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Sample records for margin sediments santa

  1. Geology of the continental margin beneath Santa Monica Bay, Southern California, from seismic-reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Normark, W.R.; Bohannon, R.G.; Sliter, R.W.; Calvert, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    We interpret seismic-reflection data, which were collected in Santa Monica Bay using a 70-in3 generator-injector air gun, to show the geologic structure of the continental shelf and slope and of the deep-water, Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins. The goal of this research is to investigate the earthquake hazard posed to urban areas by offshore faults. These data reveal that northwest of the Palos Verdes Peninsula, the Palos Verdes Fault neither offsets the seafloor nor cuts through an undeformed sediment apron that postdates the last sea level rise. Other evidence indicates that this fault extends northwest beneath the shelf in the deep subsurface. However, other major faults in the study area, such as the Dume and San Pedro Basin Faults, were active recently, as indicated by an arched seafloor and offset shallow sediment. Rocks under the lower continental slope are deformed to differing degrees on opposite sides of Santa Monica Canyon. Northwest of this canyon, the continental slope is underlain by a little-deformed sediment apron; the main structures that deform this apron are two lower-slope anticlines that extend toward Point Dume and are cored by faults showing reverse or thrust separation. Southeast of Santa Monica Canyon, lower-slope rocks are deformed by a complex arrangement of strike-slip, normal, and reverse faults. The San Pedro Escarpment rises abruptly along the southeast side of Santa Monica Canyon. Reverse faults and folds underpinning this escarpment steepen progressively southeastward. Locally they form flower structures and cut downward into basement rocks. These faults merge downward with the San Pedro Basin fault zone, which is nearly vertical and strike slip. The escarpment and its attendant structures diverge from this strike-slip fault zone and extend for 60 km along the margin, separating the continental shelf from the deep-water basins. The deep-water Santa Monica Basin has large extent but is filled with only a thin (less than 1.5-km

  2. Sedimentation of Williams Reservoir, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritter, John R.; Brown, William M., III

    1972-01-01

    Fifty-two acre-feet of sediment was ·deposited in Williams Reservoir between 1913 and 1971. From calculations of the sediment yields in other nearby drainage basins in Santa Clara County, it was determined that 24 to 38 acre-feet of sediment would have been transported to Williams Reservoir between 1961 and 1971 under natural conditions. The difference (14 to 28 acre-ft) is probably a consequence of increased sediment yield due to a fire that destroyed much of the vegetation in the drainage basin in 1961.

  3. Geology of the Continental Margin Beneath Santa Monica Bay, Southern California, from Small-Airgun, Seismic-Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, M. A.; Normark, W. R.; Bohannon, R. G.; Sliter, R. W.; Calvert, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    Small-airgun, multichannel-seismic-reflection (MCS) data collected in Santa Monica Bay reveal the geologic structure of the continental shelf and of the adjacent basin slope and deep-water basins. The Palos Verdes fault under the northern, shallow part of the bay cannot be identified in seismic-reflection data, even though many studies suggest its presence. This fault neither offsets the seafloor nor cuts through an undeformed sediment apron. Other major faults, such as the east-west Dume fault under the northern part of Santa Monica Bay, show evidence for recent activity. Tomographic-velocity data, derived from arrivals along the LARSE, deep-crustal MCS streamer, show that metamorphic rocks, probably the Catalina schist, underlie Santa Monica Bay and the deep-water Santa Monica basin to the south. The Santa Monica canyon marks a significant change in deformation of the lower slope of the Santa Monica Basin. North and northwest of this canyon, the slope is underlain by a little-deformed sediment apron; the main apron structures are two anticlines that extend toward Point Dume and are cored by reverse or thrust faults. Southeast of the canyon, lower-slope rocks are deformed by a complex zone of strike-slip, normal and reverse faults. The San Pedro bathymetric escarpment rises abruptly along the southeast side of Santa Monica Canyon. Structures underpinning this escarpment steepen progressively southeastward; they cut downward into basement rocks, and merge with the San Pedro Basin fault zone, which is nearly vertical and possibly strike-slip. The escarpment and its attendant structures extend for 60 km along the margin, separating the continental shelf from the mid-bathyal Santa Monica and San Pedro basins. The Santa Monica Basin, the more extensive of the two, contains about 1.5 km of turbidite fill that is deformed only near the northern basin margin. Data from ODP site 1015 indicate that this fill is most likely no older than Quaternary, and possibly no older

  4. Continental margin sedimentation: from sediment transport to sequence stratigraphy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nittrouer, Charles A., (Edited By); Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P.M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    2007-01-01

    This volume on continental margin sedimentation brings together an expert editorial and contributor team to create a state-of-the-art resource. Taking a global perspective, the book spans a range of timescales and content, ranging from how oceans transport particles, to how thick rock sequences are formed on continental margins. - Summarizes and integrates our understanding of sedimentary processes and strata associated with fluvial dispersal systems on continental shelves and slopes - Explores timescales ranging from particle transport at one extreme, to deep burial at the other - Insights are presented for margins in general, and with focus on a tectonically active margin (northern California) and a passive margin (New Jersey), enabling detailed examination of the intricate relationships between a wide suite of sedimentary processes and their preserved stratigraphy - Includes observational studies which document the processes and strata found on particular margins, in addition to numerical models and laboratory experimentation, which provide a quantitative basis for extrapolation in time and space of insights about continental-margin sedimentation - Provides a research resource for scientists studying modern and ancient margins, and an educational text for advanced students in sedimentology and stratigraphy

  5. Santa Ana River: An example of a sandy braided floodplain system showing sediment source area imprintation and selective sediment modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haner, Barbara E.

    1984-03-01

    The Santa Ana River floodplain can be divided into five geomorphic environments recognized by both morphology and sedimentary characteristics: braided channels, bars, vegetated islands, sand flats and floodplain terraces. Braided channels which vary in width from 30 to 80 m and are bordered by sand flats, flow round vegetated islands and emergent mid-channel bars. Deep braided channels have linguoid dume bedforms which are reworked during falling flood stages. If channel bars emerge in early spring, vegetation is rapidly established and they may become vegetated islands. Bars emerging in minor channels and in areas of increased channel width may develop into extensive sand flats. Away from the channel margins, sand flats are subject to wind erosion as the water table declines in summer and fall. This sediment is deposited in sand sheets and vegetated dunes. These distal sand flat environments are characterized by a well-sorted, medium sand-sized sediment population and are separated from negatively skewed, moderately sorted coarse channel sands by a mixed sediment population along channel margins. The drainage basin discharge is dominated by the regional Mediterranean climate. The coarse channel sediment reflects the large temporal variations in drainage discharge and the resulting greater variability and competence to transport sediment. Major decreases in channel width during both seasonal summer drought and prolonged periodic drought exposes large areas of the floodplain to selective wind winnowing of fluvially derived sediment. This process operates on a small scale today, but during arid conditions in the late Wisconsin interglacial interval (prior to 22,000 yrs B.P.) extensive sand flats along the Santa Ana River, distal alluvial fans, and sediment from minor tributaries were the sediment source for a major riverine dune field adjacent to the floodplain. This dune field was stabilized during the late Wisconsin glacial interval. Subsequent channel entrenchment

  6. Across-shelf sediment transport since the Last Glacial Maximum, southern California margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sommerfield, C.K.; Lee, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    Correlation of continental shelf-slope stratigraphy in Santa Monica Bay (southern California) with Ocean Drilling Program records for nearby slope-basin sites has illuminated the timing and scale of terrigenous sediment dispersal on margin since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Marine flooding surfaces preserved in a transgressive sequence on the Santa Monica Shelf provide a key link between base-level elevation and sediment transport across shelf. Sediment-accumulation rates at slope-basin sites were maximal ca. 15-10 ka, well after the LGM, decreased during the 12-9 ka transition from fluvial-estuarine to fully marine conditions on the shelf, and decelerated throughout the Holocene to 30%-75% of their values at the LGM. The deceleration is interpreted to manifest a landward shift in the margin depocenter with the onset of transgressive sedimentation beginning when sea level surmounted the shelf edge ca. 13 ka, as predicted by sequence-stratigraphic models. However, the records make clear that factors other than base level modulated slope-basin accumulation rates during the deglaciation. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  7. Organic geochemistry of outer continental margins and deep ocean sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the activities and progress made in the study of continental margins and deep ocean sediments. Topics discussed are the calibration of thermal maturation markers, hydrous pyrolysis studies and sample collection. (KS)

  8. Physical subdivision and description of the water-bearing sediments of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wentworth, Carl M.; Jachens, Robert C.; Williams, Robert A.; Tinsley, John C., III; Hanson, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    Maps and cross sections show the elevations of cycle boundaries and the underlying bedrock surface, the varying thicknesses of the cycles and of their fine tops and coarse bottoms, and the aggregate thickness of coarse layers in those bottom intervals. Coarse sediment is more abundant toward some parts of the basin margin and in the southern part of the basin. Cycle boundary surfaces are relatively smooth, and their shapes are consistent with having been intercycle topographic surfaces. The underlying bedrock surface has a relief of more than 1,200 feet and deepens toward the center of the basin and the west edge of the fault-bounded Evergreen Basin, which is concealed beneath the east side of the Quaternary basin. The absence of consistent abrupt changes in thicknesses or boundary elevations across the basin or in cross section indicates that the interior of the basin is largely unfaulted, with the Silver Creek strand of the San Andreas system at the west edge of the Evergreen Basin being the sole exception. The east and west margins of the Santa Clara Basin, in contrast, are marked by reverse and thrust fault systems.

  9. SEDIMENT AND PLANT PHOSPHORUS IN TWO THALASSIA TESTUDINUM SEAGRASS BEDS OF SANTA ROSA SOUND, NW FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated phosphorus concentrations in the seagrass, Thalassia testudinum, and the supporting quartz sediments of two meadows in Santa Rosa Sound. One meadow was sampled during 2002, and the other during 2003. Triplicate sediment and biomass cores were obtained from beneath...

  10. Eel River margin source-to-sink sediment budgets: revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    The Eel River coastal margin has been used as a representative source-to-sink sediment dispersal system owing to its steep, high-sediment yield river and the formation of sedimentary strata on its continental shelf. One finding of previous studies is that the adjacent continental shelf retains only ~25% of the Eel River fine-grained sediment (less than 63 μm) discharged over time scales of both individual floods and the 20th century, thus suggesting that the Eel shelf trapping-efficiency is uniquely lower than other similar systems. Here I provide data and analyses showing that sediment discharge relationships in the Eel River have varied strongly with time and include substantial decreases in suspended-sediment concentrations during the latter 20th century. Including these trends in margin-wide sediment budgets, I show that previous Eel River sediment discharge rates were overestimated by a factor of two. Thus, revised sediment budgets shown here reveal that the Eel shelf retained ~50% of the discharged river fine-grained suspended sediment during intensively sampled events of 1995–97 and over the 20th century. In light of this, hypotheses about high rates of sediment export away from the primary shelf depocenter should be reevaluated.

  11. Terrestrial organic carbon contributions to sediments on the Washington margin

    SciTech Connect

    Prahl, F.G.; Sparrow, M.A.; Eversmeyer, B. ); Ertel, J.R. ); Goni, M.A. )

    1994-07-01

    Elemental and stable carbon isotopic compositions and biomarker concentrations were determined in sediments from the Columbia River basin and the Washington margin in order to evaluate geochemical approaches for quantifying terrestrial organic matter in marine sediments. The biomarkers include: an homologous series of long-chain n-alkanes derived from the surface waxes of higher plants; phenolic and hydroxyalkanoic compounds produced by CuO oxidation of two major vascular plant biopolymers, lignin and cutin. All marine sediments, including samples collected from the most remote sites in Cascadia Basin, showed organic geochemical evidence for the presence of terrestrial organic carbon. Using endmember values for the various biomarkers determined empirically by two independent means, the authors estimate that the terrestrial contribution to the Washington margin is [approximately] 60% for shelf sediments, [approximately] 30% for slope sediments, and decreases further to [le] 15% in basin sediments. Results from the same geochemical measurements made with depth in gravity core 6705-7 from Cascadia Seachannel suggest that this approach to assess terrestrial organic carbon contributions to contemporary deposits on the Washington margin can be applied to the study of sediments depositing in this region since the last glacial period.

  12. Geohistory analysis of the Santa Maria basin, California, and its relationship to tectonic evolution of the continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, P.A.; Arends, R.G. ); Ingle, J.C. Jr. ); Isaacs, C.M.; Stanley, R.G. ); Thornton, M.L.C. )

    1991-02-01

    The Santa Maria basin of central California is a geologically complex area located along the tectonically active California continental margin. The record of Cenozoic tectonism preserved in Santa Maria strata provides an opportunity to compare the evolution of the region with plate tectonic models for Cenozoic interactions along the margin. Geohistory analysis of Neogene Santa Maria basin strata provides important constraints for hypotheses of the tectonic evolution of the central California margin during its transition from a convergent to a transform plate boundary. Preliminary analyses suggest that the tectonic evolution of the Santa Maria area was dominated by coupling between adjacent oceanic plates and the continental margin. This coupling is reflected in the timing of major hiatuses within the basin sedimentary sequence and margin subsidence and uplift which occurred during periods of tectonic plate adjustment. Stratigraphic evidence indicates that the Santa Maria basin originated on the continental shelf in early Miocene time. A component of margin subsidence is postulated to have been caused by cessation of spreading on adjacent offshore microplates approximately 19-18 ma. A sharp reduction in rate of tectonic subsidence in middle Miocene time, observed in the Santa Maria basin both onshore and offshore, was coeval with rotation of crustal blocks as major shearing shifts shoreward. Tectonic uplift of two eastern sites, offshore Point Arguello and near Point Sal, in the late Miocene may have been related to a change to transpressional motion between the Pacific and North American plates, as well as to rotation of the western Transverse Ranges in a restraining geometry.

  13. A conceptual model for river water and sediment dispersal in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Mertes, L.A.K.; Washburn, L.; Siegel, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    The ephemeral Santa Clara River delivers large amounts of freshwater and sediment to the eastern Santa Barbara Channel during brief, episodic discharge events. This discharge into the channel was characterized here with shipboard measurements during floods of 1997 and 1998. Within approximately 1-km of the river mouth, the river discharge quickly stratifies into a freshened, turbid surface plume and a bottom nephloid layer. Observations immediately off the Santa Clara River mouth on a peak day of river discharge revealed that sediment rapidly settled from the freshened surface waters, as suspended sediment in the freshened surface plume contained only ???6% of the sediment mass expected if the sediment mixed conservatively. On the two subsequent days the reduction of sediment mass in the surface plume continued at ???50% per day. These observations suggest that river sediment undergoes rapid initial settling within ???1-km of the river mouth, followed by somewhat slower rates of settling. Although we did not measure sedimentation or bottom boundary layer processes, our mass balance results suggest that almost all of the river sediment either escapes along or deposits upon the inner shelf seabed.

  14. Quaternary hyperpycnal fans on the shelf of an active margin basin, Northern Santa Barbara Channel, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steel, E.; Simms, A.; Warrick, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The small mountainous rivers draining the Transverse Ranges of southern California are known to form sediment-rich hyperpycnal plumes on the adjacent shelf during flooding events. Six fans were recently identified using sonar and lidar data in the northern Santa Barbara Channel and represent a unique opportunity to sample hyperpycnal deposits that have not been reworked or remobilized by other sedimentary processes. The two largest of these fans are those located directly offshore of Refugio and Tajiguas Creeks and are found in 20m to 70m water depths. We conducted shallow seismic surveys to image the morphology and internal architecture of the two fans. Internal reflectors define three seismic packages within the fans and isopach maps of these packages are presented. Geometries of the seismic reflections are interpreted to represent a shift from erosion of material over the most proximal fan locations to deposition of sediment with little or no erosion in distal portions. In several locations, dipping reflections can be clearly seen beneath an unconformity. Where present, this unconformity is interpreted to represent the base of the Holocene section overlying deformed Neogene strata. We report the results of a coring campaign on one of these fans designed to characterize the grain size, grain shape, and facies trends of hyperpycnal deposits. Additionally, petrology of core samples was compared to modern river samples to determine source regions. By analyzing sedimentation patterns and structures found in the fans of the Santa Barbara Channel, we hope to identify features that can be used to distinguish hyperpycnal deposition from other density-driven flows.

  15. The dynamics of fine-grain sediment dredged from Santa Cruz Harbor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Conaway, Christopher H.; Presto, M. Katherine; Logan, Joshua B.; Cronin, Katherine; van Ormondt, Maarten; Lescinski, Jamie; Harden, E. Lynne; Lacy, Jessica R.; Tonnon, Pieter K.

    2011-01-01

    In the fall and early winter of 2009, a demonstration project was done at Santa Cruz Harbor, California, to determine if 450 m3/day of predominantly (71 percent) mud-sized sediment could be dredged from the inner portion of the harbor and discharged to the coastal ocean without significant impacts to the beach and inner shelf. During the project, more than 7600 m3 of sediment (~5400 m3 of fine-grain material) was dredged during 17 days and discharged approximately 60 m offshore of the harbor at a depth of 2 m on the inner shelf. The U.S. Geological Survey's Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center was funded by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Santa Cruz Port District to do an integrated mapping and process study to investigate the fate of the mud-sized sediment dredged from the inner portion of Santa Cruz Harbor and to determine if any of the fine-grain material settled out on the shoreline and/or inner shelf during the fall and early winter of 2009. This was done by collecting highresolution oceanographic and sediment geochemical measurements along the shoreline and on the continental shelf of northern Monterey Bay to monitor the fine-grain sediment dredged from Santa Cruz Harbor and discharged onto the inner shelf. These in place measurements, in conjunction with beach, water column, and seabed surveys, were used as boundary and calibration information for a three-dimensional numerical circulation and sediment dynamics model to better understand the fate of the fine-grain sediment dredged from Santa Cruz Harbor and the potential consequences of disposing this type of material on the beach and on the northern Monterey Bay continental shelf.

  16. Patterns of late Quaternary shelf-margin sedimentation, southwest Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, J.R.; Berryhill, H.L.

    1986-09-01

    Late Quaternary extension of the continental shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico has been largely accomplished by deposition at the shelf margin during sea level lowstands. The distribution and geometry of facies suggest that delta progradation during sea level fall and lowstand is a principal process for shelf accretion. Along the shelf margin of southwest Louisiana, sets of deltaic deposits corresponding to the last two lowstands of sea level have been mapped from high-resolution seismic profiles. Individual deltas extend farther than 5000 m/sup 2/ and are more than 160 m thick. Diapirism has had a controlling effect on sedimentation patterns of the shelf-margin deltas throughout their depositional histories. Shelf-margin deltas have also been the loci for the transfer of large volumes of sediment from the shelf to the upper slope by mass transport, with buried submarine troughs formed by retrogressive shelf-edge failure in association with major streams acting as conduits for sediment movement. In southwest Louisiana, mass transport deposits follow depressions formed by salt diapirism rather than creating broad aprons on the slope.

  17. Cretaceous to Eocene passive margin sedimentation in Northeastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, J.P. )

    1993-02-01

    Twenty two palinspastic paleogeographic maps are presented for the Cretaceous to Eocene strata of the Serrania del Interior of northeastern Venezuela. The mapped lithologies, environmental conditions, and evolving depositional systems record [approximately]90 m.y. of dominantly marine sedimentation on the only observable Mesozoic passive margin in the Western Hemisphere. The depositional systems of the passive margin are heterogeneous at lateral (i.e., along-margin) length scales greater than [approximately]40 km. The primary lateral heterogeneity is caused by a major Lower Cretaceous deltaic system that emanated southwest of the Serrania del Interior. All important intervals, such as the laterally variable Aptian-Albian El Cantil platform limestone and the hydrocarbon source rocks of the Upper Cretaceous Querecual and San Antonio formations, are related to probable causal mechanisms and environmental conditions. Stratigraphic events have been interpreted as of either local or regional extent; based on a combination of outcrop sedimentologic analyses and regional depositional systems interpretation. The 3-dimensional distribution of depositional systems and systems tracts reveals 4-6 regional sequence boundaries separated by 4-20 m.y. Subsidence analyses support the facies interpretation of a passive margin by showing continuous, thermally dominated subsidence during the Cretaceous to Eocene interval. Subsidence and accumulation rates increased and facies changed significantly in the Oligocene, indicating the end of passive margin sedimentation and the initiation of foredeep subsidence and accumulation associated with overthrusting the eastward-advancing Caribbean Plate.

  18. The Chukchi Borderland: a Sediment-starved Rifted Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, D. R.; Houseknecht, D.; Mosher, D. C.; Hart, P. E.; Jackson, H. R.; Lebedeva-Ivanova, N. N.; Shimeld, J.; Chian, D.

    2013-12-01

    The origin and geologic structure of the Chukchi Borderland region, approximately 650 by 400 km in size, has been the subject of speculation since the earliest ice island research groups discovered its existence more than 60 years ago. Multichannel seismic reflection and refraction data acquired between 2007 and 2011, together with legacy seismic data show fragments of high-standing basement (continental) horsts. The structure is draped with less than a kilometer of sediment. Between the high-standing blocks are deep grabens with locally tilted but mostly flat-lying deposits generally only 1-2 km thick. Northwind Escarpment, along the eastern boundary of the Borderland, is a 600-km-long fault adjacent to the deeply subsided and hyper-extended crust of the Canada Basin to the east. The long, linear, sub-parallel orientation of the major structures (including Northwind Escarpment) is consistent with transtensional deformation of the Borderland. The general paucity of thick sediments indicates a sediment-starved environment. Both the North Chukchi Basin on the west and an unnamed deeply buried valley east on the Beaufort margin provide sediment-routing conduits through which sediment by-passed the Borderland throughout much of the Cretaceous history of the growing Brooks Range to the south. Canada Basin deposits also show strata thicken towards the southwest, suggesting sediment influx via the deeply buried valley on the Beaufort margin. On the northeastern side of the Canada Basin, the region is underlain by horst and graben structures with orientations similar to the Chukchi Borderland, but the intervening valleys are filled with as much as two km of sediment and the entire feature is buried beneath another 2 km of post-rift sediment. The similarity of structural styles on both sides of the Canada Basin suggests that this style of transtensional rifting could have been widespread during the early extension of this part of the Arctic and perhaps the Chukchi

  19. Estimating floodplain sedimentation in the Laguna de Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, Jennifer A.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2013-01-01

    We present a conceptual and analytical framework for predicting the spatial distribution of floodplain sedimentation for the Laguna de Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, CA. We assess the role of the floodplain as a sink for fine-grained sediment and investigate concerns regarding the potential loss of flood storage capacity due to historic sedimentation. We characterized the spatial distribution of sedimentation during a post-flood survey and developed a spatially distributed sediment deposition potential map that highlights zones of floodplain sedimentation. The sediment deposition potential map, built using raster files that describe the spatial distribution of relevant hydrologic and landscape variables, was calibrated using 2 years of measured overbank sedimentation data and verified using longer-term rates determined using dendrochronology. The calibrated floodplain deposition potential relation was used to estimate an average annual floodplain sedimentation rate (3.6 mm/year) for the ~11 km2 floodplain. This study documents the development of a conceptual model of overbank sedimentation, describes a methodology to estimate the potential for various parts of a floodplain complex to accumulate sediment over time, and provides estimates of short and long-term overbank sedimentation rates that can be used for ecosystem management and prioritization of restoration activities.

  20. Autigenic and Anthropogenic Uranium in the Marine Sediments of the Gulf of California in Front of Santa Rosalia Mining District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choumiline, K.; Rodríguez-Figueroa, G.; Shumilin, E.; Sapozhnikov, D.

    2007-05-01

    To verify the possibilities of U enrichments in the marine sedimentary environment of the eastern sector of the central Gulf of Califoria (GC), eleven sediment cores were collected in front of the Santa Rosalia mining region, peninsula of Baja California. Uranium and some other trace element contents in sliced core layers, dried and homogenized, were determined using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Average total U contents in sediments of five cores collected in the open GC in front of Santa Rosalía at sites with water depths from 265 m to 1030 m and in the Guaymas Basin with 2019 m, ranged from 1.36±0.26 mg kg-1 (Guaymas Basin) to 9.31±3.03 mg kg-1 (SR63 core, depth 630 m). To distinguish non-lithogenic U from the lithogenic one, the normalization of total U contents to the concentrations of Sc in the samples was used. That because this element is a reliable indicator of crustal materials, mainly aluminosilicates in the marine sediments. The relative contribution of non-lithogenic (authigenic) U varied from 49.8±3 % (Guaymas Basin) to 84.2±8.2 % (SR62 core) of the total U content in the sediments of the open central GC. Surprisingly, in three sediment cores from the coastal zone adjacent to the town of Santa Rosalía in water depth range 3-6 m very high concentrations of total U were found, ranging from 54.2±7.3 mg kg-1 (SR4 core) to 110±13 mg kg-1 (SR2 core) and exceeding not only U average abundance in the earth´s crust (2.7 mg kg-1), but also its levels found for SR62 core, as well as those reported for natural enrichments of U in suboxic-anoxic environments, e.g. at Mexico and Peru margin sites (3.04 mg kg-1 - 24.54 mg kg-1, McManus et al., 2006). The relative contribution of non-lithogenic U in the sediments of these three anomalous cores varied from 97.2±0.4 % (SR4 core) to 98.80.2 % (SR1 and SR2 cores) of their total U content. The sediments were also depleted in organic C (0.05 % - 0.18 %), which is not typical for marine solid phases

  1. Changes in ice-margin processes and sediment routing during ice-sheet advance across a marginal moraine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, P.G.; Jennings, C.E.; Waller, R.I.; Robinson, Z.P.

    2007-01-01

    Advance of part of the margin of the Greenland ice sheet across a proglacial moraine ridge between 1968 and 2002 caused progressive changes in moraine morphology, basal ice formation, debris release, ice-marginal sediment storage, and sediment transfer to the distal proglacial zone. When the ice margin is behind the moraine, most of the sediment released from the glacier is stored close to the ice margin. As the margin advances across the moraine the potential for ice-proximal sediment storage decreases and distal sediment flux is augmented by reactivation of moraine sediment. For six stages of advance associated with distinctive glacial and sedimentary processes we describe the ice margin, the debris-rich basal ice, debris release from the glacier, sediment routing into the proglacial zone, and geomorphic processes on the moraine. The overtopping of a moraine ridge is a significant glaciological, geomorphological and sedimentological threshold in glacier advance, likely to cause a distinctive pulse in distal sediment accumulation rates that should be taken into account when glacial sediments are interpreted to reconstruct glacier fluctuations. ?? 2007 Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography.

  2. Authigenic carbonate formation at hydrocarbon seeps in continental margin sediments: A comparative study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naehr, T.H.; Eichhubl, P.; Orphan, V.J.; Hovland, M.; Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W., III; Lorenson, T.D.; Greene, H. Gary

    2007-01-01

    Authigenic carbonates from five continental margin locations, the Eel River Basin, Monterey Bay, Santa Barbara Basin, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the North Sea, exhibit a wide range of mineralogical and stable isotopic compositions. These precipitates include aragonite, low- and high-Mg calcite, and dolomite. The carbon isotopic composition of carbonates varies widely, ranging from -60??? to +26???, indicating complex carbon sources that include 13C-depleted microbial and thermogenic methane and residual, 13C-enriched, bicarbonate. A similarly large variability of ??18O values (-5.5??? to +8.9???) demonstrates the geochemical complexity of these sites, with some samples pointing toward an 18O-enriched oxygen source possibly related to advection of 18O-enriched formation water or to the decomposition of gas hydrate. Samples depleted in 18O are consistent with formation deeper in the sediment or mixing of pore fluids with meteoric water during carbonate precipitation. A wide range of isotopic and mineralogical variation in authigenic carbonate composition within individual study areas but common trends across multiple geographic areas suggest that these parameters alone are not indicative for certain tectonic or geochemical settings. Rather, the observed variations probably reflect local controls on the flux of carbon and other reduced ions, such as faults, fluid conduits, the presence or absence of gas hydrate in the sediment, and the temporal evolution of the local carbon reservoir. Areas with seafloor carbonates that indicate formation at greater depth below the sediment-water interface must have undergone uplift and erosion in the past or are still being uplifted. Consequently, the occurrence of carbonate slabs on the seafloor in areas of active hydrocarbon seepage is commonly an indicator of exhumation following carbonate precipitation in the shallow subsurface. Therefore, careful petrographic and geochemical analyses are critical components necessary for the

  3. Experimental Monitoring of Mixed Sand and Mud Sediment in the Nearshore Area of Santa Cruz, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, S. G.; Greene, H. G.

    2001-12-01

    An experiment conducted in late March of 2001 along the beaches and nearshore of Santa Cruz, California consisted of three phases: pre-experiment, experiment, and post-experiment. In the pre- and post-experimental phases, high-resolution side scan sonar and multibeam bathymetry data were collected to produce maps describing surface sediments and depth changes of the seafloor near the Santa Cruz Harbor. Offshore and beach sediment samples were collected three weeks prior to and after the experiment to analyze for changes in grain size and to provide physical evidence of seafloor substrate. Experimental monitoring consisted of daily beach and offshore sediment sampling. Oceanographic data including swell direction, height, and period were obtained from buoys offshore. Rainfall and stream flow data from the nearby San Lorenzo River were recorded during all phases of the project. Our sedimentological studies of materials dredged from the upper Santa Cruz Harbor, California suggest that sediment containing approximately 40% sand and 60% mud can be disposed in the surf zone without adversely affecting the quality of neighboring beaches or offshore rocky habitats while simultaneously replenishing sand to eroding beaches downcoast. A small amount of the mud-rich material (about 2300 m3) was placed into the surf-zone during the winter of 2000-2001 to determine the retention of sands in the nearshore zone and the impact that fine-grain (mud) sediment may have on rocky habitats. The beaches and other nearshore environments near the disposal site of the Santa Cruz Small Craft Harbor appear to be unchanged by the disposed harbor sediments. The data indicates that little change in sediment grain size or distribution has occurred. This is most likely due to the high-energy nature of this coastline, which results in suspension of silts and clays until they reach lower energy, deeper water offshore outside of the study area. The sand fraction of the disposed sediment was likely

  4. Capacity and sedimentation of Loch Lomond Reservoir Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogelman, R.P.; Johnson, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    A sedimentation study of Loch Lomond Reservoir in Santa Cruz County, California, was begun in 1982 to determine reservoir storage capacity and to establish permanent ranges for future studies. Results of a reservoir survey indicated a total storage capacity of 8,824 acre-ft in 1982. Comparison of thalweg profiles from this survey and a survey done prior to dam construction in 1960 shows that deposition has occurred in the lower reach of the reservoir due to landsliding and in the upper reach due to sediment inflow from Newell Creek. (Author 's abstract)

  5. Sediment Dynamics Affecting the Threatened Santa Ana Sucker in the Highly-modified Santa Ana River and Inset Channel, Southern California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minear, J. T.; Wright, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the sediment dynamics of the low-flow channel of the Santa Ana River that is formed by wastewater discharges and contains some of the last remaining habitat of the Santa Ana Sucker (Catostomus santaanae). The Santa Ana River is a highly-modified river draining the San Bernardino Mountains and Inland Empire metropolitan area east of Los Angeles. Home to over 4 million people, the watershed provides habitat for the federally-threatened Santa Ana Sucker, which presently reside within the mainstem Santa Ana River in a reach supported by year-round constant discharges from water treatment plants. The nearly constant low-flow wastewater discharges and infrequent runoff events create a small, approximately 8 m wide, inset channel within the approximately 300 m wide mainstem channel that is typically dry except for large flood flows. The sediment dynamics within the inset channel are characterized by constantly evolving bed substrate and sediment transport rates, and occasional channel avulsions. The sediment dynamics have large influence on the Sucker, which rely on coarse-substrate (gravel and cobble) for their food production. In WY 2013 through the present, we investigated the sediment dynamics of the inset channel using repeat bathymetric and substrate surveys, bedload sampling, and discharge measurements. We found two distinct phases of the inset channel behavior: 1. 'Reset' flows, where sediment-laden mainstem discharges from upstream runoff events result in sand deposition in the inset channel or avulse the inset channel onto previously dry riverbed; and 2. 'Winnowing' flows, whereby the sand within the inset channel is removed by clear-water low flows from the wastewater treatment plant discharges. Thus, in contrast to many regulated rivers where high flows are required to flush fine sediments from the bed (for example, downstream from dams), in the Santa Ana River the low flows from wastewater treatment plants serve as the flushing

  6. Estimated post-Messinian sediment supply and sedimentation rates on the Ebro continental margin, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    Because of the extensive data base of seismic profiles, radiometric ages, and stratigraphic time markers such as the subaerial Messinian surface, sedimentation rates and Ebro River sediment discharge can be estimated for different periods and environments of the Ebro continental margin. New values for sediment discharge (i.e., 6.2 versus previous estimates of 2-3.5 million t/yr) for the Holocene highstand are more reliable but remain minimum estimates because a small proportion of Ebro sediment advected to the Balearic Rise and Abyssal Plain cannot be accounted for, especially during lowstands. The general highstand conditions of the Pliocene, which were similar to those of the Holocene, resulted in a low discharge of Ebro River sediment (ca. 6.5 million t/yr) and an even thickness of sediment across the margin that deposited at rates of about 24-40 cm/ky. In contrast, sediment supply increased two-three times during the Pleistocene, the margin prograded rapidly and deposition occurred at rates of 101-165 cm/ky on the outer shelf and slope, but basin floor rates remained anomalously low (21-26 cm/ky) because sediment was drained and broadly dispersed eastward in Valencia Trough. During the late Pleistocene rise of sea level, the main depocenters progressively shifted shoreward and sedimentation rates greatly decreased from 175 cm/ky on the upper slope during the early transgression to 106 cm/ky on the outer shelf and then to 63 cm/ky on the mid-shelf during the late transgression as the river sediment discharge dropped to half by Holocene time. Maximal sedimentation rates occurred in active depocenters of sediment dispersal such as the Holocene delta (370 cm/ky) or the youngest Pleistocene Oropesa channel-levee complex (705 cm/ky) where deposition rates increased by an order of magnitude or more compared to average Ebro shelf (38 cm/ky) or base-of-slope rates in the Pleistocene (21 cm/ky). The sedimentation rates verify the importance of sea-level control on the

  7. Suspended-sediment rating curve response to urbanization and wildfire, Santa Ana River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Rubin, David M.

    2007-06-01

    River suspended-sediment concentrations provide insights to the erosion and transport of materials from a landscape, and changes in concentrations with time may result from landscape processes or human disturbance. Here we show that suspended-sediment concentrations in the Santa Ana River, California, decreased 20-fold with respect to discharge during a 34-year period (1968-2001). These decreases cannot be attributed to changes in sampling technique or timing, nor to event or seasonal hysteresis. Annual peak and total discharge, however, reveal sixfold increases over the 34-year record, which largely explain the decreases in sediment concentration by a nonlinear dilution process. The hydrological changes were related to the widespread urbanization of the watershed, which resulted in increases in storm water discharge without detectable alteration of sediment discharge, thus reducing suspended-sediment concentrations. Periodic upland wildfire significantly increased water discharge, sediment discharge, and suspended-sediment concentrations and thus further altered the rating curve with time. Our results suggest that previous inventories of southern California sediment flux, which assume time-constant rating curves and extend these curves beyond the sampling history, may have substantially overestimated loads during the most recent decades.

  8. Chromium geochemistry of serpentinous sediment in the Willow core, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oze, Christopher J.; LaForce, Matthew J.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Hanson, Randall T.; Bird, Dennis K.; Coleman, Robert G.

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of Cr geochemistry in serpentinous sediment completed for a multiple-aquifer ground-water monitoring well (Willow core of Santa Clara County, CA) determined sediment at depths >225 meters contains Cr concentrations ranging from 195 to 1155 mg/kg. Serpentinous sediment from this site is a potential source of non-anthropogenic Cr contamination. Chromium-bearing minerals such as Cr-spinel appear to be the main source of Cr in the sediment; however, Cr-bearing silicates and clay minerals are additional Cr sources. Aqueous Cr concentrations in the sediment are <4.6 mg/L; however, the valence of Cr was not identified in the solutions or in the sediment. Although there is no indication of Cr(VI) contamination derived from the serpentinous sediment, elevated Cr concentrations in the sediment, the observed ‘dissolution’ textures of the Cr-bearing minerals, the estimated redox environment, and water chemistry indicate the formation of Cr(VI) is potentially favorable.

  9. Suspended-sediment rating curve response to urbanization and wildfire, Santa Ana River, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Rubin, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    River suspended-sediment concentrations provide insights to the erosion and transport of materials from a landscape, and changes in concentrations with time may result from landscape processes or human disturbance. Here we show that suspended-sediment concentrations in the Santa Ana River, California, decreased 20-fold with respect to discharge during a 34-year period (1968−2001). These decreases cannot be attributed to changes in sampling technique or timing, nor to event or seasonal hysteresis. Annual peak and total discharge, however, reveal sixfold increases over the 34-year record, which largely explain the decreases in sediment concentration by a nonlinear dilution process. The hydrological changes were related to the widespread urbanization of the watershed, which resulted in increases in storm water discharge without detectable alteration of sediment discharge, thus reducing suspended-sediment concentrations. Periodic upland wildfire significantly increased water discharge, sediment discharge, and suspended-sediment concentrations and thus further altered the rating curve with time. Our results suggest that previous inventories of southern California sediment flux, which assume time-constant rating curves and extend these curves beyond the sampling history, may have substantially overestimated loads during the most recent decades.

  10. Monitoring sediment transfer processes on the desert margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millington, Andrew C.; Arwyn, R. Jones; Quarmby, Neil; Townshend, John R. G.

    1987-01-01

    LANDSAT Thematic Mapper and Multispectral Scanner data have been used to construct change detection images for three playas in south-central Tunisia. Change detection images have been used to analyze changes in surface reflectance and absorption between wet and dry season (intra-annual change) and between different years (inter-annual change). Change detection imagery has been used to examine geomorphological changes on the playas. Changes in geomorphological phenomena are interpreted from changes in soil and foliar moisture levels, differences in reflectances between different salt and sediments and the spatial expression of geomorphological features. Intra-annual change phenomena that can be detected from multidate imagery are changes in surface moisture, texture and chemical composition, vegetation cover and the extent of aeolian activity. Inter-annual change phenomena are divisible into those restricted to marginal playa facies (sedimentation from sheetwash and alluvial fans, erosion from surface runoff and cliff retreat) and these are found in central playa facies which are related to the internal redistribution of water, salt and sediment.

  11. Molybdenum Cycling in Upwelling Sediments: An Example from Namibian Margin Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, G. L.; Goldhammer, T.; Formolo, M.; Brunner, B.; Ferdelman, T.

    2008-12-01

    The paleo-redox application of molybdenum (Mo) isotopes is strongly tied to our knowledge of the modern marine Mo cycle. Elemental mass balance indicates that ~47% of the Mo supplied to the oceans is removed to deep sea sediments, leaving the remaining Mo to "near-shore" reducing sediments (1). The Black Sea is likely the best studied reducing environment with regards to Mo isotopes, yet accounts for only a small fraction of the Mo mass balance. The accumulation of Mo in continental margin sediments has been recently re-assessed and may account for a larger fraction of the marine Mo reservoir than previously thought (2). In the presence of sulfide, the molybdate anion is transformed, by the replacement of oxygen with sulfur, to particle reactive oxy-thiomolybdates (3). This is often cited as the mechanism by which Mo removal proceeds in the Black Sea where sulfide concentrations in the water are high. In contrast, in continental margin settings, the removal mechanism is poorly understood, and the extent to which sulfur cycling plays a role remains un-quantified. To better understand removal/cycling processes in a continental margin setting, where sulfide may only be present in the pore waters and not in the water column, Mo was studied in an array of marine settings off the Namibian coast. Surface sediments were collected across a transect from near-shore/high productivity to deep water/low productivity sediments. These sediments were incubated in bag experiments to study the relationship between sulfur and Mo cycling. Molybdenum concentrations in the Namibian sediments range from detrital values at the lowest productivity site to 25 ppm in surface sediments with high productivity. Preliminary results allude to a correlation between sulfate reduction rates and Mo accumulation in these sediments. Detailed studies of Mo, Mo isotopes, other trace metals, and sulfur investigations from both sediment cores and bag experiments will be presented. (1)Bertine and Turekian

  12. Methane oxidation in permeable sediments at hydrocarbon seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treude, T.; Ziebis, W.

    2010-03-01

    A shallow-water area in the Santa Barbara Channel (California), known collectively as the Coal Oil Point seep field, is one the largest natural submarine oil and gas emission areas in the world. Both gas and oil are seeping constantly through a predominantly sandy seabed into the ocean. This study focused on the methanotrophic activity within the surface sediments (0-15 cm) of the permeable seabed in the so-called Brian Seep area at a water depth ~10 m. Detailed investigations of biogeochemical parameters in the sediment surrounding active gas vents indicated that methane seepage through the permeable seabed induces a convective transport of fluids within the surface sediment layer, which results in a deeper penetration of oxidants (oxygen, sulfate) into the sediment, as well as in a faster removal of potentially inhibiting reduced end products (e.g. hydrogen sulfide). Methanotrophic activity was often found close to the sediment-water interface, indicating the involvement of aerobic bacteria. However, biogeochemical data suggests that the majority of methane is consumed by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction below the surface layer (>15 cm), where sulfate is still available in high concentrations. This subsurface maximum of AOM activity in permeable sands is in contrast to known deep-sea seep habitats, where upward fluid advection through more fine-grained sediments leads to an accumulation of AOM activity within the top 10 cm of the sediments, because sulfate is rapidly depleted.

  13. Late Quaternary sedimentation on the North Aegean continental margin, Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, D.J.W. ); Perissoratis, C. )

    1991-01-01

    The late Quaternary seismic stratigraphy of the North Aegean continental shelf and adjacent basins has been interpreted from boomer and 3.5-kHz seismic profiles. Ages derived from shallow cores and offshore wells, and relative offsets on small synsedimentary faults, provide chronological control. Sea level history inferred from seismic stratigraphy correlates with the global eustatic sea level record based on oxygen isotopic curves. The present depth of the delta plain formed on the outer shelf during the late stage 6 lowstand provides a dated and originally horizontal marker for estimating rates of tectonic subsidence. Gross distribution of sediment facies is similar in both tectonically stable and active areas. The shell break formed by delta progradation, but is marked by faults in most places because of the accommodation provided by graben subsidence rates of 0.3-1.5 mm/yr. Standard sequence stratigraphic analysis can be applied to these sediments deposited during high-amplitude Quaternary sea level oscillations. High rates of subsidence result in the preservation an unusually complete record of sea level change. Major lowstand progradation is dependent on the duration, rather than the magnitude, of sea level lowstand. The long glaciations in isotopic stages 6, 12, 16, and 22 resulted in the most prominent seaward progradation on the margin. Sandy lowstand turbidite deposits formed only when there was rapid fall in sea level; otherwise sand was trapped on delta tops and silty muds were deposited in deep water.

  14. Storage Capacity and Sedimentation of Loch Lomond Reservoir, Santa Cruz, California, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Kelly R.; Harmon, Jerry G.

    2000-01-01

    In 1998, a bathymetric survey was done to determine the storage capacity and the loss of capacity owing to sedimentation of Loch Lomond Reservoir in Santa Cruz County, California. Results of the survey indicate that the maximum capacity of the reservoir is 8,991 acre-feet in November 1998. The results of previous investigations indicate that storage capacity of the reservoir is less than 8,991 acre-feet. The storage capacity determined from those investigations probably were underestimated because of limitations of the methods and the equipment used. The volume of sedimentation in a reservoir is considered equal to the decrease in storage capacity. To determine sedimentation in Loch Lomond Reservoir, change in storage capacity was estimated for an upstream reach of the reservoir. The change in storage capacity was determined by comparing a 1998 thalweg profile (valley floor) of the reservoir with thalweg profiles from previous investigations; results of the comparison indicate that sedimentation is occurring in the upstream reach. Cross sections for 1998 and 1982 were compared to determine the magnitude of sedimentation in the upstream reach of the reservoir. Results of the comparison, which were determined from changes in the cross-sectional areas, indicate that the capacity of the reservoir decreased by 55 acre-feet.

  15. Movility of metals in surface sediments of the Santa Rosalia mining region, Wester Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Figueroa, G. M.; Shumilin, E.; Demina, L.; Gordeev, V.; Choumiline, K.

    2009-04-01

    The sediments near Santa Rosalía (Peninsula of Baja California) are contaminated by a variety of metals produced by ancient copper mineral smelting. However high metal enrichments were not detected in the brown seaweeds collected in the contamination "hot spot", suggesting low bioavailability of the metals. To check this hypothesis, a sequential chemical leaching was applied to the sediments from the coastal zone of Santa Rosalía with different levels of metals. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in four fractions (metals interchangeable or incorporated into carbonates F1, oxy-hydroxides F2, organic matter/sulphides F3 and detrital components F4) of the leaching were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In the sediments, non-contaminated or slightly contaminated by copper, the mobile fraction F1 and relatively mobile F2 were the most important for Cd, Cu, Mn and Pb. The fraction of metals associated with organic matter/sulfides F3 was relatively low in all samples. For Fe and Ni the residual fraction F4 was always high (more than 65 %) because of strong affinity of these two metals to the crystalline matrix of the natural sediments (usually aluminosilicates). The sediments moderately contaminated with copper, conserve the same trend. However, in the sediments with highest levels of copper, the metals Cu, Mn, Pb y Zn increase drastically their occurrence in fraction F4 (63-81 %). Particularly, the copper relative abundances in this kind of sediments with concentrations of this metal ranging from 2895 mg kg-1 to 4818 mg kg-1 followed the next sequence: residual fraction F4 (79.5 ± 4.6 %) > absorbed form and carbonates F1(14.0 ± 4.6 %) > Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides F2(5.7 ± 1.5 %) > associated with organic matter and sulfides F3 (4.3 ± 3.6%). These four metals were presumably incorporated during copper mineral smelting inside of the residual components, which are very resistant to physico-chemical action and presumably cannot be removed

  16. Antarctic glacial history from numerical models and continental margin sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, P.F.; Barrett, P.J.; Cooper, A. K.; Huybrechts, P.

    1999-01-01

    The climate record of glacially transported sediments in prograded wedges around the Antarctic outer continental shelf, and their derivatives in continental rise drifts, may be combined to produce an Antarctic ice sheet history, using numerical models of ice sheet response to temperature and sea-level change. Examination of published models suggests several preliminary conclusions about ice sheet history. The ice sheet's present high sensitivity to sea-level change at short (orbital) periods was developed gradually as its size increased, replacing a declining sensitivity to temperature. Models suggest that the ice sheet grew abruptly to 40% (or possibly more) of its present size at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, mainly as a result of its own temperature sensitivity. A large but more gradual middle Miocene change was externally driven, probably by development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and Polar Front, provided that a few million years' delay can be explained. The Oligocene ice sheet varied considerably in size and areal extent, but the late Miocene ice sheet was more stable, though significantly warmer than today's. This difference probably relates to the confining effect of the Antarctic continental margin. Present-day numerical models of ice sheet development are sufficient to guide current sampling plans, but sea-ice formation, polar wander, basal topography and ice streaming can be identified as factors meriting additional modelling effort in the future.

  17. Ravinement Surfaces And Deglacial Sediments On The Rhone Margin (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berne, S.

    2003-12-01

    The significance of key surfaces and parasequences on the Rhone margin is investigated by comparing high-, very high-, and ultra-high resolution seismic data to long Calypso cores. Each surface and deposit correspond to typical seismic facies, distinct lithologies and different faunal associations. Radiocarbon datings allow us to tie these surfaces and deposits to the deglacial history of the area. However, it is necessary to consider the Rhone subaqueous delta in three dimensions, in order to decipher the impact of global (sea-level), regional (climate, sediment flux), and local (hydrodynamics, avulsion) processes. The last deglacial sea-level rise is well recorded through surprisingly similar clinoform parasequences, that consist of sand and gravels progressively passing seaward to clayey silts. When these systems have a sufficient lateral extent, they can be utilized as a "dipstick" for sea-levels in the Western Mediterranean Sea. Cemented sands, that formed along the phreatic zone, are also observed at different depths and provide an independent way to constrain paleo-water depths.

  18. Microbial Oxidation of Ethane within Seep Sediment at Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, S. D.; Duncombe, R.; Scarlett, R. D.; Shaffer, J.; Lensch, S.; Valentine, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrocarbon seep field at Coal Oil Point (COP), off the coast of Santa Barbara, California, releases more than 10^10 g of thermogenic natural gas each year. Only a fraction of this methane, ethane, propane, and butane reaches the atmosphere, and is instead consumed by marine microbes in both the sediment and water column. Bacterial respiration of these gases has been observed in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, with the exception of ethane (aerobic only) (Kniemeyer et. al 2007). This work seeks to quantify the rate of ethane oxidation (both aerobic and anaerobic) in marine sediment. A series of experiments, to be conducted using COP seep sediment aboard the R/V Atlantis in October 2013, will test how varying oxygen conditions impact ethane oxidation rate. Oxidation rates will be quantified using sensitive 3H-ethane tracers. Preliminary data from Shane's Seep, located within the COP seep field, indicates that ethane oxidation is restricted to the top 6 cm of sediment. This suggests that oxygen is a limiting factor, but further work is needed to establish if ethane oxidation is restricted to exclusively aerobic environments.

  19. Rapid and widespread dispersal of flood sediment on the northern California margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheatcroft, R.A.; Sommerfield, C.K.; Drake, D.E.; Borgeld, J.C.; Nittrouer, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The dispersal of flood sediment from small river systems is a poorly studied, yet potentially important aspect of active continental-margin sedimentation. In January 1995, during a flood with a 30 yr return period, the Eel River (northern California) delivered an estimated 25 ?? 3 ?? 106 t (metric tons) of tine-grained (<62 ??m) sediment to the ocean. The flood formed a distinct layer on the sea bed that was centered on the 70 m isobath, extended for 30 km along shelf and 8 km across shelf, and was as thick as 8.5 cm, but contained only 6 ?? 106 t of sediment. Thus, 75% of the flood-derived sediment did not form a recount/able deposit, but was instead rapidly and widely dispersed over the continental margin. Stratigraphic models of, and compilations of sediment flux to, active continental margins need to take the dispersive nature of small river systems into account.

  20. Sediment discharge in the Upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Sediment data collected in the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California, during the 1968-73 water years were analyzed to determine total sediment discharge at four stations in the basins. Water discharge and total sediment discharge at these stations, representative of the 1943-72 period, were estimated from long-term flow data for nearby gaging stations and water-sediment discharge relations determined for the 1968-73 water years. Most of the total annual sediment discharge at each station occurs during a few days each year. The quantity of sediment transported in a single day often accounts for more than 40 percent of the total annual sediment discharge. Estimated sediment discharge for the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins during the 1943-72 water years averaged 53,000 tons and 23,000 tons per year. Long-term sediment deposition in Lopez Reservoir, which is in the southern part of the upper Arroyo Grande basin, was estimated to be 35 acre-feet per year. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Comparison of marine gas hydrates in sediments of an active and passive continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two sites of the Deep Sea Drilling Project in contrasting geologic settings provide a basis for comparison of the geochemical conditions associated with marine gas hydrates in continental margin sediments. Site 533 is located at 3191 m water depth on a spit-like extension of the continental rise on a passive margin in the Atlantic Ocean. Site 568, at 2031 m water depth, is in upper slope sediment of an active accretionary margin in the Pacific Ocean. Both sites are characterized by high rates of sedimentation, and the organic carbon contents of these sediments generally exceed 0.5%. Anomalous seismic reflections that transgress sedimentary structures and parallel the seafloor, suggested the presence of gas hydrates at both sites, and, during coring, small samples of gas hydrate were recovered at subbottom depths of 238m (Site 533) and 404 m (Site 568). The principal gaseous components of the gas hydrates wer methane, ethane, and CO2. Residual methane in sediments at both sites usually exceeded 10 mll-1 of wet sediment. Carbon isotopic compositions of methane, CO2, and ??CO2 followed parallel trends with depth, suggesting that methane formed mainly as a result of biological reduction of oxidized carbon. Salinity of pore waters decreased with depth, a likely result of gas hydrate formation. These geochemical characteristics define some of the conditions associated with the occurrence of gas hydrates formed by in situ processes in continental margin sediments. ?? 1984.

  2. Pathways of organic carbon oxidation in three continental margin sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, D. E.; Jorgensen, B. B.; Fossing, H.; Glud, R.; Gundersen, J.; Ramsing, N. B.; Thamdrup, B.; Hansen, J. W.; Nielsen, L. P.; Hall, P. O.

    1993-01-01

    We have combined several different methodologies to quantify rates of organic carbon mineralization by the various electron acceptors in sediments from the coast of Denmark and Norway. Rates of NH4+ and Sigma CO2 liberation sediment incubations were used with O2 penetration depths to conclude that O2 respiration accounted for only between 3.6-17.4% of the total organic carbon oxidation. Dentrification was limited to a narrow zone just below the depth of O2 penetration, and was not a major carbon oxidation pathway. The processes of Fe reduction, Mn reduction and sulfate reduction dominated organic carbon mineralization, but their relative significance varied depending on the sediment. Where high concentrations of Mn-oxide were found (3-4 wt% Mn), only Mn reduction occurred. With lower Mn oxide concentrations more typical of coastal sediments, Fe reduction and sulfate reduction were most important and of a similar magnitude. Overall, most of the measured O2 flux into the sediment was used to oxidized reduced inorganic species and not organic carbon. We suspect that the importance of O2 respiration in many coastal sediments has been overestimated, whereas metal oxide reduction (both Fe and Mn reduction) has probably been well underestimated.

  3. Sediment deformation related to the submarine failure in northeastern South China Sea continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, J.

    2012-12-01

    In northeastern South China Sea continental margin, geological structure is complex due to the passive continental margin meets the Taiwan mountain belt. Submarine slope failures, turbidity flows and so on are the main sedimentary processes in this continental slope, but these processes play different roles along the passive continental slope. So Chirp subbottom profiles, include analog and digital data, and cores collected in this region were analyzed to study the difference of sedimentation of the Late Quaternary. We found that more sediment deformations near seafloor, e.g. sediment layer pulled by sliding block and formed a shape like "pinch-out", were observed in the west region of the study area. This phenomenon could be related to finer sediments from mainland China, comparing with coarser sediments from Taiwan mountain belt deposited in the east region of the study area.

  4. Data report: Permeabilities of eastern equatorial Pacific and Peru margin sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamage, K.; Bekins, B.; Screaton, E.

    2006-01-01

    Constant-flow permeability tests were conducted on core samples from Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201 from the eastern equatorial Pacific and the Peru margin. Eighteen whole-round core samples from Sites 1225, 1226, 1227, 1230, and 1231 were tested for vertical permeabilities. Sites 1225, 1226, and 1231 represent sediments of the open ocean, whereas Sites 1227 and 1230 represent sediments of the ocean margin. Measured vertical permeabilities vary from ???8 ?? 10-19 m2 to ???1 ?? 10-16 m2 for a porosity range of 450%-90%.

  5. Geochemical discrimination of siliciclastic sediments from active and passive margin settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surendra P.; Armstrong-Altrin, John S.

    2016-03-01

    Discrimination of active and passive margins is important from both academic and economic aspects. This can only be successfully achieved, however, if there are major compositional differences among sediments derived from different continental margins. A worldwide database of active and passive margin settings was established from published major and trace element geochemical data of Neogene to Quaternary siliciclastic sediments. These data were used to evaluate the performance of existing discrimination diagrams, which were shown to work unsatisfactorily with success values of mostly between 0% and 30%. Because these diagrams were not based on a statistically coherent methodology, we proposed two new discriminant functions from linear discriminant analysis of multinormally distributed isometric log-transformed ratios of major and combined major and trace elements. These new diagrams showed very high percent success values of about 87%-97% and 84%-86% for the active and passive margins, respectively, for the original database. Excellent performance of the multidimensional diagrams and related discriminant functions was confirmed from 11 test studies involving Quaternary to Holocene siliciclastic sediments from known tectonic margins. The expected result of an active or passive margin was obtained, with most samples plotting correctly in the respective field.

  6. Manganese and copper fluxes from continental margin sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Heggie, D.; Klinkhammer, G.; Cullen, D.

    1987-05-01

    Total dissolvable Cu and Mn have been measured in sea water collected from the continental shelf of the eastern Bering Sea. Copper concentrations of <3 nmole kg/sup -1/ were measured over the shelf break but concentrations increased to >4 nmole kg/sup -1/ inshore of a hydrographic front over the 100 m isobath. Manganese concentrations also were low over the shelf break, <10 nmole kg/sup -1/, and increased systematically to concentrations >10 nmole kg/sup -1/ inshore of the hydrographic front. Depth distributions of Mn at all continental shelf stations showed gradients into the sediments, with concentrations typically >20 nmole kg/sup -1/ in a bottom layer extending about 30 m off the bottom. Benthic Cu and Mn fluxes are indicated by cross-shelf pore water profiles that show interfacial concentrations more than an order of magnitude greater than in bottom water. These data and the results of a model of metal transport across the shelf suggest that Cu and Mn fluxes, estimated at 2 and 18 nmole cm/sup -2/y/sup -1/, respectively, from continental shelf sediments may be one source of these metals to the deep sea.

  7. Authigenic molybdenum formation in marine sediments: A link to pore water sulfide in the Santa Barbara Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zheng, Yen; Anderson, Robert F.; VanGeen, A.; Kuwabara, J.

    2000-01-01

    Pore water and sediment Mo concentrations were measured in a suite of multicores collected at four sites along the northeastern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin to examine the connection between authigenic Mo formation and pore water sulfide concentration. Only at the deepest site (580 m), where pore water sulfide concentrations rise to >0.1 ??M right below the sediment water interface, was there active authigenic Mo formation. At shallower sites (550,430, and 340 m), where pore water sulfide concentrations were consistently <0.05 ??M, Mo precipitation was not occuring at the time of sampling. A sulfide concentration of ???0.1 ??M appears to be a threshold for the onset of Mo-Fe-S co-precipitation. A second threshold sulfide concentration of ???100 ??M is required for Mo precipitation without Fe, possibly as Mo-S or as particle-bound Mo. Mass budgets for Mo were constructed by combining pore water and sediment results for Mo with analyses of sediment trap material from Santa Barbara Basin as well as sediment accumulation rates derived from 210Pb. The calculations show that most of the authigenic Mo in the sediment at the deepest site is supplied by diffusion from overlying bottom waters. There is, however, a non-lithogenic particulate Mo associated with sinking particles that contributes ???15% to the total authigenic Mo accumulation. Analysis of sediment trap samples and supernant brine solutions indicates the presence of non-lithogenic particulate Mo, a large fraction of which is easily remobilized and, perhaps, associated with Mn-oxides. Our observations show that even with the very high flux of organic carbon reaching the sediment of Santa Barbara Basin, active formation of sedimentary authigenic Mo requires a bottom water oxygen concentration below 3 ??M. However, small but measurable rates of authigenic Mo accumulation were observed at sites where bottom water oxygen ranged between 5 and 23 ??M, indicating that the formation of authigenic Mo occured in the

  8. Shelfal sediment transport by undercurrents forces turbidity current activity during high sea level, Chile continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Anne; Hebbeln, Dierk; Regenberg, Marcus; Lückge, Andreas; Strecker, Manfred. R.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the links between terrigenous sediment supply and marine transport and depositional processes along tectonically active margins is essential to decipher turbidite successions as potential archives of climatic and seismic forcings and to comprehend timing and quantity of marine clastic deposition. Sequence stratigraphic models predict coarse-grained terrigenous sediment delivery to deep-marine sites mainly during sea-level fall and lowstand. Marine clastic deposition during periods of transgression and highstand has been attributed to the continued geomorphic connectivity between terrestrial sediment sources and marine sinks (e.g., rivers connected to submarine canyons) often facilitated by narrow shelves, high sediment supply causing delta migration to the shelf edge, and/or abrupt increases in sediment supply due to climatic variability or catastrophic events. To decipher the controls on Holocene highstand turbidite deposition, we analyzed twelve sediment cores of spatially disparate, coeval Holocene turbidite systems along the Chile margin (29-40°S) with changing climatic and geomorphic characteristics but uniform changes of sea level. Intraslope basins in north-central Chile (29-33°S) offshore a narrow to absent shelf record a shut-off of turbidite activity during the Holocene. In contrast, core sites in south-central Chile (36-40°S) offshore a wide continental shelf have repeatedly experienced turbidite deposition during sea-level highstand conditions, even though most of the depocenters are not connected via canyons to sediment sources. The interplay of stable high sediment supply related to strong onshore precipitation in combination with a wide shelf, over which undercurrents move sediment towards the shelf edge, appears to control Holocene turbidite sedimentation and sediment export to the deep sea.

  9. Organic geochemistry of continental margin and deep ocean sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.K.; Hunt, J.M.; Seewald, J.M.; Eglinton, L.B.; Zawoysky, M.; Dickinson, P.; Dickneider, T.

    1992-09-01

    Objective was to study petroleum formation, migration, and accumulation in marine sediments. Collaboration in Global Basin Research Network (GBRN) showed that the hydrocarbon parameters used in oil exploration are also valuable in understanding sedimentary basin fluid flow processes, crucial to production of drinking water, metal ore deposits, and gas and oil. Two goals are : (1) to run hydrous pyrolysis experiments on immature gas-prone source rocks, in order to evaluate the potential influence of gas evolution on oil migration and subsurface pressurization, and (2) to integrate organic geochemical data from the Louisiana Gulf Coast into GBRN subsurface visualization and computer modeling. Experimental methods (petrography, EPR, thermogravimetric Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) were also studied.

  10. Interim report on streamflow, sediment discharge, and water quality in the Calabazas Creek Basin, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, J.M.; Pederson, G.L.; Middelburg, Robert F.

    1978-01-01

    Streamflow, sediment-discharge, and water-quality data are being collected in the Calabazas Creek basin, Santa Clara County, Calif., to determine annual water and sediment discharge at base-line conditions that are representative of a basin prior to urbanization. Results of the first 3 years of the study (1973-75) are given in this report. Climatic conditions during this period were representative of a very wet year (1973) and 2 years of above-average rainfall (1974 and 1975). Daily water and sediment discharge were monitored at three primary stations, and periodic measurements were made at five secondary stations during selected storms. Most of the total annual sediment discharge at each station was transported during a few days each year. Maximum daily sediment discharge in a given year ranged from 23 to 62 percent of the annual total. Daily water discharge at the gaging station Calabazas Creek at Rainbow Drive, near Cupertino, ranged from no flow to 3.31 cubic meters per second. Streamflow at this location was significantly augmented during low flow by diversion of water from the South Bay Aqueduct. Annual sediment discharge at Calabazas Creek at Rainbow Drive was 4,900 t in 1974 and 9,570 t in 1975. A large quantity of sediment was trapped in a debris basin at Comer Drive upstream from this station during both years. If this sediment had not been trapped, sediment discharge at the station would have been about 35 percent greater in 1974 and 30 percent greater in 1975. Most of the trapped sediment consists of sand and gravel that would probably have been deposited in the Calabazas Creek channel downstream from the station. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Pleistocene slope instability of gas hydrate-laden sediment on the Beaufort Sea margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, R.E.; Lee, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    In oceanic areas underlain by sediment with gas hydrate, reduction of sea level initiates disassociation along the base of the gas hydrate, which, in turn, causes the release of large volumes of gas into the sediment and creates excess pore-fluid pressures and reduced slope stability. Fluid diffusion properties dominate the disassociation process in fine-grained marine sediment. Slope failure appears likely for this sediment type on moderate slopes unless pressures can be adequately vented away from the gas hydrate base. Pleistocene eustatic-sea level regressions, likely triggered seafloor landslides on the continental slope of the Beaufort Sea and other margins where gas hydrate is present in seafloor sediment. -from Authors

  12. Application of compound-specific radiocarbon dating for Antarctic margin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkouchi, N.; Koizumi, M.; Anderson, J. B.; Eglinton, T. I.; Miura, H.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Radiocarbon dating has been extensively applied for the development of chronologies of Antarctic margin sediments deposited during the late Quaternary. However, the problems are 1) the DIC reservoir age in the surface mixed layer is much older than that of the other oceans, 2) Antarctic margin sediments generally lack calcareous foraminifera conventionally used for radiocarbon dating and as stratigraphic tool, and 3) the sediments are subjected to significant "contamination" of relict organic matter eroded from the Antarctic continent, leading to substantially older radiocarbon ages of bulk sedimentary organic matter. Ohkouchi et al. (2003) first applied compound-specific radiocarbon dating to the surface sediments collected from Ross Sea, Antarctica for resolving the problem. They reported that the radiocarbon ages of solvent-extractable, short-chain (C14, C16, and C18) fatty acids are consistent with the modern DIC reservoir age (Pre-bomb: 14C -150, Post-bomb: 14C -100). Furthermore, the radiocarbon ages of these fatty acids at five down-core intervals progressively increase with the core depth. These results clearly show a utility of the compound- specific radiocarbon dating for developing sediment chronologies in Antarctic margin sediments. We also determined radiocarbon ages of the fatty acids from a core recovered in the NW Ross Sea to reconstruct sediment chronologies. Furthermore, we determined hydrogen isotopic compositions of sedimentary biomarkers in the core. Around 6.8, 5.7, 4.1, 2.5, and 1.5 kyr ago, the reconstructed D values of paleo- seawater were -200 or lower, suggesting a large amount of meltwater influx to the Ross Sea. Currently, we are applying the method to more sediment samples collected from wider area of Ross Sea to investigate the timing and pattern of retreat of West Antarctic Ice Sheet in the Holocene. I will present the up-dated results in my talk.

  13. Impacts of flamingos on saline lake margin and shallow lacustrine sediments in the Kenya Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jennifer J.; Renaut, Robin W.; Owen, R. Bernhart

    2012-11-01

    Studies of modern, Holocene, and Pleistocene sediments around saline to hypersaline, alkaline Lake Bogoria and Lake Magadi show that evidence of flamingo activity in marginal areas of these lakes is nearly ubiquitous. Flamingos produce discrete structures such as webbed footprints (~ 9 cm long, ~ 11 cm wide) and nest mounds (~ 30 cm wide, ~ 20 cm high), and they also extensively rework sediments in delta front, delta plain, and shoreline areas. Large (~ 0.5-2 cm in diameter), pinched, 'bubble pores' and ped-like mud clumps are formed by the trampling and churning of wet clay-rich sediments in these settings. Flamingo nest mounds, although superficially similar to some thrombolite mounds, are typically internally structureless, unless formed on pre-existing sediments that preserve internal structures. The flamingo mounds consist of a dense, packed oval-shaped core, a surrounding 'body' of packed sediment, and an external layer with a ped-like texture of clumped mud. The nests may contain open holes from roots or feather shafts incorporated into the nest, and (or) burrows produced once the nests are abandoned. In areas with high densities of flamingos, lake margin sediments may be preferentially compacted, particularly at breeding sites, and become resistant to subaerial erosion and the effects of transgressive ravinement on time scales ranging from seasons to tens of thousands of years. The relatively well-compacted nest mounds and associated sediments also contribute to the stability of delta distributary channels during regressive-transgressive cycles, and can lead to the minor channelization of unconfined flows where currents are diverted around nest mounds. Pleistocene exhumed surfaces of relatively well-indurated lake margin sediments at Lake Bogoria and Lake Magadi that are interpreted as combined regressive and transgressive surfaces (flooding surface/sequence boundary) preserve evidence of flamingo activities, and are overlain by younger, porous lacustrine

  14. Manganese flux from continental margin sediments in a transect through the oxygen minimum

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.S. Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Inst., Pacific Grove, CA ); Berelson, W.M.; Iams, H.D.; Kilgore, T.E. ); Coale, K.H.; Coley, T.L.; Elrod, V.A.; Fairey, W.R.; Nowicki, J.L. )

    1992-08-28

    The flux of manganese from continental margin sediments to the ocean was measured with a free-vehicle, benthic flux chamber in a transect across the continental shelf and upper slope of the California margin. The highest fluxes were observed on the shallow continental shelf. Manganese flux decreased linearly with bottom water oxygen concentration, and the lowest flux occurred in the oxygen minimum zone (at a depth of 600 to 1,000 meters). Although the flux of manganese from continental shelf sediments can account for the elevated concentrations observed in shallow, coastal waters, the flux from sediments that intersect the oxygen minimum cannot produce the subsurface concentration maximum of dissolved manganese that is observed in the Pacific Ocean.

  15. Evidence of Active Methanogen Communities in Shallow Sediments of the Sonora Margin Cold Seeps

    PubMed Central

    L'Haridon, Stéphane; Godfroy, Anne; Roussel, Erwan G.; Cragg, Barry A.; Parkes, R. John; Toffin, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the Sonora Margin cold seep ecosystems (Gulf of California), sediments underlying microbial mats harbor high biogenic methane concentrations, fueling various microbial communities, such as abundant lineages of anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME). However, the biodiversity, distribution, and metabolism of the microorganisms producing this methane remain poorly understood. In this study, measurements of methanogenesis using radiolabeled dimethylamine, bicarbonate, and acetate showed that biogenic methane production in these sediments was mainly dominated by methylotrophic methanogenesis, while the proportion of autotrophic methanogenesis increased with depth. Congruently, methane production and methanogenic Archaea were detected in culture enrichments amended with trimethylamine and bicarbonate. Analyses of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and reverse-transcribed PCR-amplified 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from these enrichments revealed the presence of active methylotrophic Methanococcoides burtonii relatives and several new autotrophic Methanogenium lineages, confirming the cooccurrence of Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales methanogens with abundant ANME populations in the sediments of the Sonora Margin cold seeps. PMID:25769831

  16. Organic geochemistry of continental margin and deep ocean sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.K.; Hunt, J.M.; Eglinton, T.; Dickinson, P.; Johnson, C.; Buxton, L.; Tarafa, M.E.

    1990-08-01

    The objective of this research continues to be the understanding of the complex processes of fossil fuel formation and migration. DOE funded research to date has focused on case histories'' of down-hole well profiles of light hydrocarbons, pyrograms, pyrolysis-GC and -GCMS parameters, and biomarker data from wells in the Louisiana and Texas Gulf Coasts the Alaskan North Slope. In the case of the Alaskan North Slope, geological data and one-dimensional maturation modeling have been integrated in order to better constrain possible source rocks, timing, and migration routes for oil and gas generation and expulsion processes.This period, biomarker analyses and organic petrographic analyses were completed for the Ikpikpuk well. In the case of the Gulf Coast, we have obtained a one-dimensional maturation model of the Cost B-1 well in E. Cameron field of the Louisiana Gulf Coast. The completed E. Cameron data set adds to the enigma of the Gulf Coast oils found on the continental shelf of Louisiana. If significant quantities of the oil are coming from relatively organic lean Tertiary rocks, then non-conventional'' expulsion and migration mechanisms, such as gas dissolved in oil must be invoked to explain the Gulf Coast oils reservoired on the Louisiana continental shelf. We are designing and starting to assemble a hydrous pyrolysis apparatus to follow, the laboratory, rates of generation and expulsion of sediment gases. Initiation of some new research to examine {delta}{sup 13}C of individual compounds from pyrolysis is also described. We are beginning to examine both the laboratory and field data from the Gulf Coast in the context of a Global Basin Research Network (GBRN). The purpose is to better understand subsurface fluid flow processes over geologic time in sedimentary basins and their relation to resource accumulation (i.e., petroleum and metal ores). 58 refs.

  17. Sediment Deposition into a Valley-Margin Lake in a Managed Floodplain, Catahoula Lake, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keim, R.; Latuso, K.; DeLaune, R. D.; Weindorf, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment sources to valley-margin lakes vary spatially and temporally depending on relative dominance of the main or tributary rivers. Catahoula Lake is the largest valley-margin lake in the lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley and is hydrologically influenced by backwaters of the Mississippi and Red rivers and headwaters of the Little River. Our objective was to understand effects of hydrological management of the floodplain and the lake itself on lake sediments and recent changes in vegetation. Comparison of 137Cs profiles with prior 210Pb and 14C profiles indicates the recent deposition rate has been low (0.3 cm/yr) but triple that prior to settlement. Sediment chemistry profiles indicate dominance of acidic coastal-plain sediments from the tributary Little River in the past ~60 yr, but spatially mixed influence of acidic and neutral, Mississippi-Red sediments prior to that. We conclude that a century of increasing hydrologic management of the Mississippi and Red rivers has disconnected Catahoula Lake from their sedimentary influence and that the consequent change in chemical composition of surficial sediments may be contributing to ecologic changes in the lake.

  18. Lower Cretaceous organic-rich sediments drilled on Antarctic Continental Margin during ODP Leg 113

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, S.

    1988-02-01

    Lower Cretaceous organic-rich sediments were recovered below a major unconformity at two sites on the eastern Weddell Sea margin during ODP Leg 113. No age overlap exists between the two sites. A more continuous Cretaceous section was previously recovered at DSDP Site 511 on the Falkland plateau. Site 692 (2880 m water depth) is located on a mid-slope bench in Wegener Canyon. Early Cretaceous-age (pre-Albian) sediments extend from 53-98 m below sea floor (mbsf) and are dominated by organic-rich nannofossil claystone. Macrofossils (e.g., belemites and ammonites), thin carbonate lenses (<1 cm), and water escape structures are abundant. Thin beds of devitrified ash, bioturbation, and graded bedding are present. Site 693 (2360 m water depth), 30 km west of Site 692 on the canyon's outer rim, recovered Albian-age organic-rich claystones and mudstones from 416-483 mbsf. Site 693 sediments have lower organic contents than those at Site 692. Glauconite is common in the upper part of the unit. Well-preserved diatoms and diatomite layers suggest high productivity. These sediments differ from Albian-age sediments at Site 511, which consist of open-marine nannofossil ooze. The sediments were deposited in an anoxic or hypoxic upper bathyal (500-1000 mbsl) marine environment. Oxygenation occurred later along the Antarctic margin than the Falkland plateau, possibly as the inflow of Atlantic water proceeded south from an opening near the Falkland plateau.

  19. The Effect of Low Energy Turbulence in Estuary Margins on Fine Sediment Settling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. M.; MacVean, L. J.; Tse, I.; Mazzaro, L. J.; Stacey, M. T.; Variano, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    turbulent Reynolds number will enable more mechanistic predictions of sediment transport in low energy environments like protected estuary margins.

  20. 7Be as a tracer of flood sedimentation on the northern California continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sommerfield, C. K.; Nittrouer, C. A.; Alexander, C. R.

    1999-01-01

    Sediment inventories of the cosmogenic radionuclide 7Be (t1/2=53 d) were measured on the Eel River shelf and slope (northern California continental margin) to investigate sedimentation processes associated with coastal river flooding. Seabed coring shortly after major riverflow events in 1995 and 1997 documented a shelf-wide flood deposit, and subsequent radionuclide studies determined 7Be to be a powerful tracer of fine-grained river sediment. In addition, distinctive signatures of 234Th and 210Pb were observed in oceanic flood deposits and provided additional information regarding depositional processes. During the 1995–1997 monitoring period, 7Be was present (2–35 dpm cm-2) in shelf and slope sediments only after periods of high rainfall and river runoff during the winter months. It is suggested that fluvial input was the primary source of 7Be in shelf sediments after the floods. 7Be sediment inventories and sediment-trap fluxes determined after the 1997 flood revealed that fine-grained fluvial sediments were rapidly (within one month) broadcast over the continental margin, to the 500 m isobath. Dispersal was apparently facilitated by energetic storm waves, which resuspended and redistributed some fraction of the suspended load residing on the shelf prior to accretion as flood deposits. These observations illustrate that floods are an important sedimentary process for modern environments of the Eel shelf and slope, and perhaps for other fluviomarine sedimentary systems of the northern California continental margin. Ratios of the 210Pb sediment-accumulation rate (100 yr average) to the 7Be deposition rate (1–2 month average) for shelf sites illustrate the episodic nature of shelf sedimentation, and suggest that a minimum of 3–30 depositional events complete the most recent stratigraphic record. This observation is consistent with the magnetude and frequency of fluvial sediment input, as Eel River floods with return periods of 3–33 yr (3% of the time of

  1. Anthropogenic contamination of metals in sediments of the Santa Rosalía harbor, Baja California peninsula.

    PubMed

    Shumilin, Evgueni; Jiménez-Illescas, Ángel Rafael; López-López, Silverio

    2013-03-01

    To know the environment impact on a harbor of the Santa Rosalía port on the Baja California peninsula, the concentrations of metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Pb, U and Zn) in harbor sediments were determined for 13 stations and compared with their average upper Earth´s crust abundance. The mean enrichment factors, calculated using Al as a normalizer, were higher than the unity for Ag, Ba, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, U, V and Zn. Concentrations of slightly enriched Cd in the sediments are below the effect range low (ERL) sediment quality guidelines value only at three stations. The levels of Pb in the harbor sediments at four stations (1, 6, 9 and 11) are between the ERL (46.7 mg kg(-1)) and the effect range medium (ERM) (218 mg kg(-1)), and Pb content in the rest of the sediment samples is higher than the ERM, demonstrating the high extent of the anthropogenic impact of this metal on the sedimentary environment. The total concentrations of the potentially toxic elements Cu (3,390 ± 804 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (1,916 ± 749 mg kg(-1)) very strongly exceed their ERM, showing a high possibility of toxicological danger for marine biota, living inside or entering the harbor. PMID:23277367

  2. Nearshore disposal of fine-grained sediment in a high-energy environment: Santa Cruz Harbor case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, Katherine; van Ormondt, Maarten; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Presto, Katherine; Tonnon, Pieter K.

    2011-01-01

    Current regulations in California prohibit the disposal of more than 20% fine-grained sediment in the coastal zone; this threshold is currently being investigated to determine if this environmental regulation can be improved upon. A field monitoring and numerical modeling experiment took place late 2 009 to determine the fate of fine-grained dredge disposal material from Santa Cruz Harbor, California, U.S.A. A multi-nested, hydrodynamic-sediment transport modeling approach was used to simulate the direction and dispersal of the dredge plume. Result s show that the direction and dispersal of the plume was influenced by the wave  climate, a large proportion of which moved in a easterly direction during wave events. Therefore it is vitally important to accurately simulate the tides, waves, currents, temperature and salinity when modeling the dispersal of the fine-grained dredge plume. 

  3. Early Diagenesis and Trace Element Accumulation in North American Arctic Margin Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyk, Z. Z. A.; Gobeil, C.; Goni, M. A.; Macdonald, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    Concentrations of redox-sensitive elements (S, Mn, Mo, U, Cd, Re) were analyzed in a set of 27 sediment cores collected along a section extending from the North Bering Sea to Davis Strait via the Canadian Archipelago. Sedimentary distributions and accumulation rates of the elements were used to document the early diagenetic properties of North American Arctic margin sediments and to estimate the importance of this margin as a sink for key elements in the Arctic and global ocean. Distributions of Mn, total S and reduced inorganic S demonstrated that most sediments had relatively thick (>1 cm) surface oxic layers underlain by weakly reducing conditions, reflecting limited sulphate reduction. Strongly reducing conditions sufficient for significant sulphate reduction and strong sedimentary pyrite burial occurred only in certain subregions, including the Bering-Chukchi Shelves, shallow portions of Barrow Canyon, and, to a lesser extent, Lancaster Sound. Estimated accumulation rates of authigenic S, Mo, Cd and U, and total Re displayed marked spatial variability related to sedimentary redox conditions. Strong relationships between the accumulation rates and vertical carbon flux, estimated from regional primary production values and water depth at the coring sites, indicate that the primary driver in the regional patterns is variation in labile carbon forcing. After accounting for the influence of carbon flux, authigenic Mo accumulation rates show a significant relationship with vascular plant input to the sediments, implying that terrestrial organic matter contributes to supporting metabolism in Arctic margin sediments. In the Chukchi Shelf, where our cores represent a sizeable area (~140,000 km2), and where we encountered the strongest reducing conditions and highest authigenic element accumulation rates in sediments, we estimate that the total authigenic S, Mo, Cd and U accumulation may account for as much as 9% of the pyrite S, 14% of the Mo, 6%-24% of the Cd, and 10

  4. Geochemistry of stream-sediment samples from the Santa Renia Fields and Beaver Peak quadrangles, northern Carlin Trend, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theodore, Ted G.; Kotlyar, Boris B.; Berger, Vladimir I.; Moring, Barry C.; Singer, Donald A.; Edstrom, Sven A.

    1999-01-01

    A broad west-to-east increase of many metal concentrations has been found in stream sediments during a reconnaissance investigation conducted in conjunction with geologic studies in the Santa Renia Fields and Beaver Peak 7–1/2 minute quadrangles near the northern end of the Carlin trend of gold deposits in the Tuscarora Mountains. This regional increase in metal concentrations coincides with a dramatic change in landform wherein high concentrations of metals in stream sediments appear to correlate directly with areas of high elevations and steep slopes in the Beaver Peak quadrangle. Robust erosion combined with high flow rates in streams from these higher elevations are envisaged to have contributed significantly to increased metal concentrations in the stream sediments by an enhanced presence of minerals with high specific gravities and a correspondingly diminished presence of minerals with low specific gravities. Minerals with low specific gravities probably have been preferentially flushed down stream because of high transporting capacities for sediment by streams in the Beaver Peak quadrangle. In addition, the Carlin trend, a generally northwest-alignment of gold deposits in the Santa Renia Fields quadrangle, is well outlined by arsenic concentrations that include a maximum of approximately 54 parts per million. Further, a weakly developed distal-to-proximal metal zonation towards these gold deposits appears to be defined respectively in plots showing distributions of thallium, arsenic, antimony, and zinc. A broad area of high metal concentrations—including sharply elevated abundances of Ag, As, Au, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, P, Sb, Sc, Te, V, and especially Zn—near the southeast corner of the Beaver Peak quadrangle primarily could be the result of stratiform mineralized rocks in the Ordovician Vinini Formation or Devonian Slaven Chert, or the result of a subsequent Mesozoic or Tertiary epigenetic overprint.

  5. Seasonal Trends in Sedimentation on the Fly River Margin: Shelf, Channel, and Open Clinoform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, J. S.; Nittrouer, C. A.; Ogston, A. S.

    2004-12-01

    Recent multibeam mapping and sedimentary studies on the Fly River margin, Papua New Guinea, have revealed across-shelf heterogeneity that likely impacts sediment-transport processes on the margin. Several ancient river valleys with up to 50 m of relief have been discovered and their sedimentary history provides insights to the mechanisms of channel infilling and sedimentation on this margin. Umuda channel, which is located adjacent to the Northern Entrance of the Fly River, exhibits the greatest extent of infilling, and will be a focus of this paper. Kasten ( ˜2 m) and box ( ˜50 cm) cores were collected during the energetic Trade-wind season (June to November), the relatively quiescent Monsoon season (December to March), and the Transition from Monsoon to Trade-wind conditions (April/May). 210Pb, x-radiograph, and grain-size analysis reveal the patterns of sedimentation within Umuda channel, and on the open clinoform to the north. The surface 150 cm of sediment in Umuda channel has relatively uniform excess 210Pb activity that abruptly decreases to background levels below ˜150 cm. These data suggest that the surface 150 cm were deposited relatively quickly within the last ˜100 y. Over the course of sampling seasons, a decrease of ˜10 cm was observed in the elevation of the seabed within Umuda channel. During the Trade-wind season, seabed elevation was at a maximum. Surface sediments were removed between the Trade-wind and Monsoon seasons, and again between the Monsoon and Transition seasons. This pattern is similar on the open clinoform to the north. We hypothesize that this represents a seasonal transfer of sediment from shallow to deeper water.

  6. On the preservation of laminated sediments along the western margin of North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanGeen, A.; Zheng, Yen; Bernhard, J.M.; Cannariato, K.G.; Carriquiry, J.; Dean, W.E.; Eakins, B.W.; Ortiz, J.D.; Pike, J.

    2003-01-01

    Piston, gravity, and multicores as well as hydrographic data were collected along the Pacific margin of Baja California to reconstruct past variations in the intensity of the oxygen-minimum zone (OMZ). Gravity cores collected from within the OMZ north of 24??N did not contain laminated surface sediments even though bottom water oxygen (BWO) concentrations were close to 5 ??mol/kg. However, many of the cores collected south of 24??N did contain millimeter- to centimeter-scale, brown to black laminations in Holocene and older sediments but not in sediments deposited during the Last Glacial Maximum. In addition to the dark laminations, Holocene sediments in Soledad Basin, silled at 290 m, also contain white coccolith laminae that probably represent individual blooms. Two open margin cores from 430 and 700 m depth that were selected for detailed radiocarbon dating show distinct transitions from bioturbated glacial sediment to laminated Holocene sediment occurring at 12.9 and 11.5 ka, respectively. The transition is delayed and more gradual (11.3-10.0 ka) in another dated core from Soledad Basin. The observations indicate that bottom-water oxygen concentrations dropped below a threshold for the preservation of laminations at different times or that a synchronous hydrographic change left an asynchronous sedimentary imprint due to local factors. With the caveat that laminated sections should therefore not be correlated without independent age control, the pattern of older sequences of laminations along the North American western margin reported by this and previous studies suggests that multiple patterns of regional productivity and ventilation prevailed over the past 60 kyr. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Chromium isotope composition of reducing and anoxic sediments from the Peru Margin and Cariaco Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueguen, B.; Planavsky, N.; Wang, X.; Algeo, T. J.; Peterson, L. C.; Reinhard, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Chromium isotope systematics in marine sediments are now being used as a new redox proxy of the modern and ancient Earth's surface. Chromium is primarily delivered to the oceans by riverine inputs through weathering of Cr(III)-rich minerals present in the continental crust and oxidation of insoluble Cr(III) to soluble Cr(VI) species. Since oxidation-reduction reactions fractionate Cr isotopes whereby oxidized Cr(VI) species are preferentially enriched in heavy Cr isotopes, the Cr isotope composition of marine sediments may be useful tracers of redox conditions at the Earth's surface through geological time. Chromium is quantitatively removed in organic-rich sediments where reducing conditions prevail and promote reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), and thus, these sediments should capture the ambient seawater Cr isotope composition. However, the isotopic composition of modern organic-rich sediments is poorly documented so far, and this step is essential for further modeling the global oceanic Cr isotope mass balance and assessing the effects of sedimentation and post-depositional processes on the marine Cr isotopes archive. In this study, we have characterized modern marine organic-rich sediments for their Cr isotope composition (δ53/52Cr) from two different settings, the Peru margin upwelling zone and the anoxic Cariaco Basin (Venezuela). Chromium isotopes were measured on a MC-ICP-MS (Nu Plasma) using a double-spike correction method. The authigenic fraction of shallow samples from the Peru margin sedimentary sequence with a high Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content (>10 wt%) yield an average δ53/52Crauthigenic value of +0.67 ±0.05 ‰ (2sd). However, although this value is close to the seawater value (Atlantic Ocean) and to Cariaco basin sediments (~ +0.6 ‰), reducing sediments from the Peru margin are on average isotopically slightly heavier, especially in samples having a low authigenic fraction and a low TOC content (δ53/52Crauthigenic values up to +1.30

  8. Sediment flux, east Greenland margin. Final report, 1 October 1988-1 September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.T.; Williams, K.M.

    1991-09-17

    We investigated sediment flux across an ice-dominated, high latitude continental margin, using cores from the East Greenland Shelf (ca. 68 deg N). Density, weight percentages of the various sediment components, and sediment/age relations (AMS C- 14 dates) were investigated from cores collected 1988 and 1990. High-resolution DTS Huntec surveys indicated 10-20 m of acoustically transparent sediment. Maximum core length was 3 m and most of the gravity cores were between 1-2 m. The radiocarbon assays show that basal core sediments date between ca. 9,000 and 14,500 BP. The acoustic characteristics, the low dry volume densities (ca. 600 kg/m3 and the faunal and floral assemblages) suggest ice-distal conditions between ca. 14,500 and the present. Net sediment flux in the Kangerdlugssuaq Trough during the last 14,500 years has been low; this might be explained by either (1) cold-based glaciological conditions of the East Greenland ice sheet; and/or (2) efficient sediment trap(s) lying along the inner shelf/fjords of East Greenland.

  9. Ice Sheet History from Antarctic Continental Margin Sediments: The ANTOSTRAT Approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, P.F.; Barrett, P.J.; Camerlenghi, A.; Cooper, A. K.; Davey, F.J.; Domack, E.W.; Escutia, C.; Kristoffersen, Y.; O'Brien, P.E.

    1998-01-01

    The Antarctic Ice Sheet is today an important part of the global climate engine, and probably has been so for most of its long existence. However, the details of its history are poorly known, despite the measurement and use, over two decades, of low-latitude proxies of ice sheet volume. An additional way of determining ice sheet history is now available, based on understanding terrigenous sediment transport and deposition under a glacial regime. It requires direct sampling of the prograded wedge of glacial sediments deposited at the Antarctic continental margin (and of derived sediments on the continental rise) at a small number of key sites, and combines the resulting data using numerical models of ice sheet development. The new phase of sampling is embodied mainly in a suite of proposals to the Ocean Drilling Program, generated by separate regional proponent groups co-ordinated through ANTOSTRAT (the Antarctic Offshore Acoustic Stratigraphy initiative). The first set of margin sites has now been drilled as ODP Leg 178 to the Antarctic Peninsula margin, and a first, short season of inshore drilling at Cape Roberts, Ross Sea, has been completed. Leg 178 and Cape Roberts drilling results are described briefly here, together with an outline of key elements of the overall strategy for determining glacial history, and of the potential contributions of drilling other Antarctic margins investigated by ANTOSTRAT. ODP Leg 178 also recovered continuous ultra-high-resolution Holocene biogenic sections at two sites within a protected, glacially-overdeepened basin (Palmer Deep) on the inner continental shelf of the Antarctic Peninsula. These and similar sites from around the Antarctic margin are a valuable resource when linked with ice cores and equivalent sections at lower latitude sites for studies of decadal and millenial-scale climate variation.

  10. Elevated shear strength of sediments on active margins: Evidence for seismic strengthening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Derek E.; DeVore, Joshua R.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquakes are a primary trigger of submarine landslides, yet some of the most seismically active areas on Earth show a surprisingly low frequency of submarine landslides. Here we show that within the uppermost 100 m below seafloor (mbsf) in previously unfailed sediment, active margins have elevated shear strength by a factor of 2-3 relative to the same interval on passive margins. The elevated shear strength is seen in a global survey of undrained shear strength with depth as well as a normalized analysis that accounts for lithology and stress state. The enhanced shear strength is highest within the uppermost 10 mbsf. These results indicate that large areas of modern day slopes on active margins have enhanced slope stability, which may explain the relative paucity of landslides. These findings lend support to the seismic strengthening hypothesis that the repeated exposure to earthquake energy gradually increases shear strength by shear-induced compaction.

  11. Sediment delivery to the Gulf of Alaska: source mechanisms along a glaciated transform margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dobson, M.R.; O'Leary, D.; Veart, M.

    1998-01-01

    Sediment delivery to the Gulf of Alaska occurs via four areally extensive deep-water fans, sourced from grounded tidewater glaciers. During periods of climatic cooling, glaciers cross a narrow shelf and discharge sediment down the continental slope. Because the coastal terrain is dominated by fjords and a narrow, high-relief Pacific watershed, deposition is dominated by channellized point-source fan accumulations, the volumes of which are primarily a function of climate. The sediment distribution is modified by a long-term tectonic translation of the Pacific plate to the north along the transform margin. As a result, the deep-water fans are gradually moved away from the climatically controlled point sources. Sets of abandoned channels record the effect of translation during the Plio-Pleistocene.

  12. Terrigenous Sedimentation On The North-Western Subtropical Margin Of The American Continent Over The Last 120,000 Yrs. New Insights From Magnetic And Geochemical Properties Of Sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, C. L.; Thouveny, N.; Vidal, L.

    2006-12-01

    The magnetic and geochemical properties of four marine sediment cores from the North-Western American margin allowed reconstructing the dynamics of the terrigenous sedimentation, related to climatic changes during the last glacial-interglacial cycle (0-120,000 yrs). The cores have been retrieved in three sites located on the Californian and Mexican coasts: Santa Barbara Basin (35°N), margin of Baja California (23°N) and Gulf of Tehuantepec (15°N). The present sedimentation is characterized by high terrigenous input, deposited under the influence of a strong seasonal variability and high accumulation rates (35 to 150 cm/ka), allowing to monitor the rhythms of the terrigenous input at high resolution. The magnetic parameters (magnetic susceptibility, natural, anhysteretic and isothermal remanent magnetizations and hysteresis properties) are used to trace the concentration, nature or grain sizes changes of the magnetic fraction. The type of terrigenous iron oxides and grain sizes identified (magnetite, hematite, goethite) can be related to fluvial or aeolian inputs, and thus to erosion regimes forced by climatic conditions. The relative contents of major and trace elements, measured by X-ray fluorescence scanner (XRF) on key interval of the cores, helped to improve interpretations. The sedimentary sequences, dated by correlation of magnetic susceptibility profiles, calibrated 14C ages and identification of paleomagnetic excursions, totally or partly cover the last glacial-interglacial cycle (0-120 ka). The high concentration of iron oxides in glacial sediments in the three sites suggests strong terrigenous inputs on the NW American margin and notably intense aeolian inputs during the last glacial maximum (20-26 ka BP), revealing a strong erosion in arid conditions affecting wider areas of coastal surfaces (lower sea level). In the Santa Barbara Basin, terrigenous input variations during the last 35 ka were probably modulated by the oscillation of the volume and

  13. Distinguishing Terrestrial Organic Carbon in Marginal Sediments of East China Sea and Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, Selvaraj; Lin, Baozhi; Wang, Huawei; Liu, Qianqian; Liu, Zhifei; Lou, Jiann-Yuh; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Mayer, Lawrence M.

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge about the sources, transport pathways and behavior of terrestrial organic carbon in continental margins adjoining to large rivers has improved in recent decades, but uncertainties and complications still exist with human-influenced coastal regions in densely populated wet tropics and subtropics. In these regions, the monsoon and other episodic weather events exert strong climatic control on mineral and particulate organic matter delivery to the marginal seas. Here we investigate elemental (TOC, TN and bromine-Br) and stable carbon isotopic (δ13C) compositions of organic matter (OM) in surface sediments and short cores collected from active (SW Taiwan) and passive margin (East China Sea) settings to understand the sources of OM that buried in these settings. We used sedimentary bromine to total organic carbon (Br/TOC) ratios to apportion terrigenous from marine organic matter, and find that Br/TOC may serve as an additional, reliable proxy for sedimentary provenance in both settings. Variations in Br/TOC are consistent with other provenance indicators in responding to short-lived terrigenous inputs. Because diagenetic alteration of Br is insignificant on shorter time scales, applying Br/TOC ratios as a proxy to identify organic matter source along with carbon isotope mixing models may provide additional constraints on the quantity and transformation of terrigenous organics in continental margins. We apply this combination of approaches to land-derived organic matter in different depositional environments of East Asian marginal seas.

  14. Late Cretaceous - Paleogene forearc sedimentation and accretion of oceanic plateaus and seamounts along the Middle American convergent margin (Costa Rica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Peter O.; Baumgartner-Mora, Claudia; Andjic, Goran

    2016-04-01

    The Late Cretaceous-Paleogene sedimentation pattern in space and time along the Middle American convergent margin was controlled by the accretion of Pacific plateaus and seamounts. The accretion of more voluminous plateaus must have caused the temporary extinction of the arc and tectonic uplift, resulting in short lived episodes of both pelagic and neritic biogenic sedimentation. By the Late Eocene, shallow carbonate environments became widespread on a supposed mature arc edifice, that is so far only documented in arc-derived sediments. In northern Costa Rica forearc sedimentation started during the Coniacian-Santonian on the Aptian-Turonian basement of the Manzanillo Terrane. The arrival and collision of the Nicoya Terrane (a CLIP-like, 139-83 Ma Pacific plateau) and the Santa Elena Terrane caused the extinction of the arc during late Campanian- Early Maastrichtian times, indicated by the change to pelagic limestone sedimentation (Piedras Blancas Formation) in deeper areas and shallow-water rudistid - Larger Benthic Foraminfera limestone on tectonically uplifted areas of all terranes. Arc-derived turbidite sedimentation resumed in the Late Maastrichtian and was again interrupted during the Late Paleocene - Early Eocene, perhaps due to the underplating of a yet unknown large seamount. The extinction of the arc resulted in the deposition of the siliceous pelagic Buenavista Formation, as well as the principally Thanetian Barra Honda carbonate platform on a deeply eroded structural high in the Tempisque area. In southern Costa Rica the basement is thought to be the western edge of the CLIP. It is Santonian-Campanian in age and is only exposed in the southwestern corner of Herradura. Cretaceous arc-forearc sequences are unknown, except for the Maastrichtian-Paleocene Golfito Terrane in southeastern Costa Rica. The distribution and age of shallow/pelagic carbonates vs. arc-derived detrital sediments is controlled by the history of accretion of Galápagos hot spot

  15. Tectonic significance of Synrift sediment packages across the Congo continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, J.P.; Karner, G.D.; Driscoll, N.W. ); Brumbaugh, W.D. ); Cameron, N. )

    1993-09-01

    The tectonic and stratigraphic development of the Congo continental margin reflects the timing, magnitude, and distribution of lithospheric extension responsible for its formation. Details of the lithospheric extension process are recorded in the stratigraphic successions preserved along and across the margin. By using the stratal relationships (e.g., onlap, downlap, and truncation) and lithofacies determined from seismic reflection and exploratory well data as input into our basin-modeling strategy, we have developed an integrated approach to determine the relationship between the timing, magnitude, and distribution of lithospheric extension across the margin. Two hinge zones, an eastern and Atlantic hinge formed along the Congo margin in response to discrete extensional events occurring from the Berriasian to the Aptian. The eastern hinge zone demarcates the eastern limit of the broadly distributed Berriasian extension. This extension resulted in the formation of deep anoxic, lacustrine systems. In contrast, the Atlantic hinge, located [approximately]90 km west of the eastern hinge, marks the eastern limit of a second phase of extension, which began in the Hauterivian. Consequent footwall uplift and rotation exposed the earlier synrift and prerift stratigraphy to at least wave base causing varying amounts of erosional truncation across the Atlantic hinge zone along much of the Gabon, Congo, and Angola margins. The absence of the Melania Formation across the Congo margin implies that uplift of the Atlantic hinge was relatively minor compared to that across the Angola and Gabon margins. In addition, material eroded from the adjacent and topographically higher hinge zones may in part account for the thick wedge of sediment deposited seaward of the Congo Atlantic hinge. A third phase of extension reactivated both the eastern and Atlantic hinge zones and was responsible for creating the accommodation space for Marnes Noires source rock deposition.

  16. Bacterial and archaeal communities in sediments of the north Chinese marginal seas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiwen; Liu, Xiaoshou; Wang, Min; Qiao, Yanlu; Zheng, Yanfen; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Microbial communities of the Chinese marginal seas have rarely been reported. Here, bacterial and archaeal community structures and abundance in the surface sediment of four sea areas including the Bohai Sea (BS), North Yellow Sea (NYS), South Yellow Sea (SYS), and the north East China Sea (NECS) were surveyed by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR. The results showed that microbial communities of the four geographic areas were distinct from each other at the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level, whereas the microbial communities of the BS, NYS, and SYS were more similar to each other than to the NECS at higher taxonomic levels. Across all samples, Bacteria were numerically dominant relative to Archaea, and among them, Gammaproteobacteria and Euryarchaeota were predominant in the BS, NYS, and SYS, while Deltaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota were prevalent in the NECS. The most abundant bacterial genera were putative sulfur oxidizer and sulfate reducer, suggesting that sulfur cycle processes might prevail in these areas, and the high abundance of dsrB (10(7)-10(8) copies g(-1)) in all sites verified the dominance of sulfate reducer in the north Chinese marginal seas. The differences in sediment sources among the sampling areas were potential explanations for the observed microbial community variations. Furthermore, temperature and dissolved oxygen of bottom water were significant environmental factors in determining both bacterial and archaeal communities, whereas chlorophyll a in sediment was significant only in structuring archaeal community. This study presented an outline of benthic microbial communities and provided insights into understanding the biogeochemical cycles in sediments of the north Chinese marginal seas. PMID:25501892

  17. Tectonic controls on sedimentation in Mesozoic convergent margin basin of Baja California (Mexico)

    SciTech Connect

    Busby-Spera, C.J.; Smith, D.P.; Morris, W.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Mesozoic rocks of the Baja California peninsula form one of the most extensive, best exposed, oldest (160 m.y.), and least-tectonized and metamorphosed convergent margin basin complexes in the world. Much of the fill of these basins consist of coarse-grained volcaniclastic and epiclastic sequences that directly reflect the tectonic evolution of the region. The early history of the convergent margin was dominated by sedimentation in small, steep-sided basins within oceanic island arc systems. The Triassic and Jurassic convergent margin basins probably represent proto-Pacific terranes that traveled from another area. These terranes were assembled by the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, and underlie the forearc region of a medial Cretaceous oceanic island arc system. Tbis system fringed the Mesoamerican continental margin and underwent regional-scale extension during subduction of old, dense lithosphere. The latest phases of sedimentation in the convergent margin occurred in broad, relatively stable forearc basins of a mature continental arc, during the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene. Nonetheless, intrabasinal faults provided some controls on depositional systems and bathymetry. The authors speculate that these faults formed in response to oblique convergence which ultimately resulted in 10-19{degree} northward displacement of Baja California relative to the North American craton, from the latitude of Central America to northern Mexico. The fill of oceanic island arc basins in Baja California is dominated by coarse-grained marine wedges including (1) arc apron deposits, consisting of pyroclastic and/or volcanic epiclastic debris deposited in intra-arc or back-arc basins, and (2) slope apron deposits, consisting of epiclastic debris shed from local fault scarps and more distally derived arc volcaniclastics, deposited in forearc basins.

  18. Geomicrobial characterization of gas hydrate-bearing sediments along the mid-Chilean margin.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Leila J; Gillevet, Patrick M; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Pohlman, John W; Plummer, Rebecca E; Coffin, Richard B

    2008-07-01

    Bacterial diversity in eight sediment cores from the mid-Chilean margin was studied using length heterogeneity (LH)-PCR, and described in relation to in situ geochemical conditions. DNA from the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) of three cores [one containing methane gas; two proximal to a gas hydrate mound (GHM)] was cloned and sequenced. Clones related to uncultured relatives of Desulfosarcina variabilis were found in all clone libraries and dominated one. Desulfosarcina variabilis related clones were similar to phylotypes observed at the SMT in association with anaerobic methane oxidation in the Eel River basin, Cascadia margin and the Gulf of Mexico. The LH-PCR amplicon associated with D. variabilis clones matched the amplicon that dominated most SMT samples, indicating environmental selection for D. variabilis relatives. Clones related to the Verrucomicrobia dominated the library for the methane gas-containing core. Uncultured Treponema relatives dominated the library for the core obtained on the edge of a GHM. Statistical analysis using geochemical data to describe variance in LH-PCR data revealed that stable carbon isotope ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon are the principal structuring factor on SMT communities. These data suggest that D. variabilis relatives are involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane at the SMT in Chilean margin sediments. PMID:18522645

  19. Coastal landsliding and catastrophic sedimentation triggered by Cretaceous-Tertiary bolide impact: A Pacific margin example?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, Cathy J.; Yip, Grant; Blikra, Lars; Renne, Paul

    2002-08-01

    We report here the first-recognized Pacific margin stratigraphic sequence containing evidence for catastrophic landsliding attributed to bolide impact related seismic shocking at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary. The K-T boundary is not commonly preserved in stratigraphic sequences of the Pacific margin, but we have discovered it within a coastal paleovalley in Baja California, Mexico (near El Rosario). This 5-km-wide, 15-km-long, and 200-m-deep coastal paleovalley formed by massive gravitational collapses and rapidly filled with coastal (shallow marine and lesser fluvial) gravels and sands, as well as slide sheets of marine mudstone that range from meters to kilometers in length. We infer that seismic shocking caused liquefaction and extremely rapid sedimentation of the gravels and sands, simultaneous with unleashing of slide sheets. Laser-heating 40Ar/39Ar data for biotite, hornblende, and plagioclase (single crystal and bulk step heating) on a 20-m-thick pumice lapilli tuff in the middle of the valley fill give an age of 65.5 ± 0.6 Ma; this is indistinguishable from the age of Haitian tektites dated by the same laboratory. Our new Pacific margin sequence, like many K-T boundary sequences in the Gulf of Mexico Caribbean region, provides evidence of giant landslides and catastrophic sedimentation 1800 km from the bolide impact site.

  20. A 250-Year Sediment Record of Anthropogenic Contaminants in the Lisbon Canyon, Portuguese Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Stigter, H. C.; Richter, T. O.; Booij, K.; Boer, W.; Jesus, C. C.; van Weering, T. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Lisbon Canyon on the continental margin of Portugal is located in the immediate vicinity of a densely populated and industrialized metropolitan area, and receives terrigenous sediments from the Tagus River draining a large part of the Iberian Peninsula. Radionuclide records (210Pb, 137Cs) for piston cores retrieved from the canyon indicate rapid and almost continuous accumulation over the last 250 years, with sedimentation rates of up to 1 cm per year. The devastating 1755AD Lisbon Earthquake is represented in some cores by a sandy turbidite layer with erosive base, but subsequently disturbance of the sedimentary record by mass sedimentation events has been very limited. In one core at 1710 m water depth, Pb concentrations increased gradually over the last 250 years, and more abruptly after ~1960AD. Subsequently, anthropogenic lead contributed more than half of total lead deposition. Stable Pb isotope ratios indicate concurrent shifts in sources of Pb and increasing influence of anthropogenic pollutants. A slight reversal in both long-term trends after ~1990AD presumably reflects the phase-out of leaded gasoline. Organic contaminant analyses of a core collected from 1112 m water depth demonstrate enrichment of the canyon sediments with a variety of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) over the last century. PCBs increased abruptly during the second half of the 20th century but show a slight decrease over the most recent decade. PAHs appear to have had their maximum in the late 19th century, possibly reflecting fallout of coal dust from one of the busiest shipping routes of the eastern Atlantic. The present study illustrates the potential of submarine canyon sediments as high-resolution archives of human impacts on the continental margin.

  1. Authigenic apatite formation and burial in sediments from non-upwelling, continental margin environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ruttenberg, K.C.; Berner, R.A. )

    1993-03-01

    Evidence for precipitation of authigenic carbonate fluorapatite (CFA) in Long Island Sound and Mississippi Delta sediments suggests that formation of CFA is not restricted to environments of active coastal upwelling. The authors present porewater data suggestive of CFA formation in both these areas. Application of a sequential leaching procedure, designed specifically to separate authigenic carbonate fluorapatite from other phosphorus-containing phases, including detrital apatite of igneous or metamorphic origin, provides strong supporting evidence for authigenic apatite formation in these sediments. The size of the authigenic apatite reservoir increases with depth, indicating continued formation of CFA during early diagenesis. This depth increase is mirrored by a decrease in solid-phase organic P at both sites, suggesting that CFA is forming at the expense of organic P. Mass balance considerations, application of diagenetic models to intersitital water nutrient data, and the saturation state of the interstitial water are consistent with this interpretation. Diagenetic redistribution of phosphorus among the different solid-phase reservoirs is observed at both sites, and results in near perfect retention of P by these sediments over the depth intervals sampled. Formation of CFA in continental margins which do not conform to the classically defined regions of phosphorite formation renders CFA a quantitatively more important sink than has previously been recognized. Including this reservoir as a newly identified sink for reactive P in the ocean, the residence time of P in the modern ocean must be revised downward. The implication for ancient oceans of CFA formation in continental margin sediments other than phosphorites is that phosphorite formation may be less a representation of episodicity in removal of reactive P from the oceans than of localized concentration of CFA in phosphatic sediments by secondary physical processes. 90 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Assessment of geochemical mobility of metals in surface sediments of the Santa Rosalia mining region, Western Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Shumilin, Evgueni; Gordeev, Vyacheslav; Figueroa, Griselda Rodríguez; Demina, Liudmila; Choumiline, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    To asses the geomobility of cadmium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, and zinc in marine sediments near the Santa Rosalía copper smelter, which is located on the eastern coast of the Baja California Peninsula, sequential leaching was applied to sediment samples containing different levels of Cu: (1) uncontaminated or slightly contaminated (<55 mg kg⁻¹ Cu); (2) moderately contaminated (55-500 mg kg⁻¹ Cu); and (3) heavily contaminated (>500 mg kg⁻¹ Cu). Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in four fractions of the leachate (mobile fraction F1, relatively mobile fraction F2, associated with organic matter/sulphides fraction F3, and residual fraction F4) were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The sediments with Cu concentration <500 mg kg⁻¹ displayed prevalence of mobile acid-leachable fraction F1 and reducible fraction F2 for Cd, Cu, Mn, and Pb, whereas the relative contribution of fraction F3 was relatively low for all of the examined metals. Residual fraction F4 was highest (>65%) for Fe and Ni because both metals are associated with the crystalline matrix of natural sediments. The sediments heavily contaminated with Cu (>500 mg kg⁻¹) had dramatically increased percentages of Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn, ranging on average from 63 to 81%, in the residual fraction. In the case of Cu, for example, the relative abundances of this element in the different fractions of such sediments followed this sequence: residual fraction F4 (76 ± 5%) >absorbed form and carbonates fraction F1 (15 ± 5%) >Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides fraction F2 (5 ± 2%) >fraction associated with organic matter and sulphides F3 (4.5 ± 3.9%). Copper, Pb, and Zn contents in each geochemical fraction of all samples were compared with sediment-quality guideline values ("effects range low" [ERL] and "effects range medium" [ERM]) to assess their possible negative effects on biota. Copper contents in mobile fractions F1 and F2, which were moderately contaminated

  3. Maturation of Tertiary sediments in the Asian Continental Margins: A basis for hydrocarbon generation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, Takashi )

    1994-07-01

    In the marginal areas of the Asian continent, the Paleogene and Miocene coal-bearing formations are sporadically distributed. In some areas, particularly in the sea regions, their equivalents are possibly explored for oil and gas. The basins mainly formed as tectonic depressions, and are filled with fluvial to marine clastic rocks. The formations show marked lateral variation in thickness, lithology, and sediment characteristics, which are related to the geotectonic settings of the basins at active plate margins. Remarkable accumulation of overburden and high paleogeothermal conditions, which are marked in northern Kyushu, Japan, and Thailand, influenced diagenesis. Organic and inorganic maturation studies in northern Kyushu reveal a progress of diagenesis from the inland of Kyushu toward the sea region essentially controlled by additional heat supply from the sea region during and after sedimentation. The sediments on the land surface are chiefly overmatured, and/or contain minor amounts of organic carbon. High paleogeothermal influence on Tertiary maturation is clear also in northern Thailand. The high paleotemperature conditions in these areas may be related to tectonic interaction between the oceanic and continental plates.

  4. Evidence and biogeochemical implications for glacially-derived sediments in an active margin cold seep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohlman, John W.; Riedel, Michael; Novosel, Ivana; Bauer, James E.; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Paull, Charles K.; Coffin, Richard B.; Grabowski, Kenneth S.; Knies, David L.; Hyndman, Roy D.; Spence, George D.

    2011-01-01

    Delineating sediment organic matter origins and sediment accumulation rates at gas hydratebearing and hydrocarbon seeps is complicated by the microbial transfer of 13C-depleted and 14Cdepleted methane carbon into sedimentary pools. Sediment 13C and 14C measurements from four cores recovered at Bullseye vent on the northern Cascadia margin are used to identify methane carbon assimilation into different carbon pools. While the total organic carbon (TOC) is mostly unaltered and primarily terrigenous in origin, planktonic foraminifera and the bulk carbonate display evidence of methane overprinting. Mass balance models are applied to determine the extent to which methane overprinting increased the radiocarbon ages of the biogenic foraminifera. The corrected and calibrated foraminifera ages between sediment depths of 70 and 573 cm are from 14.9 to 15.9 ka BP, which coincides with the retreat of the late Quaternary Cordilleran Ice Sheet from Vancouver Island. Uniform TOC _13C values of -24.5 ± 0.5‰ from the upper 8 meters of sediment at Bullseye vent suggest all cored material is Pleistocene-derived glacimarine material deposited as the ice edge retreated landward. Bullseye vent is located within an uplifted sediment block isolated from turbidite deposition and has been a site of non-deposition since the ice sheet retreated from the shelf. Biogeochemical implications of seep sediments being dominated by aged, organic-poor (<0.4 wt% TOC) material are that methane is the primary energy source, and microbes directly and indirectly associated with the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) will dominate the seep microbial community.

  5. Cenozoic ice sheet history from East Antarctic Wilkes Land continental margin sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Escutia, C.; De Santis, L.; Donda, F.; Dunbar, R.B.; Cooper, A. K.; Brancolini, Giuliano; Eittreim, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    The long-term history of glaciation along the East Antarctic Wilkes Land margin, from the time of the first arrival of the ice sheet to the margin, through the significant periods of Cenozoic climate change is inferred using an integrated geophysical and geological approach. We postulate that the first arrival of the ice sheet to the Wilkes Land margin resulted in the development of a large unconformity (WL-U3) between 33.42 and 30 Ma during the early Oligocene cooling climate trend. Above WL-U3, substantial margin progradation takes place with early glacial strata (e.g., outwash deposits) deposited as low-angle prograding foresets by temperate glaciers. The change in geometry of the prograding wedge across unconformity WL-U8 is interpreted to represent the transition, at the end of the middle Miocene "climatic optimum" (14-10 Ma), from a subpolar regime with dynamic ice sheets (i.e., ice sheets come and go) to a regime with persistent but oscillatory ice sheets. The steep foresets above WL-U8 likely consist of ice proximal sediments (i.e., water-lain till and debris flows) deposited when grounded ice-sheets extended into the shelf. On the continental rise, shelf progradation above WL-U3 results in an up-section increase in the energy of the depositional environment (i.e., seismic facies indicative of more proximal turbidite and of bottom contour current deposition from the deposition of the lower WL-S5 sequence to WL-S7). Maximum rates of sediment delivery to the rise occur during the development of sequences WL-S6 and WL-S7, which we infer to be of middle Miocene age. During deposition of the two uppermost sequences, WL-S8 and WL-S9, there is a marked decrease in the sediment supply to the lower continental rise and a shift in the depocenters to more proximal areas of the margin. We believe WL-S8 records sedimentation during the final transition from a dynamic to a persistent but oscillatory ice sheet in this margin (14-10 Ma). Sequence WL-S9 forms under a polar

  6. Diatoms and aquatic palynomorphs in surface sediments of the White Sea bays as indicators of sedimentation in marginal filters of rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakova, Ye. I.; Novichkova, Ye. A.; Lisitzin, A. P.; Shevchenko, V. P.; Kravchishina, M. D.

    2016-03-01

    Diatom algae, aquatic palynomorphs, and the grain-size of surface sediments from bays of the White Sea were investigated in a program dedicated to the study of marginal filters (MF) in the Severnaya Dvina, Onega, and Kem rivers. Three microalgal assemblages are established in surface sediments, which replace each other successively with distance from river mouths and are characterized by a gradual decrease in a share of freshwater species of diatoms and Chlorophyceae algae, significantly varying concentrations of marine diatoms and dinocysts due to changes in water salinity, grain-size composition of sediments, quantitative distribution of suspended particulate matter (SPM), and water productivity at different marginal filter stages.

  7. Holocene temperature history at the west Greenland Ice Sheet margin reconstructed from lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, Y.; Losee, S.; Briner, J. P.; Francis, D.; Langdon, P. G.; Walker, I.

    2011-12-01

    Paleoclimate proxy data can help reduce uncertainties regarding how the Greenland Ice Sheet, and thus global sea level, will respond to future climate change. Studies of terrestrial deposits along Greenland's margins offer opportunities to reconstruct both past temperature changes and the associated changes in Greenland Ice Sheet extent, thus empirically characterizing the ice sheet's response to temperature change. Here we present Holocene paleoclimate reconstructions developed from sediment records of five lakes along the western ice sheet margin, near Jakobshavn Isbræ and Disko Bugt. Insect (Chironomidae, or non-biting midge) remains from North Lake provide quantitative estimates of summer temperatures over the past ca. 7500 years at multi-centennial resolution, and changes in sediment composition at all five lakes offer evidence for glacier fluctuations, changes in lake productivity, and other environmental changes throughout the Holocene. Aims of this study include quantification of warmth in the early to mid Holocene, when summer solar insolation forcing exceeded present-day values at northern latitudes and the local Greenland Ice Sheet margin receded inboard of its present position, and the magnitude of subsequent Neoglacial and Little Ice Age cooling that drove ice sheet expansion. We find that the Jakobshavn Isbrae region experienced the warmest temperatures of the Holocene (with summers 2 to 3.5 degrees C warmer than present) between ~6000 and 4000 years ago. Neoglacial cooling began rather abruptly ~4000 years ago and intensified 3000 years ago. Our proxy data suggest that the coldest summers of the Holocene occurred during the 18th and 19th centuries in the Jakobshavn region. These results agree well with previous glacial geologic studies reconstructing local ice margin positions through the Holocene. Such reconstructions of paleoclimate and past ice sheet extent provide targets for testing and improving ice sheet models.

  8. Coseismic deformation during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and range-front thrusting along the southwestern margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Schmidt, K.M.; Jachens, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    Damage patterns caused by the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake along the southwestern margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California, form three zones that coincide with mapped and inferred traces of range-front thrust faults northeast of the San Andreas fault. Damage in these zones was largely contractional, consistent with past displacement associated with these faults. The damage zones coincide with gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies; modeling of the anomalies defines a southwest-dipping thrust fault that places the Franciscan Complex over Cenozoic sedimentary rocks to minimum depths of 2 km. Diffuse Loma Prieta earthquake aftershocks encompass the downward projection of this modeled thrust to depths of 9 km. Our results indicate that in this region the potential for concentrated damage arising from either primary deformation along the thrust faults themselves or by sympathetic motion triggered by earthquakes on the San Andreas fault may be higher than previously recognized.

  9. H/V spectral ratios of the continental margin sediments offshore southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing-Yi; Cheng, Win-Bin; Chin, Shao-Jinn; Hsu, Shu-Kun

    2015-04-01

    For decades, it has been mentioned that submarine slope failures are spatially linked to the presence of gas hydrates/gas-charged sediments. When triggered by earthquakes, over steepen and instable sediments may prompt breakouts of the slopes containing gas hydrates and cause submarine landslides and tsunamis. Widely distributed BSRs have been observed in the area offshore of southwestern Taiwan where the active accretionary complex meets with the passive China continental margin. In the region, large or small scale landslides were also reported based on seismic interpretations. In order to clarify the link between earthquake, landslide and the presence of gas hydrate, we evaluate the response of seafloor sediments in regard to passive dynamic loads. Horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) spectral ratios are used to characterize the local sediment response. Ambient noise as well as distant earthquake is used as generators of the passive dynamic loads. Based on this study, we aim to characterize the site in terms of its physical properties and the local site effect produced by shallow marine sediments. Estimating H/V spectral ratios of data recorded by the short period OBSs (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) deployed in the active and paqssive margin offshore southwestern Taiwan show similar spectral characteristics and provide a general understanding of the preferential vibration modes of sediment systems. The results show that the maximal H/V ratios appeared in the range of 5-10 Hz, where the horizontal amplitudes increased by an order of magnitude relative to the vertical amplitude. The stations located in the northwestern part of study area were characterized by another relatively small peak at proximately 2 Hz, which may indicates the presence of a discontinuity of sediments. For most stations, the H/V ratios estimated based on the earthquakes (i.e. strong input signal) and noise (background, micro-seismic noise) records were characterized by different pattern. No distinct peak

  10. Morphotectonics and sedimentation in convergent margin basins: An example from juxtaposed marginal sea basin and foreland basin, Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ho-Shing; Huang, Zehn-Yin

    2009-03-01

    Using reflection seismic profiles and bathymetric mapping this paper reveals the tectonic-sedimentary characteristics of the convergent margins in the northern South China Sea, where it is strongly related to flexure of Chinese rifted margin and overthrust of Taiwan orogen. Convergent margin tectonics of the South China Sea near southern Taiwan is characterized by a progressively northward transition from oceanic subduction along the Manila Trench to the incipient collision zone offshore southern Taiwan where the continental crust of the Eurasian plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. North of 21°N, dip angles of the Benioff zone increase up to 80° in the incipient collision zone where the Manila Trench becomes shallower, gradually loses its morphological identity and finally merges into the nearly N-S trending Penghu Canyon. Convergent margin tectonics in the initial collision zone in SW Taiwan is manifested by the beginning of flexure of the Chinese margin under the westward migrating overthrust belt of Taiwan, forming two distinct basins. On the passive Chinese margin, the marginal sea basin becomes smaller and is underlain by the South China Sea Slope, while on the active Taiwan margin, a wedge-top basin has formed above the frontal thrust sheets of the Taiwan orogenic wedge. Sediments derived from the Taiwan orogen progressively overlie the strata of the passive Chinese margin, resulting in sediment thickening and basin shallowing from south to north. Sedimentary facies shows that offshore deep-water mud is gradationally overlain by shallow marine sediments. Sediments of the wedge-top basin are being actively deformed into mud diapiric intrusions and a series of west-vergent thrusts and folds with their associated piggy-back basins, resulting in irregular topography of the sea floor with alternating sea ridges and troughs. Pliocene-Quaternary strata of the passive Chinese margin are a little deformed under the westward compression induced by the

  11. Dynamic coupling of sedimentation and convergence tectonics in Peru-Chile trench and outer Andean margin

    SciTech Connect

    Kulm, L.D.; Thornburg, T.M.

    1988-02-01

    The convergence rate and sediment supply to the trench control the evolution of trench deposits as well as the subduction processes of accretion and erosion along the adjacent margin. South of 41/degrees/S latitude, where Pleistocene cordilleran glaciation was severe, turbidity current deposition and unchannelized, producing sheeted basin deposits. Between 41/degrees/S and 33/degrees/S, trench fans (/approximately/ 20 km wide) exhibit both depositional and erosional morphologies in response to dynamic tectonism within a prevailing axial gradient. An outboard axial channel transports massive quantities of remobilized sediments to the north. Subsurface lenticular bodies seen on seismic reflection profiles represent buried channel deposits. SeaMARC-II records show complex dispersal patterns and erosional features on the fans, extensional structures on the descending plate, and anastomosed accreted ridges on the inner trench wall. Lithofacies include channel (amalgamated laminated to massive sand), levee (rhythmic thin-bedded graded sand and silt), and basin (low-energy graded and laminated silt) deposits. At 33/degrees/S, San Antonio canyon feeds an axial sediment lobe at the base of a 1400-m vertical discontinuity in the subducting slab. The canyon captures littoral sands and represents the last major source of sediment supply. North of 33/degrees/S, the trench consists of small basins ponded within block-faulted depressions on the oceanic plate. Lithofacies include contourite (winnowed silt and sand laminae) and basin deposits. Large offsets in the descending plate, a steep inner trench wall and the lack of slope basins indicate the northern Chile margin is undergoing subduction erosion.

  12. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Sediments from Yellow River-Dominated Margin

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Su; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Xinyu; Zhao, Liang; Ruan, Jiaping; Wu, Weichao

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed for surface sediments and a sediment core from the Yellow River-dominated margin. The concentration of 16 USEPA priority PAHs in surface sediments ranged from 5.6 to 175.4 ng g−1 dry weight sediment (dws) with a mean of 49.1 ng g−1 dws. From 1930 to 2011, the distribution of PAHs (37.2 to 210.6 ng g−1 dws) was consistent with the socioeconomic development of China. The PAHs' concentration peaked in 1964 and 1986, corresponding to the rapid economic growth in China (1958–1965) and the initiation of the “Reform and Open” policy in 1978, respectively. The applications of molecular diagnostic ratios and principal component analysis suggest that PAHs are predominantly produced by the coal and biomass combustion, whereas the contribution of petroleum combustions slightly increased after the 1970s, synchronous with an increasing usage of oil and gas in China. PMID:25386611

  13. Interactions of Thalassia testudinum and sediment biogeochemsistry in Santa Rosa Sound, NW Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    Northern Gulf of Mexico Thalassia testudinum biomass, leaf measurements, and shoot growth rates were determined during three surveys each from a different meadow over consecutive years, and correlated with sediment biogeochemical measurements by correlation analyses and multiple ...

  14. Analysis of methods to determine storage capacity of, and sedimentation in, Loch Lomond Reservoir, Santa Cruz County, California, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Kelly R.; Freeman, Lawrence A.; Flint, Lorraine E.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Santa Cruz, conducted bathymetric and topographic surveys to determine the water storage capacity of, and the loss of capacity owing to sedimentation in, Loch Lomond Reservoir in Santa Cruz County, California. The topographic survey was done as a supplement to the bathymetric survey to obtain information about temporal changes in the upper reach of the reservoir where the water is shallow or the reservoir may be dry, as well as to obtain information about shoreline changes throughout the reservoir. Results of a combined bathymetric and topographic survey using a new, state-of-the-art method with advanced instrument technology indicate that the maximum storage capacity of the reservoir at the spillway altitude of 577.5 feet (National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929) was 8,646 ±85 acre-feet in March 2009, with a confidence level of 99 percent. This new method is a combination of bathymetric scanning using multibeam-sidescan sonar, and topographic surveying using laser scanning (LiDAR), which produced a 1.64-foot-resolution grid with altitudes to 0.3-foot resolution and an estimate of total water storage capacity at a 99-percent confidence level. Because the volume of sedimentation in a reservoir is considered equal to the decrease in water-storage capacity, sedimentation in Loch Lomond Reservoir was determined by estimating the change in storage capacity by comparing the reservoir bed surface defined in the March 2009 survey with a revision of the reservoir bed surface determined in a previous investigation in November 1998. This revised reservoir-bed surface was defined by combining altitude data from the 1998 survey with new data collected during the current (2009) investigation to fill gaps in the 1998 data. Limitations that determine the accuracy of estimates of changes in the volume of sedimentation from that estimated in each of the four previous investigations (1960, 1971, 1982, and 1998

  15. Phosphate oxygen isotope ratio proxy for specific microbial activity in marine sediments (Peru Margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Blake, R. E.

    2005-12-01

    Oxygen (O) isotope ratios of biogenic apatites have been widely used as paleotemperature and environmental geochemical proxies. With improved knowledge of the phosphate O isotope effects of different P cycling pathways, the δ18O value of inorganic phosphate (δ18OP) has been proposed as a useful proxy and tracer of biological reactions and P cycling in natural environments[1,2,3,4]. Being the only way of removing P from oceanic water, sedimentary P burial is one of the most important processes during biogeochemical cycling of P. The high concentrations of organic matter and pronounced microbial activity at ODP Site 1230 along the Peru Margin result in unusually high interstitial water phosphate concentrations, which provides a unique opportunity to use δ18OP to investigate inorganic phosphate (Pi) regeneration and P cycling pathways in marine sediments. The isotopic measurements of both dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) and bulk sediment Pi show that DIP δ18OP values are affected by three different processes, which are all induced by specific microbial activities present in the sediments. In sediments at ~ 65 to 120 mbsf, porewater DIP is derived from dissolved organophosphorus compounds (DOP) through enzymatic degradation pathways, evidenced by both DIP δ18OP values and interstitial water chemistry. Measured porewater DIP δ18OP values also suggest that 4 to 8% of interstitial water DIP reflects regeneration of Pi from Porg by microbially-synthesized enzymes. Throughout the sediment column and especially at ~ 120 to 150 mbsf, DIP is released from the sediments by microbially-induced reductive dissolution of Fe-oxides, which contributes to the overall high DIP concentrations at Site 1230. The third and dominant process controlling measured DIP δ18OP values is microbial turnover of regenerated Pi. The presence of high microbial activities in organic-rich Site 1230 sediments promotes the remobilization of P and affects marine P cycling by potentially enhancing

  16. Budgeting postglacial sedimentation history on the Santa Cruz, California mid-continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, E.E.; Eittreim, S.L.; Hanes, D.M.; Field, M.E.; Edwards, B.D.; Fallon, S.J.; Anima, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiling and surface texture mapping of the central California continental shelf, reveal a prominent subsurface reflector interpreted as a low stand erosion surface and an overlying mudbelt that covers 421 km2 of the mid-shelf in depths of 40-90 m. Radiometric and sedimentologic analyses of samples from vibracores taken along the seaward edge of the mudbelt show that initial deposition above the pre-Holocene erosion surface began ca. 14.5 ka. These data and model results of sea-level history, tectonics, and the Monterey Bay littoral sediment budget support the notion that the entire midshelf deposit was formed during the postglacial transgression. An alternative explanation, that <30% of the deposit is Holocene, requires that (1) sediment input is overestimated and/or loss is greatly underestimated, and (2) preservation on the shelf was significant despite deep and active wave scour observed in the form of rapid cliff and bedrock cutting early and late in the transgression. The difference between a basal age of ???14.5 ka and residence time of midshelf sediment (3,273 years), derived from dividing mudbelt volume by modern accumulation rate, implies: (1) significant sediment loss occurred since the mudbelt formed and/or (2) sediment accumulation has varied greatly over time. Although modern sediment budgets are relatively well constrained, it remains uncertain how well we can apply them to the past. An evolving model of sedimentation history explores the likelihood of changes in sediment supply, accumulation patterns, and depositional patterns owing to postglacial sea-level history and human land-use activities while providing important boundary conditions for modeling shoreface evolution.

  17. Historical oceanographic events reflected in13C/12C ratio of total organic carbon in laminated Santa Barbara Basin Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Tegner, Mia J.

    1991-06-01

    An 1844-1987 time series of carbon stable isotope ratios from dated sedimentary total organic carbon (TOC) from the center of the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) is compared with historical climate and oceanographic records. Four isotopically distinct biogeochemical sources of TOC are important: phytoplankton-derived marine biomass, macroalgal biomass from kelp forests, terrigenous biomass (mainly flushed into the SBB via river discharge), and redeposited fossil organic carbon. The significance of the latter two sources is largely limited to a few unusual flood and oil spill events, whereas the combination of 13C-depleted phytoplankton and 13C-enriched macroalgal biomass appears to be responsible for most of the isotopic variance of the marine coastal biomass as recorded in sedimentary TOC. The isotopic response of marine organic carbon in sediments records strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the frequently associated severe storm and wave events in SBB varved sediments. The plausible major isotopic mechanisms are (1) increased physical liberation of 13C-enriched kelp carbon from locally abundant giant kelp (Macrocystis spp.) forests during times of physical and environmental stress, and (2) decreased productivity of 13C-depleted phytoplankton during ENSO events.

  18. Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in turbid coastal waters of the Santa Barbara Channel with SeaWiFS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Mertes, L.A.K.; Siegel, D.A.; Mackenzie, C.

    2004-01-01

    A technique is presented for estimating suspended sediment concentrations of turbid coastal waters with remotely sensed multi-spectral data. The method improves upon many standard techniques, since it incorporates analyses of multiple wavelength bands (four for Sea-viewing Wide Field of view Sensor (SeaWiFS)) and a nonlinear calibration, which produce highly accurate results (expected errors are approximately ±10%). Further, potential errors produced by erroneous atmospheric calibration in excessively turbid waters and influences of dissolved organic materials, chlorophyll pigments and atmospheric aerosols are limited by a dark pixel subtraction and removal of the violet to blue wavelength bands. Results are presented for the Santa Barbara Channel, California where suspended sediment concentrations ranged from 0–200+ mg l−1 (±20 mg l−1) immediately after large river runoff events. The largest plumes were observed 10–30 km off the coast and occurred immediately following large El Niño winter floods.

  19. Controls of tectonics and sediment source locations on along-strike variations in transgressive deposits on the northern California margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spinelli, G.A.; Field, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    We identify two surfaces in the shallow subsurface on the Eel River margin offshore northern California, a lowstand erosion surface, likely formed during the last glacial maximum, and an overlying surface likely formed during the most recent transgression of the shoreline. The lowstand erosion surface, which extends from the inner shelf to near the shelfbreak and from the Eel River to Trinidad Head (???80 km), truncates underlying strata on the shelf. Above the surface, inferred transgressive coastal and estuarine sedimentary units separate it from the transgressive surface on the shelf. Early in the transgression, Eel River sediment was likely both transported down the Eel Canyon and dispersed on the slope, allowing transgressive coastal sediment from the smaller Mad River to accumulate in a recognizable deposit on the shelf. The location of coastal Mad River sediment accumulation was controlled by the location of the paleo-Mad River. Throughout the remainder of the transgression, dispersed sediment from the Eel River accumulated an average of 20 m of onlapping shelf deposits. The distribution and thickness of these transgressive marine units was strongly modified by northwest-southeast trending folds. Thick sediment packages accumulated over structural lows in the lowstand surface. The thinnest sediment accumulations (0-10 m) were deposited over structural highs along faults and uplifting anticlines. The Eel margin, an active margin with steep, high sediment-load streams, has developed a thick transgressive systems tract. On this margin sediment accumulates as rapidly as the processes of uplift and downwarp locally create and destroy accommodation space. Sequence stratigraphic models of tectonically active margins should account for variations in accommodation space along margins as well as across them. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Long-distance multistep sediment transfer at convergent plate margins (Barbados, Lesser Antilles)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limonta, Mara; Garzanti, Eduardo; Resentini, Alberto; Andò, Sergio; Boni, Maria; Bechstädt, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    analysis is a basic tool in paleogeographic reconstructions when multicyclic sediment dispersal along and across convergent plate margins occur. Such analysis provides the link between faraway factories of detritus and depositional sinks, as well as clues on subduction geometry and the nature of associated growing orogenic belts, and even information on climate, atmospheric circulation and weathering intensity in source regions. REFERENCES Garzanti, E., Limonta, M., Resentini, A., Bandopadhyay, P.C., Najman, Y., Andò, S., Vezzoli, G., 2013. Sediment recycling at convergent plate margins (Indo-Burman Ranges and Andaman-Nicobar Ridge). Earth Sci. Rev., 123, 113-132. Speed, C. and Sedlock, R. 2012. Geology and geomorphology of Barbados. Geol. Soc. Am. Spec. Pap., 491, 63 p.

  1. Distribution and sources of organic matter in surface marine sediments across the North American Arctic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goñi, Miguel A.; O'Connor, Alison E.; Kuzyk, Zou Zou; Yunker, Mark B.; Gobeil, Charles; Macdonald, Robie W.

    2013-09-01

    As part of the International Polar Year research program, we conducted a survey of surface marine sediments from box cores along a section extending from the Bering Sea to Davis Strait via the Canadian Archipelago. We used bulk elemental and isotopic compositions, together with biomarkers and principal components analysis, to elucidate the distribution of marine and terrestrial organic matter in different regions of the North American Arctic margin. Marked regional contrasts were observed in organic carbon loadings, with the highest values (≥1 mg C m-2 sediment) found in sites along Barrow Canyon and the Chukchi and Bering shelves, all of which were characterized by sediments with low oxygen exposure, as inferred from thin layers (<2 cm) of Mn oxihydroxides. We found strong regional differences in inorganic carbon concentrations, with sites from the Canadian Archipelago and Lancaster Sound displaying elevated values (2-7 wt %) and highly depleted 14C compositions consistent with inputs from bedrock carbonates. Organic carbon:nitrogen ratios, stable carbon isotopes, and terrigenous organic biomarkers (lignin phenols and cutin acids) all indicate marked regional differences in the proportions of marine and terrigenous organic matter present in surface sediments. Regions such as Barrow Canyon and the Mackenzie River shelf were characterized by the highest contributions of land-derived organic matter, with compositional characteristics that suggested distinct sources and provenance. In contrast, sediments from the Canadian Archipelago and Davis Strait had the smallest contributions of terrigenous organic matter and the lowest organic carbon loadings indicative of a high degree of post-depositional oxidation.

  2. Organic carbon accumulation and preservation in surface sediments on the Peru margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Laarkamp, K.

    1998-01-01

    Concentrations and characteristics of organic matter in surface sediments deposited under an intense oxygen-minimum zone on the Peru margin were studied in samples from deck-deployed box cores and push cores acquired by submersible on two transects spanning depths of 75 to 1000 m at 12??and 13.5??S. The source of organic matter to the seafloor in these areas is almost entirely marine material as confirmed by the narrow range of ??13C of organic carbon obtained in the present study (-20.3 to -21.6???; PDB) and the lack of any relationship between pyrolysis hydrogen index and carbon isotope composition. Organic carbon contents are highest (up to 16%) on the slope at depths between 75 and 350 m in sediments deposited under intermediate water masses with low dissolved oxygen concentrations (< 5 ??mol/kg). Even at these low concentrations of dissolved oxygen, however, the surface sediments that were recovered from these depths are dominantly unlaminated. Strong currents (up to 30 cm/s) associated with the poleward-flowing Peru Undercurrent were measured at depths between 160 and 300 m on both transects. The seafloor in this range of water depths is characterized by bedforms stabilized by bacterial mats, extensive authigenic mineral crusts, and (or) thick organic flocs. Constant advection of dissolved oxygen, although in low concentrations, active resuspension of surficial organic matter, activity of organisms, and transport of fine-grained sediment to and from more oxygenated zones all contribute to greater degradation and poorer initial preservation of organic matter than might be expected under oxygen-deficient conditions. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations ultimately may be the dominant affect on organic matter characteristics, but reworking of fine-grained sediment and organic matter by strong bottom currents and redeposition on the seafloor in areas of lower energy also exert important controls on organic carbon concentration and degree of oxidation in this region.

  3. GLORIA imagery links sedimentation in Aleutian Trench to Yakutat margin via surveyor channel

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, P.R.; Bruns, T.R.; Mann, D.M.; Stevenson, A.J. ); Huggett, Q.J. )

    1990-06-01

    GLORIA side-scan sonar imagery shows that the continental slope developing along the active margin of the Gulf of Alaska is devoid of large submarine canyons, in spite of the presence of large glacially formed sea valleys that cross the continental shelf. In the western and northern Gulf, discontinuous, actively growing deformation structures disrupt or divert the downslope transport of sediment into the Aleutian Trench. To the east of Middleton Island, the slope is intensively gullied and incised only by relatively small canyons. At the base of the gullied slope between Pamplona Spur and Alsek Valley, numerous small slope gullies coalesce into three turbidity current channels that merge to form the Surveyor deep-sea channel. About 350 km from the margin, the channel crosses the structural barrier formed by the Kodiak-Bowie Seamount chain and heads south for another 150 km where it bends northerly, perhaps influenced by the oceanic basement relief of the Patton Seamounts. The channel, now up to 5 km wide and deeply entrenched to 450 m, continues northerly for 200 km where it intercepts the Aleutian Trench, some 700 km from the Yakutat margin. South of Surveyor Channel, GLORIA imagery revealed evidence of another older channel. The older channel meanders through a gap in the seamount chain and eventually bends northwesterly. This now inactive, largely buried channel may have carried turbidity currents to the Aleutian Trench concurrent with the active Surveyor Channel.

  4. Radiocarbon calibration-comparison records based on marine sediments from the Pakistan and Iberian Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, E.; Ménot, G.; Licari, L.

    2009-04-01

    We present new results on the radiocarbon records based on planktonic foraminifera of core MD042876 from the Pakistan Margin and updated results for core MD952042 from the Iberian Margin (Bard et al. 2004, Science 303, 178; 2004, Quat. Res. 61, 204; 2004, Radiocarbon 46, 1189; Shackleton et al. 2004, QSR 23, 1513). Both cores exhibit high sedimentation rates on the order of 50 and 40 cm/kyr for the Pakistan and Iberian cores, respectively. For a calendar age scale, we matched climate records of both cores to the oxygen isotopic profile of the Hulu Cave stalagmites that have been accurately dated by U-Th (Wang et al. 2001, Science 294, 2345). Our new comparison data can be compared with the IntCal04 record (Reimer et al. 2004, Radiocarbon 46, 1029) and with individual records based on other archives: corals from Barbados (Fairbanks et al. 2005, QSR 24, 1781), marine sediments of the Cariaco Basin (Hughen et al. 2004, Science 303, 202; 2006, QSR 25, 3216), varves of Lake Suigetsu (Kitagawa & van der Plicht 1998, Science 279, 1187; 2000, Radiocarbon 42, 369), and speleothems from the Bahamas (Beck et al. 2001, Science 292, 2453). Up to 26,000 cal-yr-BP, the Pakistan and Iberian data can be used to validate the precision and accuracy of the marine sediment approach. In the interval between 26,000 and 50,000 cal-yr-B.P., the Pakistan and Iberian records agree closely with each other and with the Cariaco and Barbados data. This agreement clearly shows the feasibility of extending the IntCal04 14C calibration curve.

  5. Phylogenetic diversity of sediment bacteria from the southern Cretan margin, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Lampadariou, Nikolaos; Mandalakis, Manolis; Tselepides, Anastasios

    2009-02-01

    This study is the first culture-independent report on the regional variability of bacterial diversity in oxic sediments from the unexplored southern Cretan margin (SCM). Three main deep basins (water column depths: 2670-3603m), located at the mouth of two submarine canyons (Samaria Gorge and Paximades Channel) and an adjacent slope system, as well as two shallow upper-slope stations (water column depths: 215 and 520m), were sampled. A total of 454 clones were sequenced and the bacterial richness, estimated through five clone libraries using rarefaction analysis, ranged from 71 to 296 unique phylotypes. The average sequence identity of the retrieved Cretan margin sequences compared to the >1,000,000 known rRNA sequences was only 93.5%. A diverse range of prokaryotes was found in the sediments, which were represented by 15 different taxonomic groups at the phylum level. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that these new sequences grouped with the phyla Acidobacteria, Planctomycetes, Actinobacteria, Gamma-, Alpha- and Delta-proteobacteria. Only a few bacterial clones were affiliated with Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Verrucomicrobia, Nitrospirae, Beta-proteobacteria, Lentisphaerae and Dictyoglomi. A large fraction of the retrieved sequences (12%) did not fall into any taxonomic division previously characterized by molecular criteria, whereas four novel division-level lineages, termed candidate division SCMs, were identified. Bacterial community composition demonstrated significant differences in comparison to previous phylogenetic studies. This divergence was mainly triggered by the dominance of Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria and reflected a bacterial community different from that currently known for oxic and pristine marine sediments. PMID:19058941

  6. Stability studies of surficial sediments in the Wilmington-Lindenkohl Canyons area, eastern U.S. margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almagor, G.; Bennett, R.H.; Mc Gregor, B.A.; Shephard, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Stability analysis, based on infinite slope analysis and geotechnical data from a suite of 34 cores collected from the continental slope between Wilmington and Lindenkohl Canyons, indicates that the Quaternary surficial silty clay sediments on gentle slopes are stable; that sediment stability on steeper slopes (14??-19??) is marginal; and that on precipitous slopes (>50??) only a thin veneer of unconsolidated sediments can exist. Small earthquake-induced accelerations or the effects of internal waves can result in slope sediment instabilities. ?? 1982 A. M. Dowden, Inc.

  7. Mercury profiles in sediment from the marginal high of Arabian Sea: an indicator of increasing anthropogenic Hg input.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Vudamala, Krushna; Chennuri, Kartheek; Armoury, Kazip; Linsy, P; Ramteke, Darwin; Sebastian, Tyson; Jayachandran, Saranya; Naik, Chandan; Naik, Richita; Nath, B Nagender

    2016-05-01

    Total Hg distributions and its speciation were determined in two sediment cores collected from the western continental marginal high of India. Total Hg content in the sediment was found to gradually increase (by approximately two times) towards the surface in both the cores. It was found that Hg was preferentially bound to sulfide under anoxic condition. However, redox-mediated reactions in the upper part of the core influenced the total Hg content in the sediment cores. This study suggests that probable increase in authigenic and allogenic Hg deposition attributed to the increasing Hg concentration in the surface sediment in the study area. PMID:26797942

  8. Single cell genomic study of Dehalococcoidites in deep sea sediments of Peru Margin 1230

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaster, A.; Meyer-Blackwell, K.; Spormann, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Dehalogenating Chloroflexi, such as Dehalococcoidites Dhc were originally discovered as the key microorganisms mediating reductive dehalogenation of the prevalent groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene. Molecular and genomic studies on their key enzymes for energy conservation, reductive dehalogenases rdh, have provided evidence for ubiquitous horizontal gene transfer. A pioneering study by Futagami et al. discovered novel putative rdh phylotypes in sediments from the Pacific, revealing an unknown and surprising abundance of rdh genes in pristine habitats. The frequent detection of Dhc-related 16S rRNA genes from these environments implied the occurrence of dissimilatory dehalorespiration in marine subsurface sediments, however, pristine Dhc could never be linked to this activity. Despite being ubiquitous in those environments, metabolic life style or ecological function of Dhc in the absence of anthropogenic contaminants is still completely unknown. We therefore analyzed a non-contaminated deep sea sediment sample of the Peru Margin 1230 site by a single cell genomic (SGC) approach. We present for the first time data on three single Dhc cells, helping to elucidate their role in the poorly understood oligotrophic marine sub-surface environment.

  9. Distribution and sources of organic matter in surface sediments of the eastern continental margin of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, M. S.; Naidu, S. A.; Subbaiah, Ch. V.; Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Reddy, N. P. C.

    2013-12-01

    sources and distribution of organic matter (OM) in surface sediments of the eastern continental margin of India, including the region influenced by river discharge, were investigated using content, molar C:N ratios and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen. Despite relatively high water column integrated chlorophyll-a concentrations were found in the continental shelf than the slope; however, the lower sediment organic carbon (SOC) was found in the former than the latter region suggesting that in situ production did not play significant role on preservation of SOC in the coastal Bay of Bengal. The broad range of δ13C of SOC (-23.2 to -16.7‰) suggests that OM is a broad mixture of terrestrial and marine OM. Relative contributions from terrestrial C3 and C4 plants and marine sources are quantified as 34%, 23%, and 43%, respectively, indicating that dominant source of allochthonous OM (~57%) in the coastal Bay of Bengal. Relatively higher contribution of OM from C4 plants was found in the sediments at off river Krishna indicating that this region received detritus of agricultural crops such as jowar, bajra, and sugar cane, which are dominant in its drainage basin, during SW monsoon. This study revealed that relatively high OM preserved in the slope than shelf region along the coastal Bay of Bengal and the composition of OM is primarily controlled by the type of agricultural crops and vegetation in the drainage basin of the river.

  10. Single cell genomic study of dehalogenating Chloroflexi from deep sea sediments of Peruvian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spormann, A.; Kaster, A.; Meyer-Blackwell, K.; Biddle, J.

    2012-12-01

    Dehalogenating Chloroflexi, such as Dehalococcoidites (Dhc), are members of the rare biosphere of deep sea sediments but were originally discovered as the key microbes mediating reductive dehalogenation of the prevalent groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene to ethene. Dhc are slow growing, highly niche adapted microbes that are specialized to organohalide respiration as the sole mode of energy conservation. These strictly anaerobic microbes depend on a supporting microbial community to mitigate electron donor and cofactor requirements among other factors. Molecular and genomic studies on the key enzymes for energy conservation, reductive dehalogenases, have provided evidence for rapid adaptive evolution in terrestrial environments. However, the metabolic life style of Dhc in the absence of anthropogenic contaminants, such as in pristine deep sea sediments, is still unknown. In order to provide fundamental insights into life style, genomic population structure and evolution of Dhc, we analyzed a non-contaminated deep sea sediment sample of the Peru Margin 1230 site collected 6 mbf by a metagenomic and single cell genomic. We present for the first time single cell genomic data on dehalogenating Chloroflexi, a significant microbial population in the poorly understood oligotrophic marine sub-surface environments.

  11. Single cell genomic study of dehalogenating Chloroflexi in deep sea sediments of Peru Margin 1230

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaster, A.; Meyer-Blackwell, K.; Biddle, J.; Spormann, A.

    2012-12-01

    Dehalogenating Chloroflexi, such as Dehalococcoidites (Dhc), are members of the rare biosphere of deep sea sediments but were originally discovered as the key microbes mediating reductive dehalogenation of the prevalent groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene to ethene. Dhc are slow growing, highly niche adapted microbes that are specialized to organohalide respiration as the sole mode of energy conservation. They are strictly anaerobic microbes that depend on a supporting microbial community for electron donor and cofactor requirements among other factors. Molecular and genomic studies on the key enzymes for energy conservation, reductive dehalogenases, have provided evidence for rapid adaptive evolution in terrestrial environments. However, the metabolic life style of Dhc in the absence of anthropogenic contaminants, such as in pristine deep sea sediments, is still unknown. In order to provide fundamental insights into life style, genomic population structure and evolution of Dhc, we analyzed a non-contaminated deep sea sediment sample of the Peru Margin 1230 site collected 6 mbsf by a metagenomic and single cell genomic approach. We present for the first time single cell genomic data on dehalogenating Chloroflexi, a significant microbial population in the poorly understood oligotrophic marine sub-surface environment.

  12. Lower cretaceous organic-rich sediments drilled on Antarctic continental margin during ODP Leg 113

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, S.

    1988-01-01

    Lower Cretaceous organic-rich sediments were recovered below a major unconformity at two sites on the eastern Weddell Sea margin during ODP Leg 113. No age overlap exists between the two sites. A more continuous Cretaceous section was previously recovered at DSDP Site 511 on the Falkland plateau. Site 692 (2,880 m water depth) is located on a mid-slope bench in Wegener Canyon. Early Cretaceous-age (pre-Albian) sediments extend from 53-98 m below sea floor (mbsf) and are dominated by organic-rich nannofossil claystone. Macrofossils (e.g., belemites and ammonites), thin carbonate lenses (<1 cm), and water escape structures are abundant. Thin beds of devitrified ash, bioturbation, and graded bedding are present. Site 693 (2,360 m water depth), 30 km west of Site 692 on the canyon's outer rim, recovered Albian-age organic-rich claystones and mudstones from 416-483 mbsf. Site 693 sediments have lower organic contents than those at Site 692. Glauconite is common in the upper part of the unit. Well-preserved diatoms and diatomite layers suggest high productivity.

  13. Recent sediment transport and deposition in the Cap-Ferret Canyon, South-East margin of Bay of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sabine; Howa, Hélène; Diallo, Amy; Martín, Jacobo; Cremer, Michel; Duros, Pauline; Fontanier, Christophe; Deflandre, Bruno; Metzger, Edouard; Mulder, Thierry

    2014-06-01

    The Cap-Ferret Canyon (CFC), a major morphologic feature of the eastern margin of the Bay of Biscay, occupies a deep structural depression that opens about 60 km southwest of the Gironde Estuary. Detailed depth profiles of the particle-reactive radionuclides 234Th and 210Pb in interface sediments were used to characterise the present sedimentation (bioturbation, sediment mass accumulation, and focusing) in the CFC region. Two bathymetric transects were sampled along the CFC axis and the southern adjacent margin. Particle fluxes were recorded from the nearby Landes Plateau by means of sediment traps in 2006 and 2007. This dataset provides a new and comprehensive view of particulate matter transfer in the Cap-Ferret Canyon region, through a direct comparison of the canyon with the adjacent southern margin. Radionuclide profiles (234Th and 210Pb) and mass fluxes demonstrate that significant particle dynamics occur on the SE Aquitanian margin in comparison with nearby margins. The results also suggest show three distinct areas in terms of sedimentary activity. In the upper canyon (<500 m), there is little net sediment accumulation, suggesting a by-pass area. Sediment focusing is apparent at the middle canyon (500-1500 m), that therefore acts as a depocenter for particles from the shelf and the upper canyon. The lower canyon (>2000 m) can be considered inactive at annual or decadal scales. In contrast with the slow and continuous accumulation of relatively fresh material that characterises the middle canyon, the lower canyon receives pulses of sediment via gravity flows on longer time scales. At decadal scale, the CFC can be considered as a relatively quiescent canyon. The disconnection of the CFC from major sources of sediment delivery seems to limit its efficiency in particle transfer from coastal areas to the adjacent ocean basin.

  14. Pathways of carbon oxidation in continental margin sediments off central Chile.

    PubMed

    Thamdrup, B; Canfield, D E

    1996-12-01

    Rates and oxidative pathways of organic carbon mineralization were determined in sediments at six stations on the shelf and slope off Concepcion Bay at 36.5 degrees S. The depth distribution of C oxidation rates was determined to 10 cm from accumulation of dissolved inorganic C in 1-5-d incubations. Pathways of C oxidation were inferred from the depth distributions of the potential oxidants (O2, NO3-, and oxides of Mn and Fe) and from directly determined rates of SO4(2-) reduction. The study area is characterized by intense seasonal upwelling, and during sampling in late summer the bottom water over the shelf was rich in NO3- and depleted of O2. Sediments at the four shelf stations were covered by mats of filamentous bacteria of the genera Thioploca and Beggiatoa. Carbon oxidation rates at these sites were extremely high near the sediment surface (>3 micromol cm-3 d-1) and decreased exponentially with depth. The process was entirely coupled to SO4(2-) reduction. At the two slope stations where bottom-water O2 was > 100 microM, C oxidation rates were 10-fold lower and varied less with depth; C oxidation coupled to the reduction of O2, NO3-, and Mn oxides combined to yield an estimated 15% of the total C oxidation between 0 and 10 cm. Carbon oxidation through Fe reduction contributed a further 12-29% of the depth-integrated rate, while the remainder of C oxidation was through SO4(2-) reduction. The depth distribution of Fe reduction agreed well with the distribution of poorly crystalline Fe oxides, and as this pool decreased with depth, the importance of SO4(2-) reduction increased. The results point to a general importance of Fe reduction in C oxidation in continental margin sediments. At the shelf stations, Fe reduction was mainly coupled to oxidation of reduced S. These sediments were generally H2S-free despite high SO4(2-) reduction rates, and precipitation of Fe sulfides dominated H2S scavenging during the incubations. A large NO3- pool was associated with the

  15. Carbonate sedimentation in an extensional active margin: Cretaceous history of the Haymana region, Pontides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okay, Aral I.; Altiner, Demir

    2016-03-01

    The Haymana region in Central Anatolia is located in the southern part of the Pontides close to the İzmir-Ankara suture. During the Cretaceous, the region formed part of the south-facing active margin of the Eurasia. The area preserves a nearly complete record of the Cretaceous system. Shallow marine carbonates of earliest Cretaceous age are overlain by a 700-m-thick Cretaceous sequence, dominated by deep marine limestones. Three unconformity-bounded pelagic carbonate sequences of Berriasian, Albian-Cenomanian and Turonian-Santonian ages are recognized: Each depositional sequence is preceded by a period of tilting and submarine erosion during the Berriasian, early Albian and late Cenomanian, which corresponds to phases of local extension in the active continental margin. Carbonate breccias mark the base of the sequences and each carbonate sequence steps down on older units. The deep marine carbonate deposition ended in the late Santonian followed by tilting, erosion and folding during the Campanian. Deposition of thick siliciclastic turbidites started in the late Campanian and continued into the Tertiary. Unlike most forearc basins, the Haymana region was a site of deep marine carbonate deposition until the Campanian. This was because the Pontide arc was extensional and the volcanic detritus was trapped in the intra-arc basins and did not reach the forearc or the trench. The extensional nature of the arc is also shown by the opening of the Black Sea as a backarc basin in the Turonian-Santonian. The carbonate sedimentation in an active margin is characterized by synsedimentary vertical displacements, which results in submarine erosion, carbonate breccias and in the lateral discontinuity of the sequences, and differs from blanket like carbonate deposition in the passive margins.

  16. Measurement of sediment and crustal thickness corrected RDA for 2D profiles at rifted continental margins: Applications to the Iberian, Gulf of Aden and S Angolan margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Leanne; Kusznir, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Subsidence analysis of sedimentary basins and rifted continental margins requires a correction for the anomalous uplift or subsidence arising from mantle dynamic topography. Whilst different global model predictions of mantle dynamic topography may give a broadly similar pattern at long wavelengths, they differ substantially in the predicted amplitude and at shorter wavelengths. As a consequence the accuracy of predicted mantle dynamic topography is not sufficiently good to provide corrections for subsidence analysis. Measurements of present day anomalous subsidence, which we attribute to mantle dynamic topography, have been made for three rifted continental margins; offshore Iberia, the Gulf of Aden and southern Angola. We determine residual depth anomaly (RDA), corrected for sediment loading and crustal thickness variation for 2D profiles running from unequivocal oceanic crust across the continental ocean boundary onto thinned continental crust. Residual depth anomalies (RDA), corrected for sediment loading using flexural backstripping and decompaction, have been calculated by comparing observed and age predicted oceanic bathymetries at these margins. Age predicted bathymetric anomalies have been calculated using the thermal plate model predictions from Crosby & McKenzie (2009). Non-zero sediment corrected RDAs may result from anomalous oceanic crustal thickness with respect to the global average or from anomalous uplift or subsidence. Gravity anomaly inversion incorporating a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction and sediment thickness from 2D seismic reflection data has been used to determine Moho depth, calibrated using seismic refraction, and oceanic crustal basement thickness. Crustal basement thicknesses derived from gravity inversion together with Airy isostasy have been used to correct for variations of crustal thickness from a standard oceanic thickness of 7km. The 2D profiles of RDA corrected for both sediment loading and non-standard crustal

  17. Planktonic and sediment-associated aerobic methanotrophs in two seep systems along the North American margin.

    PubMed

    Tavormina, Patricia L; Ussler, William; Orphan, Victoria J

    2008-07-01

    Methane vents are of significant geochemical and ecological importance. Notable progress has been made toward understanding anaerobic methane oxidation in marine sediments; however, the diversity and distribution of aerobic methanotrophs in the water column are poorly characterized. Both environments play an essential role in regulating methane release from the oceans to the atmosphere. In this study, the diversity of particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) and 16S rRNA genes from two methane vent environments along the California continental margin was characterized. The pmoA phylotypes recovered from methane-rich sediments and the overlying water column differed. Sediments harbored the greatest number of unique pmoA phylotypes broadly affiliated with the Methylococcaceae family, whereas planktonic pmoA phylotypes formed three clades that were distinct from the sediment-hosted methanotrophs and distantly related to established methanotrophic clades. Water column-associated phylotypes were highly similar between field sites, suggesting that planktonic methanotroph diversity is controlled primarily by environmental factors rather than geographical proximity. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes from methane-rich waters did not readily recover known methanotrophic lineages, with only a few phylotypes demonstrating distant relatedness to Methylococcus. The development of new pmo primers increased the recovery of monooxygenase genes from the water column and led to the discovery of a highly diverged monooxygenase sequence which is phylogenetically intermediate to Amo and pMMO. This sequence potentiates insight into the amo/pmo superfamily. Together, these findings lend perspective into the diversity and segregation of aerobic methanotrophs within different methane-rich habitats in the marine environment. PMID:18487407

  18. Pertinent spatio-temporal scale of observation to understand sediment yield control factors in the Andean Region: the case of the Santa River (Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morera, S. B.; Condom, T.; Vauchel, P.; Guyot, J.-L.; Galvez, C.; Crave, A.

    2013-01-01

    Hydro-sedimentology development is a great challenge in Peru due to limited data as well as sparse and confidential information. Consequently, little is known at present about the relationship between the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), precipitation, runoff, land use and the sediment transport dynamics. The aim of this paper is to bridge this gap in order to quantify and understand the signal of magnitude and frequency of the sediment fluxes from the central western Andes; also, to identify the main erosion control factor and its relevance. The Tablachaca River (3132 km2) and the Santa River (6815 km2), two mountainous Andean catchments that are geographically close to each other, both showed similar statistical daily rainfall and discharge variability but high contrast in sediment yield (SY). In order to investigate which factors are of importance, the continuous water discharge and hourly suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) of the Santa River were studied. Firstly, the specific sediment yield (SSY) at the continental Andes range scale for the Pacific side is one of the highest amounts (2204 t km2 yr-1). Secondly, no relationship between the water discharge (Q) and El Niño/La Niñ a events is found over a 54 yr time period. However, the Santa Basin is highly sensitive during mega Niños (1982-1983 and 1997-1998). Lastly, dispersed micro-mining and mining activity in specific lithologies are identified as the major factors that control the high SSY. These remarks make the Peruvian coast key areas for future research on Andean sediment rates.

  19. Pertinent spatio-temporal scale of observation to understand suspended sediment yield control factors in the Andean region: the case of the Santa River (Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morera, S. B.; Condom, T.; Vauchel, P.; Guyot, J.-L.; Galvez, C.; Crave, A.

    2013-11-01

    Hydro-sedimentology development is a great challenge in Peru due to limited data as well as sparse and confidential information. This study aimed to quantify and to understand the suspended sediment yield from the west-central Andes Mountains and to identify the main erosion-control factors and their relevance. The Tablachaca River (3132 km2) and the Santa River (6815 km2), located in two adjacent Andes catchments, showed similar statistical daily rainfall and discharge variability but large differences in specific suspended-sediment yield (SSY). In order to investigate the main erosion factors, daily water discharge and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) datasets of the Santa and Tablachaca rivers were analysed. Mining activity in specific lithologies was identified as the major factor that controls the high SSY of the Tablachaca (2204 t km2 yr-1), which is four times greater than the Santa's SSY. These results show that the analysis of control factors of regional SSY at the Andes scale should be done carefully. Indeed, spatial data at kilometric scale and also daily water discharge and SSC time series are needed to define the main erosion factors along the entire Andean range.

  20. Late Pleistocene valley fills source sediment flux of Tibetan Plateau margin rivers, Zanskar, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blöthe, J. H.; Munack, H.; Korup, O.; Fulop, R. H.; Codilean, A.; Fink, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Indus and its tributaries, one of Asia's largest river systems, drain the NW Himalaya and the Transhimalayan ranges that border the western Tibetan Plateau margin. From the internally drained low-relief areas of the Tibetan Plateau, local relief increases towards the Western Himalayan Syntaxis, where it exceeds 7 km. Simultaneously, average denudation rates rise from as little as 10 mm ka-1 at the Tibetan Plateau margin to rates of >1000 mm ka-1 close to the western Himalayan Syntaxis. In this rugged bedrock landscape, river valleys frequently alternate between deeply incised gorges and broad alluviated reaches. Vast fill terrace staircases of up to 400 m height above current river levels, and intercalated lake sediments point to repeated phases of incision and aggradation within the region. Despite a broad interest in a better understanding of mechanisms that modulate plateau erosion, age constraints on the generation of these impressive features remain sparse, though indicate mainly Pleistocene formation ages. Here we present new data from the More Plains section, a vast sedimentary fill, located in the headwaters of the Zanskar River, the largest tributary to the upper Indus. The vast sedimentary successions of the More Plains originally belonged to a former endorheic basin that has been tapped by the Zanskar River, today revealing a sedimentary exposures of >250 m thickness. We combine morphometric analysis and field based observations with 10Be surface exposure dating and basin-wide denudation rates to constrain the late Quaternary history of this setting. Analysis of a 10Be depth profile on top of the More Plains section indicate a surface exposure age of ~125 +/- 15 ka, which is supported by ages from nearby amalgamated surface samples. Grounding on a morphometric approach, we estimate that ~1.65-1.95 km3 were removed from this section by fluvial erosion since aggradation ceased, requiring a specific sediment yield of 85-100 t km-2 yr-1 averaged over the

  1. Modeling of depth to base of Last Glacial Maximum and seafloor sediment thickness for the California State Waters Map Series, eastern Santa Barbara Channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Florence L.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Sliter, Ray W.

    2012-01-01

    Models of the depth to the base of Last Glacial Maximum and sediment thickness over the base of Last Glacial Maximum for the eastern Santa Barbara Channel are a key part of the maps of shallow subsurface geology and structure for offshore Refugio to Hueneme Canyon, California, in the California State Waters Map Series. A satisfactory interpolation of the two datasets that accounted for regional geologic structure was developed using geographic information systems modeling and graphics software tools. Regional sediment volumes were determined from the model. Source data files suitable for geographic information systems mapping applications are provided.

  2. Anthropogenic and authigenic uranium in marine sediments of the central Gulf of California adjacent to the Santa Rosalía mining region.

    PubMed

    Shumilin, Evgueni; Rodríguez-Figueroa, Griselda; Sapozhnikov, Dmitry; Sapozhnikov, Yuri; Choumiline, Konstantin

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the causes of uranium (U) enrichment in marine sediments in the eastern sector of the Gulf of California, surface sediments and sediment cores were collected adjacent to the Santa Rosalía copper mining region in the Baja California peninsula. Three coastal sediment cores were found to display high concentrations of U (from 54.2 ± 7.3 mg kg(-1) to 110 ± 13 mg kg(-1)) exceeding those found in the deeper cores (1.36 ± 0.26 mg kg(-1) in the Guaymas Basin to 9.31 ± 3.03 mg kg(-1) in the SR63 core from the suboxic zone). The contribution of non-lithogenic U (estimated using scandium to normalize) to the total U content in sediments of three coastal cores varied from 97.2 ± 0.4 % to 98.82 % versus 49.8 ± 3 % (Guaymas Basin) to 84.2 ± 8.2 % (SR62 core) in the deeper cores. The U content record in a lead-210 ((210)Pb)-dated core had two peaks (in 1923 and 1967) corresponding to the history of ancient mining and smelting activities in Santa Rosalía. PMID:22722804

  3. Single cell genomic study of Dehalococcoidetes species from deep-sea sediments of the Peruvian Margin

    PubMed Central

    Kaster, Anne-Kristin; Mayer-Blackwell, Koshlan; Pasarelli, Ben; Spormann, Alfred M

    2014-01-01

    The phylum Chloroflexi is one of the most frequently detected phyla in the subseafloor of the Pacific Ocean margins. Dehalogenating Chloroflexi (Dehalococcoidetes) was originally discovered as the key microorganisms mediating reductive dehalogenation via their key enzymes reductive dehalogenases (Rdh) as sole mode of energy conservation in terrestrial environments. The frequent detection of Dehalococcoidetes-related 16S rRNA and rdh genes in the marine subsurface implies a role for dissimilatory dehalorespiration in this environment; however, the two genes have never been linked to each other. To provide fundamental insights into the metabolism, genomic population structure and evolution of marine subsurface Dehalococcoidetes sp., we analyzed a non-contaminated deep-sea sediment core sample from the Peruvian Margin Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) site 1230, collected 7.3 m below the seafloor by a single cell genomic approach. We present for the first time single cell genomic data on three deep-sea Chloroflexi (Dsc) single cells from a marine subsurface environment. Two of the single cells were considered to be part of a local Dehalococcoidetes population and assembled together into a 1.38-Mb genome, which appears to be at least 85% complete. Despite a high degree of sequence-level similarity between the shared proteins in the Dsc and terrestrial Dehalococcoidetes, no evidence for catabolic reductive dehalogenation was found in Dsc. The genome content is however consistent with a strictly anaerobic organotrophic or lithotrophic lifestyle. PMID:24599070

  4. Sedimentation history of the northern North Sea Margin during the last 150 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekens, W. A. H.; Haflidason, H.; Sejrup, H. P.; Nygard, A.; Richter, T.; Vogt, C.; Frederichs, T.

    2009-03-01

    The Norwegian Channel Ice Stream (NCIS) is one the defining features of the Fennoscandian icesheet. Still little is known of the detailed dynamics of this ice stream in relation to regional changes in ice cover, paleoceanographic and climatic changes. Sedimentological data from core MD99-2283 in combination with seismic data allow a detailed chronological reconstruction of the outbuilding of the margin and the ice extent in southern Scandinavia through the last 150 ka. An integrated stratigraphy of the margin is presented and compared to the glacial history. Changes in the regional ice cover are reflected in the accumulation rates, the clay mineralogy, the coarse chalk fraction and the number of IRD >2 mm in core MD99-2283, while the sedimentation on the North Sea Fan as derived from seismic data provides direct evidence for the glacial activity at the shelf edge. Tentative evidence was found for two Early Weichselian glacial advances in southern Scandinavia and possibly Scotland at around 110 and 80 ka BP. From 42 cal ka BP the ice cover expanded in southern Fennoscandia and led to increased deposition on the margin and the occurrence of local melt water outbursts. Significantly increased accumulation rates, coarse chalk, local meltwater output and smectite occur during the ice expansion in the North Sea from around 34 cal ka BP. The main outbuilding phase of the NSF during the last glacial cycle occurred after 30 cal ka BP. From around 24 cal ka BP the NCIS became highly active and advanced at least three times prior to the final retreat from the shelf edge around 19.0 cal ka BP.

  5. Seismo-turbidite Sedimentology: Implications for Active Tectonic Margin Stratigraphy and Sediment Facies Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, C. H.; Goldfinger, C.; Gutierrez Pastor, J.; Polonia, A.; Van Daele, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes generate mass transport deposits (MTDs); megaturbidites (MTD overlain by coeval turbidite); multi-pulsed, stacked, and mud homogenite seismo-turbidites; tsunamites; and seiche deposits. The strongest (Mw 9) earthquake shaking signatures appear to create multi-pulsed individual turbidites, where the number and character of multiple coarse-grained pulses for correlative turbidites generally remain constant both upstream and downstream in different channel systems. Multiple turbidite pulses, that correlate with multiple ruptures shown in seismograms of historic earthquakes (e.g. Chile 1960, Sumatra 2004 and Japan 2011), support this hypothesis. The weaker (Mw = or < 8) (e.g. northern California San Andreas) earthquakes generate dominantly upstream simple fining-up (uni-pulsed) turbidites in single tributary canyons and channels; however, downstream stacked turbidites result from synchronously triggered multiple turbidity currents that deposit in channels below confluences of the tributaries. Proven tsunamites, which result from tsunami waves sweeping onshore and shallow water debris into deeper water, are a fine-grained turbidite cap over other seismo-turbidites. In contrast, MTDs and seismo-turbidites result from slope failures. Multiple great earthquakes cause seismic strengthening of slope sediment, which results in minor MTDs in basin floor turbidite system deposits (e.g. maximum run-out distances of MTDs across basin floors along active margins are up to an order of magnitude less than on passive margins). In contrast, the MTDs and turbidites are equally intermixed in turbidite systems of passive margins (e.g. Gulf of Mexico). In confined basin settings, earthquake triggering results in a common facies pattern of coeval megaturbidites in proximal settings, thick stacked turbidites downstream, and ponded muddy homogenite turbidites in basin or sub-basin centers, sometimes with a cap of seiche deposits showing bi-directional flow patterns.

  6. Evidence for current-controlled sedimentation along the southern Mozambique continental margin since Early Miocene times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preu, Benedict; Spieß, Volkhard; Schwenk, Tilmann; Schneider, Ralph

    2011-12-01

    Major plastered drift sequences were imaged using high-resolution multichannel seismics during R/V Meteor cruises M63/1 and M75/3 south of the Mozambique Channel along the continental margin of Mozambique off the Limpopo River. Detailed seismic-stratigraphic analyses enabled the reconstruction of the onset and development of the modern, discontinuous, eddy-dominated Mozambique Current. Major drift sequences can first be identified during the Early Miocene. Consistent with earlier findings, a progressive northward shift of the depocenter indicates that, on a geological timescale, a steady but variable Mozambique Current existed from this time onward. It can furthermore be shown that, during the Early/Middle Miocene, a coast-parallel current was established off the Limpopo River as part of a lee eddy system driven by the Mozambique Current. Modern sedimentation is controlled by the interplay between slope morphology and the lee eddy system, resulting in upwelling of Antarctic Intermediate Water. Drift accumulations at larger depths are related to the reworking of sediment by deep-reaching eddies that migrate southward, forming the Mozambique Current and eventually merging with the Agulhas Current.

  7. Coarse-grained sediment delivery and distribution in the Holocene Santa Monica Basin, California: Implications for evaluating source-to-sink flux at millennial time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romans, B.W.; Normark, W.R.; McGann, M.M.; Covault, J.A.; Graham, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing accumulations of coarse-grained terrigenous sediment from deep-marine basins to evaluate the relative contributions of and history of controls on sediment flux through a source-to-sink system has been difficult as a result of limited knowledge of event timing. In this study, six new radiocarbon (14C) dates are integrated with five previously published dates that have been recalibrated from a 12.5-m-thick turbidite section from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1015 in Santa Monica Basin, offshore California. This borehole is tied to high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles that cover an 1100 km2 area of the middle and lower Hueneme submarine fan and most of the basin plain. The resulting stratigraphic framework provides the highest temporal resolution for a thick-bedded Holocene turbidite succession to date, permitting an evaluation of source-to-sink controls at millennial (1000 yr) scales. The depositional history from 7 ka to present indicates that the recurrence interval for large turbidity-current events is relatively constant (300-360 yr), but the volume of sediment deposited on the fan and in the basin plain has increased by a factor of 2 over this period. Moreover, the amount of sand per event on the basin plain during the same interval has increased by a factor of 7. Maps of sediment distribution derived from correlation of seismic-reflection profiles indicate that this trend cannot be attributed exclusively to autogenic processes (e.g., progradation of depocenters). The observed variability in sediment accumulation rates is thus largely controlled by allogenic factors, including: (1) increased discharge of Santa Clara River as a result of increased magnitude and frequency of El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events from ca. 2 ka to present, (2) an apparent change in routing of coarse-grained sediment within the staging area at ca. 3 ka (i.e., from direct river input to indirect, littoral cell input into Hueneme submarine canyon), and (3

  8. The Pemali Formation of Central Java and equivalents: Indicators of sedimentation on an active plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, Peter; Burgon, Gerald; Baky, Alaa

    2009-01-01

    The Pemali Formation is revised from being the oldest known sedimentary unit in north Central Java to being almost the youngest. This, and a new examination of its composition, has implications for regional geological models and petroleum geology. The Pemali Formation was originally interpreted as "early Miocene" but is now shown to be latest Miocene through Pliocene in age, and characterised by both very high rates of sedimentation and a particularly high degree of reworking. The mid-Late Miocene tectonic event that initiated deposition of this formation created a new series of basins that were filled by erosion of new structural highs. Continuing constriction of the basins resulted in the uplift of older Pemali sediments on the basin margins, being reworked into the youngest Pemali strata. Neither the Pemali Formation nor the associated uplift and erosion are seen in the basins in the Java Sea a short distance to the north. Both the severe effects of the mid-Late Miocene tectonism and the Pemali-type sediments are restricted to a particular geologic zone, which is roughly the same as the modern island of Java. This may be above lithosphere of mixed terranes that forms a rim to the sialic Sunda Plate. The onshore Java area has a history of severe tectonism through the Tertiary and consequently a stratigraphy that greatly contrasts with that of the present-day Java Sea. The localised and thick Pemali deposition affected the burial history and the generation of hydrocarbons around the mid-Late Miocene basins, whilst the uplifted areas may include hydrocarbon traps. If basement composition influenced the location and thickness of the Pemali Formation then it is also likely to have fundamentally controlled deposition of older formations, including the unknown source rock for surface oil seeps. Likewise, these controls appear to contrast strongly with the better known rift-sag basins of the Java Sea.

  9. Deformation from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake near the southwest margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Kevin M.; Ellen, Stephen D.; Peterson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    To gain additional measurement of any permanent ground deformation that accompanied this damage, we compiled and conducted post-earthquake surveys along two 5-km lines of horizontal control and a 15-km level line. Measurements of horizontal distortion indicate approximately 0.1 m shortening in a NE-SW direction across the valley margin, similar to the amount measured in the channel lining. Evaluation of precise leveling by the National Geodetic Survey showed a downwarp, with an amplitude of >0.1 m over a span of >12 km, that resembled regional geodetic models of coseismic deformation. Although the leveling indicates broad, regional warping, abrupt discontinuities characteristic of faulting characterize both the broad-scale distribution of damage and the local deformation of the channel lining. Reverse movement largely along preexisting faults and probably enhanced significantly by warping combined with enhanced ground shaking, produced the documented coseismic ground deformation.

  10. Platform-margin and marginal slope relationships and sedimentation in Devonian reef complexes of Canning basin, Western Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Playford, P.E.; Kerans, C.; Hurley, N.F.

    1984-04-01

    Devonian limestone platforms in the Canning basin were generally rimmed by reef-margin and reef-flat deposits, constructed by stromatoporoids, algae, and corals in the Givetian and Frasnian, and by algae in the Famennian. However, some platforms were low-relief banks with little or no reef development. The reefs and slowly deposited parts of the marginal-slope facies were subject to pervasive early submarine cementation by fibrous high-magnesium calcite (now radiaxial spar). The strongly cemented reef limestones formed rigid wave-resistant rims to the platforms. Fracturing of these limestones, probably largely associated with earthquake shaking, gave rise to extensive networks of neptunian dikes and sills, and to the collapse of some sections of the margins. Such collapses in turn initiated debris flows and the deposition of allochthonous reef blocks on the adjoining marginal slopes. The reef complexes are being explored extensively for lead-zinc deposits in outcrop and oil in the subsurface. A significant oil discovery was made in a Famennian platform margin (the Blina field) in 1981.

  11. Increased continental-margin slumping frequency during sea-level lowstands above gas hydrate-bearing sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Paull, C.K.; Buelow, W.J.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

    1996-02-01

    We present {sup 14}C data on sediment samples from cores of the upper 7 m of the sediment column overlying a major continental-rise gas hydrate field on the southern Carolina Rise and inner Blake Ridge offshore the southeastern United States. The data show that glacial-age sediments are underrepresented in the cores. The observation is consistent with a previously predicted association between sea-level lowstands and increased frequency of sea-floor slumping on continental margins containing gas hydrates. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  12. The Brazilian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, L. R.; Coutinho, P. N.

    1981-04-01

    The Brazilian continental margin, with its interesting morphology, structure and sediments, has become better known only during the last two decades. Six physiographical provinces can be recognized at the continental margin and the adjacent coast: (1) Cabo Orange-Parnaiba delta; (2) Parnaiba delta-Cabo Sa˜o Roque; (3) Cabo Sa˜o Roque-Belmonte; (4) Belmonte-Cabo Frio; (5) Cabo Frio-Cabo Santa Marta; and (6) Cabo Santa Marta-Chui. The shelf is rather wide near the Amazon Mouth, becoming narrower eastwards, continuing very narrow along the northeastern and eastern coast, and becoming wider again in the south towards the Plate River. Prominent morphological features along the margin are the Amazon cone, the marginal plateaus off northeastern Brazil, the Sa˜o Francisco cone and canyon, the Abrolhos Bank, and the deep-sea plateaus of Pernambuco and Sa˜o Paulo. On the shelf proper a number of relief elements exist, such as sand waves east of the Amazon, submarine terraces at various places, and irregularities of structural origin. The shelf break is rather smooth in the far north and south, more abrupt in the remainder. Surface sediments of the Brazilian shelf show five distinct facies types: littoral quartz sands, mud, transition sand-mud, coralline algae, and biodetrital. The terrigenous elastic fractions dominate off the Amazon and in southern Brazil; between these areas they occupy a very narrow strip near the coast. The carbonate facies, predominantly composed of calcareous algae, is abundant between the Parnaiba delta and Cabo Frio; to the south this facies is more biodetrital and restricted to the outer shelf. Economically important on the Brazilian continental margin besides oil, are sands and gravels, carbonate deposits, evaporites and some subsurface coal. Other possible mineral resources could be phosphate, heavy minerals and clays for ceramics.

  13. Correlation and Analysis of Volcanic Ash in Marine Sediments From the Peru Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D.; Miller, J.

    2005-05-01

    While land studies have identified the major volcanic centers of historic eruptions and active to recent volcanism within the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) of the Central Andes, the tephrachronologic records are disturbed by the high erosion rates of this arid region. However, volcanic material frequently occurs in marine sediment as discrete ash-fall layers and, or disseminated ash accumulations. Cores from three Peru Margin sites sites(1227, 1228, and 1229) drilled during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 201 have been studied to determine the occurrence of volcanic ash layers and ash accumulations within marine sediments along the Peru shelf. The thickness of each ash layer and accumulations has been measured and the volumes calculated in order to decipher the episodicity of explosive volcanic activity in the North-Central Andes recorded in the off shore sediments. The geographic distribution of the sites (over 3 degrees of latitude and from 50 to 300 km offshore) and correlation of ash units between sites form the basis for minimal estimates of explosive volcanic activity in the region (only eruptions large enough to deposit ash in excess of 100 km from source are represented). Pouclet et al., (1990) estimated the minimum explosive activity along the Andean Arc from ash-bearing sediments and ash layers within cores from sites along the Peru margin collected during ODP Leg 112. As a result of better recovery (as much as ten times more core recovery in many intervals) and decreased disturbance in cores recovered during Leg 201, our documentation of ash content in cores from Leg 201 has led to a more complete record of the explosive volcanic activity along the Andean Arc. For example, Pouclet, et al., (1990) reports four ash layers from Sites 684, 680, and 681, whereas forty ash layers have been documented from cores recovered from the same locations (Sites 1227, 1228, and 1229 respectively). Our stratigraphic record agrees with Pouclet, et al., (1990), suggesting

  14. Methane Production In Forearc Sediments At The Costa Rican Convergent Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.; Morris, J. D.; Peacock, A.; White, D. C.

    2004-12-01

    Plate tectonics creates suitable habitats for deep biosphere organisms, affecting the distribution of biological communities on Earth. Subduction zones, where crustal materials return to the planetary interior through plate convergence, expose active microbial communities in subducting seafloor sediments to a fresh chemical inventory as diagenesis, metamorphic reactions, and tectonically-induced fluid flow alter sediments and surrounding porewaters. The plate interface (the decollement) experiences persistent geochemical flux of light hydrocarbon- and metal-bearing fluids from depth. This project (1) examines the habitability of the decollement zone at the Costa Rican convergent margin from a geochemical perspective, (2) uses lipid biomarkers to describe biomass distribution in sediment samples adjacent to and within the decollement, and (3) cites methanogenesis as a likely metabolic strategy employed by the resident microbial community. Sterile plugs of sediment were recovered from cores taken during Leg 205 of the Ocean Drilling Program, in the Middle America Trench off Costa Rica. Samples are from the incoming carbonate section of Site 1253 at 370-437 meters below seafloor (mbsf), in the forearc sedimentary wedge at Site 1255 at 134-145 mbsf, and around an upper fault (153-220 mbsf) and in the decollement zone (305-366 mbsf) at Site 1254. Drilling mud and fluid were sampled to monitor potential microbial contamination. Samples were immediately frozen at -80ºC. Prior to analysis, samples were freeze-dried in preparation for serial extraction of DNA and lipids. DNA was identified by fluorometry in 13 of 26 samples tested. The DNA was screened for methanogens by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), employing ME1 and ME2 primers that amplify a 0.75-kb region of the alpha-subunit gene for methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR). Methanogen-specific genes were detected in DNA extracted from one Site 1253 sample (at 436.9 mbsf in the basal carbonates) and four Site

  15. Microbial methanogenesis in the sulfate-reducing zone of surface sediments traversing the Peruvian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltby, J.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Treude, T.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the concurrence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in surface sediments (0-25 cm below sea floor) at six stations (70, 145, 253, 407, 990 and 1024 m) along the Peruvian margin (12° S). This oceanographic region is characterized by high carbon export to the seafloor creating an extensive oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the shelf, both factors that could favor surface methanogenesis. Sediments sampled along the depth transect traversed areas of anoxic and oxic conditions in the bottom-near water. Net methane production (batch incubations) and sulfate reduction (35S-sulfate radiotracer incubation) were determined in the upper 0-25 cm b.s.f. of multiple cores from all stations, while deep hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (> 30 cm b.s.f., 14C-bicarbonate radiotracer incubation) was determined in two gravity cores at selected sites (78 and 407 m). Furthermore, stimulation (methanol addition) and inhibition (molybdate addition) experiments were carried out to investigate the relationship between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis.

    Highest rates of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in the surface sediments, integrated over 0-25 cm b.s.f., were observed on the shelf (70-253 m, 0.06-0.1 and 0.5-4.7 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively), while lowest rates were discovered at the deepest site (1024 m, 0.03 and 0.2 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively). The addition of methanol resulted in significantly higher surface methanogenesis activity, suggesting that the process was mostly based on non-competitive substrates - i.e., substrates not used by sulfate reducers. In the deeper sediment horizons, where competition was probably relieved due to the decrease of sulfate, the usage of competitive substrates was confirmed by the detection of hydrogenotrophic activity in the sulfate-depleted zone at the shallow shelf station (70 m).

    Surface methanogenesis appeared to be correlated to the availability of labile organic matter (C / N ratio) and organic carbon

  16. Microbial methanogenesis in the sulfate-reducing zone of surface sediments traversing the Peruvian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltby, J.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Treude, T.

    2015-09-01

    We studied the concurrence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in surface sediments (0-25 cm below sea floor, cmbsf) at six stations (70, 145, 253, 407, 770 and 1024 m) along the Peruvian margin (12° S). This oceanographic region is characterized by high carbon export to the seafloor, creating an extensive oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the shelf, both factors that could favor surface methanogenesis. Sediments sampled along the depth transect traversed areas of anoxic and oxic conditions in the bottom-near water. Net methane production (batch incubations) and sulfate reduction (35S-sulfate radiotracer incubation) were determined in the upper 0-25 cmbsf of multicorer cores from all stations, while deep hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (> 30 cmbsf, 14C-bicarbonate radiotracer incubation) was determined in two gravity cores at selected sites (78 and 407 m). Furthermore, stimulation (methanol addition) and inhibition (molybdate addition) experiments were carried out to investigate the relationship between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Highest rates of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in the surface sediments, integrated over 0-25 cmbsf, were observed on the shelf (70-253 m, 0.06-0.1 and 0.5-4.7 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively), while lowest rates were discovered at the deepest site (1024 m, 0.03 and 0.2 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively). The addition of methanol resulted in significantly higher surface methanogenesis activity, suggesting that the process was mostly based on non-competitive substrates, i.e., substrates not used by sulfate reducers. In the deeper sediment horizons, where competition was probably relieved due to the decline of sulfate, the usage of competitive substrates was confirmed by the detection of hydrogenotrophic activity in the sulfate-depleted zone at the shallow shelf station (70 m). Surface methanogenesis appeared to be correlated to the availability of labile organic matter (C / N ratio) and organic carbon degradation (DIC production

  17. Carbonate diagenesis in the methane-rich sediments of the Beringian margin, IODP 323 Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, C.; Blanc Valleron, M.; Maerz, C.; Ravelo, A.; Takahashi, K.; Alvarez Zarikian, C. A.; Scientific Party Of Iodp Expedition 323

    2010-12-01

    During IODP expedition 323 in the Bering Sea (July 5- September 4, 2009) a series of drilling (down to 750 meters below sea floor) was realized at 7 sites localized on the Umnak plateau (U1339), on the Bowers Ridge (U1340, U1341, U1342) and on the Beringian margin (U1343, U1344, U1345) ; the oldest sediments dated at 5 Myrs were recovered at Sites U1340 and U1341. Diagenetic carbonates are present at all Sites either as nodules and cm to dm thick layers, or as isolated acicular crystals, within the diatom-rich oozes of the Bering Sea, which are also characterized by their extreme richness in methane. The mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic study of diagenetic carbonates from Sites U1343, U1344 and U1345 was realized to characterize the nature of inorganic and microbial processes responsible for this diagenesis, and to determine the composition and origin of fluids in which these carbonates were precipitated. The carbonate mineralogy is very complex ; it is represented by composite mixtures of magnesian calcite and dolomite of various composition. Fe-rich dolomite/siderite dominate below ~260 mbsf at Site U1343 and ~200 mbsf at Site U1344. The isotopic compositions of the diagenetic carbonates display wide ranges of variations both for calcite (+2.84 < δ18O ‰ < +6.92 ; -20.52 < δ13C ‰ <+4.83) and dolomite (+3.58< δ18O ‰ < +9.19; +1.28 < δ13C ‰ <+11.37). The δ13C values clearly indicate that methanogenesis was involved in the sediments during microbial fermentation of organic matter : in this reaction, the 13C-rich CO2 was converted to carbonate alkalinity via silicate weathering and the 13C-poor methane was oxidized as bicarbonate via anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction as it is shown by the association of pyrite with the diagenetic carbonates.

  18. Character and Fate of Methane Plumes from Sediments on the North Cascadia Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiticar, M. J.; Wania, R.; Price, A.; Spence, G.; Riedel, M.

    2010-12-01

    Previous cruises to the North Cascadia margin study site off Vancouver Island, Canada, (NEPTUNE site) discovered with acoustic imaging (12 and 18 kHz echosounders) and submersible observations (ROPOS) multiple bubble plumes emanating from seafloor vents. The ‘Bullseye’, ‘Spinnaker' and ‘Amnesiac’ vent regions (ca. 48° 40’N, 126° 54’W) at 1260 m water depths have several large plumes, extending up to 800 m from the seabed and with apparent widths up to 500 m. Submersible dives recorded visual observations of bubbles venting from the sediment. Marine gas hydrates are the most logical source of the methane gas, based on earlier work in the region, e.g., ODP 146 (Whiticar, and Hovland, 1995) and IODP 311 (Pohlman et al., 2005). Molecular and isotope results indicate that the subsurface hydrate is predominantly comprised of microbial gas. However, thermogenic hydrocarbons do occur at greater sediment depth. Furthermore, gas hydrates at the adjacent Barclay Canyon site (48° 18.5’N, 126° 04.0’W) have a thermogenic character and flux thermogenic gas into the water column. As a consequence various sources of methane potentially can contribute to the gas plumes. During a cruise in late September 2010, measurements of hydrocarbon concentrations together with stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of methane in the bubble plume characterize the nature of the gas sources. These measurements also examine if dispersion and/or aerobic methane oxidation processes are influencing the gas plume distributions in the water column.

  19. Biogeographical distribution and diversity of microbes in methane hydrate-bearing deep marine sediments on the Pacific Ocean Margin.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Fumio; Nunoura, Takuro; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Teske, Andreas; Lever, Mark; Lauer, Antje; Suzuki, Masae; Takai, Ken; Delwiche, Mark; Colwell, Frederick S; Nealson, Kenneth H; Horikoshi, Koki; D'Hondt, Steven; Jørgensen, Bo B

    2006-02-21

    The deep subseafloor biosphere is among the least-understood habitats on Earth, even though the huge microbial biomass therein plays an important role for potential long-term controls on global biogeochemical cycles. We report here the vertical and geographical distribution of microbes and their phylogenetic diversities in deeply buried marine sediments of the Pacific Ocean Margins. During the Ocean Drilling Program Legs 201 and 204, we obtained sediment cores from the Peru and Cascadia Margins that varied with respect to the presence of dissolved methane and methane hydrate. To examine differences in prokaryotic distribution patterns in sediments with or without methane hydrates, we studied >2,800 clones possessing partial sequences (400-500 bp) of the 16S rRNA gene and 348 representative clone sequences (approximately 1 kbp) from the two geographically separated subseafloor environments. Archaea of the uncultivated Deep-Sea Archaeal Group were consistently the dominant phylotype in sediments associated with methane hydrate. Sediment cores lacking methane hydrates displayed few or no Deep-Sea Archaeal Group phylotypes. Bacterial communities in the methane hydrate-bearing sediments were dominated by members of the JS1 group, Planctomycetes, and Chloroflexi. Results from cluster and principal component analyses, which include previously reported data from the West and East Pacific Margins, suggest that, for these locations in the Pacific Ocean, prokaryotic communities from methane hydrate-bearing sediment cores are distinct from those in hydrate-free cores. The recognition of which microbial groups prevail under distinctive subseafloor environments is a significant step toward determining the role these communities play in Earth's essential biogeochemical processes. PMID:16477011

  20. Linking Late Pleistocene alpine glacial erosion and continental margin sedimentation: Insights from 40Ar/39Ar dating of silt-sized sediment, Canterbury Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaseñor, Tania; Jaeger, John M.; Foster, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Quaternary climatic and eustatic cycles in mid-latitude regions have led to more extensive alpine glaciations and continental shelf progradation, respectively. However, the glacial influence on sediment fluxes to the ocean creating continental margin strata is poorly documented. This contribution analyzes the provenance of fine sediment accumulating on the continental shelf during the Late Pleistocene to evaluate the influence of glacial cycles on sediment erosion and routing to the continental shelf. Taking advantage of the contrasting bedrock ages exposed across the Southern Alps, New Zealand, we perform 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating on the bulk silt-size sediment from three drill sites of IODP Expedition 317, Canterbury Basin, New Zealand. The results suggest that a large proportion of sediment accumulating on the continental shelf results from erosion within the Main Divide fault zone of the Southern Alps. Sediment 40Ar/39Ar age fluctuations over this time period suggest that bedrock with various 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages has been differentially eroded in the upper Waitaki River catchment and mixed in the Waitaki-Canterbury sediment-routing system. Across-shelf variations in sediment 40Ar/39Ar age reflect changing modes of sediment dispersal on the continental shelf. Fluvial material, likely derived from the main drainage divide zone, preferentially accumulates in the middle continental shelf, whereas material representing erosion of older bedrock (Torlesse Terrane), located lower in the drainage basin, is dispersed uniformly across the shelf. The age signature of the muddy sediment accumulating on the continental shelf reflects Late Pleistocene landscape evolution of the Southern Alps and its influence on sediment dispersal to the continental shelf.

  1. A 30,000 year record of terrestrial sediment delivery to the southern Chile margin (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Z.; Muratli, J. M.; McManus, J.; Mix, A. C.

    2009-12-01

    The southern Chilean margin is an important site for paleoreconstructions linking terrestrial and oceanic processes. Specifically, the region has been used to study changes in the position of the southern westerly winds and the link between variations in ice sheet extent and changes in adjacent sea surface temperature. Here we use concentrations of lithogenically-sourced trace metals to reconstruct the flux and provenance of terrestrial material in three high-sedimentation-rate cores from central-southern Chile (36°S-41°S) over the last 30 ky. Ratios of Ti/Al and Fe/Al serve to distinguish Andean versus coast range sediment sources, being high in the volcanic rocks that form the Andes, and low in the metamorphic rocks of the coast range. ODP site 1233 (838 m), at 41°S, shows an abrupt increase in Ti/Al at Termination 1, synchronous with the post-glacial rise in regional sea-surface temperatures, rising oxygen isotope values in Dronning-Maud Land and with changes in pollen assemblages in the Bio-bio river drainage interpreted as a poleward shift of the Southern Westerlies. This change in lithogenic source is decoupled from variations in terrestrial sediment flux, determined both by mass accumulation rates and by 230Th normalization. The latter shows several peaks during the last glacial interval, possibly associated with maxima in the extent of the Patagonian Ice Sheet. We propose that the deglacial increase in the delivery of Andean material to this site is driven by the retreat of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, which exposed Ti-rich material to chemical erosion. More subtle, millennial-scale variations in Ti/Al may be linked to changes in regional precipitation. Two cores at 36°S (1234; 1014 m and 1235; 489 m) record changes in Ti/Al and Fe/Al across the termination that are much smaller than at 41°S, perhaps due to the large and climatically varied drainage basin that supplies this region. There is no glacial-interglacial change in Ti/Al at Site 1235, while Site

  2. Factors controlling the rate of DDE dechlorination to DDMU in Palos Verdes margin sediments under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Quensen, J F; Tiedje, J M; Jain, M K; Mueller, S A

    2001-01-15

    Marine sediments off the coast of the Palos Verdes Peninsula in California have been designated a Superfund site primarily because of the presence of DDE [1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethene]. For decades, it was believed that DDE was not microbially transformed, but anaerobic bacteria in the Palos Verdes sediments reductively dechlorinate DDEto DDMU [1-chloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethene], which is also found in the sediments. The effects of electron donor to sulfate ratio, available carbon, sampling sites, sediment depth, and temperature on the rate and extent of DDE dechlorination in anaerobic Palos Verdes sediment microcosms were investigated. Dechlorination rates varied, depending on the site and depth from which the sediments were collected, but DDE dechlorination occurred with sediments from all locations studied. Sulfate and low temperatures slowed dechlorination, but in the presence of sulfate and at in situ temperature, the dechlorination rates observed in the microcosms agree well with the observed rate of DDE disappearance from the Palos Verdes margin sediments. PMID:11347599

  3. Geotechnical Properties of Submarine Sediments from Submarine Landslides on the Eastern Australian Continental Margin and Implications for Slide Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. L.; Hubble, T.; Airey, D.

    2014-12-01

    Geomechanical test data are presented for 12 gravity cores, up to 5 m long, taken at sites from the upper slope (<1200 m) of the east Australian continental margin in or adjacent to five submarine landslide features. Sediments uniformly consist of olive grey to grey sandy silts (MH-ML), with clay content ranging from 2-12% (using the Unified Soil Classification System - USCS). Total unit weight varies between 14.1 to 17.4 kNm-3, bulk density 715-2065 kgm-3, water content 43-90+%, and specific gravity 2.5-2.74. Sediments present low plasticity, liquid limits 43-63%, and plasticity indices of 8.7-34%. Measured strength values, friction angle (Ф') and apparent cohesion (c'), vary between 30-40°, and 0-10 kPa respectively. One slide-adjacent core, and four within-landslide cores present boundary surfaces located at depths of 0.8 to 2.2 meters below the present-day seafloor that are identified by a sharp, colour-change boundary; small increases in sediment stiffness; slight increases in sediment bulk density of 0.1 gcm-3; and distinct gaps in AMS 14C age of at least 25 ka. Compression testing indicates that the sediment above and below the boundary surface is slightly overconsolidated. Triaxial tests indicate a significant increase in the brittleness of the shear response of the sediment with increasing vertical stress, which would cause a progressive increase of pore pressure if the sediment was subjected to cyclic (earthquake) loading. The boundary surfaces are interpreted to represent detachment surfaces or slide plane surfaces. Slope stability models based on classical soil mechanics and measured sediment shear-strengths indicate that the upper slope sediments should be stable. However, multibeam bathymetry data reveal that many upper slope landslides occur across the margin and that submarine landsliding is a common process. We infer from these results that: a) the margin experiences seismic events that act to destabilise the slope sediments, and/or b) an

  4. Phylogenetic and functional diversity of microbial communities associated with subsurface sediments of the Sonora Margin, Guaymas Basin.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Adrien; Cruaud, Perrine; Roussel, Erwan G; Pignet, Patricia; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Callac, Nolwenn; Ciobanu, Maria-Cristina; Godfroy, Anne; Cragg, Barry A; Parkes, John R; Van Nostrand, Joy D; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Toffin, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface sediments of the Sonora Margin (Guaymas Basin), located in proximity of active cold seep sites were explored. The taxonomic and functional diversity of bacterial and archaeal communities were investigated from 1 to 10 meters below the seafloor. Microbial community structure and abundance and distribution of dominant populations were assessed using complementary molecular approaches (Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis, 16S rRNA libraries and quantitative PCR with an extensive primers set) and correlated to comprehensive geochemical data. Moreover the metabolic potentials and functional traits of the microbial community were also identified using the GeoChip functional gene microarray and metabolic rates. The active microbial community structure in the Sonora Margin sediments was related to deep subsurface ecosystems (Marine Benthic Groups B and D, Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group, Chloroflexi and Candidate divisions) and remained relatively similar throughout the sediment section, despite defined biogeochemical gradients. However, relative abundances of bacterial and archaeal dominant lineages were significantly correlated with organic carbon quantity and origin. Consistently, metabolic pathways for the degradation and assimilation of this organic carbon as well as genetic potentials for the transformation of detrital organic matters, hydrocarbons and recalcitrant substrates were detected, suggesting that chemoorganotrophic microorganisms may dominate the microbial community of the Sonora Margin subsurface sediments. PMID:25099369

  5. Archaeal diversity in ODP legacy borehole 892b and associated seawater and sediments of the Cascadia Margin.

    PubMed

    Lanoil, Brain D; La Duc, Myron T; Wright, Miriam; Kastner, Miriam; Nealson, Kenneth H; Bartlett, Douglas

    2005-10-01

    The Cascadia Margin is a region of active accretionary tectonics characterized by high methane flux accompanied by the formation of sedimentary gas hydrates, carbonate nodules, and carbonate pavements. Several sediment cores have been obtained from this region by the Ocean Drilling Project (ODP), and in some cases the boreholes have been sealed off, serving as sites for long-term observatories. We characterized geochemical parameters and diversity of Archaea in one such "legacy" borehole, ODP site 892b, as well as in bottom water immediately above the borehole and in two nearby sediments. The methane concentrations in the samples varied over five orders of magnitude, from approximately 25 to 35 nM in the bottom water to approximately 1.4mM in one of the sediment samples. Despite these differences, the Archaeal community in all samples was dominated by gene sequences related to the methanogenic Archaea, a finding that correlates with studies of other environments characterized by high methane flux. The archaeal phylotype richness in borehole ODP 892b was limited to two phylotypes; one specifically related to Methanosaeta spp., the other to the anaerobic methane oxidizing ANME-1 group. Although some similar groups were observed in nearby sediment and seawater samples, their archaeal phylotype richness was significantly higher than in the borehole. The possible presence of a dynamic microbial community in the Cascadia Margin sub-surface and its potential roles in methanogenesis, anaerobic oxidation of methane, and authigenic precipitation of carbonate in the Cascadia Margin are discussed. PMID:16332316

  6. Phylogenetic and Functional Diversity of Microbial Communities Associated with Subsurface Sediments of the Sonora Margin, Guaymas Basin

    PubMed Central

    Vigneron, Adrien; Cruaud, Perrine; Roussel, Erwan G.; Pignet, Patricia; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Callac, Nolwenn; Ciobanu, Maria-Cristina; Godfroy, Anne; Cragg, Barry A.; Parkes, John R.; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Toffin, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface sediments of the Sonora Margin (Guaymas Basin), located in proximity of active cold seep sites were explored. The taxonomic and functional diversity of bacterial and archaeal communities were investigated from 1 to 10 meters below the seafloor. Microbial community structure and abundance and distribution of dominant populations were assessed using complementary molecular approaches (Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis, 16S rRNA libraries and quantitative PCR with an extensive primers set) and correlated to comprehensive geochemical data. Moreover the metabolic potentials and functional traits of the microbial community were also identified using the GeoChip functional gene microarray and metabolic rates. The active microbial community structure in the Sonora Margin sediments was related to deep subsurface ecosystems (Marine Benthic Groups B and D, Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group, Chloroflexi and Candidate divisions) and remained relatively similar throughout the sediment section, despite defined biogeochemical gradients. However, relative abundances of bacterial and archaeal dominant lineages were significantly correlated with organic carbon quantity and origin. Consistently, metabolic pathways for the degradation and assimilation of this organic carbon as well as genetic potentials for the transformation of detrital organic matters, hydrocarbons and recalcitrant substrates were detected, suggesting that chemoorganotrophic microorganisms may dominate the microbial community of the Sonora Margin subsurface sediments. PMID:25099369

  7. Strong Acid Mixture and Sequential Geochemical Arsenic Extractions in Surface Sediments from the Santa Maria La Reforma Coastal Lagoon, Mexico: A Bioavailability Assessment.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Hernández, José R; Green-Ruiz, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Thirty-three sediment samples were collected from the Santa Maria La Reforma coastal lagoon and digested by way of a strong acid mixture and sequential arsenic (As)-extraction method to determine the arsenic (As) content and bioavailability. The As content was determined by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. In addition, grain-size analyses were performed, and organic carbon, carbonate, and iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) concentrations were determined. Fe and Mn determination was performed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A Pearson correlation matrix and As enrichment factors were calculated. Sediment concentrations from Santa Maria La Reforma ranged from 3.6 to 25 µg As g(-1) with an average of 13.4 ± 7.6 µg As g(-1). The highest values were observed in the northern (Playa Colorada), north-central (Mocorito River discharge zone), and southern zones ("El Tule" agricultural drain). Most samples were classified as exhibiting no or minor As enrichment and were lower than the threshold effect level (TEL; 7.24 µg g(-1)) for biota (MacDonald et al. in Ecotoxicology 5:253-278, 1996). Low bioavailable As values (<3 %) were measured in the majority of the sediment. The highest As percentages were associated with the oxyhydroxide fraction (F5). The results indicate that As bioavailability is negligible. PMID:26743199

  8. Effects of limestone quarrying and cement-plant operations on runoff and sediment yields in the Upper Permanente Creek basin, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolan, K.M.; Hill, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    High sediment loads below headwater areas of the Permanente Creek drainage basin, Santa Clara County, California, have caused flood-control problems in downstream lowland areas. Measured sediment yields in Permanente Creek, which drains areas affected by limestone quarrying and cement-plant operations, were 14 times greater than yields from the West Fork Permanente Creek, which primarily drains parkland. Part of this large disparity in yields is the result of higher runoff/unit of drainage area in the Permanente Creek Basin. Results of rainfall-runoff modeling indicate that the tendency for higher runoff from Permanente Creek results from natural differences in basin physiography. Runoff during periods of high streamflow (when most sediment is transported) is dominated by subsurface flow, which is not affected by human activities. Although artificial features created by human activities seem to have had only minor effects on runoff, they apparently have had major effects on sediment availability. Artificial features accounted for 273 acres (89%) of the 307 acres of active erosional landforms mapped in 1984. Increased availability of sediment in the Permanente Creek basin appears to be indicated by elevated intercepts of sediment-transport curves. A comparison of sediment-transport curves for the West Fork Permanente Creek with similar curves for the Permanente Creek basin under natural conditions suggests that the sediment yield from Permanente Creek is about 3.5 times higher than it would be under natural basin conditions. The increased yield apparently is due to an increase in sediment availability rather than an increase in runoff. (USGS)

  9. The Response of Sediments and Dissolved Organic Matter to Rapid Rainfall in the Santa Maria da Vitoria Watershed, Espírito Santo, BR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, N. D.; Firme de Almeida, L.; Dias, G.; Gould, R.; Tan, A.; Bianchi, T. S.; Krusche, A. V.; Keil, R. G.; Richey, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Santa Maria da Vitória River supplies over 30% of the water for the greater Vitória, Espírito Santo, BR metropolitan area, which has a population of roughly 1.6 million people. The availability of clean freshwater is severely limited during periods of heavy rainfall because water sanitation facilities are "clogged" by high sediment discharge. The headwaters of the Santa Maria da Vitória River are characterized by relatively pristine forested environments, transitioning into primarily agricultural and rural land uses, and finally reaching the large urban center of Vitória near its marine receiving waters. The discharge of suspended sediments and dissolved organic matter (DOM) was examined at a 3 hour frequency during heavy storm flows from October 2013 to May 2015 in the Santa Maria da Vitória River main channel and a small tributary, the Mangaraí River. Bulk isotopic analyses were used to determine potential sediment sources and whether specific landscape/land use features were functionalized during periods of high runoff. Likewise, time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-ToF-MS) was used to identify a broad suite of DOM compounds that responded positively with river discharge in an effort to determine the influence of land use on the delivery of dissolved components to the river. For example, the abundance of compounds related to specific agricultural settings increased during storm flow along with anthropogenic DOM sources such as plasticizer and pesticide-derived compounds. Suspended sediment concentrations increased by as much as 70 times during peak river discharge relative to base flow several days earlier with similar increases in particulate organic carbon and nitrogen observed. Results from this study and previous field measurements were integrated into a coupled hydrology-sediment transport model, DHSVM, as part of a dynamic information framework with the goal of predicting water/sediment discharge to inform management and policy sectors of the

  10. Anomalous South Pacific lithosphere dynamics derived from new total sediment thickness estimates off the West Antarctic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wobbe, Florian; Lindeque, Ansa; Gohl, Karsten

    2014-12-01

    Paleotopographic models of the West Antarctic margin, which are essential for robust simulations of paleoclimate scenarios, lack information on sediment thickness and geodynamic conditions, resulting in large uncertainties. A new total sediment thickness grid spanning the Ross Sea-Amundsen Sea-Bellingshausen Sea basins is presented and is based on all the available seismic reflection, borehole, and gravity modeling data offshore West Antarctica. This grid was combined with NGDC's global 5 arc minute grid of ocean sediment thickness (Whittaker et al., 2013) and extends the NGDC grid further to the south. Sediment thickness along the West Antarctic margin tends to be 3-4 km larger than previously assumed. The sediment volume in the Bellingshausen, Amundsen, and Ross Sea basins amounts to 3.61, 3.58, and 2.78 million km3, respectively. The residual basement topography of the South Pacific has been revised and the new data show an asymmetric trend over the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge. Values are anomalously high south of the spreading ridge and in the Ross Sea area, where the topography seems to be affected by persistent mantle processes. In contrast, the basement topography offshore Marie Byrd Land cannot be attributed to dynamic topography, but rather to crustal thickening due to intraplate volcanism. Present-day dynamic topography models disagree with the presented revised basement topography of the South Pacific, rendering paleotopographic reconstructions with such a limited dataset still fairly uncertain.

  11. Effects of urbanization and long-term rainfall on the occurrence of organic compounds and trace elements in reservoir sediment cores, streambed sediment, and fish tissue from the Santa Ana River basin, California, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Carmen A.

    2002-01-01

    Organcochlorine compounds, semivolatile-organic compounds (SVOC), and trace elements were analyzed in reservoir sediment cores, streambed sediment, and fish tissue in the Santa Ana River Basin as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Three reservoirs were sampled in areas that have different degrees of urbanization. Streambed sediment and fish tissue collected at 12 sites were divided into two groups, urban and nonurban. More organochlorine compounds were detected in reservoir sediment cores, streambed sediment and fish tissue, and at higher concentrations at urban sites than at nonurban sites. At all sites, except West Street Basin, concentrations of organochlorine compounds were lower than the probable-effect concentration (PEC). At the highly urbanized West Street Basin, chlordane and p,p'-DDE exceeded the PEC throughout the historical record. The less stringent threshold-effect concentration (TEC) was exceeded for six compounds at eight sites. Most of the organochlorine compounds detected in streambed sediment and fish tissue were at urban sites on the Santa Ana River as opposed to its tributaries, suggesting accumulation and persistence in the river. More SVOCs were detected in reservoir sediment cores and streambed sediment, and at higher concentrations, at urban sites than at nonurban sites. At all the sites, except West Street Basin, concentrations of SVOCs were lower than the PEC. At West Street Basin, chrysene, pyrene, and total polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons exceeded the PEC throughout the historical record. The TEC was exceeded for 10 compounds at 3 sites. Most of the SVOCs were detected in streambed sediment at urban sites on tributaries to the Santa Ana River rather than the mainstem itself. The less frequent occurrence and lower concentrations in the Santa Ana River suggest that SVOCs are less persistent than organochlorine compounds, possibly as a result of volatization, gradation, or dilution. Most trace

  12. Potential for generation of natural gas in sediments of the convergent margin of the Aleutian Trench Area

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; von Huene, R.

    1983-01-01

    Sediment being subducted in the eastern part of the convergent margin of the Aleutian Trench has a potential to generate large volumes of natural gas, perhaps as much as 2.8 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/ of methane per km/sup 3/ of sediment, even though the content of organic carbon in the sediment is very low, averaging about 0.4%. This high potential for gas generation results primarily from the enormous volume of sediment undergoing subduction. Along the eastern Aleutian Arc-Trench system a 3-km thick sheet of sediment is being subducted at a rate of about 60 km per million years. We estimate, based on considerations of the stability requirements for gas hydrates observed as anomalous reflectors in some of our seismic records, and on one measurement in a deep well, that the geothermal gradient in this region is about 30/sup 0/C/km. Such a gradient suggests a temperature regime in which the maximum gas generation in the subducting sediment occurs beneath the upper slope. Thus the sediment of the upper slope, as opposed to that of the shelf and lower slope, could be the most prospective for gas accumulation if suitable reservoirs are present. 40 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Response of infaunal macrobenthos to the sediment granulometry in a tropical continental margin southwest coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraj, K. A.; Sheeba, P.; Jacob, Josia; Revichandran, C.; Arun, P. K.; Praseeda, K. S.; Nisha, P. A.; Rasheed, K. A.

    2008-05-01

    Surficial sediment samples, collected from the continental margin of the southwest coast of India in July 2004, were examined for the grain size and soft-bottom macrobenthic fauna, to understand the sediment granulometry and its effect on the faunal distribution. Samples were collected using Smith-McIntyre Grab, from 20 to 200 m depth range, consisting of mid-shelf, outer shelf and slope. Fine-grained sediment located in the mid shelf and supported low faunal abundance. Polychaetes constituted the bulk of the fauna. Feeding guild changed with depth and sediment granulometry. Coexistence of deposit feeders and carnivores in outer shelf and deposit feeders and filter feeders in the slope region indicated the effective utilization of different food resources. In general, richness and diversity were high in the southern region. Depth wise, the diversity and abundance were relatively high in the 50-75 m depth range. Correlation and BIO-ENV analysis showed that combination of different factors such as sediment texture, sediment sorting and depth were found to influence the distribution of macrobenthos. Hence, spatial variations observed in benthic community were presumably linked to the variations in sediment granulometry and the energy level conditions prevailing in the area.

  14. Morphology, seismic characteristics and development of the sediment dispersal system along the Taiwan-Luzon convergent margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, Kan-Hsi; Su, Chih-Chieh; Yu, Ho-Shing; Chang, Jih-Hsin

    2015-12-01

    The sediment dispersal system along the convergent margin between Taiwan and Luzon links the terrestrial and shallow marine sediments from the source areas nearby Taiwan orogen to the ultimate sink in the northern Manila Trench. Using seismic reflection profiles and bathymetry mapping we determine three distinct morpho-tectonic features of the Penghu Submarine Canyon, deep-sea Penghu Channel and oceanic Manila Trench which are linearly interconnected to form a longitudinal sediment route. Seismic profiles show characteristic features of truncated strata along canyon walls and cut-and-fills in canyon bottom. Deformed and uplifted bathymetric ridges and troughs and volcanic intrusions with unstratified and chaotic seismic facies are associated with the Penghu Channel. The seismic facies of the trench wedge are characterized by sub-horizontal and conformable layers of sediment stacking upwards to the trench floor. The sediment wedge adjacent to the inner lower slope is deformed to blind folds and thrust faults as precursors of the accretionary prism. The most prominent seismic characteristics is wide-spread undulating reflectors on the seafloor along the west edge of the sediment dispersal system and the toe of the South China Sea Basin floor, suggesting a large sediment wave field with a turbidity currents origin. The location, orientation and geometry of this sediment routing system are mainly controlled by underlying tectonics in progressive changes from arc-continental collision in transition to subduction. The deep-sea Penghu Channel is formed by compression in transitional zone of the North Luzon Ridge region, neither subduction nor channel erosion. The sediments in northern Manila Trench are mainly transported by turbidity currents via the upslope deep-sea Penghu Channel and Penghu Canyon and trench axis is filled up to a flat-floor trench wedge without sediment ponding. A four-stage development of sediment dispersal system in Taiwan-Luzon convergent margin

  15. Biogenic magnetite, detrital hematite, and relative paleointensity in Quaternary sediments from the Southwest Iberian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channell, J. E. T.; Hodell, D. A.; Margari, V.; Skinner, L. C.; Tzedakis, P. C.; Kesler, M. S.

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic properties of late Quaternary sediments on the SW Iberian Margin are dominated by bacterial magnetite, observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with contributions from detrital titanomagnetite and hematite. Reactive hematite, together with low organic matter concentrations and the lack of sulfate reduction, lead to dissimilatory iron reduction and availability of Fe(II) for abundant magnetotactic bacteria. Magnetite grain-size proxies (κARM/κ and ARM/IRM) and S-ratios (sensitive to hematite) vary on stadial/interstadial timescales, contain orbital power, and mimic planktic δ18O. The detrital/biogenic magnetite ratio and hematite concentration are greater during stadials and glacial isotopic stages, reflecting increased detrital (magnetite) input during times of lowered sea level, coinciding with atmospheric conditions favoring hematitic dust supply. Magnetic susceptibility, on the other hand, has a very different response being sensitive to coarse detrital multidomain (MD) magnetite associated with ice-rafted debris (IRD). High susceptibility and/or magnetic grain-size coarsening, mark Heinrich stadials (HS), particularly HS2, HS3, HS4, HS5, HS6 and HS7, as well as older Heinrich-like detrital layers, indicating the sensitivity of this region to fluctuations in the position of the polar front. Relative paleointensity (RPI) records have well-constrained age models based on planktic δ18O correlation to ice-core chronologies, however, they differ from reference records (e.g. PISO) particularly in the vicinity of glacial maxima, mainly due to inefficient normalization of RPI records in intervals of enhanced hematite input.

  16. Early Neogene unroofing of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta along the Bucaramanga -Santa Marta Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piraquive Bermúdez, Alejandro; Pinzón, Edna; Bernet, Matthias; Kammer, Andreas; Von Quadt, Albrecht; Sarmiento, Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    Plate interaction between Caribbean and Nazca plates with Southamerica gave rise to an intricate pattern of tectonic blocks in the Northandean realm. Among these microblocks the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (SNSM) represents a fault-bounded triangular massif composed of a representative crustal section of the Northandean margin, in which a Precambrian to Late Paleozoic metamorphic belt is overlain by a Triassic to Jurassic magmatic arc and collateral volcanic suites. Its western border fault belongs to the composite Bucaramanga - Santa Marta fault with a combined left lateral-normal displacement. SE of Santa Marta it exposes remnants of an Oligocene marginal basin, which attests to a first Cenoizoic activation of this crustal-scale lineament. The basin fill consists of a sequence of coarse-grained cobble-pebble conglomerates > 1000 m thick that unconformably overlay the Triassic-Jurassic magmatic arc. Its lower sequence is composed of interbedded siltstones; topwards the sequence becomes dominated by coarser fractions. These sedimentary sequences yields valuable information about exhumation and coeval sedimentation processes that affected the massif's western border since the Upper Eocene. In order to analyse uplifting processes associated with tectonics during early Neogene we performed detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology, detrital thermochronology of zircon and apatites coupled with the description of a stratigraphic section and its facies composition. We compared samples from the Aracataca basin with analog sequences found at an equivalent basin at the Oca Fault at the northern margin of the SNSM. Our results show that sediments of both basins were sourced from Precambrian gneisses, along with Mesozoic acid to intermediate plutons; sedimentation started in the Upper Eocene-Oligocene according to palynomorphs, subsequently in the Upper Oligocene a completion of Jurassic to Cretaceous sources was followed by an increase of Precambrian input that became the dominant

  17. Breaks in Pavement and Pipes as Indicators of Range-Front Faulting Resulting from the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake near the Southwest Margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Kevin M.; Ellen, Stephen D.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Peterson, David M.; Phelps, Geoffery A.

    1995-01-01

    Damage to pavement and near-surface utility pipes, caused by the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake, provide indicators for ground deformation in a 663 km2 area near the southwest margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California. The spatial distribution of 1284 sites of such damage documents the extent and distribution of detectable ground deformation. Damage was concentrated in four zones, three of which are near previously mapped faults. The zone through Los Gatos showed the highest concentration of damage, as well as evidence for pre- and post-earthquake deformation. Damage along the foot of the Santa Cruz Mountains reflected shortening that is consistent with movement along reverse faults in the region and with the hypothesis that tectonic strain is distributed widely across numerous faults in the California Coast Ranges.

  18. Quantifying the role of sandy-silty sediments in generating slope failures during earthquakes: example from the Algerian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Gabriela; Sultan, Nabil; Savoye, Bruno; Deverchere, Jacques; Yelles, Karim

    2009-06-01

    The Algerian margin is a seismically active region, where during the last century, several large magnitude earthquakes took place. This study combines geotechnical and sedimentological data with numerical modelling to quantitatively assess the present-day slope stability of the Algerian margin. Geotechnical laboratory tests, such as cyclic triaxial tests, oedometric tests and vane shear tests were carried out on sediment cores collected on the study area. The liquefaction potential of a sediment column located about 30 km from the Boumerdès earthquake epicentre of 21st May 2003 was evaluated theoretically for an earthquake of M w = 6.8. We show that thin sand and silt beds such as those described on recovered sediment cores are the main cause of sediment deformation and liquefaction during earthquakes. Numerical calculations showed that the slope failure may occur during an earthquake characterised by a PGA in excess of 0.1 g, and also that, under a PGA of 0.2 g liquefaction could be triggered in shallow silty-sandy deposits. Moreover, comparison of the predicted slope failure with failure geometries inferred from seafloor morphology showed that earthquakes and subsequent mass movements could explain the present-day morphology of the study area.

  19. Historical changes in terrestrially derived organic carbon inputs to Louisiana continental margin sediments over the past 150 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampere, Troy P.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Allison, Mead A.

    2011-03-01

    Major rivers (and associated deltaic environments) provide the dominant pathway for the input of terrestrial-derived organic carbon in sediments (TOCT) to the ocean. Natural watershed processes and land-use changes are important in dictating the amount and character of carbon being buried on continental margins. Seven core sites were occupied on the Louisiana continental margin aboard the R/V Pelican in July 2003 along two major sediment transport pathways south and west of the Mississippi River mouth. Lignin profiles in these age-dated cores (210Pb geochronology) indicate artificial reservoir retention as a primary control on organic carbon quantity and quality reaching the margin post-1950, whereas pre-1950 sediments may reflect soil erosion due to land clearing and farming practices. Lignin (Λ8) concentrations (range 0.2 to 1.7) also indicate that TOCT delivery rates/decay processes have probably remained relatively consistent from proximal to distal stations along transects. The down-core profile at the Canyon station seems to be temporally linked and connected to inner shelf deposition, suggestive of rapid cross-shelf transport. Sources of terrestrially derived organic carbon were reflective of mixed angiosperms over the last 150 years in cores west and south of the Mississippi River delta. The lignin-phenol vegetation index (LPVI) (range 130.0 to 510) proved to be a sensitive indicator of source changes in these sediments and eliminated some of the variability compared to C/V (range 0.01 to 0.4) and S/V (range 0.9 to 2.1) ratios. Stochastic events such as hurricanes and large river floods have a measurable, albeit ephemeral, effect on the shelf TOCT record. Burial of TOCT on the river-dominated Louisiana continental margin is largely driven by anthropogenic land-use alterations in the last 150 years. Land-use changes in the Mississippi River basin and river damming have likely affected carbon cycling and TOCT burial on the Louisiana continental margin over a

  20. Lipid Biomarkers and Carbon Isotopic Composition from Authigenic Carbonates and Seep Sediments from the US Mid-Atlantic Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, P.; Prouty, N.; Demopoulos, A. W.; Roark, B.; Coykendall, K.

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by Archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria, is common in continental margin sediment and can result in authigenic carbonate precipitation. A lipid biomarker study was undertaken in Mid-Atlantic submarine canyons, focusing specifically on Baltimore and Norfolk canyons, to determine biomarker variability of carbonate rock and the associated sediment in cold seep communities dominated by chemosynthetic mussels, Bathymodiolus childressi. Preliminary 16S metagenomic results confirm the presence of free-living sulfur-reducing bacteria and methantrophic endosymbiotic bacteria in the mussels. Depleted d13C values in both the mussel tissue (-63 ‰) and authigenic carbonates (-48 ‰) support methanotrophy as the dominant nutritional pathway and AOM as the main driver of carbonate precipitation. In addition, paired 14C and 230Th dates are highly discordant, reflecting dilution of the 14C pool with fossil hydrocarbon derived carbon. Seep and canyon sediment, as well as authigenic carbonates, were collected and analyzed for a suite of biomarkers, including sterols, alcohols, alkanes and fatty acids, as well as δ13C values of select biomarkers, to elucidate pathways of organic matter cycling. A comparison of terrestrial biomarker signatures (e.g., n-alkane carbon preference index and C23 / (C23 + C29) values, HMW n-alkanes and C29 sterols) suggests that terrestrial inputs dominate the submarine canyon surface sediment, whereas seep sediment is predominantly marine autochthonous (i.e., cholesterol and 5α-cholestanol). Lipid biomarker profiles (e.g., n-alkanes in the C15 to C33 range) from authigenic carbonates mirror those found in the seep sediment, suggesting that the organisms mediating carbonate precipitation on the seafloor are characteristic of the assemblages present in the sediment at these sites. With widespread methane leakage recently discovered along the Atlantic Margin, the presence of AOM-mediated carbonate

  1. Precipitation of authigenic uranium in suboxic continental margin sediments from the Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Wang, Zhong-Liang; Kato, Yoshihisa

    2006-02-01

    Concentrations of U and Th isotopes in Okinawa Trough and East China Sea sediment cores were determined by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) to investigate the behavior of redox sensitive uranium in suboxic hemipelagic sediments and determine their significance in oceanic uranium balance. 238U concentrations and 238U/ 232Th activity ratios in the East China Sea sediments showed no remarkable variation with depth. However, 238U and 238U/ 232Th ratios in the Okinawa Trough sediments were low in the surface oxidizing layer but increased where the suboxic condition was encountered. The distribution profiles of 230Th and 232Th concentrations were relatively constant with depth in both the Okinawa Trough and East China Sea sediment cores. These results suggested that there has been post-depositional precipitation of authigenic uranium within the suboxic Okinawa Trough sediment column. The post-depositional precipitation rates of authigenic uranium were estimated to be 47 ± 5 to >62 ± 8 ng cm -2 yr -1; these rates were comparable to those previously reported for several anoxic sediments. A mechanism controlling precipitation of uranium may be the downward diffusion of uranium U(VI), reduction to U(IV) and finally precipitation onto the solid phase. The accumulation rate of uranium for the Okinawa Trough sediments was approximately eight times higher than the world average rate reported for suboxic sediments. This removal of uranium in the oceanic budget increases the importance of the suboxic sediment sink.

  2. Community Proteogenomics of a Cold-methane Seep Sediment at Nyegga, Mid-Norwegian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokke, R.; Roalkvam, I.; Lanzen, A.; Chen, Y.; Haflidason, H.; Steen, I.

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is limited to anoxic environments and differs in its rates from a few pmol cm-3day-1 in subsurface SMTZ (sulfate-methane transition zone) of deep margins, to a few μmol cm-3 day-1 in surface sediments above gas hydrates [1]. This process is catalyzed by consortia of anaerobic methane oxidizing archaea (ANME) in association with sulfate-reducing bacteria. The Nyegga area is located on the Mid-Norwegian continental slope at the northern flank of the Storegga Slide at 700-800 mbsl. Hundreds of pockmarks are widespread on the seabed in Nyegga and sub-zero temperatures (-0.7 °C), and pingo-structures within the pockmarks are indicators of active fluid flow locations. Preliminary microbial and geochemical profiling of a 22 cm push-core within the G11 pockmark gave strong indications of an ANME-1 dominated community at 14-16 cmbsf. In light of these findings we submitted extracted DNA to 454-pyrosequencing. Sequencing data (829,527 reads) was assembled using the Newbler v2.3, resulting in 13,151 contigs (357,530 reads) over 500 bp with the longest contig being 24,521 bp. MEGAN taxonomic analysis supported the high abundance of Euryarchaea (70%) with 66% of the assembled metagenome belonging to ANME-1. In order to obtain functional information of the ANME-1 community, protein extraction protocols from sediment samples was established. Extracted proteins was separated on a large (18cm) 1D-SDS-PAGE and subsequently cut in 30 gel slices. Peptides extracted after In-gel tryptic digest was injected into an Ultimate 3000 nanoLC system connected to a linear quadropole ion trap-orbitrap (LTQ-Orbitrap XL) mass spectrometer equipped with a nanoelectrospray ion source. A custom database of open reading frames (ORFs) from the metagenome including known contaminants such as trypsin and human keratin was search against using Mascot 2.2. IRMa tool box [2] was used in peptide validation and peptides whose score >= 25.0 (i.e avg identity, p<0.05) and

  3. Subseafloor microbial communities in methane hydrate-bearing sediment at two distinct locations (ODP Leg204) in the cascadia margin.

    PubMed

    Nunoura, Takuro; Inagaki, Fumio; Delwiche, Mark E; Colwell, Frederick S; Takai, Ken

    2008-01-01

    The prokaryotic communities in deep subseafloor sediment collected during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204 from the South Hydrate Ridge (SHR) on the Cascadia Margin were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene clone sequencing and a fluorescent quantitative PCR technique. The microbial communities came from sites with contrasting geological characteristics on the SHR: sites 1244 and 1245 (located on the flank of the ridge, hydrate-rich sediment) and site 1251 (located on the slope basin of SHR, hydrate-poor sediment). The overall copy numbers of the 16S rRNA gene, and the proportion of archaeal 16S rRNA gene in all 16S rRNA gene community in sediment were larger on the slope basin than on the flank of the SHR. Archaeal community structure around the sulfate-methane transition zone at site 1251 (4.5 mbsf) was intensively investigated using two different PCR primer sets. A relatively abundant distribution of the 16S rRNA gene sequences related to mesophilic methanogen of the genus Methanoculleus was identified at a depth of 43.2 mbsf, and suggested that the methanogens occur in relatively shallow zones of sediment. This study demonstrated that the subseafloor microbial communities shown by 16S rRNA gene clone analyses were not directly associated with subseafloor methane hydrate deposits. PMID:21558725

  4. Sedimentation processes on the Mid Norwegian margin during the last 40ka: impact of ice sheet fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekens, W. A. H.; Sejrup, H. P.; Haflidason, H.

    2003-04-01

    The Mid-Norwegian margin is characterized by large-scale geological processes during the Late Quaternary, such as glacigenic debris flows, turbidites, huge translational slides, contourites and large-scale hemipelagic deposits. By using high resolution cores and seismic data these processes are further characterized and both their timing and interrelation are presented for the last 40ka. It has been found that the deposition of glacigenic debris flows is associated with advances of the Norwegian Channel Ice Stream (NCIS). These events are followed by large scale meltwater plume deposition, which was later partly redeposited downslope in the Storegga slide. The influence of meltwater on the oxygen isotope records is widely shown within the region and large plumite deposits have been recognized from X-ray and high resolution seismic profiles. It has been suggested that northward currents shaped the sediment plume along the Mid Norwegian margin. The sedimentation rates and bulk accumulation rates show the variability of deposition and input to the margin and are mainly governed by the changes in deglaciation rate of the Fennoscandian ice sheet and the regional weathering rate on the surrounding mainland.

  5. Activities and distribution of methanogenic and methane-oxidizing microbes in marine sediments from the Cascadia Margin.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, H; Maruyama, A; Nakamura, T; Higashi, Y; Fuse, H; Sakata, S; Bartlett, D H

    2010-06-01

    We investigated methane production and oxidation and the depth distribution and phylogenetic affiliation of a functional gene for methanogenesis, methyl coenzyme M reductase subunit A (mcrA), at two sites of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 311. These sites, U1327 and U1329, are respectively inside and outside the area of gas hydrate distribution on the Cascadia Margin. Radiotracer experiments using (14)C-labelled substrates indicated high potential methane production rates in hydrate-bearing sediments [128-223 m below seafloor (mbsf)] at U1327 and in sediments between 70 and 140 mbsf at U1329. Tracer-free experiments indicated high cumulative methane production in sediments within and below the gas hydrate layer at U1327 and in sediments below 70 mbsf at U1329. Stable tracer experiments using (13)C-labelled methane showed high potential methane oxidation rates in near-surface sediments and in sediments deeper than 100 mbsf at both sites. Results of polymerase chain reaction amplification of mcrA in DNA were mostly consistent with methane production: relatively strong mcrA amplification was detected in the gas hydrate-bearing sediments at U1327, whereas at U1329, it was mainly detected in sediments from around the bottom-simulating reflector (126 mbsf). Phylogenetic analysis of mcrA separated it into four phylotype clusters: two clusters of methanogens, Methanosarcinales and Methanobacteriales, and two clusters of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea, ANME-I and ANME-II groups, supporting the activity measurement results. These results reveal that in situ methanogenesis in deep sediments probably contributes to gas hydrate formation and are inconsistent with the geochemical model that microbial methane currently being generated in shallow sediments migrates downward and contributes to the hydrate formation. At Site U1327, gas hydrates occurred in turbidite sediments, which were absent at Site U1329, suggesting that a geological setting suitable for a

  6. Rheological implications of sediment transport for continental rifting and its impact in margin geometry and major unconformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres-Martinez, Miguel; Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Armitage, John; Morgan, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The inner dynamics of the Earth such as mantle convection, geochemical reactions and isostasy have been typically interpreted as the main engine of plate tectonics and crustal deformation. However, nowadays it is well established that processes transporting material along the surface of the Earth influence the inner dynamics. Surface processes play a key role particularly during rifting, where great subsidence rates occur at synrift basins while shoulder uplift provides rock to be eroded for later infilling of these basins. Erosion implies unloading of the crust which favours uplift, and sedimentation at basins results in loading which favours subsidence. Consequently, erosion and sedimentation amplify stresses and the flexural response of the lithosphere in situations with extensive faulting. These changes to the stress field may be large enough to result in changes in the evolution of rifting and its modes of extension. Additionally, higher subsidence rates and thermal blanketing due to sediments may result in higher geotherms and consequently, a weaker/more-viscous behaviour of the crustal rocks. This would also have a large impact on the deformation style during extension. Here, we explore the interactions between surface processes and tectonics using numerical modelling. Experiments are run with the absence of sediment transport and with different sediment transport regimes for 35 and 40 km crustal thicknesses. Tests with higher transport coefficient show more effective localization of deformation into upper crustal faults which results in effective crustal thinning, larger blocks and longer-lived faults. Our experiments also prove that more effective surface processes reduce the length of margins generated by sequential faulting. For our end member situations, high sedimentation rates lead to pure shear extension of the crust induced by high temperatures, which finally results in broad extension and symmetric margins. Furthermore, our model allows for the

  7. Shelf-margin sedimentation in Wilcox group, south-central Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, P.; Lemoine, R.C.; Moslow, T.F.

    1986-09-01

    Two well-defined trends of Wilcox oil and gas production occur in Louisiana: an updip dip-oriented trend and a downdip strike-oriented trend. The downdip trend delineates an uppermost Wilcox shelf margin and includes recent discoveries at Lockhart Crossing field and the long-established Fordoche field. This Wilcox shelf margin is adjacent to carbonate reef trends that formed a stable shelf margin throughout central Louisiana during the early Cretaceous. Shelf-margin locations remained essentially unchanged at least through the late Paleocene, by which time Wilcox clastics began to prograde out to and beyond the established margin. The depositional features of this progradational episode reflect the unstable nature of the shelf margin and a high wave-energy environment. Shelf-margin processes were responsible for the formation of a regional syndepositional normal fault system, the incision and subsequent infilling of a major submarine canyon system, and the development of stacked paralic sequences. The submarine canyon system is manifest as a mudstone-filled channel in St. Landry Parish where it reaches a maximum thickness of 1000 ft and is up to 12 mi wide. Lower to middle shoreface facies of the stacked paralic sequences constitute the primary reservoir sandstones for both Lockhart Crossing and Fordoche fields. The major producing intervals of both fields belong to two discrete sandstone bodies that are at least 30-40 mi long, 6-7 mi wide, and 30-40 ft thick, and are analogous to late Quaternary Gulf Coast shelf-margin deltas. The co-occurrence of these laterally continuous thick sandstones, favorable structural trapping mechanisms, and previous performance suggest a high potential for future exploration along this and other Gulf Coast Tertiary shelf-margin trends.

  8. The eastern Gulf of Aden: A case study for the setting up of the deep-sea gravity sedimentation on a young continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baurion, Celine; Zaragosi, Sebastien; Leroy, Sylvie; Gorini, Christian; Lucazeau, Francis; Migeon, Sebastien; Garlan, Thierry

    2013-04-01

    The study of sedimentary processes across a young and segmented passive margin under the influence of the Asian monsoon-climate, provide a potential record of tectonic, climatic and high-resolution eustatic events. The northern margin of the eastern Gulf of Aden is one of the world rare examples to study the setting up of gravity sedimentation in a deep basin and the related control parameters. Using multibeam data, Chirp profiles, and sediment cores, we show that this gravity sedimentation highlights the importance of flooding of wadis on the sediment transfer from onshore to the deep basin. The drainage network is not mature on this starved margin, which is affected by post-rift uplift. The main channelized turbidite systems are localized in the western part of the margin, while mass-transport deposits and sheet turbidite deposits are concentrated along the eastern part of the margin affected by a late post-rift uplift. The deep-basin sedimentation is composed of many coarse-grained carbonate turbidites that are related to the lithology of the onshore sedimentary cover. The central part of the uplifted margin does not exhibit coarse-grained turbidites since about 70 ka BP, while the eastern part displays turbidites until recently. This monsoon-influenced margin is characterized by strong along-strike variability in tectonics and fluvial input distribution that might directly influence and segment the gravity sedimentation: (i) the western channelized turbidite system formation depend mainly of the wide catchment area onshore in combination with the geometry of the deep basin; (ii) the starved part of the margin, characterized by mass-transport deposits is mainly controlled by the post-rift uplift; (iii) along the eastern part of the uplifted margin, the unchannelized turbidite deposits seem to be primarily controlled by the presence of a well-developed continental shelf combined to the late uplift impact on the sedimentary supply.

  9. Environmental Conditions Outweigh Geographical Contiguity in Determining the Similarity of nifH-Harboring Microbial Communities in Sediments of Two Disconnected Marginal Seas.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haixia; Dang, Hongyue; Klotz, Martin G

    2016-01-01

    Ecological evidence suggests that heterotrophic diazotrophs fueled by organic carbon respiration in sediments play an important role in marine nitrogen fixation. However, fundamental knowledge about the identities, abundance, diversity, biogeography, and controlling environmental factors of nitrogen-fixing communities in open ocean sediments is still elusive. Surprisingly, little is known also about nitrogen-fixing communities in sediments of the more research-accessible marginal seas. Here we report on an investigation of the environmental geochemistry and putative diazotrophic microbiota in the sediments of Bohai Sea, an eutrophic marginal sea of the western Pacific Ocean. Diverse and abundant nifH gene sequences were identified and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were found to be the dominant putative nitrogen-fixing microbes. Community statistical analyses suggested bottom water temperature, bottom water chlorophyll a content (or the covarying turbidity) and sediment porewater Eh (or the covarying pH) as the most significant environmental factors controlling the structure and spatial distribution of the putative diazotrophic communities, while sediment Hg content, sulfide content, and porewater [Formula: see text]-Si content were identified as the key environmental factors correlated positively with the nifH gene abundance in Bohai Sea sediments. Comparative analyses between the Bohai Sea and the northern South China Sea (nSCS) identified a significant composition difference of the putative diazotrophic communities in sediments between the shallow-water (estuarine and nearshore) and deep-water (offshore and deep-sea) environments, and sediment porewater dissolved oxygen content, water depth and in situ temperature as the key environmental factors tentatively controlling the species composition, community structure, and spatial distribution of the marginal sea sediment nifH-harboring microbiota. This confirms the ecophysiological specialization and niche

  10. Relation between denudation history and sediment supply from apatite fission track thermochronology in the northeast Brazilian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinek, Andrea; Chemale, Farid; Bueno, Gilmar

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a quantitative overview of Mesozoic-Cenozoic morphotectonic evolution and sediment supply to the northeast Brazilian margin. Landscape evolution and denudation histories for the northeastern Brazilian continental margin (Sergipe, Alagoas, Bahia, and Espírito Santo states) were detailed by apatite fission track thermochronology and thermal-history modeling and related with the sedimentological record of the offshore basins of the passive margin for a comparison with their denudational history. Approximately one hundred basement samples were analyzed from the coast to the inland of the Brazilian margin. The apparent fission track ages vary from 360 to 61 Ma and confined fission track lengths vary between 10 and 14.6 µm, indicating that not all of the samples recorded the same cooling events. The results of apatite fission track ages indicate that the area has been eroded regionally since the Mesozoic (< 250 Ma) and suggest that at less 4 km of overburden has been eroded regionally since the late Cretaceous (< 120 Ma) at a rate of 120 to 15 m/Ma. Two-stage of erosion process is deduced from simulated cooling histories for each sector. The Permian-Early Jurassic exhumation is restricted to the area of the Sertaneja Depression, besides the Diamantina Plateau. During this time, denudation rates are generally <20 m My-1 and record up to 1.5 km of denudation. Pre-rift sedimentation is recorded in the Camamu-Almada, Recôncavo, and Sergipe-Alagoas basins. Samples from the Conquista and Borborema Plateaus, and Mantiqueira Range record a Cretaceous-Paleogene onset of exhumation. This timing is consistent with the offshore sedimentary record, wherein a large clastic wedge started forming in the northeastern Sergipe-Alagoas basin, which suggests Sergipe-Alagoas basin records drainage reorganization and extension of the São Francisco River catchment. Interestingly, the Camamu basin, adjacent to the section of the margin does not record syn

  11. Radiocarbon Evidence for Active Turnover of Pore-Water Dissolved Organic Carbon in the Methanogenic and Sulfate-Methane-Transition Zones of Santa Barbara Basin Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komada, T.; Li, H. L.; Cada, A. K.; Burdige, D.; Magen, C.; Chanton, J.; Grose, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Diverse metabolic activities have been documented in the deep biosphere. However, how these activities affect carbon cycling in the subsurface, and how they in turn affect the marine and global cycles of carbon are still unclear. Here we present natural-abundance 14C and 13C data from the uppermost 4.5 m of the sediments of the Santa Barbara Basin, California Borderland, showing active turnover of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) within, and immediately below, the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ; ~1.25 m). DOC concentrations increased with depth throughout the core, indicating net production within the sediment column. Enhanced DOC production was observed near the sediment-water interface, and also at ~30 cm below the SMTZ (~1.55 m). ∆14C values of DOC increased across the sediment-water interface, then decreased with depth, consistent with net production of modern DOC near the sediment-water interface, and input of 14C-depleted DOC from deeper horizons. An isotope mixing plot constructed with these data shows that the DOC diffusing upward at the base of the core is devoid of 14C, yet the DOC diffusing into and out of the SMTZ is relatively enriched (-460‰ and -300‰, respectively). This difference in 14C content of the DOC flux can only be reconciled if the following two are occurring within, and immediately below, the SMTZ: (1) >90% of the 14C-dead basal DOC flux is removed from the pore water (by, e.g., oxidation, fermentation, methanogenesis, precipitation), and (2) this DOC is replaced by material produced in this region at a rate that exceeds the upward basal flux. The 14C and 13C signatures suggest sedimentary organic matter to be the dominant source of DOC in process (2). Our data provide a unique insight into the active transformation of DOC and sedimentary organic matter in the subsurface.

  12. Estimates of Biogenic Methane Production Rates in Deep Marine Sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Margin

    SciTech Connect

    F. S. Colwell; S. Boyd; M. E. Delwiche; D. W. Reed; T. J. Phelps; D. T. Newby

    2008-06-01

    Methane hydrate found in marine sediments is thought to contain gigaton quantities of methane and is considered an important potential fuel source and climate-forcing agent. Much of the methane in hydrates is biogenic, so models that predict the presence and distribution of hydrates require accurate rates of in situ methanogenesis. We estimated the in situ methanogenesis rates in Hydrate Ridge (HR) sediments by coupling experimentally derived minimal rates of methanogenesis to methanogen biomass determinations for discrete locations in the sediment column. When starved in a biomass recycle reactor Methanoculleus submarinus produced ca. 0.017 fmol methane/cell/day. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) directed at the methyl coenzyme M reductase subunit A (mcrA) gene indicated that 75% of the HR sediments analyzed contained <1000 methanogens/g. The highest methanogen numbers were mostly from sediments <10 meters below seafloor. By combining methanogenesis rates for starved methanogens (adjusted to account for in situ temperatures) and the numbers of methanogens at selected depths we derived an upper estimate of <4.25 fmol methane produced/g sediment/day for the samples with fewer methanogens than the QPCR method could detect. The actual rates could vary depending on the real number of methanogens and various seafloor parameters that influence microbial activity. However, our calculated rate is lower than rates previously reported from such sediments and close to the rate derived using geochemical modeling of the sediments. These data will help to improve models that predict microbial gas generation in marine sediments and determine the potential influence of this source of methane on the global carbon cycle.

  13. Estimates of biogenic methane production rates in deep marine sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia margin.

    PubMed

    Colwell, F S; Boyd, S; Delwiche, M E; Reed, D W; Phelps, T J; Newby, D T

    2008-06-01

    Methane hydrate found in marine sediments is thought to contain gigaton quantities of methane and is considered an important potential fuel source and climate-forcing agent. Much of the methane in hydrates is biogenic, so models that predict the presence and distribution of hydrates require accurate rates of in situ methanogenesis. We estimated the in situ methanogenesis rates in Hydrate Ridge (HR) sediments by coupling experimentally derived minimal rates of methanogenesis to methanogen biomass determinations for discrete locations in the sediment column. When starved in a biomass recycle reactor, Methanoculleus submarinus produced ca. 0.017 fmol methane/cell/day. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) directed at the methyl coenzyme M reductase subunit A gene (mcrA) indicated that 75% of the HR sediments analyzed contained <1,000 methanogens/g. The highest numbers of methanogens were found mostly from sediments <10 m below seafloor. By considering methanogenesis rates for starved methanogens (adjusted to account for in situ temperatures) and the numbers of methanogens at selected depths, we derived an upper estimate of <4.25 fmol methane produced/g sediment/day for the samples with fewer methanogens than the QPCR method could detect. The actual rates could vary depending on the real number of methanogens and various seafloor parameters that influence microbial activity. However, our calculated rate is lower than rates previously reported for such sediments and close to the rate derived using geochemical modeling of the sediments. These data will help to improve models that predict microbial gas generation in marine sediments and determine the potential influence of this source of methane on the global carbon cycle. PMID:18344348

  14. Margin Architecture and Sediment Flux as Controls on Submarine Fan Development: Tectonic-Climate Interactions in the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, S. P. S.; Montelli, A.; Swartz, J. M.; Morey, S.; Jaeger, J. M.; Mix, A. C.; Reece, R.; Somchat, K.; Wagner, P. F.; Worthington, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    The oblique collision of the Yakutat microplate into southeast Alaska generates the St. Elias Mountains, a coastal orogen with significant moisture from the Gulf of Alaska resulting in large, temperate glacial systems that expand to and eventually cross the continental shelf during glacial maxima. We present an overview of the evolution of sediment routing on this margin from integration of seismic images, updated age models and core-log-seismic correlations from IODP Expedition 341 drilling sites, and mapping efforts from shelf, slope, and fan. We focus on the three dominant glacial systems during the climatically important intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation at the Plio-Pleistocene transition and the further intensification of glaciation since the mid-Pleistocene transition. Along strike, sediment delivery to deepwater from the three glacial systems varied according to Pleistocene shelf accommodation space. The Alsek crossed a narrower shelf with a bedrock high near the shelf edge; the Malaspina-Hubbard system crossed an undeformed, ~1 km deep shelf; the Bering-Bagley system crossed a several km deep shelf deforming as an active fold and thrust belt. The Malaspina and Bering catchments exhibit high exhumation rates onshore due to the Yakutat collision and upon reaching the shelf edge these glaciers generate trough mouth fans (TMFs) on the adjacent continental slope but only after first filling the available accommodation with glacigenic sediment and lowering the slope gradient through progradation. The Alsek crosses the shelf earliest but never with sufficient sediment flux to generate a TMF. An east-west transition in adjacent deepwater submarine channels that feed and generate the Surveyor Fan suggests that shelf accommodation and sediment flux are primary controls on sediment routing from orogen to submarine fan. Both of these parameters are in turn a function of initial tectonic architecture and ongoing orogen dynamics.

  15. Distribution and preservation of black carbon in the East China Sea sediments: Perspectives on carbon cycling at continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Ying; Wang, Jinlong

    2016-02-01

    We determined the concentrations and radiocarbon (14C) compositions of black carbon (BC) in the sediments of the East China Sea (ECS). The BC concentrations, which were in the range of 0.30-1.52 mg/g, accounted for 12-65% of the total organic carbon (TOC). The distribution of BC in ECS sediments was controlled by factors such as grain size, distance from the coast, and deposition rate. Radiocarbon measurements of BC yielded ages of 6350-10,440 years before present (BP), suggesting that the percentage of BC derived from biomass combustion was in the range of 29-48%. The BC burial flux in sediments of the ECS was estimated to be ∼1.39×106 t/yr, which was similar to burial fluxes reported for shelf sediments in other areas. However, the magnitude of the total BC sink was far greater than that of any other shelf regions studied to date, indicating the global importance of BC accumulation in the ECS, and the magnitude of BC input from large rivers (e.g., the Changjiang). The riverine delivery of BC to the ECS (73%) was far greater than that of atmospheric flux (27%). Further study of the BC cycle and the interactions of BC with other organic compounds in marginal seas was required to better understand the role of BC in the global carbon cycle.

  16. Sediment resuspension by coastal waters: a potential mechanism for nutrient re-cycling on the ocean's margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanning, Kent A.; Carder, Kendall L.; Betzer, Peter R.

    1982-08-01

    Nutrient profiles from the continental shelf of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico indicated considerable near-bottom enrichment in silica and nitrate above coarse sediments east of the Mississippi delta. In contrast, near-bottom water of the carbonate-rich West Florida Shelf showed no such enrichmmets. Storm-related suspension apparently produced the enrichments because, in near-bottom waters south of Mobile Bay, silica, nitrate plus nitrite, and suspended load increased subbtantially as a winter storm front passed. Also, laboratory simulation of resuspension by stirring the supernatant seawater over a clay-rich core produced similar increase in silica and nitrate plus nitrite, with ammonia being the apparent precursor to the nitrate and nitrite. Most of the nutrient increase appeared to come from previously deposited sediments in the early stages of resuspension. Using the ratios of nutrients released to sediments resuspended, calculations indicate that resuspension of as little as 1 mm of shelf sediment could intermittenly augment overlying productivity by as much as 100 to 200%. Thus, resuspension may accelerate nutrient recycling on continental margins.

  17. Sediment flux history of Pearl River mouth basin, North margin of South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.

    2004-12-01

    This work estimates the solid sediment flux in Pearl River mouth basin from Cenozoic (42Ma). The estimates were derived from isopach maps, seismic reflection profiles and drill holes. Average solid sediment fluxes were calculated for six epochs approximately corresponding to geological periods: Eocene-Lower Oligocene (42-29.3), Upper Oligocene (29.3-23.8), Lower Miocene (23.8-16.4), Middle Miocene (16.4-11.2), Upper Miocene (11.2-5.32), and Pliocene-Pleistocene (5.32-0). The total sediment flux from 42 Ma is 392071.3 km3 and 0.89 km of erosion formed from the onshore drainage basin area. The average erosion rate is 22 m/ Ma. The sediment flux curve shows 3 episodes massive increase in sediment supply, i.e. Upper Oligocene, Middle Miocene and Pliocene-Pleistocene. The first increase related to the break up activity and is the product of elevated rift shoulder. The other two increase peak link to the changing of climate.

  18. Sediment core record of global fallout and Bikini close-in fallout Pu in Sagami Bay, Western Northwest Pacific margin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2004-07-01

    The total 239-240Pu activity and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio in the sediments in Sagami Bay of the western Northwest Pacific margin were investigated using ICP-MS with a shield torch system. 239+240Pu inventories in the examined sediment cores were found to be much higher than those predicted from atmospheric global fallout (42 MBq/km2) at the same latitude. In addition, elevated 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios ranging from 0.22 to 0.28 were observed in the sediment samples. On the basis of the vertical profiles of 239+240Pu and characterized 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in a sediment core collected in the center of Sagami Bay, we identified two distinct sources of fallout Pu in the bay: the global stratospheric fallout with characteristic 240Pu/239Pu ratio of 0.18 and the transported close-in fallout derived from Bikini and Enewetak surface nuclear weapon test series in the 1950s. We propose that the Pu transportation was mainly due to oceanic processes (for example, through the North Equatorial Current and the Kuroshio Current). Using a two fallout end-member model, we find that the contribution of Bikini close-in fallout Pu ranged from 44 to 59% in Sagami Bay sediments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that Pu contamination, which originated from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapon test series in the 1950s, has extended westwards as far as the Japanese coast. PMID:15296298

  19. Coupled onshore erosion and offshore sediment loading as causes of lower crust flow on the margins of South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clift, Peter D.

    2015-12-01

    Hot, thick continental crust is susceptible to ductile flow within the middle and lower crust where quartz controls mechanical behavior. Reconstruction of subsidence in several sedimentary basins around the South China Sea, most notably the Baiyun Sag, suggests that accelerated phases of basement subsidence are associated with phases of fast erosion onshore and deposition of thick sediments offshore. Working together these two processes induce pressure gradients that drive flow of the ductile crust from offshore towards the continental interior after the end of active extension, partly reversing the flow that occurs during continental breakup. This has the effect of thinning the continental crust under super-deep basins along these continental margins after active extension has finished. This is a newly recognized form of climate-tectonic coupling, similar to that recognized in orogenic belts, especially the Himalaya. Climatically modulated surface processes, especially involving the monsoon in Southeast Asia, affects the crustal structure offshore passive margins, resulting in these "load-flow basins". This further suggests that reorganization of continental drainage systems may also have a role in governing margin structure. If some crustal thinning occurs after the end of active extension this has implications for the thermal history of hydrocarbon-bearing basins throughout the area where application of classical models results in over predictions of heatflow based on observed accommodation space.

  20. Relations between tectonics and sedimentation along the Eastern Sardinian margin (Western Tyrrhenian Sea) : from rifting to reactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaullier, Virginie; Chanier, Frank; Vendeville, Bruno; Lymer, Gaël; Maillard, Agnès; Thinon, Isabelle; Lofi, Johanna; Sage, Françoise; Giresse, Pierre; Bassetti, Maria-Angela

    2014-05-01

    The offshore-onshore project "METYSS-METYSAR" aims at better understand the Miocene-Pliocene relationships between crustal tectonics, salt tectonics, and sedimentation along the Eastern Sardinian margin, Western Tyrrhenian Sea. In this key-area, the Tyrrhenian back-arc basin underwent recent rifting (9-5 Ma), pro parte coeval with the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.96-5.33 Ma), sea-floor spreading starting during Pliocene times. Thereby, the Tyrrhenian basin and the Eastern Sardinian margin are excellent candidates for studying the mechanisms of extreme lithospheric stretching and thinning, the role of pre-existing structural fabric during and after rifting, and the reactivation of a passive margin and the associated deformation and sedimentation patterns during the MSC. We looked at the respective contributions of crustal and salt tectonics in quantifying vertical and horizontal movements, using especially the seismic markers of the MSC. Overall, we delineate the history of rifting and tectonic reactivation in the area. The distribution maps respectively of the Messinian Erosion Surface and of Messinian units (Upper Unit and Mobile Unit) show that a rifted basin already existed by Messinian time. This reveals a major pre-MSC rifting across the entire domain. Because salt tectonics can create fan-shaped geometries in sediments, syn-rift deposits have to be carefully re-examined in order to decipher the effects of crustal tectonics (rifting) and thin-skinned salt tectonics. Our data surprisingly show that there are no clues for Messinian syn-rift sediments along the East-Sardinia Basin and Cornaglia Terrace, hence no evidence for rifting after Late Tortonian times. Nevertheless, widespread deformation occurred during the Pliocene and can only be attributed to post-rift reactivation. This reactivation is characterized not only by normal faulting but also by contractional structures. Some Pliocene vertical movements caused localized gravity gliding of the mobile

  1. Towards Biogeochemical Modeling of Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane: Characterization of Microbial Communities in Methane-bearing North American Continental Margin Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graw, M. F.; Solomon, E. A.; Chrisler, W.; Krause, S.; Treude, T.; Ruppel, C. D.; Pohlman, J.; Colwell, F. S.

    2015-12-01

    Methane advecting through continental margin sediments may enter the water column and potentially contribute to ocean acidification and increase atmospheric methane concentrations. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by syntrophic consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria (ANME-SRB), consumes nearly all dissolved methane in methane-bearing sediments before it reaches the sediment-water interface. Despite the significant role ANME-SRB play in carbon cycling, our knowledge of these organisms and their surrounding microbial communities is limited. Our objective is to develop a metabolic model of ANME-SRB within methane-bearing sediments and to couple this to a geochemical reaction-transport model for these margins. As a first step towards this goal, we undertook fluorescent microscopic imaging, 16S rRNA gene deep-sequencing, and shotgun metagenomic sequencing of sediments from the US Pacific (Washington) and northern Atlantic margins where ANME-SRB are present. A successful Illumina MiSeq sequencing run yielded 106,257 bacterial and 857,834 archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from 12 communities from the Washington Margin using both universal prokaryotic and archaeal-specific primer sets. Fluorescent microscopy confirmed the presence of cells of the ANME-2c lineage in the sequenced communities. Microbial community characterization was coupled with measurements of sediment physical and geochemical properties and, for samples from the US Atlantic margin, 14C-based measurements of AOM rates and 35S-based measurements of sulfate reduction rates. These findings have the potential to increase understanding of ANME-SRB, their surrounding microbial communities, and their role in carbon cycling within continental margins. In addition, they pave the way for future efforts at developing a metabolic model of ANME-SRB and coupling it to geochemical models of the US Washington and Atlantic margins.

  2. Carbon and nitrogen geochemistry of sediments in the Central American convergent margin: Insights regarding subduction input fluxes, diagenesis, and paleoproductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Bebout, Gray E.

    2005-11-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) concentrations and isotopic compositions were determined for sediments from Ocean Drilling Program legs 170 and 205 offshore of Costa Rica, in an attempt to characterize C-N flux into the Central America (CA) convergent margin and identify signatures of diagenesis and changing productivity in this sediment section. Samples from sites 1039 and 1253 (outboard of the trench) contain 62 to 2382 ppm total nitrogen (TN) with δ15NAir values of +2.4 to +8.5‰, 0.04-2.65 wt% total organic carbon (TOC) with δ13CVPDB values of -25.4 to -20.8‰, and 1.1-87.3 wt% carbonate with δ13C values of +0.1 to +3.2‰ and δ18OVSMOW values of +21.3 to +34.2‰. Total organic C and TN concentrations strongly depend on lithology, with carbonate-rich samples containing smaller amounts of both. Total organic C and TN concentrations and isotopic compositions also vary systematically within single units, perhaps reflecting small degrees of diagenetic alteration but mostly significant increase in productivity since the early Pliocene. Sediment subduction feeds 1.3 × 1010 g yr-1 N (mean δ15N = +5.7‰), 1.4 × 1011 g yr-1 TOC (mean δ13C = -22.0‰) and 1.5 × 1012 g yr-1 oxidized C (mean δ13C = +1.9‰) into the 1100 km CA convergent margin. Incorporating possible inputs in altered oceanic crust (AOC) and by tectonic erosion, the C-N inputs appear to be far larger than the arc outputs. A small part of this excess C and N is probably returning toward the surface by devolatilization, along structural heterogeneities in the forearc, and the remaining inventory is likely recycling into the deeper mantle.

  3. Diagenesis and Associated Sedimentary Environments of Subseafloor Argillaceous Sediments in the Eastern Margin of Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Kato, Y.; Matsumoto, R.

    2013-12-01

    The MD179 project was undertaken in 2010 by the Marion Dufresne aiming at recovering gas hydrate, methane induced carbonate and deep sediments to develop the geologic model of gas hydrate accumulation and evaluate the possible environmental impact of gas hydrate generation and decomposition for the last glacial-interglacial cycles. Sediment samples below the seafloor were retrieved as long as 40 meters at the Umitaka Spur, Joetsu Channel, Toyama Trough, Japan Basin, Nishi Tsugaru and Okushiri Ridge areas in Japan Sea. Small amounts of sandy sediment have been retrieved as thin intercalations in Pleistocene and Holocene muddy layers, where trace fossils and strong bioturbations are commonly observed. Those sandy sediments consist of very fine- to fine-grained sands, and are sometimes tuffaceous. These sandy sediments might have been transported approximately around 3 to 30 ka according to the tephra ages, where supplying sediments might have not been abundant due to sea level fluctuation during the Pleistocene ice age. It is important to clarify the relationship between burial depths and absolute porosities of the argillaceous sediments. Therefore, macroscopic observations and descriptions, measurements of porosities and the pore size distributions, thin-section observations, SEM-BEI (scanning electron microscope-backscattered electron image) observations, and the X-ray diffraction analyses have been performed. They consist of silt- to clay-grained particles, and they sometimes contain very fine- to medium-grained thin sandy layers. Average porosities are 50 % in all study areas, but mean pore sizes in the Nishi Tsugaru are around 1000 nm while 100 nm in the other areas, which tend to decrease as increasing of depths. It is suggested that repacking of the muddy particles dominantly advances by physical compaction in early diagenesis. They generally contain much opal-A, quartz, feldspar, illite and smectite that do not change definitely with depth, because they are

  4. Temporal evolution of lead isotope ratios in sediments of the Central Portuguese Margin: a fingerprint of human activities.

    PubMed

    Mil-Homens, Mário; Caetano, Miguel; Costa, Ana M; Lebreiro, Susana; Richter, Thomas; de Stigter, Henko; Trancoso, Maria A; Brito, Pedro

    2013-09-15

    Stable Pb isotope ratios ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(206)Pb), (210)Pb, Pb, Al, Ca, Fe, Mn and Si concentrations were measured in 7 sediment cores from the west coast of the Iberian Peninsula to assess the Pb contamination throughout the last 200 years. Independently of their locations, all cores are characterized by increasing Pb/Al rends not related to grain-size changes. Conversely, decreasing trends of (206)Pb/(207)Pb were found towards the present. This tendency suggest a change in Pb sources reflecting an increased proportion derived from anthropogenic activities. The highest anthropogenic Pb inventories for sediments younger than 1950s were found in the two shallowest cores of Cascais and Lisboa submarine canyons, reflecting the proximity of the Tagus estuary. Lead isotope signatures also help demonstrate that sediments contaminated with Pb are not constrained to estuarine-coastal areas and upper parts of submarine canyons, but are also to transferred to a lesser extent to deeper parts of the Portuguese Margin. PMID:23871578

  5. The Lithological Constraint To Gas Hydrate Formation: Evidence OF Grain Size Of Sediments From IODP 311 On CASCADIA Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.

    2006-12-01

    A total of 614 sediment samples at intervals of about 1.5 m from all 5 sites of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 on Cascadia Margin were analyzed using a Beckman Coulter LS-230 Particle Analyzer. The grain-size data were then plotted in depth and compared with other proxies of gas hydrate- occurrence such as soupy/mousse-like structures in sediments, gas hydrate concentration (Sh) derived from LWD data using Archie's relation, IR core images (infrared image) and the recovered samples of gas hydrate¨Cbearing sediments. A good relationship between the distribution of coarse grains in size of 31-63¦Ìm and 63-125¦Ìm sediments and the potential occurrence of gas hydrate was found across the entire gas hydrate stability zone. The depth distribution of grain size from the Site U1326 shows clear excursions at depths of 5-8, 21-26, 50- 123, 132-140, 167-180, 195-206 and 220-240 mbsf, which coincide with the potential occurrence of gas hydrate suggested by soupy/mousse-like structures, logging-derived gas hydrate concentrations (Sh) and the recovered samples of the gas hydrate¨Cbearing sand layers. The lithology of sediments significantly affects the formation of gas hydrate. Gas hydrate forms preferentially within relatively coarse grain-size sediments above 31 ¦Ìm. Key words: grain size of sediments, constraint, occurrence of gas hydrate, IODP 311 IODP Expedition 311 Scientists: Michael Riedel (Co-chief Scientist), Timothy S. Collett (Co-chief Scientist), Mitchell Malone (Expedition Project Manager/Staff Scientist), Gilles Gu¨¨rin, Fumio Akiba, Marie-Madeleine Blanc-Valleron, Michelle Ellis, Yoshitaka Hashimoto, Verena Heuer, Yosuke Higashi, Melanie Holland, Peter D. Jackson, Masanori Kaneko, Miriam Kastner, Ji-Hoon Kim, Hiroko Kitajima, Philip E. Long, Alberto Malinverno, Greg Myers, Leena D. Palekar, John Pohlman, Peter Schultheiss, Barbara Teichert, Marta E. Torres, Anne M. Tr¨¦hu, Jiasheng Wang, Ulrich G. Wortmann, Hideyoshi

  6. Benthic remineralisation rates in shelf and slope sediments of the northern Benguela upwelling margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Andreas; Lahajnar, Niko; Emeis, Kay-Christian

    2016-02-01

    The Benguela Upwelling System off Namibia is a region of intensive plankton production. Remineralisation of this biomass frequently causes the formation of an oxygen minimum zone. A part of the organic matter is further deposited on the broad shelf in form of an extensive mudbelt with high TOC concentrations. During February 2011 we retrieved sediment samples from shelf and slope sediment along the Namibian coast to establish fluxes of nutrients, oxygen, and N2 on the basis of pore water concentrations. In mudbelt sediment, fluxes were estimated as high as 8 mmol NH4+ m-2 d-1 and 0.9 mmol PO43 - m-2 d-1, which is probably attributable to the activity of large sulphur bacteria. Especially phosphate is mobilised from sediment overlain by oxygen deficient bottom water when and where bottom water oxygen concentrations fall below 50 μmol l-1. In comparison to nutrient transport by Southern Atlantic Central Water flowing onto the Namibian shelf, benthic nutrient fluxes of the mudbelt contribute less than 5% to the nutrient budget of the shelf.

  7. Holocene depocenter migration and sediment accumulation in Delaware Bay: a submerging marginal marine sedimentary basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, C. H., III; Knebel, H. J.; Kraft, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Holocene transgression of the Delaware Bay estuary and adjacent Atlantic coast results from the combined effect of regional crustal subsidence and eustasy. Together, the estuary and ocean coast constitute a small sedimentary basin whose principal depocenter has migrated with the transgression. A millenial time series of isopach and paleogeographic reconstructions for the migrating depocenter outlines the basin-wide pattern of sediment distribution and accumulation. Upland sediments entering the basin through the estuarine turbidity maximum accumulate in tidal wetland or open water sedimentary environments. Wind-wave activity at the edge of the tidal wetlands erodes the aggraded Holocene section and builds migrating washover barriers. Along the Atlantic and estuary coasts of Delaware, the area of the upland environment decreases from 2.0 billion m2 to 730 million m2 during the transgression. The area of the tidal wetland environment increases from 140 million to 270 million m2, and due to the widening of the estuary the area of open water increases from 190 million to 1.21 billion m2. Gross uncorrected rates of sediment accumulation for the tidal wetlands decrease from 0.64 mm/yr at 6 ka to 0.48 mm/yr at 1 ka. In the open water environments uncorrected rates decrease from 0.50 mm/yr to 0.04 mm/yr over the same period. We also present data on total sediment volumes within the tidal wetland and open water environments at specific intervals during the Holocene. ?? 1992.

  8. Erosion processes, fluvial sediment transport, and reservoir sedimentation in a part of the Newell and Zayante Creek basins, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, W. M., III

    1973-01-01

    The drainage basins upstream from Loch Lomond, a water-supply reservoir on Newell Creek, and a proposed reservoir site on Zayante Creek were investigated for their characteristics with respect to the erosion, transportation, and deposition of sediment. The study area is underlain predominantly by sandstone, siltstone, and shale of Tertiary age that decompose readily into moderately deep soils, friable colluvium, and easily transported sediment particles. The Rices Mudstone and Twobar, Shale Members of the San Lorenzo Formation of Brabb (1964) underlie steep dip slopes in the study area, and probably are the most highly erodible of the several geologic units present there. However, nearly all of the geologic units have shown a propensity for accelerated erosion accompanying the disturbance of the land surface by the roadbuilding practices that predominate over other types of sediment-producing land-use activities in the study area. Sediment transport in the study area was estimated from (1) a reservoir survey of Loch Lomond in 1971 that was compared with a preconstruction survey of 1960, and (2) sampling of sediment transported in suspension by Zayante Creek during the 1970 and 1971 water years. At least 46 acre-feet of sediment accumulated in Loch Lomond in a 10-year period, and an unmeasured quantity of very fine sediment in the form of a thin layer over much of the reservoir bottom was observed. The measured quantity of deposited sediment in a 10-year period represented a sediment yield of about 1,100 tons annually per square mile of drainage basin upstream from the reservoir arms where the major deposition occurred. This sediment occupied less than i percent of the original capacity of Loch Lomond, but the volume of measured sediment deposition is probably conservative in view of the unmeasured deposits observed and a reservoir trap efficiency of about 95 percent. Sediment sampling on Zayante Creek indicated suspended-sediment yields of about 4,570 and 570 tons

  9. Lack of enhanced preservation of organic matter in sediments under the oxygen minimum on the Oman Margin

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, T.F. ); Shimmield, G.B.; Price, N.B. )

    1992-01-01

    The impingement of oxygen minima on continental margins is widely thought to promote the accumulation of sedimentary facies enriched in well-preserved organic matter. It is shown here, however, that such a relationship does not clearly apply to the productive Oman Margin in the Arabian Sea, which hosts one of the most severe oxygen minima in the oceans. Measurements made on the 0-1 cm depth interval from fourteen box cores collected from the outer shelf-upper continental slope area off Oman show that (1) deposited organic matter is overwhelmingly of marine origin, (2) there is no significant correlation between the abundance of sedimentary organic carbon (C{sub org}) and the bottom-water O{sub 2} concentration, (3) there is no relation between the sedimentary C{sub org}:N ratio and bottom-water O{sub 2}, and (4) there is no correlation between the hydrogen index (HI) of the organic matter and bottom water oxygen. There are, however, significant correlations between the C{sub org}:N ratio and the I:C{sub org}, Cr:Al, and Zr:Al ratios, as well as between the C{sub org}:N ratio and the hydrogen index. Overall, these data suggest that the bottom water oxygen concentration has little effect in governing either the distribution of the degree of preservation of organic matter on this margin. Thus, the generally high but spatially variable C{sub org} content of the sediments on the Oman Margin may not reflect the occurrence of an oxygen minimum but instead be the result of a high settling flux of organic matter, supported by monsoon-driven upwelling, and post-depositional redistribution of the organic material by hydrodynamic influences.

  10. Mass sediment failure and transport features revealed by acoustic techniques, Beringian Margin, Bering Sea, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, P.R.; Karl, Herman A.; Edwards, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    Some of the largest single slide masses, including huge blocks tens of kilometers wide, occur on the rise of the central margin. Sliding of these blocks may have initiated the incision of some of the world's largest submarine canyons. One mass failure, particularly well defined by GLORIA, is 55 km long. This slide and others along the plateau are associated with diapiric-like structures indicative of relatively recent tectonism. -from Authors

  11. Radiolarian indicators of El Nino and anti-El Nino events in Holocene sediments of Santa Barbara basin

    SciTech Connect

    Weinheimer, A.L.

    1986-04-01

    Radiolarian distributions and physical oceanographic data from the Santa Barbara basin indicate the following. Strong anti-El Nino periods can be characterized by (1) intermediate radiolarian density, (2) high percentage of transition-central radiolarian fauna, and (3) low percentage and number of warm-water radiolarian fauna. This distribution pattern is attributed to strong wind-driven upwelling and reduced northward transport by the California Countercurrent during anti-El Nino periods. Strong El Nino periods are typically (1) high in radiolarian density, and (2) low in percentage but high in number of warm-water fauna. This distribution is attributed to reduced wind-driven upwelling, enhanced northward countercurrent transport, and geostrophic doming of the cold-water masses in the shear zone between the California Current and California Countercurrent.

  12. Diversity, Community Composition and Abundance of Anammox Bacteria in Sediments of the North Marginal Seas of China.

    PubMed

    Shehzad, Ahmed; Liu, Jiwen; Yu, Min; Qismat, Shakeela; Liu, Jingli; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-06-25

    Over the past few decades, anammox bacteria have been recognized as key players that contribute significantly to the release of large amounts of nitrogen in the global marine nitrogen cycle. In the present study, the diversity, community composition, and abundance of anammox bacteria from the sediments of four diverse regions in the north marginal seas in China were determined via clone library construction and a quantitative PCR analysis. The clone libraries retrieved by the 16S rRNA gene and Hzo gene markers indicated that "Candidatus Scalindua" was the predominant group throughout the sites examined. The 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed exceptional diversity by identifying two potential novel anammox clades, as evidenced by the high sequence similarities between these two clades and known anammox genera, and their unique phylogenetic positions with high bootstrap values. However, their potential roles in the anammox reaction need to be validated. Six novel members of Planctomycetes, divergent from the known genera of anammox bacteria, were also detected. A phylogenetic analysis by Hzo protein sequences revealed the existence of two known genera, i.e., "Candidatus Jettenia" and "Candidatus Anammoxoglobus", which are rarely captured from marine sediments. Among all ecological parameters investigated, the distribution patterns and composition of anammox bacteria were found to be influenced by salinity, total organic matter, and temperature. The abundance of the anammox bacterial 16S rRNA gene from the sites examined ranged between 3.95×10(5) and 9.21×10(5) copies g(-1) wet sediment and positively correlated with the median size of the sediment sample. PMID:27180640

  13. Diversity, Community Composition and Abundance of Anammox Bacteria in Sediments of the North Marginal Seas of China

    PubMed Central

    Shehzad, Ahmed; Liu, Jiwen; Yu, Min; Qismat, Shakeela; Liu, Jingli; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, anammox bacteria have been recognized as key players that contribute significantly to the release of large amounts of nitrogen in the global marine nitrogen cycle. In the present study, the diversity, community composition, and abundance of anammox bacteria from the sediments of four diverse regions in the north marginal seas in China were determined via clone library construction and a quantitative PCR analysis. The clone libraries retrieved by the 16S rRNA gene and Hzo gene markers indicated that “Candidatus Scalindua” was the predominant group throughout the sites examined. The 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed exceptional diversity by identifying two potential novel anammox clades, as evidenced by the high sequence similarities between these two clades and known anammox genera, and their unique phylogenetic positions with high bootstrap values. However, their potential roles in the anammox reaction need to be validated. Six novel members of Planctomycetes, divergent from the known genera of anammox bacteria, were also detected. A phylogenetic analysis by Hzo protein sequences revealed the existence of two known genera, i.e., “Candidatus Jettenia” and “Candidatus Anammoxoglobus”, which are rarely captured from marine sediments. Among all ecological parameters investigated, the distribution patterns and composition of anammox bacteria were found to be influenced by salinity, total organic matter, and temperature. The abundance of the anammox bacterial 16S rRNA gene from the sites examined ranged between 3.95×105 and 9.21×105 copies g−1 wet sediment and positively correlated with the median size of the sediment sample. PMID:27180640

  14. The organic geochemistry of Peru margin surface sediments: II. Paleoenvironmental implications of hydrocarbon and alcohol profiles

    SciTech Connect

    McCaffrey, M.A.; Farrington, J.W.; Repeta, D.J. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors assess the utility of sedimentary hydrocarbons and alcohols as indicators of short-term changes in depositional conditions in the coastal Peruvian upwelling regime at 15{degree}S. The distribution of 35 lipids in a 1 m dated core from 253 m water depth are interpreted by (1) a principal components analysis and (2) a consideration of individual source- specific biomarkers. profiles of odd-carbon-number n-alkanes (C{sub 25}-C{sub 33}) and even carbon-number n-alkanols (C{sub 24}-C{sub 28}) reflect changes in the contribution of terrigenous sediment relative to marine sediment during deposition, as indicated by the correlations between these lipids and inorganic indicators of terrigenous clastic debris. The n-alkane carbon preference index (CPI) provides a less-sensitive record of fluctuations in the terrestrial input than the concentration profiles of the individual n-alkanes and n-alkanols, and these lipids are not well-correlated with the historical El Nino record. The similarity of all the stenol profiles measured and the lack of concordance between these profiles and inorganic indicators of terrigenous input suggest that any fluctuations in the abundance of higher-plant stenols are obscured by the larger marine contribution of these compounds. Similarities between the profiles of total organic carbon (TOC) and cholestanol/cholesterol are consistent with stenol hydrogenation being influenced by the sediment redox conditions.

  15. Late Matuyama climate forcing on sedimentation at the margin of the southern Alps (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scardia, Giancarlo; Donegana, Marta; Muttoni, Giovanni; Ravazzi, Cesare; Vezzoli, Giovanni

    2010-04-01

    The Pleistocene history of climate control on sedimentation in the Southern Alps-Po Plain system, northern Italy, was reconstructed using an integrated magnetostratigraphic, palynological, and petrographical approach on a 47-m-deep core. The core mainly consists of lacustrine sediments pertaining to the Bagaggera sequence, deposited at the foothills of the Southern Alps during the late Matuyama subchron (0.99-0.78 Ma). At that time, climate worsened globally and locally it caused the progradation of an alluvial fan unit onto the nearby Po Plain, triggering lake formation by damming of a tributary valley. These new data are used in conjunction with data from the literature to highlight and track the effects of climate forcing on sedimentation during the late Matuyama subchron in different orographic and geodynamic settings of the Southern Alps-Po Plain system as part of the greater Alpine area. We found that the episodes of alluvial fan and braidplain progradation observed in the southern foreland of the Alps during the late Matuyama global cooling seem broadly synchronous with the deposition of most of the so-called Günz and Älterer Deckenschotter deposits in the northern forelands of the Alps as well as with the first major waxing of the Alpine valley glaciers, possibly around the Marine Isotope Stage 22 (˜0.87 Ma).

  16. Episodic Sediment Failure in Northern Flemish Pass, Eastern Canadian Margin: Interplay of Seismicity, Contour Current Winnowing, and Excess Pore Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, D.

    2015-12-01

    Episodic sediment failures are recognised on continental slopes around Flemish Pass and Orphan Basin from multibeam bathymetry, seismic reflection profiles and piston cores. Seismic stratigraphy is tied to published long cores with O-isotope data back to before MIS 6 and carbonate rich Heinrich layers in places produce marker reflections in high-resolution sparker profiles. Heinrich layers, radiocarbon dates and peaks in diatom abundance provide core chronology. Slope sedimentation was strongly influenced by the Labrador Current and the silty muds show architecture characteristic of contourites. Variation in Labrador Current strength is known from the sortable silt proxy over the past 125 ka. Large slope failures were mapped from seismic reflection profiles and their age estimated from seismic stratigraphy (3-5 ka resolution) and in some cases refined from cores (1-3 ka resolution). Large slope failures occurred apparently synchronously over margin lengths of 50-350 km. Such failures were earthquake triggered: other mechanisms for producing laterally extensive synchronous failure do not apply. Triaxial shear measurements show a Su/σ' ratio of typical slope sediment of 0.48, implying considerable stability. However, some silty muds have Atterberg limits that suggest susceptibility to liquefaction under cyclic loading, particularly in Holocene deposits and by analogy those of past full interglacials. Basal failure planes of some large failures correspond with either the last interglacial or the MIS 6 glacial maximum. Comparison with seismological models suggests that the observed slope failures represent earthquakes ranging from Mw ~5.6 to ~7.6. Mean recurrence interval of M = 7 earthquakes at any point on the margin is estimated at 30 ka from seismological models and 40 ka from the sediment failure record. In northern Flemish Pass, a spatial cluster of several failures over 30 ka preceded by a long interval with no failures suggests that some other mechanism has

  17. Impact of discharge and sediment flux on basin margin architecture: an experimental approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg van Saparoea, A. P. H.; Postma, G.

    2003-04-01

    In most cases it is very difficult to evaluate the stratigraphic record in terms of causality. Important parameters in fluvial-deltaic settings are relative sea level and the ratio of discharge (Q) and solid load (Qs). We use analogue modelling for unravelling the role of each in strata formation over long time spans. The changes in the modelled system are monitored by means of digital elevation maps (DEM's) of the surface, and are calibrated against the last glacial cycle stratigraphic record of the Colorado (Texas, USA) fluvial-delta-shelf system. The influence of relative sea level at constant Q/Qs ratio has been investigated in a previous series of experiments [1]. In the experiments described here Q/Qs ratio is varied, while the rate of change in relative sea level is kept constant. Our preliminary results indicate that the efficiency of sediment transport increases with higher Q/Qs ratios. A system with high Q/Qs ratio is predominantly progradational, while a system with a low Q/Qs ratio shows progradation and aggradation over the entire shelf. Secondly there is a clear relation between the Q/Qs ratio and the cone shaped distribution of sediment over the shelf. The lower the Q/Qs ratio, the higher the spreading angle due to increase in avulsion frequency in the apex of the delta with increasing sediment load. Thirdly, the amount of incision into the original shelf material depends both on the ability of the system to erode (the discharge) and the amount of sediment available for deposition. As a consequence, at low Q/Qs ratios there is a minimum of shelf incision and cannibalisation of shelf stratigraphy, while sediments deposited in the falling stage systems tract are continuously reworked and redeposited. Hence, the lowstand fans contain high amounts of fluvial material transported during the sea-level fall. This is in contrast with high Q/Qs ratios that lead to shelf incision and increased headward erosion rates in the fluvial valleys. The connection time

  18. Stratigraphy of two conjugate margins (Gulf of Lion and West Sardinia): modeling of vertical movements and sediment budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, Estelle; Gorini, Christian; Aslanian, Daniel; Rabineau, Marina; Blanpied, Christian; Rubino, Jean-Loup; Robin, Cécile; Granjeon, Didier; Taillepierre, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    The post-rift (~20-0 Ma) vertical movements of the Provence Basin (West Mediterranean) are quantified on its both conjugate (the Gulf of Lion and the West Sardinia) margins. This work is based on the stratigraphic study of sedimentary markers using a large 3D grid of seismic data, correlations with existing drillings and refraction data. The post-rift subsidence is measured by the direct use of sedimentary geometries analysed in 3D [Gorini et al., 2015; Rabineau et al., 2014] and validated by numerical stratigraphic modelling. Three domains were found: on the platform (1) and slope (2), the subsidence takes the form of a seaward tilting with different amplitudes, whereas the deep basin (3) subsides purely vertically [Leroux et al., 2015a]. These domains correspond to the deeper crustal domains respectively highlighted by wide angle seismic data. The continental crust (1) and the thinned continental crust (2) are tilted, whereas the intermediate crust, identified as lower continental exhumed crust [Moulin et al., 2015, Afhilado et al., 2015] (3) sagged. The post-break-up subsidence re-uses the initial hinge lines of the rifting phase. This striking correlation between surface geologic processes and deep earth dynamic processes emphasizes that the sedimentary record and sedimentary markers is a window into deep geodynamic processes and dynamic topography. Pliocene-Pleistocene seismic markers enabled high resolution quantification of sediment budgets over the past 6 Myr [Leroux et al., in press]. Sediment budget history is here completed on the Miocene interval. Thus, the controlling factors (climate, tectonics and eustasy) are discussed. Afilhado, A., Moulin, M., Aslanian, D., Schnürle, P., Klingelhoefer, F., Nouzé, H., Rabineau, M., Leroux, E. & Beslier, M.-O. (2015). Deep crustal structure across a young 1 passive margin from wide-angle and reflection seismic data (The SARDINIA Experiment) - II. Sardinia's margin. Bull. Soc. géol. France, 186, ILP Spec. issue, 4

  19. Poroelastic Parameters of Peru Margin Sediments: Implications for Flow and Transport at Multiple Scales in the Marine Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettemy, G. L.; Cikoski, C.; Tobin, H. J.

    2004-12-01

    As part of a broader investigation of the deep marine subsurface environment, the first biosphere-focused drilling expedition, Leg 201, of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) occupied five unique sites in the Peru Margin (in a 1200 km2 region centered at 10 S, 80E). These sites represent the entire range of shallow biogeological conditions associated with this convergent margin:deep-water, mixed clay-pelagic sediments ocean-ward of the trench; slope-apron and prism toe sediments at the deformation front; and several distinct lithostratigraphic sequences on the continental shelf. Microbial enumeration and pore-water geochemistry results show that each particular site is both consistent and unique--consistent in terms of general biotic quantity and activity as predicted by energy flux and redox potential given the depositional environment and sedimentary record, but unique at key biogeological boundaries such as lithologic and/or physical property interfaces. This research addresses questions related to our understanding of how and why these boundaries form by looking at poroelastic and hydrologic parameters measured at multiple scales, from sub-millimeter to several centimeters. The issue of measurement scale, especially in regard to permeability and diffusivity characterization, is vital to interpreting observations of biologically-mediated diagenetic fronts (e.g., dolomitic lenses, depth- or time-varying barite fronts). These parameters are derived from (i) hydrologic and wave propagation experiments, (ii) SEM images, and (iii) shipboard split-core measurements, and structured in a modified Biot poroelasticity framework. This approach also allows quantification of the local heterogeneity of these parameters at the scale applicable to (and controlled by) microbial life; these results can then be used to formulate predictive models of the impact of biogeochemical processes. Ultimately, these models could then be used in interpretation of new remote-sensed data (e

  20. Paleoenvironmental records from newly recovered sediment cores at the southeast margin of the Salar de Atacama, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutt, D. F.; Munk, L. A.; Hynek, S. A.; Corenthal, L.; Huff, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    A suite of new cores recovered from recent boreholes in the southeastern margin of the Salar de Atacama, Chile span a modern environmental gradient from distal alluvial fans, groundwater discharge marshes, sulfate-rich playas, saline lagoons, and the halite nucleus of the salar. These same environments are preserved as stratigraphic records of environmental change in the cores. Cores from the salar nucleus are dominated by halite, and similarly alluvial cores provide a poor paleoenvironmental record. However, the cores from the transition zone between the salar margin and the halite nucleus document alluvial, lagoonal, and evaporite environments. Cores near the halite nucleus record inter-bedded carbonate, gypsum, and halite. Finely laminated carbonates inter-bedded with cm-thick halite beds are a target for U-series geochronology. Cores near modern lagoons contain 2-6 m thick diatomites in addition to microbially-mediated carbonate, organic-rich mud, and minor alluvium. The uppermost 20 cm of diatomite deposits are commonly rooted with vascular plant material which is being processed for 14C geochronology. Ignimbrite and tephra deposits are also encountered and will provide important chronological control. The presence and absence of the 3.5-4.0 Ma Tucucaro ignimbrite in various cores documents a complex pattern of subsidence near the salar margin, some areas have accumulated little sediment since its deposition while in other areas the cores likely record only late Pleistocene deposition. Preliminary interpretations of the stratigraphic records within a paleohydrologic context are tenable. The specific control on this paleohydrologic record is likely to be a combination of increased inflow due to wetter climates and migration of the freshwater/brine interface which underlies the margins of the Salar de Atacama. Stratigraphic variations in the lithium content of evaporite minerals is being explored as a potential indicator of water balance. Lithium concentrations

  1. Glacial climate driven sedimentation overwhelms tectonics in the battle for control of margin architecture: Southeast Alaska, St. Elias Orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, S. P.; Jaeger, J. M.; Willems, B.; Powell, R. D.; Lowe, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    The interplay of tectonic and climatic processes is fundamental to the development of mountain belts and the ensuing patterns of deformation and erosion. Of equal significance is the interaction of tectonic and climatic processes in the development of orogenic sedimentary basins, or in the case of a coastal mountain belt, in the growth of a continental margin. The Chugach-St. Elias Orogeny, which is driven by the collision of the Yakutat microplate with North America in southeast Alaska, has generated the highest coastal relief in the world. The combined forces of tectonic uplift and glacial erosion have resulted in the accumulation of over 5 km of sediment to form the continental shelf and the creation of the Surveyor Fan that is over 2 km thick proximally. High-resolution GI-gun seismic data allow for detailed examination of the margin architecture off the Bering Glacier within the leading edge of the Yakutat block. The deformation and growth of the margin appears to have first undergone a tectonically dominated phase followed more recently by a glacially dominated phase. During the tectonically dominated period a broad anticline-syncline system helped create accommodation space and the margin both shallowed and widened to its current 50 km width. Based on ties with industry well cuttings, the dominance switched sometime between 0.75 and 1.25 Ma to being completely controlled by glacial advance-retreat patterns. The mappable glacial sequences are undeformed by the underlying anticlines and display several notable features: 1) erosional bases that can often be mapped across the entire shelf, terminating at the shelf edge, 2) little evidence for terminal or retreat moraines on the shelf suggesting very rapid and single phase retreat of the glacier, 3) incomplete glacial sequences due to erosion by later advances, and 4) minimal creation of accommodation space. We investigate the cause of the switch to glacial dominance, the mechanisms and causes of the potentially

  2. Nitrogen geochemistry of subducting sediments: New results from the Izu-Bonin-Mariana margin and insights regarding global nitrogen subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadofsky, Seth J.; Bebout, Gray E.

    2004-03-01

    Toward understanding of the subduction mass balance in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) convergent margin, we present an inventory of N and C concentrations and isotopic compositions in sediments obtained on Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Legs 129 and 185. Samples from Sites 1149, 800, 801, and 802 contain 5 to 661 ppm total N (organic, inorganic combined) with δ15NAir of -0.2 to +8.2‰ (all δ15N values <+2.5‰ from Site 800). At Site 1149, N content is higher in clay-rich layers and lower in chert and carbonate layers, and δ15N shows a distinct down-section decrease from 0 to 120 mbsf (near +8.0 at shallow levels to near +4.0‰). Reduced-C concentration ranges from 0.02 to 0.5 wt.%, with δ13CVPDB of -28.1 to -21.7‰. The down-section decreases in δ15N and N concentration (and variations in concentrations and δ13C of reduced C, and Creduced/N) at Site 1149 could help reconcile differences between δ15N values of modern deep-sea sediments from near the sediment-water interface and values for forearc metasedimentary rocks. At Site 1149, negative shifts in δ15N, from marine organic values (up to ˜+8‰) toward lower values approaching those for the metasedimentary rocks (+1 to +3‰), are most likely caused by complex diagenetic processes, conceivably with minor effects of changes in productivity and differing proportions of marine and terrestrial organic matter. However, the forearc metamorphic suites (e.g., Franciscan Complex) are known to have been deposited nearer continents, and their lower δ15N at least partly reflects larger proportions of lower-δ15N terrestrial organic matter. Subduction at the Izu-Bonin (IB) margin, of a sediment section like that at Site 1149, would deliver an approximate annual subduction flux of 2.5 × 106 g of N and 1.4 × 107 g of reduced C per linear kilometer of trench, with average δ15N of +5.0‰ and δ13C of -24‰. Incorporating the larger C flux of 9.2 × 108 g/yr/linear-km in carbonate-rich layers of 1149B (average δ13C

  3. Glacio-eustatic Control on Plio-Pleistocene Sedimentation Along the Northern California Ocean Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green Nylen, N. M.; Zinniker, D. A.; Ingle, J. C.; Moldowan, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    Over the last 3.5 million years major climatic and tectonic changes have resulted in high frequency fluctuations in relative sea level adjacent to the northern California shoreline. A detailed record of these changes is preserved in two sedimentary sequences currently exposed along the coast: the neritic to nonmarine Merced Formation near San Francisco and the bathyal to neritic Rio Dell Formation north of Cape Mendocino. With the goal of deciphering the Plio-Pleistocene paleoenvironmental histories of these expanded ocean margin sequences, detailed stratigraphic sections were measured and described from the lower portion of the Merced Formation and from the Upper Rio Dell Formation. Samples are being analyzed for benthic foraminiferal assemblage, palynological assemblage, stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of foraminiferal carbonate, and organic geochemistry. These data provide insight into paleo-water characteristics and paleobathymetry, global ice volume and climate, terrestrial and marine ecosystem composition and structure, specific sources of sedimentary organic material, the frequency and magnitude of wildfires on land during deposition, and redox conditions during early diagenesis. Variations in these climate and environmental proxies appear to demarcate glacial and interglacial cycles. These results generally support previous interpretations of glacio-eustatic control on the cyclicity of sedimentary facies within the Merced and Rio Dell formations. Ongoing work aims to explore the relationship between local and global climate proxies and to develop a more detailed model of northern California ocean margin sedimentary response to rapid Plio-Pleistocene sea-level change.

  4. Gas content and composition of gas hydrate from sediments of the southeastern North American continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenson, T.D.; Collett, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Gas hydrate samples were recovered from four sites (Sites 994, 995, 996, and 997) along the crest of the Blake Ridge during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 164. At Site 996, an area of active gas venting, pockmarks, and chemosynthetic communities, vein-like gas hydrate was recovered from less than 1 meter below seafloor (mbsf) and intermittently through the maximum cored depth of 63 mbsf. In contrast, massive gas hydrate, probably fault filling and/or stratigraphically controlled, was recovered from depths of 260 mbsf at Site 994, and from 331 mbsf at Site 997. Downhole-logging data, along with geochemical and core temperature profiles, indicate that gas hydrate at Sites 994, 995, and 997 occurs from about 180 to 450 mbsf and is dispersed in sediment as 5- to 30-m-thick zones of up to about 15% bulk volume gas hydrate. Selected gas hydrate samples were placed in a sealed chamber and allowed to dissociate. Evolved gas to water volumetric ratios measured on seven samples from Site 996 ranged from 20 to 143 mL gas/mL water to 154 mL gas/mL water in one sample from Site 994, and to 139 mL gas/mL water in one sample from Site 997, which can be compared to the theoretical maximum gas to water ratio of 216. These ratios are minimum gas/water ratios for gas hydrate because of partial dissociation during core recovery and potential contamination with pore waters. Nonetheless, the maximum measured volumetric ratio indicates that at least 71% of the cages in this gas hydrate were filled with gas molecules. When corrections for pore-water contamination are made, these volumetric ratios range from 29 to 204, suggesting that cages in some natural gas hydrate are nearly filled. Methane comprises the bulk of the evolved gas from all sites (98.4%-99.9% methane and 0%-1.5% CO2). Site 996 hydrate contained little CO2 (0%-0.56%). Ethane concentrations differed significantly from Site 996, where they ranged from 720 to 1010 parts per million by volume (ppmv), to Sites 994 and 997

  5. Ice Sheet History from Sediments Recovered from the Antarctic Wilkes Land Margin: Iodp Expedition 318

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escutia Dotti, Carlota; Brinkhuis, Henk; Dunbar, Robert; Klaus, Adam

    2010-05-01

    Drilling the Antarctic Wilkes Land margin sedimentary archives along an inshore to offshore transect provides insights about the development of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) and its intimate relationships with global climatic, oceanographic and sea level change. Drilling was driven by seismic stratigraphic interpretations indicating that the Wilkes Land sedimentary record included critical periods in Cenozoic Earth climate evolution when the cryosphere formed, likely in step-wise fashion, and subsequently evolved to assume its present-day configuration. In addition, the sedimentary archives lie in front of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin where the EAIS is grounded below sea level and is potentially more sensitive to climate changes in the late Neogene, during times when the EAIS is thought to be more stable (15 Ma-recent). The principal goals of Expedition 318 were to obtain: 1. the timing and nature of the first arrival of ice at the Wilkes Land margin (referred to as the "onset of glaciation") inferred to have occurred during the earliest Oligocene (Oligocene isotope event-1), 2. the nature and age of the changes in the geometry of the progradational wedge interpreted to correspond with large fluctuations in the extent of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) and possibly coinciding with the transition from a wet-based to a cold-based glacial regime (late Miocene-Pliocene?), 3. a high-resolution record of Antarctic climate variability during the late Neogene and Quaternary; and 4. an unprecedented, ultra-high resolution (annual to decadal) Holocene record of climate variability. Records from the Wilkes Land margin are complementary to some of the time intervals obtained from Prydz Bay during ODP Leg 188 and ANDRILL records from the Ross Sea, which will allow to asses regional variability. Here we present preliminary results from IODP Expedition 318, taken place during January-March 2010. The chronostratigraphic and paleoenvironmental information from Expedition

  6. Ostracoda and Foraminifera associated with macrofauna of marginal marine origin in continental sabkha sediments of Tayma (NW Saudi Arabia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pint, Anna; Frenzel, Peter; Engel, Max; Plessen, Birgit; Melzer, Sandra; Brückner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    The oasis Tayma in northwestern Saudi Arabia (27°38'N, 38°33'E) is well known for its rich archaeological heritage and also hosts a key sedimentary record of Holocene environmental change.The palaeontologically investigated material comes from two 5.5 m long sediment cores taken in the northeastern and central part of the sabkha and two outcrops of shoreline deposits at the northeastern and southwestern margin of a large lake. Microfossil-rich layers have an age of about 9.2-ca. 8 ka BP. The sandy and carbonate-dominated sediments contain autochthonous balanids, the gastropods Melanoides tuberculatus and hydrobiids as well as the foraminifers Ammonia tepida (Cushman, 1926), Quinqueloculina seminula (Linnaeus, 1758), and Flintionoides labiosa (&dacute;Orbigny, 1839). This brackish water association is completed by partially mass-occurrence of Cyprideis torosa (JONES, 1850), an euryhaline and generally widely tolerant ostracod species. Only the smooth shelled morphotype littoralis occurs. The association indicates a large brackish water lake with temporary freshwater inflows. All species documented originate in the marginal marine environment of the Red or Mediterranean Sea within the intertidal zone and hence they are adapted for strong environmental changes. We assume negative water balance under arid climatic conditions as cause for the high salinity of this athalassic lake. Sieve-pore analyses and shell chemistry suppose a trend of increasing salinity towards the top of the studied microfossil-bearing sections. This pattern is confirmed by increasing test malformation ratios of foraminifers. The marine origin of the fauna is surprising in this area 250 km away from the sea in an altitude of about 800 m a.s.l. We assume an avian-mediated transport of eggs, larvae or even adult animals to this site. The brackish water character of the lake enabled a permanent settling of marginal marine foraminifers, ostracods and even macrofauna as gastropods and balanids. The

  7. Ostracoda and Foraminifera associated with macrofauna of marginal marine origin in continental sabkha sediments of Tayma (NW Saudi Arabia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pint, Anna; Frenzel, Peter; Engel, Max; Plessen, Birgit; Melzer, Sandra; Brückner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    The oasis Tayma in northwestern Saudi Arabia (27°38'N, 38°33'E) is well known for its rich archaeological heritage and also hosts a key sedimentary record of Holocene environmental change.The palaeontologically investigated material comes from two 5.5 m long sediment cores taken in the northeastern and central part of the sabkha and two outcrops of shoreline deposits at the northeastern and southwestern margin of a large lake. Microfossil-rich layers have an age of about 9.2-ca. 8 ka BP. The sandy and carbonate-dominated sediments contain autochthonous balanids, the gastropods Melanoides tuberculatus and hydrobiids as well as the foraminifers Ammonia tepida (Cushman, 1926), Quinqueloculina seminula (Linnaeus, 1758), and Flintionoides labiosa (d'Orbigny, 1839). This brackish water association is completed by partially mass-occurrence of Cyprideis torosa (JONES, 1850), an euryhaline and generally widely tolerant ostracod species. Only the smooth shelled morphotype littoralis occurs. The association indicates a large brackish water lake with temporary freshwater inflows. All species documented originate in the marginal marine environment of the Red or Mediterranean Sea within the intertidal zone and hence they are adapted for strong environmental changes. We assume negative water balance under arid climatic conditions as cause for the high salinity of this athalassic lake. Sieve-pore analyses and shell chemistry suppose a trend of increasing salinity towards the top of the studied microfossil-bearing sections. This pattern is confirmed by increasing test malformation ratios of foraminifers. The marine origin of the fauna is surprising in this area 250 km away from the sea in an altitude of about 800 m a.s.l. We assume an avian-mediated transport of eggs, larvae or even adult animals to this site. The brackish water character of the lake enabled a permanent settling of marginal marine foraminifers, ostracods and even macrofauna as gastropods and balanids. The studied

  8. Structure and Development Processes of the Sediment Ridges on the Continental Rise off the Prydz Bay Margin, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.; Yang, C.; Gao, J.; Ji, F.

    2015-12-01

    Several sediment ridges (SRs) are located on the continental slope and rise off the Prydz Bay margin, East Antarctica. These SRs contain the history of the regional glacial movements and bottom current activities. Multichannel seismic reflection data and bathymetric data in this region have been interpreted to know the planar distribution, cross-section structures along strike, and the formation and development processes of the SRs. Based on the above work, two different groups of the SRs have been identified. The first one includes two SRs which were asymmetric levees on both sides of the Wild Canyon in the western part of the study area. The second one includes SRs in the eastern part of the study area whose formation and development are closely related to the local, diachronous hiatuses generated by the turbidity flow. The onset time of the turbidity activities in different canyons are not concurrent. For Wild Canyon in the west, the onset time is P1, which is the base of the glaciomarine deposit on the continental rise, while for Wilkins and Murray Canyon in the east, it is a later time P3 (~26.1 Ma), which represents an expansion of the glaciers in Prydz Bay area. All the canyons and the turbidity currents within them both extend seaward with time and so does the consequent SRs. In the areas north of the seaward edge of the SRs, large deep-sea sediment waves consisting of fine-grain sediments supplied mainly by down-slope turbidity currents were generated under westward-flowing bottom currents.

  9. High-latitude Paleomagnetic Records of Quaternary Sediments from Baffin Bay, Western Greenland Margin (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, C.; Maxwell, S. B.; Acton, G.; Evans, H. F.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment samples recovered during the Baffin Bay Scientific Coring Expedition (Expedition 344S) retrieved well-preserved core material from off the coast of northwest Greenland, providing an archive for the study of the geomagnetic field at high latitude. Although funded by a consortium of oil companies, this expedition, also referred to as Expedition 344S, was conducted on the D/V JOIDES Resolution and used standard Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) methodologies. We will present the first results from the 12 sites cored, which are located between the latitudes of 74°45.32‧N and 75°46.68‧N in the Melville Bay region (Cape York and Melville Ridge) of Baffin Bay in water depths of 131 to 545 m. The glacial sediments in the top 2 to 150 m below seafloor consist of very soft diatom-bearing muds to over-compacted clast-rich muddy or sandy diamicts, which suggest deposition in a subglacial to ice-procimal glaciomarine environment. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic measurements were carried out on the shipboard cryogenic magnetometer at 5-cm resolution on 32 split-core sections and a selected number of discrete samples, and at 1-cm resolution on ~5 m of U-channel samples which were obtained from the uppermost Holocene part of the section. Stepwise demagnetization of the natural remanent magnetization yields excellent demagnetization behavior, with a viscous isothermal remanent magnetization drilling overprint effectively removed during the 20 mT demagnetization step. The paleomagnetic data are characterized by steep, ~80°, normal inclinations, consistent with the site position near the North Pole. Thermal demagnetization, magnetic susceptibility, isothermal remanent magnetization, and hysteresis parameters indicate that the primary magnetic carrier consists of a low-coercivity mineral, e.g., magnetite and/or titanomagnetite, with minor traces of higher-coercivity minerals, e.g., hematite and/or goethite. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of the sediments

  10. Orbital- to Sub-Orbital-Scale Cyclicity in Seismic Reflections and Sediment Character in Early to Middle Pleistocene Mudstone, Santa Barbara Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, C. D.; Behl, R. J.; Nicholson, C.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Sorlien, C. C.

    2009-12-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection records and well logs from the Santa Barbara Channel suggest that large parts of the Pleistocene succession records climate variability on orbital to sub-orbital scales with remarkable sensitivity, much like the well-studied sediments of the last glacial cycle (ODP Site 893). Spectral analysis of seismic reflection data and gamma ray logs from stratigraphically similar Pleistocene sections finds similar cyclic character and shifts through the section. This correlation suggests that acoustic impedance and physical properties of sediment are linked by basin-scale, likely climatically-driven, oscillations in lithologic composition and fabric during deposition, and that seismic profiling can provide a method for remote identification and correlation of orbital- and sub-orbital-scale sedimentary cyclicity. Where it crops out along the northern shelf of the central Santa Barbara Channel, the early to middle Pleistocene succession (~1.8-1.2 Ma) is a bathyal hemipelagic mudstone with remarkably rhythmic planar bedding, finely laminated fabric, and well-preserved foraminifera, none of which have been significantly altered, or obscured by post-depositional diagenesis or tectonic deformation. Unlike the coarser, turbiditic successions in the central Ventura and Los Angeles basins, this sequence has the potential to record Quaternary global climate change at high resolution. Seismic reflection data (towed chirp) collected on the R/V Melville 2008 Cruise (MV08) penetrate 10's of meters below seafloor into a ~1 km-long sequence of south-dipping seismic reflectors. Sampling parallel to the seafloor permits acquisition of consistent signal amplitude for similar reflectors without spreading loss. Based on established age ranges for this section, sedimentation rates may range from 0.4 to 1.4 meters/kyr, therefore suggesting that the most powerful cycles are orbital- to sub-orbital-scale. Discrete sets of cycles with high power show an abrupt shift

  11. Environmental Conditions Outweigh Geographical Contiguity in Determining the Similarity of nifH-Harboring Microbial Communities in Sediments of Two Disconnected Marginal Seas

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haixia; Dang, Hongyue; Klotz, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological evidence suggests that heterotrophic diazotrophs fueled by organic carbon respiration in sediments play an important role in marine nitrogen fixation. However, fundamental knowledge about the identities, abundance, diversity, biogeography, and controlling environmental factors of nitrogen-fixing communities in open ocean sediments is still elusive. Surprisingly, little is known also about nitrogen-fixing communities in sediments of the more research-accessible marginal seas. Here we report on an investigation of the environmental geochemistry and putative diazotrophic microbiota in the sediments of Bohai Sea, an eutrophic marginal sea of the western Pacific Ocean. Diverse and abundant nifH gene sequences were identified and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were found to be the dominant putative nitrogen-fixing microbes. Community statistical analyses suggested bottom water temperature, bottom water chlorophyll a content (or the covarying turbidity) and sediment porewater Eh (or the covarying pH) as the most significant environmental factors controlling the structure and spatial distribution of the putative diazotrophic communities, while sediment Hg content, sulfide content, and porewater SiO32−-Si content were identified as the key environmental factors correlated positively with the nifH gene abundance in Bohai Sea sediments. Comparative analyses between the Bohai Sea and the northern South China Sea (nSCS) identified a significant composition difference of the putative diazotrophic communities in sediments between the shallow-water (estuarine and nearshore) and deep-water (offshore and deep-sea) environments, and sediment porewater dissolved oxygen content, water depth and in situ temperature as the key environmental factors tentatively controlling the species composition, community structure, and spatial distribution of the marginal sea sediment nifH-harboring microbiota. This confirms the ecophysiological specialization and niche differentiation

  12. A phylogenetic analysis of microbial communities associated with methane hydrate containing marine fluids and sediments in the Cascadia margin (ODP site 892B).

    PubMed

    Bidle, K A; Kastner, M; Bartlett, D H

    1999-08-01

    Methane hydrates represent an enormous carbon and energy source in many low temperature deep marine sediments. However, little information is available concerning the nature of the microbial communities associated with these structures. Here, we describe a phylogenetic analysis based on ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences obtained from sediment and fluid samples present in a region of gas hydrate formation in shallow sediments within the Cascadia margin in and around Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 892B. Our studies detected diverse sulfur-utilizing microbes, methanogens, methanotrophs, and non-thermophilic members of the kingdom Crenarchaeota. This is the first culture-independent phylogenetic analysis of a gas hydrate habitat. PMID:10436927

  13. Sources of terrestrially-derived organic carbon in lower Mississippi River and Louisiana shelf sediments: Implications for differential sedimentation and transport at the coastal margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bianchi, T.S.; Mitra, Siddhartha; McKee, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we examined the temporal and spatial variability of terrestrial organic carbon sources in lower Mississippi River and Louisiana shelf sediments (during 11 cruises over a 22-month period) to further understand the sorting dynamics and selective transport of vascular plant materials within the primary dispersal system of the river. Bulk ??13C values in lower river sediments ranged from -21.90??? to -24.64??? (mean=-23.20??1.09???), these values were generally more depleted than those found in shelf sediments (-22.5??? to -21.2???). The ??8 (??8 = sum of vanillyl, syringyl and cinnamyl phenols produced from the oxidation of 100 mg of organic carbon) values in the lower river ranged from 0.71 to 3.74 (mean = 1.78??0.23). While there was no significant relationship between ??8 and river discharge (p>0.05), the highest value occurred during peak discharge in April 1999-which corresponded to the highest observed C/N value of 17.41. The ??8 values on the shelf ranged from 0.68 to 1.36 (mean = 0.54??0.30) and were significantly lower (p <0.05) than the average value for lower river sediments. The range of S/V (syringyl/vanillyl) and C/V (cinnamyl/vanillyl) ratios on the shelf, 0.11 to 0.95 and 0.01 to 0.08, respectively, were similar to that found in the lower river. These low C/V ratios are indicative a mixture of woody and non-woody carbon sources. Recent work by Goni et al. [Nature 389 (1997) 275; Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 62 (1998) 3055], which did not include sampling transects within the primary dispersal system of the Mississippi River, showed a non-woody vascular plant signature on the Louisiana shelf. This suggests that riverine-derived woody tissues preferentially settle out of the water column, in the lower river and inner shelf, prior to the selective dispersal of C3 versus C4 non-woody materials in other regions the shelf and slope. This works further demonstrates the importance of differential settlement of particles, sampling location within the

  14. Helium transport in sediment pore fluids of the Congo-Angola margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaduteau, Carine; Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Fourré, Elise; Charlou, Jean-Luc; Donval, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    During the ZaïRov2 cruise of the ZaïAngo project (1998-2000) on the passive Congo-Angola margin, several gravity cores were analyzed for helium isotopic composition of sedimentary pore waters in two cold fluid seepage zones: the Astrid slide area and the Regab giant pockmark. Gas concentration and isotopic composition are presented along with thermal data in terms of the origin and circulation of fluids. Helium isotope data lie on a mixing line between bottom seawater and an almost pure radiogenic. Helium and temperature vertical profiles are well described by the classic diffusion-advection equation. On the basis of He profiles, we estimate the advection rate on the rim of the pockmark between 1.2 and 2.3 mm/a. The He flux derived for a pure diffusive regime (2.4 × 10-8 mol/m2/a) can favorably be compared to literature data and contrasts with the flux computed close to the pockmark center (1.9 × 10-7 mol/m2/a). Helium depth profiles turned to be more sensitive to advection rate than temperature profiles are.

  15. Intra-arc sedimentation in a low-lying marginal arc, Eocene Clarno Formation, central Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.D.L.; Robinson, P.T. . Centre for Marine Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The largely Eocene Clarno Formation consists of andesitic volcaniclastic rocks interstratified with clayey paludal sediments and lava flows, and cut locally by irregular hypabyssal stocks, dikes and sills. Lateral lithofacies variations are pronounced, and intrusive and extrusive volcanic rocks appear haphazardly emplaced throughout the formation. A range of sedimentary environments is represented, including near-vent flow and breccia accumulations, bouldery high-gradient braided streams, and relatively low-gradient sandy-tuff braidplains associated with paludal deposits. The authors infer that the coarse-grained volcaniclastic rocks of the Clarno Formation accumulated largely in volcanic flank and apron settings. The stratigraphy of the formation indicates that it was formed in sedimentary lowlands into which many small volcanoes erupted; only a few, scattered remnants of large central vent volcanoes are known. The absence of systematic variation across the unit's large outcrop belt argues against the derivation of the succession from a line of volcanoes beyond the reaches of the present outcrop. The authors infer that the arc was composed of small to medium-sized volcanoes arranged non-systematically over a broad area. The sedimentary succession most probably accumulated in a series of shallow intra-arc depressions formed by crustal stretching and diffuse block rotation driven by oblique subduction during the Eocene.

  16. Liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure photoionization-Orbitrap analysis of fullerene aggregates on surface soils and river sediments from Santa Catarina (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Sanchís, Josep; Oliveira, Luis Felipe Silva; de Leão, Felipe Baptista; Farré, Marinella; Barceló, Damià

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, a new analytical approach is proposed for the analysis of seven fullerenes (C₆₀, C₇₀, N-methylfulleropyrrolidine, [6,6]-phenyl C₆₁ butyric acid methyl ester, [6,6]-thienyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, C60 pyrrolidine tris-acid ethyl ester and [6,6]-phenyl C₇₁ butyric acid methyl ester fullerenes) in soils and sediments. This procedure combines an ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction (UAE) with toluene followed by liquid chromatography (LC), using a pyrenylpropyl group bonded silica based column, coupled to a high-resolution mass spectrometer (HRMS) using atmospheric pressure photoionisation (APPI) in negative ion mode. The analytical performance for fullerene separation of the pyrenylpropyl group bonded silica column was compared to the C18 column. For the ultra-trace analysis of fullerenes in complex environmental samples, the use of the APPI source and the use of the electrospray ionisation (ESI) source were compared. Using this approach for the analysis of fullerenes in complex matrices, a series of advantages, in terms of sensitivity and specificity, have been demonstrated. The method limits of detection (MLOD) and the method limits of quantification (MLOQ) in soils and sediments ranged from 0.022 to 0.39 pg/g and from 0.072 to 1.3 pg/g, respectively. Recoveries were between 68 and 106%. The analytical method was applied in order to assess the occurrence of selected fullerenes in 45 soils of Sul Catarinense (Santa Catalina State, Brazil) and 15 sediments from the Tubarão River, presenting different pressures of contamination: a coal-combustion power plant, car exhaust, coal mining industry and wastewater effluents. C₆₀ and C₇₀ fullerenes have been detected at concentrations ranging from the MLOD to 0.150 ng/g. None of the functionalised fullerenes were detected in any of the samples. Combustion processes, in particular car exhaust, were identified as the main source of fullerenes. However, the potential

  17. Paleointensity record from Pleistocene sediments (1.4-0 Ma) off the California Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyodo, Yohan; Richter, Carl; Valet, Jean-Pierre

    1999-10-01

    High resolution magnetic measurements of 45 m of sediment from the Delgada Fan area at Ocean Drilling Program Site 1021 (39°5'N/127°46'W) were performed in order to extract a reliable signal of relative paleointensity. A detailed chronology was established by correlation of the magnetic susceptibility variations to the insolation curve for the past 1.4 Myr covered by the record. The remanence carrier is pseudo-single-domain-sized magnetite that varies in concentration by a factor <3. Stepwise alternating field demagnetization isolated a very stable natural remanent magnetization (NRM) which showed the succession of the Cobb and Jaramillo Subchrons and directional changes associated with the Punaruu event (1.105 Ma). Two techniques have been used to extract the signal of relative paleointensity. A significant climatic component remained present in the curve obtained from the slopes of the NRM versus the anhysteretic remanent magnetization(ARM). In contrast the NRM and the susceptibility (klf) both being driven by orbital forcing, normalization by susceptibility is not contaminated by climatically driven changes and is thus taken as our best estimate of relative paleointensity. Comparison with other high-resolution records and compilations reinforces the actual geomagnetic origin of the variations displayed by the NRM/k signal. Overall, this record confirms the succession of distinct highs and lows which are concomitant with full field reversals and short-term geomagnetic events present during the Matuyama Chron. The presence of large oscillations of the field with no periodicity confirms that the geomagnetic field (at least his dipolar part) is highly unstable and may have remained in this mode for a long period of time.

  18. A time-transgressive Holocene onset from Globorotalia menardii records on Brazilian continental margin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, F. S.; Costa, K. B.; Toledo, F. A. D. L.; Santarosa, A. C. A.; Chiessi, C. M.; Camillo, E., Jr.; Quadros, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The planktic foraminifer Globorotalia menardii presents a cyclic behavior within Pleistocene glacial cycles on Atlantic; it disappears during glacial periods and returns to this ocean after deglaciations. Therefore, G. menardii has been used to identify limits between those cycles and the last limit is recognized as the Holocene onset. The Holocene onset has been reported before as being more than 4 kyrs later than expected at the equatorial Atlantic Ocean based on a G. menardii record (Broecker & Pena, 2014). In this study, we explore the time-transgressive Holocene onset of G. menardii in the Atlantic from 21 piston cores collected along the Brazilian continental margin, between 7 ˚N and 33 ˚S. Radiocarbon dating was conducted on Globigerinoides ruber on samples prior to and after G. menardii reappearance in the cores. Reservoir-age corrected 14C dates vary between 17 and 6.5 cal kyrs; the older ages are found at ~14 ˚S and younger ages at 6 ˚N and 33 ˚S. From these ages and latitudes, we hypothesize that G. menardii's population has spread at higher rates southward. From the scenario observed on Brazilian coast it is possible to conclude that although ocean circulation has an important role on dispersion of planktonic foraminifera, it may be superimposed by ecological constraints of the species. G. menardii absence during glacials is linked to the Agulhas Leakage activity, which is prevented from getting to the Atlantic due the northern position of the Subtropical Convergence Zone during glacials. On interglacials, warm and saline waters carrying G. menardii are transported into the Subtropical Gyre currents, achieving Brazil's coast through the South Equatorial Current and spreading south and northward through Brazil Current and North Brazil Current, respectively. Nonetheless, from velocity and volume registered for this currents, we would expect a higher G. menardii dispersion rate northward. A faster southward dispersal during the deglaciation suggests

  19. The effect of grain size and surface area on organic matter, lignin and carbohydrate concentration, and molecular compositions in Peru Margin sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, B.A.; Tsamakis, E.; Keil, R.G.; Eglinton, T.I.; Montlucon, D.B.; Hedges, J.I.

    1997-01-01

    A C-rich sediment sample from the Peru Margin was sorted into nine hydrodynamically-determined grain size fractions to explore the effect of grain size distribution and sediment surface area on organic matter content and composition. The neutral monomeric carbohydrate composition, lignin oxidation product yields, total organic carbon, and total nitrogen contents were determined independently for each size fraction, in addition to sediment surface area and abundance of biogenic opal. The percent organic carbon and percent total nitrogen were strongly related to surface area in these sediments. In turn, the distribution of surface area closely followed mass distribution among the textural size classes, suggesting hydrodynamic controls on grain size also control organic carbon content. Nevertheless, organic compositional distinctions were observed between textural size classes. Total neutral carbohydrate yields in the Peru Margin sediments were found to closely parallel trends in total organic carbon, increasing in abundance among grain size fractions in proportion to sediment surface area. Coincident with the increases in absolute abundance, rhamnose and mannose increased as a fraction of the total carbohydrate yield in concert with surface area, indicating these monomers were preferentially represented in carbohydrates associated with surfaces. Lignin oxidation product yields varied with surface area when normalized to organic carbon, suggesting that the terrestrially-derived component may be diluted by sorption of marine derived material. Lignin-based parameters suggest a separate source for terrestrially derived material associated with sand-size material as opposed to that associated with silts and clays. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  20. The effect of grain size and surface area on organic matter, lignin and carbohydrate concentration, and molecular compositions in Peru Margin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Tsamakis, Elizabeth; Keil, Richard G.; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Montluçon, Daniel B.; Hedges, John I.

    1997-03-01

    A C-rich sediment sample from the Peru Margin was sorted into nine hydrodynamically-determined grain size fractions to explore the effect of grain size distribution and sediment surface area on organic matter content and composition. The neutral monomeric carbohydrate composition, lignin oxidation product yields, total organic carbon, and total nitrogen contents were determined independently for each size fraction, in addition to sediment surface area and abundance of biogenic opal. The percent organic carbon and percent total nitrogen were strongly related to surface area in these sediments. In turn, the distribution of surface area closely followed mass distribution among the textural size classes, suggesting hydrodynamic controls on grain size also control organic carbon content. Nevertheless, organic compositional distinctions were observed between textural size classes. Total neutral carbohydrate yields in the Peru Margin sediments were found to closely parallel trends in total organic carbon, increasing in abundance among grain size fractions in proportion to sediment surface area. Coincident with the increases in absolute abundance, rhamnose and mannose increased as a fraction of the total carbohydrate yield in concert with surface area, indicating these monomers were preferentially represented in carbohydrates associated with surfaces. Lignin oxidation product yields varied with surface area when normalized to organic carbon, suggesting that the terrestrially-derived component may be diluted by sorption of marine derived material. Lignin-based parameters suggest a separate source for terrestrially derived material associated with sand-size material as opposed to that associated with silts and clays.

  1. The biogeochemistry of carbon in continental slope sediments: The North Carolina margin

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Levin, L.; DeMaster, D.; Plaia, G.; Martin, C.; Fornes, W.; Thomas, C.; Pope, R.

    1999-12-01

    The responses of the continental slope benthos to organic detritus deposition were studied with a multiple trace approach. Study sites were offshore of Cape Fear (I) and Cape Hatteras (III), N.C. (both 850 m water depth) and were characterized by different organic C deposition rates, macrofaunal densities (III>I in both cases) and taxa. Natural abundances of {sup 13}C and {sup 12}C in particulate organic carbon (POC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and macrofauna indicate that the reactive organic detritus is marine in origin. Natural abundance levels of {sup 14}C and uptake of {sup 13}C-labeled diatoms by benthic animals indicate that they incorporate a relatively young component of carbon into their biomass. {sup 13}C-labeled diatoms (Thalassiorsira pseudonana) tagged with {sup 210}Pb, slope sediment tagged with {sup 113}Sn and {sup 228}Th-labeled glass beads were emplaced in plots on the seafloor at both locations and the plots were sampled after 30 min., 1-1.5 d and 14 mo. At Site I, tracer diatom was intercepted at the surface primarily by protozoans and surface-feeding annelids. Little of the diatom C penetrated below 2 cm even after 14 months. Oxidation of organic carbon appeared to be largely aerobic. At Site III, annelids were primarily responsible for the initial uptake of tracer. On the time scale of days, diatom C was transported to a depth of 12 cm and was found in animals collected between 5-10 cm. The hoeing of tracer from the surface by the maldanid Praxillela sp. may have been responsible for some of the rapid nonlocal transport. Oxidation of the diatom organic carbon was evident to at least 10 cm depth. Anaerobic breakdown of organic matter is more important at Site III. Horizontal transport, which was probably biologically mediated, was an order of magnitude more rapid than vertical displacement over a year time scale. If the horizontal transport was associated with biochemical transformations of the organic matter, it may represent an

  2. High Sedimentation Rate Paleomagnetic Records for the Last 70 kyrs From the Chilean Margin (ODP Sites 1233, 1234, 1235)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoner, J. S.; Lund, S.; Channell, J. E.; Mix, A. C.; Davies, M. H.; Lamy, F.

    2008-12-01

    Sediments that accumulate at around 1-m/kyr or greater preserve a paleomagnetic record that, under favorable conditions, may record the original geomagnetic input with little smoothing. However, such great rates of accumulation come with a price as features of interest are often deeply buried and may only be adequately recovered using drilling technologies. Here we present a full-vector geomagnetic reconstruction for the last 70,000 yrs from ultrahigh resolution records obtained through ODP drilling (Leg 202) on the Chilean Margin. ODP Site 1233 (41.0 S, 74.26 W, water depth 838 m) provides a 135-mcd u-channel derived directional paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) and relative paleointensity (RPI) records. The chronology is constrained by AMS radiocarbon dates and tuning of alkenone sea surface temperature to Antarctic ice core temperature records back to 70,000 years BP. To the north, ODP Sites 1234 (36.13 S, 73.40W, water depth 1015 m) and 1235 (36.9 S, 73.33 W, water depth 489 m) provide independently dated shipboard and developing u-channel paleomagnetic records that reproduce many of the geomagnetic features observed at Site 1233 including excursions and high amplitude PSV intervals, while providing additional radiocarbon and isotopic constraints for development of a regional master chronology. All three Sites have exceptionally high glacial sedimentation rates that average 2-m/kyr for 1233, 80-cm/kyr for 1234 and 1-m/kyr for 1235. Fortuitously, the Laschamp magnetic excursion at Site 1233 occurs during an interval where sedimentation rates exceed 3-m/kyr. The Site 1233 chronology indicates that the Laschamp event, centered at 41,000 yrs BP, has a duration in reverse polarity of only 600 yrs, with polarity transitions occurring in less than 200 yrs within a 1500 yr long interval of low RPI. The path of virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) positions for the Laschamp excursion at Site 1233 is generally consistent with the hypothesis of a simple field geometry

  3. Organic matter pools, C turnover and meiofaunal biodiversity in the sediments of the western Spitsbergen deep continental margin, Svalbard Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusceddu, A.; Carugati, L.; Gambi, C.; Mienert, J.; Petani, B.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.; Canals, M.; Heussner, S.; Danovaro, R.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated organic matter (OM) quantity, nutritional quality and degradation rates, as well as abundance and biodiversity of meiofauna and nematodes along the deep continental margin off Spitsbergen, in the Svalbard Archipelago. Sediment samples were collected in July 2010 and 2011 along a bathymetric gradient between 600 m and 2000 m depth, and total mass flux measured at the same depths from July 2010 to July 2011. In both sampling periods sedimentary OM contents and C degradation rates increased significantly with water depth, whereas OM nutritional quality was generally higher at shallower depths, with the unique exception at 600 m depth in 2010. Meiofaunal abundance and biomass (largely dominated by nematodes) showed the highest values at intermediate depths (ca 1500 m) in both sampling periods. The richness of meiofaunal higher taxa and nematode species richness did not vary significantly with water depth in both sampling periods. We suggest here that patterns in OM quantity, C degradation rates, and meiofauna community composition in 2011 were likely influenced by the intensification of the warm West Spitsbergen Current (WSC). We hypothesize that the intensity of the WSC inflow to the Arctic Ocean could have an important role on benthic biodiversity and functioning of deep-sea Arctic ecosystems.

  4. Variations in Organic Matter Burial and Composition in Sediments from the Indian Ocean Continental Margin Off SW Indonesia (Sumatra - Java - Flores) Since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennerjahn, T. C.; Gesierich, K.; Schefuß, E.; Mohtadi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Global climate change is a mosaic of regional changes to a large extent determined by region-specific feedbacks between climate and ecosystems. At present the ocean is forming a major sink in the global carbon cycle. Organic matter (OM) storage in sediments displays large regional variations and varied over time during the Quaternary. Upwelling regions are sites of high primary productivity and major depocenters of organic carbon (OC), the least understood of which is the Indian Ocean upwelling off Indonesia. In order to reconstruct the burial and composition of OM during the Late Quaternary, we analyzed five sediment cores from the Indian Ocean continental margin off the Indonesian islands Sumatra to Flores spanning the last 20,000 years (20 kyr). Sediments were analyzed for bulk composition, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes of OM, amino acids and hexosamines and terrestrial plant wax n-alkanes and their stable carbon isotope composition. Sedimentation rates hardly varied over time in the western part of the transect. They were slightly lower in the East during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and deglaciation, but increased strongly during the Holocene. The amount and composition of OM was similar along the transect with maximum values during the deglaciation and the late Holocene. High biogenic opal covarying with OM content indicates upwelling-induced primary productivity dominated by diatoms to be a major control of OM burial in sediments in the East during the past 20 kyr. The content of labile OM was low throughout the transect during the LGM and increased during the late Holocene. The increase was stronger and the OM less degraded in the East than in the West indicating that continental margin sediments off Java and Flores were the major depocenter of OC burial along the Indian Ocean margin off SW Indonesia. Temporal variations probably resulted from changes in upwelling intensity and terrestrial inputs driven by variations in monsoon strength.

  5. Sediment dispersal system in the Taiwan-South China Sea collision zone along a convergent margin in the perspective of source to sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, K.; Yu, H.

    2011-12-01

    Through a large-scale examination of the morpho-sedimentary features on seafloor in the Taiwan-Luzon convergent margin, we determined the main sediment dispersal system which stretches from 23°N to 20°N and displays as an aligned linear sediment pathway, consisting of the Penghu Canyon, the deep-sea Penghu Channel and northern Manila Trench. The seafloor of South China Sea (SCS) north of 21°N are underlain by a triangle-shaped collision basin, resulting from oblique collision between the Luzon Arc and Chinese margin, and is mainly occupied by two juxtaposed slopes, the SCS and Kaoping slopes. The Penghu Canyon is located along the tilting basin axis where is the physiographic boundary separating the SCS and Kaoping slopes. Progressive subsidence of the basin floor from this nearby uplifted Taiwan orogen results in the linear basin axis deepening and tilting towards the open SCS, serving as a longitudinal sediment conduit. Two major tributary canyons of the Formosa and Kaoping and small channels and gullies on both slopes join into the axial Penghu Canyon and form a dendritic canyon drainage system in this collision basin. The canyon drainage system is characteristic of lateral sediment supply from flank slopes and axial sediment transport down-canyon following the tilting basin axis. The significance of the collision basin in term of source to sink is that terrestrial and shallow marine sediments derived from nearby Taiwan orogen, Chinese margin and the Taiwan Strait are transported to and accumulated in the collision basin, serving as a temporary sediment sink and the major marine transport route along the basin axis. The multi-sourced sediments in the collision basin are then delivered down-dip via the Penghu Canyon to the deep-sea Penghu Channel and ultimately to the final destination of the Manila Trench, representing a regional longitudinal sediment dispersal route along the convergent margin between Taiwan and Luzon. A comparison with other examples is a

  6. Late Quaternary slip on the Santa Cruz Island fault, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pinter, N.; Lueddecke, S.B.; Keller, E.A.; Simmons, K.R.

    1998-01-01

    The style, timing, and pattern of slip on the Santa Cruz Island fault were investigated by trenching the fault and by analysis of offset late Quaternary landforms. A trench excavated across the fault at Christi Beach, on the western coast of the island, exposed deformation of latest Pleistocene to Holocene sediments and pre-Quaternary rocks, recording repeated large-magnitude rupture events. The most recent earthquake at this site occurred ca. 5 ka. Coastal terraces preserved on western Santa Cruz Island have been dated using the uranium-series technique and by extrapolation using terrace elevations and the eustatic record. Offset of terraces and other landforms indicates that the Santa Cruz Island fault is predominantly left lateral, having a horizontal slip rate of not more than 1.1 mm/yr and probably about 0.8 mm/yr. The fault also has a smaller reverse component, slipping at a rate of between 0.1 and 0.2 mm/yr. Combined with measurements of slip per event, this information suggests a long-term average recurrence interval of at least 2.7 k.y. and probably 4-5 k.y., and average earthquake magnitudes of Mw 7.2-7.5. Sense of slip, recurrence interval, and earthquake magnitudes calculated here for the Santa Cruz Island fault are very similar to recent results for other faults along the southern margin of the western Transverse Range, including the Malibu Coast fault, the Santa Monica fault, the Hollywood fault, and the Raymond fault, supporting the contention that these faults constitute a continuous and linked fault system, which is characterized by large but relatively infrequent earthquakes.

  7. Magnetic Properties of Sediments from IODP Expedition 311 - Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates: Records of Fossil Sulphate Methane Interface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkin, R. J.; Baker, J.; Esteban, L.; Mullin, A. J.; Paterson, B.; Hamilton, T. S.; Michael, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition 311 sampled a transect across the Cascadia continental margin of North America to study the occurrence of gas hydrates. Magnetic properties are sensitive to the diagenetic history, and particularly the redox state associated with the transport of methane and the creation of gas hydrates. Additionally, they offer the possiblility of a remote sensing method to explore for gas hydrates deposits. Aboard the Joides Resolution, remanence and magnetic susceptibility measurement were made on recovered core and 1692 discrete samples were taken, approximately every 50 cm, for further study at the Geological Survey of Canada - Pacific laboratory. Magnetic remanence, hysteresis loops, isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curves and thermomagnetic variation of susceptibility were measured to characterize the mineralogy, domain state, and direction of magnetization of the magnetic carriers. Almost all samples hold normal polarity remanence, except in two holes (1327C and 1329C) which have ~ 30m reverse polarity intervals. Cores taken with the Extended Core Barrel usually are overprinted by a large vertical remanence overprint. Throughout the collection we observe two distinct magnetic behaviors: type-A and type-B. These behaviors are relatively uniform within depth intervals of up to several 10s of meters and are apparently unrelated to present gas hydrate concentration as estimated from electric resistivity variations. Type-A samples are an order of magnitude stronger than type-B samples in saturation magnetization and magnetic susceptibility. They also have lower magnetic coercivity, multidomain coercivity ratios, little superparamagnetism, and Curie temperatures of 580°C. The type-A samples are interpreted to hold primary detrital magnetite. The type-B samples have single-domain to pseudo-single domain coercivity ratios and they readily transform to a high susceptibility mineral on heating above 400°C. We

  8. Glaciomarine sedimentation and bottom current activity on the north-western and northern continental margins of Svalbard during the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Teena; Noormets, Riko; Rasmussen, Tine L.

    2016-04-01

    Palaeo-bottom current strength of the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) and the influence of the Svalbard-Barents Sea Ice Sheet (SBIS) on the depositional environment along the northern Svalbard margins are poorly known. Two gravity cores from the southern Yermak Plateau and the upper slope north of Nordaustlandet, covering marine isotope stage (MIS) 1 to MIS 5, are investigated. Five lithofacies, based on grain size distribution, silt/clay ratio, content and mean of sortable silt (SS), are distinguished to characterise the contourite-dominated sedimentary environments. In addition, depositional environments are described using total organic carbon (TOC), total sulphur (TS) and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) contents of sediments. Facies A, containing coarse SS, suggests strong bottom current activity and good bottom water ventilation conditions as inferred from low TOC content. This facies was deposited during the glacial periods MIS 4, MIS 2 and during the late Holocene. Facies B is dominated by fine SS indicating weak bottom current and poor ventilation (cf. high TOC content of 1.2-1.6%), and correlates with the MIS 4/3 and MIS 2/1 transition periods. With an equal amount of clay and sand, fine SS and high content of TOC, facies C indicates reduced bottom current strength for intervals with sediment supply from proximal sources such as icebergs, sea ice or meltwater discharge. This facies was deposited during the last glacial maximum. Facies D represents mass-flow deposits on the northern Svalbard margin attributed to the SBIS advance at or near the shelf edge. Facies E sediments indicating moderate bottom current strength were deposited during MIS 5 and MIS 3, and during parts of MIS 2. This first late Quaternary proxy record of the WSC flow and sedimentation history from the northern Svalbard margin suggests that the oceanographic conditions and ice sheet processes have exerted first-order control on sediment properties.

  9. Organic geochemistry of sediments from the continental margin off southern New England, U.S.A.--Part I. Amino acids, carbohydrates and lignin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, S. M.; Venkatesan, M. I.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1987-01-01

    Total organic carbon (TOC), lignin, amino acids, sugars and amino sugars were measured in recent sediments for the continental margin off southern New England. The various organic carbon fractions decreased in concentration with increasing distance from shore. The fraction of the TOC that was accounted for by these major components also decreased with increasing distance from shore. The concentration of lignin indicated that only about 3-5% of the organic carbon in the nearshore sediment was of terrestrial origin. The various fractions were highly correlated, which was consistent with a simple linear mixing model of shelf organic matter with material form the slope and rise and indicated a significant transport of sediment from the continental shelf to the continental slope and rise.

  10. Influence of the Portuguese Bend landslide on the character of the effluent-affected sediment deposit, Palos Verdes margin, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, R.E.; Lee, H.J.; Hein, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    Historic accretion of sediment on the Palos Verdes margin off Los Angeles County, CA, is dominated by two sources, effluent from Whites Point outfall and sediment eroded from the toe of Portuguese Bend landslide. In this paper, we document the recent history of sedimentation from these non-marine sources from 1937 until the late 1990s, and attempt to estimate the amount of material preserved on the shelf. Toward that end, we characterized offshore sediment by physical and geotechnical testing, using non-destructive gamma-ray whole-core logging techniques and conventional geotechnical strength tests, and X-ray diffraction. Results are reported within a geographic information system framework that allows for: (1) the evaluation of the spatial variability of the measured properties, and (2) assessment of the influence of these properties on processes affecting the effluent-affected Sediment layer. In the inner shelf, material eroded by wave action from the toe of the Portuguese Bend landslide since 1956 has contributed 5.7-9.4 million metric tons (Mmt) of sediment, from a total eroded mass of 12.1 Mmt. A lesser fraction (???2.7Mmt) of sediment is incorporated into the mid- and outer-shelf effluent-affected sediment layer. Evidence from X-ray diffractograms clearly indicates that landslide material has mixed with the mid- and outer-shelf effluent. From 1937-1987, it is estimated that 3.8 Mmt of solid anthropogenic effluent was discharged into the water column and onto the Palos Verdes Shelf.

  11. Modeling sulfate reduction in methane hydrate-bearing continental margin sediments: Does a sulfate-methane transition require anaerobic oxidation of methane?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malinverno, A.; Pohlman, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The sulfate-methane transition (SMT), a biogeochemical zone where sulfate and methane are metabolized, is commonly observed at shallow depths (1-30 mbsf) in methane-bearing marine sediments. Two processes consume sulfate at and above the SMT, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organoclastic sulfate reduction (OSR). Differentiating the relative contribution of each process is critical to estimate methane flux into the SMT, which, in turn, is necessary to predict deeper occurrences of gas hydrates in continental margin sediments. To evaluate the relative importance of these two sulfate reduction pathways, we developed a diagenetic model to compute the pore water concentrations of sulfate, methane, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). By separately tracking DIC containing 12C and 13C, the model also computes ??13C-DIC values. The model reproduces common observations from methane-rich sediments: a well-defined SMT with no methane above and no sulfate below and a ??13C-DIC minimum at the SMT. The model also highlights the role of upward diffusing 13C-enriched DIC in contributing to the carbon isotope mass balance of DIC. A combination of OSR and AOM, each consuming similar amounts of sulfate, matches observations from Site U1325 (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 311, northern Cascadia margin). Without AOM, methane diffuses above the SMT, which contradicts existing field data. The modeling results are generalized with a dimensional analysis to the range of SMT depths and sedimentation rates typical of continental margins. The modeling shows that AOM must be active to establish an SMT wherein methane is quantitatively consumed and the ??13C-DIC minimum occurs. The presence of an SMT generally requires active AOM. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. The modern reef complex, Jeddah area, Red Sea: a facies model for carbonate sedimentation on embryonic passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaggioni, L. F.; Behairy, A. K. A.; El-Sayed, M. K.; Yusuf, N.

    1986-12-01

    The modern reef complex north of Jeddah comprises an offshore knoll platform and a fringing reef, subdivised into several depositional zones: tops and upper flanks of offshore reefs; lower flanks of offshore reefs and nearby inter-reef areas; fringing forereef, reef flat and backreef zones, and beach. Sixty-seven sediment samples were collected from the different zones and have been analysed in order to define relationships between the distribution of sedimentary facies and the depositional environments, and to furnish a reliable facies model by using multivariate analysis. Six types and subtypes have been objectively differentiated on the basis of total biogenic component and foraminiferal associations. Grain size data allowed us to discriminate three textural types, whereas five chemotypes have been recognized according to trace element concentration. Regarding the offshore reef platform, poorly sorted, medium sands of molluscan-coralline algal- Amphistegina and Cd types are restricted to the lower flanks of buildups and to the adjacent inter-reef deposits, whereas the tops and upper flanks of theses buildups are characterized by moderately sorted, coarse sands of coralline algal- Tubipora-Amphistegina-encrusting foraminiferal-bryozoan types, with a Mn chemotype. Concerning the fringing reef system, backreef areas exhibit poorly sorted, fine sands of molluscan- Ammonia-Peneroplis and Fe-Cu types. Moderately sorted, coarse sands of coralgal- Calcarina-Spiroloculina and Fe-Zn types are found on the reef flat. The forereef zone is characterized by poorly sorted, fine sand of Triloculina-encrusting foraminiferal-bryozoan and Zn-Mn types. The lateral limits of the various biotypes roughly coincide with the distribution of the relevant living organic communities. Trace elements appear to be either bound to the reef-associated silicate fractions or incorporated into the carbonate skeletons. On the basis of prevailing water conditions, physiography, biological and

  13. Integrated Mineralogic, Magnetic, Geochemical, and Isotopic Tracers of Sediment Provenance for the Circum-Antarctic Margin (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachfeld, S. A.; Cuomo, D. M.; van de Flierdt, T.; Hemming, S. R.; Dale, C. L.; Goldstein, S. L.; Pierce, E. L.; Williams, T.

    2010-12-01

    An important component to understanding past dynamics of Antarctica’s ice sheets is determining which parts of the ice sheets have responded to climate change. If a fingerprint for different ice drainage basins can be determined, we can potentially match Southern Ocean ice rafted debris back to its most probable source, providing a means of identifying the source of iceberg-generating events through time. Obtaining the maximum information on the regional variability of sediment sources requires a spectrum of strategies. This work integrates a new study of iron oxide geochemistry and textures with magnetic properties, major and trace element and Nd isotope composition of bulk sediment, and Ar-Ar ages of detrital hornblende grains. We analyzed the geochemistry and mineral textures of iron oxide grains contained in glacial-marine diamict and dropstones from the East Antarctic Margin. Diamict and dropstones recovered in fjords, bays, and inner shelf basins represent sub-glacially derived and transported material from the adjacent ice sheet drainage basin. These materials can be used to investigate the bedrock below the Antarctic Ice Sheet in regions where outcrops are absent or inaccessible. Last glacial maximum diamict from the George V Coast, Prydz Bay, Svenner Channel, and the Mac. Robertson Coast were divided into size fractions and mineral fractions to construct a suite of provenance tracers. Iron oxides in the 45-500 µm size fraction were mounted and polished for reflected light microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. The George V Coast is dominated by magnetite, with minor ilmenite, and hematite. The Mn-rich silicate rhodonite was also present. The magnetite grains contain significant Mn substituting for Fe. Grains are generally smaller than 100 μm, euhedral and homogeneous. Iron oxides from Prydz Bay are 100-250 μm in diameter and show three main textures. We observed homogeneous grains, magnetite host grains with narrow exsolved ilmenite bodies, and

  14. Differences in meiofauna communities with sediment depth are greater than habitat effects on the New Zealand continental margin: implications for vulnerability to anthropogenic disturbance.

    PubMed

    Rosli, Norliana; Leduc, Daniel; Rowden, Ashley A; Clark, Malcolm R; Probert, P Keith; Berkenbusch, Katrin; Neira, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Studies of deep-sea benthic communities have largely focused on particular (macro) habitats in isolation, with few studies considering multiple habitats simultaneously in a comparable manner. Compared to mega-epifauna and macrofauna, much less is known about habitat-related variation in meiofaunal community attributes (abundance, diversity and community structure). Here, we investigated meiofaunal community attributes in slope, canyon, seamount, and seep habitats in two regions on the continental slope of New Zealand (Hikurangi Margin and Bay of Plenty) at four water depths (700, 1,000, 1,200 and 1,500 m). We found that patterns were not the same for each community attribute. Significant differences in abundance were consistent across regions, habitats, water and sediment depths, while diversity and community structure only differed between sediment depths. Abundance was higher in canyon and seep habitats compared with other habitats, while between sediment layer, abundance and diversity were higher at the sediment surface. Our findings suggest that meiofaunal community attributes are affected by environmental factors that operate on micro- (cm) to meso- (0.1-10 km), and regional scales (> 100 km). We also found a weak, but significant, correlation between trawling intensity and surface sediment diversity. Overall, our results indicate that variability in meiofaunal communities was greater at small scale than at habitat or regional scale. These findings provide new insights into the factors controlling meiofauna in these deep-sea habitats and their potential vulnerability to anthropogenic activities. PMID:27441114

  15. Differences in meiofauna communities with sediment depth are greater than habitat effects on the New Zealand continental margin: implications for vulnerability to anthropogenic disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Daniel; Rowden, Ashley A.; Clark, Malcolm R.; Probert, P. Keith; Berkenbusch, Katrin; Neira, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Studies of deep-sea benthic communities have largely focused on particular (macro) habitats in isolation, with few studies considering multiple habitats simultaneously in a comparable manner. Compared to mega-epifauna and macrofauna, much less is known about habitat-related variation in meiofaunal community attributes (abundance, diversity and community structure). Here, we investigated meiofaunal community attributes in slope, canyon, seamount, and seep habitats in two regions on the continental slope of New Zealand (Hikurangi Margin and Bay of Plenty) at four water depths (700, 1,000, 1,200 and 1,500 m). We found that patterns were not the same for each community attribute. Significant differences in abundance were consistent across regions, habitats, water and sediment depths, while diversity and community structure only differed between sediment depths. Abundance was higher in canyon and seep habitats compared with other habitats, while between sediment layer, abundance and diversity were higher at the sediment surface. Our findings suggest that meiofaunal community attributes are affected by environmental factors that operate on micro- (cm) to meso- (0.1–10 km), and regional scales (> 100 km). We also found a weak, but significant, correlation between trawling intensity and surface sediment diversity. Overall, our results indicate that variability in meiofaunal communities was greater at small scale than at habitat or regional scale. These findings provide new insights into the factors controlling meiofauna in these deep-sea habitats and their potential vulnerability to anthropogenic activities. PMID:27441114

  16. Sediment movement and dispersal patterns on the Grand Banks continental shelf and slope were tied to the dynamics of the Laurentide ice-sheet margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, H.; MacKillop, K.; Piper, D.; Vermooten, M.; Higgins, J.; Marche, B.; Langer, K.; Brockway, B.; Spicer, H. E.; Webb, M. D.; Fournier, E.

    2015-12-01

    The expansion and contraction of the late Pleistocene Laurentide ice-sheet (LIS) was the crucial determining factor for the geomorphic features and shelf and slope sediment mobility on the eastern Canadian continental margin, with abundant mass-transport deposits (MTDs) seaward of ice margins on the upper slope. Here, we report for the first time sediment failure and mass-transport deposits from the central Grand Banks slope in the Salar and Carson petroleum basins. High-resolution seismic profiles and multibeam bathymetry show numerous sediment failure scarps in 500-1600 m water depth. There is no evidence for an ice margin on the upper slope younger than MIS 6. Centimeter-scale X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), grain size, and oxygen isotope data from piston cores constrain sediment processes over the past 46 ka. Geotechnical measurements including Atterberg limit tests, vane shear measurements and triaxial and multi-stage isotropic consolidation tests allowed us to assess the instability on the continental margin. Cores with continuous undisturbed stratigraphy in contourite silty muds show normal downcore increase in bulk density and undrained peak shear strength. Heinrich (H) layers are identifiable by a marked increase in the bulk density, high Ca (ppm), increase in iceberg-rafted debris and lighter δ18O in the polar planktonic foram Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral): with a few C-14 dates they provide a robust chronology. There is no evidence for significant supply of sediment from the Grand Banks at the last-glacial maximum. Mass-transport deposits (MTD) are marked by variability in the bulk density, undrained shear strength and little variation in bulk density or Ca (ppm) values. The MTD are older than 46 ka on the central Grand Banks slope, whereas younger MTDs are present in southern Flemish Pass. Factor of safety calculations suggest the slope is statically stable up to gradients of 10°, but more intervals of silty mud may fail during earthquake

  17. Conditions and mechanism for the formation of iron-rich Montmorillonite in deep sea sediments (Costa Rica margin): Coupling high resolution mineralogical characterization and geochemical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, D.; Buatier, M. D.; Jacquot, E.; Gaudin, A.; Wheat, C. G.

    2011-03-01

    Iron-rich smectite is commonly described in the diagenetic fraction of deep-sea sediment, as millimeter to centimeter aggregates dispersed in the sediment, or as a coating on sedimentary particles or nodules. This study examines several factors to elucidate formation mechanisms of a particular iron-rich smectite and its potential transformation to glauconite. The study combines a detailed mineralogical investigation on natural samples and a chemical modeling approach to assess mineralogical reactions and pathways. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations and analytical electron microscopy (TEM-AEM) analyses were conducted on microtomed samples of millimeter- to centimeter-long green grains. These grains are widespread in pelagic calcareous sediment from the Costa Rica margin. They are composed of pyrites that are partially dissolved and are surrounded by amorphous or very poorly crystallized iron-rich particles. Iron-rich montmorillonite grows from an amorphous precursor and its formation requires the input of Si, O, Mg, K, Na and Ca; our results suggest that these inputs are supported by the dissolution of sedimentary phases such as volcanic glasses, siliceous fossils and silicates. Thermodynamic modeling of fluid-sediment interactions was conducted with the geochemical computer code PhreeqC, using mineralogical and pore fluid compositions from sediment samples and calculated estimates for thermodynamic constants of smectites that are not maintained by the computer code. Simulations confirm the possibility that the green grains are the product of pyrite alteration by seawater under oxidizing conditions. The extent of smectite production is controlled by the kinetics of pyrite dissolution and fluid migration. The absence of aluminum in the Costa Rica margin system explains the formation of an iron-rich montmorillonite instead of glauconite, whereas the presence of calcite that buffers the system explains the formation of an iron-rich montmorillonite

  18. Carbon cycling on the continental margin evidence from sediment 14-C and nutrient elements. Progress report, October 1992--October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This progress report discusses field equipment acquisition, fabrication, sample collection and sample analysis of sea bottom sediments. Investigators also discussed the Neuse River Estuary Experiment.

  19. Geomorphology, acoustic backscatter, and processes in Santa Monica Bay from multibeam mapping.

    PubMed

    Gardner, James V; Dartnell, Peter; Mayer, Larry A; Hughes Clarke, John E

    2003-01-01

    Santa Monica Bay was mapped in 1996 using a high-resolution multibeam system, providing the first substantial update of the submarine geomorphology since the initial compilation by Shepard and Emery [(1941) Geol. Soc. Amer. Spec. Paper 31]. The multibeam mapping generated not only high-resolution bathymetry, but also coregistered, calibrated acoustic backscatter at 95 kHz. The geomorphology has been subdivided into six provinces; shelf, marginal plateau, submarine canyon, basin slope, apron, and basin. The dimensions, gradients, and backscatter characteristics of each province is described and related to a combination of tectonics, climate, sea level, and sediment supply. Fluctuations of eustatic sea level have had a profound effect on the area; by periodically eroding the surface of Santa Monica plateau, extending the mouth of the Los Angeles River to various locations along the shelf break, and by connecting submarine canyons to rivers. A wetter glacial climate undoubtedly generated more sediment to the rivers that then transported the increased sediment load to the low-stand coastline and canyon heads. The trends of Santa Monica Canyon and several bathymetric highs suggest a complex tectonic stress field that has controlled the various segments. There is no geomorphic evidence to suggest Redondo Canyon is fault controlled. The San Pedro fault can be extended more than 30 km to the northwest by the alignment of a series of bathymetric highs and abrupt changes in direction of channel thalwegs. PMID:12648948

  20. An Assessment of Global Organic Carbon Flux Along Continental Margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thunell, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This project was designed to use real-time and historical SeaWiFS and AVHRR data, and real-time MODIS data in order to estimate the global vertical carbon flux along continental margins. This required construction of an empirical model relating surface ocean color and physical variables like temperature and wind to vertical settling flux at sites co-located with sediment trap observations (Santa Barbara Basin, Cariaco Basin, Gulf of California, Hawaii, and Bermuda, etc), and application of the model to imagery in order to obtain spatially-weighted estimates.

  1. Evolution of post-rift sediment transport on a young rifted margin : Insights from the eastern part of the Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baurion, C.; Gorini, C.; Leroy, S.; Lucazeau, F.; Migeon, S.

    2012-04-01

    The formation of gravity-driven sedimentary systems on continental rifted margins results from the interaction between climate, ocean currents and tectonic activity. During the early stages of margin evolution, the tectonic processes are probably as important as climate for the sedimentary architecture. Therefore, the young margins (ca. 35 Ma) of the Gulf of Aden provide the opportunity to evaluate the respective roles of monsoon and tectonic uplift in the formation and evolution through the post-rift period of gravity-driven deposits (Mass Transport Complexes (MTCs) and deep-sea systems) on the continental slopes and in the oceanic basin respectively. Here we present a combined geomorphologic and stratigraphic study of the northern margin (Oman and Yemen) and the southern margin (Socotra island), in which we classified and interpreted the gravity-driven processes, their formation and their evolution during the post-rift period. The interpretation of seismic lines reveals the presence of bottom currents since the drift phase, suggesting that the Gulf of Aden was connected to the world oceans at that time. An abrupt depositional change affected the eastern basin of the Gulf of Aden around 10 Ma or thereafter (Chron 5), characterised by the first occurrence of deep sea fans and an increase in the number of MTCs. The first occurrence of MTCs may be explained by the combined 2nd-3rd order fall of the relative sea-level (Serravalian/Tortonian transition). This variation of relative sea level combined with a climatic switch (Asian monsoon onset around 15 Ma and its intensification around 7-8 Ma) control the sediment flux. The youngest unit of the post-rift supersequence is characterised by a second important MTC occurrence that is restricted to the eastern part of the deep basin. This is caused by a late uplift of the northern and southern margins witnessed onshore by the presence of young stepped marine terraces.

  2. Early Diagenesis of Subseafloor Sandy Sediments Closely Related to Gas Hydrate Occurrences and Their Provenances in the Eastern Margin of Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Sakai, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Matsumoto, R.

    2015-12-01

    A lot of effort have been put into recovering gas hydrate, methane induced carbonate, and associated sediments in order to develop the geologic model of gas hydrate accumulation and evaluate its possible environmental impact for the last glacial-interglacial cycles. Having investigated gas hydrate occurrences in the eastern margin of Japan Sea revealed wide distributions of chimney-shape gas hydrate concentrations beneath the seafloor, confirmed off Shimane and off Akita/Yamagata as well as off Joetsu (Niigata), which are quite different from the occurrences of pore space hydrate filling intergranular pore systems of sands recognized in Nankai Trough, Mallik and other sites. Many sediment samples have been obtained below from the Umitaka Spur, Joetsu Channel, Toyama Trough, Mogami Trough and Okushiri Ridge areas. Small amounts of sandy sediment have been retrieved as thin intercalations in Holocene and Pleistocene silty/muddy layers, where trace fossils and strong bioturbations are commonly observed. Sandy sediments consist of very fine- to fine-grained sand grains, and are sometimes tuffaceous. Pore-size distribution measurements and thin-section observations of these sands were carried out, which indicate that porosities of silty sediments are around 50 % but those of arenites range from 42 to 52 %, of which mean pore sizes and permeabilities are larger than those of silty sediments. These coarser sediments might have been transported approximately around 3 to 30 ka due to the tephra ages, where supplying sediments might be abundant due to sea level fluctuation during the Pleistocene ice age. Sandy sediments contain not only detrital quartz and feldspar but mafic minerals (pyroxene, amphibole and mica), contents of which may indicate their provenances. Silty/muddy sediments usually contain diatom tests, foraminifers and framboidal pyrites, and, in particular, the shapes of diatom are usually various, dominantly fragmental and infrequently preserved. It is

  3. Estimates of Biogenic Methane Production Rates in Deep Marine Sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Margin ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, F. S.; Boyd, S.; Delwiche, M. E.; Reed, D. W.; Phelps, T. J.; Newby, D. T.

    2008-01-01

    Methane hydrate found in marine sediments is thought to contain gigaton quantities of methane and is considered an important potential fuel source and climate-forcing agent. Much of the methane in hydrates is biogenic, so models that predict the presence and distribution of hydrates require accurate rates of in situ methanogenesis. We estimated the in situ methanogenesis rates in Hydrate Ridge (HR) sediments by coupling experimentally derived minimal rates of methanogenesis to methanogen biomass determinations for discrete locations in the sediment column. When starved in a biomass recycle reactor, Methanoculleus submarinus produced ca. 0.017 fmol methane/cell/day. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) directed at the methyl coenzyme M reductase subunit A gene (mcrA) indicated that 75% of the HR sediments analyzed contained <1,000 methanogens/g. The highest numbers of methanogens were found mostly from sediments <10 m below seafloor. By considering methanogenesis rates for starved methanogens (adjusted to account for in situ temperatures) and the numbers of methanogens at selected depths, we derived an upper estimate of <4.25 fmol methane produced/g sediment/day for the samples with fewer methanogens than the QPCR method could detect. The actual rates could vary depending on the real number of methanogens and various seafloor parameters that influence microbial activity. However, our calculated rate is lower than rates previously reported for such sediments and close to the rate derived using geochemical modeling of the sediments. These data will help to improve models that predict microbial gas generation in marine sediments and determine the potential influence of this source of methane on the global carbon cycle. PMID:18344348

  4. Organic matter budget in the Southeast Atlantic continental margin close to the Congo Canyon: In situ measurements of sediment oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabouille, C.; Caprais, J.-C.; Lansard, B.; Crassous, P.; Dedieu, K.; Reyss, J. L.; Khripounoff, A.

    2009-12-01

    A study of organic carbon mineralization from the Congo continental shelf to the abyssal plain through the Congo submarine channel and Angola Margin was undertaken using in situ measurements of sediment oxygen demand as a tracer of benthic carbon recycling. Two measurement techniques were coupled on a single autonomous platform: in situ benthic chambers and microelectrodes, which provided total and diffusive oxygen uptake as well as oxygen microdistributions in porewaters. In addition, sediment trap fluxes, sediment composition (Org-C, Tot-N, CaCO 3, porosity) and radionuclide profiles provided measurements of, respectively input fluxes and burial rate of organic and inorganic compounds. The in situ results show that the oxygen consumption on this margin close to the Congo River is high with values of total oxygen uptake (TOU) of 4±0.6, 3.6±0.5 mmol m -2 d -1 at 1300 and 3100 m depth, respectively, and between 1.9±0.3 and 2.4±0.2 mmol m -2 d -1 at 4000 m depth. Diffusive oxygen uptakes (DOU) were 2.8±1.1, 2.3±0.8, 0.8±0.3 and 1.2±0.1 mmol m -2 d -1, respectively at the same depths. The magnitude of the oxygen demands on the slope is correlated with water depth but is not correlated with the proximity of the submarine channel-levee system, which indicates that cross-slope transport processes are active over the entire margin. Comparison of the vertical flux of organic carbon with its mineralization and burial reveal that this lateral input is very important since the sum of recycling and burial in the sediments is 5-8 times larger than the vertical flux recorded in traps. Transfer of material from the Congo River occurs through turbidity currents channelled in the Congo valley, which are subsequently deposited in the Lobe zone in the Congo fan below 4800 m. Ship board measurements of oxygen profiles indicate large mineralization rates of organic carbon in this zone, which agrees with the high organic carbon content (3%) and the large sedimentation rate (19

  5. Landscape response to late Pleistocene climate change along the Puna Plateau margin: Sediment flux and cosmogenic landslide signatures modulated by basin geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildgen, T. F.; Robinson, R. A. J.; Savi, S.; Phillips, W. M.; Spencer, J. Q. G.; Bookhagen, B.; Scherler, D.; Tofelde, S.; Alonso, R. N.; Kubik, P.; Binnie, S. A.; Strecker, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Along the steep flanks of the southern Central Andes (eastern margin of the Puna Plateau), fluvial fill terraces preserve archives of landscape response to climate change over millennial timescales. These archives record information about past erosion and aggradation rates, erosion processes, and even paleoclimate. In the Humahuaca Basin of NW Argentina, our 29 new optically stimulated luminescence ages of late Pleistocene fill terrace sediments demonstrate that past river aggradation occurred over different intervals on the west and east sides of the valley. On the west side, aggradation coincided with periods of increasing intensity of the South American Monsoon System and the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (increasing precipitation), while on the east side, aggradation coincided with periods of decreasing intensities of both systems (decreasing precipitation) or with more variable conditions. Denudation rates and grain-size dependencies from 70 new cosmogenic 10Be analyses reveal that landslides were more important during periods of increasing precipitation compared to today. On the west side of the valley, a sudden pulse of sediment led to aggradation near the intersection with the trunk stream. In contrast, on the east side, the pulse of sediment likely blocked the narrow bedrock gorges that characterize those catchments, leading to temporary sediment storage in upstream perched basins; sediment evacuation into the main valley occurred preferentially during periods of decreasing precipitation and fewer landslides. Different levels of fluvial connectivity to the trunk stream for the western and eastern catchments within the Humahuaca Basin produces heterogeneity in the locus of aggradation and the timing of sediment movement through the system. Hence, for larger basins that integrate sub-basins with differing geometries or degrees of connectivity, sedimentary responses to climate forcing are likely to be attenuated.

  6. Neodymium isotope constraints on provenance, dispersal, and climate-driven supply of Zambezi sediments along the Mozambique Margin during the past ˜45,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lubbe, H. J. L.; Frank, Martin; Tjallingii, Rik; Schneider, Ralph R.

    2016-01-01

    Marine sediments deposited off the Zambezi River that drains a considerable part of the southeast African continent provide continuous records of the continental climatic and environmental conditions. Here we present time series of neodymium (Nd) isotope signatures of the detrital sediment fraction during the past ˜45,000 years, to reconstruct climate-driven changes in the provenance of clays deposited along the Mozambique Margin. Coherent with the surface current regime, the Nd isotope distribution in surface sediments reveals mixing of the alongshore flowing Zambezi suspension load with sediments supplied by smaller rivers located further north. To reconstruct past changes in sediment provenances, Nd isotope signatures of clays that are not significantly fractionated during weathering processes have been obtained from core 64PE304-80, which was recovered just north of the Zambezi mouth at 1329 m water depth. Distinctly unradiogenic clay signatures (ɛNd values <-14.2) are found during the Last Glacial Maximum, Heinrich Stadial 1, and Younger Dryas. In contrast, the Nd isotope record shows higher, more radiogenic isotope signatures during Marine Isotope Stage 3 and between ˜15 and ˜5 ka BP, the latter coinciding with the timing of the northern hemisphere African Humid Period. The clay-sized sediment fraction with the least radiogenic Nd isotope signatures was deposited during the Holocene, when the adjacent Mozambique Shelf became completely flooded. In general, the contribution of the distinctly unradiogenic Zambezi suspension load has followed the intensity of precession-forced monsoonal precipitation and enhanced during periods of increased southern hemisphere insolation and high-latitude northern hemispheric climate variability.

  7. Phylogenetic Diversity of aprA Genes in Subseafloor Sediments on the Northwestern Pacific Margin off Japan.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masataka; Kakiuchi, Ryota; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Takai, Ken; Inagaki, Fumio; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Markedly diverse sequences of the adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase alpha subunit gene (aprA), which encodes a key enzyme in microbial sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation, were detected in subseafloor sediments on the northwestern Pacific off Japan. The aprA gene sequences were grouped into 135 operational taxonomic units (90% sequence identity), including genes related to putative sulfur-oxidizing bacteria predominantly detected in sulfate-depleted deep sediments. Our results suggest that microbial ecosystems in the subseafloor biosphere have phylogenetically diverse genetic potentials to mediate cryptic sulfur cycles in sediments, even where sulfate is rarely present. PMID:26156553

  8. Chemistry and mineralogy of pyrite-enriched sediments at a passive margin sulfide brine seep: abyssal Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Commeau, R.F.; Paull, C.K.; Commeau, J.A.; Poppe, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Pyrite is rapidly accumulating at the contact between the Cretaceous limestones of the Florida Platform and the hemipelagic sediments of the abyssal Gulf of Mexico. Sediments sampled with the submersible "Alvin" in 3266 m of water are associated with a dense community of organisms that depend on chemosynthetic primary production as a food source. Analysis of the chemistry, mineralogy, and textural composition of these sediments indicate that iron sulfide mineralization is occurring at the seafloor within an anoxic micro-habitat sustained by the advection of hydrogen sulfide-charged saline brines from the adjacent platform. The chemosynthetic bacteria that directly overlie the sediments oxidize hydrogen sulfide for energy and provide elemental sulfur that reacts with iron monosulfide to form some of the pyrite. The sediments are mixtures of pyrite (??? 30 wt.%), BaSr sulfates (??? 4 wt.%), clays, and locally derived biogenic carbonates and are progressively being cemented by iron sulfides. Oxidation of hydrogen sulfide produces locally acidic conditions that corrode the adjacent limestones. Potential sources of S, H2S, Fe, Ba, and Sr are discussed. ?? 1987.

  9. Age estimates of the seaward-dipping volcanic wedge, earliest oceanic crust, and earliest drift-stage sediments along the North American Atlantic continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Richard N.

    Owing to their depths of burial along and adjacent to the North American continental margin, there is no direct evidence obtained from boreholes for the ages of the seaward-dipping volcanic wedge, earliest drift-stage sediments overlying the wedge, and the earliest Atlantic oceanic crust between the East Coast (ECMA) and Blake Spur (BSMA) magnetic anomalies. Maximum ages of late Sinemurian for drift-stage sediments have been determined from exploration wells in the Scotian Basin. A similar age is postulated for those sediments in the Georges Bank Basin, but palynomorphs from exploration wells may indicate that earliest drift-stage sediments, in places associated with volcanic rocks, are of Bajocian age and occur higher in the section above the postrift unconformity as recognized on seismic lines. In the Southeast Georgia Embayment of the Blake Plateau Basin, the oldest drift-stage sediments overlying the postrift unconformity that were drilled are of Kimmeridgian-Tithonian age. In the Baltimore Canyon Trough, the volcanic wedge overlies the postrift unconformity which truncates buried synrift rocks that may be as young as Sinemurian. In the Carolina Trough and Blake Plateau Basin, a possible offshore flood basalt marking the postrift unconformity and traced as a reflector to the volcanic wedge may correspond to a subsurface flood basalt onshore that may be part of CAMP (Hettangian). Alternatively, its magmatic source may have been that of the possibly younger volcanic wedge. Sea-floor-spreading-rate lines based on the latest Jurassic time scales and extended to the BSMA and ECMA indicate ages of 166 and 171 Ma for the BSMA and 172 and 179 Ma for the ECMA. An alternative model suggests a middle Pliensbachian/early Toarcian age (188-190 Ma) for the igneous activity that produced the volcanic wedge and earliest oceanic crust.

  10. Fan sedimentation on continental margins: A comparison of Miocene Gulf Coast systems with the Middle Eocene Cozy Dell Formation of southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Riese, W.C.R. ); Clark, M.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Recent seismic and subsurface stratigraphic studies of the Miocene System, offshore Texas resulted in the development of a depositional model that documents and explains the deposition of sand-prone fans on the outer shelf during times when these areas were still covered by several hundred feet of water. This model suggests that sediment transport was by turbid flow and that sedimentation resulted in the development of leveed channel systems. The geometries and scales of these fan systems have been documented by three-dimensional seismic analysis and field-wide well penetrations in the Matagorda 668 field. It further advances the hypothesis that global eustatic levels were generally higher and basin water budgets greater during the Miocene than during later times in at least the Gulf Coast area. Translation of this model to outcrop areas is hampered in the Gulf Coast, and detail verification and refinement of the model has been restricted to subsurface work alone. This has also hampered the authors attempt to carry this model to non-Miocene-age systems. Work on the middle Eocene Cozy Dell Formation exposures in the Topatopa and Santa Ynez Mountains of southern California has revealed that this formation has a depositional history which may not be different than that interpreted for the Gulf Coast Miocene. This formation was deposited by turbidity currents in what has been interpreted to be an upper slope setting. The fans deposited by these currents have well-developed channel-levee complexes and display scales of geometry similar to those seen in the Gulf Coast Miocene. This formation displays seismic-sequence scale stratal geometries that suggest that it was deposited during lowstands of sea level.

  11. Methanogen and bacterial diversity and distribution in deep gas hydrate sediments from the Cascadia Margin as revealed by 16S rRNA molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Marchesi; Weightman; Cragg; Parkes; Fry

    2001-01-01

    The microbial community of a deep (to 234 m below the sea floor) sediment gas hydrate deposit (Cascadia Margin Ocean Drilling Program Site 889/890, Leg 146) was analysed for the first time by molecular genetic techniques. Both bacterial and methanogen diversity were determined by phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal DNA sequences. High molecular mass DNA, indicative of active bacteria, was present in all of the samples. Ribosomal RNA genes were amplified from extracted DNA extracted from sediment using bacteria, and methanogen specific PCR primers, the latter designed in this study. Phylogenetic analysis of approximately 400 bacterial clones demonstrated that 96% were members of the Proteobacteria. These clones were affiliated with the alpha, beta and gamma subdivisions, with Caulobacter (Zymomonas group), Ralstonia and Pseudomonas phylotypes predominating. The methanogen clones were of low diversity and clustered in three sub-groups. Two of these sub-groups (contained 96% of the 400 clones) were closely related to Methanosarcina mazeii, while the third sub-group clustered in the Methanobacteriales. This analysis of a deep sediment gas hydrate environment shows a bacteria and methanogen community of limited diversity and confirms that the gas hydrate zone is biogeochemically active. These results are consistent with the presence of bacterial populations capable of methanogenesis throughout the core, and suggest that the methane hydrate at this site is at least partially biogenic in origin. PMID:11137602

  12. Organic geochemistry of sediments from the continental margin off southern New England, U.S.A.--Part II. Lipids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, M. I.; Ruth, E.; Steinberg, S.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1987-01-01

    Organic geochemical measurements of the lipid fraction, comparing saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, fatty acids, alcohols and sterols, have been carried out on six sediments cores collected from the Atlantic shelf, slope and the rise areas to evaluate the cross-shelf transport of the organic carbon. The concentration of most of the organic compound classes studied is correlated with the total organic carbon, which decreases from the shelf through slope to the rise. Terrigenous carbon is recognizable even in the slope and rise sediments, but terrestrial influx decreases relative to marine generated lipids in the slope and rise organic matter. We estimate that approximately 50% of the shelf organic matter is exported to the slope. Data of sediment trap material collected at 1200 m from 1250 m water depth are discussed and compared with that of surface sediment from 1280 m water depth (slope). Fluxes for specific organic compound classes have been computed. The fluxes are of the same magnitude as for equatorial North Atlantic trap particulates at comparable water depth, studied by other investigations.

  13. Quantification of the effects of eustasy, subsidence, and sediment supply on Miocene sequences, mid-Atlantic margin of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, J.V.; Miller, K.G.; McLaughlin, P.P.; Kominz, M.A.; Sugarman, P.J.; Monteverde, D.; Feigenson, M.D.; Hernandez, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    We use backstripping to quantify the roles of variations in global sea level (eustasy), subsidence, and sediment supply on the development of the Miocene stratigraphic record of the mid-Atlantic continental margin of the United States (New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland). Eustasy is a primary influence on sequence patterns, determining the global template of sequences (i.e., times when sequences can be preserved) and explaining similarities in Miocene sequence architecture on margins throughout the world. Sequences can be correlated throughout the mid-Atlantic region with Sr-isotopic chronology (??0.6 m.y. to ??1.2 m.y.). Eight Miocene sequences correlate regionally and can be correlated to global ??18O increases, indicating glacioeustatic control. This margin is dominated by passive subsidence with little evidence for active tectonic overprints, except possibly in Maryland during the early Miocene. However, early Miocene sequences in New Jersey and Delaware display a patchwork distribution that is attributable to minor (tens of meters) intervals of excess subsidence. Backstripping quantifies that excess subsidence began in Delaware at ca. 21 Ma and continued until 12 Ma, with maximum rates from ca. 21-16 Ma. We attribute this enhanced subsidence to local flexural response to the progradation of thick sequences offshore and adjacent to this area. Removing this excess subsidence in Delaware yields a record that is remarkably similar to New Jersey eustatic estimates. We conclude that sea-level rise and fall is a first-order control on accommodation providing similar timing on all margins to the sequence record. Tectonic changes due to movement of the crust can overprint the record, resulting in large gaps in the stratigraphic record. Smaller differences in sequences can be attributed to local flexural loading effects, particularly in regions experiencing large-scale progradation. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  14. Glacial-interglacial cycles of erosion and sediment transport along the western North American margin constrained by reconciling geologic and climate model data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlaningham, S.; Pisias, N. G.; Duncan, R. A.; Hostetler, S. W.; Wilson, K. L.

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to determine whether observed shifts in sediment source (indicated by bulk sediment 40Ar-39Ar and Nd isotopic tracers) at a northeast Pacific core site are in response to variations in river basin erosion or transport pathways of terrigenous sediment once it reaches the ocean. We synthesize geologic and climate model data sets to evaluate whether climate model (REGCM2) outputs of precipitation-evaporation (P-E) can be linked to observed changes in erosion and landscape evolution along the western North American margin (core site EW9504-17PC, offshore southern Oregon) over the last glacial-interglacial cycle. This site is ideally located to test this new approach as it captures the combined sediment fluxes from coastal N. California/S. Oregon and the interior Cascade Volcanic Ranges, which have drastically different 40Ar-39Ar bedrock ages (130-147 Ma versus 10-30 Ma, respectively) and different climate responses occurring on glacial-interglacial timescales. We perturb a watershed-scale model of bedrock 40Ar-39Ar ages by the P-E changes to reproduce the total range of variability observed in downcore, bulk sediment 40Ar-39Ar ages and Nd isotopic values at the core site. We find that climate model percent changes in P-E values cannot reproduce the total range of variability seen in the provenance record before 22 ka without invoking drastic reductions in Klamath Mountain and Eel River sediment sources. A relatively unconstrained variable in the source area at this time is the presence of a large pluvial lake, Lake Modoc. It is possible that discharges from it could carry large volumes of young, Cascade Mountain-derived sediments offshore. Alternatively, an offshore switch in ocean current direction or reduction (relative to present-day) could explain the downcore sedimentological changes, as material discharged from the Eel River (the largest sediment source south of the core site) would not be carried north. To reproduce the observed downcore shift in

  15. Remnants of Miocene fluvial sediments in the Negev Desert, Israel, and the Jordanian Plateau: Evidence for an extensive subsiding basin in the northwestern margins of the Arabian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberman, Ezra; Calvo, Ran

    2013-06-01

    Relics of a thick, widely spread, fluvial sequence of Early Miocene age are scattered throughout southern Israel, eastern Sinai, the Dead Sea Rift Valley and the western margins of the Jordanian Plateau. These relics are mainly preserved in structural lows, karstic systems, and abandoned stream valleys. The paleogeography of this fluvial system was reconstructed based on the relations between the sequence remnants and the main structural and morphological features of the southeastern Levant region. Three sedimentary associations were identified in the Miocene sequence: a lower part dominated by locally derived clastic sediments; a thicker middle part, composed mostly of far-field allochthonous clastic sediments; and an upper part composed of local as well as allochthonous sediments. The two lower parts are regionally distributed whereas the upper part is syn-tectonic and confined to the Dead Sea basin and the Karkom graben in the central Negev. The composition of the far-field allochthonous sediments points to a provenance of Precambrian crystalline rocks of the Arabo-Nubian massif that were exposed along the uplifted shoulders of the Red Sea Rift as the upper drainage basin of the fluvial system. The diverse mammal remains found in this fluvial sequence suggest a complex of savanna, forests and fluvial habitats similar to those of present East Africa, with monsoon-type rains, which were the dominant water source of the rivers. The thickness of the Miocene sequence in the central Negev is at least 1700 m, similar to that of the subsurface sequence encountered in the Dead Sea basin. This similarity suggests that both were parts of an extensive subsiding sedimentary basin that developed between the Neo-Tethys and the uplifted margins of the Red Sea. The relations between the reconstructed pre-depositional landscape of southern Israel during the Early Miocene and the overlying fluvial sequence indicate that the entire area was buried under several hundred meters of

  16. Chronic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination Is a Marginal Driver for Community Diversity and Prokaryotic Predicted Functioning in Coastal Sediments.

    PubMed

    Jeanbille, Mathilde; Gury, Jérôme; Duran, Robert; Tronczynski, Jacek; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Agogué, Hélène; Saïd, Olfa Ben; Taïb, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Garnier, Cédric; Auguet, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Benthic microorganisms are key players in the recycling of organic matter and recalcitrant compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal sediments. Despite their ecological importance, the response of microbial communities to chronic PAH pollution, one of the major threats to coastal ecosystems, has received very little attention. In one of the largest surveys performed so far on coastal sediments, the diversity and composition of microbial communities inhabiting both chronically contaminated and non-contaminated coastal sediments were investigated using high-throughput sequencing on the 18S and 16S rRNA genes. Prokaryotic alpha-diversity showed significant association with salinity, temperature, and organic carbon content. The effect of particle size distribution was strong on eukaryotic diversity. Similarly to alpha-diversity, beta-diversity patterns were strongly influenced by the environmental filter, while PAHs had no influence on the prokaryotic community structure and a weak impact on the eukaryotic community structure at the continental scale. However, at the regional scale, PAHs became the main driver shaping the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic communities. These patterns were not found for PICRUSt predicted prokaryotic functions, thus indicating some degree of functional redundancy. Eukaryotes presented a greater potential for their use as PAH contamination biomarkers, owing to their stronger response at both regional and continental scales. PMID:27594854

  17. Chronic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination Is a Marginal Driver for Community Diversity and Prokaryotic Predicted Functioning in Coastal Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jeanbille, Mathilde; Gury, Jérôme; Duran, Robert; Tronczynski, Jacek; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Agogué, Hélène; Saïd, Olfa Ben; Taïb, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Garnier, Cédric; Auguet, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Benthic microorganisms are key players in the recycling of organic matter and recalcitrant compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal sediments. Despite their ecological importance, the response of microbial communities to chronic PAH pollution, one of the major threats to coastal ecosystems, has received very little attention. In one of the largest surveys performed so far on coastal sediments, the diversity and composition of microbial communities inhabiting both chronically contaminated and non-contaminated coastal sediments were investigated using high-throughput sequencing on the 18S and 16S rRNA genes. Prokaryotic alpha-diversity showed significant association with salinity, temperature, and organic carbon content. The effect of particle size distribution was strong on eukaryotic diversity. Similarly to alpha-diversity, beta-diversity patterns were strongly influenced by the environmental filter, while PAHs had no influence on the prokaryotic community structure and a weak impact on the eukaryotic community structure at the continental scale. However, at the regional scale, PAHs became the main driver shaping the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic communities. These patterns were not found for PICRUSt predicted prokaryotic functions, thus indicating some degree of functional redundancy. Eukaryotes presented a greater potential for their use as PAH contamination biomarkers, owing to their stronger response at both regional and continental scales. PMID:27594854

  18. Clay mineralogy of the ocean sediments from the Wilkes Land margin, east Antarctica: implications on the paleoclimate, provenance and sediment dispersal pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Kamlesh; Bhattacharya, Sanjeeb; Biswas, P.; Shrivastava, Prakash K.; Pandey, Mayuri; Pant, N. C.

    2014-11-01

    Core U1359 collected from the continental rise off Wilkes Land, east Antarctica, is analyzed for the clay mineralogy and carbon content. The temporal variation of the clay mineralogical data shows a dominance of illite with chlorite, smectite and kaolinite in decreasing concentration. Clay mineral illite is negatively correlated with smectite which shows enrichment during 6.2-6.8, 5.5-5.8, 4.5 and 2.5 Ma. The mineralogical analyses on the silt size fraction (2-53 μm) of some selected samples were also carried out. The combined result of both the size fractions shows the presence of chlorite and illite in both size fractions, smectite and kaolinite only in clay size fraction (<2 μm) and similarity in the crystallinity and chemistry of illite in both fractions. Similar nature of illite in both fractions suggests negligible role of sorting probably due to the deposition from the waxing ice sheet. During times of ice growth, nearby cratonic east Antarctica shield provided biotite-rich sediments to the depositional site. On the other hand, the presence of smectite, only in the clay size fraction, suggests the effective role of sorting probably due to the deposition from distal source in ice retreat condition. During times of ice retreat, smectite-rich sediment derived from Ross Orogen is transported to the core site through surface or bottom water currents. Poor crystallinity of illite due to degradation further corroborates the ice retreat condition. The ice sheet proximal sediments of U1359 show that in the eastern part of Wilkes Land, the `warming' was initiated during late Miocene.

  19. Tracking Monsoon Related Provenance Changes in Continental Margin Sediments of the East China Sea: Preliminary Results from IODP Expedition 346.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. H.; Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Kinsley, C. W.; McGee, D.; Giosan, L.; Zheng, H.; Tada, R.; Alvarez Zarikian, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Sedimentation in the East China Sea (ECS) is driven largely by fluvial and eolian fluxes that are likely influenced by the East Asian Monsoon (EAM). Terrigenous matter from the Yangtze River is transported into the ECS and is also carried by winds of the Westerly Jet. Seasonal and long term shifts in the atmospheric and precipitation regimes over Asia are recorded in the inorganic chemistry of the sediment of the ECS and other Asian coastal seas. For example, changes in intensity and timing of the EAM over short and long term time scales likely impact the relative proportion of fluvial and eolian inputs to the region, and perhaps their individual sources. Bulk sediment was recovered from IODP Sites U1428 and U1429 in the ECS during Expedition 346. T these sites are separated by 7.4 km, located in the northernmost portion of the ECS in the Danjo Basin, and are generally characterized by two sedimentary units. Unit A is largely nannofossil-rich calcareous ooze and calcareous-rich clays, punctuated with smaller tephra layers throughout. Unit B is composed of fine- to medium-grained, rounded sands. Here we present major, trace and rare earth element (REE) data for 54 bulk sediment samples analyzed via ICP-ES and ICP-MS. We trace downhole fluctuations in the geochemical data in order to investigate the provenance of terrigenous material during the Pleistocene. Preliminary major element concentration data indicate the presence of distinct continental sediment and carbonates at both sites. Average downhole major element ratios exhibit limited variation at both sites. For example, Ti/Al (g/g) is tightly constrained with values of 0.05 /- 0.003, Fe/Al 0.5 /- 0.05, and Si/Al 3.3 /- 0.3. In addition to standard geochemical techniques to assess provenance, we are using multivariate statistics (e.g., Q-Mode Factor Analyses, Multiple Linear Regressions) to examine this large dataset. We focus on a smaller suite of elements that are exclusively associated with the terrigenous

  20. Mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic characterization of authigenic carbonates from the methane-bearing sediments of the Bering Sea continental margin (IODP Expedition 323, Sites U1343-U1345)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, C.; Blanc-Valleron, M.-M.; Caquineau, S.; März, C.; Ravelo, A. C.; Takahashi, K.; Alvarez Zarikian, C.

    2016-03-01

    During Expedition 323 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program to the Bering Sea (July 5-September 4, 2009), three sites were drilled along the Bering Sea northeastern continental margin [U1343 down to 745 meters below sea floor (mbsf), U1344 (745 mbsf), U1345 (150 mbsf)]. Diagenetic carbonates are present at all sites within the clayey, diatom-rich oozes of the Bering Sea, where pore waters are also characterized by extremely high methane concentrations. We here present mineralogical, elemental and isotopic data obtained from the authigenic carbonate-rich intercalations within the clay-rich Pleistocene sediments deposited along the Bering Sea continental margin. The mineralogy of the authigenic carbonates is generally represented by composite mixtures of very small crystals of magnesian calcite, dolomite, and iron-rich carbonates, with the latter phases occurring below 260 mbsf at Site U1343, below 200 mbsf at Site U1344, and below 130 mbsf at Site U1345. Element geochemistry shows that Ca, Mg, Fe, Ba, Mn, Sr and U are enriched in the carbonate-rich intercalations relative to the background sediments due to their incorporation into the carbonates and into other authigenic phases (e.g., barite and pyrite). The oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of the authigenic carbonate minerals show that they were sequentially precipitated from pore waters at different temperatures (i.e., different burial depths) and with different isotopic compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The authigenic Mg-calcite precipitated early during diagenesis and shallow burial from a 13C-depleted DIC pool, whereas dolomite and Fe-rich carbonates formed during later diagenesis and deeper burial from a 13C-enriched DIC pool. These authigenic carbonate occurrences are interpreted as resulting from microbial sulfate reduction combined with anaerobic oxidation of methane, and methanogenesis that was intimately linked to the alteration of silicates, especially iron-rich clay minerals.

  1. Zircon from Mesoproterozoic sediments sheds light on the subduction-collision history at the eastern active continental margin of the Archaean Kalahari-Grunehogna Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, H.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Leat, P. T.; Dhuime, B.; Storey, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Grunehogna Craton (East Antarctica) was a part of the Archean Kalahari Craton of southern Africa prior to Gondwana breakup. Granite from the basement of the craton has been dated by U-Pb zircon dating to 3,067 Ma with inherited grains showing ages of up to 3,433 Ma [1]. At the eastern margin of the craton, the Ahlmannryggen nunataks comprise an ~2000 m thick pile of clastic and volcanic sediments of the Ritscherflya Supergroup. These were sourced from eroding a proximal active continental arc as demonstrated through the age distribution and internal zoning of detrital zircon [2]. Detrital zircon grains from the Ritscherflya Supergroup show an age distribution with a dominant age peak at ~1,130 Ma, i.e., close to the sedimentation age. Older age peaks include those at 1370 Ma, 1725 Ma, 1880 Ma, 2050 Ma, and 2700 Ma. Palaeo- and Mesoarchaean zircon grains (2800-3445 Ma) were also discovered, corresponding to the age of the Kalahari-Grunehogna Craton basement. Most significantly we found a number of inherited Archaean cores in ~1130 Ma zircons. They demonstrate that the volcanic arc was indeed located on Archaean continental crust, rather than in Mesoproterozoic, intra-oceanic island arcs. The age spectrum of the zircons bears strong evidence for (i) derivation of the entire Ritscherflya sediment sequence from an active continental convergent margin; (ii) a cratonic provenance of part of the sediments from population peaks coinciding with major tectono-thermal events in the Kalahari Craton; (iii) at least some of the active volcanism being located on cratonic basement rather than a juvenile island arc. Detrital zircons in the ~1130 Ma age group show several distinct populations in their Hf isotopic compositions. The dominant group shows negative ɛHf values of -11.5 corresponding to a model age (TDM) of ~2700 Ma (average crustal 176Lu/177Hf = 0.015). A smaller group shows ɛHf values of +2 to +6, which may represent mantle-derived subduction-zone volcanism at

  2. Methane efflux from marine sediments in passive and active margins: Estimations from bioenergetic reaction-transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, A. W.; Van Cappellen, P.; Aguilera, D. R.; Regnier, P.

    2008-01-01

    A simplified version of a kinetic-bioenergetic reaction model for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments [Dale, A.W., Regnier, P., Van Cappellen, P., 2006. Bioenergetic controls on anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in coastal marine sediments: a theoretical analysis. Am. J. Sci. 306, 246-294.] is used to assess the impact of transport processes on biomass distributions, AOM rates and methane release fluxes from the sea floor. The model explicitly represents the functional microbial groups and the kinetic and bioenergetic limitations of the microbial metabolic pathways involved in AOM. Model simulations illustrate the dominant control exerted by the transport regime on the activity and abundance of AOM communities. Upward fluid flow at active seep systems restricts AOM to a narrow subsurface reaction zone and sustains high rates of methane oxidation. In contrast, pore-water transport dominated by molecular diffusion leads to deeper and broader zones of AOM, characterized by much lower rates and biomasses. Under steady-state conditions, less than 1% of the upward dissolved methane flux reaches the water column, irrespective of the transport regime. However, a sudden increase in the advective flux of dissolved methane, for example as a result of the destabilization of methane hydrates, causes a transient efflux of methane from the sediment. The benthic efflux of dissolved methane is due to the slow growth kinetics of the AOM community and lasts on the order of 60 years. This time window is likely too short to allow for a significant escape of pore-water methane following a large scale gas hydrate dissolution event such as the one that may have accompanied the Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM).

  3. Late quaternary deposition in the inner basins of the California continental borderland - Part A. Santa Monica Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, William R.; McGann, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating of sediment core samples from Santa Monica Basin document Holocene (younger than approximately 11 ka) landslides and fault offsets along the basin margin. The new dates include 17 from six piston cores on the continental slope and 11 from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1015 on the basin floor. The dates, which are based on data from pelagic and benthic foraminifera in addition to several dates from mollusk shells, are used to provide chronostratigraphic control for a previously determined basin-wide seismic stratigraphy. The geologic setting at the core sites and a sediment log for each core are shown. In addition, each sediment log is accompanied by a color core photograph as well as P-wave velocity and gamma-ray density profiles. The primary purpose of the report is to make the radiocarbon dates available for other studies in the Santa Monica Basin. A comparison of sediment accumulation rates between the late Pleistocene and Holocene provides insight to the effects of sea-level change on sediment input to the basin. In addition, the results can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of wire-line piston coring in providing age control for earthquake hazard and sedimentologic studies.

  4. Mass-physical properties of surficial sediments on the Rhoˆne continental margin: implications for the nepheloid benthic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassefiere, Bernard

    1990-09-01

    Mass-physical properties of the surficial (upper 5 m) sediments on the Gulf of Lions continental margin were analysed, from more than 100 short (1 m) and longer (5 m) cores obtained during several cruises. Data include water content, unit weight, Atterberg limits (liquid limit, plastic limit, plasticity index), shear strength and compression index, and are used to determine: first, the mass property distribution, according to the main parameters influencing mass-physical properties; the relationships between these properties and the nepheloid layer on the shelf. The shoreline (lagoons) and inner shelf are characterized by low density and shear strength and high water content deposits, due to electrochemical flocculation of the sediment. The outer shelf is blanketed by higher density and shear strength and lower water content deposits generated by normal settling of suspended particles. On the inner shelf, during river peak discharges, a short-term thin bottom layer of "yogurt-like" [ FASS (1985) Geomarine Letters, 4, 147-152; FASS (1986) Continental Shelf Research, 6, 189-208] fluid-mud (unit weight lower than 1.3 mg m -3) is supplied, by a bottom nepheloid layer. During stormy periods, this "yogurt-like" layer (about 10 cm thick) partly disappears by resuspension of suspended particulate matter; this is advected, in the bottom nepheloid layer, over the shelf and the canyons within the upper slope.

  5. High-Resolution 3D-Seismic Investigations Indicate Focused Fluid Flow Systems in Hydrated Sediments at the Vestnesa Ridge off the W-Svalbard Margin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, C.; Buenz, S.; Hustoft, S.; Mienert, J.

    2007-12-01

    High-resolution seismic data were acquired using the 3D seismic P-Cable system of the University of Tromsoe to investigate how the fluid flow penetrates gas hydrate systems of the Vestnesa Ridge. The ridge represents a current-controlled sediment drift on the continental margin offshore western Svalbard. The survey area is located at the northwestern part of the Vestnesa Ridge and centered at the ridge crest that resembles an anticline in a water depth of 1250-1320 m. The seafloor morphology at the crest is characterized by an abundance of pockmarks with a diameter between 50-500 m indicating recent fluid flow activity. Since the area is within the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), it is an ideal site to understand where and how fluids escape through a hydrated sediment drift. 35 reflection seismic profiles with a spacing of about 40-60 m were shot resulting in a seismic cube covering an area of approximately 22 km2. In addition, regional single channel streamer (SCS) seismic lines were acquired across the ridge perpendicular to the crest to connect the 3D area with the regional structural setting. The seismic data provide images of the subsurface to about 500 ms TWT (two-way time) below the seafloor (bsf), where gas accumulations cause acoustic attenuations that hinder deeper acoustic signal penetration. The well-stratified sediments exhibit a bottom simulating reflector (BSR) at about 200 ms TWT bsf at the base of the GHSZ. The BSR is difficult to identify due to the stratification, but it is accompanied by the onset of an ubiquitous band of strong reflectivity indicating free gas accumulation zones beneath the GHSZ. Fluid flow activity is evident from a link between gas accumulations (bright spots), gas wipeouts and disturbed reflectivity in the seismic data. These features are observed not only beneath the pockmark structures, but also in the sediment without seafloor expressions of fluid venting. The fluid source might be related to deep tectonic processes at

  6. Early Diagenetic Changes of Sediment Pore Properties Beneath the Seafloor and Their Contributions to Gas Hydrate Concentration in the Eastern Margin of Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Horiuchi, S.; Kato, Y.; Matsumoto, R.

    2014-12-01

    Recently many of the chimney-shape gas hydrate concentrated beneath the seafloor have been confirmed off Shimane and off Akita as well as off Joetsu in the eastern margin of Japan Sea, which are quite different from the occurrences of pore space hydrate filling the intergranular pore system of sands recognized in Nankai Trough, Mallik and other sites. Sediment samples below the seafloor were retrieved in 2010 up to 40 m long at the Umitaka Spur, Joetsu Channel, Toyama Trough, Japan Basin, Nishi Tsugaru and Okushiri Ridge areas. Small amounts of sandy sediment have been retrieved as thin intercalations in Pleistocene and Holocene muddy layers transported approximately around 3 to 30 ka according to the tephra ages, where supplying sediments might have not been abundant due to sea level fluctuation during the Pleistocene ice age. It is important to clarify the relationship between burial depths and absolute porosities of the argillaceous sediments in relation to early diagenesis. Macroscopic observations and descriptions, measurements of porosity and permeability, SEM (scanning electron microscope) observations, and X-ray diffraction analyses have been performed. They consist of silt- to clay-grained particles, and they sometimes contain very fine- to medium-grained thin sandy layers. Average porosities of these fine-grained sediments are 50 % in all study areas, which quickly reduce from 60% to less than 50% within 10 meters and gradually decrease to the depth. However, mean pore sizes in the Nishi Tsugaru are around 1000 nm while 100 nm in the other areas, which tend to decrease with depth. It is suggested that repacking of the muddy particles gradually advances by mechanical compaction, which may crucially influence permeability. They usually contain much opal-A, quartz, feldspar, illite and smectite that do not change definitely with depth. By optical and microscopic observations, diatom tests, foraminifers and framboidal pyrites are commonly observed, and, in

  7. Late Cenozoic orogenic history of Western Qinling inferred from sedimentation of Tianshui basin, northeastern margin of Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuxi; Li, Jijun; Song, Chunhui; Zattin, Massimiliano; Zhao, Zhijun; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yong; He, Kuang

    2012-07-01

    The Western Qinling orogenic belt marks the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Its late Cenozoic orogenic history is recorded in an excellent sedimentary sequence exposed in the Tianshui sub-basin of the Longzhong basin. According to the magnetostratigraphic analysis from the Yaodian and Lamashan sections, we speculate that the late Cenozoic Tianshui basin accumulated lacustrine/floodplain deposits from ~14.8 to ~2.6 Ma. In addition, detrital apatite fission-track thermochronologic and paleocurrent data reveal that the detritus of the Tianshui basin mostly derived from the Western Qinling and that the youngest population age represents a ~14 Ma volcanic intrusion, which can be related to the lithospheric deformation and uplift of the Tibetan Plateau. Furthermore, two stages of variations in depositional facies and average accumulation rates were attributed to the pulse uplift and deformation of the Western Qinling at 9.2-7.4 and ~3.6 Ma.

  8. Compound-specific δ15N and chlorin preservation in surface sediments of the Peru Margin with implications for ancient bulk δ15N records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junium, Christopher K.; Arthur, Michael A.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the processes that control the preservation of paleoceanographic proxies is of clear importance. Surface sediments from the Peru Margin oxygen-minimum zone are subject to lateral and downslope transport by bottom currents that decrease organic matter (OM) quality. Indicators of bulk OM quality (pyrolysis hydrogen index, pyrolysis S1 + S2 and C/N) demonstrate significant degradation between 150 and 400 m water depth, within the oxygen-minimum zone. Concentrations of the three most abundant chlorins (chlorophyllone, pheophytin and pyropheophytin) decrease from 750 to 150 nmol g TOC-1 from 150 to 400 m water depth though the relative abundances of the chlorins in an individual sample do not change. This suggests that the three chlorins have similar reactivity over the ambient conditions. Values for δ15N of bulk sediments (δ15Nbulk) decrease by 3‰ from the inner shelf to the upper slope (1000 m) but co-occurring compound-specific δ15N values (δ15Nchlorin) do not decrease downslope. The low variability of δ15Nchlorin values supports a single source for the chlorins, and demonstrates the recalcitrance of δ15Nchlorin values despite degradation. This set of observation raises questions about which type of OM fraction best records 'primary' signatures. We assess two possible models to guide our interpretation of these disparate datasets (1) that decreasing δ15Nbulk values are the result of degradation of a 15N-enriched fraction during downslope transport, and that δ15Nchlorin values reflect primary values; (2) that δ15Nbulk values are primary and that chlorins are derived from material transported from upslope. These data reaffirm that in active sedimentary environments such as the Eastern Tropical Pacific, transport of OM can significantly alter bulk geochemical parameters of OM integrity, but the impacts on the δ15N record of bulk sediments and chlorins are less clear, and require more study to be thoroughly understood.

  9. Lipid biomarkers for anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulphate reduction in cold seep sediments of Nyegga pockmarks (Norwegian margin): discrepancies in contents and carbon isotope signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Stadnitskaia, Alina; Taphanel, Marie-Hélène; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2014-06-01

    Distributions and carbon isotopic compositions of microbial lipid biomarkers were investigated in sediment cores from the G11 and G12 pockmarks in the Nyegga sector of the Storegga Slide on the mid-Norwegian margin to explore differences in depth zonation, type and carbon assimilation mode of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANMEs) and associated sulphate-reducing bacteria responsible for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in these cold seep environments. While the G11 site is characterised by black reduced sediments colonized by gastropods and Siboglinidae tubeworms, the G12 site has black reduced sediments devoid of fauna but surrounded by a peripheral occurrence of gastropods and white filamentous microbial mats. At both sites, bulk sediments contained abundant archaeal and bacterial lipid biomarkers substantially depleted in 13C, consisting mainly of isoprenoidal hydrocarbons and dialkyl glycerol diethers, fatty acids and non-isoprenoidal monoalkylglycerol ethers. At the G11 site, down-core profiles revealed that lipid biomarkers were in maximum abundance from 10 cm depth to the core bottom at 16 cm depth, associated with δ13C values of -57 to -136‰. At the G12 site, by contrast, lipid biomarkers were in high abundance in the upper 5 cm sediment layer, associated with δ13C values of -43 to -133‰. This suggests that, as expected from the benthic fauna characteristics of the sites, AOM takes place mainly at depth in the G11 pockmark but just below the seafloor in the G12 pockmark. These patterns can be explained largely by variable fluid flow rates. Furthermore, at both sites, a dominance of ANME-2 archaea accompanied by their bacterial partners is inferred based on lipid biomarker distributions and carbon isotope signatures, which is in agreement with recently published DNA analyses for the G11 pockmark. However, the present data reveal high discrepancies in the contents and δ13C values for both archaeal and bacterial lipid profiles, implying the

  10. Sulfate reduction and methane oxidation in continental margin sediments influenced by irrigation (south-east Atlantic off Namibia)

    SciTech Connect

    Fossing, H.; Ferdelman, T.G.; Berg, P.

    2000-03-01

    Sulfate reduction rates (SRR) and concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, H{sub 2}S, pyrite sulfur, total sulfur, CH{sub 4}, and organic carbon were measured with high depth resolution through the entire length of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}-zone and well into the CH{sub 4}-xone at two continental slope stations in the eastern South Atlantic (Benguela upwelling area). The sediments were characterized by a high organic carbon content of approx. 7.5% at GeoB 3703 and 3.7% at GeoB 3714. At GeoB 3703 SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} concentrations decreased linearly with depth to about 40 {micro}M at the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMT) at 3.5 m, while at GeoB 3714, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} remained at sea water concentration in the top 2 m of the sediment and then decreased linearly to about 70 {micro}M at the SMT at 6 m. Direct rate measurements of SRR ({sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) showed that the highest SRR occurred within the surface 3--5 cm with peak rates of up to 20 and 7 nmol SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} cm{sup 3}/day at GeoB 3703 and GeoB 3714, respectively. SRR decreased quasi-exponentially with depth at GeoB 3703 and the cumulative SRR over the length of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} zone resulted in an areal SRR of 1114--3493 {micro}mol/m{sup 2} day at GeoB 3703 with more than 80% of the total sulfate reduction proceeding in the top 30 cm sediment. Modeled SRR balanced both methane oxidation rates and measured SRR within the SMT, but severely underestimated by up to 89% the total SRR{sub area} that were obtained from direct measurements. Modeled and measured SRR were reconciled by including solute transport by irrigation described by a non-local pore water exchange function ({alpha}) which had values of up to 0.3 year{sup {minus}1} in the top sediment, and decreased exponentially to zero (i.e., no irrigation) at 2--3 meters (i.e., above SMT). These results suggested that co-existing sulfate reduction processes and linear SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} gradients can be

  11. Organic geochemistry of continental margin and deep ocean sediments. Progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.K.; Hunt, J.M.; Seewald, J.M.; Eglinton, L.B.; Zawoysky, M.; Dickinson, P.; Dickneider, T.

    1992-09-01

    Objective was to study petroleum formation, migration, and accumulation in marine sediments. Collaboration in Global Basin Research Network (GBRN) showed that the hydrocarbon parameters used in oil exploration are also valuable in understanding sedimentary basin fluid flow processes, crucial to production of drinking water, metal ore deposits, and gas and oil. Two goals are : (1) to run hydrous pyrolysis experiments on immature gas-prone source rocks, in order to evaluate the potential influence of gas evolution on oil migration and subsurface pressurization, and (2) to integrate organic geochemical data from the Louisiana Gulf Coast into GBRN subsurface visualization and computer modeling. Experimental methods (petrography, EPR, thermogravimetric Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) were also studied.

  12. Regional implications of an extensive linear sediment-dispersal system along western margin of Cretaceous interior seaway

    SciTech Connect

    Vondra, C.F.; Khandaker, N.I.

    1988-01-01

    The Second Wall Creek sand in the Powder River basin in Johnson and Natrona Counties is similar in clast lithology, primary sedimentary structures, and facies association to the Torchlight Sandstone at the top of the Frontier Formation in the northern Big Horn basin. The Second Wall Creek sand is predominantly composed of medium to coarse-grained, moderately sorted massive to cross-bedded quartz-lithic wacke with a minor amount of carbonaceous shale and siltstone. The unit is conglomeraic at the top and contains abundant granule to cobble-size clasts of andesite, quartzite, chert, granite, and sandstone. The largest clasts are concentrated in the Kaycee-Mayworth area in Johnson County and progressively decrease in size southward toward Arminto in Natrona Country, Paloeocurrent directions obtained from the cross-bedded unit indicate a general south-southeast trend. The Second Wall Creek sand is thickest in the Kaycee-Mayworth area and thins southward towards Arminto. The presence of a unique petrologic suite places a constraint on provenance and sediment-dispersal patterns in a tectonically active rapidly evolving foreland basin. Of particular interest is the peculiar lensoid distribution of andesite clasts, which follows a general northwest-southeast trend for more than 150 mi from Cody to the Kaycee-Mayworth area, Wyoming. Noticeable absence of andesite clasts on either side of this observed trend suggests a strong dependence of the ultimate sediment-dispersal system on several physical constraints, including local morphotectonic setting, paleohydraulics, and provenance. A large high-energy distributary complex is invoked for the deposition of this linear conglomeratic facies. This dispersal system extended east-southeastward from the orogenic fold-and-thrust-belt into the adjoining foreland basin.

  13. Tracking Sediment Sources to Pacific Northwest Margin Sites through Radiometric Ages of Clays: Ocean-Land Response to Millenial Scale Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, R. A.; Pisias, N. G.; Hostetler, S. W.

    2001-12-01

    The terrigenous fraction of marine sediments carries the memory of its source through its mineralogy, composition and age. This signal may also carry important information about tectonic and climatic conditions on the continents and about the mechanisms by which material is transported to the depositional site. Sediments recovered from long piston cores at sites along the Pacific Northwest margin of North America contain highly correlated records of oceanographic and terrestrial vegetation changes over the last full glacial cycle. We speculate that these records reflect principally climate-induced changes in terrestrial vegetation rather than changes in ocean circulation and sediment transport. To test this, we have begun to identify specific sources of terrigenous sediment through 40Ar-39Ar radiometric dating of clays from Pacific NW rivers. Age spectra from 15-20 step heating experiments reveal well-resolved clay formation ages from two size fractions (2-20 and 20-63 micron), and evidence of post-formation Ar-loss from low temperature steps. From these we make several important conclusions: First, the individual river clay ages are distinct from one another, and reflect the age of terranes from which they derive. Thus clay ages fingerprint discharge from specific rivers. Second, plateau (formation) ages for the two size fractions are the same. This is a different observation from that seen in previous K-Ar results, probably because the smaller size fraction has experienced more Ar-loss and K-addition during transport, and thus produces generally younger ages. However, the 40Ar-39Ar experiments reveal the same plateau (formation) ages. Thus the additional information gained from incremental heating is important in better defining the source identity. Third, we can directly measure the composition of phases carrying the age information. Two isotopes (37Ar and 39Ar) determine the Ca and K content of the phase(s) contributing to each step. The K/Ca is not strictly

  14. Sediment dispersal system in the Taiwan-South China Sea collision zone along a convergent margin: A comparison with the Papua New Guinea collision zone of the western Solomon Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, Kan-Hsi; Yu, Ho-Shing

    2013-01-01

    Through a large-scale examination of the morpho-sedimentary features on sea floors in the Taiwan-Luzon convergent margin, we determined the main sediment dispersal system which stretches from 23°N to 20°N and displays as an aligned linear sediment pathway, consisting of the Penghu Canyon, the deep-sea Penghu Channel and northern Manila Trench. The seafloor of South China Sea north of 21°N are underlain by a triangle-shaped collision marine basin, resulting from oblique collision between the Luzon Arc and Chinese margin, and are mainly occupied by two juxtaposed slopes, the South China Sea and Kaoping Slopes, and a southward tilting basin axis located along the Penghu Canyon. Two major tributary canyons of the Formosa and Kaoping and small channels and gullies on both slopes join into the axial Penghu Canyon and form a dendritic canyon drainage system in this collision marine basin. The canyon drainage system is characteristic of lateral sediment supply from flank slopes and axial sediment transport down-canyon following the tilting basin axis. The significance of the collision marine basin in term of source to sink is that sediments derived from nearby orogen and continental margins are transported to and accumulated in the collision basin, serving as a temporary sediment sink and major marine transport route along the basin axis. The comparison of the Taiwan-South China Sea collision zone with the Papua New Guinea collision zone of the western Solomon Sea reveals remarkable similarities in tectonic settings and sedimentary processes that have resulted in similar sediment dispersal systems consisting of (1) a canyon drainage network mainly in the collision basin and (2) a longitudinal sediment transport system comprising a linear connection of submarine canyon, deep-sea channel and oceanic trench beyond the collision marine basin.

  15. Morphology, spatial pattern and sediment of Nitraria tangutorum nebkhas in barchans interdune areas at the southeast margin of the Badain Jaran Desert, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, YanYan; Liu, LianYou; Shi, PeiJun; Zhang, GuoMing; Qu, ZhiQiang; Tang, Yan; Lei, Jie; Wen, HaiMing; Xiong, YiYing; Wang, JingPu; Shen, LingLing

    2015-03-01

    To understand the characteristics of the nebkhas in barchan interdune areas, isolated barchan dunes at the southeast margin of the Badain Jaran Desert in China and Nitraria tangutorun nebkhas in the interdune areas were selected, and the morphometric parameters, spatial patterns, and granulometric characteristics of the nebkhas in various interdune zones were compared. According to the locations relative to barchan dunes, the interdune areas were divided into three zones: the windward interdune zone (Zw), the leeward interdune zone (Zl), and the horn interdune zone (Zh). The zone that is proximal to barchan dunes and has never been disturbed by barchan dunes was also selected (Zi). The morphometric parameters were measured through a satellite image and field investigation. The population density and spatial patterns were analyzed using the satellite image, and surface sediment samples of the nebkhas and barchan dunes were collected for grain size analysis. The morphometric parameters of Nitraria tangutorun nebkhas in the interdune zones differ significantly. The nebkhas in Zh are larger than those observed in the other zones, and the nebkhas are the smallest in Zl. In all of the zones, the long-axis orientation of the nebkhas is perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction. The population density of the nebkhas in Zw is relatively higher, whereas the density in Zh and Zl becomes obviously lower. The spatial distribution of nebkhas in all of the zones can be categorized as a dispersed pattern. The sediments of the nebkhas are coarsest in Zh and finest in Zl. In addition, the sediments of the nebkhas in all of the zones are finer than those of barchan dunes. The amount of sand captured by the nebkhas in the interdune areas is approximately 20% of the volume of barchan dunes. The variations of the nebkhas' sizes, spatial pattern and sediment are subjected to migration, flow field and sand transport of barchan dunes and sand accumulation with plant growth in the

  16. A high-resolution record of Holocene millennial-scale oscillations of surface water, foraminiferal paleoecology and sediment redox chemistry in the SE Brazilian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, B. B.; Barbosa, C. F.; Albuquerque, A. L.; Piotrowski, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Holocene millennial-scale oscillations and Bond Events (Bond et al. 1997) are well reported in the North Atlantic as consequence of fresh water input and weaking of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). It has been hypothesized that the effect of weaking of AMOC would lead to warming in the South Atlantic due to "heat piracy", causing surface waters to warm and a reorganization of surface circulation. There are few reconstructions of AMOC strength in the South Atlantic, and none with a high resolution Holocene record of changes of productivity and the biological pump. We reconstruct past changes in the surface water mass hydrography, productivity, and sediment redox changes in high-resolution in the core KCF10-01B, located 128 mbsl water depth off Cabo Frio, Brazil, a location where upwelling is strongly linked to surface ocean hydrography. We use Benthic Foraminiferal Accumulation Rate (BFAR) to reconstruct productivity, which reveals a 1.3kyr cyclicity during the mid- and late-Holocene. The geochemistry of trace and rare earth elements on foraminiferal Fe-Mn oxide coatings show changes in redox-sensitive elements indicating that during periods of high productivity there were more reducing conditions in sediment porewaters, producing a Ce anomaly and reduction and re-precipitation of Mn oxides. Bond events 1-7 were identified by a productivity increase along with reducing sediment conditions which was likely caused by Brazil Current displacement offshore allowing upwelling of the nutritive bottom water South Atlantic Central Waters (SACW) to the euphotic zone and a stronger local biological pump. In a global context, correlation with other records show that this occurred during weakened AMOC and southward displacement of the ITCZ. We conclude that Bond climatic events and millennial-scale variability of AMOC caused sea surface hydrographic changes off the Brazilian Margin leading to biological and geochemical changes recorded in coastal records

  17. Sedimentary response to Milankovitch-type climatic oscillations and formation of sediment undulations: evidence from a shallow-shelf setting at Gela Basin on the Sicilian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, Jannis; Asioli, Alessandra; Trincardi, Fabio; Klügel, Andreas; Huhn, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    A multi-proxy chronological framework along with sequence-stratigraphic interpretations unveils composite Milankovitch cyclicity in the sedimentary records of the Last Glacial-Interglacial cycle at NE Gela Basin on the Sicilian continental margin. Chronostratigraphic data (including foraminifera-based eco-biostratigraphy and δ18O records, tephrochronological markers and 14C AMS radiometric datings) was derived from the shallow-shelf drill sites GeoB14403 (54.6 m recovery) and GeoB14414 (27.5 m), collected with both gravity and drilled MeBo cores in 193 m and 146 m water depth, respectively. The recovered intervals record Marine Isotope Stages and Substages (MIS) from MIS 5 to MIS 1, thus comprising major stratigraphic parts of the progradational deposits that form the last 100-ka depositional sequence. Calibration of shelf sedimentary units with borehole stratigraphies indicates the impact of higher-frequency (20-ka) sea level cycles punctuating this 100-ka cycle. This becomes most evident in the alternation of thick interstadial highstand (HST) wedges and thinner glacial forced-regression (FSST) units mirroring seaward shifts in coastal progradation. Albeit their relatively short-lived depositional phase, these subordinate HST units form the bulk of the 100-ka depositional sequence. Two mechanisms are proposed that likely account for enhanced sediment accumulation ratios (SAR) of up to 200 cm/ka during these intervals: (1) intensified activity of deep and intermediate Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW) associated to the drowning of Mediterranean shelves, and (2) amplified sediment flux along the flooded shelf in response to hyperpycnal plumes that generate through extreme precipitation events during overall arid conditions. Equally, the latter mechanism is thought to be at the origin of undulated features resolved in the acoustic records of MIS 5 Interstadials, which bear a striking resemblance to modern equivalents forming on late-Holocene prodeltas of other

  18. Synrift sedimentation on the northern Tethys margin: an example from the Ligurian Alps (Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous, Prepiedmont domain, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decarlis, Alessandro; Lualdi, Alberto

    2011-10-01

    The Prepiedmont domain succession of the Ligurian Alps is formed by a thick Mesozoic sedimentary cover tectonically detached from its substratum. The Arnasco-Castelbianco unit preserves the most complete record of the Ligurian Prepiedmont, although completely overturned and deformed due to Alpine tectonics. It is composed of carbonate and clastic rocks deposited during the Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous interval. This paper is focused on the stratigraphy of the Jurassic series and its relationships to the Tethyan rifting. Each term of the sedimentary record is seen as a witness of the several phases through which the rifting took place. An early rifting phase (Late Hettangian to Early Sinemurian) brought to the formation of a normal fault system affecting the carbonate platform and favoured the development of condensed sedimentation on pelagic highs. The rapid transition from open-platform carbonates to slope-basin cherty limestones testifies the increased subsidence of the margin in the Late Sinemurian, during which moderate fault activity is recorded (intraformational breccia horizons). Until the Early Pliensbachian, a tectonic pause brought to the sedimentation of a succession of pelagic carbonates, occasionally interrupted by clastic flows. During the Late Pliensbachian (?) to Toarcian, the rifting phase followed, evidenced by the large amount of clastics and generated by renewed fault activity. Clastics flowed down into the basin as fluxoturbidites first, and then passed to breccias during the maximum tectonic pulse. In the Late Toarcian to Aalenian (?), the thermal uplift of the Briançonnais shoulder generated a basin fill of fine clastics. The following thermal subsidence (Aalenian to Tithonian) favoured the restoration of quiet basinal conditions evidenced by the deposition of radiolarites.

  19. Sediment features, macrozoobenthic assemblages and trophic relationships (delta13C and delta15N analysis) following a dystrophic event with anoxia and sulphide development in the Santa Giusta lagoon (western Sardinia, Italy).

    PubMed

    Magni, P; Rajagopal, S; van der Velde, G; Fenzi, G; Kassenberg, J; Vizzini, S; Mazzola, A; Giordani, G

    2008-01-01

    Macrozoobenthic assemblages and stable carbon (delta(13)C) and nitrogen (delta(15)N) isotope values of various primary producers (macroalgae and angiosperms) and consumers (macroinvertebrate filter/suspension feeders, deposit feeders, detritivores/omnivores and carnivores and fishes) were studied in the Santa Giusta lagoon (Sardinia, Italy) before (spring) and after (autumn) a dystrophic event which occurred in the summer of 2004. A few days after the dystrophy, the physico-chemical characteristics of sediments and macrozoobenthic assemblages were also investigated. In the latter occasion, high total organic carbon (3.9%) and organic matter (15.9%) contents of surface sediments went together with peaks in acid-volatile sulphide concentrations. Certain immediate effects were quite extreme, such as the drastic reduction in macrozoobenthos and the massive fish kill in August 2004. Among the macrozoobenthos, there were few individuals of chironomid larvae and Capitella cf. capitata left. However, by October, chironomid larvae were numerous, indicating a lack of predators (e.g. fish) and competitors. In addition, some bivalve species and polychaetes which were absent, or present in small numbers before the event, became relatively numerous. The results are discussed based on a knowledge of the sulphide tolerance of these species. Stable isotope analysis clearly showed that the basal level of the food web for most consumers consisted mainly of macroalgae and sedimentary organic matter, and that the values before and after the dystrophic event were not significantly different from one another. This indicates that the relations among different trophic levels were quickly restored following the dystrophic event. PMID:18093619

  20. Synsedimentary-tectonic, soft-sediment deformation and volcanism in the rifted Tethyan margin from the Upper Triassic-Middle Jurassic deep-water carbonates in Central Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilone, Luca; Lena, Gabriele; Gasparo-Morticelli, Maurizio

    2014-07-01

    The Pizzo Lupo section (Sicanian Mts, central Sicily) is an Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic condensed deep-water succession, where the relationships among synsedimentary tectonic, soft-sediment deformations, volcanism and lithological changes reflect the evolution of a rift-basin. The morphostructural setting of the studied basin appears as a gently dipping slope where a fault-delimited area (graben to halfgraben) was developed. The instability of the sea floor, related to the seismic shocks, was the cause of the gravity-driven deformational sedimentary structures (slumping, breccia channelized bodies). The partly stratified basaltic rocks, with disorganized and chaotic stratification, suggest the occurrence of a volcanic complex located in neighbouring areas. A regional comparison with the tectono-sedimentary evolution of the pelagic drowning platform succession (i.e. Trapanese domain Auct.), outcropping in adjacent areas, suggests that these different domains were close to each other during the studied period forming a stepped margin platform-to-basin system. The environmental changes, synsedimentary tectonic activity and gravity-driven phenomena were the result of repeated events occurred during a long time interval, spanning from Late Triassic to Early Jurassic.

  1. Paleomagnetism on the Quaternary marine sediment at the DH-1 long-core site in the Korean continental margin of the East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryang, Woo Hun; Lee, Byungju

    2014-05-01

    A long core of 23.6 m was acquired in the Korean continental margin of the western East Sea. The core site of the DH-1 is located in the offshore of the Donghae City and the water depth is 357.8 m deep. In this area, the paleomagnetism and magnetostratigraphy were firstly reported using 420 samples collected from the long-core sediments. Based on the inclination distribution of the depositional remanent magnetization, the DH-1 core could be divided into two upper and lower units at the boundary of 1750 cm below seafloor. The upper unit is characterized by a positive polarity, whereas the lower unit by a negative polarity. The boundary of the upper and lower units was interpreted as the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary (778 ka). The chemical components of tephra layer at 2014 cm below seafloor belong to alkaline series, plotted between the tephra components of the Mount Baekdu and Ulleung Island. Key words: magnetostratigraphy, Brunhes-Matuyama boundary, tephra, East Sea Acknowledgements: This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010-0025733) and by the Ministry of Knowledge Economy through the grant of Marine Geology and Geophysical Mapping Project (GP2010-013).

  2. Holocene late Pleistocene non-tropical carbonate sediments and tectonic history of the western rift basin margin of the southern Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfar, Jochen; Godinez-Orta, Lucio; Goodfriend, Glenn A.; Mucciarone, David A.; Ingle, James C.; Holden, Peter

    2001-10-01

    Using high-resolution seismic reflection profiling and dating of (1) shallow marine vibracores and (2) sediments collected from uplifted marine terraces we reconstruct the tectonic history and sediment accumulation patterns of Holocene to late Pleistocene warm-temperate to subtropical carbonates in the southern Gulf of California, Mexico. The study was conducted in the vicinity of La Paz where carbonates form along the fault bounded narrow western shelf of the tectonically active Gulf of California rift basin. The non-tropical nature of the setting is responsible for (1) poor cementation of the bioclastic carbonates, and (2) a composition which is dominated by rhodoliths (coralline red algae), corals and mollusks. Unrimmed carbonate flats forming in small pocket bays and a rhodolith bioherm, which has a surface area of more than 20 km 2 and is up to 16 m thick, constitute the major carbonate factories. Holocene carbonate accumulation rates were deduced from seismic and core data and are highest on the rhodolith bioherm (260 cm/ka) and in subtidal zones of pocket bays (210 cm/ka), and lowest on the inner and middle shelf (100 cm/ka). Taken together, rates of carbonate accumulation are intermediate in magnitude between higher rates recorded in fully tropical carbonate settings and lower rates typical of cool-water carbonates. Seismic reflection profiles demonstrate that Isla Espiritu Santo in the center of the study area is a west dipping fault block, which is tectonically influenced by two distinct faults, the La Paz and Espiritu Santo faults. The latter fault accommodates at least 700 m of east-side down normal offset, and forms a steep eastern escarpment leading into the La Paz slope basin. Some of the sediments produced in the shallow carbonate factories of the narrow La Paz shelf are transported across this escarpment and are redeposited in the slope basin at a water depth of 750 m. Uranium-series dates of marine terraces exposed on Isla Espiritu Santo indicate

  3. Lens-effect in Santa Monica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, Carmen M.; Olsen, Kim B.

    We used finite-difference simulations of 10-Hz P-SV and SH waves to estimate the contribution from the deep basin structure to the large ground motion amplification in Santa Monica, California, observed for seismic waves incident from the north. Our simulations of a 17-km deep Northridge aftershock with epicenter 30 km north of Santa Monica show that focusing at the lens-shaped boundary of the sediments can only account for less than half the amplification observed in the area that was heavily damaged during the 1994 M 6.7 Northridge earthquake. The focusing in the simulations caused amplification of up to 1.6 times in a zone 0.65-2.4 km south of the Santa Monica fault and de-amplification at sites just south of the fault where some of the largest amplification is observed in the data.

  4. Correlation and Analysis of Volcanic Ash in Marine Sediments From the Peru Margin: Explosive Volcanic Cycles of the North-Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D.; Miller, J.

    2003-12-01

    To decipher the episodicity of explosive volcanic activity in the North-Central Andes, we have measured the thickness and calculated the volume of ash layers from sites drilled along the Peru margin during Leg 201 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP). The geographic distribution of the sites (over 3 degrees of latitude and from 50 to 300 km offshore) and correlation of ash units between sites form the basis for minimal estimates of explosive volcanic activity in the region (only eruptions large enough to deposit ash in excess of 100 km from source are represented). Pouclet et al., (1990), estimated the minimum explosive activity along the Andean Arc from ash-bearing sediments and ash layers within cores from sites along the Peru margin collected during ODP Leg 112. As a result of higher recovery (as much as ten times more core recovery in many intervals) and decreased disturbance in cores recovered during Leg 201, our documentation of ash content in cores from Leg 201 has led to a more complete record of the explosive volcanic activity along the Andean Arc. For example, Pouclet, et al., (1990), reports four ash layers from Sites 680 and 684, whereas we have documented fourteen ash layers from cores recovered from the same locations (Sites 1228 and 1227, respectively). Our stratigraphic record agrees with Pouclet, et al., (1990), suggesting that explosive activity began in the early Eocene ( ˜35Ma) and continued with explosive pulses during the Miocene. The greatest explosive activity occurred within the past 5 million years, with peak activity in the late Pliocene to early Pleistocene. Based on petrographic and geochemical analysis, most of the volcanic ash within cores from Leg 201 was derived from the Andean volcanic arc. These plinian eruptions produced acidic glasses and ash layers with abundant feldspar, hornblende, and biotite. Pouclet, et al., (1990), reports a transition from andesitic volcanism in the Middle to Late Miocene to a more shoshonitic

  5. Hyperextension along the pre-Caledonian margin of the Iapetus? Age and origin of discontinuous gneiss sheets associated with deep-marine sediments, Alpine metaperidotites and detrital serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Johannes; Alsaif, Manar; Corfu, Fernando; Andersen, Torgeir B.

    2016-04-01

    A mélange zone is positioned structurally below some large Proterozoic crystalline nappe complexes (NC), including the Upper Bergsdalen, Jotun and Lindås NCs in the South Norwegian Caledonides. The mélange is characterized by a lithological association of originally deep marine sediments intercalated with some coarser grained siliciclastic metasediments including meta-sandstone and conglomerates, thin slivers of gneisses, as well as detrital serpentinites and 'Alpine-type' metaperidotites. The formation of the mélange and particularly the origin of the detrital serpentinites are disputed. Several models have been suggested including formation as a) an ophiolitic mélange during ophiolite obduction, b) an unconformable post-obduction transgressive sequence or c) a mélange formed during hyperextension along the pre-Caledonian margin of Baltica. Here we present new ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology of zircon and titanite separated from some of the laterally discontinuous gneiss slivers of variably granitic to gabbroic composition. These gneisses are intercalated with the metasediments as sheets with a maximum strike length of up to 40 km, in the case of the Haukenes gneiss in the Bergen area. Two main groups of gneisses can be distinguished; a) rocks formed at ca. 1495 Ma, 1212 Ma, and 1094 Ma, respectively and b) felsic to mafic meta-intrusives formed in the Early Ordovician between 486 and 474 Ma. In the Samnanger Complex the mélange was truncated by little deformed minor granitoid intrusives at 420 Ma. We propose a Baltican origin for the Mesoproterozoic gneisses. This also implies that the mélange has an affinity with Baltica as is also suggested by its tectonostratigraphic position below the Jotun, Lindås and Upper Bergsdalen Nappe complexes.

  6. Rapid formation of hyperpycnal sediment gravity currents offshore of a semi-arid California river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Xu, Jingping; Noble, Marlene A.; Lee, Homa J.

    2008-05-01

    Observations of sediment dispersal from the Santa Clara River of southern California during two moderately sized river discharge events suggest that river sediment rapidly formed a negatively buoyant (hyperpycnal) bottom plume along the seabed within hours of peak discharge. An array of acoustic and optical sensors were placed at three stations 1 km from the Santa Clara River mouth in 10-m water depth during January-February 2004. These combined observations suggest that fluid mud concentrations of suspended sediment (>10 g/l) and across-shore gravity currents (˜5 cm/s) were observed in the lower 20-40 cm of the water column 4-6 h after discharge events. Gravity currents were wave dominated, rather than auto-suspending, and appeared to consist of silt-to-clay sized sediment from the river. Sediment mass balances suggest that 25-50% of the discharged river sediment was transported by these hyperpycnal currents. Sediment settling purely by flocs (˜1 mm/s) cannot explain the formation of the observed hyperpycnal plumes, therefore we suggest that some enhanced sediment settling from mixing, convective instabilities, or diverging plumes occurred that would explain the formation of the gravity currents. These combined results provide field evidence that high suspended-sediment concentrations from rivers (>1 g/l) may rapidly form hyperpycnal sediment gravity currents immediately offshore of river mouths, and these pathways can explain a significant portion of the river-margin sediment budget. The fate of this sediment will be strongly influenced by bathymetry, whereas the fate of the remaining sediment will be much more influenced by ocean currents.

  7. Is these a link between eustatic variations, platform drowning, oceanic anoxic events, and ammonite faunal turnovers ? Case study of the Aptian sediments along the northern Tethyan margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pictet, Antoine; Föllmi, Karl; Spangenberg, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    The early Aptian witnessed an important episode of paleoenvironmental change, which has been linked to major marine volcanic activity related to the formation of the Ontong-Java large igneous province (e.g., Larson and Erba, 1999). This phase culminated in the formation of hemipelagic and pelagic organic-rich sediments, whereas profound changes are also observed in shallow-water settings, with the step-by-step disappearance of the northern Tethyan platform. Results show that the northern Tethyan platform has passed through three major crises in its evolution during the early Aptian. A first one started with an emersion phase, marked by a subaerial karstified discontinuity reported from the middle early Aptian (Deshayesites forbesi or early D. deshayesi zone). This is directly followed by the drowning of the Urgonian platform along the northern Tethyan margin, preceding the Selli Episode. The period following this drowning phase coincides with the negative and the following positive excursions in the δ13C records and went along with the deposition of the so-called Lower Grünten Member, which is the result of heterozoan carbonate production and characterized by increased detrital input. Ammonite fauna witnessed an important diversification of hemipelagic forms, especially inside the heteromorph Ancyloceratacea. This radiation is probably linked to the expansion of hemipelagic facies, one of the main habitats of ammonites. A second phase, reported from the late early Aptian (late D. deshayesi zone), started with a small drowning event, marked by a firmground and by a phosphatic enrichment. This stratigraphical layer also corresponds to the establishment of the anoxic Apparein level. Above, the Upper Grünten Member continues with heterozoan carbonate production or with glauconitic condensed sediments. The corresponding δ13C record is a the onset of a long-term decrease. The ammonite fauna is marked by a first turnover with the disappearance of Deshayesites, and the

  8. Real-Time PCR Quantification and Diversity Analysis of the Functional Genes aprA and dsrA of Sulfate-Reducing Prokaryotes in Marine Sediments of the Peru Continental Margin and the Black Sea

    PubMed Central

    Blazejak, Anna; Schippers, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) are ubiquitous and quantitatively important members in many ecosystems, especially in marine sediments. However their abundance and diversity in subsurface marine sediments is poorly understood. In this study, the abundance and diversity of the functional genes for the enzymes adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (aprA) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA) of SRP in marine sediments of the Peru continental margin and the Black Sea were analyzed, including samples from the deep biosphere (ODP site 1227). For aprA quantification a Q-PCR assay was designed and evaluated. Depth profiles of the aprA and dsrA copy numbers were almost equal for all sites. Gene copy numbers decreased concomitantly with depth from around 108/g sediment close to the sediment surface to less than 105/g sediment at 5 mbsf. The 16S rRNA gene copy numbers of total bacteria were much higher than those of the functional genes at all sediment depths and used to calculate the proportion of SRP to the total Bacteria. The aprA and dsrA copy numbers comprised in average 0.5–1% of the 16S rRNA gene copy numbers of total bacteria in the sediments up to a depth of ca. 40 mbsf. In the zone without detectable sulfate in the pore water from about 40–121 mbsf (Peru margin ODP site 1227), only dsrA (but not aprA) was detected with copy numbers of less than 104/g sediment, comprising ca. 14% of the 16S rRNA gene copy numbers of total bacteria. In this zone, sulfate might be provided for SRP by anaerobic sulfide oxidation. Clone libraries of aprA showed that all isolated sequences originate from SRP showing a close relationship to aprA of characterized species or form a new cluster with only distant relation to aprA of isolated SRP. For dsrA a high diversity was detected, even up to 121 m sediment depth in the deep biosphere. PMID:22203820

  9. Santa Cruz River Options

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes qualitative research insights gained during development of a nonmarket valuation survey for changes to the Santa Cruz River in Southern Arizona. Qualitative research provides an important avenue for understanding how the public interprets valuation s...

  10. Sea level reconstructions and non-marine sedimentation at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary: southwestern margin of the Neotethys in the Salt Range, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The environmental changes during the Triassic-Jurassic boundary interval and the associated mass extinction event are still strongly debated. Sea-level reconstruction records during this interval reveal an end-Triassic global regression event. Erosion and karstification at the top of Triassic sediments, and Lower Jurassic fluvial channels with reworked Triassic clasts indicate widespread regression in the European basins. Laterite at the top of the Triassic, and quartzose conglomerates/sandstones at the base of the Jurassic indicate a fluvial/terrestrial onset in Iran and Afghanistan. Abrupt emergence, erosion and facies dislocation, from the Triassic dolomites (Kingriali Formation) to Lower Jurassic fluvial/continental quartzose conglomerates/pebbly sandstones (Datta Formation) occur in the Tethyan Salt Range of Pakistan. Sedimentological analyses indicate marine regression and emergence under tropical-subtropical conditions (Greenhouse conditions) and negates the possibility of glacial influence in this region. Field evidences indicate the presence of an undulatory surface at the base of the Jurassic and a high (Sargodha High) is present south of the Salt Range Thrust, the southern boundary of the basin. Furthermore, geophysical data (mostly seismic sections) in different parts of the basin display normal faults in the basement. These features are interpreted as horst and graben structures at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in the Kohat-Potwar Plateau. The Lower Jurassic Datta Formation appears to have been deposited in an overall graben fill settings. Similar normal faults and graben fill geometries are observed on seismic sections in Tanzania, Mozambique, Madagascar and other regions of the southeastern margin of the African Plate and are related to the Karoo rift system. To summarize, the basement normal faults and the graben fill features at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in the Kohat-Potwar Plateau can be correlated to similar features common in the Karoo

  11. 1. 'SANTA ANA RIVER IN SANTA ANA CANYON. ORANGE COUNTY.' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 'SANTA ANA RIVER IN SANTA ANA CANYON. ORANGE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the northeast taken from the northeast extremity of the canyon, showing, in the middle distance, the confluence of Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, site of the future Prado Dam. File number written on negative: R & H 80 026. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  12. Effects of bottom water dissolved oxygen variability on copper and lead fractionation in the sediments across the oxygen minimum zone, western continental margin of India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Jayachandran, Saranya; Madan, Ritu; Sarkar, Arindam; Linsy, P; Nath, B Nagender

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the effect of varying bottom-water oxygen concentration on geochemical fractionation (operational speciation) of Cu and Pb in the underneath sediments across the oxygen minimum zone (Arabian Sea) in the west coast of India. Both, Cu and Pb were redistributed among the different binding phases of the sediments with changing dissolved oxygen level (from oxic to hypoxic and close to suboxic) in the bottom water. The average lability of Cu-sediment complexes gradually decreased (i.e., stability increased) with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentrations of the bottom water. Decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration increased Cu association with sedimentary organic matter. However, Pb association with Fe/Mn-oxyhydroxide phases in the sediments gradually decreased with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentration of the overlying bottom water (due to dissolution of Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide phase). The lability of Pb-sediment complexes increased with the decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration. This study suggests that bottom-water oxygen concentration is one of the key factors governing stability and lability of Cu and Pb complexes in the underneath sediment. Sedimentary organic matter and Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide binding phases were the major hosting phases for Cu and Pb respectively in the study area. Increasing lability of Pb-complexes in bottom sediments may lead to positive benthic fluxes of Pb at low oxygen environment. PMID:27267721

  13. The Santa Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imber, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Discusses legal issues related to the celebration of Christmas in public schools. Concludes that schools can display secular symbols of Christmas such as reindeer, elves, and Santa Clause, but not religious ones, such as wise men, angels, and nativity scenes. (PKP)

  14. The Santa Ana Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cournoyer, David, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    One of the priority interests of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation is to connect the knowledge and resources of institutions with communities in order to improve the quality of life in community. Partnerships achieve uncommon results. In Santa Ana, California, an unusual partnership of public schools, community college, universities, community…

  15. Provenance of Holocene sediment on the Chukchi-Alaskan margin based on combined diffuse spectral reflectance and quantitative X-Ray Diffraction analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, J.D.; Polyak, L.; Grebmeier, J.M.; Darby, D.; Eberl, D.D.; Naidu, S.; Nof, D.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment clay and silt mineral assemblages provide an excellent means of assessing the provenance of fine-grained Arctic sediment especially when a unique mineral assemblage can be tied to specific source areas. The diffuse spectral reflectance (DSR) first derivative measurements and quantitative X-Ray Diffraction (qXRD) on a high-resolution sediment core from the continental slope north of Alaska constrain the sediment mineralogy. DSR results are augmented by measurements on several adjacent cores and compared to surface sediment samples from the northern Alaskan shelf and slope. Using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), we infer that the three leading DSR modes relate to mixtures of smectite + dolomite, illite + goethite, and chlorite + muscovite. This interpretation is consistent with the down core qXRD results. While the smectite + dolomite, and illite + goethite factors show increased variability down core, the chlorite + muscovite factor had highest positive loadings in the middle Holocene, between ca. 6.0 and 3.6??ka. Because the most likely source of the chlorite + muscovite suite in this vicinity lies in the North Pacific, we argue that the oscillations in chlorite + muscovite values likely reflect an increase in the inflow of Pacific water to the Arctic through the Bering Strait. The time interval of this event is associated in other parts of the globe with a non-linear response of the climate system to the decrease in insolation, which may be related to changes in water exchange between the Pacific and Arctic Ocean. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Principles of Geological Mapping of Marine Sediments (with Special Reference to the African Continental Margin). Unesco Reports in Marine Science No. 37.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisitzin, Alexandre P.

    Designed to serve as a complement to the Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science, this report concentrates on theoretical and practical problems of geological mapping of the sea floor. An introduction is given to geological mapping procedures at continental margins as well as some practical recommendations taking as an example the African region…

  17. Seismic Images of Faulting and Fossil Subduction of the Southern Baja California Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, A.; Fletcher, J. M.; Lizarralde, D.; Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Holbrook, S.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Axen, G. J.; Gorman, A. R.

    2003-12-01

    From September to November 2002, a marine geophysics experiment was carried out, using 2 ships and onshore personell, recording deep MCS (Multichannel Seismics), wide angle, gravity, magnetic and bathymetric data. The main objective of this experiment is to better understand the continental breakup processes and the rifting of the Baja California Peninsula from Mexico mainland. An array of airguns with a total air volume of 8000 cu.in. was the seismic source and a 6000 km-long, 480-channel streamer was used to record the deep MCS data. This equipment was towed by the R/V Maurice Ewing. A series of stacked and migrated sections have been obtained, showing a number of noticeable structures. To the W of the line corresponding to the Pacific margin, the fossil trench is covered by recent sediments, that are part of the Magdalena Fan. Towards the E, near the slope break, the Tosco-Abreojos fault zone is clearly imaged, showing some extensional component. Further to the E, an old syncline is covered in erosive unconformity by recent sediments. In the eastern part of the section, a half-graben structure can be observed. Under this structure, a reflective zone can be interpreted as the mylonitic zone corresponding to a detachment. Some basement scarpments seem to be parallel faults to the semigraben master fault. Other normal faults in the sediments of the basin are synthetic and antithetic with it. The master fault probably is the continuation to the S of the Santa Margarita-San Lazaro fault, reported previously as a detachment in Santa Margarita and Magdalena islands. The seismic line in the Gulf of California margin begins at a conspicuous slope at the mouth of the La Paz Bay, and corresponds to the same strike-slip fault observed in Partida and Espiritu Santo islands. The rest of the line is characterized by numerous strike-slip and normal faults, producing strong bathymetric variations.

  18. Santa and the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, P.

    2012-05-01

    This article reflects on the use of illustrations of the Moon in images of Santa Claus, on Christmas gift-wrapping paper and in children's books, in two countries which have been important in shaping the image of Santa Claus and his predecessor Sinterklaas: the USA and the Netherlands. The appearance of the Moon in Halloween illustrations is also considered. The lack of either knowledge concerning the physical origin of the Moon's phases, or interest in understanding them, is found to be widespread in the Netherlands, but is also clearly present in the USA, and is quite possibly global. Certainly incomplete, but surely representative, lists that compile occurrences of both scientifically correct and scientifically incorrect gift- wrapping paper and children's books are also presented.

  19. Insights into the East Antarctic ice sheet history from sediments recovered from the Wilkes Land margin during IODP Expedition 318 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escutia, C.; Brinkhuis, H.; Dunbar, R. B.; Klaus, A.; Scientific Team Of Iodp Drilling Expedition 318

    2010-12-01

    IODP Expedition 318 (January-March 2010) drilled for the first time the East Antarctic Wilkes Land margin. Drilling was driven by seismic stratigraphic interpretations indicating that the Wilkes Land sedimentary record included critical periods in Cenozoic Earth climate and East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) evolution when the cryosphere formed and subsequently evolved to assume its present-day configuration. The principal goals of Expedition 318 were to obtain: 1. the timing and nature of the first arrival of ice at the Wilkes Land margin inferred to have occurred during the earliest Oligocene (Oligocene isotope event-1), 2. the nature and age of the marked changes in the geometry of the progradational wedge interpreted to possibly coincide with the transition from a wet-based to a cold-based glacial regime (late Miocene-Pliocene?), 3. a high-resolution record of Antarctic climate variability during the late Neogene and Quaternary; and 4. an unprecedented 200m ultra-high resolution (i.e., annual to decadal) Holocene record of climate variability. The recovered sedimentary archives along an inshore-offshore transect provide insights about the development of the EAIS in this margin and about the short- and the long-term variability and vulnerability of this sector of the EAIS, and its relationships with global climatic, oceanographic and sea level changes. The chronostratigraphic and paleoenvironmental information from Expedition 318 is critical to provide constrains to ice sheet models to guide the forecasting of future Antarctic ice sheet behavior.

  20. Biological nitrate transport in sediments on the Peruvian margin mitigates benthic sulfide emissions and drives pelagic N loss during stagnation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, A. W.; Sommer, S.; Lomnitz, U.; Bourbonnais, A.; Wallmann, K.

    2016-06-01

    Benthic N cycling in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) was investigated at ten stations along 12 °S from the middle shelf (74 m) to the upper slope (1024 m) using in situ flux measurements, sediment biogeochemistry and modeling. Middle shelf sediments were covered by mats of the filamentous bacteria Thioploca spp. and contained a large 'hidden' pool of nitrate that was not detectable in the porewater. This was attributed to a biological nitrate reservoir stored within the bacteria to oxidize sulfide during 'dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium' (DNRA). The extremely high rates of DNRA on the shelf (15.6 mmol m-2 d-1 of N), determined using an empirical steady-state model, could easily supply all the ammonium requirements for anammox in the water column. The model further showed that denitrification by foraminifera may account for 90% of N2 production at the lower edge of the OMZ. At the time of sampling, dissolved oxygen was below detection limit down to 400 m and the water body overlying the shelf had stagnated, resulting in complete depletion of nitrate and nitrite. A decrease in the biological nitrate pool was observed on the shelf during fieldwork concomitant with a rise in porewater sulfide levels in surface sediments to 2 mM. Using a non-steady state model to simulate this natural anoxia experiment, these observations were shown to be consistent with Thioploca surviving on a dwindling intracellular nitrate reservoir to survive the stagnation period. The model shows that sediments hosting Thioploca are able to maintain high ammonium fluxes for many weeks following stagnation, potentially sustaining pelagic N loss by anammox. In contrast, sulfide emissions remain low, reducing the economic risk to the Peruvian fishery by toxic sulfide plume development.

  1. Disentangling marine, soil and plant organic carbon contributions to continental margin sediments: A multi-proxy approach in a 20,000 year sediment record from the Congo deep-sea fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijers, Johan W. H.; Schouten, Stefan; Schefuß, Enno; Schneider, Ralph R.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2009-01-01

    A 20 kyr long sediment sequence from the Congo deep sea fan (core GeoB 6518-1), one of the world's largest deep sea river fans, has been analysed for bulk and molecular proxies in order to reconstruct the marine, soil and plant organic carbon (OC) contributions to these sediments since the last glacial maximum. The bulk proxies applied, C/N ratio and δ 13C org, ranged from 10 to 12.5 and from -24.5 to -21‰ VPDB, respectively. As molecular proxies, concentrations of marine derived alkenones and terrestrial derived odd-numbered n-alkanes were used, which varied between 0.2 and 4 μg/g dry weight sediment. In addition, the branched vs. isoprenoid tetraether (BIT) index, a proxy for soil organic matter input, was used, which varied from 0.3 to 0.5 in this core. Application of binary mixing models, based on the different individual proxies, showed estimates for terrestrial OC input varying by up to 50% due to the heterogeneous nature of the OC. Application of a three end-member mixing model using the δ 13C org content, the C/N ratio and the BIT index, enabled the distinction of soil and plant organic matter as separate contributors to the sedimentary OC pool. The results show that marine OC accounts for 20% to 40% of the total OC present in the deep sea fan sediments over the last 20 kyr and that soil OC accounts for about half (˜45% on average) of the OC present. This suggests that soil OC represents the majority of the terrestrial OC delivered to the fan sediments. Accumulation rates of the plant and soil OC fractions over the last 20 kyr varied by a factor of up to 5, and are strongly related to sediment accumulation rates. They showed an increase starting at ca. 17 kyr BP, a decline during the Younger Dryas, peak values during the early Holocene and lower values in the late Holocene. This pattern matches with reconstructions of past central African humidity and Congo River discharge from the same core and revealed that central African precipitation patterns

  2. Downslope Eulerian mean flow associated with high-frequency current fluctuations observed on the outer continental shelf and upper slope along the northeastern United States continental margin: implications for sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, B.

    1988-01-01

    Eulerian current measurements made 5-7 m above bottom at six stations along the United States east coast continental margin show a net downslope flow of 1-5 cm s-1. Although the scalar current speed decreases with water depth and toward the bottom, fluctuations in the cross-isobath flow were stronger and increasingly asymmetric near the bottom. Maximum downslope flow exceeded maximum upslope flow by a factor of two to three. The strength of the low-passed downslope flow was proportional to the upslope Reynolds flux of density as well as to the amplitude of the current fluctuations that have periods shorter than 30 h. These flow characteristics may be caused by differential vertical mixing in the bottom boundary layer where a stratified fluid flows upslope (unstable) and downslope (stable). The asymmetry in current strength clearly favors net downslope transport of sediments that move as bedload. ?? 1988.

  3. Atlantic marginal basins of Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.T.

    1988-02-01

    The over 10,000-km long Atlantic margin of Africa is divisible into thirty basins or segments of the margin that collectively contain over 18.6 x 10/sup 6/ km/sup 3/ of syn-breakup and post-breakup sediments. Twenty of these basins contain a sufficiently thick volume of sediments to be considered prospects. These basins lie, at least partially, within the 200 m isobath. The distribution of source rocks is broad enough to give potential to each of these basins. The sedimentation patterns, tectonics, and timing of events differ from basin to basin and are related directly to the margin's complex history. Two spreading modes exist: rift and transform. Rifting dates from Late Triassic-Early Jurassic in the northwest to Early Cretaceous south of the Niger Delta. A complex transform fault system separated these two margins. Deep-water communication between the two basins became established in the middle Cretaceous. This Mesozoic-Cenozoic cycle of rifting and seafloor spreading has segmented the margin and where observable, basins tend to be bounded by these segments.

  4. Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and whole-rock Nd-isotope constraints on sediment provenance in the Neoproterozoic Sergipano orogen, Brazil: From early passive margins to late foreland basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, E. P.; McNaughton, N. J.; Windley, B. F.; Carvalho, M. J.; Nascimento, R. S.

    2015-11-01

    SHRIMP U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology and depleted-mantle Nd-model ages of clastic rocks were combined to understand the sediment provenance in the Neoproterozoic Sergipano Belt. The Sergipano is the main orogenic belt between the Borborema province and the São Francisco Craton, eastern South America; it is divisible into several lithostratigraphic domains from North to South: Canindé, Poço Redondo-Marancó, Macururé, Vaza Barris, and Estância. Nd model ages (TDM) and detrital zircon U-Pb SHRIMP geochronology indicate that the protoliths of clastic metasedimentary rocks from the Marancó and Macururé domains were mostly derived from eroded late Mesoproterozoic to early Neoproterozoic rocks (1000-900 Ma), whereas detritus of similar rocks from the Canindé domain came from a younger source (ca. 700 Ma and 1000 Ma). Samples from the Vaza Barris domain show the greatest scatter of both TDM and zircon ages amongst all domains, but with important contributions from Proterozoic sources (690-1050 Ma and ca. 2100 Ma) and less from Archaean sources. The Estância domain samples have zircon population peaks at 570 Ma, 600 Ma, and 920-980 Ma, with a few older grains; one diamictite contains only ca. 2150 Ma zircon grains. Our preliminary results support a model in which sediments of the Marancó and Macururé domains were deposited on a continental margin of the ancient Borborema plate before its collision with the São Francisco Craton; the Canindé domain is likely to be an aborted Neoproterozoic rift assemblage within the southern part of the Borborema plate (Pernambuco-Alagoas massif). The basal units of the Vaza Barris and Estância domains have clast sources from the São Francisco Craton and are best interpreted as passive margin sediments. However, the uppermost units of the Estância and Vaza Barris domains come from foreland basins formed during collision of Borborema plate with the São Francisco Craton.

  5. 'Santa Anita' Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for 'Santa Anita' Panorama (QTVR)

    This color mosaic taken on May 21, 25 and 26, 2004, by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was acquired from a position roughly three-fourths the way between 'Bonneville Crater' and the base of the 'Columbia Hills.' The area is within a low thermal inertia unit (an area that heats up and cools off quickly) identified from orbit by the Mars Odyssey thermal emission imaging system instrument. The rover was roughly 600 meters (1,968 feet) from the base of the hills.

    This mosaic, referred to as the 'Santa Anita Panorama,' is comprised of 64 pointings, acquired with six of the panoramic camera's color filters, including one designed specifically to allow comparisons between orbital and surface brightness data. A total of 384 images were acquired as part of this panorama. The mosaic is an approximate true-color rendering constructed from images using the camera's 750-, 530- and and 480-nanometer filters, and is presented at the full resolution of the camera.

  6. Flow dynamics and sedimentation of lateral accretion packages in sinuous deep-water channels: A 3D seismic case study from the northwestern South China Sea margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengli; Gong, Chenglin

    2016-07-01

    The current study uses 3D seismic data to document architectural styles and flow dynamics of lateral accretion packages (LAPs) associated with sinuous deep-water channels, contributing to a better understanding of flow processes and sedimentation associated with LAPs. The documented LAPs underwent three main stages of architectural evolution, including the early incision stages characterized by intense downcutting, active migration stages characterized by active migration and avulsion of the individual channels, and late abandonment stages characterized by the termination of sediment gravity-flows and LAP growth. These three stages of LAP growth repeated through time, yielding a fining-upward pattern from sandy channel-fill turbidites, into sand-mud couplets, all capped by muddy turbidites. A river-reversed helical flow circulation was created by an imbalance, through the flow depth, of inwardly directed pressure gradient forces near the bed and outwardly directed centrifugal forces near the surface. It consists of low-velocity cores near the outer banks and low-velocity cores along the inner banks. Such river-reversed helical flow pattern is evidenced by volumetrically extensive LAPs and toplap and downlap terminations along the gentle banks and by aerially restricted, seismically unresolvable levees and truncation terminations near the steep banks. This river-reversed helical flow circulation favors asymmetric intra-channel deposition characterized by inner bank deposition versus outer bank erosion, and which, in turn, forced individual channels to consistently migrate towards outer banks, resulting in significant asymmetric cross-channel profiles with aerially extensive LAPs along inner banks.

  7. Climatically related millennial-scale fluctuations in strength of California margin oxygen-minimum zone during the past 60 k.y.

    SciTech Connect

    Cannariato, K.G.; Kennett, J.P.

    1999-11-01

    A strong oxygen-minimum zone (OMZ) currently exists along the California margin because of a combination of high surface-water productivity and poor intermediate-water ventilation. However, the strength of this OMZ may have been sensitive to late Quaternary ocean-circulation and productivity changes along the margin. Although sediment-lamination strength has been used to trace ocean-oxygenation changes in the past, oxygen levels on the open margin are not sufficiently low for laminations to form. In these regions, benthic foraminifera are highly sensitive monitors of OMZ strength, and their fossil assemblages can be used to reconstruct past fluctuations. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1017, off Point Conception, exhibit major and rapid faunal oscillations in response to late Quaternary millennial-scale climate change (Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles) on the open central California margin. These faunal oscillations can be correlated to and are apparently synchronous with those reported from Santa Barbara Basin. Together they represent major fluctuations in the strength of the OMZ which were intimately associated with global climate change--weakening, perhaps disappearing, during cool periods and strengthening during warm periods. These rapid, major OMZ strength fluctuations were apparently widespread on the Northeast Pacific margin and must have influenced the evolution of margin biota and altered biogeochemical cycles with potential feedbacks to global climate change.

  8. Late Weichselian sediment geochemistry of the western Barents Sea margin - an empirical inter-instrumental comparison of core scanning and conventional XRF measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, Martin; Knies, Jochen; Forwick, Matthias; Haflidason, Haflidi

    2014-05-01

    During the last years an increasing number of studies in geosciences made use of the fast and non-destructive XRF scanning method. To create robust and reproducible data and to interpret geochemical variations across records of different origin and from different instrumentations inter-instrumental comparison becomes a necessary, inevitable and decisive procedure. In this study we present results from an empirical approach of an inter-instrumental XRF comparison including the Avaatech (University of Tromsø), Itrax (University of Bergen) and InnovX-GeoTek (The Geological Survey of Norway) core scanners. In addition single samples were measured with the PANalytical AXIOS XRF spectrometer and the Perkin Elmer 4300 Dual View ICP-AES measurements (both at the Geological Survey of Norway). We analysed the split-surface of a 300 cm long marine sediment core from the continental slope of the western Barents Sea (71°30'N, 16°10' E). The sediment core sections were logged near-continuously with the core scanners along the centre of the core axis, followed by measurements of discrete samples. All devices were standardized and calibrated prior measurements according to the individual, requisite standardisation routines. Results presented here were harmonized to common sampling midpoints. We tested element ratios commonly used in geosciences. Most of the down-core variations of element ratios from the core scans occur in general synchronously and match the variability of single sample measurements from the stand-alone XRF-analyzer indicating a convenient XRF technique implementation in the scanning instruments. However, in certain cases, element ratios appear to show very low variations, likely an indication of detection-limit problems or larger uncertainties associated with the determination of low element concentrations. Apart from good relative fit, absolute variations occur at different levels and instrumental deviation varies for particular element ratios. This likely

  9. Potassic and ultrapotassic magmatism in the circum-Tyrrhenian region: Significance of carbonated pelitic vs. pelitic sediment recycling at destructive plate margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzinelli, Riccardo; Lustrino, Michele; Mattei, Massimo; Melluso, Leone; Conticelli, Sandro

    2009-12-01

    The central-western Mediterranean is one of the most important areas on Earth for studying subduction-related potassic and ultrapotassic magmatism. In the circum-Tyrrhenian area leucite-free (i.e., lamproite) and leucite-bearing (i.e., kamafugite, leucitite, and plagioleucitite) ultrapotassic rocks have been emplaced and are associated with shoshonites and high-K calc-alkaline volcanic rocks. Four different magmatic provinces are recognised from this area. Eastward and then south-eastward migration of magmatism with time occurred following roll-back of the subducting plate. Leucite-free silica-rich lamproites are restricted to the early stages of magmatism, associated with shoshonites and high-K calc-alkaline volcanic rocks. Present day volcanic activity is restricted to the Neapolitan district where ultrapotassic rocks with variable geochemical and isotopic characteristics occur. Ultrapotassic rocks are strongly enriched in incompatible trace elements with variable fractionation of Ta, Nb, and Ti with respect to Th and large ion lithophile elements. Mafic ultrapotassic rocks are also variably enriched in radiogenic Sr and Pb and unradiogenic Nd. The main geochemical and isotopic signatures result from sediment recycling within the upper mantle via subduction. Selected trace element ratios suggest that high temperatures are required to generate sediment-derived melts. Recycling of carbonated pelites play an important role in the Roman province controlling the genesis of leucite-bearing magmas. Large volumes of metasomatic components are predicted to be accommodated within a vein network in the sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Partial melting of the pure vein mineralogy is likely to generate ultrapotassic magmas of either lamproitic or kamafugitic nature. Over time, increased interaction between the metasomatic vein lithology and the surrounding mantle dilutes the alkaline component producing shoshonites and high-K calc-alkaline rocks. The addition of a further

  10. Subsurface and petroleum geology of the southwestern Santa Clara Valley ("Silicon Valley"), California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Richard G.; Jachens, Robert C.; Lillis, Paul G.; McLaughlin, Robert J.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Hostettler, Frances D.; McDougall, Kristin A.; Magoon, Leslie B.

    2002-01-01

    Gravity anomalies, historical records of exploratory oil wells and oil seeps, new organic-geochemical results, and new stratigraphic and structural data indicate the presence of a concealed, oil-bearing sedimentary basin beneath a highly urbanized part of the Santa Clara Valley, Calif. A conspicuous isostatic-gravity low that extends about 35 km from Palo Alto southeastward to near Los Gatos reflects an asymmetric, northwest-trending sedimentary basin comprising low-density strata, principally of Miocene age, that rest on higher-density rocks of Mesozoic and Paleogene(?) age. Both gravity and well data show that the low-density rocks thin gradually to the northeast over a distance of about 10 km. The thickest (approx 4 km thick) accumulation of low-density material occurs along the basin's steep southwestern margin, which may be controlled by buried, northeast-dipping normal faults that were active during the Miocene. Movement along these hypothetical normal faults may been contemporaneous (approx 17–14 Ma) with sedimentation and local dacitic and basaltic volcanism, possibly in response to crustal extension related to passage of the northwestward-migrating Mendocino triple junction. During the Pliocene and Quaternary, the normal faults and Miocene strata were overridden by Mesozoic rocks, including the Franciscan Complex, along northeastward-vergent reverse and thrust faults of the Berrocal, Shannon, and Monte Vista Fault zones. Movement along these fault zones was accompanied by folding and tilting of strata as young as Quaternary and by uplift of the modern Santa Cruz Mountains; the fault zones remain seismically active. We attribute the Pliocene and Quaternary reverse and thrust faulting, folding, and uplift to compression caused by local San Andreas Fault tectonics and regional transpression along the Pacific-North American Plate boundary. Near the southwestern margin of the Santa Clara Valley, as many as 20 exploratory oil wells were drilled between 1891

  11. Latest Cretaceous sedimentation on Peninsular Ranges block

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, P.L.

    1986-04-01

    The Peninsular Ranges block is dominated by a Late Jurassic-middle Cretaceous batholithic belt that extends from the Santa Ana Mountains in southern California southward through the state of Baja California. From paleomagnetic evidence, the block appears to have moved north about 11/sup 0/ with respect to the North American craton since the Late Cretaceous. The Campanian-Maestrichtian sedimentary record along the western side of the block shows that sedimentation occurred contemporaneously with faulting. Dominantly coarse sediments were stripped off the batholithic complex, carried westward relatively short distances, and deposited in alluvial-fan, fluvial, fan-delta, and shelf environments as well as in submarine fans built into local, fault-created basins. The Peninsular Ranges block apparently moved northward in response to oblique subduction of the Farallon plate; it seemingly rode along on a reasonably even keel as transcurrent faulting wrenched pieces off its western side. The steady keel allowed the sedimentary record to reflect eustatic changes. Along the west side of the Peninsular Ranges block, the Campanian column typically has a retrogradational sequence lower in the section that is overlain by a progradational sequence. This pattern holds for the Santa Ana Mountains, San Diego, California, and Descanso, Salsipuedes, and El Rosario, Baja California. Eustatic sea level changes left a dominant imprint on the entire stratigraphic column, although local facies may be distinctly different because basins were created by contemporaneous faulting. The fault basins may have had a borderland-style topography, judging from their relatively small size, discontinuous and sporadic development, and apparently linear margins.

  12. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Conrad, James E.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Santa Barbara map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and geodetic studies indicate that the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. Uplift rates (as much as 2.2 mm/yr) that are based on studies of onland marine terraces provide further evidence of significant shortening. The city of Santa Barbara, the main coastal population center in the map area, is part of a contiguous urban area that extends from Carpinteria to Goleta. This urban area was developed on the coalescing alluvial surfaces, uplifted marine terraces, and low hills that lie south of the east-west-trending Santa Ynez Mountains. Several beaches line the actively

  13. Magnitude and composition of sinking particulate phosphorus fluxes in Santa Barbara Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekula-Wood, Emily; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.; Bennett, Melissa A.; Thunell, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The composition and bioavailability of particulate P influence marine biological community production on both modern and geologic time-scales, and continental margins play a critical role in the supply, modification, and storage of particulate P. This study examined particulate P cycling in the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) off the coast of southern California using a ˜520 m deep-moored sediment trap deployed from 1993-2006 and a sediment core collected in 2005 directly beneath the sediment trap at 590 m. Total particulate P (TPP), particulate inorganic P (PIP), and particulate organic P (POP) were quantified using a 5-step sequential extraction method (SEDEX) that chemically separates PIP into loosely bound, oxide-bound, authigenic, and detrital P phases. POP fluxes, while similar in magnitude to other coastal regions (22 ± 10 μmol m-2 d-1) were a small component of the TPP pool (15%). Seasonal trends revealed significant increases in POP fluxes during upwelling due to increased biological production in surface waters by organisms that increased mineral ballast. High particulate organic carbon (POC) to POP ratios (337 ± 18) further indicated rapid and efficient remineralization of POP relative to POC as particles sank through the oxic water column; however, further reduction of POP ceased in the deeper anoxic waters. Loosely bound, oxide-bound, and authigenic P, dominated the TPP pool, with PIP fluxes substantially higher than those measured in other coastal settings. Strong correlations between oxide-associated, authigenic, and detrital P fluxes with lithogenic material indicated a terrestrial source associated with riverine discharge. Furthermore, more than 30% of the loosely bound and oxide-bound P was remineralized prior to burial, with the magnitude of dissolution far exceeding that of POP. These results highlight the dynamic nature of the particulate P pool in coastal ecosystems and how changes in P source can alter the composition and lability of P that

  14. Evidence for enhanced phosphorus regeneration from marine sediments overlain by oxygen depleted waters

    SciTech Connect

    Ingall, E.; Jahnki, R.

    1994-06-01

    Phosphorus regeneration and burial fluxes determined from in situ benthic flux chamber and solid phase measurements at sites on the Californian continental margin, Peruvian continental slope, North Carolina continental slope, and from the Santa Monica basin, California are reported. Comparison of these sites indicates that O{sub 2}-depleted bottomwaters enhance P regeneration from sediments, diminishing overall phosphorus burial efficiency. Based on these observations, a positive feedback, linking ocean anoxia, enhanced benthic phosphorus regeneration, and marine productivity is proposed. On shorter timescales, these results also suggest that O{sub 2} depletion in coastal regions caused by eutrophication may enhance P regeneration from sediments, thereby providing additional P necessary for increased biological productivity. 42 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Molecular Diversity of Denitrifying Genes in Continental Margin Sediments within the Oxygen-Deficient Zone off the Pacific Coast of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueduan; Tiquia, Sonia M.; Holguin, Gina; Wu, Liyou; Nold, Stephen C.; Devol, Allan H.; Luo, Kuan; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Tiedje, James M.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2003-01-01

    To understand the composition and structure of denitrifying communities in the oxygen-deficient zone off the Pacific coast of Mexico, the molecular diversity of nir genes from sediments obtained at four stations was examined by using a PCR-based cloning approach. A total of 50 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) for nirK and 82 OTUs for nirS were obtained from all samples. Forty-four of the nirS clones and 31 of the nirK clones were sequenced; the levels of similarity of the nirS clones were 52 to 92%, and the levels of similarity of the nirS clones were 50 to 99%. The percentages of overlapping OTUs between stations were 18 to 30% for nirS and 5 to 8% for nirK. Sequence analysis revealed that 26% of the nirS clones were related to the nirS genes of Alcaligenes faecalis (80 to 94% similar) and Pseudomonas stutzeri (80 to 99%), whereas 3 to 31% of the nirK clones were closely related to the nirK genes of Pseudomonas sp. strain G-179 (98 to 99%), Bradyrhizobium japonicum (91%), Blastobacter denitrificans (83%), and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans (96%). The rest of the clones, however, were less than 80% similar to nirS and nirK sequences available in sequence databases. The results of a principal-component analysis (PCA) based on the percentage of OTUs and biogeochemical data indicated that the nitrate concentration and oxygen have an effect on the denitrifying communities. The communities at the stations in oxygen-deficient zones were more similar than the communities at the stations in the oxygenated zone. The denitrifying communities were more similar at the stations that were closer together and had similar nitrate levels. Also, the results of PCA based on biogeochemical properties suggest that geographic location and biogeochemical conditions, especially the nitrate and oxygen levels, appear to be the key factors that control the structure of denitrifying communities. PMID:12788762

  16. Effect of Wildfire on Sediment Sorting in a Steep Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsheim, J. L.; Chin, A.; O'Hirok, L.; Storesund, R.

    2014-12-01

    Wildfire is an external forcing factor in the landscape. In chaparral environments, wildfire initiates transport of well-sorted fine sediment through dry-ravel processes on hillslopes and facilitates delivery of sediment to stream channels. In turn, this periodic post-fire sediment influx governs sorting of channel-bed material during subsequent floods that mobilize and transport the sediment downstream. We investigated the effects of the May 2013 Springs Wildfire in the Santa Monica Mountains in semi-arid southern California with field measurements and terrestrial LiDAR scanning. Before the fire, sediment sorting within the heterogeneous bed material present in Big Sycamore Creek was controlled by organized step-pool bedforms. Boulders formed steps with relatively finer cobbles, gravel, and sand filling the pools. Before the fire, the grain size distribution present in the substrate between boulder steps was relatively coarse (D84 = 250 mm), in contrast to that in the influx of sediment contributed by post-fire dry-ravel processes deposited at channel margins (D84 = 8 mm). Flow shear stress during one small flood in 2014 (post-fire) was adequate to mobilize fine dry ravel- related sediment. Transport capacity was sufficient to mobilize and transport this sediment within a study reach; however, it was not adequate to flush the fine material downstream. Shear stress required to mobilize sediment contributed by dry ravel was substantially less than that required to transport the substrate material present before the wildfire. The small flood deposited fine sediment (D84 = 16 mm) as flow lost capacity. Resulting deposition buried bedforms, changing the step-pool profile to a plane bed. The relatively poorly sorted, coarse, rough bed changed to a well sorted, fine, smooth, bed. These changes have implications for sediment transport dynamics and aquatic ecology. In steep, semi-arid, chaparral fluvial systems, sediment derived from dry-ravel processes influences the

  17. Chemical modifications of subducted crust and sediments beneath convergent plate margins and the fate of extracted liquids and residual solids: examinations using ABS ver.4 numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, J.; Gill, J. B.; Van Keken, P. E.; Kawabata, H.; Hacker, B. R.; Stern, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    We have updated the Arc Basalt Simulator numerical model to ver.4 (ABS4). The ABS model (Kimura et al., 2011: G3) was developed to examine the geochemical mass balance among (1) the flux from the subducted slab, (2) open-system flux melting in the mantle peridotite, and (3) primary arc magmas. The new ABS4 model improves the geochemical model of the slab by including seven slab layers and a slab/mantle wedge interface. These are, from bottom to top, slab peridotite (SlbP), lower gabbro (LGAB), upper gabbro (UGAB), dike (DIKE), lower basalt (LBAS), upper basalt (UBAS = altered oceanic crust (AOC)), sediment (SED), and metasomatized mantle wedge basal peridotite (MwP). The P-T path of each layer is calculated using the latest geodynamic model for 54 subduction zones (van Keken et al., 2011: JGR). Petrogenetic grids for the mineralogy and the bound H2O in each slab layer are calculated with Perple_X ver.7 for P = 0.5 - 6.0 GPa and T = 100 - 1200 (C). ABS4 also includes fluid-saturated as well as under-saturated melting options of the slab layers by extending the petrogenetic grids based on experimental data, and the explicit role of accessory minerals including rutile, zircon, allanite, and monazite. Batch dehydration/melting equations calculate incompatible trace element and Sr, Nd, Hf and Pb isotope behavior in the layers and the liquids (= fluids/melts) therein. Vertical, one-dimensional liquid flow and its reaction with the eight layers is modeled by chromatographic reaction (Vernieres et al., 1997: JGR) for each 0.1 GPa incremental step in the slab. Liquid-solid reactions are simulated by altering the liquid fraction (F) term in the batch dehydration/melting equations. The liquids extracted from AOC, SED, and MwP (the top three layers) are mixed in specified proportions to obtain the slab-derived liquid composition. The composite slab liquid is then used to generate primary arc magma by open-system liquid-fluxed mantle melting, as in ABS3. We solve for the

  18. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and petrology of neogene rocks in the Deschutes Basin, Central Oregon: a record of continental-margin volcanism and its influence on fluvial sedimentation in an arc-adjacent basin

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.A.

    1986-07-01

    Neogene rocks of the Deschutes basin include the middle Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group and Simtustus Formation, and late Miocene to early Pliocene Deschutes Formation. Assignment of Prineville chemical-type flows to the Grande Ronde Basalt of the Columbia River Basalt Group is based on correlation of these lavas from their type area through the Deschutes basin and onto the Columbia Plateau, where they have been previously mapped as Grande Ronde Basalt. Simtustus Formation is a newly defined unit intercalated with and conformable upon these basalts, and is unconformably overlain by Deschutes Formation. Burial of mature topography by middle Miocene basalts raised local base levels and initiated aggradation by low-gradient streams within the basin represented by the tuffaceous sandstones and mudstones of the Simtustus Formation. These sediments are enriched in pyroclastic constituents relative to contemporaneous Western Cascades volcanics, reflecting preferential incorporation of easily eroded and more widespread pyroclastic debris in distal sedimentary sequences compared to epiclastic contributions from lavas. The abundance of basalts, combined with the paucity of hydrous minerals and FeO and TiO/sub 2/ enrichment in intermediate lavas, characterizes early High Cascade volcanics as atypical for convergent-margin arcs. These petrologic characteristics are consistent with high-level fractionation in an extensional regime. Extension culminated in the development of an intra-arc graben, which ended Deschutes Formation deposition by structurally isolating the basin from the High Cascade source area.

  19. Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

  20. Sea level controls on the textural characteristics and depositional architecture of the Hueneme and associated submarine fan systems, Santa Monica Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; Piper, D.J.W.; Hiscott, R.N.

    1998-01-01

    Hueneme and Dume submarine fans in Santa Monica Basin consist of sandy channel and muddy levee facies on the upper fan. lenticular sand sheets on the middle fan. and thinly bedded turbidite and hemipelagic facies elsewhere. Fifteen widely correlatable key seismic reflections in high-resolution airgun and deep-towed boomer profiles subdivide the fan and basin deposits into time-slices that show different thickness and seismic-facies distributions, inferred to result from changes in Quaternary sea level and sediment supply. At times of low sea level, highly efficient turbidity currents generated by hyperpycnal flows or sediment failures at river deltas carry sand well out onto the middle-fan area. Thick, muddy flows formed rapidly prograding high levees mainly on the western (right-hand) side of three valleys that fed Hueneme fan at different times: the most recently active of the lowstand fan valleys. Hueneme fan valley, now heads in Hueneme Canyon. At times of high sea level, fans receive sand from submarine canyons that intercept littoral-drift cells and mixed sediment from earthquake-triggered slumps. Turbidity currents are confined to 'underfit' talweg channels in fan valleys and to steep, small, basin-margin fans like Dume fan. Mud is effectively separated from sand at high sea level and moves basinward across the shelf in plumes and in storm-generated lutite flows, contributing to a basin-floor blanket that is locally thicker than contemporary fan deposits and that onlaps older fans at the basin margin. The infilling of Santa Monica Basin has involved both fan and basin-floor aggradation accompanied by landward and basinward facies shifts. Progradation was restricted to the downslope growth of high muddy levees and the periodic basinward advance of the toe of the steeper and sandier Dume fan. Although the region is tectonically active, major sedimentation changes can be related to eustatic sea-level changes. The primary controls on facies shifts and fan growth

  1. Sections and View of Santa Clara Pueblo looking west from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sections and View of Santa Clara Pueblo looking west from channel of Santa Clara Creek - Pueblo of Santa Clara, Central Portion, State Road 30 Vicinity, Espanola Vicinity, Santa Clara Pueblo, Rio Arriba County, NM

  2. Santa Ana Forecasting and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinski, T.; Eichhorn, D.; D'Agostino, B. J.; Vanderburg, S.; Means, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Southern California experiences wildfires every year, but under certain circumstances these fires grow into extremely large and destructive fires, such as the Cedar Fire of 2003 and the Witch Fire of 2007. The Cedar Fire burned over 1100 km2 , destroyed more than 2200 homes and killed 15 people; the Witch fire burned more than 800 km2, destroyed more than 1000 homes and killed 2 people. Fires can quickly become too large and dangerous to fight if they are accompanied by a very strong "Santa Ana" condition, which is a foehn-like wind that may bring strong winds and very low humidities. However there is an entire range of specific weather conditions that fall into the broad category of Santa Anas, from cold and blustery to hot with very little wind. All types are characterized by clear skies and low humidity. Since the potential for destructive fire is dependent on the characteristics of Santa Anas, as well as the level of fuel moisture, there exists a need for further classification, such as is done with tropical cyclones and after-the-fact with tornadoes. We use surface data and fuel moisture combined with reanalysis to diagnose those conditions that result in Santa Anas with the greatest potential for destructive fires. We use this data to produce a new classification system for Santa Anas. This classification system should be useful for informing the relevant agencies for mitigation and response planning. In the future this same classification may be made available to the general public.

  3. A rapid compatibility analysis of potential offshore sand sources for beaches of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mustain, N.; Griggs, G.; Barnard, P.L.

    2007-01-01

    The beaches of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell, which are narrow as a result of either natural and/or anthropogenic factors, may benefit from nourishment. Sand compatibility is fundamental to beach nourishment success and grain size is the parameter often used to evaluate equivalence. Only after understanding which sand sizes naturally compose beaches in a specific cell, especially the smallest size that remains on the beach, can the potential compatibility of source areas, such as offshore borrow sites, be accurately assessed. This study examines sediments on the beach and in the nearshore (5-20m depth) for the entire Santa Barbara Littoral Cell east of Point Conception. A digital bed sediment camera, the Eyeball??, and spatial autocorrelation technique were used to determine sediment grain size. Here we report on whether nearshore sediments are comparable and compatible with beach sands of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  4. Time Slice Reconstruction of Bathymetry and Shoreline, Santa Barbara Channel Area, Southern California, Past 20 k.y.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, J. M.; Behl, R.

    2002-12-01

    The Santa Barbara Channel area has been the focus of numerous marine geology, paleoceanography and tectonic studies. The coastal area also hosts important archeological resources. This study creates a series of incremental maps for every 2,000 years of the region to present a stepped view of how sea level, sedimentary and tectonic processes governed the position and shape of the coastline over the last 20,000 years. This data lends insight into the potential locations of ancient archeological sites along the coast, as well as geological processes operating in margin-proximal basins and shorelines. Bathymetric data compiled by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute were integrated with digitized, published sedimentary and tectonic data in a GIS database. Faults with a significantly high slip rate were considered in the reconstruction, along with many sedimentation rates distributed across the basin, slopes and shelves. Over the last 20,000 years, sedimentation rates of 1.2-1.73 m/k.y. have been recorded within the basin center and 0-3 m/k.y. recorded on the slopes and shelf areas. The Oak Ridge and Pitas Point reverse faults experience a relatively high average slip rate of 6 m/k.y. and 3 m/k.y., respectively. This reconstruction indicates that the Montalvo Ridge area may have been more of a promontory than an island, as previously proposed considering only change in sea level. The geomorphic evolution of the basin is determined by the combined effect of sedimentation (supply and current distribution), tectonics and eustatic sea level. Additional sedimentation and uplift rate data along the slopes and shelves, specifically west of Ventura, within the submarine fan south of Point Conception, and along the shelves surrounding the Channel Islands, would assist in a more complete reconstruction of the study area.

  5. Santa Clara Demonstration Status

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, Anthony J.; Skok, Andrew J.; O'Shea, Thomas P.

    1996-08-01

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is in the fourth year of a DOE Cooperative Agreement Program (private-sector cost-shared) aimed at the demonstration of ERC's direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology at full scale. FCE is a wholly owned subsidiary of Energy Research Corporation (ERC), which has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade. The DFC produces power directly from hydrocarbon fuels electrochemically, without the need for external reforming or intermediate mechanical conversion steps. As a result, the DFC has the potential to achieve very high efficiency with very low levels of environmental emissions. Modular DFC power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, cogeneration, industrial, and defense applications. This project is an integral part of the ERC effort to commercialize the technology to serve these applications. Potential users of the commercial DFC power plant under development at ERC will require that the technology be demonstrated at or near the full scale of the commercial products. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is to provide the first such demonstration of the technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere [1]. Briefly, an aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing contact with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: The Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its manufacturing facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales

  6. Off-shore to near-shore transects of ferromanganese crusts adjacent to the California margin Tracey A. Conrad1, James R. Hein2, Adina Paytan1 1University of California Santa Cruz, CA, 95064 (tconrad@ucsc.edu) 2USGS, Menlo Park, CA, 94025, USA (jhein@usgs.gov)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, T. A.; Hein, J. R.; Paytan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Marine ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts growing on seamounts along the California Margin (CM) are influenced by terrestrial and biogenic input. These continental margin crusts have higher concentrations of Si, K, Fe, Na, Ag, Cr, B, and Ba than Fe-Mn crusts from the global open-ocean. Al is also higher but only relative to Pacific open-ocean crusts. These relative enrichments may reflect the high primary productivity near the CM caused by seasonal upwelling and high sediment transport to the region from river/eolian input and cliff erosion. Two transects with samples from five seamounts each are used to compare seaward changes. Transect A includes analyses of 66 bulk samples from Flint, Ben, and Little Joe seamounts, Patton Escarpment, and Northeast Bank. It spans ~400 km of seafloor heading ~58N and coming within ~220 km of the shoreline with samples collected at water depths ranging from 570-2925 m. Transect B includes analyses of 136 bulk samples from Adam, Hoss, San Marcos, San Juan, and Rodriguez seamounts at water depths ranging from 692-3880 m. This transect spans ~240 km heading ~10N and comes within ~75 km of the shoreline near the base of the continental slope. For both transects, mean water depth increases with mean longitude, and latitude is fairly constant varying by approximately 2 degree latitude for transect A and 1degree for B. Both transects show statistically significant trends at the 99% confidence level for element concentrations versus water depth. Concentrations of Fe, Ca, P, Co, and Pb increase as water depth decreases. For transect (A), Mn and Mg also follow this trend, as do Mo and Al for transect (B); Mn also shows this trend for transect (B) but at the 95% confidence level. For both transects, Cu and Zn show the opposite trend, with concentrations increasing in crusts with increasing water depth. For Transect (B), Ni and Al also show this trend. Si and K show no statistically significant trends for either transect. In open-ocean samples

  7. Using Milankovitch Cyclicity as a High-Resolution Dating and Correlation Tool to Understand the Stratigraphic Evolution of the Late Neogene Central California Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, P. S.; Behl, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Natural gamma ray logs from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sites off the Central California margin and from oil wells on the outer continental shelf show cyclical variation at Milankovitch periodicities in the Neogene upper-Monterey and Sisquoc Formations and their offshore equivalents. The well-dated ODP Site 1016, 150 km offshore of Point Conception, provides the basis for development of an orbital cyclicity-refined age/depth scale that can be applied to the mid-latitude North American margin region. We correlate silica-rich/detritus-rich cycles in logs from this site to cycles in more proximal offshore and onshore oil wells in a transect across the Santa Maria Basin, thereby helping to refine dating of these rapidly-accumulated, biostratigraphically-impoverished, fine-grained sediments, which are otherwise difficult to date. The higher resolution, orbitally-based age-depth scale provides refined dating of oil well logs, revision of the numerical age range of biostratigraphic markers, recognition and quantification of changes in sedimentation rates over time and in space, and identification of generalized climatic/sedimentation trends along the Alta-Baja California margin. For example: the new age model indicates that regional age ranges of some radiolarian biostratigraphic markers extend later than previously documented in other regions. Linear sedimentation rates decrease by an order of magnitude from 45-75 cm/ky to 7-8.5 cm/ky between proximal offshore locations and the distal Site 1016A. Analysis of the frequency modulation of the major harmonic in the frequency spectrum of the gamma ray vs. depth curve reveals the presence of condensed sections between ~4.4-4.8 Ma and ~5.3-5.6 Ma at Site 1016A. These two intervals may be associated with Neogene Hiatus 7 of Keller and Barron (1983). Natural gamma ray logs from deep-sea sites of ODP Leg 167 and the proximal Santa Maria basin wells show a similarity in gross secular trends along a 1300 km stretch of the Alta

  8. University of California, Santa Cruz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHenry, Dean E.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the evolution of the innovative University of California, Santa Cruz, looks at its origins, campus organization, curriculum and instructional philosophy, campus design, leadership and faculty, student population, campus life, and curriculum design. Strategies for and obstacles to effective change are highlighted. (MSE)

  9. Coastal Processes Study of Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Revell, David L.; Hoover, Dan; Warrick, Jon; Brocatus, John; Draut, Amy E.; Dartnell, Pete; Elias, Edwin; Mustain, Neomi; Hart, Pat E.; Ryan, Holly F.

    2009-01-01

    The Santa Barbara littoral cell (SBLC) is a complex coastal system with significant management challenges. The coastline ranges broadly in exposure to wave energy, fluvial inputs, hard structures, and urbanization. Geologic influence (structural control) on coastline orientation exerts an important control on local beach behavior, with anthropogenic alterations and the episodic nature of sediment supply and transport also playing important roles. Short- and long-term temporal analyses of shoreline change, beach width, and volume change show no obvious trends in regional beach behavior. Extensive armoring along the SBLC has accreted the back beach, narrowing beach widths and in some cases increasing sediment transport. Unarmored beaches have exhibited mild erosion while maintaining similar widths. Harbor constructions have had notable impacts on downdrift beaches, but once the coastal system has equilibrated the signal becomes strongly dampened and littoral-drift gradients driven by natural shoreline orientation again become dominant. Sediment inputs from the Santa Clara River dominate sediment processes on beaches to the south. The SBLC is dominated by episodic flood and storm-wave events. Exceptionally large accretion signals along this stretch of coastline are closely tied to major flood events when large amounts of sediment are deposited in deltas. These deltas decay over time, supplying downdrift beaches with sediment. Storm-wave impacts and gradients in alongshore transport can lead to beach rotations and migrating erosion hotspots when geological controls are weak. Annual and seasonal rates of cross-shore and alongshore transport are at least 2-3 times higher for the more west- and southwest-facing beaches south of the Ventura River as compared to the more sheltered beaches to the west/north. Gross littoral transports are good approximations of net littoral transports for beaches west/north of Ventura as transport is almost purely unidirectional. However

  10. Acidalia Planitia Channel Margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image shows craters and a channel margin, in the region of southern Acidalia Planitia where Tiu and Ares Valles empty into the planitia. This image was collected during the Northern Spring season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 23.8, Longitude 327.5 East (32.5 West). 37 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion

  11. Convergent Margin Structure and a Unifying Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Huene, R.; Ranero, C. R.; Scholl, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    Marine observations of the past decade resolve 3 domains of different mechanics in space that probably respond differently from each other during an earthquake cycle. Accretion is common along thickly (>1 km) sedimented trenches and slowly (<50km/myr) converging margins. Erosion is common where convergence is greater which also reduces trench sediment thickness by rapid subduction. However erosion and accretion can be coeval, for instance, subducted seamounts erode the upper plate as adjacent sediment accretes. Trench sediment abundance appears to be a master control of tectonic erosion or accretion. Subducting plate relief and bending, fluid systems, input plate temperature, and material differences seem less important. From recent observations a unifying framework concept to aid interpretations of both accreting and eroding margins is proposed. Over a long term (Ma) the subduction channel accepts a finite amount of material. The excess amount will accrete and a shortage of trench sediment enhances erosion (Cloos and Shreve, 1988). If conditions remain consistent over ~1 Ma periods, the margin configuration becomes typically accretionary or erosional. In each margin segment the short term inter plate friction and material strength changes during the earthquake cycle as proposed by Wang and Hu, 2006. Mechanics probably changes locally during the cycle as well. K. Wang, Y. Hu, Accretionary prisms in subduction earthquake cycles: the theory of dynamic Coulomb wedge, J. Geophys. Res. 111 (2006) B06410, doi:10.1029/2005JB004094. Cloos, M., and R.L. Shreve, (1988), Subduction channel model of prism accretion, melange formation, sediment subduction, and subduction erosion at convergent plate margins: 2. Implications and discussion, Pageoph, v. 129, n. ¾ 501-545

  12. A 150 year record of inter-annual climate variability and organic carbon burial in Santa Monica and Santa Barbara Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Hagadorn, J.W.; Stott, L.D.; Sinha, A.; Rincon, M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Schimmelmann, A. . Scripps Inst. of Oceanography)

    1992-01-01

    Stable isotopic measurements were conducted on total organic carbon (TOC) and fossil planktonic foraminifera in laminated sediments collected from Santa Monica and Santa Barbara Basins, California Borderland, in order to investigate relationships between climatic variability and organic carbon burial. These data currently provide biannual sample resolution back to 1750 AD. During the past 150 years, there has been a positive covariance between the carbon isotopic composition of fossil planktonic foraminifera and of TOC. Periods of increased delta C-13 of TOC and foraminifera correspond to higher organic carbon burial in Santa Monica and Santa Barbara Basins. When combined, these patterns are interpreted as variation in productivity within the basins. Isotopic variability in TOC and planktonic foraminifera is significantly higher prior to 1900 AD. Although spring sea surface temperatures were also significantly more variable during this period, the authors do not recognize a systematic relationship between temperature and organic carbon burial. Spectral analysis of isotopic compositions of fossil foraminifera calcite, TOC, organic carbon burial and lamination frequency in the sediments reveal distinct spectral peaks at 5 and 7.7 years, corresponding to ENSO/El Nino frequencies. Additional spectral peaks occur at 19 and 20 years. Previous time series analyses of tree ring width records indicate similar decadal-scale frequencies and suggest a possible link to solar and/or lunar nodal tidal cycles. While these initial results suggest a relationship between climate-cyclicity, primary productivity and organic carbon burial, the phase relationship cannot be deciphered from this preliminary data set.

  13. The Ebro margin study, northwestern Mediterranean Sea - an introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maldonado, A.; Hans, Nelson C.

    1990-01-01

    The Ebro continental margin from the coast to the deep sea off northeastern Spain was selected for a multidisciplinary project because of the abundant Ebro River sediment supply, Pliocene and Quaternary progradation, and margin development in a restricted basin where a variety of controlling factors could be evaluated. The nature of this young passive margin for the last 5 m.y. was investigated with particular emphasis on marine circulation, sediment dynamics, sediment geochemistry, depositional facies, seismic stratigraphy, geotechnical properties, geological hazards and human influences. These studies show the importance of marine circulation, variation in sediment supply, sea-level oscillation and tectonic setting for the understanding of modern and ancient margin depositional processes and growth patterns. ?? 1990.

  14. The diffuse seismicity of the Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta, the Perijá Range, and south of the La Guajira peninsula, Colombia and Venezuela: Result of the convergence between Caribbean plate and the South American margin during the Late Neogene?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicangana, G.; Pedraza, P.; Mora-paez, H.; Ordonez Aristizabal, C. O.; Vargas-Jimenez, C. A.; Kammer, A.

    2012-12-01

    A diffuse low deep microseismicity located overall between the Guajira peninsula and the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (SNSM) was registered with the recent installation (2008 to Present) of three seismological stations in northeastern Colombia by the Colombian Seismological Network (RSNC), but mainly with the Uribia station in (the) central region of La Guajira peninsula, The microseismicity is characterized by a great population of events with 1.2 < Ml < 3.0. and few events of 3.0 < Ml < 4.0 that sporadically occur. The poor number of seismological stations in this region of Colombia impedes to locate the origin of the local seismicity; however, this seismic activity is associated to the tectonic activity of the Oca fault because with the GPS displacement analysis, neotectonics evidence found in faults traces associated to the Oca fault and the historical earthquake that affected the Colombian city of Santa Marta in 1834, lead us to conclude this. This is a big cortical fault that sets the limit between La Guajira peninsula and the SNSM. Its cortical characteristics were verified from geological data together with gravimetric and seismic exploration. The SNSM limits toward the southeast with the Cesar - Ranchería basin, and this basin in turn limits with the Perijá Range that is localized in the Colombia - Venezuela border. The SNSM, Cesar - Ranchería basin and Perijá Range limit toward the southwest with the Bucaramanga - Santa Marta fault (BSMF), the Oca fault toward the north, and Perijá - El Tigre fault toward the southeast defining a pyramidal orogenic complex. Using remote sensing images data with geological and regional geophysical information, we proposed that this orogenic complex was originated as a result of the Panama arc with the northwestern South America accretion. The final adjustment of the Caribbean plate (CP) between North America and South America during the Late Neogene produced the big cortical faults systems activation like Oca - Moron

  15. Marginalization and health geomatics.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gregory L; Kinman, Edward L; Miller, Louise C; Patrick, Timothy B

    2003-01-01

    Marginalized groups have been defined as groups that have been peripheralized from the center of society. Increasing nursing knowledge of marginalized groups and the dynamics of population diversity will enable nurses to better recognize shifting health patterns, plan for utilization of health services, and determine ethnic and cultural differences that exist in marginalized populations. The authors of this article review theoretical models responsible for defining the concept marginalization, describe geographical information systems as a recommended tool to evaluate marginalized groups, and provide a case study utilizing tools and maps as a means of assessing marginal situations. PMID:14643736

  16. 2. OBLIQUE VIEW TO NORTHEAST ALONG FRONT OF SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OBLIQUE VIEW TO NORTHEAST ALONG FRONT OF SANTA ANA RIVER DIVERSION DAM. NOTE CABLE CAR SUSPENSION CABLE AT GATE ATOP DAM. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Santa Ana River Diversion Dam, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  17. Depositional environments of the Santa Margarita Formation in the Miocene Santa Maria basin, Huasna syncline

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.L. )

    1991-02-01

    Preliminary investigation of the depositional environments of the middle sandstone member of the late middle Miocene Santa Margarita Formation in the Huasna syncline suggests a current-dominated shallow shelf environment. Progradation of coarse-grained clastic and bioclastic-rich sediment over siltstone documents the initial stage of deposition of this sand body. Overlying the basal intensely bioturbated bioclastic sediments are large-scale tabular cross-beds, up to 16 m thick, interbedded with tabular lag deposits of barnacles, oysters, and echinoids. The tabular fossil-rich beds, which form sequences up to 6 m thick between the large-scale cross-beds, represent either deposition of bottom set beds of the large-scale cross-beds or current swept lag deposits. Increasing energy conditions are recorded vertically by a decrease in the amount of bioturbation and by an increase in large-scale cross-bed sets and cosets. however, in the northern outcrop area subtidal channels are incised into the upper bioclastic sediments suggesting local shoaling conditions. Paleocurrent data record a unidirectional southwest-directed current trend normal to the basin axis and the East Huasna fault. The coarse clastic deposition terminates with deposition of siltstone as energy conditions decreased and water depth again increased. A current-swept shallow shelf containing extensive sandwaves comprises the major depositional environments. The paleocurrent data and large-scale cross-beds suggest that the shallow shelf extended to the east of the Huasna syncline and that the currents were most likely tidal in origin.

  18. Two opposed subduction modes at the southern Caribbean plate margin of Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Andreas; Piraquive, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    Cretaceous to Paleogene convergence at the southern Caribbean plate margin is still little deciphered and a generalized interpretation is hindered by the absence of regionally correlatable tectonic elements, like magmatic arcs, time constraints and an intense crustal fragmentation brought about by Neogene strike-slip tectonics. In order to illustrate the diversity of these subduction settings and discuss possible tectonic controls on their subsequent collisional evolution, we outline the structural evolution along a thickened and a thinned continental segment. The first case is exemplified by the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, a triangular block that exposes an imbricated lower crustal section capped by nested plutons and a volcanic sequence of a Jurassic to Early Cretaceous arc. This exceptionally thick crustal section forms the upper plate of a continent-ward dipping main suture that is underlain by strongly sheared platform sediments and transitional basement rocks of a lower plate. Penetrative deformation developed under medium-grade conditions with a uniform top-to-the NE shear attests to a stable subduction interval of a still unknown duration. Onset of a collisional phase is marked by a crustal imbrication further inboard of the main suture, leading to a further crustal thickening, and links in the Paleogene to the emplacement of the dome-like Santa Marta batholith within the lower plate. It is likely that the juxtaposition of thickened continental Southamerican and thinner oceanic Caribbean crust triggered a crustal channel flow that fed the magmatic dome in the transitional part of these crustal realms, leading thus to some gravitational collapse of the continental crust. The opposite case of the juxtaposition of a continental platform, previously thinned by Jurassic to Early Cretaceous rifting and a relatively thick Caribbean crust is documented in the northwestern Guajira Peninsula. Here platform sequences and their corresponding basement were subducted

  19. You're a "What"? Santa Claus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royster, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Professional Santas entertain children and adults during the holiday season at all types of events. They work at shopping malls or stores; entertain crowds at parades and tree lightings; and make appearances at holiday parties, charity events, and people's homes. Most Santas work during the Christmas holiday season, which usually lasts from late…

  20. Northern and eastern margins of the Siberian continent in Triassic

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, A.Yu. )

    1993-09-01

    Siliciclastic sedimentation has been predominant on the northern and eastern margins of the Siberian continent since the Triassic period. Seven transgression-regression cycles can be recognized in the Triassic succession: Griesbachien-Dienerian, Smithian-Low Spathian, Upper Spathian, Anissian (with subcycles), Ladian, Carnian, and Norlan (with subcycles). All zonal units were distinguished within transgressive portions of the cycles. Regressive portions of the cycles formed practically instantaneously. Very high sedimentation rate (300-3000 mm/1000 yr), specific structures of sedimentary rocks, and distribution of unconformities led to the conclusion that active avalanche sedimentation at the basin margins was of major significance. six facies regions are recognized in the sedimentation area: Taimyr, Kotuy-Anabar, Leno-Anabar, Bur-Olenek, Verkhoyansk, and Novosibirsk (New Siberian Islands). The main source areas were located at the Patoma Mountains for the eastern margin and at the Anabar anticline and Olenek uplift for the northern margin. Most sediments were transported to the eastern margin by a large river with a huge delta which was similar in size to the modern Lena's delta. Sediments were further distributed by contour streams. Local synsedimentary structures controlled the paleogeography of the entire area. The paleogeographical evolution of the eastern margin is the history of this delta development. The rifting activities with the trappean magmatism were the main events at the northern margin, especially in the Talmyr area. The pelagic sedimentation has been predominant in the New Siberian Islands area and most of the Laptev Sea aquatoria. The organic-rich sediments have been distinguished in Low Olenekian (Smithian), Low Anissian, Low Ladinian, and Low Carnian substages. Most of them could be hydrocarbon source rocks. Triassic oil and gas seeps have been discovered at the northern portion of the Vilyui syncline, near the Lena's delta and the Nordvic Bay.

  1. Holocene Paleoecology of an Estuary on Santa Rosa Island, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Kenneth L.; Liu, Geng-Wu

    1994-05-01

    The middle to late Holocene history and early Anglo-European settlement impacts on Santa Rosa Island, California, were studied through the analysis of sediments in a small estuarine marsh. A 5.4-m-long sediment core produced a stratigraphic and pollen record spanning the last 5200 yr. Three major zones are distinguishable in the core. The lowermost zone (5200 to 3250 yr B.P.) represents a time of arid climate with predominantly marine sediment input and high Chenopodiaceae and Ambrosia pollen values. The intermediate zone (3250 yr B.P. to 1800 A.D.) is characterized by greater fresh water input and high values for Asteraceae and Cyperaceae pollen and charcoal particles. The uppermost zone (1800 A.D. to present) documents the unprecedented erosion, sedimentation, and vegetation change that resulted from the introduction of large exotic herbivores and exotic plants to the island during Anglo-European settlement. The identification of pollen grains of Torrey Pine ( Pinus torreyana) documents the persistence of this endemic species on the island throughout the middle to late Holocene.

  2. Holocene paleoecology of an estuary on Santa Rosa Island, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, K.L.; Liu, Gaisheng

    1994-01-01

    The middle to late Holocene history and early Anglo-European settlement impacts on Santa Rosa Island, California, were studied through the analysis of sediments in a small estuarine marsh. A 5.4-m-long sediment core produced a stratigraphic and pollen record spanning the last 5200 yr. Three major zones are distinguishable in the core. The lowermost zone (5200 to 3250 yr B.P.) represents a time of arid climate with predominantly marine sediment input and high Chenopodiaceae and Ambrosia pollen values. The intermediate zone (3250 yr B.P. to 1800 A.D.) is characterized by greater fresh water input and high values for Asteraceae and Cyperaceae pollen and charcoal particles. The uppermost zone (1800 A.D. to present) documents the unprecedented erosion, sedimentation, and vegetation change that resulted from the introduction of large exotic herbivores and exotic plants to the island during Anglo-European settlement. The identification of pollen grains of Torrey Pine (Pinus torreyana) documents the persistence of this endemic species on the island throughout the middle to late Holocene.

  3. On the Evolution of Glaciated Continental Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverre Laberg, Jan; Rydningen, Tom Arne; Safronova, Polina A.; Forwick, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Glaciated continental margins, continental margins where a grounded ice sheet repeatedly has been at or near the shelf break, are found at both northern and southern high-latitudes. Their evolution are in several aspects different from their low-latitude counterparts where eustatic sea-level variations possess a fundamental control on their evolution and where fluvial systems provide the main sediment input. From studies of the Norwegian - Barents Sea - Svalbard and NE Greenland continental margins we propose the following factors as the main control on the evolution of glaciated continental margins: 1) Pre-glacial relief controlling the accommodation space, 2) Ice sheet glaciology including the location of fast-flowing ice streams where source area morphology exerts a fundamental control, 3) Composition of the glacigenic sediments where the clay content in previous studies have been found to be important, and 4) Sea-level controlled both by eustacy and isostacy. From three case studies, 1) the western Barents Sea, 2) part of the North Norwegian (Troms), and 3) the Mid-Norwegian margin, the influence on these factors for the sea-floor morphology, sedimentary processes of the continental slope - deep sea and continental margin architecture are discussed. The pre-glacial relief of the mid-Norwegian and Troms margins relates to the onset of rifting and plate break-up from the early Cenozoic while for the SW Barents Sea, plate shear was followed by rifting. A wide zone of extended continental crust occurs offshore mid-Norway while this zone is much narrower offshore Troms leading to a more pronounced pre-glacial relief. Regarding sediment delivery and ice sheet glaciology the western Barents Sea exemplifies very high sediment input corresponding to an estimated average erosion of the source area of ~0.4 mm/yr (SW Barents Sea), much of which is related to subglacial erosion of Mesozoic - Cenozoic sedimentary rocks from large paleo-ice streams. The mid-Norwegian margin

  4. Santa Claus, Ga./Ind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The towns of Santa Claus, Ga., (top) and Santa Claus, Ind. (bottom), are shown in these two images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite. They are the only two Santa Claus towns in the United States with post offices and zip codes, although there are 11 towns with this name in the United States. Santa Claus, Ga. is located in Toombs County, and has a population of 237. Santa Claus, Ind. is located in Spencer County, and has a population of 2,041. Its name was accepted by the United States Postal Service in 1856. The images were acquired on July 3, 2000 (top) and June 16, 2001 (bottom), respectively.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science

  5. Hyperpycnal plume-derived fans in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Simms, Alexander R.; Ritchie, Andy; Steel, Elisabeth; Dartnell, Pete; Conrad, James E.; Finlayson, David P.

    2013-05-01

    gravity currents rapidly transport sediment across shore from rivers to the continental shelf and deep sea. Although these geophysical processes are important sediment dispersal mechanisms, few distinct geomorphic features on the continental shelf can be attributed to hyperpycnal flows. Here we provide evidence of large depositional features derived from hyperpycnal plumes on the continental shelf of the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, from the combination of new sonar, lidar, and seismic reflection data. These data reveal lobate fans directly offshore of the mouths of several watersheds known to produce hyperpycnal concentrations of suspended sediment. The fans occur on an upwardly concave section of the shelf where slopes decrease from 0.04 to 0.01, and the location of these fans is consistent with wave- and auto-suspending sediment gravity current theories. Thus, we provide the first documentation that the morphology of sediment deposits on the continental shelf can be dictated by river-generated hyperpycnal flows.

  6. Hyperpycnal plume-derived fans in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Simms, Alexander R.; Ritchie, Andy; Steel, Elisabeth; Dartnell, Pete; Conrad, James E.; Finlayson, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpycnal gravity currents rapidly transport sediment across shore from rivers to the continental shelf and deep sea. Although these geophysical processes are important sediment dispersal mechanisms, few distinct geomorphic features on the continental shelf can be attributed to hyperpycnal flows. Here we provide evidence of large depositional features derived from hyperpycnal plumes on the continental shelf of the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, from the combination of new sonar, lidar, and seismic reflection data. These data reveal lobate fans directly offshore of the mouths of several watersheds known to produce hyperpycnal concentrations of suspended sediment. The fans occur on an upwardly concave section of the shelf where slopes decrease from 0.04 to 0.01, and the location of these fans is consistent with wave- and auto-suspending sediment gravity current theories. Thus, we provide the first documentation that the morphology of sediment deposits on the continental shelf can be dictated by river-generated hyperpycnal flows.

  7. EFFECTS OF SEDIMENT TYPE ON BENTHIC MACROINFAUNAL COLONIZATION OF LABORATORY MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We tested the effects of four different sediment types on macroinfaunal colonization and community development in our laboratory flow-thru microcosm system (all microcosms were 20 cm side-1 and sediment depth was 5 cm) over a period of 41 days. Sediments included Santa Rosa Islan...

  8. Cenozoic ice volume and margin erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.C.; Fairbanks, R.G.; Mountain, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    Cenozoic benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotopic data indicates that the world was glaciated in the early Oligocene, middle Oligocene, latest Oligocene, and middle Miocene to Recent, but are insufficient to resolve if the world was ice free at other times. The authors relate Oligocene and younger intervals of ice growth to continental margin erosional events. Relationships between eustasy and continental margin sedimentation are controversial. Coastal onlap is indirectly linked with rising sea level, occurring either when subsidence exceeds the rate of sea level fall or during sea-level rise. Although chronostratigraphic breaks are often local in origin, inter-regional unconformities result from eustatic lowerings. Strong evidence for eustatic lowerings is provided by the incision of canyons on margins. Chronostratigraphic breaks and canyons have noted on the US and Irish margins near the lower/upper Oligocene and middle/upper Miocene boundaries. These periods of margin erosion are temporally linked with oxygen isotopic evidence for ice growth, with erosion correlating with the greatest rate of ice growth. If the Eocene was ice free, there may have been mechanistic differences between Eocene erosion and Oligocene to Recent glacio-eustatic erosion. The authors present seismic stratigraphic evidence from the New Jersey margin that indicates contrasting styles of margin erosion between the Lower Tertiary and Upper Tertiary.

  9. Abrupt termination of Marine Isotope Stage 16 (Termination VII) at 631.5 ka in Santa Barbara Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Walter E.; Kennett, James P.; Behl, Richard J.; Nicholson, Craig; Sorlien, Christopher C.

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Isotope Stage 16-15 boundary (Termination VII) is the first deglacial warming step of the late Quaternary following the mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT), when 41 kyr climatic cycles shifted to strong 100 kyr cycles. The detailed structure of this important climatic event has remained unknown until now. Core MV0508-19JPC from Santa Barbara Basin, California, contains a decadal-scale climatic and geochemical sediment record of 4000 years duration that includes the early part of this deglacial episode. This record reveals that the climatic shift during the early deglacial occurred rapidly (<700 years), in a progression of three abrupt warming steps. The onset of Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 15 was remarkably abrupt with 4-5°C sea surface warming in ~50 years. The deglacial sequence contains the well-dated Lava Creek tephra (631.3 ± 4 ka) from Yellowstone Caldera used to date the onset of Termination VII at 631.5 ka. The late MIS 16 and early MIS 15 interval exhibits multiple decadal-scale negative excursions in δ13C of planktic foraminifera, likely the result of repeated discharges of methane from methane hydrates associated with both ocean warming and low sea level. A warm interstadial that interrupts late MIS 16 is marked by elevated concentrations of redox-sensitive elements indicating sulfidic, oxygen-deficient bottom and pore-waters, and elevated concentrations of total organic carbon and Cd, reflecting increased surface productivity. Unlike younger sediments on the California margin, these indicators of increased productivity and low dissolved oxygen do not consistently correspond with each other or with preserved laminations, possibly reflecting instability of a still evolving ocean-atmosphere system following the MPT.

  10. Origin and Dynamics of Depositionary Forearc Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Depositionary forearcs are built by terrigenous sediments that never reach the axis of a trench. It has been usually thought that at subduction zones, terrigenous sediments shed from the continent drape the upper plate slope, accumulate in aprons or forearc basins, and can easily reach the trench as turbidites or mass slope deposits. Here we propose a new framework for forearc evolution that focuses on the potential feedbacks between subduction tectonics, sedimentation and geomorphology that take place during an extreme event of subduction erosion, such as the onset of subduction of a major aseismic ridge. There subduction erosion has the potential to rapidly remove the upper plate basement, and replace it from above by rapidly redeposited sediments. This feedback can lead to the creation of "depositionary forearcs", a forearc structure that extends the traditional division of forearcs into accretionary vs. erosive subduction margins, and which emphasizes the dynamic evolution processes at these margins. We need to further recognize that subduction forearcs are usually shaped by interactions between slow long term processes and severe punctuated events reflecting the sudden influences of large-scale morphological variations in the incoming plate. Both types of processes contribute to the large-scale morphology of the forearc, with sudden events associated with a replacive depositionary mode that can suddenly create a sub-section of a typical forearc margin.

  11. Santa Barbara Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, Angela; Hansen, Sherman; Watkins, Ashley

    2013-11-30

    This report serves as the Final Report for Santa Barbara County’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report explains how DOE BBNP funding was invested to develop robust program infrastructure designed to help property owners complete energy improvements, thereby generating substantial outcomes for the local environment and economy. It provides an overview of program development and design within the grant period, program accomplishments and challenges to date, and a plan for the future sustainability of emPower, the County’s innovative clean energy and building efficiency program. During the grant period, Santa Barbara County’s emPower program primarily targeted 32,000 owner occupied, single family, detached residential homes over 25 years old within the County. In order to help these homeowners and their contractors overcome market barriers to completing residential energy improvements, the program developed and promoted six voluntary, market-based service areas: 1) low cost residential financing (loan loss reserve with two local credit unions), 2) residential rebates, 3) local customer service, 4) expert energy advising, 5) workforce development and training, and 6) marketing, education and outreach. The main goals of the program were to lower building energy use, create jobs and develop a lasting regional building performance market. These services have generated important early outcomes and lessons after the program’s first two years in service. The DOE BBNP funding was extended through October 2014 to enable Santa Barbara County to generate continued outcomes. In fact, funding related to residential financing remains wholly available for the foreseeable future to continue offering Home Upgrade Loans to approximately 1,300 homeowners. The County’s investment of DOE BBNP funding was used to build a lasting, effective, and innovative

  12. Stratigraphy and structure along the Pensacola Arch/Conecuh Embayment margin in northwest Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.G. . Geology Dept. Florida Geological Survey, Tallahassee, FL )

    1993-03-01

    Stratigraphic and structural analysis of deep borehole data along the Pensacola Arch/Conecuh Embayment margin in eastern Santa Rosa County, Florida reveals a northeast-trending basement normal fault that is downthrown to the northwest. The fault functioned as a border fault of a half-graben (or graben ) that developed during continental rifting of Pangea in the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic. The upthrown or horst block was a paleotopographic high that formed the southeastern boundary of the Middle to Late Jurassic Conecuh Embayment. A second, younger basement fault trends approximately perpendicular to the half-graben border fault. Late Triassic synrift continental sediments, deposited on the downthrown block of the half-graben, pinch-out abruptly to the southeast pre-Mesozoic Suwannee Basin basement. The border fault is located approximately where the Triassic sedimentary wedge pinches out. Middle to Upper Jurassic drift-stage strata of the Conecuh embayment progressively onlap the post-rift unconformity toward the southeast. Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation carbonates and evaporites apparently overstep Triassic deposits and rest directly on Suwannee Basin quartzitic sandstone near their depositional limit at the Pensacola Arch. The Smackover Formation thins significantly toward the southeast in association with the Triassic pinch-out and half-graben border fault. The pinch-out trend of the Smackover Formation suggests a northeast-southwest orientation for the Triassic border fault and supports a horst-block origin for the Pensacola Arch.

  13. [Marginalization and health. Introduction].

    PubMed

    Yunes, J

    1992-06-01

    The relationship between marginalization and health is clear. In Mexico, for example, life expectancy is 53 years for the poorest population sectors and 20 years more for the wealthiest. Infant mortality in poor Colombian families is twice that of wealthier families, and one-third of developing countries the rural population is only half as likely as the urban to have access to health services. Women in the Southern hemisphere are 12 times likelier than those in the Northern to die of maternal causes. The most important step in arriving at a solution to the inequity may be to analyze in depth the relationship between marginality and health. Marginality may be defined as the lack of participation of individuals or groups in certain key phases of societal life, such as production, consumption, or political decision making. Marginality came to be viewed as a social problem only with recognition of the rights of all individuals to participate in available social goods. Marginality is always relative, and marginal groups exist because central groups determine the criteria for inclusion in the marginal and central groups. Marginality thus always refers to a concrete society at a specific historical moment. Marginal groups may be of various types. At present, marginal groups include women, rural populations, people with AIDS or mental illness or certain other health conditions, refugees, ethnic or religious groups, homosexuals, and the poor, who are the largest group of marginal persons in the world. Even in developed countries, 100-200 million persons live below the poverty line. Latin America is struggling to emerge from its marginal status in the world. The economic crisis of the 1980s increased poverty in the region, and 40% are not considered impoverished. Latin America is a clear example of the relationship between marginality and health. Its epidemiologic profile is intimately related to nutrition, availability of potable water, housing, and environmental

  14. The Antarctic continental margin: Geology and geophysics of offshore Wilkes land

    SciTech Connect

    Eittreim, S.L.; Hampton, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: An Interpretation of the Multichannel Seismic Reflection Profiles across the Continental Margin of the Dumont D'Urville Sea, off Wilkes Land, East Antarctica; Hydrocarbon Geochemistry of Sediments Offshore from Antarctica: Wilkes Land Continental margin; and the Conjugate Continental margins of Antarctica and Australia.

  15. The basins on the Argentine continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Urien, C.M.

    1996-08-01

    After the stabilization of the central Gondwana Craton, orogenic belts were accreted, as a result of convergence events and an extensive passive margin developed in southwestern Gondwana. Thermal subsidence in Parana, Karoo-Ventania basins and the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic rifts, were modified by the Gondwana breakup and the South Atlantic opening. Early Paleozoic marine transgressions deposited the Table Mountain Group in Ventania. In southwestern Patagonia foreland clastics were deposited. Magmatic arcs and marine units indicate a tectonic trough was formed, alternating with continental sequences, over Late Paleozoic metamorphics and intrusives, resulting from plastered terrains along the Gondwana margin. In Patagonia, Permo-Carboniferous continental and glacio marine clastics infill the basins, while in Ventania, paralic sequences, grade from neritic to continental to the northeast, extending beneath the continental margin. The Triassic-Jurassic rift basins progressed onto regional widespread acid lavas and were infilled by lagoonal organic-rich sequences. Early drift phase built basins transverse to the margin, with fluvio-lacustrine sequences: Salado, Colorado, Valdes-Rawson, San Julian and North Malvinas intracratonic basins, which underwent transtensional faulting. Post-Oxfordian to Neocomian brackish sequences, onlapped the conjugate basins during the margin`s drift, with petroleum systems, as in Austral and Malvinas. In the Valanginian, basic extrusions commenced to form on the continental border, heralding the oceanic phase. Due to thermal subsidence, offlaping sediments prograded onto the remaining half-grabens. Several petroleum systems, proven and hypothetical, are identified in this region.

  16. ChE at UC Santa Barbara.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seborg, Dale E.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the chemical engineering program at the University of California, Santa Barbara, including history of the department, faculty research interests and professional activities, graduate and undergraduate programs, and research in nuclear engineering. (SK)

  17. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  18. Reconnaissance of alluvial fans as potential sources of gravel aggregate, Santa Cruz River valley, Southeast Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, David A.; Melick, Roger

    2002-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to provide information on the aggregate potential of alluvial fan sediments in the Santa Cruz River valley. Pebble lithology, roundness, and particle size were determined in the field, and structures and textures of alluvial fan sediments were photographed and described. Additional measurements of particle size on digital photographs were made on a computer screen. Digital elevation models were acquired and compiled for viewing the areal extent of selected fans. Alluvial fan gravel in the Santa Cruz River valley reflects the lithology of its source. Gravel derived from granitic and gneissic terrane of the Tortolita, Santa Catalina, and Rincon Mountains weathers to grus and is generally inferior for use as aggregate. Gravel derived from the Tucson, Sierrita, and Tumacacori Mountains is composed mostly of angular particles of volcanic rock, much of it felsic in composition. This angular volcanic gravel should be suitable for use in asphalt but may require treatment for alkali-silica reaction prior to use in concrete. Gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains is of mixed plutonic (mostly granitic rocks), volcanic (mostly felsic rocks), and sedimentary (sandstone and carbonate rock) composition. The sedimentary component tends to make gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains slightly more rounded than other fan gravel. The coarsest (pebble, cobble, and boulder) gravel is found near the heads (proximal part) of alluvial fans. At the foot (distal part) of alluvial fans, most gravel is pebble-sized and interbedded with sand and silt. Some of the coarsest gravel was observed near the head of the Madera Canyon, Montosa Canyon, and Esperanza Wash fans. The large Cienega Creek fan, located immediately south and southeast of Tucson, consists entirely of distal-fan pebble gravel, sand, and silt.

  19. Characterizing benthic substrates of Santa Monica Bay with seafloor photography and multibeam sonar imagery.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian D; Dartnell, Peter; Chezar, Henry

    2003-01-01

    Seafloor photography from three cruises is combined with multibeam sonar imagery to characterize benthic substrates and associated fauna of Santa Monica Bay, California. The multibeam EM1000 imagery was collected in 1996. Two sampling cruises (in 1998 and 1999) provided photographs at 142 sites throughout the Bay; a final cruise (in 2000) collected still photographs and continuous video along nine transects on the mainland shelf from Pt. Dume to the Palos Verdes peninsula. Muddy substrates (typically low backscatter) were the predominant habitat throughout the Santa Monica Bay, from the 20 m isobath to the adjacent Santa Monica basin floor (780 m). Bioturbation was pervasive as evidenced by abundant open burrows, mounds, and faunal tracks and trails. Sandy substrates (typically intermediate to high backscatter) were restricted to the innermost mainland shelf and a narrow outer shelf band north of Santa Monica Canyon. Cobble and gravel substrates (high backscatter) were restricted to the innermost shelf south of El Segundo and limited parts of the shelf edge. Rocky substrates (high backscatter) with interspersed patches of sand and gravel occurred on the high-relief marginal plateau and along parts of the shelf break offshore of Malibu. PMID:12648949

  20. Submarine Landslides at Santa Catalina Island, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legg, M. R.; Francis, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    Santa Catalina Island is an active tectonic block of volcanic and metamorphic rocks originally exposed during middle Miocene transtension along the evolving Pacific-North America transform plate boundary. Post-Miocene transpression created the existing large pop-up structure along the major strike-slip restraining bend of the Catalina fault that forms the southwest flank of the uplift. Prominent submerged marine terraces apparent in high-resolution bathymetric maps interrupt the steep submarine slopes in the upper ~400 meters subsea depths. Steep subaerial slopes of the island are covered by Quaternary landslides, especially at the sea cliffs and in the blueschist metamorphic rocks. The submarine slopes also show numerous landslides that range in area from a few hectares to more than three sq-km (300 hectares). Three or more landslides of recent origin exist between the nearshore and first submerged terrace along the north-facing shelf of the island's West End. One of these slides occurred during September 2005 when divers observed a remarkable change in the seafloor configuration after previous dives in the area. Near a sunken yacht at about 45-ft depth where the bottom had sloped gently into deeper water, a "sinkhole" had formed that dropped steeply to 100-ft or greater depths. Some bubbling sand was observed in the shallow water areas that may be related to the landslide process. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry acquired in 2008 by CSU Monterey Bay show this "fresh" slide and at least two other slides of varying age along the West End. The slides are each roughly 2 hectares in area and their debris aprons are spread across the first terrace at about 85-m water depth that is likely associated with the Last Glacial Maximum sealevel lowstand. Larger submarine slides exist along the steep Catalina and Catalina Ridge escarpments along the southwest flank of the island platform. A prominent slide block, exceeding 3 sq-km in area, appears to have slipped more than

  1. Dynamics of the continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    On 18--20 June 1990, over 70 oceanographers conducting research in the ocean margins of North America attended a workshop in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The purpose of the workshop was to provide the Department of Energy with recommendations for future research on the exchange of energy-related materials between the coastal and interior ocean and the relationship between the ocean margins and global change. The workshop was designed to optimize the interaction of scientists from specific research disciplines (biology, chemistry, physics and geology) as they developed hypotheses, research questions and topics and implementation plans. The participants were given few restraints on the research they proposed other than realistic time and monetary limits. The interdisciplinary structure of the meeting promoted lively discussion and creative research plans. The meeting was divided into four working groups based on lateral, vertical, air/sea and sediment/water processes. Working papers were prepared and distributed before the meeting. During the meeting the groups revised the papers and added recommendations that appear in this report, which was reviewed by an Executive Committee.

  2. Jurassic through Oligocene pre-basin stratigraphy in the Santa Maria basin area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsche, A.E. ); Yamashiro, D.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Compilation from published records of 30 pre-Miocene stratigraphic columns in the Santa Maria basin area of California (west of the Sur-Nacimiento fault and north of the Santa Ynez fault) reveals two basement units and 22 overlying sedimentary units. This article displays the stratigraphic columns and includes descriptions and environmental interpretations of the 24 rock units. The basement rocks include an Upper Jurassic ophiolite sequence and the Lower Jurassic through Upper Cretaceous Franciscan Complex. Most of the 22 sedimentary units were deposited along a subduction-type margin prior to development of the late Tertiary Santa Maria basin. Overlying and generally in fault contact with the basement rocks are four Upper Jurassic through Lower Cretaceous units that were deposited in basin plain and out continental margin environments. Unconformably overlying these units are eight Upper Cretaceous units that were deposited in a wide range of environments that ranged from trench, slope, and submarine fan up through shelf and nonmarine fluvial environments. Lower Tertiary units onlap unconformably onto the Cretaceous rocks and were deposited only in the southernmost part of the area. These rocks include lower Eocene basin plain and outer submarine fan deposits; middle Eocene mid-fan and slope deposits; upper Eocene inner fan, shelf, shoreface, and foreshore deposits; and Oligocene shoreface, foreshore, and nonmarine fluvial deposits.

  3. Extensive management of field margins enhances their potential for off-site soil erosion mitigation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hamada E; Reineking, Björn

    2016-03-15

    Soil erosion is a widespread problem in agricultural landscapes, particularly in regions with strong rainfall events. Vegetated field margins can mitigate negative impacts of soil erosion off-site by trapping eroded material. Here we analyse how local management affects the trapping capacity of field margins in a monsoon region of South Korea, contrasting intensively and extensively managed field margins on both steep and shallow slopes. Prior to the beginning of monsoon season, we equipped a total of 12 sites representing three replicates for each of four different types of field margins ("intensive managed flat", "intensive managed steep", "extensive managed flat" and "extensive managed steep") with Astroturf mats. The mats (n = 15/site) were placed before, within and after the field margin. Sediment was collected after each rain event until the end of the monsoon season. The effect of management and slope on sediment trapping was analysed using linear mixed effects models, using as response variable either the sediment collected within the field margin or the difference in sediment collected after and before the field margin. There was no difference in the amount of sediment reaching the different field margin types. In contrast, extensively managed field margins showed a large reduction in collected sediment before and after the field margins. This effect was pronounced in steep field margins, and increased with the size of rainfall events. We conclude that a field margin management promoting a dense vegetation cover is a key to mitigating negative off-site effects of soil erosion in monsoon regions, particularly in field margins with steep slopes. PMID:26760443

  4. Ocean margins workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the refocusing of its marine research program to emphasize the study of ocean margins and their role in modulating, controlling, and driving Global Change phenomena. This is a proposal to conduct a workshop that will establish priorities and an implementation plan for a new research initiative by the Department of Energy on the ocean margins. The workshop will be attended by about 70 scientists who specialize in ocean margin research. The workshop will be held in the Norfolk, Virginia area in late June 1990.

  5. Organizing marginalized workers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A K

    1999-01-01

    Figures from the U.S. Department of Labor show that low-wage or marginalized workers are more likely to be injured on the job and suffer more work-related medical conditions than better-paid workers. Despite an increasingly hostile organizing climate, market globalization, and corporate downsizing, significant progress has been made in organizing marginalized workers. A multifaceted, comprehensive organizing strategy, incorporating union-building strategies that include (but are not limited to) safety and health, must be used by unions to successfully organize marginalized workers and obtain the first contract. PMID:10378982

  6. Tectonic signatures on active margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

    High-resolution Compressed High-Intensity Radar Pulse (CHIRP) surveys offshore of La Jolla in southern California and the Eel River in northern California provide the opportunity to investigate the role of tectonics in the formation of stratigraphic architecture and margin morphology. Both study sites are characterized by shore-parallel tectonic deformation, which is largely observed in the structure of the prominent angular unconformity interpreted as the transgressive surface. Based on stratal geometry and acoustic character, we identify three sedimentary sequences offshore of La Jolla: an acoustically laminated estuarine unit deposited during early transgression, an infilling or "healing-phase" unit formed during the transgression, and an upper transparent unit. The estuarine unit is confined to the canyon edges in what may have been embayments during the last sea-level rise. The healing-phase unit appears to infill rough areas on the transgressive surface that may be related to relict fault structures. The upper transparent unit is largely controlled by long-wavelength tectonic deformation due to the Rose Canyon Fault. This unit is also characterized by a mid-shelf (˜40 m water depth) thickness high, which is likely a result of hydrodynamic forces and sediment grain size. On the Eel margin, we observe three distinct facies: a seaward-thinning unit truncated by the transgressive surface, a healing-phase unit confined to the edges of a broad structural high, and a highly laminated upper unit. The seaward-thinning wedge of sediment below the transgressive surface is marked by a number of channels that we interpret as distributary channels based on their morphology. Regional divergence of the sequence boundary and transgressive surface with up to ˜8 m of sediment preserved across the interfluves suggests the formation of subaerial accommodation during the lowstand. The healing-phase, much like that in southern California, appears to infill rough areas in the

  7. Population size of island loggerhead shrikes on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Thomas R.; Teel, Susan; Hall, Linnea S.; Dye, Linda C.; Laughrin, Lyndal L.

    2012-01-01

    Island loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus anthonyi) are an endemic, genetically distinct subspecies of loggerhead shrike on California's Santa Rosa, Santa Cruz, and Santa Catalina Islands (USA). This subspecies is listed as a Species of Special Concern by the California Department of Fish and Game and has been petitioned for federal listing under the Endangered Species Act. The combination of suspected low numbers and the possibility of federal listing, prompted us to undertake a study to rigorously estimate the number of remaining individuals on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands. During the 2009 and 2010 breeding seasons, we surveyed sample units on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands using a double-observer method with independent observers to estimate joint detection probabilities (p), where we selected units under a stratified random sampling design. We estimated shrike abundance to be 169 in 2009 (p = 0.476) and 240 in 2010 (p = 0.825) for Santa Rosa Island, and 35 in 2009 (p = 0.816) and 42 in 2010 (p = 0.710) for Santa Cruz Island. These numbers, especially for Santa Rosa Island, are higher than previously reported but nevertheless are still low. Rapid vegetation change on both islands due to recent removal of nonnative herbivores may threaten the habitat and status of this subspecies and, therefore, we suggest that intensive demographic and habitat use research be initiated immediately to obtain additional information vital for the management of this subspecies. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Geology of the Santa Elena Peninsula, Costa Rica and its implications for the tectonic evolution of the Central America-Caribbean region

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Santa Elena Peninsula of Costa Rice represents an Aptian to Middle Eocene intraoceanic volcanic arc formed on a basement of serpentinized periodotite. This peridotite was probably part of the oceanic lithosphere formed at a spreading ridge which began to separate South America from North America in pre-Jurassic time. The arc resulted from northward subduction of oceanic crust along one ENE-trending trench about 70 km south of Santa Elena. The first phase of tectonism, arc volcanism, and sedimentation occurred in the area from Aptian to Campanian time. Carbonate bank limestone were deposited on the peridotite, which had been tilted and uplifted along E-W-trending high angle faults. A second volcanic arc developed above the limestone and was active until the Middle Eocene. From the Campanian to the Middle Eocene a forearc basin evolved south of the arc and a backarc basin north of it. A major Middle Eocene tectonic episode was associated with termination of activity of the Santa Elena subduction zone. This involved both thin-skinned deformation and reactivation of the steep basement faults to juxtapose peridotite and Campanian to Middle Eocene sediments. Existing models of the early plate tectonic evolution of the region, postulating initiation of spreading in the Jurassic, and development of a major transform in the Santa Elena area in the Cretaceous, are incompatible with the geology of the Santa Elena area. New models have been formulated genetically relating the structures in the Santa Elena tectonic province to northward subduction.

  9. Discovery and Description of Extinct Asphalt Volcanoes Along the Southern California Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, D. L.; Reddy, C.; Ventura, G. T.; Nelson, R. K.

    2007-12-01

    Asphalt volcanism is increasingly being recognized as an important process at cold seeps, linking ancient subsurface carbon reservoirs with more rapid biogeochemical processes at the surface. Here we describe two extinct asphalt volcanoes discovered off the coast of Santa Barbara, CA, using the DSV Alvin during the July 2007 SEEPS (Studies on the Ecology and Evolution of Petroleum Seeps) cruise. These structures are located approximately 10 kilometers offshore and 2 kilometers apart from each other, at a water depth of 150 to 200 meters. The volcanoes occur as asphalt mounds closely associated with sediment-laden depressions, suggesting extrusion of liquid petroleum coupled with localized subsidence or gas blowout. The volcanoes range from 10 to 30 meters in height off the sea floor and may extend below the present level of sediment cover. No active seepage was observed during approximately 10 hours of visual and video surveys from the DSV Alvin, but the volcanoes appear to serve as an oasis for benthic life when compared to the surrounding sediment. Four asphalt samples were collected throughout each site during these surveys and all show remarkable similarity in their structure and chemical composition. Organic carbon comprises 50 percent of the mass for each sample, with sulfur, hydrogen and nitrogen comprising another 10 percent in aggregate. Inclusions of fine-grained sediment and microfossils comprise much of the residual mass and are being used in an attempt to determine the timing of the eruptive events. Each sample was analyzed for the stable isotope composition of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur, and results are consistent with a petroleum source from the Miocene-age Monterey Formation. Analysis of biomarkers using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography yields a suite of hopanes and steranes also consistent with petroleum from the Monterey Formation, but with anomalously high concentrations of bisnorhopane. To our knowledge, this is the first report

  10. Marginalization of Vocational Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinsley, Howard E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Although vocational psychology has diverse theoretical models and an empirical tradition, it is marginalized within counseling psychology. Its vitality is weakened by those who take a dabbler, pundit, or booster approach to scholarship. (Contains 46 references.) (SK)

  11. Collapse of modern carbonate platform margins

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, H.T.; Hine, A.C.; Gardulski, A.

    1985-01-01

    Modern carbonate platform margins in the Florida-Bahama region have been viewed as depositional or constructional features. However, recent studies have shown that carbonate escarpments, such as the Blake-Bahama and West Florida Escarpments, are erosional in origin where the platform margins have a scalloped or horse-shoe shape. Seismic reflection data from one of these crescentic features along the west Florida platform margin indicate that it originated by large scale gravity collapse (slump). This collapse structure extends for at least 120 km along the margin and has removed about 350 m of strata as young as early Neogene. Although at least three generations of slope failure are recognized, catastrophic collapse appears to have occurred in the mid-Miocene. Gravitational instability due to high rates of sediment accumulation may have been the triggering mechanism. These data suggest that submarine slumping is an important process in the retreat of limestone escarpments and in the generation of carbonate megabreccia debris flows. Scalloped platform margins occur on satellite images of northern Exuma Sound and Columbus Basin in the Bahamas. The authors suggest that large-scale submarine slumping can cause elongation of structurally controlled intraplatform basins (Exuma South), and produce anomalous horse-shoe shaped basins (Columbus Basin) by mega-collapse processes.

  12. Sedimentary coprostanol as an index of sewage addition in Santa Monica Basin, southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesan, M.I.; Kaplan, I.R. )

    1990-02-01

    Sediment cores from Santa Monica Basin and effluent from two major municipal wastewater dischargers in southern California were analyzed for sterols. Specifically the fecal sterols, coprostanols (coprostanol and epicoprostanol), were quantitated to determine the degree of sewage addition to the sediment. Although coprostanols are distributed throughout the Santa Monica Basin sediments in association with fine particles, some stations contain elevated levels, either due to their proximity to the outfalls or because of preferential advection of fine-grained sediments into their location where anoxicity aids in better preservation. The progressive seaward decline of coprostanols relative to total sterols from the outfalls represents dilution of sewage by biogenic sterols. The ratios of coprostanols to dinosterol appears to be a better indicator of the degree of sewage addition. A rapid increase in content of coprostanols from about 1935 coincides with the start of offshore wastewater discharge by JWPCP, the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts on Palos Verdes Shelf. It is estimated that wastewater treatment plants release into southern California Bight 260 metric tons/yr of fecal sterols and 5 {times} 10{sup 4} metric tons/yr of sewage carbon.

  13. Environmental evaluations for deepening of Richmond Harbor and Santa Fe Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.; Kohn, N.P.; Crecelius, E.A.; Ward, J.A.; Bjornstad, B.N. )

    1990-09-01

    Richland, California is an important commercial port in San Francisco Bay. The San Francisco District of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) plans to increase the depth of Richmond Harbor and Santa Fe Channels to -38 feet Mean Lower Low Water (MLLW) to accommodate deep-draft commercial vessels. The total volume of dredged material is expected to be approximately 1.4 million cubic yards. The options for disposal of the dredged material are aquatic disposal and upland disposal. The purpose of this study was to develop a database on chemical compounds in the dredged material to assist with determination of disposal methods and the need for additional testing. This purpose was accomplished through an extensive field sampling program followed by chemical analysis of samples. Field sampling involved collection of core samples from Sante Fe and Richmond Harbor Channels. Cores were shipped to Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory, where they were subsampled for chemical analysis and/or archived by freezing. All sediment and water samples were analyzed for priority pollutants, including metals, organotins, base/neutral semivolatile organic compounds, chlorinated pesticides and PCBs, herbicide acids, and acidic phenols. Sediment samples were also analyzed for oil and grease and total organic carbon. Organophosphorus pesticides and dioxins and furans were measured in selected sediment samples from Richland Harbor Channel and from both sediment and water samples from Santa Fe Channel. 21 refs., 10 figs., 60 tabs.

  14. Littoral transport rates in the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell: a process-based model analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, E. P. L.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Brocatus, John

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the sediment transport patterns and pathways is essential for sustainable coastal zone management of the heavily modified coastline of Santa Barbara and Ventura County (California, USA). A process-based model application, based on Delft3D Online Morphology, is used to investigate the littoral transport potential along the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell (between Point Conception and Mugu Canyon). An advanced optimalization procedure is applied to enable annual sediment transport computations by reducing the ocean wave climate in 10 wave height - direction classes. Modeled littoral transport rates compare well with observed dredging volumes, and erosion or sedimentation hotspots coincide with the modeled divergence and convergence of the transport gradients. Sediment transport rates are strongly dependent on the alongshore variation in wave height due to wave sheltering, diffraction and focusing by the Northern Channel Islands, and the local orientation of the geologically-controlled coastline. Local transport gradients exceed the net eastward littoral transport, and are considered a primary driver for hot-spot erosion.

  15. Early Miocene sequence development across the New Jersey margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monteverde, D.H.; Mountain, Gregory S.; Miller, K.G.

    2008-01-01

    Sequence stratigraphy provides an understanding of the interplay between eustasy, sediment supply and accommodation in the sedimentary construction of passive margins. We used this approach to follow the early to middle Miocene growth of the New Jersey margin and analyse the connection between relative changes of sea level and variable sediment supply. Eleven candidate sequence boundaries were traced in high-resolution multi-channel seismic profiles across the inner margin and matched to geophysical log signatures and lithologic changes in ODP Leg 150X onshore coreholes. Chronologies at these drill sites were then used to assign ages to the intervening seismic sequences. We conclude that the regional and global correlation of early Miocene sequences suggests a dominant role of global sea-level change but margin progradation was controlled by localized sediment contribution and that local conditions played a large role in sequence formation and preservation. Lowstand deposits were regionally restricted and their locations point to both single and multiple sediment sources. The distribution of highstand deposits, by contrast, documents redistribution by along shelf currents. We find no evidence that sea level fell below the elevation of the clinoform rollover, and the existence of extensive lowstand deposits seaward of this inflection point indicates efficient cross-shelf sediment transport mechanisms despite the apparent lack of well-developed fluvial drainage. ?? 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2008 Blackwell Publishing.

  16. Chapter 34: Geology and petroleum potential of the rifted margins of the Canada Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, D.W.; Bird, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Three sides of the Canada Basin are bordered by high-standing, conjugate rift shoulders of the Chukchi Borderland, Alaska and Canada. The Alaska and Canada margins are mantled with thick, growth-faulted sediment prisms, and the Chukchi Borderland contains only a thin veneer of sediment. The rift-margin strata of Alaska and Canada reflect the tectonics and sediment dispersal systems of adjacent continental regions whereas the Chukchi Borderland was tectonically isolated from these sediment dispersal systems. Along the eastern Alaska-southern Canada margin, termed herein the 'Canning-Mackenzie deformed margin', the rifted margin is deformed by ongoing Brooks Range tectonism. Additional contractional structures occur in a gravity fold belt that may be present along the entire Alaska and Canada margins of the Canada Basin. Source-rock data inboard of the rift shoulders and regional palaeogeographic reconstructions suggest three potential source-rock intervals: Lower Cretaceous (Hauterivian-Albian), Upper Cretaceous (mostly Turonian) and Lower Palaeogene. Burial history modelling indicates favourable timing for generation from all three intervals beneath the Alaska and Canada passive margins, and an active petroleum system has been documented in the Canning-Mackenzie deformed margin. Assessment of undiscovered petroleum resources indicates the greatest potential in the Canning-Mackenzie deformed margin and significant potential in the Canada and Alaska passive margins. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

  17. Biostratigraphy of the Santa Rosita Formation (Furongian-Tremadocian) in its type area, Eastern Cordillera, NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voldman, G. G.; Albanesi, G. L.; Ortega, G.; Monaldi, C. R.; Zeballo, F. J.; Giuliano, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    The Cambrian - Lower Ordovician stratigraphic units from the Eastern Cordillera were originally defined in the Santa Victoria Range, Salta Province, NW Argentina. At the southern margin of the Santa Victoria River, near the homonymous locality, the Santa Rosita Formation is conformably overlain by the Acoite Formation. These stratigraphic units are dated by means of conodont, graptolite and trilobite biostratigraphy in the type sections. The upper interval (ca. 700 m) of the Santa Rosita Formation consists of sandstones interbedded with purplish to grayish shales and occasional coquinas, which were sampled for microfossils. 15 carbonate samples (35 kg) were processed following standard laboratory techniques for conodont recovery. A number of species from the genera Acanthodus, Acodus, Decoriconus, Drepanodus, Drepanoistodus, Iapetognathus, Kallidontus, Paltodus, Utahconus, Teridontus and the protoconodont Phakelodus were recovered from 5 productive samples. The conodont elements exhibit a CAI 3 and correspond to the Paltodus deltifer deltifer Subzone of the P. deltifer Zone (middle Tremadocian, Tr2). Pelites of the Acoite Formation, at 300 m from its base, bear Araneograptus murrayi and Thysanopyge sp., whose ranges span the Tremadocian - Floian boundary. Conodonts and graptolites were also yielded by outcrops of the Santa Rosita Formation at the Nazareno area, 30 km to the south of the Santa Victoria type locality. The conodont associations were recorded from calcareous levels of the Alfarcito and Rupasca members, including Drepanodus arcuatus, Drepanoistodus chucaleznensis, Teridontus gallicus, Utahconus humahuacensis, Acanthodus sp. and Utahconus sp. They also integrate the eponymous subspecies from the Paltodus deltifer pristinus and P. d. deltifer subzones of the P. deltifer Zone (middle Tremadocian, Tr2). The Santa Rosita Formation correlates with a thick heterolithic succession at the Zenta Range, 120 km to the southwest of the Santa Victoria type area. This

  18. Estimating the population size of island loggerhead shrikes on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Thomas R.; Teel, Susan; Hall, Linnea S.; Dye, Linda C.; Laughrin, Lyndal L.

    2012-01-01

    Island loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus anthonyi) are an endemic, genetically distinct subspecies of loggerhead shrike on California’s Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands. This subspecies is listed as a Species of Special Concern by the California Department of Fish and Game and has been petitioned for federal listing under the Endangered Species Act. Because of suspected low numbers and the possibility of federal listing, there was an urgent need to rigorously estimate the number of remaining individuals on the Islands. In 2009 and 2010, biologists from the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service surveyed sample units on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands using a double-observer method with independent observers, where units were selected under a stratified random sampling design. Shrike abundance was estimated to be 169 in 2009 and 240 in 2010 for Santa Rosa Island, and 35 in 2009 and 42 in 2010 for Santa Cruz Island. These numbers, especially for Santa Rosa Island, are higher than previously reported but nevertheless are still low. Rapid vegetation change on both islands due to recent removal of non-native herbivores may threaten the habitat and status of this subspecies. In view of this circumstance and the still-low numbers of shrikes, additional intensive demographic and habitat-use studies are critical for obtaining information vital for the perpetuation of this subspecies.

  19. The geodynamics of the Levant margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Avraham, Z.

    2006-12-01

    The Levant continental margin, offshore Israel, Lebanon and Syria, is usually defined as a passive margin that was formed through rifting processes. During the formation two major continental fragments are assumed to separate from the northern edge of the Afro-Arabian plate to form the Levant basin: the Tauride and Eratosthenes blocks. Today an oceanic crust and, in places, a very thin continental crust are present between the Levant margin and Eratosthenes seamount. The margin can be divided into two distinct provinces that are separated by the Carmel Structure, which extends from seawards to the northwest across the continental shelf and slope. The preservation of segmentation, both in the shallow and in the deep structure, insinuates that the two segments were formed through different continental breakup processes, which continue to dictate the style of sediment accumulation. The nature and development of the continental margin offshore Israel were the subject of numerous studies, which suggest that the southern Levant segment (south of the Carmel Structure) was formed through continental rifting processes. In contrast, the northern segment, from the Carmel structure northwards and offshore southern Lebanon, was hardly studied before. Recent studies however indicate that the northern segment shows a strong similarity to classical transform margins in the world. In view of the new classification of the northern Levant margin a modified scenario is suggested for: (a) the initial stages in which the Levant margin was formed; and (b) the present day structural differences between the two segments of the margin. At present, the northern Levant continental margin is being reactivated by transpressional faulting of the marine continuation of the Carmel fault which bends northward at the base of the continental slope due to the rheological discontinuity in this region. This fault system coincides with the sharp continental-oceanic crustal transition, and acts as an

  20. 60. NEEDLE AND NOZZLE TIP, SANTA ANA NO. 1, SOUTHERN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. NEEDLE AND NOZZLE TIP, SANTA ANA NO. 1, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON CO., APR. 28, 1910, REVISED MAY 12, 1910. SCE drawing no. 4500. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  1. 34. ELEVATION OF RELAY AND CONTROL SWITCHBOARD, SANTA ANA RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. ELEVATION OF RELAY AND CONTROL SWITCHBOARD, SANTA ANA RIVER P.H. #3, JUNE 23, 1943. SCE drawing no. 413187-1. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  2. 4. PENSTOCKS. EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 1 PROJECT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PENSTOCKS. EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 1 PROJECT, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523197 (sheet no. 7; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Forebay & Penstock, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  3. 52. INDOOR SWITCHRACK, ELEVATION AND SECTIONS. SANTA ANA RIVER NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. INDOOR SWITCHRACK, ELEVATION AND SECTIONS. SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, DEC. 11, 1951, AND MAR. 20, 1952. SCE drawing no. 534986-2. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  4. 54. ALDER CREEK DIVERSION, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. ALDER CREEK DIVERSION, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA POWERHOUSE NO. 2 SCE drawing no. 5206858, no date (FERC no. 1933-48). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  5. 53. NEW BCB AND LIGHTNING ARRESTER ARRANGEMENT, SANTA ANA RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. NEW BCB AND LIGHTNING ARRESTER ARRANGEMENT, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, JAN. 24, 1977. SCE drawing no. 455670-0. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  6. 3. TAILRACE AND FOREBAY, SANTA ANA NO. 3, EXHIBIT L, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. TAILRACE AND FOREBAY, SANTA ANA NO. 3, EXHIBIT L, JAN. 25, 1956. SCE drawing no. 541475 (sheet 6; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Forebay & Penstock, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. 32. SHAW BOX 5 TON CRANE, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. SHAW BOX 5 TON CRANE, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 3, JAN. 24, 1977. SCE drawing no. 455678-0. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  8. 41. EXTERNAL ELEVATIONS, POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. EXTERNAL ELEVATIONS, POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, EDISON ELECTRIC CO., NOV. 3, 1904. SCE drawing no. 5392. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  9. 56. CROSS SECTION OF POWERHOUSE, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. CROSS SECTION OF POWERHOUSE, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA POWERHOUSE NO. 1. SCE drawing no. 5206856 (no date; FERC no. 1933-46). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. 54. PLAN OF POWERHOUSE, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. PLAN OF POWERHOUSE, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA POWERHOUSE NO. 1. SCE drawing no. 5206855 (no date; FERC no. 1933-45). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. 51. SWITCHBOARD ELEVATIONS, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, DEC. 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. SWITCHBOARD ELEVATIONS, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, DEC. 14, 1951; REVISIONS, MAR. 20 AND SEPT. 19, 1952. SCE drawing no. 534984-2. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  12. 4. INTERIOR OF ABANDONED SANTA ANA CANAL TUNNEL, SHOWING CEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR OF ABANDONED SANTA ANA CANAL TUNNEL, SHOWING CEMENT TROUGH FLOOR AND UNFINISHED GRANITE ROOF. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Abandoned Tunnel, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. 53. SIPHON NO. 1, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2 PROJECT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. SIPHON NO. 1, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2 PROJECT, EXHIBIT L, PROJECT 1933, MAY 1973. SCE drawing no. 5110869 (sheet no. 11; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. 42. FOUNDATIONS TAIL RACE, ETC., POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. FOUNDATIONS - TAIL RACE, ETC., POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, EDISON ELECTRIC CO., NOV. 3, 1904. SCE drawing no. 5393. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. 57. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT PLOT PLAN, SANTA ANA NO. 1 HYDRO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT PLOT PLAN, SANTA ANA NO. 1 HYDRO PLANT, OCTOBER 10, 1958. SCE drawing no. 428615-0. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. Epicontinental sea-margin development on the contemporary Florida Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, C.B.; Hertler, H.A.; Highley, A.B.; Hoenstine, R.W. )

    1993-03-01

    Assessment of Florida Big Bend coastal wetlands and nearshore geology reveals the nature of present day epicontinental sea margin development. Low wave energies, lack of sediment availability, and limestone-dissolution feature-control of regional geomorphology are conditions predicated by the Gulf of Mexico coastline's location in the center of the broad, flooded, gently seaward-sloping Florida Platform. In the Aucilla River study area, sediments form a thin to discontinuous clastic and organic sediment veneer (8 meters and less) which unconformably overlies the Oligocene-aged Suwannee Limestone. Carbon-14 dates from basal wood fragments indicate mid-Holocene (or younger) sediment ages. Karst, hydrodynamics, and littoral and nearshore organisms interact to control areal sedimentation. Unlithified-sediment core analyses indicate local depositional environments are not laterally continuous (coastal wetlands--peats, oyster bioherms--shell deposits, channel mouth-sand bars), nor are they vertically continuous (i.e., preserved by sediment inundation as sea level rises). This displacement of depositional form accompanied by erosion of the seaward margin may be attributed to shallow coastal conditions and inadequate sediment supply.

  17. Core drilling provides information about Santa Fe Group aquifer system beneath Albuquerque's West Mesa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, B.D.; Connell, S.D.; Hawley, J.W.; Stone, B.D.

    1998-01-01

    Core samples from the upper ???1500 ft of the Santa Fe Group in the Albuquerque West Mesa area provide a first-hand look at the sediments and at subsurface stratigraphic relationships in this important part of the basin-fill aquifer system. Two major hydrostratigraphic subunits consisting of a lower coarse-grained, sandy interval and an overlying fine-grained, interbedded silty sand and clay interval lie beneath the water table at the 98th St core hole. Borehole electrical conductivity measurements reproduce major textural changes observed in the recovered cores and support subsurface correlations of hydrostratigraphic units in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system based on geophysical logs. Comparison of electrical logs from the core hole and from nearby city wells reveals laterally consistent lithostratigraphic patterns over much of the metropolitan area west of the Rio Grande that may be used to delineate structural and related stratigraphic features that have a direct bearing on the availability of ground water.

  18. 49. BEAR CREEK AND SANTA ANA RIVER DIVERSION DAMS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. BEAR CREEK AND SANTA ANA RIVER DIVERSION DAMS AND CONCRETE CONDUIT NO. 1, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA POWERHOUSE NO. 1. SCE drawing no. 5206851, no date (FERC no. 1933-41). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  19. 52. POWER HOUSE AREA, SANTA ANA NO. 2; DETAIL MAP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. POWER HOUSE AREA, SANTA ANA NO. 2; DETAIL MAP OF SANTA ANA NO. 1 AND NO. 2 HYDROELECTRIC PROJECT, EXHIBIT K, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523691 (sheet no. 6; for filing with the Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  20. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  1. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  2. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  3. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  4. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  5. 78 FR 66982 - Santa Clara Pueblo Disaster #NM-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION Santa Clara Pueblo Disaster NM-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... for the Santa Clara Pueblo (FEMA- 4151-DR), dated 10/29/2013. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding... disaster: Primary Areas: Santa Clara Pueblo. The Interest Rates are: Percent For Physical Damage:...

  6. 51. INTAKE AND POWER HOUSE AREAS, SANTA ANA NO. 1; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. INTAKE AND POWER HOUSE AREAS, SANTA ANA NO. 1; DETAIL MAP OF SANTA ANA NO. 1 AND NO. 2 HYDROELECTRIC PROJECT, EXHIBIT K, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523690 (sheet no. 5; for filing with the Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. 2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the north, looking over the flooded fields between Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, just upstream of the Prado Dam site. File number written on negative: R & H 80 024. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  8. Monitoring Domoic Acid production by Solid Phase Adsorption Toxin Tracking off the Santa Cruz Municipal Warf, Santa Cruz, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, M.; Ziccarelli, L.; Kudela, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Certain species of the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia are producers of the neurotoxin, domoic acid (DA). DA is known to cause amnesic shellfish poisoning also known as domoic acid poisoning, which can lead to permanent brain damage in humans and marine mammals. DA accumulates at higher trophic levels, generally due to consumption of toxic cells or through trophic transfer, and can potentially cause death of both humans and marine wildlife. The Santa Cruz Municipal Warf experiences periodic rises in DA concentrations, which can reach toxic levels in shellfish, fish, and other marine organisms. While these increases in toxicity often occur during Pseudo-nitzschia blooms, several periods of elevated DA have occurred when diatom abundance is restricted and/or dominated by non-toxic species, and there is increasing evidence that DA dissolved in seawater may be prevalent. One theory suggests that senescent or dead Pseudo-nitzschia cells sink to the benthos while retaining their toxin and are buried in sediment following the death of a bloom. Therefore, DA may accumulate in the benthos, where it is eventually released during storms or wave and tide conditions that disturb the sediment. We sampled DA in situ using Solid Phase Adsorption Toxin Tracking (SPATT) bags SPATT uses a synthetic resin to capture dissolved DA, allowing for the determination of integrated DA concentrations at known time intervals. The alternative method is mussel biotoxin monitoring, but it is less accurate due to uncertainties in the time of DA accumulation within the mussel, and the lack of uptake of dissolved DA by the mussel. We deployed and collected SPATT off the Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf at multiple depths beginning in February 2013. We expect to see increasing DA following the death of a harmful algal bloom. Under pre-bloom conditions, little to no DA has been detected in mussels or surface SPATT, but DA from SPATT is frequently observed at depth, suggesting that the sediment is exposed to

  9. Marginal energy prices report

    SciTech Connect

    Chaitkin, Stuart; Biermayer, Peter; Bretz, Sarah; Brown, Steve; Constantine, Sachu; Fisher, Diane; Hakim, Sajid; Liew, Lucy; Lutz, Jim; Marnay, Chris; McMahon, James E.; Moezzi, Mithra; Osborn, Julie; Rawner, Esther; Roberson, Judy; Rosenquist, Greg; Ryan, Nancy; Turiel, Isaac; Wiel, Stephen

    1999-06-24

    This report responds to a recommendation from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Advisory Committee on Appliance Energy Efficiency Standards. It presents the derivation of estimated consumer marginal energy prices for the commercial and residential sectors for use in the life-cycle cost (LCC) analyses for four of the high priority appliances' energy efficiency standards rule makings --clothes washers, water heaters,fluorescent lamp ballasts, and central airconditioners/heat pumps. Marginal prices as discussed here are those prices consumers pay (or save) for their last units of energy used (or saved). Marginal prices reflect a change in a consumer's bill (that might be associated with new energy efficiency standards) divided by the corresponding change in the amount of energy the consumer used.

  10. Deep-sea survey for the detection of methane at the “Santa Maria di Leuca” cold-water coral mounds (Ionian Sea, South Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etiope, G.; Savini, A.; Lo Bue, N.; Favali, P.; Corselli, C.

    2010-03-01

    The "Santa Maria di Leuca" Cold-Water Coral (CWC) province (northern Ionian Sea) was investigated for the first time to detect eventual occurrence of methane anomalies as a possible indication of hydrocarbon seepage stimulating the coral growth. Most coral mounds have developed in correspondence with tectonic scarps and faults, orthogonal to the southern margin and trending NW-SE, which could be potential sites of gas escape. A visual and instrumental inspection was performed by using a new deep-sea probe equipped with video-cameras, sonar, CTD, methane sensors, and a water sampler. Eight areas were explored by 10 surveys, depths ranging from 380 to 1100 m, for a total of more than 26 h of continuous video and instrumental recording. Sediments were also sampled by gravity corers and analysed in laboratory. The images allowed to assess distribution, abundance and geometry of the colonies, most of which are developed on morphological highs often characterised by tectonic scarps. All data indicate however the lack of a significant occurrence of methane, both in seawater and sediments. No direct or indirect expressions of gas seepage were recognised on the seabed. Weak methane anomalies were detected only in seawater at the base of some fault-linked scarps, where more reducing conditions and bacterial methanogenesis are possibly enhanced by less water circulation. The faults are not fluid-bearing as previously suggested by high-resolution geophysical signatures. The development of the coral colonies thus cannot be attributed to seeping fluids, but to a favourable physiographic position with exposure to nutrient-rich currents.

  11. Sedimentation rate control on diagenesis, East China Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yan; Zheng, Hongbo; Kissel, Catherine; Laj, Carlo

    2011-08-01

    Diagenesis of ferrimagnetic minerals can alter the magnetic properties, erasing partially or entirely the original paleomagnetic and paleoclimatic signals, especially on continental margins where sedimentation rates are usually high. Understanding the mechanisms by which magnetic particles are affected by diagenesis is therefore critical for retrieving paleomagnetic and paleoclimatic information from sediments. High-resolution magnetic analysis was carried out on rapidly deposited (0.4-20 mm/year) Holocene sediments from the East China Sea (ECS) inner continental shelf. The primary magnetic mineral assemblage in the sediment core contains ferrimagnetic minerals, such as magnetite, with minor contributions from hematite. The magnetic properties vary down-core in two steps, due to post-depositional reductive diagenesis. The first occurs at depths of 0.15-1.1 m and is characterized by reduction of both magnetite and hematite in suboxic sediments. The suboxic-sulfate boundary (SSB) is therefore located at 1.1 m. We demonstrate that the depth of the SSB has negative relation to the average sedimentation rate in Chinese marginal seas. The second step change in magnetic properties occurs at 3.2-5.8 m, and contains two intervals with extremely low magnetic mineral content, each corresponding to dissolution fronts associated with the former and present position of the sulfate-methanic transition (SMT). These two intervals correlate well with abrupt changes in sedimentation rate and separate the anoxic zone into two parts: the sulfidic zone and the methanic zone. Our study suggests that sedimentation rate provides a dominant control on magnetic mineral diagenesis, at least in the Chinese marginal seas, which controls not only the type of redox zonation, but also the thicknesses of diagenetic zones.

  12. SOUTH SANTA CLARA COUNTY MIGRANT TREATMENT CLINIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SKILLICORN, STANLEY A.

    IN THE SUMMER OF 1965, A MIGRANT HEALTH CLINIC WAS STARTED IN THE SOUTHERN PART OF SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. THE CLINIC DIFFERS FROM THE PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT'S CLINICS BY OFFERING TREATMENT AND MEDICATION, INSTEAD OF ONLY PREVENTIVE SERVICES. THE ENTIRE STAFF, FROM DOCTORS TO BABY-SITTERS, VOLUNTEERS ITS TIME, AND THE CLINIC IS NOW OPEN…

  13. Santa Claus and the Conservation of Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassani, Sadri

    2005-01-01

    This article examines an amusing application of the concept of kinetic energy. Using some rudimentary physical notions, we have analysed the energetics of the motion of Santa Claus. The results, which are quite surprising, can be of interest to high school and early college physics educators when they teach kinetic energy, and energy conservation…

  14. Santa Cruz Community Service Television Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, Herbert Allan

    A non-profit corporation, called the Santa Cruz Community Service Television Project (S.C.C.S.T.P.), is proposed that would produce videotape for the purpose of intra-community communication. The corporation would use portable videotape equipment to record a variety of community programs, such as an ecological history of the Monterey Bay area, the…

  15. Santa Rosa, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Santa Rosa, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  16. Educational and Demographic Profile: Santa Clara County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Santa Clara County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  17. Educational and Demographic Profile: Santa Barbara County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Santa Barbara County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  18. Educational and Demographic Profile: Santa Cruz County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Santa Cruz County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation provides a framework for enhanced communication and…

  19. Ecotourism: The Santa Elena Rainforest Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wearing, Stephen

    1993-01-01

    Describes an ecotourism project in which the community of Santa Elena, Costa Rica, are developing a rainforest reserve on government land leased permanently to the local high school. Discusses the impact of the project on the community's economy and environment. (Contains 30 references.) (MDH)

  20. USEPA Santa Cruz River Public Survey Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA Office of Research and Development, Western Ecology Division is investigating how urban households value different possibilities for the Santa Cruz River in southern Arizona. A random sample of households in the Phoenix and Tucson areas are being asked to provide their ...

  1. Aggregate Settling Velocities in San Francisco Estuary Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. M.; Stacey, M. T.; Variano, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    One way that humans impact aquatic ecosystems is by adding nutrients and contaminants, which can propagate up the food web and cause blooms and die-offs, respectively. Often, these chemicals are attached to fine sediments, and thus where sediments go, so do these anthropogenic influences. Vertical motion of sediments is important for sinking and burial, and also for indirect effects on horizontal transport. The dynamics of sinking sediment (often in aggregates) are complex, thus we need field data to test and validate existing models. San Francisco Bay is well studied and is often used as a test case for new measurement and model techniques (Barnard et al. 2013). Settling velocities for aggregates vary between 4*10-5 to 1.6*10-2 m/s along the estuary backbone (Manning and Schoellhamer 2013). Model results from South San Francisco Bay shoals suggest two populations of settling particles, one fast (ws of 9 to 5.8*10-4 m/s) and one slow (ws of < 1*10-7 to 1.4*10-5 m/s) (Brand et al. 2015). While the open waters of San Francisco Bay and other estuaries are well studied and modeled, sediment and contaminants often originate from the margin regions, and the margins remain poorly characterized. We conducted a 24 hour field experiment in a channel slough of South San Francisco Bay, and measured settling velocity, turbulence and flow, and suspended sediment concentration. At this margin location, we found average settling velocities of 4-5*10-5 m/s, and saw settling velocities decrease with decreasing suspended sediment concentration. These results are consistent with, though at the low end of, those seen along the estuary center, and they suggest that the two population model that has been successful along the shoals may also apply in the margins.

  2. Deep continental margin reflectors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewing, J.; Heirtzler, J.; Purdy, M.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1985-01-01

    In contrast to the rarity of such observations a decade ago, seismic reflecting and refracting horizons are now being observed to Moho depths under continental shelves in a number of places. These observations provide knowledge of the entire crustal thickness from the shoreline to the oceanic crust on passive margins and supplement Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP)-type measurements on land.

  3. Predicting service life margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, G. F.

    1971-01-01

    Margins are developed for equipment susceptible to malfunction due to excessive time or operation cycles, and for identifying limited life equipment so monitoring and replacing is accomplished before hardware failure. Method applies to hardware where design service is established and where reasonable expected usage prediction is made.

  4. Hourly marginal emissions tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hourly marginal emissions tool is an excel workbook that estimates the hourly NOx, SO2 and CO2 emission reductions of energy efficiency and renewable energy policies and programs in the electric power sector. It will be based on EPA's proposed "Road map for Incorporating ene...

  5. Marginalization and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julia Ann

    2004-01-01

    The concept of marginalization was first analyzed by nursing researchers Hall, Stevens, and Meleis. Although nursing literature frequently refers to this concept when addressing "at risk" groups such as the homeless, gays and lesbians, and those infected with HIV/AIDS, the concept can also be applied to nursing. Analysis of current school nursing…

  6. Contribution Margin Budgeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambrino, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    Describes Iowa Valley Community College District's Contribution Margin Budgeting (CMB) program, successfully implemented to stave off bankruptcy. In this program, each responsibility center receives credit for all income generated and is charged for all expenditures, and each must build its own reserve against revenue shortfalls and unanticipated…

  7. Marginality and Triangle Inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nánásiová, O. L̆ga; Valášková, L̆ubica

    2010-12-01

    In this paper we study conditions for the existence of a 3-dimensional s-map on a quantum logic under assumption that marginal s-maps are known. We show that the existence of such a 3-dimensional s-map depends on the triangle inequality of d-map, which on a Boolean algebra represents a measure of symmetric difference.

  8. Volcanic passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoffroy, Laurent

    2005-12-01

    Compared to non-volcanic ones, volcanic passive margins mark continental break-up over a hotter mantle, probably subject to small-scale convection. They present distinctive genetic and structural features. High-rate extension of the lithosphere is associated with catastrophic mantle melting responsible for the accretion of a thick igneous crust. Distinctive structural features of volcanic margins are syn-magmatic and continentward-dipping crustal faults accommodating the seaward flexure of the igneous crust. Volcanic margins present along-axis a magmatic and tectonic segmentation with wavelength similar to adjacent slow-spreading ridges. Their 3D organisation suggests a connection between loci of mantle melting at depths and zones of strain concentration within the lithosphere. Break-up would start and propagate from localized thermally-softened lithospheric zones. These 'soft points' could be localized over small-scale convection cells found at the bottom of the lithosphere, where adiabatic mantle melting would specifically occur. The particular structure of the brittle crust at volcanic passive margins could be interpreted by active and sudden oceanward flow of both the unstable hot mantle and the ductile part of the lithosphere during the break-up stage. To cite this article: L. Geoffroy, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  9. Neotectonics in the northern equatorial Brazilian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Dilce F.; Souza, Lena S. B.; Prado, Renato; Elis, Vagner R.

    2012-08-01

    An increasing volume of publications has addressed the role of tectonics in inland areas of northern Brazil during the Neogene and Quaternary, despite its location in a passive margin. Hence, northern South America plate in this time interval might have not been as passive as usually regarded. This proposal needs further support, particularly including field data. In this work, we applied an integrated approach to reveal tectonic structures in Miocene and late Quaternary strata in a coastal area of the Amazonas lowland. The investigation, undertaken in Marajó Island, mouth of the Amazonas River, consisted of shallow sub-surface geophysical data including vertical electric sounding and ground penetrating radar. These methods were combined with morphostructural analysis and sedimentological/stratigraphic data from shallow cores and a few outcrops. The results revealed two stratigraphic units, a lower one with Miocene age, and an upper one of Late Pleistocene-Holocene age. An abundance of faults and folds were recorded in the Miocene deposits and, to a minor extent, in overlying Late Pleistocene-Holocene strata. In addition to characterize these structures, we discuss their origin, considering three potential mechanisms: Andean tectonics, gravity tectonics related to sediment loading in the Amazon Fan, and rifting at the continental margin. Amongst these hypotheses, the most likely is that the faults and folds recorded in Marajó Island reflect tectonics associated with the history of continental rifting that gave rise to the South Atlantic Ocean. This study supports sediment deposition influenced by transpression and transtension associated with strike-slip divergence along the northern Equatorial Brazilian margin in the Miocene and Late Pleistocene-Holocene. This work records tectonic evidence only for the uppermost few ten of meters of this sedimentary succession. However, available geological data indicate a thickness of up to 6 km, which is remarkably thick for

  10. Sedimentary processes on the northwestern Iberian continental margin viewed by long-range side-scan sonar and seismic data.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Kidd, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the continuity of sediment drifting through geological time, the stratigraphic section drilled at DSDP Site 398 was reinterpreted and, using seismic-reflection profiles, was traced throughout the northern Iberian margin. Together, the lithostratigraphic and seismic data indicate that sediment drifting developed along this margin in the Eocene. A second period of sediment drifting commenced during the Pliocene once the Mediterranean basin filled and the flow out of the Strait of Gibraltar resumed. -from Authors

  11. The Cadiz margin study off Spain: An introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.H.; Maldonado, A.

    1999-01-01

    The Cadiz continental margin of the northeastern Gulf of Cadiz off Spain was selected for a multidisciplinary project because of the interplay of complex tectonic history between the Iberian and African plates, sediment supply from multiple sources, and unique Mediterranean Gateway inflow and outflow currents. The nature of this complex margin, particularly during the last 5 million years, was investigated with emphasis on tectonic history, stratigraphic sequences, marine circulation, contourite depositional facies, geotechnical properties, geologic hazards, and human influences such as dispersal of river contaminants. This study provides an integrated view of the tectonic, sediment supply and oceanographic factors that control depositional processes and growth patterns of the Cadiz and similar modem and ancient continental margins.

  12. Dispersal of river sediment in the Southern California Bight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Farnsworth, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    The rivers of Southern California deliver episodic pulses of water, sediment, nutrients, and pollutants to the region's coastal waters. Although river-sediment dispersal is observed in positively buoyant (hypopycnal) turbid plumes extending tens of kilometers from river mouths, very little of the river sediment is found in these plumes. Rather, river sediment settles quickly from hypopycnal plumes to the seabed, where transport is controlled by bottom-boundary layer processes, presumably including fluid-mud (hyperpycnal) gravity currents. Here we investigate the geographical patterns of river-sediment dispersal processes by examining suspended-sediment concentrations and loads and the continental shelf morphology offshore river mouths. Throughout Southern California, river sediment is discharged at concentrations adequately high to induce enhanced sediment settling, including negative buoyancy. The rivers draining the Western Transverse Range produce suspended-sediment concentrations that are orders of magnitude greater than those in the urbanized region and Peninsular Range to the south, largely due to differences in sediment yield. The majority of sediment discharge from the Santa Clara River and Calleguas Creek occurs above the theoretical negative buoyancy concentration (>40 g/l). These rivers also produce event sediment loading as great as the Eel River, where fluid-mud gravity currents are observed. The continental shelf of Southern California has variable morphology, which influences the ability to transport via gravity currents. Over half of the rivers examined are adjacent to shelf slopes greater than 0.01, which are adequately steep to sustain auto-suspending gravity currents across the shelf, and have little (<10 m) Holocene sediment accumulation. Shelf settings of the Ventura, Santa Clara, and Tijuana Rivers are very broad and low sloped (less than 0.004), which suggests that fluid-mud gravity currents could transport across these shelves, albeit slowly

  13. Carbonate comparison of west Florida continental margin with margins of eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    Temperate carbonate margins may have as many similarities to clastic margins as to other carbonate systems. An example is the west Florida continental margin north of Florida Bay, a vast area of more than 150,000 km/sup 2/. The facies of this area differ from those of other Holocene carbonates, such as the Bahama Banks, the Great Barrier Reef, and the Caribbean and Pacific bioherms. The west Florida margin is analogous to the predominantly clastic southeastern US in both physiology and sedimentary processes. The shelf facies is a veneer of carbonate sand, primarily molluscan shell fragments, with low sedimentation rates. It is similar to the southeastern US sand veneer with the clastic component removed. Like the US system, the west Florida shelf has a ridge and swale topography replete with sedimentary structures, such as sand waves, with a series of drainage systems incised into its surface at lower stands of sea level. On the outer edge, it is commonly bounded by outcrops with considerable positive relief. The upper slope of the west Florida margin is a calcilutite, a Holocene chalk deposit accumulating at rates of tens of centimeters/1000 years, comparable to the clastic lutite depositional rates of the eastern US continental slope, and two orders of magnitude higher than deep-sea oozes of similar composition. These relatively high rates are probably caused by fines pumped from and across the coarser shelf-sand sheets in both systems.

  14. Interpretation of continuous-offset seismic data in central California margin

    SciTech Connect

    Putzig, N.E.; Levander, A.R.

    1988-03-01

    As part of the Pacific Gas and Electric deep crustal geophysical survey, 154 seismic group recorders were deployed in a linear, fixed receiver array to record three one-ton land dynamite shots and 406 10,280-in./sup 3/ air gun pops. Receivers were deployed every 350 m in a 50-km line extending to the northeast from the coast at Morro Bay, California. The receivers cross the Sur-Obispo terrane, the Macimiento and Rinconada fault zones, and part of the sediment-covered Salinian block. A seismic vessel fired the air gun array from 2.4 to 65.5 km offshore at 155-m intervals in line with the onshore receiver spread. The sources extended across the Hosgri fault zone and the Santa Maria basin. The authors have produced a reflection image at 5.5 to 6.0 sec two-way traveltime by CMP stacking traces with offsets less than 20 km. They believe this event, which is at about 14-km depth and dips landward at 10/sup 0/-15/sup 0/, is the top of the lower crust. An event that appears on common shot and receiver gathers, they interpret as a wide-angle reflection from the base of this dipping lower crustal layer. Ray tracing of receiver gather refraction records indicates that the layer flattens seaward of the coast. They believe that this feature is a remnant of oceanic crust that had been subducting beneath the Mesozoic-Cenozoic California margin and is tectonically correlative with a bright continuous event found on nearby offshore reflection profiles at about 6 sec two-way traveltime.

  15. Strategies for managing margins.

    PubMed

    2012-08-01

    Potential Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement cuts have made it critical for home health agencies to manage their gross and net operating profit margins. Agencies need to develop tools to analyze their margins and make sure they are following best practices. Try as you may, your agency might still face the question, "Why am I not meeting my budget?" Get some answers in this session from David Berman and Andrea L. Devoti. Berman is a principal at Simione Healthcare Consultants in Hamden, CT, where he is responsible for merchant acquisitions, business valuation due diligence, and oversight of the financial monitor benchmarking tool besides serving as interim chief financial officer. Devoti is chairman of the NAHC board and President & CEO of Neighborhood Health Visiting Nurse Association in West Chester PA. PMID:23074756

  16. Aquatic Sediments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanville, W. D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of aquatic sediments and its effect upon water quality, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) sediment water interchange; (2) chemical and physical characterization; and (3) heavy water in sediments. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  17. Epibenthic, agglutinating foraminiferans in the Santa Catalina Basin and their response to disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Childers, Susan E.; Smith, Craig R.

    1991-04-01

    There are five common species of large (0.5-6 cm long) epibenthic, agglutinating foraminiferans in the Santa Catalina Basin (1200-1350 m). This paper describes their basic ecology and response to mound disturbance. Combined, the five species attain mean densities of 200-300 individuals per m 2 and their protoplasm has an average biomass of 199.5 mg m -2. Individual species occur at densities ranging from 7 to 100 m -2, and each species has a different population size structure. Protoplasm comprises <2% of test volumes. Analysis of excess 234Th revealed no indication of particle sequestering within tests, and acridine orange direct counts of bacteria provided no evidence of microbial gardening or enhancement associated with tests. Twenty-five per cent of tests examined had metazoan associates; approximately half of these were polychaetes. Experiments were carried out to investigate the response of the epibenthic foraminiferal assemblage to disturbance from large, biogenic mounds, a common feature on the Santa Catalina Basin floor. Three branched forms, Pelosina cf. arborescens, P. cf. cylindrica and a mud-walled astrorhizinid, were most abundant on background sediments, less common on natural mounds and absent from artificially-created mounds exposed for 10.5 months. Two spherical species, Oryctoderma sp. and a different mud-walled astrorhizinid, were present at similar densities on artificial mounds (9.5-10.5 months old), natural mounds and undisturbed sediments, but Oryctoderma sp. attained largest sizes on mounds. These two species appear to be opportunistic taxa that can colonize and grow rapidly on mound sediments. This study suggests that disturbance, in this case that by sediment mound builders, is an important source of spatial heterogeneity in deep-water foraminiferal communities. Where sediment mounds occur, foraminiferal assemblages will experience disequilibrium dynamics.

  18. Evidence for latest Pleistocene to Holocene movement on the Santa Cruz Island fault, California

    SciTech Connect

    Pinter, N.; Sorlien, C. )

    1991-09-01

    Timing of the latest movement on the Santa Cruz Island fault, a dramatic physiographic feature of the southern boundary of the California Transverse Ranges, is demonstrated to be latest Pleistocene to Holocene in age. Faulting of dated terrace gravels confirms that the most recent rupture on the fault is no older than 11.78 {plus minus}0.1 ka. This represents an order of magnitude increase over the recency suggested by previous work and requires proportional increases in estimates of the minimum slip rate and seismic hazard posed by the fault. Uplifted latest Pleistocene to Holocene fill terraces are consistent with models of high rates of uplift and high sediment supply. Numerical solution of the interaction of sea-level rise with uplift at the west end of Santa Cruz Island predicts that the youngest strata in the faulted terrace sequence are about 6.1 ka. Reevaluation of high-resolution seismic sections just west of the island supports the latest Pleistocene to Holocene timing of the most recent rupture on the fault. The Santa Cruz Island fault apparently represents an active seismogenic element of southern California, the recent and high rate of activity of which have not been previously recognized.

  19. Sea Level Rise in Santa Clara County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milesi, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Presentation by Cristina Milesi, First Author, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA at the "Meeting the Challenge of Sea Level Rise in Santa Clara County" on June 19, 2005 Santa Clara County, bordering with the southern portion of the San Francisco Bay, is highly vulnerable to flooding and to sea level rise (SLR). In this presentation, the latest sea level rise projections for the San Francisco Bay will be discussed in the context of extreme water height frequency and extent of flooding vulnerability. I will also present preliminary estimations of levee requirements and possible mitigation through tidal restoration of existing salt ponds. The examples will draw mainly from the work done by the NASA Climate Adaptation Science Investigators at NASA Ames.

  20. Structural development in the Santa Catharina meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, R. S., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A metallographic study was undertaken to seek support for the idea that Santa Catharina is really massive cloudy taenite. Available metal-rich nuggets of Santa Catharina appear to have been single crystals of taenite in the few centimeter size range, separated from each other by grain boundaries occupied by troilite and schreibersite. Metallographic and electron microprobe data allow one to postulate the following cooling and structural development history: (1) single crystal taenite formed at high temperature; (2) phosphate formed within the taenite and grain boundary schreibersite formed at interfaces with troilite or with other taenite crystals; (3) schreibersite began to precipitate within taenite at about 650 C; (4) at about 450 C the meteorite entered the three phase field at which point kamacite precipitated and started growing; and (5) kamacite/schreibersite interface measurements indicate that cooling continued down to about 350 C, with large Ni diffusion gradients developing within schreibersites.

  1. Late quaternary depositional systems and sea level change-Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins, California continental borderland

    SciTech Connect

    Nardin, T.R.

    1983-07-01

    A suite of seismic reflection data that provides different degrees of resolution and penetration was used to map the depositional systems that have developed in Santa Monica and San Pedro basins during the late Quaternary. Submarine fan growth, particularly at the mouths of Hueneme and Redondo Canyons, has been the dominant mode of basin filling. Mass movement processes, ranging from creep to large-scale catastrophic slumping, have been important locally. In general, large-scale fan growth fits Normark's model in which the suprafan is the primary locus of coarse sediment deposition. Smaller scale morphologic and depositional patterns on the Hueneme and Redondo fans (e.g., distributary channels and coarse sediment concentrations basinward of the inner suprafan) suggest that a significant amount of coarse sediment presently bypasses the suprafans, however. Long-distance coarse sediment transport was particularly pronounced during late Wisconsinan lowstand of sea level and resulted in progradation of lower mid-fan and lower fan deposits.

  2. Humans, Tectonics and Climate, Changing S2S Systems over Time: Waipaoa River Margin Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehl, S. A.; Alexander, C. R.; Corbett, D. R.; Harris, C. K.; Ogston, A. S.; Orpin, A. R.; Walsh, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Recent interdisciplinary studies of the Waipaoa River margin, New Zealand North Island, provide a clear picture of human and natural signal propagation and preservation in Holocene and contemporary sedimentary sequences of the continental shelf and slope. This active margin setting presents both extraordinary high sediment yields and high sediment accommodation which are controlled, in part, by tectonic uplift and deformation. Unlike many passive margins, the resulting sediment deposits on the Waipaoa shelf and slope provide a high-resolution record of changing climate and landscape since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Giant piston cores collected using the Marion Dufresne reveal definitive textural and carbon isotopic downcore trends that clearly reflect the transgressive and regressive phases of relative sea-level since the LGM. Moreover, A distinct coarsening in sediment texture around 3ka reflects the intensification of the El Nino Southern Oscillation in the western Pacific Ocean at that time, either through increased landsliding caused by enhanced precipitation, or by higher significant wave heights and resuspension that may have accompanied increased cyclonic storm activity. A distinct signature of fine sediment in the upper sections of the Marion Dufresne cores is thought to herald the Anthropocene period, reflecting deforestation and an increase both in sediment load and the release of fine sediment from the catchment from runaway gully formation. Sediment budgets indicate that whereas the continental shelf off the Waipaoa was a very efficient sediment trap during much of the Holocene, the Anthropocene is marked by the dominance of off- and along-shelf sediment escape. Contemporary sediment transport studies, seabed observations and modeling suggest a strong disconnect with average Holocene dispersal patterns, with much sediment currently escaping along the shelf to the north. It appears that this dramatic shift in sediment dispersal on the Waipaoa margin

  3. Denitrification and flushing of the Santa Barbara Basin bottom waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goericke, Ralf; Bograd, Steven J.; Grundle, Damian S.

    2015-02-01

    The sediments of the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) are an important paleoecological resource since their structure reflects the oxygenation of the bottom waters and the quality and quantity of the particulate matter which is sequestered to the bottom of the basin. These properties are controlled by regional atmospheric and oceanic climate. The California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) program has been monitoring the bottom waters of the SBB on a regular basis since 1986. Over the last decade, properties of SBB bottom waters have undergone dramatic changes: low concentrations of nitrate were observed more frequently and concentrations of nitrite, at times, reached values of 7 μM, in contrast to maximum concentrations of 0.2 μM observed during the earlier time period. Here we study the links between regional climate and conditions at the bottom of the SBB by relating recent changes in bottom water chemistry to local and regional forcing of the basin. Varying rates of primary production of the overlying water or rates of export production were not significantly related to the observed biogeochemical changes in the basin. Rather, the frequency or rate of flushing, as inferred from phosphate concentration changes at the bottom of the basin, and decreasing concentrations of oxygen in the waters outside the basins could be related to the observed changes. The episodic more than 10-fold increases of nitrite in the bottom waters likely represent a tipping point in the biogeochemical system driven by decreasing concentrations of oxygen in the bottom waters.

  4. Multiple uplift phases inferred from the Southwest African Atlantic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Cacace, Mauro; Dressel, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    The South Atlantic basins offshore Namibia and South Africa stored more than 10 km thick sedimentary successions that are separated by major unconformities into several sequences. These sedimentary units rest on a thinned continental crust of a magmatic passive margin. Using a 3D forward modelling approach considering flexural compensation of a rheologically differentiated lithosphere in response to sedimentary loading after stretching on one hand and the thermal feed-back between cooling of the stretched lithosphere and insulating sediments on the other hand we derive quantitative estimates on how vertical movements have influenced the margin after stretching. The approach combines the consideration of observations on sediment configuration as well as on crustal thickness (ß-factor) with the process of lithosphere thinning and subsequent thermal re-equilibration. These estimates are conservative estimates as they are based on the preserved sediments only whereas eroded sediments are not considered. Nevertheless, the approach considers thermo-mechanical coupling in 3D and both initial conditions as well as sedimentary history are constrained by observations. Specific effects include the delayed thermal re-equilibration of the thinned lithosphere due to deposition of insulating sediments and the related thermal feedback on lithosphere rheology and therefore on the flexural response to sediment loading. Our results indicate that in addition to predominantly continuous subsidence also phases of uplift have affected the southwestern African margin during the syn-rift and post-rift evolution. The spatio-temporal variation of vertical movements is controlled by the amount of initial thinning of the lithosphere, the variation of rheological characteristics (lithology and temperature) but also by the distribution of sediment supply (loading and thermal insulation).

  5. California State Waters Map Series—Offshore of Santa Cruz, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Dartnell, Peter; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Greene, H. Gary; Dieter, Bryan E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Endris, Charles A.; Watt, Janet T.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Maier, Katherine L.; Krigsman, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Offshore of Santa Cruz map area is located in central California, on the Pacific Coast about 98 km south of San Francisco. The city of Santa Cruz (population, about 63,000), the largest incorporated city in the map area and the county seat of Santa Cruz County, lies on uplifted marine terraces between the shoreline and the northwest-trending Santa Cruz Mountains, part of California’s Coast Ranges. All of California’s State Waters in the map area is part of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.The map area is cut by an offshore section of the San Gregorio Fault Zone, and it lies about 20 kilometers southwest of the San Andreas Fault Zone. Regional folding and uplift along the coast has been attributed to a westward bend in the San Andreas Fault Zone and to right-lateral movement along the San Gregorio Fault Zone. Most of the coastal zone is characterized by low, rocky cliffs and sparse, small pocket beaches backed by low, terraced hills. Point Santa Cruz, which forms the north edge of Monterey Bay, provides protection for the beaches in the easternmost part of the map area by sheltering them from the predominantly northwesterly waves.The shelf in the map area is underlain by variable amounts (0 to 25 m) of

  6. Geology and tsunamigenic potential of submarine landslides in Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Normark, W.R.; Greene, H. Gary; Lee, H.J.; Sliter, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    A large submarine landslide complex and four small landslides developed under the Santa Barbara Channel, suggesting a potential hazard from landslide-generated tsunamis. We integrate offshore stratigraphy and geologic structure, multibeam bathymetric information, and several kinds of seismic-reflection data to understand how and when the submarine landslides formed. Seismic-reflection data show that mass failure along the slope began at least 200 ka ago. Landslides appear as zones of poor reflectivity having an irregular upper surface, and these zones alternate vertically with strong parallel reflections. The emplacement ages of two of the three main landslide lobes are well established at 8 and 10 ka. The source material for the youngest part of the landslide complex was sediment of probable late Pleistocene and Holocene age that accumulated in a shelf-edge delta. Directly under this delta, growth of faults and anticlines was particularly intense and tended to oversteepen the deltaic deposits. These active structures also formed migration pathways and reservoirs for aqueous and hydrocarbon fluids from the deep basin. Tsunami deposits have been described from a low-lying area near Santa Barbara, and numerical modeling of tsunamis generated by hypothetical landslides in Santa Barbara Channel indicates a moderate to severe threat [Borrero, J.C., Dolan, J.F. and Synolakis, C.E., 2001. Tsunamis within the eastern Santa Barbara Channel. Geophys. Res. Lett., 28(4): 643-646.], involving wave runups of 2-20 m, for a range of assumed landslide volumes. Inundation from these waves, however, is expected to be highly focused so that only narrow (???10-km) sections of the shoreline would be affected. Crown Copyright ?? 2005 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. East Africa continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Bosellini, A.

    1986-01-01

    New well data from Somalia, together with the history of sea-floor spreading in the Indian Ocean derived from magnetic anomalies, show that the East African margins from latitude 15/sup 0/S into the Gulf of Aden comprise four distinct segments that formed successively by the southward drift of Madagascar from Somalia during the Middle to Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, by the northeastward drift of India along the Owen Transform during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene, and by the opening of the Gulf of Aden during the Neogene.

  8. Amphetamine margin in sports

    SciTech Connect

    Laties, V.G.; Weiss, B.

    1981-10-01

    The amphetamines can enhance athletic performance. That much seem clear from the literature, some of which is reviewed here. Increases in endurance have been demonstrated in both humans and rats. Smith and Beecher, 20 years ago, showed improvement of running, swimming, and weight throwing in highly trained athletes. Laboratory analogs of such performances have also been used and similar enhancement demonstrated. The amount of change induced by the amphetamines is usually small, of the order of a few percent. Nevertheless, since a fraction of a percent improvement can make the difference between fame and oblivion, the margin conferred by these drugs can be quite important.

  9. Structural Margins Assessment Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    A general approach to the structural design and verification used to determine the structural margins of the space vehicle elements under Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) management is described. The Space Shuttle results and organization will be used as illustrations for techniques discussed. Given also are: (1) the system analyses performed or to be performed by, and (2) element analyses performed by MSFC and its contractors. Analysis approaches and their verification will be addressed. The Shuttle procedures are general in nature and apply to other than Shuttle space vehicles.

  10. Ocean Margins Programs, Phase I research summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Verity, P.

    1994-08-01

    During FY 1992, the DOE restructured its regional coastal-ocean programs into a new Ocean Margins Program (OMP), to: Quantify the ecological and biogeochemical processes and mechanisms that affect the cycling, flux, and storage of carbon and other biogenic elements at the land/ocean interface; Define ocean-margin sources and sinks in global biogeochemical cycles, and; Determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or export to the interior ocean. Currently, the DOE Ocean Margins Program supports more than 70 principal and co-principal investigators, spanning more than 30 academic institutions. Research funded by the OMP amounted to about $6.9M in FY 1994. This document is a collection of abstracts summarizing the component projects of Phase I of the OMP. This phase included both research and technology development, and comprised projects of both two and three years duration. The attached abstracts describe the goals, methods, measurement scales, strengths and limitations, and status of each project, and level of support. Keywords are provided to index the various projects. The names, addresses, affiliations, and major areas of expertise of the investigators are provided in appendices.

  11. Radial gravitational gliding on passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobbold, P. R.; Szatmari, P.

    1991-03-01

    Gravitational gliding of uppermost sediments down a passive margin is possible if there is a basal layer of evaporite or other soft material to allow detachment. In examples from the Gulf of Mexico and the Brazilian margin, gliding has produced three main structural domains: an uppermost domain of downdip extension; an intermediate domain of rigid gliding; and a lowermost domain of downdip contraction. Domain boundaries are established by changes in slope. In this paper, we examine three kinds of gravitational gliding, depending on the paths followed by material particles. In ideal parallel gliding, particle paths are parallel straight lines, trending downslope. This should occur where the margin is perfectly straight. In ideal radial gliding, particle paths are radii of a circle and the margin is shaped like a circular cone. Natural margins will not have ideal shapes; but divergent gliding will tend to occur off coastal salients; convergent gliding, off coastal re-entrants. A simple kinematic model based on ductile behaviour illustrates some essential features of radial gliding. Changes in radius during divergent gliding produce strike-parallel extension; during convergent gliding, they produce strike-parallel contraction. Vertical strains also differ. Divergent gliding produces an uppermost domain of strong vertical thinning, balanced by extensions in all horizontal directions. Similarly, convergent gliding produces a lowermost domain of strong vertical thickening, balanced by contractions in all horizontal directions. These deformed states cannot be restored by simple techniques based on section balancing. We have done three experiments using analogue materials: sand, to model the brittle behaviour of sediments; silicone putty, to model the ductile behaviour of basal layers of evaporite. The experiments were properly scaled to account for gravitational forces. Experiment I reproduced convergent gliding above a basement with a conical upper surface. Strike

  12. Surface sediment analysis and modern sedimentation rates in Flandres Bay, Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Y. P.; Wellner, J. S.; Mead, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Flandres Bay is located on the west side of the Antarctic Peninsula, where temperatures have risen more than the global average over the last century and where many glaciers have shown signs of retreat in recent decades. The Antarctic Ice Cap drains through tidewater glaciers that flow into bays around the peninsula. In this study, multibeam swath bathymetry data, seismic profiles, and sediment cores were used to determine the distribution of surface sediment types and modern sedimentation rates and compare these to the sediment accumulation down core. The bathymetry of the fjord includes small basins with flat bottoms, highly irregular seamounts, and deep channels in the bedrock as well as subglacial geomorphic features carved by the flow of glaciers. Results of sediment analysis show a variation in sediment type throughout the bay from pebbles with minor matrix close to the glacial calving margin to muddy diatomaceous ooze in the outer bay. Sediment accumulation rates were measured using 137 Cs counts on bulk sediment and 14 C on carbonate, usually forams, found after sieving bulk sediment. Samples for 137 Cs were taken on the top few centimeters of sediment cores and show a higher rate of sediment accumulation compared to rates calculated using 14 C, which measures millennial scale accumulation rates to the base of the core. Density logs of the sediment cores have relatively consistent values, indicating that the change in calculated accumulation rates is not simply due to compaction. As predicted, accumulation rates are higher close to the glaciers, where there is a high occurrence of ice rafted debris and dropstones; the sedimentation rates decrease away from the source and sediment analysis shows an increase in the biogenic component in the sediment, especially diatoms, in the outer bay. Other fjords adjacent to Flandres Bay, including Beascochea to the south, show similar trends of increasing rates of sediment accumulation in the upper portions of cores. In

  13. Sedimentary loading, lithospheric flexure and subduction initiation at passive margins

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.G. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Recent theoretical models have demonstrated the difficulty of subduction initiation at passive margins, whether subduction is assumed to initiate by overcoming the shear resistance on a thrust fault through the lithosphere or by failure of the entire lithosphere in bending due to sedimentary loading. A mechanism for subduction initiation at passive margins that overcomes these difficulties incorporates the increased subsidence of a marginal basin during decoupling of a previously locked margin. A passive margin may decouple by reactivation of rift-related faults in a local extensional or strike-slip setting. Flexure of marginal basins by sedimentary loading is modeled here by the bending of infinite and semi-infinite elastic plates under a triangular load. The geometry of a mature marginal basin fits the deflection produced by loading of an infinite plate in which the flexural rigidity of continental lithosphere is larger than that of oceanic lithosphere. Decoupling of such a locked passive margin by fault reactivation may cause the lithospheric bending behavior of the margin to change from that of an infinite plate to that of a semi-infinite plate, with a resultant increase in deflection of the marginal basin. The increase in deflection depends on the flexural rigidities of continental and oceanic lithosphere. For flexural rigidities of 10[sup 30]-10[sup 31] dyn-cm (elastic lithosphere thicknesses 24--51 km), the difference in deflections between infinite and semi-infinite plates is 15--17 km, so that decoupling sinks the top of the oceanic lithosphere to depths of ca 35 km. Additional sedimentation within the basin and phase changes within the oceanic crust may further increase this deflection. Subduction may initiate if the top of the oceanic lithosphere sinks to the base of the adjacent elastic lithosphere.

  14. High-resolution topographic, bathymetric, and oceanographic data for the Pleasure Point Area, Santa Cruz County, California: 2005-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Collins, Brian D.; Finlayson, David P.; Golden, Nadine E.; Hatcher, Gerry A.; Kayen, Robert E.; Ruggiero, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The County of Santa Cruz Department of Public Works and the County of Santa Cruz Redevelopment Agency requested the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Coastal and Marine Geology Team (WCMG) to provide baseline geologic and oceanographic information on the coast and inner shelf at Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California. The rationale for this proposed work is a need to better understand the environmental consequences of a proposed bluff stabilization project on the beach, the nearshore and the surf at Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California. To meet these information needs, the USGS-WCMG Team collected baseline scientific information on the morphology and waves at Pleasure Point. This study provided high-resolution topography of the coastal bluffs and bathymetry of the inner shelf off East Cliff Drive between 32nd Avenue and 41st Avenue. The spatial and temporal variation in waves and their breaking patterns at the study site were documented. Although this project did not actively investigate the impacts of the proposed bluff stabilization project, these data provide the baseline information required for future studies directed toward predicting the impacts of stabilization on the sea cliffs, beach and nearshore sediment profiles, natural rock reef structures, and offshore habitats and resources. They als