate (and sorbed strontium and actinides) and entrained sludge. The filtrate is transferred to the MCU for further treatment to remove cesium. The solid particulates removed by the filter are concentrated to {approx} 5 wt %, washed to reduce the sodium concentration, and transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility for vitrification. The CSSX process extracts the cesium from the radioactive waste using a customized solvent to produce a Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS), and strips and concentrates the cesium from the solvent with dilute nitric acid. The DSS is incorporated in grout while the strip acid solution is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility for vitrification. The facilities began radiological processing in April 2008 and started processing of the third campaign ('MarcoBatch 3') of waste in June 2010. Campaigns to date have processed {approx}1.2 million gallons of dissolved saltcake. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel performed tests using actual radioactive samples for each waste batch prior to processing. Testing included monosodium titanate sorption of strontium and actinides followed by CSSX batch contact tests to verify expected cesium mass transfer. This paper describes the tests conducted and compares results from facility operations. The results include strontium, plutonium, and cesium removal, cesium concentration, and organic entrainment and recovery data. Additionally, the poster describes lessons learned during operation of the facility.

Peters, T.; Poirier, M.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.; Brown, S.; Geeting, M.

2011-02-07

396

Atmospheric Processing Module for Mars Propellant Production  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The multi-NASA center Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllector/PrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project was established to build and demonstrate a methane/oxygen propellant production system in a Mars analog environment. Work at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Applied Chemistry Laboratory is focused on the Atmospheric Processing Module (APM). The purpose of the APM is to freeze carbon dioxide from a simulated Martian atmosphere containing the minor components nitrogen, argon, carbon monoxide, and water vapor at Martian pressures (approx.8 torr) by using dual cryocoolers with alternating cycles of freezing and sublimation. The resulting pressurized CO2 is fed to a methanation subsystem where it is catalytically combined with hydrogen in a Sabatier reactor supplied by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to make methane and water vapor. We first used a simplified once-through setup and later employed a HiCO2 recycling system to improve process efficiency. This presentation and paper will cover (1) the design and selection of major hardware items, such as the cryocoolers, pumps, tanks, chillers, and membrane separators, (2) the determination of the optimal cold head design and flow rates needed to meet the collection requirement of 88 g CO2/hr for 14 hr, (3) the testing of the CO2 freezer subsystem, and (4) the integration and testing of the two subsystems to verify the desired production rate of 31.7 g CH4/hr and 71.3 g H2O/hr along with verification of their purity. The resulting 2.22 kg of CH4/O2 propellant per 14 hr day (including O2 from electrolysis of water recovered from regolith, which also supplies the H2 for methanation) is of the scale needed for a Mars Sample Return mission. In addition, the significance of the project to NASA's new Mars exploration plans will be discussed.

Muscatello, Anthony; Gibson, Tracy; Captain, James; Athman, Robert; Nugent, Matthew; Parks, Steven; Devor, Robert

2013-01-01

397

Atmospheric Processing Module for Mars Propellant Production  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The multi-NASA center Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllector/PrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project was established to build and demonstrate a methane/oxygen propellant production system in a Mars analog environment. Work at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Applied Chemistry Laboratory is focused on the Atmospheric Processing Module (APM). The purpose of the APM is to freeze carbon dioxide from a simulated Martian atmosphere containing the minor components nitrogen, argon, carbon monoxide, and water vapor at Martian pressures (8 torr) by using dual cryocoolers with alternating cycles of freezing and sublimation. The resulting pressurized CO2 is fed to a methanation subsystem where it is catalytically combined with hydrogen in a Sabatier reactor supplied by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to make methane and water vapor. We first used a simplified once-through setup and later employed a HiCO2 recycling system to improve process efficiency. This presentation and paper will cover (1) the design and selection of major hardware items, such as the cryocoolers, pumps, tanks, chillers, and membrane separators, (2) the determination of the optimal cold head design and flow rates needed to meet the collection requirement of 88 g CO2/hr for 14 hr, (3) the testing of the CO2 freezer subsystem, and (4) the integration and testing of the two subsystems to verify the desired production rate of 31.7 g CH4/hr and 71.3 g H20/hr along with verification of their purity. The resulting 2.22 kg of CH4/O2 propellant per 14 hr day (including O2 from electrolysis of water recovered fro