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Sample records for marine photosynthetic bacterium

  1. Development of a gene cloning system for the hydrogen-producing marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp.

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, T; Matsunaga, N; Tsubaki, K; Tanaka, T

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-six strains of marine photosynthetic bacteria were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis for plasmid DNA content. Among these strains, 12 carried two to four different plasmids with sizes ranging from 3.1 to 11.0 megadaltons. The marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 had two plasmids, pRD06S and pRD06L. The smaller plasmid, pRD06S, had a molecular weight of 3.8 megadaltons and was cut at a single site by restriction endonucleases SalI, SmaI, PstI, XhoI, and BglII. Moreover, the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 containing plasmid pRD06 had a satisfactory growth rate (doubling time, 7.5 h), a hydrogen-producing rate of 0.96 mumol/mg (dry weight) of cells per h, and nitrogen fixation capability. Plasmid pRD06S, however, had neither drug resistance nor heavy-metal resistance, and its copy number was less than 10. Therefore, a recombinant plasmid consisting of pRD06S and Escherichia coli cloning vector pUC13 was constructed and cloned in E. coli. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106. As a result, Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 developed ampicillin resistance. Thus, a shuttle vector for gene transfer was constructed for marine photosynthetic bacteria. PMID:3020006

  2. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate by the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum P5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jinling; Wei, Ying; Zhao, Yupeng; Pan, Guanghua; Wang, Guangce

    2012-07-01

    The effects of different NaCl concentrations, nitrogen sources, carbon sources, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios on biomass accumulation and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production were studied in batch cultures of the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum P5 under aerobic-dark conditions. The results show that the accumulation of PHB in strain P5 is a growth-associated process. Strain P5 had maximum biomass and PHB accumulation at 2%-3% NaCl, suggesting that the bacterium can maintain growth and potentially produce PHB at natural seawater salinity. In the nitrogen source test, the maximum biomass accumulation (8.10±0.09 g/L) and PHB production (1.11±0.13 g/L and 14.62%±2.2 of the cell dry weight) were observed when peptone and ammonium chloride were used as the sole nitrogen source. NH{4/+}-N was better for PHB production than other nitrogen sources. In the carbon source test, the maximum biomass concentration (7.65±0.05 g/L) was obtained with malic acid as the sole carbon source, whereas the maximum yield of PHB (5.03±0.18 g/L and 66.93%±1.69% of the cell dry weight) was obtained with sodium pyruvate as the sole carbon source. In the carbon to nitrogen ratios test, sodium pyruvate and ammonium chloride were selected as the carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The best carbon to nitrogen molar ratio for biomass accumulation (8.77±0.58 g/L) and PHB production (6.07±0.25 g/L and 69.25%±2.05% of the cell dry weight) was 25. The results provide valuable data on the production of PHB by R. sulfidophilum P5 and further studies are on-going for best cell growth and PHB yield.

  3. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.E.; Gilbert, C.W.; Guy, R.; Arntzen, C.J.

    1984-10-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa Q/sub B/ protein of chloroplast membranes. 42 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  4. PHOTOSYNTHETIC EFFICIENCY OF MARINE PLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Yocum, C. S.; Blinks, L. R.

    1954-01-01

    Multicellular marine plants were collected from their natural habitats and the quantum efficiency of their photosynthesis was determined in the laboratory in five narrow wave length bands in the visible spectrum. The results along with estimates of the relative absorption by the various plastid pigments show a fairly uniform efficiency of 0.08 molecules O2 per absorbed quantum for (a) chlorophyll of one flowering plant, green algae, and brown algae, (b) fucoxanthol and other carotenoids of brown algae, and (c) the phycobilin pigments phycocyanin and phycoerythrin of red algae. The carotenoids of green algae are sometimes less efficient while those of red algae are largely or entirely inactive. Chlorophyll a of red algae is about one-half as efficient (φo2 = 0.04) as either the phycobilins, or the chlorophyll of most other plants. These results as well as those of high intensity and of fluorescence experiments are consistent with a mechanism in which about half the chlorophyll is inactive while the other half is fully active and is an intermediate in phycoerythrin- and phycocyanin-sensitized photosynthesis. PMID:13192311

  5. Photosynthetic carbon metabolism of a marine grass.

    PubMed

    Benedict, C R; Scott, J R

    1976-06-01

    The delta(13)C value of a tropical marine grass Thalassia testudinum is -9.04 per thousand. This value is similar to the delta(13)C value of terrestrial tropical grasses. The delta(13)C values of the organic acid fraction, the amino acid fraction, the sugar fraction, malic acid, and glucose are: -11.2 per thousand, -13.1 per thousand, -10.1 per thousand, -11.1 per thousand, and -11.5 per thousand, respectively. The delta(13)C values of malic acid and glucose of Thalassia are similar to the delta(13)C values of these intermediates in sorghum leaves and attest to the presence of the photosynthetic C(4)-dicarboxylic acid pathway in this marine grass. The inorganic HCO(3) (-) for the growth of the grass fluctuates between -6.7 to -2.7 per thousand during the day. If CO(2) fixation in Thalassia is catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (which would result in a -3 per thousand fractionation between HCO(3) (-) and malic acid), the predicted delta(13)C value for Thalassia would be -9.7 to -5.7 per thousand. This range is close to the observed range of -12.6 to -7.8 per thousand for Thalassia and agree with the operation of the C(4)-dicarboxylic acid pathway in this plant. The early products of the fixation of HCO(3) (-) in the leaf sections are malic acid and aspartic acid which are similar to the early products of CO(2) fixation in C(4) terrestrial plants.Electron microscopy of the leaves of Thalassia reveal thick walled epidermal cells exceedingly rich in mitochondria and C(3)-type chloroplasts. The mesophyll cells have many different shapes and surround air lacunae which contain O(2) and CO(2). The mesophyll cells are highly vacuolated and the parietal cytoplasm contains an occasional chloroplast. This chloroplast contains grana but the lamellar system is not as developed as the system in epidermal chloroplasts. Extensive phloem tissue is present but the xylem elements are reduced in this aquatic grass. The vascular tissue is not surrounded by bundle sheath cells

  6. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas

    PubMed Central

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7–83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9–5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed. PMID:27189983

  7. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas.

    PubMed

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7-83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9-5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed. PMID:27189983

  8. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Glucose Metabolism by Marine Bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Andrew S.; Millero, Frank J.; Gerchakov, Sol M.

    1982-01-01

    Microcalorimetric measurements of heat production from glucose by Vibrio alginolyticus were made to assess the viability of calorimetry as a technique for studying the metabolism of marine bacteria at organic nutrient concentrations found in marine waters. The results show that the metabolism of glucose by this bacterium can be measured by calorimetry at submicromolar concentrations. A linear correlation between glucose concentration and total heat production was observed over a concentration range of 8 mM to 0.35 μM. It is suggested that these data indicate a constant efficiency of metabolism for this bacterium over the wide range of glucose concentrations studied. PMID:16346131

  9. Nobel lecture. The photosynthetic reaction centre from the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis.

    PubMed Central

    Deisenhofer, J; Michel, H

    1989-01-01

    In our lectures we first describe the history and methods of membrane protein crystallization, before we show how the structure of the photosynthetic reaction centre from the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis was solved. Then the structure of this membrane protein complex is correlated with its function as a light-driven electron pump across the photosynthetic membrane. Finally we draw conclusions on the structure of the photosystem II reaction centre from plants and discuss the aspects of membrane protein structure. Sections 1 (crystallization), 4 (conclusions on the structure of photosystem II reaction centre and evolutionary aspects) and 5 (aspects of membrane protein structure) were presented and written by H.M., Sections 2 (determination of the structure) and 3 (structure and function) by J.D. We have arranged the paper in this way in order to facilitate continuous reading. Images PMID:2676514

  10. Marine transducing bacteriophage attacking a luminous bacterium.

    PubMed

    Keynan, A; Nealson, K; Sideropoulos, H; Hastings, J W

    1974-08-01

    The isolation and partial characterization of a marine bacteriophage attacking a strain of luminous bacteria is described, including some physical, biological, and genetic properties. It is a DNA phage of density of 1.52 with a long flexible tail and an apparently icosohedral head. With respect to stability in suspension, it has a rather specific requirement for the sodium ion in high concentration; it is further stabilized by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions. These same ions are likewise all required for both good plating efficiency and plaque uniformity. Although it goes through a typical lytic growth cycle (about 45 min), with a burst size of 100, and no stable lysogens have been isolated, it is nevertheless a transducing phage specifically for the tryptophan region, transducing several, but not all, independently isolated Trp(-) auxotrophs to protrophy. No other auxotrophs of a variety of amino acids were transduced by this phage to prototrophy. Phage infection does not change the normal expression of the luminescent system, and light remains at near normal levels until cell lysis occurs. PMID:16789143

  11. Cytochromes c biogenesis in a photosynthetic bacterium requires a periplasmic thioredoxin-like protein.

    PubMed Central

    Beckman, D L; Kranz, R G

    1993-01-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus is a Gram-negative photosynthetic bacterium that requires c-type cytochromes for photosynthetic electron transport. Our studies demonstrate that the gene helX is required for the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes in R. capsulatus. A helX chromosomal deletion mutant cannot grow photosynthetically, due to a deficiency of all c-type cytochromes. The predicted amino acid sequence of the helX gene product (176 residues) is related to that of thioredoxin and shares active-site homology with protein disulfide isomerase. Cytochrome c2-alkaline phosphatase gene fusions are used to show that HelX is not required for the transcription, translation, or secretion of apocytochrome c2. HelX-alkaline phosphatase and HelX-beta-galactosidase gene fusions are used to demonstrate that HelX is a periplasmic protein, which is consistent with the presence of a typical signal sequence in HelX. Based on these results, we propose HelX functions as a periplasmic disulfide oxidoreductase that is essential for cytochromes c biogenesis. This role is in accordance with the observation that both heme and the cysteines of apocytochromes c (Cys-Xaa-Yaa-Cys-His) must be in the reduced state for covalent linkage between the two moieties to occur. PMID:8384715

  12. The terminal oxidase in the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617.

    PubMed

    Simpson, H; Denis, M; Malatesta, F

    1997-06-01

    The molecular properties of a novel membrane quinol oxidase from the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617 are presented. The protein contains 2b hemes/mole which may be distinguished by EPR spectroscopy but not by optical spectroscopy and electrochemistry. Respiration, though being cyanide insensitive, is not inhibited by carbon monoxide and oxygen reduction is carried out only half-way with production of hydrogen peroxide. The terminal oxidase represents, therefore, a unique example in the large family of terminal oxidases known up to date. PMID:9337488

  13. Decoherence dynamics of coherent electronic excited states in the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xian-Ting; Zhang, Wei-Min; Zhuo, Yi-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical description to the quantum coherence and decoherence phenomena of energy transfer in photosynthesis observed in a recent experiment [Science 316, 1462 (2007)]. As a successive two-color laser pulses with selected frequencies cast on a sample of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rb. sphaeroides two resonant excitations of electrons in chromophores can be generated. However, this effective two-level subsystem will interact with its protein environment and decoherence is inevitable. We describe this subsystem coupled with its environment as a dynamical spin-boson model. The non-Markovian decoherence dynamics is described using a quasiadiabatic propagator path integral (QUAPI) approach. With the photon-induced effective time-dependent level splitting energy and level flip coupling coefficient between the two excited states and the environment-induced non-Markovian decoherence dynamics, our theoretical result is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Purification and characterization of the alternative nitrogenase from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R; Lehman, L; Petrovich, R; Shah, V K; Roberts, G P; Ludden, P W

    1996-01-01

    The alternative nitrogenase from a nifH mutant of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum has been purified and characterized. The dinitrogenase protein (ANF1) contains three subunits in an apparent alpha2beta2gamma2 structure and contains Fe but no Mo or V. A factor capable of activating apo-dinitrogenase (lacking the FeMo cofactor) from Azotobacter vinelandii was extracted from the alternative dinitrogenase protein with N-methylformamide. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal of the dinitrogenase protein is not characteristic of the EPR signals of molybdenum- or vanadium-containing dinitrogenases. The alternative dinitrogenase reductase (ANF2) was purified as an alpha2 dimer containing an Fe4S4 cluster and exhibited an EPR spectrum characteristic of dinitrogenase reductases. The enzyme complex reduces protons to H2 very well but reduces N2 to ammonium poorly. Acetylene is reduced to a mixture of ethylene and ethane. PMID:8631723

  15. Native Mass Spectrometry Characterizes the Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex from the Purple Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Harrington, Lucas B.; Lu, Yue; Prado, Mindy; Saer, Rafael; Rempel, Don; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) is an emerging approach to study protein complexes in their near-native states and to elucidate their stoichiometry and topology. Here, we report a native MS study of the membrane-embedded reaction center (RC) protein complex from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The membrane-embedded RC protein complex is stabilized by detergent micelles in aqueous solution, directly introduced into a mass spectrometer by nano-electrospray (nESI), and freed of detergents and dissociated in the gas phase by collisional activation. As the collision energy is increased, the chlorophyll pigments are gradually released from the RC complex, suggesting that native MS introduces a near-native structure that continues to bind pigments. Two bacteriochlorophyll a pigments remain tightly bound to the RC protein at the highest collision energy. The order of pigment release and their resistance to release by gas-phase activation indicates the strength of pigment interaction in the RC complex. This investigation sets the stage for future native MS studies of membrane-embedded photosynthetic pigment-protein and related complexes.

  16. A cambialistic superoxide dismutase in the thermophilic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Vanessa L; LoBrutto, Russell; Selvaraj, Fabiyola M; Blankenship, Robert E

    2004-06-01

    Superoxide dismutase from the thermophilic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was cloned, purified, and characterized. This protein is in the manganese- and iron-containing family of superoxide dismutases and is able to use both manganese and iron catalytically. This appears to be the only soluble superoxide dismutase in C. aurantiacus. Iron and manganese cofactors were identified by using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. By metal enrichment of growth media and by performing metal fidelity studies, the enzyme was found to be most efficient with manganese incorporated, yet up to 30% of the activity was retained with iron. Assimilation of iron or manganese ions into superoxide dismutase was also found to be affected by the growth conditions. This enzyme was also found to be remarkably thermostable and was resistant to H2O2 at concentrations up to 80 mM. Reactive oxygen defense mechanisms have not been previously characterized in the organisms belonging to the phylum Chloroflexi. These systems are of interest in C. aurantiacus since this bacterium lives in a hyperoxic environment and is subject to high UV radiation fluxes. PMID:15150226

  17. The Protective Roles of the Antioxidant Enzymes Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase in the Green Photosynthetic Bacterium Chloroflexus Aurantiacus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Robert E.; Rothschild, Lynn (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the biochemical response of the green thermophilic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus to oxidative stress. Lab experiments focused primarily on characterizing the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and the response of this organism to oxidative stress. Experiments in the field at the hotsprings in Yellowstone National Park focused on the changes in the level of these enzymes during the day in response to oxidants and to the different types of ultraviolet radiation.

  18. Rhodobase, a meta-analytical tool for reconstructing gene regulatory networks in a model photosynthetic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Moskvin, Oleg V; Bolotin, Dmitry; Wang, Andrew; Ivanov, Pavel S; Gomelsky, Mark

    2011-02-01

    We present Rhodobase, a web-based meta-analytical tool for analysis of transcriptional regulation in a model anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The gene association meta-analysis is based on the pooled data from 100 of R. sphaeroides whole-genome DNA microarrays. Gene-centric regulatory networks were visualized using the StarNet approach (Jupiter, D.C., VanBuren, V., 2008. A visual data mining tool that facilitates reconstruction of transcription regulatory networks. PLoS ONE 3, e1717) with several modifications. We developed a means to identify and visualize operons and superoperons. We designed a framework for the cross-genome search for transcription factor binding sites that takes into account high GC-content and oligonucleotide usage profile characteristic of the R. sphaeroides genome. To facilitate reconstruction of directional relationships between co-regulated genes, we screened upstream sequences (-400 to +20bp from start codons) of all genes for putative binding sites of bacterial transcription factors using a self-optimizing search method developed here. To test performance of the meta-analysis tools and transcription factor site predictions, we reconstructed selected nodes of the R. sphaeroides transcription factor-centric regulatory matrix. The test revealed regulatory relationships that correlate well with the experimentally derived data. The database of transcriptional profile correlations, the network visualization engine and the optimized search engine for transcription factor binding sites analysis are available at http://rhodobase.org. PMID:21070832

  19. Characterisation of the LH2 spectral variants produced by the photosynthetic purple sulphur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Picken, Nichola; Honkanen, Suvi; Kelly, Sharon; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Blankenship, Robert E; Shimizu, Yuuki; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-11-01

    This study systematically investigated the different types of LH2 produced by Allochromatium (Alc.) vinosum, a photosynthetic purple sulphur bacterium, in response to variations in growth conditions. Three different spectral forms of LH2 were isolated and purified, the B800-820, B800-840 and B800-850 LH2 types, all of which exhibit an unusual split 800 peak in their low temperature absorption spectra. However, it is likely that more forms are also present. Relatively more B800-820 and B800-840 are produced under low light conditions, while relatively more B800-850 is produced under high light conditions. Polypeptide compositions of the three different LH2 types were determined by a combination of HPLC and TOF/MS. The B800-820, B800-840 and B800-850 LH2 types all have a heterogeneous polypeptide composition, containing multiple types of both α and β polypeptides, and differ in their precise polypeptide composition. They all have a mixed carotenoid composition, containing carotenoids of the spirilloxanthin series. In all cases the most abundant carotenoid is rhodopin; however, there is a shift towards carotenoids with a higher conjugation number in LH2 complexes produced under low light conditions. CD spectroscopy, together with the polypeptide analysis, demonstrates that these Alc. vinosum LH2 complexes are more closely related to the LH2 complex from Phs. molischianum than they are to the LH2 complexes from Rps. acidophila. PMID:25111749

  20. Denitrification characteristics of a marine origin psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyan; Liu, Ying; Sun, Guangdong; Gao, Xiyan; Zhang, Qingling; Liu, Zhipei

    2011-01-01

    A psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium, strain S1-1, was isolated from a biological aerated filter conducted for treatment of recirculating water in a marine aquaculture system. Strain S1-1 was preliminarily identified as Psychrobacter sp. based on the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, which showed 100% sequence similarity to that of Psychrobacter sp. TSBY-70. Strain S1-1 grew well either in high nitrate or high nitrite conditions with a removal of 100% nitrate or 63.50% nitrite, and the total nitrogen removal rates could reach to 46.48% and 31.89%, respectively. The results indicated that nitrate was mainly reduced in its logarithmic growth phase with a very low level accumulation of nitrite, suggesting that the aerobic denitrification process of strain S1-1 occurred mainly in this phase. The GC-MS results showed that N2O was formed as the major intermediate during the aerobic denitrifying process of strain S1-1. Finally, factors affecting the growth of strain S1-1 and its aerobic denitrifying ability were also investigated. Results showed that the optimum aerobic denitrification conditions for strain S1-1 were sodium succinate as carbon source, C/N ratio15, salinity 10 g/L NaCl, incubation temperature 20 degrees C and initial pH 6.5. PMID:22432315

  1. Induction and anisotropy of fluorescence of reaction center from photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Sipka, Gábor; Maróti, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Submillisecond dark-light changes of the yield (induction) and anisotropy of fluorescence under laser diode excitation were measured in the photosynthetic reaction center of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Narrow band (1-2 nm) laser diodes emitting at 808 and 865 nm were used to selectively excite the accessory bacteriochlorophyll (B, 800 nm) or the upper excitonic state of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P-, 810 nm) and the lower excitonic state of the dimer (P+, 865 nm), respectively. The fluorescence spectrum of the wild type showed two bands centered at 850 nm (B) and 910 nm (P-). While the monotonous decay of the fluorescence yield at 910 nm tracked the light-induced oxidation of the dimer, the kinetics of the fluorescence yield at 850 nm showed an initial rise before a decrease. The anisotropy of the fluorescence excited at 865 nm (P-) was very close to the limiting value (0.4) across the whole spectral range. The excitation of both B and P- at 808 nm resulted in wavelength-dependent depolarization of the fluorescence from 0.35 to 0.24 in the wild type and from 0.30 to 0.24 in the reaction center of triple mutant (L131LH-M160LH-M197FH). The additivity law of the anisotropies of the fluorescence species accounts for the wavelength dependence of the anisotropy. The measured fluorescence yields and anisotropies are interpreted in terms of very fast energy transfer from (1)B* to (1)P- (either directly or indirectly by internal conversion from (1)P+) and to the oxidized dimer. PMID:25698106

  2. High-level production of the industrial product lycopene by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Shu; Grammel, Hartmut; Abou-Aisha, Khaled; Sägesser, Rudolf; Ghosh, Robin

    2012-10-01

    The biosynthesis of the major carotenoid spirilloxanthin by the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum is thought to occur via a linear pathway proceeding through phytoene and, later, lycopene as intermediates. This assumption is based solely on early chemical evidence (B. H. Davies, Biochem. J. 116:93-99, 1970). In most purple bacteria, the desaturation of phytoene, catalyzed by the enzyme phytoene desaturase (CrtI), leads to neurosporene, involving only three dehydrogenation steps and not four as in the case of lycopene. We show here that the chromosomal insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette into the crtC-crtD region of the partial carotenoid gene cluster, whose gene products are responsible for the downstream processing of lycopene, leads to the accumulation of the latter as the major carotenoid. We provide spectroscopic and biochemical evidence that in vivo, lycopene is incorporated into the light-harvesting complex 1 as efficiently as the methoxylated carotenoids spirilloxanthin (in the wild type) and 3,4,3',4'-tetrahydrospirilloxanthin (in a crtD mutant), both under semiaerobic, chemoheterotrophic, and photosynthetic, anaerobic conditions. Quantitative growth experiments conducted in dark, semiaerobic conditions, using a growth medium for high cell density and high intracellular membrane levels, which are suitable for the conventional industrial production in the absence of light, yielded lycopene at up to 2 mg/g (dry weight) of cells or up to 15 mg/liter of culture. These values are comparable to those of many previously described Escherichia coli strains engineered for lycopene production. This study provides the first genetic proof that the R. rubrum CrtI produces lycopene exclusively as an end product. PMID:22865070

  3. High-Level Production of the Industrial Product Lycopene by the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Shu; Grammel, Hartmut; Abou-Aisha, Khaled; Sägesser, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the major carotenoid spirilloxanthin by the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum is thought to occur via a linear pathway proceeding through phytoene and, later, lycopene as intermediates. This assumption is based solely on early chemical evidence (B. H. Davies, Biochem. J. 116:93–99, 1970). In most purple bacteria, the desaturation of phytoene, catalyzed by the enzyme phytoene desaturase (CrtI), leads to neurosporene, involving only three dehydrogenation steps and not four as in the case of lycopene. We show here that the chromosomal insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette into the crtC-crtD region of the partial carotenoid gene cluster, whose gene products are responsible for the downstream processing of lycopene, leads to the accumulation of the latter as the major carotenoid. We provide spectroscopic and biochemical evidence that in vivo, lycopene is incorporated into the light-harvesting complex 1 as efficiently as the methoxylated carotenoids spirilloxanthin (in the wild type) and 3,4,3′,4′-tetrahydrospirilloxanthin (in a crtD mutant), both under semiaerobic, chemoheterotrophic, and photosynthetic, anaerobic conditions. Quantitative growth experiments conducted in dark, semiaerobic conditions, using a growth medium for high cell density and high intracellular membrane levels, which are suitable for the conventional industrial production in the absence of light, yielded lycopene at up to 2 mg/g (dry weight) of cells or up to 15 mg/liter of culture. These values are comparable to those of many previously described Escherichia coli strains engineered for lycopene production. This study provides the first genetic proof that the R. rubrum CrtI produces lycopene exclusively as an end product. PMID:22865070

  4. Transcriptional response of the photoheterotrophic marine bacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae to changing light regimes

    PubMed Central

    Tomasch, Jürgen; Gohl, Regina; Bunk, Boyke; Diez, Maria Suarez; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis (AAP) is an important mechanism of energy generation in aquatic habitats, accounting for up to 5% of the surface ocean's photosynthetic electron transport. We used Dinoroseobacter shibae, a representative of the globally abundant marine Roseobacter clade, as a model organism to study the transcriptional response of a photoheterotrophic bacterium to changing light regimes. Continuous cultivation of D. shibae in a chemostat in combination with time series microarray analysis was used in order to identify gene-regulatory patterns after switching from dark to light and vice versa. The change from heterotrophic growth in the dark to photoheterotrophic growth in the light was accompanied by a strong but transient activation of a broad stress response to the formation of singlet oxygen, an immediate downregulation of photosynthesis-related genes, fine-tuning of the expression of ETC components, as well as upregulation of the transcriptional and translational apparatus. Furthermore, our data suggest that D. shibae might use the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle for CO2 fixation. Analysis of the transcriptome dynamics after switching from light to dark showed relatively small changes and a delayed activation of photosynthesis gene expression, indicating that, except for light other signals must be involved in their regulation. Providing the first analysis of AAP on the level of transcriptome dynamics, our data allow the formulation of testable hypotheses on the cellular processes affected by AAP and the mechanisms involved in light- and stress-related gene regulation. PMID:21654848

  5. A global perspective on marine photosynthetic picoeukaryote community structure

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, Amy R; Lepère, Cécile; Jardillier, Ludwig E; Not, Fabrice; Bouman, Heather; Mead, Andrew; Scanlan, David J

    2013-01-01

    A central goal in ecology is to understand the factors affecting the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of microorganisms and the underlying processes causing differences in community structure and composition. However, little is known in this respect for photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPEs), algae that are now recognised as major players in marine CO2 fixation. Here, we analysed dot blot hybridisation and cloning–sequencing data, using the plastid-encoded 16S rRNA gene, from seven research cruises that encompassed all four ocean biomes. We provide insights into global abundance, α- and β-diversity distribution and the environmental factors shaping PPE community structure and composition. At the class level, the most commonly encountered PPEs were Prymnesiophyceae and Chrysophyceae. These taxa displayed complementary distribution patterns, with peak abundances of Prymnesiophyceae and Chrysophyceae in waters of high (25:1) or low (12:1) nitrogen:phosphorus (N:P) ratio, respectively. Significant differences in phylogenetic composition of PPEs were demonstrated for higher taxonomic levels between ocean basins, using Unifrac analyses of clone library sequence data. Differences in composition were generally greater between basins (interbasins) than within a basin (intrabasin). These differences were primarily linked to taxonomic variation in the composition of Prymnesiophyceae and Prasinophyceae whereas Chrysophyceae were phylogenetically similar in all libraries. These data provide better knowledge of PPE community structure across the world ocean and are crucial in assessing their evolution and contribution to CO2 fixation, especially in the context of global climate change. PMID:23364354

  6. Isotope effects associated with the anaerobic oxidation of sulfite and thiosulfate by the photosynthetic bacterium, Chromatium vinosum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The purple photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium vinosum, strain D, catalyzes several oxidations of reduced sulfur compounds under anaerobic conditions in the light: e.g., sulfide --> sulfur --> sulfate, sulfite --> sulfate, and thiosulfate --> sulfur + sulfate. Here it is shown that no sulfur isotope effect is associated with the last of these processes; isotopic compositions of the sulfur and sulfate produced can differ, however, if the sulfane and sulfonate positions within the thiosulfate have different isotopic compositions. In the second process, an observed change from an inverse to a normal isotope effect during oxidation of sulfite may indicate the operation of 2 enzymatic pathways. In contrast to heterotrophic anaerobic reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds, anaerobic oxidations of inorganic sulfur compounds by photosynthetic bacteria are characterized by relatively small isotope effects.

  7. Photosynthetic inhibition and oxidative stress to the toxic Phaeocystis globosa caused by a diketopiperazine isolated from products of algicidal bacterium metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shuo; Hu, Xiaoli; Yin, Pinghe; Zhao, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Algicidal bacteria have been turned out to be available for inhibiting Phaeocystis globosa which frequently caused harmful algal blooms and threatened to economic development and ecological balance. A marine bacterium Bacillus sp. Ts-12 exhibited significant algicidal activity against P. globosa by indirect attack. In present study, an algicidal compound was isolated by silica gel column, Sephadex G-15 column and HPLC, further identified as hexahydropyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine-1,4-dione, cyclo-(Pro-Gly), by GC-MS and (1)H-NMR. Cyclo-(Pro-Gly) significantly increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within P. globosa cells, further activating the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA). The increase in methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content showed that the surplus ROS induced lipid peroxidation on membrane system. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and flow cytometry (FCM) analysis revealed that cyclo-(Pro-Gly) caused reduction of Chl-a content, destruction of cell membrane integrity, chloroplasts and nuclear structure. Real-time PCR assay showed that the transcriptions of photosynthesis related genes (psbA, psbD, rbcL) were significantly inhibited. This study indicated that cyclo-(Pro-Gly) from marine Bacillus sp. Ts-12 exerted photosynthetic inhibition and oxidative stress to P. globosa and eventually led to the algal cells lysis. This algicidal compound might be potential bio-agent for controlling P. globosa red tide. PMID:27095455

  8. Identification, isolation, and sequence of the reaction center protein genes of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata

    SciTech Connect

    Hearst, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Reaction centers in photosynthetic membranes are the centers to which electronic excitation due to light absorption is transferred. This excitation brings about a charge separation between a bacteriochlorophyll molecule and two quinone molecules which ultimately leads to the formation of a hydroquinone. The reduced hydroquinone is then utilized to produce a proton gradient across the membrane and ultimately to produce ATP. We have focused our interest on the structure of the reaction center in the photosynthetic purple bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas capsulata, with the intention of establishing a detailed understanding of these first chemical steps in the natural fixation of sunlight. The methods used to identify and isolate the genes for the three reaction center subunits, L, M, and H, in Rps. capsulata are outlined. These genes have then been sequenced, and the sequences analyzed in detail for their similarity with sequences of comparable proteins from more advanced photosynthetic bacteria such as Anabena, from algae such as Euglena and Chlamydomonas, and from higher plants such as amaranthus, soybean, tobacco and spinach. Homology was found which has been tentatively interpreted to be in the region of quinone binding in all of these reaction centers. There is growing optimism that there will be substantial structural similarity between the reaction centers of the purple bacteria and those of photosystem II in higher plants. This conclusion is important because the x-ray crystal structures of several of the purple bacteria reaction center complexes are presently being worked on and will ultimately be solved.

  9. Ammonificins C and D, Hydroxyethylamine Chromene Derivatives from a Cultured Marine Hydrothermal Vent Bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans

    PubMed Central

    Andrianasolo, Eric H.; Haramaty, Liti; Rosario-Passapera, Richard; Vetriani, Costantino; Falkowski, Paul; White, Eileen; Lutz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Chemical and biological investigation of the cultured marine hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonifican led to the isolation of two hydroxyethylamine chromene derivatives, ammonificins C and D. Their structures were elucidated using combination of NMR and mass spectrometry. Absolute stereochemistry was ascertained by comparison of experimental and calculated CD spectra. Biological evaluation and assessment were determined using the patented ApopScreen cell-based screen for apoptosis-induction. Ammonificins C and D induce apoptosis in micromolar concentrations. To our knowledge, this finding is the first report of chemical compounds that induce apoptosis from the cultured deep-sea marine organism, hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans. PMID:23170085

  10. Korormicin, a novel antibiotic specifically active against marine gram-negative bacteria, produced by a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, K; Takadera, T; Adachi, K; Nishijima, M; Sano, H

    1997-11-01

    A novel antibiotic named korormicin was isolated from the marine bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas sp. F-420. This strain was isolated from the surface of a macro alga Halimeda sp. collected from Palau (the Republic of Belau). The planar structure of korormicin was determined by the result of 2D NMR studies and mass spectral data. Korormicin had specific inhibitory activity against marine Gram-negative bacteria, but was inactive against terrestrial microorganisms. PMID:9592569

  11. PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS, A MARINE BACTERIUM WITH A GENERATION TIME OF LESS THAN 10 MINUTES

    PubMed Central

    Eagon, R. G.

    1962-01-01

    Eagon, R. G. (University of Georgia, Athens). Pseudomonas natriegens, a marine bacterium with a generation time of less than 10 minutes. J. Bacteriol. 83:736–737. 1962.—Pseudomonas natriegens, a marine microorganism, was demonstrated to have a generation time of 9.8 min. This is the shortest generation time reported to date. Optimal growth occurred at 37 C in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with 1.5% sea salt. PMID:13888946

  12. Breakdown of food waste by anaerobic fermentation and non-oxygen producing photosynthesis using a photosynthetic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Mekjinda, N; Ritchie, R J

    2015-01-01

    Large volumes of food waste are produced by restaurants, hotels, etc generating problems in its collection, processing and disposal. Disposal as garbage increases the organic matter in landfills and leachates. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris (CGA 009) easily broke down food waste. R. palustris produces H2 under anaerobic conditions and digests a very wide range of organic compounds. R. palustris reduced BOD by ≈70% and COD by ≈33%, starch, ammonia, nitrate, was removed but had little effect on reducing sugar or the total phosphorus, lipid, protein, total solid in a 7-day incubation. R. palustris produced a maximum of 80ml H2/g COD/day. A two-stage anaerobic digestion using yeast as the first stage, followed by a R. palustris digestion was tested but production of H2 was low. PMID:25465509

  13. Five New Amicoumacins Isolated from a Marine-Derived Bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongxin; Xu, Ying; Liu, Lingli; Han, Zhuang; Lai, Pok Yui; Guo, Xiangrong; Zhang, Xixiang; Lin, Wenhan; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Four novel amicoumacins, namely lipoamicoumacins A–D (1–4), and one new bacilosarcin analog (5) were isolated from culture broth of a marine-derived bacterium Bacillus subtilis, together with six known amicoumacins. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic (2D NNR, IR, CD and MS) analysis and in comparison with data in literature. PMID:22412803

  14. Novel Epibiotic Thiothrix Bacterium on a Marine Amphipod

    PubMed Central

    Gillan, David C.; Dubilier, Nicole

    2004-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to identify epibiotic filamentous bacteria living on the marine amphipod crustacean Urothoe poseidonis. The epibionts belong to the gamma proteobacteria and represent a novel marine phylotype within the genus Thiothrix. FISH and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that the Thiothrix filaments are present on the majority of the amphipods examined. PMID:15184190

  15. Auracyanin A from the thermophilic green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus represents an unusual class of small blue copper proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Van Driessche, G.; Hu, W.; Van de Werken, G.; Selvaraj, F.; McManus, J. D.; Blankenship, R. E.; Van Beeumen, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the small copper protein auracyanin A isolated from the thermophilic photosynthetic green bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus has been determined to be a polypeptide of 139 residues. His58, Cys123, His128, and Met132 are spaced in a way to be expected if they are the evolutionary conserved metal ligands as in the known small copper proteins plastocyanin and azurin. Secondary structure prediction also indicates that auracyanin has a general beta-barrel structure similar to that of azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and plastocyanin from poplar leaves. However, auracyanin appears to have sequence characteristics of both small copper protein sequence classes. The overall similarity with a consensus sequence of azurin is roughly the same as that with a consensus sequence of plastocyanin, namely 30.5%. We suggest that auracyanin A, together with the B forms, is the first example of a new class of small copper proteins that may be descendants of an ancestral sequence to both the azurin proteins occurring in prokaryotic nonphotosynthetic bacteria and the plastocyanin proteins occurring in both prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae and plants. The N-terminal sequence region 1-18 of auracyanin is remarkably rich in glycine and hydroxy amino acids, and required mass spectrometric analysis to be determined. The nature of the blocking group X is not yet known, although its mass has been determined to be 220 Da. The auracyanins are the first small blue copper proteins found and studied in anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria and are likely to mediate electron transfer between the cytochrome bc1 complex and the photosynthetic reaction center. PMID:10338005

  16. Isolation, characterization, and amino acid sequences of auracyanins, blue copper proteins from the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McManus, J. D.; Brune, D. C.; Han, J.; Sanders-Loehr, J.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Tollin, G.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Three small blue copper proteins designated auracyanin A, auracyanin B-1, and auracyanin B-2 have been isolated from the thermophilic green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. All three auracyanins are peripheral membrane proteins. Auracyanin A was described previously (Trost, J. T., McManus, J. D., Freeman, J. C., Ramakrishna, B. L., and Blankenship, R. E. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 7858-7863) and is not glycosylated. The two B forms are glycoproteins and have almost identical properties to each other, but are distinct from the A form. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis apparent monomer molecular masses are 14 (A), 18 (B-2), and 22 (B-1) kDa. The amino acid sequences of the B forms are presented. All three proteins have similar absorbance, circular dichroism, and resonance Raman spectra, but the electron spin resonance signals are quite different. Laser flash photolysis kinetic analysis of the reactions of the three forms of auracyanin with lumiflavin and flavin mononucleotide semiquinones indicates that the site of electron transfer is negatively charged and has an accessibility similar to that found in other blue copper proteins. Copper analysis indicates that all three proteins contain 1 mol of copper per mol of protein. All three auracyanins exhibit a midpoint redox potential of +240 mV. Light-induced absorbance changes and electron spin resonance signals suggest that auracyanin A may play a role in photosynthetic electron transfer. Kinetic data indicate that all three proteins can donate electrons to cytochrome c-554, the electron donor to the photosynthetic reaction center.

  17. Prochlorococcus, a Marine Photosynthetic Prokaryote of Global Significance

    PubMed Central

    Partensky, F.; Hess, W. R.; Vaulot, D.

    1999-01-01

    The minute photosynthetic prokaryote Prochlorococcus, which was discovered about 10 years ago, has proven exceptional from several standpoints. Its tiny size (0.5 to 0.7 μm in diameter) makes it the smallest known photosynthetic organism. Its ubiquity within the 40°S to 40°N latitudinal band of oceans and its occurrence at high density from the surface down to depths of 200 m make it presumably the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth. Prochlorococcus typically divides once a day in the subsurface layer of oligotrophic areas, where it dominates the photosynthetic biomass. It also possesses a remarkable pigment complement which includes divinyl derivatives of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and Chl b, the so-called Chl a2 and Chl b2, and, in some strains, small amounts of a new type of phycoerythrin. Phylogenetically, Prochlorococcus has also proven fascinating. Recent studies suggest that it evolved from an ancestral cyanobacterium by reducing its cell and genome sizes and by recruiting a protein originally synthesized under conditions of iron depletion to build a reduced antenna system as a replacement for large phycobilisomes. Environmental constraints clearly played a predominant role in Prochlorococcus evolution. Its tiny size is an advantage for its adaptation to nutrient-deprived environments. Furthermore, genetically distinct ecotypes, with different antenna systems and ecophysiological characteristics, are present at depth and in surface waters. This vertical species variation has allowed Prochlorococcus to adapt to the natural light gradient occurring in the upper layer of oceans. The present review critically assesses the basic knowledge acquired about Prochlorococcus both in the ocean and in the laboratory. PMID:10066832

  18. Denitrification by a marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica strain 617.

    PubMed

    Bonin, P; Gilewicz, M; Bertrand, J C

    1987-01-01

    A bacterial strain was isolated from a marine sediment highly contaminated by hydrocarbons. From taxonomic tests, it was identified as Pseudomonas nautica. This marine strain was able to grow on nitrate, nitrite and nitrous oxide as an electron acceptor. The terminal product from the denitrification was dinitrogen. Thus, P. nautica was a denitrifier. The kinetics of each step of denitrification was examined in resting cell suspensions. The relative rates of nitrate and nitrite reduction and of nitrite reduction and nitrous oxide production explain, respectively, the presence of accumulated nitrite and that of compound intermediate between nitrite and nitrous oxide. PMID:3620203

  19. Light-enhanced bioaccumulation of molybdenum by nitrogen-deprived recombinant anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    PubMed

    Naito, Taki; Sachuronggui; Ueki, Masayoshi; Maeda, Isamu

    2016-01-01

    As molybdenum (Mo) is an indispensable metal for plant nitrogen metabolisms, accumulation of dissolved Mo into bacterial cells may connect to the development of bacterial fertilizers that promote plant growth. In order to enhance Mo bioaccumulation, nitrogen removal and light illumination were examined in anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (APB) because APB possess Mo nitrogenase whose synthesis is strictly regulated by ammonium ion concentration. In addition, an APB, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, transformed with a gene encoding Mo-responsive transcriptional regulator ModE was constructed. Mo content was most markedly enhanced by the removal of ammonium ion from medium and light illumination while their effects on other metal contents were limited. Increases in contents of trace metals including Mo by the genetic modification were observed. Thus, these results demonstrated an effective way to enrich Mo in the bacterial cells by the culture conditions and genetic modification. PMID:26376718

  20. Triplet excited state spectra and dynamics of carotenoids from the thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-01-13

    Light-harvesting complex 2 from the anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption, fluorescence and flash photolysis spectroscopy. Steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements show that carotenoids play a negligible role as supportive energy donors and transfer excitation to bacteriochlorophyll-a with low energy transfer efficiency of ~30%. HPLC analysis determined that the dominant carotenoids in the complex are rhodopin and spirilloxanthin. Carotenoid excited triplet state formation upon direct (carotenoid) or indirect (bacteriochlorophyll-a Q{sub x} band) excitation shows that carotenoid triplets are mostly localized on spirilloxanthin. In addition, no triplet excitation transfer between carotenoids was observed. Such specific carotenoid composition and spectroscopic results strongly suggest that this organism optimized carotenoid composition in the light-harvesting complex 2 in order to maximize photoprotective capabilities of carotenoids but subsequently drastically suppressed their supporting role in light-harvesting process.

  1. Cadherin Domains in the Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 Are Carbohydrate-Binding Modules▿

    PubMed Central

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Bayer, Edward A.; Weiner, Ronald M.; Lamed, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 produces putative proteins that contain numerous cadherin and cadherin-like domains involved in intercellular contact interactions. The current study reveals that both domain types exhibit reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium. PMID:21036994

  2. Synthesis of High-Molecular-Weight Polyhydroxyalkanoates by Marine Photosynthetic Purple Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Morisaki, Kumiko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a biopolyester/bioplastic that is produced by a variety of microorganisms to store carbon and increase reducing redox potential. Photosynthetic bacteria convert carbon dioxide into organic compounds using light energy and are known to accumulate PHA. We analyzed PHAs synthesized by 3 purple sulfur bacteria and 9 purple non-sulfur bacteria strains. These 12 purple bacteria were cultured in nitrogen-limited medium containing acetate and/or sodium bicarbonate as carbon sources. PHA production in the purple sulfur bacteria was induced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Purple non-sulfur bacteria accumulated PHA even under normal growth conditions, and PHA production in 3 strains was enhanced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Gel permeation chromatography analysis revealed that 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized high-molecular-weight PHAs, which are useful for industrial applications. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that mRNA levels of phaC and PhaZ genes were low under nitrogen-limited conditions, resulting in production of high-molecular-weight PHAs. We conclude that all 12 tested strains are able to synthesize PHA to some degree, and we identify 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria that accumulate high-molecular-weight PHA molecules. Furthermore, the photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized PHA when they were cultured in seawater supplemented with acetate. The photosynthetic purple bacteria strains characterized in this study should be useful as host microorganisms for large-scale PHA production utilizing abundant marine resources and carbon dioxide. PMID:27513570

  3. Synthesis of High-Molecular-Weight Polyhydroxyalkanoates by Marine Photosynthetic Purple Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Morisaki, Kumiko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a biopolyester/bioplastic that is produced by a variety of microorganisms to store carbon and increase reducing redox potential. Photosynthetic bacteria convert carbon dioxide into organic compounds using light energy and are known to accumulate PHA. We analyzed PHAs synthesized by 3 purple sulfur bacteria and 9 purple non-sulfur bacteria strains. These 12 purple bacteria were cultured in nitrogen-limited medium containing acetate and/or sodium bicarbonate as carbon sources. PHA production in the purple sulfur bacteria was induced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Purple non-sulfur bacteria accumulated PHA even under normal growth conditions, and PHA production in 3 strains was enhanced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Gel permeation chromatography analysis revealed that 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized high-molecular-weight PHAs, which are useful for industrial applications. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that mRNA levels of phaC and PhaZ genes were low under nitrogen-limited conditions, resulting in production of high-molecular-weight PHAs. We conclude that all 12 tested strains are able to synthesize PHA to some degree, and we identify 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria that accumulate high-molecular-weight PHA molecules. Furthermore, the photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized PHA when they were cultured in seawater supplemented with acetate. The photosynthetic purple bacteria strains characterized in this study should be useful as host microorganisms for large-scale PHA production utilizing abundant marine resources and carbon dioxide. PMID:27513570

  4. Chitin Degradation Proteins Produced by the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi Growing on Different Forms of Chitin

    PubMed Central

    Svitil, A. L.; Chadhain, S.; Moore, J. A.; Kirchman, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the number, diversity, and function of chitinases produced by bacteria, even though chitin is one of the most abundant polymers in nature. Because of the importance of chitin, especially in marine environments, we examined chitin-degrading proteins in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi. This bacterium had a higher growth rate and more chitinase activity when grown on (beta)-chitin (isolated from squid pen) than on (alpha)-chitin (isolated from snow crab), probably because of the more open structure of (beta)-chitin. When exposed to different types of chitin, V. harveyi excreted several chitin-degrading proteins into the culture media. Some chitinases were present with all of the tested chitins, while others were unique to a particular chitin. We cloned and identified six separate chitinase genes from V. harveyi. These chitinases appear to be unique based on DNA restriction patterns, immunological data, and enzyme activity. This marine bacterium and probably others appear to synthesize separate chitinases for efficient utilization of different forms of chitin and chitin by-products. PMID:16535505

  5. Isolation and Characterization of a Purple Non-Sulfur Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas faecalis Strain A from Swine Sewage Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongyi; Okunishi, Suguru; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Kamei, Yuto; Maeda, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    A purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium (PNSB), PSB Strain A was isolated from swine sewage wastewater. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PSB Strain A was most closely related to Rhodopseudomonas faecalis. Growth of the isolate under anaerobic-light conditions with a variety of carbon sources was investigated. Both PSB Strain A and the standard strain showed good growth with acetic acid, propionic acid, and n-butyric acid at a concentration of 20 mM. At the high concentration of 200 mM, PSB Strain A showed better growth in pyruvate, acetate, propionate, succinate and malate. By applying PSB Strain A to treat swine sewage wastewater, the concentration of VFAs, which were acetic acid and propionic acid, decreased from 158.0 mM to 120.2±2.9 mM, and 14.9 mM to 9.3±0.9 mM, respectively, after 216-h incubation. After 330-h incubation, the concentrations of TOC and ammonia nitrogen dropped from 4508.0 mg/L to 3104.0±451.5 mg/L, and 629.7 mg/L to 424.1±7.4 mg/L, respectively. The isolated PSB Strain A showed almost the same efficiency compared with the standard strain on the removal of VFAs and TOC. The results suggest the possibility of using the isolated strain to treat swine sewage wastewater. PMID:27009507

  6. Pathways of energy flow through the light-harvesting antenna of the photosynthetic purple bacterium rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fu Geng; van Grondelle, Rienk; Sundström, Villy

    1992-01-01

    Using low intensity picosecond absorption spectroscopy with independently tunable excitation and probing infrared pulses, we have studied the pathways of energy transport through the light-harvesting antenna pigments of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. From the observed excited-state rise time of the red-most pigment B896 as a function of excitation wavelength it is concluded that the B850 pigment of LH2 is spectrally heterogeneous. For excitations originating in the B850 pigment this results in a fast channel (9 ps) that is mainly excited in the peak of the B850 absorption band, and a slow channel (35 ps) that is predominantly excited at ∼840 nm. Upon excitation of B800, more than 90% of the excitations follow the fast path. From the observed kinetics it is concluded that the majority of the LH2 → LH1 energy transfer takes place within at most a few picoseconds. The rate-limiting step in the whole energy transfer sequence appears to be the B896 → reaction center transfer. The origin of the B850 heterogeneity and the slow 35-ps component is at the moment unclear. Possibly it represents a highly extended form of LH2 in which transfer to LH1 takes a relatively long time, due to a large number of transfer steps. PMID:19431825

  7. Inhibitor-complexed Structures of the Cytochrome bc[subscript 1] from the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, Lothar; Elberry, Maria; Zhou, Fei; Yu, Chang-An; Yu, Linda; Xia, Di

    2008-06-30

    The cytochrome bc{sub 1} complex (bc{sub 1}) is a major contributor to the proton motive force across the membrane by coupling electron transfer to proton translocation. The crystal structures of wild type and mutant bc{sub 1} complexes from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Rsbc{sub 1}), stabilized with the quinol oxidation (Q{sub P}) site inhibitor stigmatellin alone or in combination with the quinone reduction (Q{sub N}) site inhibitor antimycin, were determined. The high quality electron density permitted assignments of a new metal-binding site to the cytochrome c1 subunit and a number of lipid and detergent molecules. Structural differences between Rsbc{sub 1} and its mitochondrial counterparts are mostly extra membranous and provide a basis for understanding the function of the predominantly longer sequences in the bacterial subunits. Functional implications for the bc{sub 1} complex are derived from analyses of 10 independent molecules in various crystal forms and from comparisons with mitochondrial complexes.

  8. Femtosecond spectroscopy of excitation energy transfer and initial charge separation in the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    PubMed Central

    Breton, J.; Martin, J.-L.; Migus, A.; Antonetti, A.; Orszag, A.

    1986-01-01

    Reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis have been excited within the near-infrared absorption bands of the dimeric primary donor (P), of the “accessory” bacteriochlorophylls (B), and of the bacteriopheophytins (H) by using laser pulses of 150-fsec duration. The transfer of excitation energy between H, B, and P occurs in slightly less than 100 fsec and leads to the ultrafast formation of an excited state of P. This state is characterized by a broad absorption spectrum and exhibits stimulated emission. It decays in 2.8 ± 0.2 psec with the simultaneous oxidation of the primary donor and reduction of the bacteriopheophytin acceptor, which have been monitored at 545, 675, 815, 830, and 1310 nm. Although a transient bleaching relaxing in 400 ± 100 fsec is specifically observed upon excitation and observation in the 830-nm absorption band, we have found no indication that an accessory bacteriochlorophyll is involved as a resolvable intermediary acceptor in the primary electron transfer process. PMID:16593728

  9. Extracellular production of tellurium nanoparticles by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Borghese, Roberto; Brucale, Marco; Fortunato, Gianuario; Lanzi, Massimiliano; Mezzi, Alessio; Valle, Francesco; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Zannoni, Davide

    2016-05-15

    The toxic oxyanion tellurite (TeO3(2-)) is acquired by cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus grown anaerobically in the light, via acetate permease ActP2 and then reduced to Te(0) in the cytoplasm as needle-like black precipitates. Interestingly, photosynthetic cultures of R. capsulatus can also generate Te(0) nanoprecipitates (TeNPs) outside the cells upon addition of the redox mediator lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphtoquinone). TeNPs generation kinetics were monitored to define the optimal conditions to produce TeNPs as a function of various carbon sources and lawsone concentration. We report that growing cultures over a 10 days period with daily additions of 1mM tellurite led to the accumulation in the growth medium of TeNPs with dimensions from 200 up to 600-700 nm in length as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This result suggests that nucleation of TeNPs takes place over the entire cell growth period although the addition of new tellurium Te(0) to pre-formed TeNPs is the main strategy used by R. capsulatus to generate TeNPs outside the cells. Finally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis of TeNPs indicate they are coated with an organic material which keeps the particles in solution in aqueous solvents. PMID:26894294

  10. Role of Rhodobacter sp. Strain PS9, a Purple Non-Sulfur Photosynthetic Bacterium Isolated from an Anaerobic Swine Waste Lagoon, in Odor Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Do, Young S.; Schmidt, Thomas M.; Zahn, James A.; Boyd, Eric S.; de la Mora, Arlene; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2003-01-01

    Temporal pigmentation changes resulting from the development of a purple color in anaerobic swine waste lagoons were investigated during a 4-year period. The major purple photosynthetic bacterium responsible for these color changes and the corresponding reductions in odor was isolated from nine photosynthetic lagoons. By using morphological, physiological, and phylogenetic characterization methods we identified the predominant photosynthetic bacterium as a new strain of Rhodobacter, designated Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9. Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 is capable of photoorganotrophic growth on a variety of organic compounds, including all of the characteristic volatile organic compounds (VOC) responsible for the odor associated with swine production facilities (J. A. Zahn, A. A. DiSpirito, Y. S. Do, B. E. Brooks, E. E. Copper, and J. L. Hatfield, J. Environ. Qual. 30:624-634, 2001). The seasonal variations in airborne VOC emitted from waste lagoons showed that there was a 80 to 93% decrease in the concentration of VOC during a photosynthetic bloom. During the height of a bloom, the Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 population accounted for 10% of the total community and up to 27% of the eubacterial community based on 16S ribosomal DNA signals. Additional observations based on seasonal variations in meteorological, biological, and chemical parameters suggested that the photosynthetic blooms of Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 were correlated with lagoon water temperature and with the concentrations of sulfate and phosphate. In addition, the photosynthetic blooms of Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 were inversely correlated with the concentrations of protein and fluoride. PMID:12620863

  11. The mannitol utilization system of the marine bacterium Zobellia galactanivorans.

    PubMed

    Groisillier, Agnès; Labourel, Aurore; Michel, Gurvan; Tonon, Thierry

    2015-03-01

    Mannitol is a polyol that occurs in a wide range of living organisms, where it fulfills different physiological roles. In particular, mannitol can account for as much as 20 to 30% of the dry weight of brown algae and is likely to be an important source of carbon for marine heterotrophic bacteria. Zobellia galactanivorans (Flavobacteriia) is a model for the study of pathways involved in the degradation of seaweed carbohydrates. Annotation of its genome revealed the presence of genes potentially involved in mannitol catabolism, and we describe here the biochemical characterization of a recombinant mannitol-2-dehydrogenase (M2DH) and a fructokinase (FK). Among the observations, the M2DH of Z. galactanivorans was active as a monomer, did not require metal ions for catalysis, and featured a narrow substrate specificity. The FK characterized was active on fructose and mannose in the presence of a monocation, preferentially K(+). Furthermore, the genes coding for these two proteins were adjacent in the genome and were located directly downstream of three loci likely to encode an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter complex, suggesting organization into an operon. Gene expression analysis supported this hypothesis and showed the induction of these five genes after culture of Z. galactanivorans in the presence of mannitol as the sole source of carbon. This operon for mannitol catabolism was identified in only 6 genomes of Flavobacteriaceae among the 76 publicly available at the time of the analysis. It is not conserved in all Bacteroidetes; some species contain a predicted mannitol permease instead of a putative ABC transporter complex upstream of M2DH and FK ortholog genes. PMID:25548051

  12. Characterization of a marine origin aerobic nitrifying-denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hai-Yan; Liu, Ying; Gao, Xi-Yan; Ai, Guo-Min; Miao, Li-Li; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2012-07-01

    The bacterial strain F6 was isolated from a biological aerated filter that is used for purifying recirculating water in a marine aquaculture system and was identified as Marinobacter sp. based on the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. Strain F6 showed efficient aerobic denitrifying ability. One hundred percent of nitrates and 73.10% of nitrites were removed, and the total nitrogen (TN) removal rates reached 50.08% and 33.03% under a high nitrate and nitrite concentration in the medium, respectively. N(2)O and (15)N(2), as revealed by GC-MS and GC-IRMS, were the products of aerobic denitrification. Factors affecting the growth and aerobic denitrifying performance of strain F6 were investigated. The results showed that the optimum aerobic denitrification conditions for strain F6 were the presence of sodium succinate as a carbon source, a C/N ratio of 15, salinity ranging from 32-35 g/L of NaCl, incubation temperature of 30°C, an initial pH of 7.5, and rotation speed of 150 rpm [dissolved oxygen (DO) 6.75 mg/L]. In addition, strain F6 was confirmed to be a heterotrophic nitrifier through its NO(2)(-) generation and 25.96% TN removal when NH(4)(+) was used as the sole N source. Therefore, strain F6, the first reported member of genus Marinobacter with aerobic heterotrophic nitrifying-denitrifying ability, is an excellent candidate for facilitating simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) in industry and aquaculture wastewater. PMID:22578593

  13. The Mannitol Utilization System of the Marine Bacterium Zobellia galactanivorans

    PubMed Central

    Groisillier, Agnès; Labourel, Aurore; Michel, Gurvan

    2014-01-01

    Mannitol is a polyol that occurs in a wide range of living organisms, where it fulfills different physiological roles. In particular, mannitol can account for as much as 20 to 30% of the dry weight of brown algae and is likely to be an important source of carbon for marine heterotrophic bacteria. Zobellia galactanivorans (Flavobacteriia) is a model for the study of pathways involved in the degradation of seaweed carbohydrates. Annotation of its genome revealed the presence of genes potentially involved in mannitol catabolism, and we describe here the biochemical characterization of a recombinant mannitol-2-dehydrogenase (M2DH) and a fructokinase (FK). Among the observations, the M2DH of Z. galactanivorans was active as a monomer, did not require metal ions for catalysis, and featured a narrow substrate specificity. The FK characterized was active on fructose and mannose in the presence of a monocation, preferentially K+. Furthermore, the genes coding for these two proteins were adjacent in the genome and were located directly downstream of three loci likely to encode an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter complex, suggesting organization into an operon. Gene expression analysis supported this hypothesis and showed the induction of these five genes after culture of Z. galactanivorans in the presence of mannitol as the sole source of carbon. This operon for mannitol catabolism was identified in only 6 genomes of Flavobacteriaceae among the 76 publicly available at the time of the analysis. It is not conserved in all Bacteroidetes; some species contain a predicted mannitol permease instead of a putative ABC transporter complex upstream of M2DH and FK ortholog genes. PMID:25548051

  14. The structure of ferricytochrome c552 from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H

    PubMed Central

    Harvilla, Paul B.; Wolcott, Holly N.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 40% of all proteins are metalloproteins, and approximately 80% of Earth’s ecosystems are at temperatures ≤ 5 °C, including 90% of the global ocean. Thus, an essential aspect of marine metallobiochemistry is an understanding of the structure, dynamics, and mechanisms of cold adaptation of metalloproteins from marine microorganisms. Here, the molecular structure of the electron-transfer protein cytochrome c552 from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H has been determined by X-ray crystallography (PDB: 4O1W). The structure is highly superimposable with that of the homologous cytochrome from the mesophile Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. Based on structural analysis and comparison of psychrophilic, psychrotolerant, and mesophilic sequences, a methionine-based ligand-substitution mechanism for psychrophilic protein stabilization is proposed. PMID:24727932

  15. The structure of ferricytochrome c552 from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H.

    PubMed

    Harvilla, Paul B; Wolcott, Holly N; Magyar, John S

    2014-06-01

    Approximately 40% of all proteins are metalloproteins, and approximately 80% of Earth's ecosystems are at temperatures ≤5 °C, including 90% of the global ocean. Thus, an essential aspect of marine metallobiochemistry is an understanding of the structure, dynamics, and mechanisms of cold adaptation of metalloproteins from marine microorganisms. Here, the molecular structure of the electron-transfer protein cytochrome c552 from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H has been determined by X-ray crystallography (PDB: ). The structure is highly superimposable with that of the homologous cytochrome from the mesophile Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. Based on structural analysis and comparison of psychrophilic, psychrotolerant, and mesophilic sequences, a methionine-based ligand-substitution mechanism for psychrophilic protein stabilization is proposed. PMID:24727932

  16. Delineating ecotypes of marine photosynthetic picoeukaryotes in the wild

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limardo, A. J.; Sudek, S.; Rii, Y. M.; Church, M. J.; Wei, C. L.; Armbrust, E. V.; Worden, A. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Extremely small eukaryotic green algae are abundant primary producers found in diverse marine habitats. Over the last decade several studies have revealed extensive diversity within the "pico-prasinophytes" (≤2 µm diameter) that was previously unrecognized due to a lack of distinguishing morphological features. Using whole genome and marker gene analyses, distinct species have since been recognized within the Micromonas and Ostreococcus genera. Relatively little is known about environmental factors driving distributions of these species, but for Ostreococcus, laboratory studies suggested that differentiation reflects high- and low-light adapted ecotypes. Subsequent field studies indicated that Ostreococcus Clade OI and Clade OII rarely co-occur but partition according to distinct habitats - representing 'mesotrophic' and 'oligotrophic' ecotypes, respectively. Unlike Micromonas and Ostreococcus, Bathycoccus was presumed to be a single cosmopolitan species because identical 18S rRNA gene sequences are observed in cultured isolates and in environmental surveys. However, analysis of a targeted metagenome from a Bathycoccus population in the tropical Atlantic led to the hypothesis that Bathycoccus also harbors distinct ecotypes. Here, we have developed qPCR assays to enumerate the two Bathycoccus types which can be discriminated based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS). Statistical analysis of qPCR and environmental data from >200 North Pacific Ocean samples shows that the two Bathycoccus clades are only somewhat analogous to oligotrophic and mesotrophic Ostreococcus clades. The two Bathycoccus clades co-occurred more than twice as often as the Ostreococcus clades. Additionally, while Bathycoccus BII and oligotrophic Ostreococcus OII were found at warm temperatures up to 26°C, BII extended into colder waters than OII. Similarly, Bathycoccus BI extended into warmer waters than mesotrophic Ostreococcus OI. Currently, we are analyzing metatranscriptomes to

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of a Marine Bacterium, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes Strain S1, with High Mercury Resistance and Bioaccumulation Capacity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Bian, Chao; Huang, Huiwei; Yin, Zhiwei; Shi, Qiong; Deng, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes S1, a marine bacterium, exhibited strong resistance to a high concentration of Hg(2+) and remarkable Hg(2+) bioaccumulation capacity. Here, we report the 6.9-Mb genome sequence of P. pseudoalcaligenes S1, which may help clarify its phylogenetic status and provide further understanding of the mechanisms of mercury bioremediation in a marine environment. PMID:27198018

  18. Isolation and biological characteristics of aerobic marine magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Pan, Hongmiao; Yue, Haidong; Song, Tao; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Guanjun; Wu, Longfei; Xiao, Tian

    2006-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have become a hot spot of research in microbiology attracting intensive interest of researchers in multiple disciplinary fields. However, the studies were limited in few fastidious bacteria. The objective of this study aims at isolating new marine magnetic bacteria and better comprehension of magnetotactic bacteria. In this study, an aerobic magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1 was isolated from sediments in the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM). In TEM, magnetic cells have one or several circular magnetosomes in diameter of 100nm, and consist of Fe and Co shown on energy dispersive X-ray spectrum. The biological and physiological characteristics of this bacterium were also described. The colour of YSC-1 colony is white in small rod. The gram stain is negative. Results showed that Strain YSC-1 differs from microaerophile magnetotactic bacteria MS-1 and WD-1 in biology.

  19. N-Acyl Dehydrotyrosines, Tyrosinase Inhibitors from the Marine Bacterium Thalassotalea sp. PP2-459.

    PubMed

    Deering, Robert W; Chen, Jianwei; Sun, Jiadong; Ma, Hang; Dubert, Javier; Barja, Juan L; Seeram, Navindra P; Wang, Hong; Rowley, David C

    2016-02-26

    Thalassotalic acids A-C and thalassotalamides A and B are new N-acyl dehydrotyrosine derivatives produced by Thalassotalea sp. PP2-459, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from a marine bivalve aquaculture facility. The structures were elucidated via a combination of spectroscopic analyses emphasizing two-dimensional NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometric data. Thalassotalic acid A (1) displays in vitro inhibition of the enzyme tyrosinase with an IC50 value (130 μM) that compares favorably to the commercially used control compounds kojic acid (46 μM) and arbutin (100 μM). These are the first natural products reported from a bacterium belonging to the genus Thalassotalea. PMID:26824128

  20. Production and Consumption of Hydrogen in Hot Spring Microbial Mats Dominated by a Filamentous Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Otaki, Hiroyo; Everroad, R. Craig; Matsuura, Katsumi; Haruta, Shin

    2012-01-01

    Microbial mats containing the filamentous anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aggregans develop at Nakabusa hot spring in Japan. Under anaerobic conditions in these mats, interspecies interaction between sulfate-reducing bacteria as sulfide producers and C. aggregans as a sulfide consumer has been proposed to constitute a sulfur cycle; however, the electron donor utilized for microbial sulfide production at Nakabusa remains to be identified. In order to determine this electron donor and its source, ex situ experimental incubation of mats was explored. In the presence of molybdate, which inhibits biological sulfate reduction, hydrogen gas was released from mat samples, indicating that this hydrogen is normally consumed as an electron donor by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Hydrogen production decreased under illumination, indicating that C. aggregans also functions as a hydrogen consumer. Small amounts of hydrogen may have also been consumed for sulfur reduction. Clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes amplified from the mats indicated the existence of several species of hydrogen-producing fermentative bacteria. Among them, the most dominant fermenter, Fervidobacterium sp., was successfully isolated. This isolate produced hydrogen through the fermentation of organic carbon. Dispersion of microbial cells in the mats resulted in hydrogen production without the addition of molybdate, suggesting that simultaneous production and consumption of hydrogen in the mats requires dense packing of cells. We propose a cyclic electron flow within the microbial mats, i.e., electron flow occurs through three elements: S (elemental sulfur, sulfide, sulfate), C (carbon dioxide, organic carbon) and H (di-hydrogen, protons). PMID:22446313

  1. Exploration of the antioxidant system and photosynthetic system of a marine algicidal Bacillus and its effect on four harmful algal bloom species.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shaoling; Shu, Wanjiao; Tan, Shuo; Zhao, Ling; Yin, Pinghe

    2016-01-01

    A novel marine bacterium, strain B1, initially showed 96.4% algicidal activity against Phaeocystis globosa. Under this situation, 3 other harmful algal species (Skeletonema costatum, Heterosigma akashiwo, and Prorocentrum donghaiense) were chosen to study the algicidal effects of strain B1, and the algicidal activities were 91.4%, 90.7%, and 90.6%, respectively. To explore the algicidal mechanism of strain B1 on these 4 harmful algal species, the characteristics of the antioxidant system and photosynthetic system were studied. Sensitivity to strain B1 supernatant, enzyme activity, and gene expression varied with algal species, while the algicidal patterns were similar. Strain B1 supernatant increased malondialdehyde contents; decreased chlorophyll a contents; changed total antioxidant and superoxide dismutase activity; and restrained psbA, psbD, and rbcL genes expression, which eventually resulted in the algal cells death. The algicidal procedure was observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy, which indicated that algal cells were lysed and cellular substances were released. These findings suggested that the antioxidant and photosynthetic system of these 4 algal species was destroyed under strain B1 supernatant stress. This is the first report to explore and compare the mechanism of a marine Bacillus against harmful algal bloom species of covered 4 phyla. PMID:26634608

  2. Transcriptional Control of Expression of Genes for Photosynthetic Reaction Center and Light-Harvesting Proteins in the Purple Bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Shinji; Nagashima, Kenji V. P.; Shimada, Keizo; Matsuura, Katsumi

    2000-01-01

    The purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum synthesizes photosynthetic apparatus even under highly aerated conditions in the dark. To understand the oxygen-independent expression of photosynthetic genes, the expression of the puf operon coding for the light-harvesting 1 and reaction center proteins was analyzed. Northern blot hybridization analysis showed that puf mRNA synthesis was not significantly repressed by oxygen in this bacterium. High-resolution 5′ mapping of the puf mRNA transcriptional initiation sites and DNA sequence analysis of the puf upstream regulatory region indicated that there are three possible promoters for the puf operon expression, two of which have a high degree of sequence similarity with those of Rhodobacter capsulatus, which shows a high level of oxygen repression of photosystem synthesis. Deletion analysis showed that the third promoter is oxygen independent, but the activity of this promoter was not enough to explain the aerobic level of mRNA. The posttranscriptional puf mRNA degradation is not significantly influenced by oxygen in R. sulfidophilum. From these results, we conclude that puf operon expression in R. sulfidophilum is weakly repressed by oxygen, perhaps as a result of the following: (i) there are three promoters for puf operon transcription, at least one of which is oxygen independent; (ii) readthrough transcripts which may not be affected by oxygen may be significant in maintaining the puf mRNA levels; and (iii) the puf mRNA is fairly stable even under aerobic conditions. PMID:10781546

  3. Bisucaberin B, a linear hydroxamate class siderophore from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum mesophilum.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaki J; Nakano, Koji; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    A siderophore, named bisucaberin B, was isolated from Tenacibaculum mesophilum bacteria separated from a marine sponge collected in the Republic of Palau. Using spectroscopic and chemical methods, the structure of bisucaberin B (1) was clearly determined to be a linear dimeric hydroxamate class siderophore. Although compound 1 is an open form of the known macrocyclic dimer bisucaberin (2), and was previously described as a bacterial degradation product of desferrioxamine B (4), the present report is the first description of the de novo biosynthesis of 1. To the best of our knowledge, compound 1 is the first chemically characterized siderophore isolated from a bacterium belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. PMID:23549298

  4. An Updated genome annotation for the model marine bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    When the genome of Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3 was published in 2004, it represented the first sequence from a heterotrophic marine bacterium. Over the last ten years, the strain has become a valuable model for understanding the cycling of sulfur and carbon in the ocean. To ensure that this genome remains useful, we have updated 69 genes to incorporate functional annotations based on new experimental data, and improved the identification of 120 protein-coding regions based on proteomic and transcriptomic data. We review the progress made in understanding the biology of R. pomeroyi DSS-3 and list the changes made to the genome. PMID:25780504

  5. CsmA Protein is Associated with BChl a in the Baseplate Subantenna of Chlorosomes of the Photosynthetic Green Filamentous Bacterium Oscillochloris trichoides belonging to the Family Oscillochloridaceae

    PubMed Central

    Zobova, Anastasiya; Taisova, Alexandra; Lukashev, Eugeny; Fedorova, Nataliya; Baratova, Ludmila; Fetisova, Zoya

    2011-01-01

    The baseplate subantenna in chlorosomes of green anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, belonging to the families Chloroflexaceae and Chlorobiaceae, is known to represent a complex of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a with the ~6 kDa CsmA proteins. Earlier, we showed the existence of a similar BChl a subantenna in chlorosomes of the photosynthetic green bacterium Oscillochloris trichoides, member of Oscillochloridaceae, the third family of green photosynthetic bacteria. However, this BChl a subantenna was not visually identified in absorption spectra of isolated Osc. trichoides chlorosomes in contrast to those of Chloroflexaceae and Chlorobiaceae. In this work, using room and low-temperature absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of alkaline-treated and untreated chlorosomes of Osc. trichoides, we showed that the baseplate BChl a subantenna does exist in Oscillochloridaceae chlorosomes as a complex of BChl a with the 5.7 kDa CsmA protein. The present results support the idea that the baseplate subantenna, representing a complex of BChl a with a ~6 kDa CsmA protein, is a universal interface between the BChl c subantenna of chlorosomes and the nearest light-harvesting BChl a subantenna in all three known families of green anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. PMID:21941538

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the Complex Carbohydrate-Degrading Marine Bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans Strain 2-40T

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Ronald M.; Taylor, Larry E.; Henrissat, Bernard; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Rancurel, Corinne; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Longmire, Atkinson G.; Zhang, Haitao; Bayer, Edward A.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Larimer, Frank; Zhulin, Igor B.; Ekborg, Nathan A.; Lamed, Raphael; Richardson, Paul M.; Borovok, Ilya; Hutcheson, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 (Sde 2-40) is emerging as a vanguard of a recently discovered group of marine and estuarine bacteria that recycles complex polysaccharides. We report its complete genome sequence, analysis of which identifies an unusually large number of enzymes that degrade >10 complex polysaccharides. Not only is this an extraordinary range of catabolic capability, many of the enzymes exhibit unusual architecture including novel combinations of catalytic and substrate-binding modules. We hypothesize that many of these features are adaptations that facilitate depolymerization of complex polysaccharides in the marine environment. This is the first sequenced genome of a marine bacterium that can degrade plant cell walls, an important component of the carbon cycle that is not well-characterized in the marine environment. PMID:18516288

  7. Microfabrication of patterns of adherent marine bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens using soft lithography and scanning probe lithography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuan; Burchardt, Malte; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Beardsley, Christine; Simon, Meinhard; Wittstock, Gunther

    2010-06-01

    Two lithographic approaches have been explored for the microfabrication of cellular patterns based on the attachment of marine bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens strain T5. Strain T5 produces a new antibiotic that makes this bacterium potentially interesting for the pharmaceutical market and as a probiotic organism in aquacultures and in controlling biofouling. The microcontact printing (microCP) method is based on the micropatterning of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) terminated with adhesive end groups such as CH(3) and COOH and nonadhesive groups (e.g., short oligomers of ethylene glycol (OEG)) to form micropatterned substrates for the adhesion of strain T5. The scanning probe lithographic method is based on the surface modification of OEG SAM by using a microelectrode, the probe of a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). Oxidizing agents (e.g., Br(2)) were electrogenerated in situ at the microelectrodes from Br(-) in aqueous solution to remove OEG SAMs locally, which allows the subsequent adsorption of bacteria. Various micropatterns of bacteria could be formed in situ on the substrate without a prefabricated template. The fabricated cellular patterns may be applied to a variety of marine biological studies that require the analysis of biofilm formation, cell-cell and cell-surface interactions, and cell-based biosensors and bioelectronics. PMID:20397716

  8. Enrichment and physiological characterization of a novel Nitrospira-like bacterium obtained from a marine sponge.

    PubMed

    Off, Sandra; Alawi, Mashal; Spieck, Eva

    2010-07-01

    Members of the nitrite-oxidizing genus Nitrospira are most likely responsible for the second step of nitrification, the conversion of nitrite (NO(2)(-)) to nitrate (NO(3)(-)), within various sponges. We succeeded in obtaining an enrichment culture of Nitrospira derived from the mesohyl of the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba using a traditional cultivation approach. Electron microscopy gave first evidence of the shape and ultrastructure of this novel marine Nitrospira-like bacterium (culture Aa01). We characterized these bacteria physiologically with regard to optimal incubation conditions, especially the temperature and substrate range in comparison to other Nitrospira cultures. Best growth was obtained at temperatures between 28 degrees C and 30 degrees C in mineral medium with 70% North Sea water and a substrate concentration of 0.5 mM nitrite under microaerophilic conditions. The Nitrospira culture Aa01 is very sensitive against nitrite, because concentrations higher than 1.5 mM resulted in a complete inhibition of growth. Sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the novel Nitrospira-like bacterium is separated from the sponge-specific subcluster and falls together with an environmental clone from Mediterranean sediments (98.6% similarity). The next taxonomically described species Nitrospira marina is only distantly related, with 94.6% sequence similarity, and therefore the culture Aa01 represents a novel species of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:20511427

  9. Data supporting functional diversity of the marine bacterium Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296.

    PubMed

    Balabanova, Larissa; Nedashkovskaya, Olga; Podvolotskaya, Anna; Slepchenko, Lubov; Golotin, Vasily; Belik, Alexey; Shevchenko, Ludmila; Son, Oksana; Rasskazov, Valery

    2016-09-01

    Data is presented in support of functionality of hyper-diverse protein families encoded by the Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296 (formerly Cobetia marina KMM 296) genome ("The genome of the marine bacterium Cobetia marina KMM 296 isolated from the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (Dunker, 1853)" [1]) providing its nutritional versatility, adaptability and biocontrol that could be the basis of the marine bacterium evolutionary and application potential. Presented data include the information of growth and biofilm-forming properties of the food-associated isolates of Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Listeria, Salmonella and Staphylococcus under the conditions of their co-culturing with C. amphilecti KMM 296 to confirm its high inter-species communication and anti-microbial activity. Also included are the experiments on the crude petroleum consumption by C. amphilecti KMM 296 as the sole source of carbon in the presence of sulfate or nitrate to ensure its bioremediation capacity. The multifunctional C. amphilecti KMM 296 genome is a promising source for the beneficial psychrophilic enzymes and essential secondary metabolites. PMID:27508225

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Strain MMB-1 (CECT 4803), a Novel Melanogenic Marine Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Solano, F; Garcia, E; Perez, D; Sanchez-Amat, A

    1997-09-01

    A novel marine melanogenic bacterium, strain MMB-1, was isolated from the Mediterranean Sea. The taxonomic characterization of this strain indicated that it belongs to the genus Alteromonas. Under in vivo conditions, L-tyrosine was the specific monophenolic precursor for melanin synthesis. This bacterium contained all types of activities associated with polyphenol oxidases (PPOs), cresolase (EC 1.18.14.1), catecholase (EC 1.10.3.1), and laccase (EC 1.10.3.2). These activities were due to the presence of two different PPOs. The first one showed all the enzymatic activities, but it was not involved in melanogenesis in vivo, since amelanogenic mutant strains obtained by nitrosoguanidine treatment contained levels of this PPO similar to that of the wild-type MMB-1 strain. The second PPO showed cresolase and catecholase activities but no laccase, and it was involved in melanogenesis, since this enzyme was lost in amelanogenic mutant strains. This PPO was strongly activated by sodium dodecyl sulfate below the critical micelle concentration, and it is a tyrosinase-like enzyme showing a lag period in its tyrosine hydroxylase activity that could be avoided by small amounts of L-dopa. This is the first report of a bacterium that contains two PPOs and also the first report of a pluripotent PPO showing all types of oxidase activities. The bacterium and the pluripotent PPO may be useful models for exploring the roles of PPOs in cellular physiology, aside from melanin formation. On the other hand, the high oxidizing capacity of the PPO for a wide range of substrates could make possible its application in phenolic biotransformations, food processing, or the cosmetic industry, where fungal and plant PPOs are being used. PMID:16535688

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Strain MMB-1 (CECT 4803), a Novel Melanogenic Marine Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Solano, F.; Garcia, E.; Perez, De; Sanchez-Amat, A.

    1997-01-01

    A novel marine melanogenic bacterium, strain MMB-1, was isolated from the Mediterranean Sea. The taxonomic characterization of this strain indicated that it belongs to the genus Alteromonas. Under in vivo conditions, L-tyrosine was the specific monophenolic precursor for melanin synthesis. This bacterium contained all types of activities associated with polyphenol oxidases (PPOs), cresolase (EC 1.18.14.1), catecholase (EC 1.10.3.1), and laccase (EC 1.10.3.2). These activities were due to the presence of two different PPOs. The first one showed all the enzymatic activities, but it was not involved in melanogenesis in vivo, since amelanogenic mutant strains obtained by nitrosoguanidine treatment contained levels of this PPO similar to that of the wild-type MMB-1 strain. The second PPO showed cresolase and catecholase activities but no laccase, and it was involved in melanogenesis, since this enzyme was lost in amelanogenic mutant strains. This PPO was strongly activated by sodium dodecyl sulfate below the critical micelle concentration, and it is a tyrosinase-like enzyme showing a lag period in its tyrosine hydroxylase activity that could be avoided by small amounts of L-dopa. This is the first report of a bacterium that contains two PPOs and also the first report of a pluripotent PPO showing all types of oxidase activities. The bacterium and the pluripotent PPO may be useful models for exploring the roles of PPOs in cellular physiology, aside from melanin formation. On the other hand, the high oxidizing capacity of the PPO for a wide range of substrates could make possible its application in phenolic biotransformations, food processing, or the cosmetic industry, where fungal and plant PPOs are being used. PMID:16535688

  12. Biosynthesis of unnatural bacteriochlorophyll c derivatives esterified with α,ω-diols in the green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Nishimori, Risato; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Kashimura, Shigenori; Saga, Yoshitaka

    2011-09-13

    Unnatural bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c derivatives possessing a hydroxy group at the terminus of a hydrocarbon chain at the 17-propionate were biosynthesized in the green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. Addition of exogenous 1,8-octanediol, 1,12-dodecanediol, and 1,16-hexadecanediol in acetone to liquid cultures resulted in accumulation of BChl c monoesterified with the corresponding diols. The relative ratios of the novel BChl c derivatives esterified with 1,8-, 1,12-, and 1,16-diols to totally producing BChl c were 8.2, 50.2, and 57.6% in the cells grown with additive α,ω-diols at concentrations of 1.5, 0.06, and 0.06 mM, respectively, at the final concentration. The homologue composition of BChl c derivatives esterified with these α,ω-diols was similar to that of original, coexisting BChl c esterified with farnesol (BChl c(F)), suggesting that esterification of α,ω-diols occurred at the last step of the BChl c biosynthetic pathway by BChl c synthase, BchK, in the same manner as in BChl c(F). Chlorosomes, which were isolated from cells grown in the presence of exogenous α,ω-diols, contained a ratio and a composition of BChl c derivatives esterified with the diols similar to those in the whole cells, indicating that these BChl c derivatives were actually present in chlorosomes. Q(y) absorption bands of C. tepidum cells containing the novel BChl c derivatives were shifted to a shorter wavelength, although their bandwidths were analogous to those of cells obtained by normal cultivation. Circular dichroism spectra of cells that had BChl c derivatives esterified with α,ω-diols exhibited S-shaped signals in the Q(y) region, whose polarities were the reverse of those of cells grown in the normal medium and by supplementation with neat acetone as a control experiment. These spectral features of C. tepidum possessing BChl c derivatives esterified with α,ω-diols imply that the novel BChl c derivatives possessing a hydroxy group at the

  13. Paulinella longichromatophora sp. nov., a New Marine Photosynthetic Testate Amoeba Containing a Chromatophore.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunju; Park, Myung Gil

    2016-02-01

    The freshwater testate filose amoeba Paulinella chromatophora is the sole species in the genus to have plastids, usually termed "chromatophores", of a Synechococcus/Prochlorococcus-like cyanobacterial origin. Here, we report a new marine phototrophic species, Paulinella longichromatophora sp. nov., using light and electron microscopy and molecular data. This new species contains two blue-green U-shaped chromatophores reaching up to 40 μm in total length. Further, the new Paulinella species is characterized by having five oral scales surrounding the pseudostomal aperture. All trees generated using three nuclear rDNA datasets (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA, and the concatenated 18S + 28S rDNA) demonstrated that three photosynthetic Paulinella species (two freshwater species, P. chromatophora and Paulinella strain FK01, and one marine species, P. longichromatophora) congruently formed a monophyletic group with strong support (≥ 90% of ML and ≥ 0.90 of PP), but their relationship to each other within the clade remained unresolved in all trees. P. longichromatophora, nevertheless, clustered consistently together with Paulinella strain FK01 with very low support, but the clade received strong support in plastid phylogenies. Phylogenetic analyses inferred from plastid-encoded 16S rDNA and a concatenated dataset of plastid 16S+23S rDNA demonstrated that chromatophores of all photosynthetic Paulinella species were monophyletic. The monophyletic group fell within a cyanobacteria clade having a close relationship to an α-cyanobacterial clade containing Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus species with very robust support (100% of ML and 1.0 of PP). Additionally, phylogenetic analyses of nuclear 18S rDNA and plastid 16S rDNA suggested divergent evolution within the photosynthetic Paulinella population after a single acquisition of the chromatophore. After the single acquisition of the chromatophore, ancestral photosynthetic Paulinella appears to have diverged into at least two

  14. Death-specific protein in a marine diatom regulates photosynthetic responses to iron and light availability.

    PubMed

    Thamatrakoln, Kimberlee; Bailleul, Benjamin; Brown, Christopher M; Gorbunov, Maxim Y; Kustka, Adam B; Frada, Miguel; Joliot, Pierre A; Falkowski, Paul G; Bidle, Kay D

    2013-12-10

    Diatoms, unicellular phytoplankton that account for ∼40% of marine primary productivity, often dominate coastal and open-ocean upwelling zones. Limitation of growth and productivity by iron at low light is attributed to an elevated cellular Fe requirement for the synthesis of Fe-rich photosynthetic proteins. In the dynamic coastal environment, Fe concentrations and daily surface irradiance levels can vary by two to three orders of magnitude on short spatial and temporal scales. Although genome-wide studies are beginning to provide insight into the molecular mechanisms used by diatoms to rapidly respond to such fluxes, their functional role in mediating the Fe stress response remains uncharacterized. Here, we show, using reverse genetics, that a death-specific protein (DSP; previously named for its apparent association with cell death) in the coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana (TpDSP1) localizes to the plastid and enhances growth during acute Fe limitation at subsaturating light by increasing the photosynthetic efficiency of carbon fixation. Clone lines overexpressing TpDSP1 had a lower quantum requirement for growth, increased levels of photosynthetic and carbon fixation proteins, and increased cyclic electron flow around photosystem I. Cyclic electron flow is an ATP-producing pathway essential in higher plants and chlorophytes with a heretofore unappreciated role in diatoms. However, cells under replete conditions were characterized as having markedly reduced growth and photosynthetic rates at saturating light, thereby constraining the benefits afforded by overexpression. Widespread distribution of DSP-like sequences in environmental metagenomic and metatranscriptomic datasets highlights the presence and relevance of this protein in natural phytoplankton populations in diverse oceanic regimes. PMID:24277817

  15. Death-specific protein in a marine diatom regulates photosynthetic responses to iron and light availability

    PubMed Central

    Thamatrakoln, Kimberlee; Bailleul, Benjamin; Brown, Christopher M.; Gorbunov, Maxim Y.; Kustka, Adam B.; Frada, Miguel; Joliot, Pierre A.; Falkowski, Paul G.; Bidle, Kay D.

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms, unicellular phytoplankton that account for ∼40% of marine primary productivity, often dominate coastal and open-ocean upwelling zones. Limitation of growth and productivity by iron at low light is attributed to an elevated cellular Fe requirement for the synthesis of Fe-rich photosynthetic proteins. In the dynamic coastal environment, Fe concentrations and daily surface irradiance levels can vary by two to three orders of magnitude on short spatial and temporal scales. Although genome-wide studies are beginning to provide insight into the molecular mechanisms used by diatoms to rapidly respond to such fluxes, their functional role in mediating the Fe stress response remains uncharacterized. Here, we show, using reverse genetics, that a death-specific protein (DSP; previously named for its apparent association with cell death) in the coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana (TpDSP1) localizes to the plastid and enhances growth during acute Fe limitation at subsaturating light by increasing the photosynthetic efficiency of carbon fixation. Clone lines overexpressing TpDSP1 had a lower quantum requirement for growth, increased levels of photosynthetic and carbon fixation proteins, and increased cyclic electron flow around photosystem I. Cyclic electron flow is an ATP-producing pathway essential in higher plants and chlorophytes with a heretofore unappreciated role in diatoms. However, cells under replete conditions were characterized as having markedly reduced growth and photosynthetic rates at saturating light, thereby constraining the benefits afforded by overexpression. Widespread distribution of DSP-like sequences in environmental metagenomic and metatranscriptomic datasets highlights the presence and relevance of this protein in natural phytoplankton populations in diverse oceanic regimes. PMID:24277817

  16. In situ associations between marine photosynthetic picoeukaryotes and potential parasites - a role for fungi?

    PubMed

    Lepère, Cécile; Ostrowski, Martin; Hartmann, Manuela; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Scanlan, David J

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPEs) are important components of the marine picophytoplankton community playing a critical role in CO2 fixation but also as bacterivores, particularly in the oligotrophic gyres. Despite an increased interest in these organisms and an improved understanding of the genetic diversity of this group, we still know little of the environmental factors controlling the abundance of these organisms. Here, we investigated the quantitative importance of eukaryotic parasites in the free-living fraction as well as in associations with PPEs along a transect in the South Atlantic. Using tyramide signal amplification-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TSA-FISH), we provide quantitative evidence of the occurrence of free-living fungi in open ocean marine systems, while the Perkinsozoa and Syndiniales parasites were not abundant in these waters. Using flow cytometric cell sorting of different PPE populations followed by a dual-labelled TSA-FISH approach, we also demonstrate fungal associations, potentially parasitic, occurring with both pico-Prymnesiophyceae and pico-Chrysophyceae. These data highlight the necessity for further work investigating the specific role of marine fungi as parasites of phytoplankton to improve understanding of carbon flow in marine ecosystems. PMID:26420747

  17. Fabivirga thermotolerans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel marine bacterium isolated from culture broth of a marine cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Tang, M; Chen, C; Li, J; Xiang, W; Wu, H; Wu, J; Dai, S; Wu, H; Li, T; Wang, G

    2016-02-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, red, non-spore-forming, strictly aerobic bacterium, designated strain A4T, was isolated from culture broth of a marine cyanobacterium. Cells were flexible rods with gliding motility. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, revealed that strain A4T formed a coherent cluster with members of the genera Roseivirga and Fabibacter, and represents a distinct lineage in the family Flammeovirgaceae. Thermotolerance and a distinctive cellular fatty acid profile could readily distinguish this isolate from any bacteria of the genera Roseivirga and Fabibacter with a validly published name. On the basis of the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic characteristics, strain A4T is suggested to represent a novel species in a novel genus, for which the name Fabivirga thermotolerans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is A4T ( = KCTC 42507T = CGMCC 1.15111T). PMID:26652750

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the Complex Carbohydrate-Degrading Marine Bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Ronald M; TaylorII, Larry E; Henrissat, Bernard; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Coutinho, Pedro M; Rancurel, Corinne; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Longmire, Atkinson G; Zhang, Haitao; Bayer, Ed; Gilbert, Harry J; Larimer, Frank W; Zhulin, Igor B; Ekborg, Nathan A.; Lamed, Raphael; Richardson, P M; Borovok, Ilya; Hutcheson, Steven

    2008-05-01

    The marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 (Sde 2-40) is emerging as a vanguard of a recently discovered group of marine and estuarine bacteria that recycles complex polysaccharides (CP). We report its complete genome sequence, analysis of which identifies an unusually large number of enzymes that degrade >10 CP. Not only is this an extraordinary range of catabolic capability, but many of the enzymes contain domains and features - some unusual, others unique - that are believed to facilitate depolymerization of CP. This is the first sequenced genome of a marine bacterium that can degrade plant cell walls, an important component of the carbon cycle that is not well characterized in the marine environment.

  19. Discovery of a novel iota carrageenan sulfatase isolated from the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genicot, Sabine; Groisillier, Agnès; Rogniaux, Hélène; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Barbeyron, Tristan; Helbert, William

    2014-08-01

    Carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides extracted from the cell wall of some marine red algae. These polysaccharides are widely used as gelling, stabilizing, and viscosifying agents in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Since the rheological properties of these polysaccharides depend on their sulfate content, we screened several isolated marine bacteria for carrageenan specific sulfatase activity, in the aim of developing enzymatic bioconversion of carrageenans. As a result of the screening, an iota-carrageenan sulfatase was detected in the cell-free lysate of the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora strain PscT. It was purified through Phenyl Sepharose and Diethylaminoethyl Sepharose chromatography. The pure enzyme, Psc ?-CgsA, was characterized. It had a molecular weight of 115.9 kDaltons and exhibited an optimal activity/stability at pH ~8.3 and at 40°C ± 5°C. It was inactivated by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride but not by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. Psc ?-CgsA specifically catalyzes the hydrolysis of the 4-S sulfate of iota-carrageenan. The purified enzyme could transform iota-carrageenan into hybrid iota-/alpha- or pure alpha-carrageenan under controlled conditions. The gene encoding Psc ?-CgsA, a protein of 1038 amino acids, was cloned into Escherichia coli, and the sequence analysis revealed that Psc ?-CgsA has more than 90% sequence identity with a putative uncharacterized protein Q3IKL4 from the marine strain Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125, but besides this did not share any homology to characterized sulfatases. Phylogenetic studies show that P. carrageenovora sulfatase thus represents the first characterized member of a new sulfatase family, with a C-terminal domain having strong similarity with the superfamily of amidohydrolases, highlighting the still unexplored diversity of marine polysaccharide modifying enzymes.

  20. Discovery of a novel iota carrageenan sulfatase isolated from the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora

    PubMed Central

    Genicot, Sabine M.; Groisillier, Agnès; Rogniaux, Hélène; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Barbeyron, Tristan; Helbert, William

    2014-01-01

    Carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides extracted from the cell wall of some marine red algae. These polysaccharides are widely used as gelling, stabilizing, and viscosifying agents in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Since the rheological properties of these polysaccharides depend on their sulfate content, we screened several isolated marine bacteria for carrageenan specific sulfatase activity, in the aim of developing enzymatic bioconversion of carrageenans. As a result of the screening, an iota-carrageenan sulfatase was detected in the cell-free lysate of the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora strain PscT. It was purified through Phenyl Sepharose and Diethylaminoethyl Sepharose chromatography. The pure enzyme, Psc ι-CgsA, was characterized. It had a molecular weight of 115.9 kDaltons and exhibited an optimal activity/stability at pH ~8.3 and at 40 ± 5°C. It was inactivated by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride but not by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. Psc ι-CgsA specifically catalyzes the hydrolysis of the 4-S sulfate of iota-carrageenan. The purified enzyme could transform iota-carrageenan into hybrid iota-/alpha- or pure alpha-carrageenan under controlled conditions. The gene encoding Psc ι-CgsA, a protein of 1038 amino acids, was cloned into Escherichia coli, and the sequence analysis revealed that Psc ι-CgsA has more than 90% sequence identity with a putative uncharacterized protein Q3IKL4 from the marine strain Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125, but besides this did not share any homology to characterized sulfatases. Phylogenetic studies show that P. carrageenovora sulfatase thus represents the first characterized member of a new sulfatase family, with a C-terminal domain having strong similarity with the superfamily of amidohydrolases, highlighting the still unexplored diversity of marine polysaccharide modifying enzymes. PMID:25207269

  1. Evidence for quorum sensing and differential metabolite production by a marine bacterium in response to DMSP

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Winifred M; Kido Soule, Melissa C; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B

    2016-01-01

    Microbes, the foundation of the marine foodweb, do not function in isolation, but rather rely on molecular level interactions among species to thrive. Although certain types of interactions between autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms have been well documented, the role of specific organic molecules in regulating inter-species relationships and supporting growth are only beginning to be understood. Here, we examine one such interaction by characterizing the metabolic response of a heterotrophic marine bacterium, Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, to growth on dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), an abundant organosulfur metabolite produced by phytoplankton. When cultivated on DMSP, R. pomeroyi synthesized a quorum-sensing molecule, N-(3-oxotetradecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, at significantly higher levels than during growth on propionate. Concomitant with the production of a quorum-sensing molecule, we observed differential production of intra- and extracellular metabolites including glutamine, vitamin B2 and biosynthetic intermediates of cyclic amino acids. Our metabolomics data indicate that R. pomeroyi changes regulation of its biochemical pathways in a manner that is adaptive for a cooperative lifestyle in the presence of DMSP, in anticipation of phytoplankton-derived nutrients and higher microbial density. This behavior is likely to occur on sinking marine particles, indicating that this response may impact the fate of organic matter. PMID:26882264

  2. Thymidine uptake, thymidine incorporation, and thymidine kinase activity in marine bacterium isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, W.H.; Paul, J.H. )

    1990-05-01

    One assumption made in bacterial production estimates from ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation is that all heterotrophic bacteria can incorporate exogenous thymidine into DNA. Heterotrophic marine bacterium isolates from Tampa Bay, Fla., Chesapeake Bay, Md., and a coral surface microlayer were examined for thymidine uptake (transport), thymidine incorporation, the presence of thymidine kinase genes, and thymidine kinase enzyme activity. Of the 41 isolates tested, 37 were capable of thymidine incorporation into DNA. The four organisms that could not incorporate thymidine also transported the thymidine poorly and lacked thymidine kinase activity. Attempts to detect thymidine kinase genes in the marine isolates by molecular probing with gene probes made from Escherichia coli and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase genes proved unsuccessful. To determine if the inability to incorporate thymidine was due to the lack of thymidine kinase, one organism, Vibro sp. strain DI9, was transformed with a plasmid (pGQ3) that contained an E. coli thymidine kinase gene. Although enzyme assays indicated high levels of thymidine kinase activity in transformants, these cells still failed to incorporate exogenous thymidine into DNA or to transport thymidine into cells. These results indicate that the inability of certain marine bacteria to incorporate thymidine may not be solely due to the lack of thymidine kinase activity but may also be due to the absence of thymidine transport systems.

  3. Evidence for quorum sensing and differential metabolite production by a marine bacterium in response to DMSP.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Winifred M; Kido Soule, Melissa C; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B

    2016-09-01

    Microbes, the foundation of the marine foodweb, do not function in isolation, but rather rely on molecular level interactions among species to thrive. Although certain types of interactions between autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms have been well documented, the role of specific organic molecules in regulating inter-species relationships and supporting growth are only beginning to be understood. Here, we examine one such interaction by characterizing the metabolic response of a heterotrophic marine bacterium, Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, to growth on dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), an abundant organosulfur metabolite produced by phytoplankton. When cultivated on DMSP, R. pomeroyi synthesized a quorum-sensing molecule, N-(3-oxotetradecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, at significantly higher levels than during growth on propionate. Concomitant with the production of a quorum-sensing molecule, we observed differential production of intra- and extracellular metabolites including glutamine, vitamin B2 and biosynthetic intermediates of cyclic amino acids. Our metabolomics data indicate that R. pomeroyi changes regulation of its biochemical pathways in a manner that is adaptive for a cooperative lifestyle in the presence of DMSP, in anticipation of phytoplankton-derived nutrients and higher microbial density. This behavior is likely to occur on sinking marine particles, indicating that this response may impact the fate of organic matter. PMID:26882264

  4. NH4+ transport system of a psychrophilic marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. strain ABE-1.

    PubMed

    Chou, M; Matsunaga, T; Takada, Y; Fukunaga, N

    1999-05-01

    NH4(+) transport system of a psychrophilic marine bacterium Vibrio sp. strain ABE-1 (Vibrio ABE-1) was examined by measuring the uptake of [14C]methylammonium ion (14CH3NH3+) into the intact cells. 14CH3NH3+ uptake was detected in cells grown in medium containing glutamate as the sole nitrogen source, but not in those grown in medium containing NH4Cl instead of glutamate. Vibrio ABE-1 did not utilize CH3NH3+ as a carbon or nitrogen source. NH4Cl and nonradiolabeled CH3NH3+ completely inhibited 14CH3NH3+ uptake. These results indicate that 14CH3NH3+ uptake in this bacterium is mediated via an NH4+ transport system and not by a specific carrier for CH3NH3+. The respiratory substrate succinate was required to drive 14CH3NH3+ uptake and the uptake was completely inhibited by KCN, indicating that the uptake was energy dependent. The electrochemical potentials of H+ and/or Na+ across membranes were suggested to be the driving forces for the transport system because the ionophores carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and monensin strongly inhibited uptake activities at pH 6.5 and 8.5, respectively. Furthermore, KCl activated 14CH3NH3+ uptake. The 14CH3NH3+ uptake activity of Vibrio ABE-1 was markedly high at temperatures between 0 degrees and 15 degrees C, and the apparent Km value for CH3NH3+ of the uptake did not change significantly over the temperature range from 0 degrees to 25 degrees C. Thus, the NH4+ transport system of this bacterium was highly active at low temperatures. PMID:10356994

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus plakortidis P203T (DSM 19153), an Alkali- and Salt-Tolerant Marine Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie-ping; Liu, Guo-hong; Ge, Ci-bin; Xiao, Rong-feng; Zheng, Xue-fang; Shi, Huai

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus plakortidis P203T is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, and alkali- and salt-tolerant marine bacterium. Here, we report the 3.97-Mb draft genome sequence of B. plakortidis P203T, which will promote its fundamental research and provide useful information for genomic taxonomy and phylogenomics of Bacillus-like bacteria. PMID:26847896

  6. Draft Genome of Shewanella frigidimarina Ag06-30, a Marine Bacterium Isolated from Potter Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Vázquez, Susana C.; MacCormack, Walter P.; Iriarte, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Shewanella frigidimarina Ag06-30, a marine bacterium from King George Island, Antarctica, which encodes the carbapenemase SFP-1. The assembly contains 4,799,218 bp (G+C content 41.24%). This strain harbors several mobile genetic elements that provide insight into lateral gene transfer and bacterial plasticity and evolution. PMID:27151790

  7. Draft Genome of Shewanella frigidimarina Ag06-30, a Marine Bacterium Isolated from Potter Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Vázquez, Susana C; MacCormack, Walter P; Iriarte, Andrés; Quiroga, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Shewanella frigidimarina Ag06-30, a marine bacterium from King George Island, Antarctica, which encodes the carbapenemase SFP-1. The assembly contains 4,799,218 bp (G+C content 41.24%). This strain harbors several mobile genetic elements that provide insight into lateral gene transfer and bacterial plasticity and evolution. PMID:27151790

  8. Marine bacterium strain screening and pyrethroid insecticide-degrading efficiency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Aili; Liu, Jinghua; Shi, Xizhi; Li, Dexiang; Chen, Jiong; Tang, Daojun

    2014-09-01

    A pyrethroid insecticide-degrading bacterium, strain HS-24, was isolated from an offshore seawater environment. The strain, which can degrade cypermethrin (CYP) and deltamethrin (DEL), was identified as Methylophaga sp. The optimal culture and degradation conditions for CYP and DEL by strain HS-24 is pH 7 at 28°C. Under optimum culture conditions, strain HS-24 exhibited a broad degradation concentration range of 100, 200, 400, 600, and 800 mg/L for CYP and DEL. The metabolic intermediates were analyzed by NMR, which provided strong evidence that CYP and DEL removal occurred mainly because of a biological process. The toxicity of the degradation products of strain HS-24 was studied simultaneously by measuring the light output of the luminescence bacterium. This demonstrated that the biodegradation ability of strain HS-24 significantly decreased the toxicity of CYP- and DEL-contaminated aquaculture seawater. Finally, the findings of this paper indicate that strain HS-24 is thus revealed as a biological agent for the remediation of marine aquatic environments.

  9. Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus NY-4, a novel denitrifying, moderately halophilic marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongpeng; Zi, Xiaoli; Wang, Xinfeng; Zhang, Xia; Gao, Haofeng; Hu, Nan

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of a novel halophilic denitrifying marine bacterium is described. The halophilic bacterium, designated as NY-4, was isolated from soil in Yancheng City, China, and identified as Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus by 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogenetic analysis. This organism can grow in NaCl concentrations ranging from 20 to 120 g/L. Optimum growth occurs at 80 g/L NaCl and pH 8.0. The organism can grow on a broad range of carbon sources and demonstrated efficient denitrifying ability (94.2% of nitrate removal and 80.9% of total nitrogen removal in 48 h). During denitrification by NY-4, no NO2 (-)-N was accumulated, N2 was the only gaseous product and no harmful N2O was produced. Because of its rapid denitrification ability, broad carbon use range and ability to grow under high salinity and pH conditions, NY-4 holds promise for the treatment of saline waste waters. PMID:25538872

  10. Characterization of acetonitrile-tolerant marine bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. SBH81 and its tolerance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kongpol, Ajiraporn; Kato, Junichi; Tajima, Takahisa; Vangnai, Alisa S

    2012-01-01

    A Gram-positive marine bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. SBH81, was isolated as a hydrophilic organic-solvent tolerant bacterium, and exhibited high tolerance to various types of toxic hydrophilic organic solvents, including acetonitrile, at relatively high concentrations (up to 6% [v/v]) under the growing conditions. Investigation of its tolerance mechanisms illustrated that it does not rely on solvent inactivation processes or modification of cell surface characteristics, but rather, increase of the cell size lowers solvent partitioning into cells and the extrusion of solvents through the efflux system. A test using efflux pump inhibitors suggested that secondary transporters, i.e. resistance nodulation cell division (RND) and the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family, are involved in acetonitrile tolerance in this strain. In addition, its acetonitrile tolerance ability could be stably and significantly enhanced by repetitive growth in the presence of toxic acetonitrile. The marked acetonitrile tolerance of Exiguobacterium sp. SBH81 indicates its potential use as a host for biotechnological fermentation processes as well as bioremediation. PMID:21971080

  11. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, a bacterium pathogenic for marine animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Amable J; Lemos, Manuel L; Osorio, Carlos R

    2013-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (formerly Vibrio damsela) is a pathogen of a variety of marine animals including fish, crustaceans, molluscs, and cetaceans. In humans, it can cause opportunistic infections that may evolve into necrotizing fasciitis with fatal outcome. Although the genetic basis of virulence in this bacterium is not completely elucidated, recent findings demonstrate that the phospholipase-D Dly (damselysin) and the pore-forming toxins HlyApl and HlyAch play a main role in virulence for homeotherms and poikilotherms. The acquisition of the virulence plasmid pPHDD1 that encodes Dly and HlyApl has likely constituted a main driving force in the evolution of a highly hemolytic lineage within the subspecies. Interestingly, strains that naturally lack pPHDD1 show a strong pathogenic potential for a variety of fish species, indicating the existence of yet uncharacterized virulence factors. Future and deep analysis of the complete genome sequence of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae will surely provide a clearer picture of the virulence factors employed by this bacterium to cause disease in such a varied range of hosts. PMID:24093021

  12. The nucleotide sequence of Beneckea harveyi 5S rRNA. [bioluminescent marine bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehrsen, K. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    The primary sequence of the 5S ribosomal RNA isolated from the free-living bioluminescent marine bacterium Beneckea harveyi is reported and discussed in regard to indications of phylogenetic relationships with the bacteria Escherichia coli and Photobacterium phosphoreum. Sequences were determined for oligonucleotide products generated by digestion with ribonuclease T1, pancreatic ribonuclease and ribonuclease T2. The presence of heterogeneity is indicated for two sites. The B. harveyi sequence can be arranged into the same four helix secondary structures as E. coli and other prokaryotic 5S rRNAs. Examination of the 5S-RNS sequences of the three bacteria indicates that B. harveyi and P. phosphoreum are specifically related and share a common ancestor which diverged from an ancestor of E. coli at a somewhat earlier time, consistent with previous studies.

  13. Acetylcholinesterase-Inhibiting Activity of Pyrrole Derivatives from a Novel Marine Gliding Bacterium, Rapidithrix thailandica

    PubMed Central

    Sangnoi, Yutthapong; Sakulkeo, Oraphan; Yuenyongsawad, Supreeya; Kanjana-opas, Akkharawit; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Plubrukarn, Anuchit; Suwanborirux, Khanit

    2008-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting activity of marinoquinoline A (1), a new pyrroloquinoline from a novel species of a marine gliding bacterium Rapidithrix thailandica, was assessed (IC50 4.9 μM). Two related pyrrole derivatives, 3-(2′-aminophenyl)-pyrrole (3) and 2,2-dimethyl-pyrrolo-1,2-dihydroquinoline (4), were also isolated from two other strains of R. thailandica. The isolation of 3 from a natural source is reported here for the first time. Compound 4 was proposed to be an isolation artifact derived from 3. The two isolated compounds were virtually inactive in the acetylcholinesterase-inhibitory assay (enzyme inhibition < 30% at 0.1 g L−1). PMID:19172195

  14. Antagonistic effect of monovalent cations in maintenance of cellular integrity of a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    De Voe, I W; Oginsky, E L

    1969-06-01

    The susceptibility of a marine bacterium, designated isolate c-A1, to lysis in distilled water and in salt solutions has been found to be a function of Na(+) concentration. Optical densities of cells pre-exposed to 0.05 m MgCl(2) were maintained in 1.0 m KCl, whereas those of cells pre-exposed to 1.0 m NaCl were not maintained at any KCl concentration tested. Cells transferred from MgCl(2) to low concentrations of NaCl underwent more extensive lysis than did those transferred to distilled water. The degree of disruption of cells transferred to distilled water from mixtures of 0.05 m MgCl(2) and NaCl (0 to 1.0 m) was dependent on the concentration of NaCl; similar results were obtained with LiCl, but not with KCl. In electron micrographs of thin sections, c-A1 cell envelopes consisted of two double-track layers which fractured and peeled apart on lysis after pre-exposure to NaCl-MgCl(2) mixtures. Envelope eruptions or "hernias" occurred only in lysed cells pre-exposed to NaCl alone. No evidence for a functional lytic enzyme was found. Comparative studies on a terrestrial pseudomonad with a multilayered envelope indicated that preexposure to NaCl did not enhance the susceptibility of this cell to lysis in distilled water. The lytic susceptibility of the marine bacterium is considered to be the consequence of competition between specific monovalent cations and Mg(++) for electrostatic interactions with components of the cell envelope of this organism. PMID:5788707

  15. Antagonistic Effect of Monovalent Cations in Maintenance of Cellular Integrity of a Marine Bacterium1

    PubMed Central

    De Voe, Irving W.; Oginsky, Evelyn L.

    1969-01-01

    The susceptibility of a marine bacterium, designated isolate c-A1, to lysis in distilled water and in salt solutions has been found to be a function of Na+ concentration. Optical densities of cells pre-exposed to 0.05 m MgCl2 were maintained in 1.0 m KCl, whereas those of cells pre-exposed to 1.0 m NaCl were not maintained at any KCl concentration tested. Cells transferred from MgCl2 to low concentrations of NaCl underwent more extensive lysis than did those transferred to distilled water. The degree of disruption of cells transferred to distilled water from mixtures of 0.05 m MgCl2 and NaCl (0 to 1.0 m) was dependent on the concentration of NaCl; similar results were obtained with LiCl, but not with KCl. In electron micrographs of thin sections, c-A1 cell envelopes consisted of two double-track layers which fractured and peeled apart on lysis after pre-exposure to NaCl-MgCl2 mixtures. Envelope eruptions or “hernias” occurred only in lysed cells pre-exposed to NaCl alone. No evidence for a functional lytic enzyme was found. Comparative studies on a terrestrial pseudomonad with a multilayered envelope indicated that preexposure to NaCl did not enhance the susceptibility of this cell to lysis in distilled water. The lytic susceptibility of the marine bacterium is considered to be the consequence of competition between specific monovalent cations and Mg++ for electrostatic interactions with components of the cell envelope of this organism. Images PMID:5788707

  16. A Novel Eliminase from a Marine Bacterium That Degrades Hyaluronan and Chondroitin Sulfate*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wenjun; Wang, Wenshuang; Zhao, Mei; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Li, Fuchuan

    2014-01-01

    Lyases cleave glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in an eliminative mechanism and are important tools for the structural analysis and oligosaccharide preparation of GAGs. Various GAG lyases have been identified from terrestrial but not marine organisms even though marine animals are rich in GAGs with unique structures and functions. Herein we isolated a novel GAG lyase for the first time from the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. FC509 and then recombinantly expressed and characterized it. It showed strong lyase activity toward hyaluronan (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) and was designated as HA and CS lyase (HCLase). It exhibited the highest activities to both substrates at pH 8.0 and 0.5 m NaCl at 30 °C. Its activity toward HA was less sensitive to pH than its CS lyase activity. As with most other marine enzymes, HCLase is a halophilic enzyme and very stable at temperatures from 0 to 40 °C for up to 24 h, but its activity is independent of divalent metal ions. The specific activity of HCLase against HA and CS reached a markedly high level of hundreds of thousands units/mg of protein under optimum conditions. The HCLase-resistant tetrasaccharide Δ4,5HexUAα1-3GalNAc(6-O-sulfate)β1-4GlcUA(2-O-sulfate)β1-3GalNAc(6-O-sulfate) was isolated from CS-D, the structure of which indicated that HCLase could not cleave the galactosaminidic linkage bound to 2-O-sulfated d-glucuronic acid (GlcUA) in CS chains. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that HCLase may work via a catalytic mechanism in which Tyr-His acts as the Brønsted base and acid. Thus, the identification of HCLase provides a useful tool for HA- and CS-related research and applications. PMID:25122756

  17. Could narrow marine embayments prevent sea-glacier invasion, and protect photosynthetic life during a Snowball Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Adam J.

    During the Snowball Earth events of the Neoproterozoic, the Earth's oceans may have been completely covered in ice. This ice would have been thick enough to prohibit the transmission of light to the liquid water underneath the entirely frozen surface of the ocean. However, photosynthetic eukaryotes are thought to have survived during these events. This is the first work to throughly attempt to reconcile how photosynthetic eukaryotes survived on a planet with a completely frozen ocean surface. Narrow marine embayments like the modern-day Red Sea, would restrict the inflow of sea glaciers. These embayments, if located in regions of net sublimation, would restrict sea-glacier invasion and could provide refuge for these organisms at the end of their channels. This work demonstrates that under a set of climate conditions and channel geometries, narrow marine embayments allow for incomplete sea-glacier invasion, a necessary condition for marine embayments to provide refugia.

  18. Against the rules: a marine bacterium, Loktanella rosea, possesses a unique lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Ieranò, Teresa; Silipo, Alba; Nazarenko, Evgeny L; Gorshkova, Raisa P; Ivanova, Elena P; Garozzo, Domenico; Sturiale, Luisa; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Molinaro, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    Bacteria are an inimitable source of new glyco-structures potentially useful in medicinal and environmental chemistry. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS; endotoxins) are the major components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria; being exposed toward the external environment they can undergo structural changes and thus, they often possess peculiar chemical features that allow them to thrive in harsh chemical and physical environments. Marine bacteria have evolved and adapted over millions of years in order to succeed in different environments, finding a niche for their survival characterized by severe physical or chemical parameters. The present work focuses on the structural investigation of the LPS from Loktanella rosea, a marine Gram-negative bacterium. Through chemical analysis, 2D nuclear magnetic resonance and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry investigations, a unique LPS carbohydrate backbone has been defined. The lipid A skeleton consists of a trisaccharide backbone lacking the typical phosphate groups and is characterized by two beta-glucosamines and an alpha-galacturonic acid. The core region is built up of three ulosonic acids, with two 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulopyranosonic acid residues, one of which is carrying a neuraminic acid. This carbohydrate structure is an exceptional variation from the typical architectural skeleton of endotoxins which consequently implies a very different biosynthesis. PMID:20093711

  19. Genome sequence of Enterobacter sp. ST3, a quorum sensing bacterium associated with marine dinoflagellate

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Lao, Yong-Min; Ma, Zhi-Ping; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Phycosphere environment is a typical marine niche, harbor diverse populations of microorganisms, which are thought to play a critical role in algae host and influence mutualistic and competitive interactions. Understanding quorum sensing-based acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) language may shed light on the interaction between algal-associated microbial communities in the native environment. In this work, we isolated an epidermal bacterium (was tentatively named Enterobacter sp. ST3, and deposited in SOA China, the number is MCCC1K02277-ST3) from the marine dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea, and found it has the ability to produce short-chain AHL signal. In order to better understand its communication information at molecular level, the genomic map was investigated. The genome size was determined to be 4.81 Mb with a G + C content of 55.59%, comprising 6 scaffolds of 75 contigs containing 4647 protein-coding genes. The functional proteins were predicted, and 3534 proteins were assigned to COG functional categories. An AHL-relating gene, LuxR, was found in upstream position at contig 1. This genome data may provide clues to increase understanding of the chemical characterization and ecological behavior of strain ST3 in the phycosphere microenvironment. PMID:26981407

  20. Complete Cellulase System in the Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans Strain 2-40T

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Larry E.; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Ekborg, Nathan A.; Hutcheson, Steven W.; Weiner, Ronald M.

    2006-01-01

    Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 is a representative of an emerging group of marine complex polysaccharide (CP)-degrading bacteria. It is unique in its metabolic versatility, being able to degrade at least 10 distinct CPs from diverse algal, plant and invertebrate sources. The S. degradans genome has been sequenced to completion, and more than 180 open reading frames have been identified that encode carbohydrases. Over half of these are likely to act on plant cell wall polymers. In fact, there appears to be a full array of enzymes that degrade and metabolize plant cell walls. Genomic and proteomic analyses reveal 13 cellulose depolymerases complemented by seven accessory enzymes, including two cellodextrinases, three cellobiases, a cellodextrin phosphorylase, and a cellobiose phosphorylase. Most of these enzymes exhibit modular architecture, and some contain novel combinations of catalytic and/or substrate binding modules. This is exemplified by endoglucanase Cel5A, which has three internal family 6 carbohydrate binding modules (CBM6) and two catalytic modules from family five of glycosyl hydrolases (GH5) and by Cel6A, a nonreducing-end cellobiohydrolase from family GH6 with tandem CBM2s. This is the first report of a complete and functional cellulase system in a marine bacterium with a sequenced genome. PMID:16707677

  1. Structural and conformational study of the O-polysaccharide produced by the metabolically versatile photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain BisA53.

    PubMed

    Silipo, Alba; Di Lorenzo, Flaviana; De Felice, Antonia; Vanacore, Adele; De Castro, Cristina; Gully, Djamel; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Giraud, Eric; Molinaro, Antonio

    2014-12-19

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris is a purple photosynthetic bacterium characterized by a versatile nature and a remarkable ability to adapt to various environments. In this work, we focused our attention to its membrane characteristics and defined the structural and conformational features of the O-chain polysaccharide of LPS isolated from R. palustris strain BisA53. This strain produces a polymer with a trisaccharide repeating unit characterized by d-rhamnose, 3-deoxy-d-lyxo-2-heptulosaric acid (Dha), and a novel C-branched monosaccharide, a 4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-3-C-methyl-2-O-methyl-α-l-glucopyranose whose absolute configuration has been determined by a combination of 2D NMR spectroscopy and molecular mechanic and dynamic simulation. PMID:25263905

  2. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Akano, T.; Fukatsu, K.; Miyasaka, H. |

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogen is a clean energy alternative to the fossil fuels, the main source of greenhouse gas emissions. We developed a stable system for the conversion of solar energy into hydrogen using photosynthetic microorganisms. Our system consists of the following three stages: (1) Photosynthetic starch accumulation in green microalgae (400 L x2); (2) Dark anaerobic fermentation of the algal starch biomass to produce hydrogen and organic compounds (155 L x2); and (3) Further conversion of the organic compounds to produce hydrogen using photosynthetic bacteria (three types of reactors, parallel plate, raceway, and tubular). We constructed a test plant of this process at Nankoh power plant of Kansai Electric Power Company in Osaka, Japan, and carried out a series of tests using CO{sub 2} obtained from a chemical absorption pilot-plant. The photobiological hydrogen production process used a combination of a marine alga, Chlamydomonas sp. MGA 161 and marine photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas sp. W-1S. The dark anaerobic fermentation of algal starch biomass was also investigated. Sustained and stable starch accumulation, starch degradation in the algal cell, and hydrogen production from algal fermentation and photosynthetic bacteria in the light were demonstrated during several experiments. 3 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Effect of algal extract on H2 production by a photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobium marinum A-501: analysis of stimulating effect using a kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Hideo; Nagase, Hiroyasu; Hashimoto, Kyoko; Kimata, Shiho; Doi, Mikio; Hirata, Kazumasa; Miyamoto, Kazuhisa

    2002-01-01

    We have established a system for hydrogen (H2) production from algal starch via lactic acid using a mixed culture of a lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus amylovorus, and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobium marinum A-501. We found that the H2 production from lactate was stimulated in the presence of algal extract, which was obtained from algal biomass homogenate used as a substrate in the system by removing settleable solids including starch. To analyze the stimulating effect of algal extract on H2 production, we developed a kinetic model for H2 production by R. marinum A-501. The model revealed that approximately 20% of lactate was consumed for cell mass production, and the remaining portion was a source of reducing power to drive hydrogen production or other cellular processes. In the presence of algal extract, the model indicated that the conversion efficiency from lactate to the reducing power increased from 0.56 to 0.80 and nitrogenase activity increased up to twofold, resulting in the increase in yield of hydrogen from lactate from 29% to 48%. These results suggest that algal extract can attenuate the limitation process in lactate catabolism by which the supplementation of reducing power to drive H2 production was suppressed. PMID:16233271

  4. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparks, N.H.C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Lovley, D.R.; Jannasch, H.W.; Frankel, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 ?? 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of {110} faces which are capped and truncated by {111} end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization. ?? 1990.

  5. Stereochemical course of hydrolytic reaction catalyzed by alpha-galactosidase from cold adaptable marine bacterium of genus Pseudoalteromonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakunina, Irina; Balabanova, Larissa; Golotin, Vasiliy; Slepchenko, Lyubov; Isakov, Vladimir; Rasskazov, Valeriy

    2014-10-01

    The recombinant α-galactosidase of the marine bacterium (α-PsGal) was synthesized with the use of the plasmid 40Gal, consisting of plasmid pET-40b (+) (Novagen) and the gene corresponding to the open reading frame of the mature α-galactosidase of marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. KMM 701, transformed into the E. coli Rosetta(DE3) cells. In order to understand the mechanism of action, the stereochemistry of hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl α-D-galactopyranoside (4-NPGP) by α-PsGal was measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The kinetics of formation of α- and β-anomer of galactose showed that α-anomer initially formed and accumulated, and then an appreciable amount of β-anomer appeared as a result of mutarotation. The data clearly show that the enzymatic hydrolysis of 4-NPGP proceeds with the retention of anomeric configuration, probably, due to a double displacement mechanism of reaction.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Providencia sneebia Strain ST1, a Quorum Sensing Bacterium Associated with Marine Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Lao, Yong-Min; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Providencia sneebia strain ST1 is a symbiotic bacterium (belonging to phylum gammaproteobacteria) with marine microalgae. This bacterium exhibits the ability to produce N-Acyl homoserine lactone signal molecule. To date, no genome that originates from marine Providencia spp. has been reported. In this study, we present the genome sequence of this strain. It has a genome size of 4.89 M, with 19 contigs and an average G+C of 51.97%. The function of 4,631 proteins was predicted, and 3,652 proteins were assigned to COG functional categories. Among them, 407 genes are involved in carbohydrate metabolism, 306 genes participate in nitrogen utilization and energy conversion, and 185 genes related to signal transduction process. Thus, this strain plays an active role in the biogeochemical cycle in algal life history. The whole-genome of this isolate and annotation will help enhance understanding of bacterial ecological behavior in the phycosphere. PMID:27026792

  7. Purification and Characterization of a Fucoidanase (FNase S) from a Marine Bacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis PF-1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jung; Park, Joo Woong; Park, Jae Kweon; Choi, Doo Jin; Park, Yong Il

    2015-01-01

    The Search for enzyme activities that efficiently degrade marine polysaccharides is becoming an increasingly important area for both structural analysis and production of lower-molecular weight oligosaccharides. In this study, an endo-acting fucoidanase that degrades Miyeokgui fucoidan (MF), a sulfated galactofucan isolated from the sporophyll (called Miyeokgui in Korean) of Undaria pinnatifida, into smaller-sized galactofuco-oligosaccharides (1000–4000 Da) was purified from a marine bacterium, Sphingomonas paucimobilis PF-1, by ammonium sulfate precipitation, diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sepharose column chromatography, and chromatofocusing. The specific activity of this enzyme was approximately 112-fold higher than that of the crude enzyme, and its molecular weight was approximately 130 kDa (FNase S), as determined by native gel electrophoresis and 130 (S1), 70 (S2) and 60 (S3) kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The optimum pH and temperature of FNase S were pH 6.0–7.0 and 40–45 °C, respectively. FNase S activity was enhanced by Mn2+ and Na+ (115.7% and 131.2%), but it was inhibited by Ca2+, K+, Ba2+, Cu2+ (96%, 83.7%, 84.3%, and 89.3%, respectively), each at 1 mM. The Km, Vmax and Kcat values of FNase S on MF were 1.7 mM, 0.62 mg·min−1, and 0.38·S−1, respectively. This enzyme could be a valuable tool for the structural analysis of fucoidans and production of bioactive fuco-oligosaccharides. PMID:26193285

  8. Comprehensive insights into the response of Alexandrium tamarense to algicidal component secreted by a marine bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xueqian; Li, Dong; Li, Yi; Chen, Zhangran; Chen, Yao; Cai, Guanjing; Yang, Xujun; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms occur throughout the world, threatening human health, and destroying marine ecosystems. Alexandrium tamarense is a globally distributed and notoriously toxic dinoflagellate that is responsible for most paralytic shellfish poisoning incidents. The culture supernatant of the marine algicidal bacterium BS02 showed potent algicidal effects on A. tamarense ATGD98-006. In this study, we investigated the effects of this supernatant on A. tamarense at physiological and biochemical levels to elucidate the mechanism involved in the inhibition of algal growth by the supernatant of the strain BS02. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels increased following exposure to the BS02 supernatant, indicating that the algal cells had suffered from oxidative damage. The levels of cellular pigments, including chlorophyll a and carotenoids, were significantly decreased, which indicated that the accumulation of ROS destroyed pigment synthesis. The decline of the maximum photochemical quantum yield (Fv/Fm) and relative electron transport rate (rETR) suggested that the photosynthesis systems of algal cells were attacked by the BS02 supernatant. To eliminate the ROS, the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), increased significantly within a short period of time. Real-time PCR revealed changes in the transcript abundances of two target photosynthesis-related genes (psbA and psbD) and two target respiration-related genes (cob and cox). The transcription of the respiration-related genes was significantly inhibited by the treatments, which indicated that the respiratory system was disturbed. Our results demonstrate that the BS02 supernatant can affect the photosynthesis process and might block the PS II electron transport chain, leading to the production of excessive ROS. The increased ROS can further destroy membrane integrity and pigments, ultimately inducing algal cell death. PMID:25667582

  9. Comprehensive insights into the response of Alexandrium tamarense to algicidal component secreted by a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xueqian; Li, Dong; Li, Yi; Chen, Zhangran; Chen, Yao; Cai, Guanjing; Yang, Xujun; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms occur throughout the world, threatening human health, and destroying marine ecosystems. Alexandrium tamarense is a globally distributed and notoriously toxic dinoflagellate that is responsible for most paralytic shellfish poisoning incidents. The culture supernatant of the marine algicidal bacterium BS02 showed potent algicidal effects on A. tamarense ATGD98-006. In this study, we investigated the effects of this supernatant on A. tamarense at physiological and biochemical levels to elucidate the mechanism involved in the inhibition of algal growth by the supernatant of the strain BS02. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels increased following exposure to the BS02 supernatant, indicating that the algal cells had suffered from oxidative damage. The levels of cellular pigments, including chlorophyll a and carotenoids, were significantly decreased, which indicated that the accumulation of ROS destroyed pigment synthesis. The decline of the maximum photochemical quantum yield (Fv/Fm) and relative electron transport rate (rETR) suggested that the photosynthesis systems of algal cells were attacked by the BS02 supernatant. To eliminate the ROS, the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), increased significantly within a short period of time. Real-time PCR revealed changes in the transcript abundances of two target photosynthesis-related genes (psbA and psbD) and two target respiration-related genes (cob and cox). The transcription of the respiration-related genes was significantly inhibited by the treatments, which indicated that the respiratory system was disturbed. Our results demonstrate that the BS02 supernatant can affect the photosynthesis process and might block the PS II electron transport chain, leading to the production of excessive ROS. The increased ROS can further destroy membrane integrity and pigments, ultimately inducing algal cell death. PMID:25667582

  10. Tenacibactins A-D, hydroxamate siderophores from a marine-derived bacterium, Tenacibaculum sp. A4K-17.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Kanoh, Kaneo; Adachi, Kyoko; Matsuda, Satoru; Shizuri, Yoshikazu

    2007-04-01

    Four new hydroxamate siderophores, tenacibactins A-D (1-4), were isolated from a culture broth of the marine-derived bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. A4K-17. The structures of these tenacibactins were determined by NMR analyses and ESIMS/MS experiments. The iron-binding (chelating) activity of 1-4 was evaluated by the chrome azurol sulfonate (CAS) assay. PMID:17319723

  11. Purification and characterization of catalase from marine bacterium Acinetobacter sp. YS0810.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xinhua; Wang, Wei; Hao, Jianhua; Zhu, Xianglin; Sun, Mi

    2014-01-01

    The catalase from marine bacterium Acinetobacter sp. YS0810 (YS0810CAT) was purified and characterized. Consecutive steps were used to achieve the purified enzyme as follows: ethanol precipitation, DEAE Sepharose ion exchange, Superdex 200 gel filtration, and Resource Q ion exchange. The active enzyme consisted of four identical subunits of 57.256 kDa. It showed a Soret peak at 405 nm, indicating the presence of iron protoporphyrin IX. The catalase was not apparently reduced by sodium dithionite but was inhibited by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, hydroxylamine hydrochloride, and sodium azide. Peroxidase-like activity was not found with the substrate o-phenylenediamine. So the catalase was determined to be a monofunctional catalase. N-terminal amino acid of the catalase analysis gave the sequence SQDPKKCPVTHLTTE, which showed high degree of homology with those of known catalases from bacteria. The analysis of amino acid sequence of the purified catalase by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed that it was a new catalase, in spite of its high homology with those of known catalases from other bacteria. The catalase showed high alkali stability and thermostability. PMID:25045672

  12. A polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Flammeovirga sp. MY04 and its extracellular agarase system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wenjun; Gu, Jingyan; Yan, Qiujie; Li, Jungang; Wu, Zhihong; Gu, Qianqun; Li, Yuezhong

    2012-09-01

    Bacteria of the genus Flammeovirga can digest complex polysaccharides (CPs), but no details have been reported regarding the CP depolymerases of these bacteria. MY04, an agarolytic marine bacterium isolated from coastal sediments, has been identified as a new member of the genus Flammeovirga. The MY04 strain is able to utilize multiple CPs as a sole carbon source and grows well on agarose, mannan, or xylan. This strain produces high concentrations of extracellular proteins (490 mg L-1 ± 18.2 mg L-1 liquid culture) that exhibit efficient and extensive degradation activities on various polysaccharides, especially agarose. These proteins have an activity of 310 U mg-1 ± 9.6 U mg-1 proteins. The extracellular agarase system (EAS) in the crude extracellular enzymes contains at least four agarose depolymerases, which are with molecular masses of approximately 30-70 kDa. The EAS is stable at a wide range of pH values (6.0-11.0), temperatures (0-50°C), and sodium chloride (NaCl) concentrations (0-0.9 mol L-1). Two major degradation products generated from agarose by the EAS are identified to be neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose, suggesting that β-agarases are the major constituents of the MY04 EAS. These results suggest that the Flammeovirga strain MY04 and its polysaccharide-degradation system hold great promise in industrial applications.

  13. Copper-induced production of copper-binding supernatant proteins by the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood-Sears, V.; Gordon, A.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Growth of the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus is temporarily inhibited by micromolar levels of copper. During the copper-induced lag phase, supernatant compounds and detoxify copper are produced. In this study two copper-inducible supernatant proteins having molecular masses of ca. 21 and 19 kilodaltons (CuBP1 and CuPB2) were identified; these proteins were, respectively, 25 and 46 times amplified in supernatants of copper-challenged cultures compared with controls. Experiments in which chloramphenicol was added to cultures indicated that there was de novo synthesis of these proteins in response to copper. When supernatants were separated by gel permeation chromatography, CuBP1 and CuPB2 coeluted with a copper-induced peak in copper-binding activity. CuBP1 and CuBP2 from whole supernatants were concentrated and partially purified by using a copper-charged immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography column, confirming the affinity of these proteins for copper. A comparison of cell pellets and supernatants demonstrated that CuBP1 was more concentrated in supernatants than in cells. Our data are consistent with a model for a novel mechanism of copper detoxification in which excretion of copper-binding protein is induced by copper.

  14. A new κ-carrageenase CgkS from marine bacterium Shewanella sp. Kz7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linna; Li, Shangyong; Zhang, Shilong; Li, Jiejing; Yu, Wengong; Gong, Qianhong

    2015-08-01

    A new κ-carrageenase gene cgkS was cloned from marine bacterium Shewanella sp. Kz7 by using degenerate and site-finding PCR. The gene was comprised of an open reading frame of 1224 bp, encoding 407 amino acid residues, with a signal peptide of 24 residues. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence, the κ-carrageenase CgkS was classified into the Glycoside Hydrolase family 16. The cgkS gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity with a specific activity of 716.8 U mg-1 and a yield of 69%. Recombinant CgkS was most active at 45°C and pH 8.0. It was stable at pH 6.0-9.0 and below 30°C. The enzyme did not require NaCl for activity, although its activity was enhanced by NaCl. CgkS degraded κ-carrageenan in an endo-fashion releasing tetrasaccharides and disaccharides as main hydrolysis products.

  15. Three Alginate Lyases from Marine Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens HZJ216: Purification and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Liyan, Li; Jiang, Xiaolu; Wang, Peng; Guan, Huashi; Guo, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Three alginate lyases (A, B, and C) from an alginate-degrading marine bacterium strain HZJ216 isolated from brown seaweed in the Yellow Sea of China and identified preliminarily as Pseudomonas fluorescens are purified, and their biochemical properties are described. Molecular masses of the three enzymes are determined by SDS-PAGE to be 60.25, 36, and 23 kDa with isoelectric points of 4, 4.36, and 4.59, respectively. Investigations of these enzymes at different pH and temperatures show that they are most active at pH 7.0 and 35 C. Alginate lyases A and B are stable in the pH range of 5.0 9.0, while alginate lyase C is stable in the pH range of 5.0 7.0. Among the metal ions tested, additions of Na+, K+, and Mg2+ ions can enhance the enzyme activities while Fe2+, Fe3+, Ba2+, and Zn2+ ions show inhibitory effects. The substrate specificity results demonstrate that alginate lyase C has the specificity for G block while alginate lyases A and B have the activities for both M and G blocks. It is the first report about extracellular alginate lyases with high alginate-degrading activity from P. fluorescens.

  16. Recombinant α-NAcetylgalactosaminidase from Marine Bacterium-Modifying A Erythrocyte Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Balabanova, L. A.; Golotin, V. A.; Bakunina, I. Y.; Slepchenko, L. V.; Isakov, V. V.; Podvolotskaya, A. B.; Rasskazov, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    A plasmid based on pET-40b was constructed to synthesize recombinant α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase of the marine bacterium Arenibacter latericius KMM 426T (α-AlNaGal) in Escherichia coli cells. The yield of α-Al- NaGal attains 10 mg/ml with activity of 49.7 ± 1.3 U at 16°C, concentration of inductor 2 mM, and cultivation for 12 h. Techniques such as anion exchange, metal affinity and gel filtration chromatography to purify α-AlNaGal were applied. α-AlNaGal is a homodimer with a molecular weight of 164 kDa. This enzyme is stable at up to 50°C with a temperature range optimum activity of 20–37°C. Furthermore, its activity is independent of the presence of metal ions in the incubation medium. 1H NMR spectroscopy revealed that α-AlNaGal catalyzes the hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic bond with retention of anomeric stereochemistry and possesses a mechanism of action identical to that of other glycoside hydrolases of the 109 family. α-AlNaGal reduces the serological activity of A erythrocytes at pH 7.3. This property of α-AlNaGal can potentially be used for enzymatic conversion of A and AB erythrocytes to blood group O erythrocytes. PMID:25927009

  17. Recombinant α-NAcetylgalactosaminidase from Marine Bacterium-Modifying A Erythrocyte Antigens.

    PubMed

    Balabanova, L A; Golotin, V A; Bakunina, I Y; Slepchenko, L V; Isakov, V V; Podvolotskaya, A B; Rasskazov, V A

    2015-01-01

    A plasmid based on pET-40b was constructed to synthesize recombinant α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase of the marine bacterium Arenibacter latericius KMM 426T (α-AlNaGal) in Escherichia coli cells. The yield of α-Al- NaGal attains 10 mg/ml with activity of 49.7 ± 1.3 U at 16°C, concentration of inductor 2 mM, and cultivation for 12 h. Techniques such as anion exchange, metal affinity and gel filtration chromatography to purify α-AlNaGal were applied. α-AlNaGal is a homodimer with a molecular weight of 164 kDa. This enzyme is stable at up to 50°C with a temperature range optimum activity of 20-37°C. Furthermore, its activity is independent of the presence of metal ions in the incubation medium. 1H NMR spectroscopy revealed that α-AlNaGal catalyzes the hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic bond with retention of anomeric stereochemistry and possesses a mechanism of action identical to that of other glycoside hydrolases of the 109 family. α-AlNaGal reduces the serological activity of A erythrocytes at pH 7.3. This property of α-AlNaGal can potentially be used for enzymatic conversion of A and AB erythrocytes to blood group O erythrocytes. PMID:25927009

  18. Effects of Inorganic Particles on Metabolism by a Periphytic Marine Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Andrew S.; Gerchakov, Sol M.; Millero, Frank J.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements were made of adsorption of a periphytic marine bacterium, glucose, and glutamic acid to inorganic particles in seawater and defined bacterial growth medium. Measurements of the metabolism of bacteria were made in the presence and absence of particles by microcalorimetry and radiorespirometry. It was found that hydroxyapatite adsorbs glutamic acid, but not glucose, from the experimental medium. It was also found that hydroxyapatite adsorbs essentially all of the bacteria from the medium when the bacterial concentration is approximately 6 × 105 bacteria per ml. If the bacterial concentration is approximately 6 × 107, then only a small fraction of cells become attached. It was therefore possible to select bacterial concentrations and organic nutrients so that bacterial attachment, organic nutrient adsorption, or both would occur in different experiments. In this experimental system the metabolism by attached and nonattached bacteria of adsorbing and nonadsorbing organic nutrients was measured. The results show that bacterial activity in this model system was not enhanced by the particles, regardless of whether the bacteria, the organic nutrient, or both were associated with the surface. In fact, the respiratory activity of the attached bacteria was diminished in comparison with that of free bacteria. PMID:16346191

  19. Cloning, expression, purification and application of a novel chitinase from a thermophilic marine bacterium Paenibacillus barengoltzii.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaoqing; Fu, Xing; Yan, Qiaojuan; Guo, Yu; Liu, Zhuqing; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2016-02-01

    A novel chitinase gene (PbChi70) from a marine bacterium Paenicibacillus barengoltzii was cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme (PbChi70) was purified to homogeneity with a recovery yield of 51.9%. The molecular mass of purified enzyme was estimated to be 70.0 kDa by SDS-PAGE. PbChi70 displayed maximal activity at pH 5.5 and 55 °C, respectively. It exhibited strict substrate specificity for colloidal chitin, glycol chitin, powdery chitin, and N-acetyl chitooligosaccharides with degrees of polymerization above three. The enzyme exhibited an endo-type cleavage pattern and hydrolyzed colloidal chitin to yield mainly (GlcNAc)2. Furthermore, colloidal chitin was hydrolyzed by PbChi70 to produce 21.6 mg mL(-1) (GlcNAc)2 with the highest conversion yield of 89.5% (w/w). (GlcNAc)2 was further separated by an active charcoal column with a purity of 99% and a final yield of 61%. The unique enzymatic properties of the chitinase may make it a good candidate for (GlcNAc)2 production. PMID:26304445

  20. Colwellia asteriadis sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from the starfish Asterias amurensis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Ju; Kwon, Hak Cheol; Koh, Hye Yeon; Kim, Young Sug; Yang, Hyun Ok

    2010-08-01

    A marine bacterial strain, KMD 002T, was isolated from an Amur starfish, Asterias amurensis, collected in the East Sea of Korea. Strain KMD 002T was a Gram-negative, beige-pigmented, rod-shaped bacterium. The strain was capable of growth at relatively low temperatures (4-25 degrees C) and over a broad pH range (pH 4.0-10.0). The major fatty acids were C16:1omega7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH and C16:0 and the predominant isoprenoid quinone was Q-8. The DNA G+C content of strain KMD 002T was 40.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain KMD 002T belonged to the genus Colwellia. However, various phenotypic properties as well as low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities to members of the genus Colwellia (94.1-96.7%) suggested that strain KMD 002T is a representative of a novel species, for which the name Colwellia asteriadis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KMD 002T (=KCCM 90077T =JCM 15608T). PMID:19801395

  1. Regulation of iron transport related genes by boron in the marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ariel; Trimble, Lyndsay; Hobusch, Ashtian R; Schroeder, Kristine J; Amin, Shady A; Hartnett, Andrej D; Barker, Ryan A; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Carrano, Carl J

    2013-08-01

    While there has been extensive interest in the use of boron isotope ratios as a surrogate of pH in paleoclimate studies in the context of climate change-related questions, the high (0.4 mM) concentration and the depth-independent (conservative or non-nutrient-like) concentration profile of this element have led to boron being neglected as a potentially biologically relevant element in the modern ocean. Here we report that boron affects the expression of a number of protein and genes in the "algal-associated" Gram-negative marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893. Most intriguingly, a number of these proteins and genes are related to iron uptake. In a recent separate publication we have shown that boron regulates one such iron transport related protein, i.e. the periplasmic iron binding protein FbpA via a direct interaction of the metalloid with this protein. Here we show that a number of other iron uptake related genes are also affected by boron but in the opposite way i.e. they are up-regulated. We propose that the differential effect of boron on FbpA expression relative to other iron transport related genes is a result of an interaction between boron and the global iron regulatory protein Fur. PMID:23775459

  2. Evidence for the subcellular localization and specificity of chlordane inhibition in the marine bacterium Aeromonas proteolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Nakas, J P; Litchfield, C D

    1979-01-01

    Sublethal levels (10 to 100 micrograms/ml) of the chlorinated insecticide chlordane (1,2,4,5,6,7,8,8-octachloro-3a,4,7,7a-tetrahydro-4,7-methanoindan) were introduced into the growth medium of the marine bacterium, Aeromonas proteolytica. Chlordane inhibited the synthesis of an extracellular endopeptidase by almost 40% but exhibited no such inhibition of the extracellular aminopeptidase also produced during the growth cycle. Studied with 14C-labeled chlordane demonstrated that the insecticide was not biologically degraded under the test conditions used and that up to 75% of the recoverable chlordane was cell associated within 48 h. Studied with uniformly labeled L[14C]valine and [2-14C]uracil established that neither the transport nor the incorporation of these protein and ribonucleic acid precursors was inhibited by chlordane. Separation of the membrane fractions using isopycnic centrifugation localized 14C-labeled chlordane in the cytoplasmic membrane. Also, chlordane inhibited the membrane-bound adenosine 5'-triphosphatase while the soluble (released) form of this enzyme remained unaffected. These data indicate that chlordane resides in the cytoplasmic membrane and may cause specific alterations in membrane-associated activities. PMID:156517

  3. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of a range of alkyl sulfides by a denitrifying marine bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Visscher, P.T.; Taylor, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of a bacterium was obtained from a marine microbial mat by using an anoxic medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and nitrate. The isolate grew aerobically or anaerobically as a denitrifier on alkyl sulfides, including DMS, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl sulfide (DES), ethyl methyl sulfide, dipropyl sulfide, dibutyl sulfide, and dibutyl disulfide. Cells grown on an alkyl sulfide or disulfide also oxidized the corresponding thiols, namely, methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, or butanethiol. Alkyl sulfides were metabolized by induced or derepressed cells with oxygen, nitrate, or nitrite as electron acceptor. Cells grown on DMS immediately metabolized DMS, but there was a lag before DES was consumed; with DES-grown cells, DES was immediately used but DMS was used only after a lag. Chloramphenicol prevented the eventual use of DES by DMS-grown cells and DMS use by DES-grown cells, respectively, indicating separate enzymes for the metabolism of methyl and ethyl groups. Growth was rapid on formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate but slow on methanol. The organism also grew chemolithotrophically on thiosulfate with a decrease in pH; growth required carbonate in the medium. Growth on sulfide was also carbonate dependent but slow. The isolate was identified as a Thiobacillus sp. and designated strain ASN-1. It may have utility for removing alkyl sulfides, and also nitrate, nitrite, and sulfide, from wastewaters.

  4. A cold-adapted, solvent and salt tolerant esterase from marine bacterium Psychrobacter pacificensis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gaobing; Zhang, Xiangnan; Wei, Lu; Wu, Guojie; Kumar, Ashok; Mao, Tao; Liu, Ziduo

    2015-11-01

    Lipolytic enzymes with unique physico-chemical characteristics are gaining more attention for their immense industrial importance. In this study, a novel lipolytic enzyme (Est11) was cloned from the genomic library of a marine bacterium Psychrobacter pacificensis. The enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity with molecular mass of 32.9kDa. The recombinant Est11 was able to hydrolyze short chain esters (C2-C8) and displayed an optimum activity against butyrate ester (C4). The optimal temperature and pH were 25°C and 7.5, respectively. Est11 retained more than 70% of its original activity at 10°C, suggesting that it was a cold-active esterase. The enzyme was highly active and stable at high concentration of NaCl (5M). Further, incubation with ethanol, isopropanol, propanediol, DMSO, acetonitrile, and glycerol rendered remarkable positive effects on Est11 activity. Typically, even at the concentration of 30% (v/v), ethanol, DMSO, and propanediol increased Est11 activity by 1.3, 2.0, and 2.4-folds, respectively. This new robust enzyme with remarkable properties like cold-adaptability, exceptional tolerance to salt and organic solvents provides us a promising candidate to meet the needs of some harsh industrial processes. PMID:26231332

  5. Iridescence of a Marine Bacterium and Classification of Prokaryotic Structural Colors

    PubMed Central

    Vukusic, Peter; Luke, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Iridescence is a property of structural color that is occasionally encountered in higher eukaryotes but that has been poorly documented in the prokaryotic kingdom. In the present work, we describe a marine bacterium, identified as Cellulophaga lytica, isolated from the surface of an anemone, that exhibits bright green iridescent colonies under direct epi-illumination. This phenomenon has not previously been investigated in detail. In this study, color changes of C. lytica colonies were observed at various angles of direct illumination or observation. Its iridescent green appearance was dominant on various growth media. Red and violet colors were also discerned on colony edges. Remarkable C. lytica bacterial iridescence was revealed and characterized using high-resolution optical spectrometry. In addition to this, by culturing other bacterial strains to which various forms of faintly iridescent traits have previously been attributed, we identify four principal appearance characteristics of structural color in prokaryotes. A new general classification of bacterial iridescence is therefore proposed in this study. Furthermore, a specific separate class is described for iridescent C. lytica strains because they exhibit what is so far a unique intense glitter-like iridescence in reflection. C. lytica is the first prokaryote discovered to produce the same sort of intense iridescence under direct illumination as that associated with higher eukaryotes, like some insects and birds. Due to the nature of bacterial biology, cultivation, and ubiquity, this discovery may be of significant interest for both ecological and nanoscience endeavors. PMID:22267664

  6. Affinity purification of metalloprotease from marine bacterium using immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shangyong; Wang, Linna; Yang, Juan; Bao, Jing; Liu, Junzhong; Lin, Shengxiang; Hao, Jianhua; Sun, Mi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an efficient affinity purification protocol for an alkaline metalloprotease from marine bacterium was developed using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. After screening and optimization of the affinity ligands and spacer arm lengths, Cu-iminmodiacetic acid was chosen as the optimal affinity ligand, which was coupled to Sepharose 6B via a 14-atom spacer arm. The absorption analysis of this medium revealed a desorption constant Kd of 21.5 μg/mL and a theoretical maximum absorption Qmax of 24.9 mg/g. Thanks to this affinity medium, the enzyme could be purified by only one affinity purification step with a purity of approximately 95% pure when analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The recovery of the protease activity reached 74.6%, which is much higher than the value obtained by traditional protocols (8.9%). These results contribute to the industrial purifications and contribute a significant reference for the purification of other metalloproteases. PMID:27058973

  7. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of a range of alkyl sulfides by a denitrifying marine bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Visscher, P T; Taylor, B F

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of a bacterium was obtained from a marine microbial mat by using an anoxic medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and nitrate. The isolate grew aerobically or anaerobically as a denitrifier on alkyl sulfides, including DMS, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl sulfide (DES), ethyl methyl sulfide, dipropyl sulfide, dibutyl sulfide, and dibutyl disulfide. Cells grown on an alkyl sulfide or disulfide also oxidized the corresponding thiols, namely, methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, or butanethiol. Alkyl sulfides were metabolized by induced or derepressed cells with oxygen, nitrate, or nitrite as electron acceptor. Cells grown on DMS immediately metabolized DMS, but there was a lag before DES was consumed; with DES-grown cells, DES was immediately used but DMS was used only after a lag. Chloramphenicol prevented the eventual use of DES by DMS-grown cells and DMS use by DES-grown cells, respectively, indicating separate enzymes for the metabolism of methyl and ethyl groups. Growth was rapid on formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate but slow on methanol. The organism also grew chemolithotrophically on thiosulfate with a decrease in pH; growth required carbonate in the medium. Growth on sulfide was also carbonate dependent but slow. The isolate was identified as a Thiobacillus sp. and designated strain ASN-1. It may have utility for removing alkyl sulfides, and also nitrate, nitrite, and sulfide, from wastewaters. PMID:8285707

  8. Assignment of photosynthetic parameters in estimation of marine phytoplankton production from remote sensing of ocean colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, Marie-Helene

    2007-12-01

    Photosynthesis (primary production) is the fundamental process by which solar photons are transformed into organic matter that is the source of energy for the entire food web. The first chapter of this thesis reviews the concepts that underpin models of marine primary production as well as the relevant parameters and their variation according to phytoplankton functional type. The application of the models to compute primary production from remotely-sensed images of ocean colour is then reviewed. The different approaches for assignment of the photosynthetic parameters in the model are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each one of them are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to understanding the variability in photosynthesis-irradiance ( P -- E) parameters, which is the focus of the thesis. In Chapter 2 and 4, new measurements of P -- E are presented for two ecologically-different regions of the North Atlantic: the tropical Caribbean waters and the temperate North-West Atlantic. The issues that have to be addressed for regional computations of primary production are examined, and results are presented for primary production in the two regions using remotely-sensed data on ocean colour. Chapter 3 presents a new method for extraction of the photosynthesis-response parameters from profiles of in situ phytoplankton production. The procedure, previously proposed but hitherto untested, is here implemented in various aquatic systems and a protocol is established for its use. The major conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented in the fifth and final chapter.

  9. Physiological and biochemical response of the photosynthetic apparatus of two marine diatoms to Fe stress

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, R.M.L.; LaRoche, J.; Geider, R.J.

    1997-06-01

    Flavodoxin is a small electron-transfer protein capable of replacing ferredoxin during periods of Fe deficiency. When evaluating the suitability of flavodoxin as a diagnostic indicator for Fe limitation of phytoplankton growth, we examined its expression in two marine diatoms we cultured using trace-metal-buffered medium. Thalassiosira weissflogii and Phaeodactylum tricornutum were cultured in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-buffered Sargasso Sea water containing from 10 to 1000 nm added Fe. Trace-metal-buffered cultures of each diatom maintained high growth rates across the entire range of Fe additions. Similarly, declines in chlorophyll/cell and in the ratio of photosystem II variable-to-maximum fluorescence were negligible (P. tricornutum) to moderate (T. weissflogii, 54% decline in chlorophyll/cell and 22% decrease in variable-to-maximum fluorescence). Moreover, only minor variations in photosynthetic parameters were observed across the range of additions. In contrast, flavodoxin was expressed to high levels in low-Fe cultures. Despite the inverse relationship between flavodoxin expression and Fe content of the medium, its expression was seemingly independent of any of the indicators of cell physiology that were assayed. It appears that flavodoxin is expressed as an early-stage response to Fe stress and that its accumulation need not be intimately connected to limitations imposed by Fe on the growth rate of these diatoms.

  10. Physiological and Biochemical Response of the Photosynthetic Apparatus of Two Marine Diatoms to Fe Stress.

    PubMed Central

    McKay, R. M. L.; Geider, R. J.; LaRoche, J.

    1997-01-01

    Flavodoxin is a small electron-transfer protein capable of replacing ferredoxin during periods of Fe deficiency. When evaluating the suitability of flavodoxin as a diagnostic indicator for Fe limitation of phytoplankton growth, we examined its expression in two marine diatoms we cultured using trace-metal-buffered medium. Thalassio-sira weissflogii and Phaeodactylum tricornutum were cultured in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-buffered Sargasso Sea water containing from 10 to 1000 nM added Fe. Trace-metal-buffered cultures of each diatom maintained high growth rates across the entire range of Fe additions. Similarly, declines in chlorophyll/cell and in the ratio of photosystem II variable-to-maximum fluorescence were negligible (P. tricornutum) to moderate (T. weissflogii; 54% decline in chlorophyll/cell and 22% decrease in variable-to-maximum fluorescence). Moreover, only minor variations in photosynthetic parameters were observed across the range of additions. In contrast, flavodoxin was expressed to high levels in low-Fe cultures. Despite the inverse relationship between flavodoxin expression and Fe content of the medium, its expression was seemingly independent of any of the indicators of cell physiology that were assayed. It appears that flavodoxin is expressed as an early-stage response to Fe stress and that its accumulation need not be intimately connected to limitations imposed by Fe on the growth rate of these diatoms. PMID:12223732

  11. A light-dependent mechanism for massive accumulation of manganese in the photosynthetic bacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Keren, Nir; Kidd, Matthew J; Penner-Hahn, James E; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2002-12-17

    Manganese is an essential micronutrient for many organisms. Because of its unique role in the water oxidizing activity of photosystem II, manganese is required for photosynthetic growth in plants and cyanobacteria. Here we report on the mechanism of manganese uptake in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Cells grown in 9 microM manganese-containing medium accumulate up to 1 x 10(8) manganese atoms/cell, bound to the outer membrane (pool A). This pool could be released by EDTA treatment. Accumulation of manganese in pool A was energized by photosynthetic electron flow. Moreover, collapsing the membrane potential resulted in the immediate release of this manganese pool. The manganese in this pool is mainly Mn(II) in a six-coordinate distorted environment. A distinctly different pool of manganese, pool B ( approximately 1.5 x 10(6) atoms/cell), could not be extracted by EDTA. Transport into pool B was light-independent and could be detected only under limiting manganese concentrations (1 nM). Evidently, manganese uptake in Synechocystis 6803 cells occurs in two steps. First, manganese accumulates in the outer membrane (pool A) in a membrane potential-dependent process. Next, manganese is transported through the inner membrane into pool B. We propose that pool A serves as a store that allows the cells to overcome transient limitations in manganese in the environment. PMID:12475258

  12. Biomass Yield Efficiency of the Marine Anammox Bacterium, “Candidatus Scalindua sp.,” is Affected by Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Takanori; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Ozaki, Noriatsu; Ohashi, Akiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The growth rate and biomass yield efficiency of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria are markedly lower than those of most other autotrophic bacteria. Among the anammox bacterial genera, the growth rate and biomass yield of the marine anammox bacterium “Candidatus Scalindua sp.” is still lower than those of other anammox bacteria enriched from freshwater environments. The activity and growth of marine anammox bacteria are generally considered to be affected by the presence of salinity and organic compounds. Therefore, in the present study, the effects of salinity and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) on the anammox activity, inorganic carbon uptake, and biomass yield efficiency of “Ca. Scalindua sp.” enriched from the marine sediments of Hiroshima Bay, Japan, were investigated in batch experiments. Differences in VFA concentrations (0–10 mM) were observed under varying salinities (0.5%–4%). Anammox activity was high at 0.5%–3.5% salinity, but was 30% lower at 4% salinity. In addition, carbon uptake was higher at 1.5%–3.5% salinity. The results of the present study clearly demonstrated that the biomass yield efficiency of the marine anammox bacterium “Ca. Scalindua sp.” was significantly affected by salinity. On the other hand, the presence of VFAs up to 10 mM did not affect anammox activity, carbon uptake, or biomass yield efficiency. PMID:25740428

  13. Antibiofilm Activity of an Exopolysaccharide from Marine Bacterium Vibrio sp. QY101

    PubMed Central

    Han, Feng; Duan, Gaofei; Lu, Xinzhi; Gu, Yuchao; Yu, Wengong

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial exopolysaccharides have always been suggested to play crucial roles in the bacterial initial adhesion and the development of complex architecture in the later stages of bacterial biofilm formation. However, Escherichia coli group II capsular polysaccharide was characterized to exert broad-spectrum biofilm inhibition activity. In this study, we firstly reported that a bacterial exopolysaccharide (A101) not only inhibits biofilm formation of many bacteria but also disrupts established biofilm of some strains. A101 with an average molecular weight of up to 546 KDa, was isolated and purified from the culture supernatant of the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QY101 by ethanol precipitation, iron-exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides showed that A101 is primarily consisted of galacturonic acid, glucuronic acid, rhamnose and glucosamine. A101 was demonstrated to inhibit biofilm formation by a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria without antibacterial activity. Furthermore, A101 displayed a significant disruption on the established biofilm produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not by Staphylococcus aureus. Importantly, A101 increased the aminoglycosides antibiotics' capability of killing P. aeruginosa biofilm. Cell primary attachment to surfaces and intercellular aggregates assays suggested that A101 inhibited cell aggregates of both P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, while the cell-surface interactions inhibition only occurred in S. aureus, and the pre-formed cell aggregates dispersion induced by A101 only occurred in P. aeruginosa. Taken together, these data identify the antibiofilm activity of A101, which may make it potential in the design of new therapeutic strategies for bacterial biofilm-associated infections and limiting biofilm formation on medical indwelling devices. The found of A101 antibiofilm activity may also promote a new recognition

  14. Purification and characterization of the oxidase from the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, S; Malatesta, F; Guigliarelli, B; Gayda, J P; Bertrand, P; Miraglio, R; Denis, M

    1991-06-01

    The aerobic respiratory system of the hydrocarbonoclastic marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617 ends with a single terminal oxidase. It is a heme-containing membranous protein which has been demonstrated only to reduce molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide [Denis, M., Arnaud S. & Malatesta, F. (1989) FEBS Lett. 247, 475-479]. The purification of this oxidase was achieved in a single step through by DEAE-Trisacryl chromatography. SDS/PAGE showed the presence of four subunits. The pI was found to be 4.45 and a Mr of 130,000 was determined by gel filtration. The amino acid composition of the purified terminal oxidase has been determined. About 52% of the residues are hydrophobic, strengthening the membranous nature of this bacterial oxidase. Room temperature optical spectra are typical of heme b with a 560-nm band for the reduced form in the alpha range. The prosthetic group is made of two hemes b, one high-spin (S = 5/2, gl = 5.9, g parallel approximately 2.0), the other low-spin (S = 1/2, gz = 2.94, gy = 2.27). No other metal centre was detected by EPR. The two hemes remained unresolved in optical spectra, even at low temperature, and throughout redox titration. They behaved potentiometrically like a one-electron, single redox couple, with Em = 87 +/- 10 mV at pH 7.2 and 293 K. The purified oxidase did not oxidize ferrocytochrome c, but displayed quinol oxidase activity both with the native quinone (2419 nmol O2.min-1.mg protein-1 and commercially available coenzyme (101.74 nmol O2.min-1.mg protein-1). Exposure of the reduced enzyme to CO induced the collapse of alpha and beta bands as occurred during reoxidation. In contrast, NaCN and NaN3 fully inhibited the oxidase activity. Results are discussed with respect to other purified quinol oxidases. PMID:1645655

  15. Desulfoluna spongiiphila sp. nov., a dehalogenating bacterium in the Desulfobacteraceae from the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Young-Beom; Kerkhof, Lee J; Häggblom, Max M

    2009-09-01

    A reductively dehalogenating, strictly anaerobic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated strain AA1T, was isolated from the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba collected in the Mediterranean Sea and was characterized phenotypically and phylogenetically. Cells of strain AA1T were Gram-negative, short, curved rods. Growth of strain AA1T was observed between 20 and 37 degrees C (optimally at 28 degrees C) at pH 7-8. NaCl was required for growth; optimum growth occurred in the presence of 25 g NaCl l(-1). Growth occurred with lactate, propionate, pyruvate, succinate, benzoate, glucose and sodium citrate as electron donors and carbon sources and either sulfate or 2-bromophenol as electron acceptors, but not with acetate or butyrate. Strain AA1T was able to dehalogenate several different bromophenols, and 2- and 3-iodophenol, but not monochlorinated or fluorinated phenols. Lactate, pyruvate, fumarate and malate were not utilized without an electron acceptor. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 58.5 mol%. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C14:0, iso-C14:0, C14:0 3-OH, anteiso-C15:0, C16:0, C16:1omega7c and C18:1omega7c. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons placed the novel strain within the class Deltaproteobacteria. Strain AA1T was related most closely to the type strains of Desulfoluna butyratoxydans (96% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Desulfofrigus oceanense (95%) and Desulfofrigus fragile (95%). Based on its phenotypic, physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain AA1T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Desulfoluna, for which the name Desulfoluna spongiiphila sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AA1T (=DSM 17682T=ATCC BAA-1256T). PMID:19605712

  16. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of the Complex Agarolytic Enzyme System from the Marine Bacterium Zobellia galactanivorans*

    PubMed Central

    Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Correc, Gaëlle; Thomas, François; Bernard, Thomas; Barbeyron, Tristan; Jam, Murielle; Helbert, William; Michel, Gurvan; Czjzek, Mirjam

    2012-01-01

    Zobellia galactanivorans is an emerging model bacterium for the bioconversion of algal biomass. Notably, this marine Bacteroidetes possesses a complex agarolytic system comprising four β-agarases and five β-porphyranases, all belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 16. Although β-agarases are specific for the neutral agarobiose moieties, the recently discovered β-porphyranases degrade the sulfated polymers found in various quantities in natural agars. Here, we report the biochemical and structural comparison of five β-porphyranases and β-agarases from Z. galactanivorans. The respective degradation patterns of two β-porphyranases and three β-agarases are analyzed by their action on defined hybrid oligosaccharides. In light of the high resolution crystal structures, the biochemical results allowed a detailed mapping of substrate specificities along the active site groove of the enzymes. Although PorA displays a strict requirement for C6-sulfate in the −2- and +1-binding subsites, PorB tolerates the presence of 3–6-anhydro-l-galactose in subsite −2. Both enzymes do not accept methylation of the galactose unit in the −1 subsite. The β-agarase AgaD requires at least four consecutive agarose units (DP8) and is highly intolerant to modifications, whereas for AgaB oligosaccharides containing C6-sulfate groups at the −4, +1, and +3 positions are still degraded. Together with a transcriptional analysis of the expression of these enzymes, the structural and biochemical results allow proposition of a model scheme for the agarolytic system of Z. galactanivorans. PMID:22778272

  17. DMSP: tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase from the marine sulfate-reducing bacterium strain WN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, M.; Hansen, T. A.

    2000-08-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), an important compatible solute of many marine algae, can be metabolised by bacteria via cleavage to dimethylsulfide and acrylate or via an initial demethylation. This is the first report on the purification of an enzyme that specifically catalyses the demethylation of DMSP. The enzyme was isolated from the sulfate-reducing bacterium strain WN, which grows on DMSP and demethylates it to methylthiopropionate. DMSP:tetrahydrofolate (THF) methyltransferase from strain WN was purified 76-fold [to a specific activity of 40.5 μmol min -1 (mg protein) -1]. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed two bands of approximately 10 and 35 kDa; in particular the 35 kDa polypeptide became significantly enriched during the purification. Storage of the purified fraction at -20°C under nitrogen resulted in a 99% loss of activity in two days. The activity could be partially restored by addition of 200 μM cyanocobalamin, hydroxocobalamin or coenzyme B 12. ATP did not have any positive effect on activity. Reduction of the assay mixture by titanium(III)nitrilotriacetic acid slightly stimulated the activity. Gel filtration chromatography revealed a native molecular mass between 45 and 60 kDa for the DMSP:THF methyltransferase. The enzyme was most active at 35°C and pH 7.8. Glycine betaine, which can be considered an N-containing structural analogue of DMSP, did not serve as a methyl donor for DMSP:THF methyltransferase. Various sulfur-containing DMSP-analogues were tested but only methylethylsulfoniopropionate served as methyl donor. None of these compounds inhibited methyl transfer from DMSP to THF. Strain WN did not grow on any of the sulfur-containing DMSP-analogues.

  18. Recombinant production and characterization of a highly active alkaline phosphatase from marine bacterium Cobetia marina.

    PubMed

    Golotin, Vasily; Balabanova, Larissa; Likhatskaya, Galina; Rasskazov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    The psychrophilic marine bacterium, Cobetia marina, recovered from the mantle tissue of the marine mussel, Crenomytilus grayanus, which contained a gene encoding alkaline phosphatase (AP) with apparent biotechnology advantages. The enzyme was found to be more efficient than its counterparts and showed k cat value 10- to 100-fold higher than those of all known commercial APs. The enzyme did not require the presence of exogenous divalent cations and dimeric state of its molecule for activity. The recombinant enzyme (CmAP) production and purification were optimized with a final recovery of 2 mg of the homogenous protein from 1 L of the transgenic Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3)/Pho40 cells culture. CmAP displayed a half-life of 16 min at 45 °C and 27 min at 40 °C in the presence of 2 mM EDTA, thus suggesting its relative thermostability in comparison with the known cold-adapted analogues. A high concentration of EDTA in the incubation mixture did not appreciably inhibit CmAP. The enzyme was stable in a wide range of pH (6.0-11.0). CmAP exhibited its highest activity at the reaction temperature of 40-50 °C and pH 9.5-10.3. The structural features of CmAP could be the reason for the increase in its stability and catalytic turnover. We have modeled the CmAP 3D structure on the base of the high-quality experimental structure of the close homologue Vibrio sp. AP (VAP) and mutated essential residues predicted to break Mg(2+) bonds in CmAP. It seems probable that the intrinsically tight binding of catalytic and structural metal ions together with the flexibility of intermolecular and intramolecular links in CmAP could be attributed to the adapted mutualistic lifestyle in oceanic waters. PMID:25260971

  19. A Comparative biochemical study on two marine endophytes, Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS, Isolated from red sea algae.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Eman Fadl; Hassan, Hossam Mokhtar; Rateb, Mostafa Ezzat; Abdel-Wahab, Noha; Sameer, Somayah; Aly Taie, Hanan Anwar; Abdel-Hameed, Mohammed Sayed; Hammouda, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Two marine endophytic bacteria were isolated from the Red Sea algae; a red alga; Acanthophora dendroides and the brown alga Sargassum sabrepandum. The isolates were identified based on their 16SrRNA sequences as Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential anti-microbial and antioxidant activities of the extracts of the isolated bacteria grown in different nutrient conditions. Compared to amoxicillin (25μg/disk) and erythromycin (15μg/disk), the extracts of Bacterium SRCn min media II, III, IV and V were potent inhibitors of the gram-positive bacterium Sarcina maxima even at low concentrations. Also, the multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) was more sensitive to the metabolites produced in medium (II) of the same endophyte than erythromycin (15μg/disk). A moderate activity of the Bacillus sp. JS extracts of media I and II was obtained against the same pathogen. The total compounds (500ug/ml) of both isolated endophytes showed moderate antioxidant activities (48.9% and 46.1%, respectively). LC/MS analysis of the bacterial extracts was carried out to investigate the likely natural products produced. Cyclo(D-cis-Hyp-L-Leu), dihydrosphingosine and 2-Amino-1,3-hexadecanediol were identified in the fermentation medium of Bacterium SRCnm, whereas cyclo (D-Pro-L-Tyr) and cyclo (L-Leu-L-Pro) were the suggested compounds of Bacillus sp. JS. PMID:26826831

  20. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of the light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Fuciman, Marcel; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Frank, Harry A.; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2011-10-08

    The light-harvesting complex 2 from the thermophilic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption and fluorescence, sub-nanosecond-time-resolved fluorescence and femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The measurements were performed at room temperature and at 10 K. The combination of both ultrafast and steady-state optical spectroscopy methods at ambient and cryogenic temperatures allowed the detailed study of carotenoid (Car)-to-bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) as well BChl-to-BChl excitation energy transfer in the complex. The studies show that the dominant Cars rhodopin (N = 11) and spirilloxanthin (N = 13) do not play a significant role as supportive energy donors for BChl a. This is related with their photophysical properties regulated by long π-electron conjugation. On the other hand, such properties favor some of the Cars, particularly spirilloxanthin (N = 13) to play the role of the direct quencher of the excited singlet state of BChl.

  1. Excitation energy transfer in the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus: A specific effect of 1-hexanol on the optical properties of baseplate and energy transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Mimuro, M; Nishimura, Y; Yamazaki, I; Kobayashi, M; Wang, Z Y; Nozawa, T; Shimada, K; Matsuura, K

    1996-05-01

    The effect of 1-hexanol on spectral properties and the processes of energy transfer of the green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was investigated with reference to the baseplate region. On addition of 1-hexanol to a cell suspension in a concentration of one-fourth saturation, a specific change in the baseplate region was induced: that is, a bleach of the 793-nm component, and an increase in absorption of the 813-nm component. This result was also confirmed by fluorescence spectra of whole cells and isolated chlorosomes. The processes of energy transfer were affected in the overall transfer efficiency but not kinetically, indicating that 1-hexanol suppressed the flux of energy flow from the baseplate to the B806-866 complexes in the cytoplasmic membranes. The fluorescence excitation spectrum suggests a specific site of interaction between bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c with a maximum at 771 nm in the rod elements and BChl a with a maximum at 793 nm in the baseplate, which is a funnel for a fast transfer of energy to the B806-866 complexes in the membranes. The absorption spectrum of chlorosomes was resolved to components consistently on the basis, including circular dichroism and magnetic circular dichroism spectra; besides two major BChl c forms, bands corresponding to tetramer, dimer, and monomer were also discernible, which are supposed to be intermediary components for a higher order structure. A tentative model for the antenna system of C. aurantiacus is proposed. PMID:24271307

  2. Structure analysis and comparative characterization of the cytochrome c' and flavocytochrome c from thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yu; Kimura, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Hideaki; Miki, Kunio; Wang, Zheng-Yu

    2012-08-21

    The thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of two soluble electron transport proteins, cytochrome (Cyt) c' and flavocytochrome c, isolated from thermophilic purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum were examined and compared with those of the corresponding proteins from a closely related mesophilic bacterium Allochromatium (Alc.) vinosum. These proteins share sequence identities of 82% for the cytochromes c' and 86% for the flavocytochromes c. Crystal structures of the two proteins have been determined at high resolutions. Differential scanning calorimetry and denaturing experiments show that both proteins from Tch. tepidum are thermally and structurally much more stable than their mesophilic counterparts. The denaturation temperature of Tch. tepidum Cyt c' was 22 °C higher than that of Alc. vinosum Cyt c', and the midpoints of denaturation using guanidine hydrochloride were 2.0 and 1.2 M for the Tch. tepidum and Alc. vinosum flavocytochromes c, respectively. The enhanced stabilities can be interpreted on the basis of the structural and sequence information obtained in this study: increased number of hydrogen bonds formed between main chain nitrogen and oxygen atoms, more compact structures and reduced number of glycine residues. Many residues with large side chains in Alc. vinosum Cyt c' are substituted by alanines in Tch. tepidum Cyt c'. Both proteins from Tch. tepidum exhibit high structural similarities to their counterparts from Alc. vinosum, and the different residues between the corresponding proteins are mainly located on the surface and exposed to the solvent. Water molecules are found in the heme vicinity of Tch. tepidum Cyt c' and form hydrogen bonds with the heme ligand and C-terminal charged residues. Similar bound waters are also found in the vicinity of one heme group in the diheme subunit of Tch. tepidum flavocytochrome c. Electron density map of the Tch. tepidum flavocytochrome c clearly revealed the presence of disulfur atoms

  3. Aerobic and anaerobic metabolism of 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one by a denitrifying bacterium isolated from marine sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Rontani, J F; Gilewicz, M J; Michotey, V D; Zheng, T L; Bonin, P C; Bertrand, J C

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the metabolism of 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one by a denitrifying bacterium (Marinobacter sp. strain CAB) isolated from marine sediments. Under aerobic and denitrifying conditions, this strain efficiently degraded this ubiquitous isoprenoid ketone. Several bacterial metabolites, 4,8,12-trimethyl-tridecan-1-ol, 4,8,12-trimethyltridecanal, 4,8,12-trimethyltridecanoic acid, Z-3,7-dimethylocten-2-oic acid, Z-3,7,11-trimethyldodecen-2-oic acid, and 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-ol, were formally identified, and different pathways were proposed to explain the formation of such isoprenoid compounds. PMID:9023941

  4. Photoinhibition of Phaeocystis globosa resulting from oxidative stress induced by a marine algicidal bacterium Bacillus sp. LP-10

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Chengwei; Guo, Xiaoyun; Li, Yi; Zhang, Huajun; Lei, Xueqian; Cai, Guanjing; Guo, Jiajia; Yu, Zhiming; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms caused by Phaeocystis globosa have resulted in staggering losses to coastal countries because of their world-wide distribution. Bacteria have been studied for years to control the blooms of harmful alga, however, the action mechanism of them against harmful algal cells is still not well defined. Here, a previously isolated algicidal bacterium Bacillus sp. LP-10 was used to elucidate the potential mechanism involved in the dysfunction of P. globosa algal cells at physiological and molecular levels. Our results showed Bacillus sp. LP-10 induced an obvious rise of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was supposed to be major reason for algal cell death. Meanwhile, the results revealed a significant decrease of photosynthetic physiological indexes and apparent down-regulated of photosynthesis-related genes (psbA and rbcS) and protein (PSII reaction center protein D1), after treated by Bacillus sp. LP-10 filtrates, suggesting photoinhibition occurred in the algal cells. Furthermore, our results indicated that light played important roles in the algal cell death. Our work demonstrated that the major lethal reason of P. globosa cells treated by the algicidal bacterium was the photoinhibition resulted from oxidative stress induced by Bacillus sp. LP-10. PMID:26601700

  5. Photobacterium kishitanii sp. nov., a luminous marine bacterium symbiotic with deep-sea fishes.

    PubMed

    Ast, Jennifer C; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Engelbeen, Katrien; Urbanczyk, Henryk; Thompson, Fabiano L; De Vos, Paul; Dunlap, Paul V

    2007-09-01

    Six representatives of a luminous bacterium commonly found in association with deep, cold-dwelling marine fishes were isolated from the light organs and skin of different fish species. These bacteria were Gram-negative, catalase-positive, and weakly oxidase-positive or oxidase-negative. Morphologically, cells of these strains were coccoid or coccoid-rods, occurring singly or in pairs, and motile by means of polar flagellation. After growth on seawater-based agar medium at 22 degrees C for 18 h, colonies were small, round and white, with an intense cerulean blue luminescence. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity placed these bacteria in the genus Photobacterium. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven housekeeping gene sequences (16S rRNA gene, gapA, gyrB, pyrH, recA, rpoA and rpoD), seven gene sequences of the lux operon (luxC, luxD, luxA, luxB, luxF, luxE and luxG) and four gene sequences of the rib operon (ribE, ribB, ribH and ribA), resolved the six strains as members of the genus Photobacterium and as a clade distinct from other species of Photobacterium. These strains were most closely related to Photobacterium phosphoreum and Photobacterium iliopiscarium. DNA-DNA hybridization values between the designated type strain, Photobacterium kishitanii pjapo.1.1(T), and P. phosphoreum LMG 4233(T), P. iliopiscarium LMG 19543(T) and Photobacterium indicum LMG 22857(T) were 51, 43 and 19 %, respectively. In AFLP analysis, the six strains clustered together, forming a group distinct from other analysed species. The fatty acid C(17 : 0) cyclo was present in these bacteria, but not in P. phosphoreum, P. iliopiscarium or P. indicum. A combination of biochemical tests (arginine dihydrolase and lysine decarboxylase) differentiates these strains from P. phosphoreum and P. indicum. The DNA G+C content of P. kishitanii pjapo.1.1(T) is 40.2 %, and the genome size is approximately 4.2 Mbp, in the form of two circular chromosomes. These strains represent a novel species, for

  6. Photosynthetic and molecular responses of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana to triphenyltin exposure.

    PubMed

    Yi, Andy Xianliang; Leung, Priscilla T Y; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the responses of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana upon waterborne exposure to triphenyltin chloride (TPTCl) through determining their photosynthetic response, growth performance, and expressions of genes and proteins. Based on the growth inhibition test, the 96-h IC50 (i.e., median inhibition concentration) was found to be 1.09 μg/L (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.89-1.34 μg/L). According to photosynthetic parameters, the 96-h EC50s (i.e., median effect concentrations) were estimated at 1.54 μg/L (95% CI: 1.40-1.69 μg/L) and 1.51 μg/L (95% CI: 1.44-1.58 μg/L) for the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry (ΦPo) and the effective quantum yield of photochemical energy conversion in PSII (Φ2), respectively. Non-photochemical quenching in the algae was increased at low concentrations of TPTCl (0.5-1.0 μg/L) but it decreased gradually when the TPTCl concentration further increased from 1.0 to 2.5 μg/L. Results of gene expressions showed that lipid metabolism related genes were not influenced by TPTCl at 0.5 or 1.0 μg/L, while silica shell formation genes were down-regulated at 0.5 μg/L. Photosynthesis related genes were up-regulated at 0.5 μg/L TPTCl but were down-regulated at 1.0 μg/L TPTCl. Proteomics analysis revealed that relatively less proteins could be detected after exposure to 1.0 μg/L TPTCl (only about 50-60 spots) compared with that observed in the 0.5μg/L TPTCl treatment and two control groups (each with about 290-300 protein spots). At 0.5 μg/L TPTCl, five proteins were differentially expressed when compared with the seawater control and solvent control, and most of these proteins are involved in defence function to protect the biological systems from reactive oxygen species that generated by TPTCl. These proteins include oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 1 precursor, fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c protein - LI818 clade, and mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase, which can

  7. Fermentation Products of Solvent Tolerant Marine Bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and Its Biotechnological Applications in Salicylic Acid Bioconversion

    PubMed Central

    Wahidullah, Solimabi; Naik, Deepak N.; Devi, Prabha

    2013-01-01

    As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of various analgesics including aspirin. It is a common component of sewage effluent and also an intermediate in the degradation pathway of various aromatic compounds which are introduced in the marine environment as pollutants. In this study, biotransformation products of salicylic acid by seaweed, Bryopsis plumosa, associated marine bacterium, Moraxella spp. MB1, have been investigated. Phenol, conjugates of phenol and hydroxy cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl, caffeoyl, feruloyl and trihydroxy cinnamyl) with salicylic acid (3–8) were identified as the bioconversion products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These results show that the microorganism do not degrade phenolic acid but catalyses oxygen dependent transformations without ring cleavage. The degradation of salicylic acid is known to proceed either via gentisic acid pathway or catechol pathway but this is the first report of biotransformation of salicylic acid into cinnamates, without ring cleavage. Besides cinnamic acid derivatives (9–12), metabolites produced by the bacterium include antimicrobial indole (13) and β-carbolines, norharman (14), harman (15) and methyl derivative (16), which are beneficial to the host and the environment. PMID:24391802

  8. Fermentation products of solvent tolerant marine bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and its biotechnological applications in salicylic acid bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Wahidullah, Solimabi; Naik, Deepak N; Devi, Prabha

    2013-01-01

    As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of various analgesics including aspirin. It is a common component of sewage effluent and also an intermediate in the degradation pathway of various aromatic compounds which are introduced in the marine environment as pollutants. In this study, biotransformation products of salicylic acid by seaweed, Bryopsis plumosa, associated marine bacterium, Moraxella spp. MB1, have been investigated. Phenol, conjugates of phenol and hydroxy cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl, caffeoyl, feruloyl and trihydroxy cinnamyl) with salicylic acid (3-8) were identified as the bioconversion products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These results show that the microorganism do not degrade phenolic acid but catalyses oxygen dependent transformations without ring cleavage. The degradation of salicylic acid is known to proceed either via gentisic acid pathway or catechol pathway but this is the first report of biotransformation of salicylic acid into cinnamates, without ring cleavage. Besides cinnamic acid derivatives (9-12), metabolites produced by the bacterium include antimicrobial indole (13) and β-carbolines, norharman (14), harman (15) and methyl derivative (16), which are beneficial to the host and the environment. PMID:24391802

  9. Introduction of perfluoroalkyl chain into the esterifying moiety of bacteriochlorophyll c in the green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum by pigment biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hayato; Hirota, Keiya

    2016-09-15

    The green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum was grown in liquid cultures containing perfluoro-1-decanol, 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluoro-1-decanol [CF3(CF2)7(CH2)2OH] or 1H,1H-nonadecafluoro-1-decanol [CF3(CF2)8CH2OH], to introduce rigid and fluorophilic chains into the esterifying moiety of light-harvesting bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c. Exogenous 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluoro-1-decanol was successfully attached to the 17(2)-carboxy group of bacteriochlorophyllide (BChlide) c in vivo: the relative ratio of the unnatural BChl c esterified with this perfluoroalcohol over the total BChl c was 10.3%. Heat treatment of the liquid medium containing 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluoro-1-decanol with β-cyclodextrin before inoculation increased the relative ratio of the BChl c derivative esterified with this alcohol in the total BChl c in Cba. tepidum. In a while, 1H,1H-nonadecafluoro-1-decanol was not attached to BChlide c in Cba. tepidum, which was grown by its supplementation. These results suggest that the rigidity close to the hydroxy group of the esterifying alcohol is not suitable for the recognition by the BChl c synthase called BchK in Cba. tepidum. The unnatural BChl c esterified with 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluoro-1-decanol participated in BChl c self-aggregates in chlorosomes. PMID:27427396

  10. Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus sp. nov., an aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium identified in laboratory cultures of marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Nichols, Peter D; Whitman, William B; Aitken, Michael D

    2012-02-01

    A marine bacterium, designated strain MCTG13d, was isolated from a laboratory culture of the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum CCAP1121/2 by enrichment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole carbon source. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons, the strain was most closely related to Porticoccus litoralis IMCC2115(T) (96.5%) and to members of the genera Microbulbifer (91.4 to 93.7%) and Marinimicrobium (90.4 to 92.0%). Phylogenetic trees showed that the strain clustered in a distinct phyletic line in the class Gammaproteobacteria for which P. litoralis is presently the sole cultured representative. The strain was strictly aerobic, rod shaped, Gram negative, and halophilic. Notably, it was able to utilize hydrocarbons as sole sources of carbon and energy, whereas sugars did not serve as growth substrates. The predominant isoprenoid quinone of strain MCTG13d was Q-8, and the dominant fatty acids were C(16:1ω7c), C(18:1ω7c), and C(16:0). DNA G+C content for the isolate was 54.9 ± 0.42 mol%. Quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of this strain showed that this organism was common in other laboratory cultures of marine phytoplankton. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain MCTG13d represents a novel species of Porticoccus, for which the name Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus sp. nov. is proposed. The discovery of this highly specialized hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium living in association with marine phytoplankton suggests that phytoplankton represent a previously unrecognized biotope of novel bacterial taxa that degrade hydrocarbons in the ocean. PMID:22139001

  11. Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus sp. nov., an Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Identified in Laboratory Cultures of Marine Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Peter D.; Whitman, William B.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    A marine bacterium, designated strain MCTG13d, was isolated from a laboratory culture of the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum CCAP1121/2 by enrichment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole carbon source. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons, the strain was most closely related to Porticoccus litoralis IMCC2115T (96.5%) and to members of the genera Microbulbifer (91.4 to 93.7%) and Marinimicrobium (90.4 to 92.0%). Phylogenetic trees showed that the strain clustered in a distinct phyletic line in the class Gammaproteobacteria for which P. litoralis is presently the sole cultured representative. The strain was strictly aerobic, rod shaped, Gram negative, and halophilic. Notably, it was able to utilize hydrocarbons as sole sources of carbon and energy, whereas sugars did not serve as growth substrates. The predominant isoprenoid quinone of strain MCTG13d was Q-8, and the dominant fatty acids were C16:1ω7c, C18:1ω7c, and C16:0. DNA G+C content for the isolate was 54.9 ± 0.42 mol%. Quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of this strain showed that this organism was common in other laboratory cultures of marine phytoplankton. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain MCTG13d represents a novel species of Porticoccus, for which the name Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus sp. nov. is proposed. The discovery of this highly specialized hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium living in association with marine phytoplankton suggests that phytoplankton represent a previously unrecognized biotope of novel bacterial taxa that degrade hydrocarbons in the ocean. PMID:22139001

  12. Genome Sequence of Vibrio sp. Strain EJY3, an Agarolytic Marine Bacterium Metabolizing 3,6-Anhydro-l-Galactose as a Sole Carbon Source

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hanseong; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Saeyoung; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Kim, Sujin; Kim, Byung-Yong; Song, Heesang; Lim, Kwang-il

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic fate of 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose (l-AHG) is unknown in the global marine carbon cycle. Vibrio sp. strain EJY3 is an agarolytic marine bacterium that can utilize l-AHG as a sole carbon source. To elucidate the metabolic pathways of l-AHG, we have sequenced the complete genome of Vibrio sp. strain EJY3. PMID:22535948

  13. Azide anions inhibit GH-18 endochitinase and GH-20 Exo β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Sirimontree, Paknisa; Fukamizo, Tamo; Suginta, Wipa

    2016-02-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a bioluminescent marine bacterium that utilizes chitin as its sole source of energy. In the course of chitin degradation, the bacterium primarily secretes an endochitinase A (VhChiA) to hydrolyze chitin, generating chitooligosaccharide fragments that are readily transported into the cell and broken down to GlcNAc monomers by an exo β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (VhGlcNAcase). Here we report that sodium salts, especially sodium azide, inhibit two classes of these chitin-degrading enzymes (VhChiA and VhGlcNAcase) with distinct modes of action. Kinetic analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysis of pNP-glycoside substrates reveals that sodium azide inhibition of VhChiA has a mixed-type mode, but that it inhibits VhGlcNAcase competitively. We propose that azide anions inhibit chitinase activity by acting as strong nucleophiles that attack Cγ of the catalytic Glu or Cβ of the neighbouring Asp residues. Azide anions may bind not only to the catalytic centre, but also to the other subsites in the substrate-binding cleft of VhChiA. In contrast, azide anions may merely occupy the small-binding pocket of VhGlcNAcase, thereby blocking the accessibility of its active site by short-chain substrates. PMID:26330565

  14. Role of Chitin-Binding Proteins in the Specific Attachment of the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi to Chitin

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Michael T.; Kirchman, David L.

    1993-01-01

    We examined the mechanism of attachment of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi to chitin. Wheat germ agglutinin and chitinase bind to chitin and competitively inhibited the attachment of V. harveyi to chitin, but not to cellulose. Bovine serum albumin and cellulase do not bind to chitin and had no effect on bacterial attachment to chitin. These data suggest that this bacterium recognizes specific attachment sites on the chitin particle. The level of attachment of a chitinase-overproducing mutant of V. harveyi to chitin was about twice as much as that of the uninduced wild type. Detergent-extracted cell membranes inhibited attachment and contained a 53-kDa peptide that was overproduced by the chitinase-overproducing mutant. Three peptides (40, 53, and 150 kDa) were recovered from chitin which had been exposed to membrane extracts. Polyclonal antibodies raised against extracellular chitinase cross-reacted with the 53- and 150-kDa chitin-binding peptides and inhibited attachment, probably by sterically hindering interactions between the chitin-binding peptides and chitin. The 53- and 150-kDa chitin-binding peptides did not have chitinase activity. These results suggest that chitin-binding peptides, especially the 53-kDa chitin-binding peptide and chitinase and perhaps the 150-kDa peptide, mediate the specific attachment of V. harveyi to chitin. Images PMID:16348865

  15. Structure and anticancer activity of sulfated O-polysaccharide from marine bacterium Cobetia litoralis KMM 3880(T).

    PubMed

    Kokoulin, Maxim S; Kuzmich, Alexandra S; Kalinovsky, Anatoly I; Tomshich, Svetlana V; Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Mikhailov, Valery V; Komandrova, Nadezhda A

    2016-12-10

    We presented the structure of the polysaccharide moiety and anticancer activity in vitro of the sulfated lipopolysaccharide isolated from the marine bacterium Cobetia litoralis KMM 3880(T). The structure of O-polysaccharide was investigated by chemical methods along with (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The O-polysaccharide was built up of branched trisaccharide repeating units consist of D-glucose (D-Glcр), D-mannose (D-Manр) and sulfated 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo5S): →7-β-Kdoр4Ac5S-(2→4)-[β-d-Glcp-(1→2)-]-β-d-Manр6Ac-1→. We demonstrated that the lipopolysaccharide and О-deacetylated O-polysaccharide from Cobetia litoralis KMM 3880(T) inhibited a colony formation of human melanoma SK-MEL-28 and colorectal carcinoma HTC-116 cells. PMID:27577896

  16. Yields, photosynthetic efficiencies, and proximate chemical composition of dense cultures of marine microalgae. A subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, W.H.; Seibert, D.L.R.; Alden, M.; Eldridge, P.; Neori, A.

    1983-07-01

    The yields, photosynthetic efficiencies, and proximate composition of several microalgae were compared in dense cultures grown at light intensities up to 70% sunlight. Yields ranged from 3.4 to 21.7 g dry weight/m/sup 2/ day. The highest yield was obtained with Phaeodactylum; the lowest in Botryococcus cultures. The same species had the highest and lowest efficiencies of utilization of photosynthetically active radiation. In nitrogen-sufficient cells of all but one species, most of the dry weight consisted of protein. Lipid content of all species was 20 to 29%, and carbohydrate content 11 to 23%. Lipid content increased somewhat in N-deficient Phaeodactylum and Isochrysis cells, but decreased in deficient Monallanthus cells. Because the overall dry weight yield was reduced by deficiency, lipid yields did not increase. However, since the carbohydrate content increased to about 65% in N-deficient Dunaliella and Tetraselmis cells, the carbohydrate yield increased. In Phaeodactylum the optimum light intensity was about 40% of full sunlight. Most experimets with this alga included a CUSO/sub 4/ filter to decrease infrared irradiance. When this filter was removed, the yield increased because more red light in the photosynthetically active spectral range was included. These results should prove useful to workers attempting to maximize yields and efficiencies, but additional studies are needed. 69 references, 27 figures, 18 tables.

  17. Mechanistic Insight into Trimethylamine N-Oxide Recognition by the Marine Bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Yang; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Shao, Xuan; Wei, Tian-Di; Wang, Peng; Xie, Bin-Bin; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Su, Hai-Nan; Song, Xiao-Yan; Shi, Mei; Zhou, Bai-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) is an important nitrogen source for marine bacteria. TMAO can also be metabolized by marine bacteria into volatile methylated amines, the precursors of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide. However, it was not known how TMAO is recognized and imported by bacteria. Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, a marine Roseobacter, has an ATP-binding cassette transporter, TmoXWV, specific for TMAO. TmoX is the substrate-binding protein of the TmoXWV transporter. In this study, the substrate specificity of TmoX of R. pomeroyi DSS-3 was characterized. We further determined the structure of the TmoX/TMAO complex and studied the TMAO-binding mechanism of TmoX by biochemical, structural, and mutational analyses. A Ca2+ ion chelated by an extended loop in TmoX was shown to be important for maintaining the stability of TmoX. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that TmoX can alternate between “open” and “closed” states for binding TMAO. In the substrate-binding pocket, four tryptophan residues interact with the quaternary amine of TMAO by cation-π interactions, and Glu131 forms a hydrogen bond with the polar oxygen atom of TMAO. The π-π stacking interactions between the side chains of Phe and Trp are also essential for TMAO binding. Sequence analysis suggests that the TMAO-binding mechanism of TmoX may have universal significance in marine bacteria, especially in the marine Roseobacter clade. This study sheds light on how marine microorganisms utilize TMAO. IMPORTANCE Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) is an important nitrogen source for marine bacteria. The products of TMAO metabolized by bacteria are part of the precursors of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide. It is unclear how TMAO is recognized and imported by bacteria. TmoX is the substrate-binding protein of a TMAO-specific transporter. Here, the substrate specificity of TmoX of Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3 was characterized. The TMAO-binding mechanism of TmoX was studied by biochemical, structural

  18. Complete genome of a coastal marine bacterium Muricauda lutaonensis KCTC 22339(T).

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeongsu; Choe, Hanna; Kim, Byung Kwon; Kim, Kyung Mo

    2015-10-01

    Muricauda lutaonensis KCTC 22339(T) is a yellow-pigmented, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that was isolated from a coastal hot spring of a volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean, off the eastern coast of Taiwan. We here report the complete genome of M. lutaonensis KCTC 22339(T), which consists of 3,274,259bp with the G+C content of 44.97%. The completion of the M. lutaonensis genome sequence is expected to provide a valuable resource for understanding the secondary metabolic pathways related to bacterial pigmentation. PMID:25986927

  19. Respiration and respiratory enzyme activity in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, T. T.; Garfield, P. C.; Martinez, R.

    1983-03-01

    Oxygen consumption, nitrate reduction, respiratory electron transport activity, and nitrate reductase activity were measured in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus. The respiratory electron transport activity was closely correlated with oxygen consumption ( r = 0.98) in aerobic cultures and nearly as well correlated with nitrate reductase activity ( r = 0.91) and nitrate reduction ( r = 0.85) in anaerobic cultures. It was also well correlated with biomass in both aerobic ( r = 0.99) and anaerobic ( r = 0.94) cultures supporting the use of tetrazolium reduction as an index of living biomass. Time courses of nitrate and nitrate in the anaerobic cultures demonstrated that at nitrate concentrations above 1 mM, denitrification proceeds stepwise. Time courses of pH in anaerobic cultures revealed a rise from 7 to 8.5 during nitrite reduction indicating net proton utilization. This proton utilization is predicted by the stoichiometry of denitrification. Although the experiments were not under 'simulated in situ' conditions, the results are relevant to studies of denitrification, to bacterial ATP production, and to the respiratory activity of marine plankton in the ocean.

  20. Spongiimicrobium salis gen. nov., sp. nov., a bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from a marine sponge.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jaewoo; Adachi, Kyoko; Kasai, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, pale-yellow pigmented, rod-shaped, chemoheterotrophic bacterium, designated A6F-11(T), was isolated from a marine sponge collected in Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the novel marine strain was affiliated with the family Flavobacteriaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes and that it shared the highest (92.9 %) sequence similarity with Arenibacter palladensis LMG 21972(T). The strain could be differentiated phenotypically from related members of the family Flavobacteriaceae. The major fatty acids of strain A6F-11(T) were iso-C15:1 G, iso-C15:0, C16:1 ω6c and/or C16:1 ω7c and iso-C17:0 3-OH. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, two unidentified aminolipids and two unidentified lipids. The DNA G+C content was 34.7 mol%, and the major respiratory quinone was menaquinone 6 (MK-6). From the distinct phylogenetic position and combination of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the strain is considered to represent a novel taxon in the family Flavobacteriaceae, for which the name Spongiimicrobium salis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of S. salis gen. nov., sp. nov. is A6F-11(T) (= KCTC 42753(T) = NBRC 111401(T)). PMID:27125652

  1. Pyruvatibacter mobilis gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium from the culture broth of Picochlorum sp. 122.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanghua; Tang, Mingxing; Wu, Hualian; Dai, Shikun; Li, Tao; Chen, Chenghao; He, Hui; Fan, Jiewei; Xiang, Wenzhou; Li, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic bacterium, designated strain GYP-11T, was isolated from the culture broth of a marine microalga, Picochloruma sp. 122. Cells were dimorphic rods; free living cells were motile by means of a single polar flagellum, and star-shaped-aggregate-forming cells were attached with stalks and non-motile. Sodium pyruvate or Tween 20 was required for growth on marine agar 2216.16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that this isolate shared 94.07 % similarity with its closest type strain, Parvibaculum hydrocarboniclasticum EPR92T. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that strain GYP-11T represents a distinct lineage in a robust clade consisting of strain GYP-11T, alphaproteobacterium GMD21A06 and Candidatus Phaeomarinobacter ectocarpi Ec32. This clade was close to the genera Parvibaculum and Tepidicaulis in the order Rhizobiales. Chemotaxonomic and physiological characteristics, including cellular fatty acids and carbon source profiles, also readily distinguished strain GYP-11T from all established genera and species. Thus, it is concluded that strain GYP-11T represents a novel species of a new genus in the order Rhizobiales, for which the name Pyruvatibacter mobilis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Pyruvatibacter mobilis is GYP-11T ( = CGMCC 1.15125T = KCTC 42509T). PMID:26476620

  2. Global characterization of the photosynthetic glycerolipids from a marine diatom Stephanodiscus sp. by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jilin; Chen, Deying; Yan, Xiaojun; Chen, Juanjuan; Zhou, Chengxu

    2010-03-17

    The photosynthetic glycerolipids composition of algae is crucial for structural and physiological aspects. In this work, a comprehensive characterization of the photosynthetic glycerolipids of the diatom Stephanodiscus sp. was carried out by ultra performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS). By use of the MS(E) data collection mode, the Q-TOF instrument offered a very viable alternative to triple quadrupoles for precursor ion scanning of photosynthetic glycerolipids and had the advantage of high efficiency, selectivity, sensitivity and mass accuracy. Characteristic fragment ions were utilized to identify the structures and acyl compositions of photosynthetic glycerolipids. Comparing the abundance of fragment ions, it was possible to determine the position of the sn-glycerol-bound fatty acyl chains. As a result, four classes of photosynthetic glycerolipid in the extract of Stephanodiscus sp. were unambiguously identified, including 16 monogalactosyldiacylglycerols (MGDGs), 9 digalactosyldiacylglycerols (DGDGs), 23 sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols (SQDGs) and 8 phosphatidylglycerols (PGs). As far as our knowledge, this is the first report on global identification of photosynthetic glycerolipids, including lipid classes, fatty acyl composition within lipids and the location of fatty acids in lipids (sn-1 vs. sn-2), in the extract of marine microalgae by UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS directly. PMID:20172098

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the Bioluminescent Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV]).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Hervey, W Judson; Kim, Seongwon; Lin, Baochuan; Vora, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a Gram-negative marine γ-proteobacterium that is known to be a formidable pathogen of aquatic animals and is a model organism for the study of bacterial bioluminescence and quorum sensing. In this report, we describe the complete genome sequence of the most studied strain of this species: V. harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV]). PMID:25635019

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Bioluminescent Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV])

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Hervey, W. Judson; Kim, Seongwon; Lin, Baochuan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a Gram-negative marine γ-proteobacterium that is known to be a formidable pathogen of aquatic animals and is a model organism for the study of bacterial bioluminescence and quorum sensing. In this report, we describe the complete genome sequence of the most studied strain of this species: V. harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV]). PMID:25635019

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Proteorhodopsin-Containing Marine Bacterium Sediminicola sp. YIK13

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Min

    2016-01-01

    Sediminicola sp. YIK13 is a marine flavobacterium, isolated from tidal flat sediment. Here, we present the first complete genome sequence of this genus, which consists of 3,569,807 bp with 39.4% GC content. This strain contains proteorhodopsin, as well as retinal biosynthesis genes, allowing it to utilize sunlight as an energy source. PMID:26823585

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the Proteorhodopsin-Containing Marine Bacterium Sediminicola sp. YIK13.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong Min; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Sediminicola sp. YIK13 is a marine flavobacterium, isolated from tidal flat sediment. Here, we present the first complete genome sequence of this genus, which consists of 3,569,807 bp with 39.4% GC content. This strain contains proteorhodopsin, as well as retinal biosynthesis genes, allowing it to utilize sunlight as an energy source. PMID:26823585

  7. Living in a coastal lagoon environment: photosynthetic and biochemical mechanisms of key marine macroalgae.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Marta; Korbee, Nathalie; Pérez-Ruzafa, Isabel María; Marcos, Concepción; Figueroa, Félix L; Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel

    2014-10-01

    The physiological status of Cystoseira compressa, Padina pavonica and Palisada tenerrima was studied by in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence, pigment content, stoichiometry (C:N), accumulation of UV photoprotectors and antioxidant activity; comparing their photosynthetic response in a coastal lagoon (Mar Menor) and in Mediterranean coastal waters. In general, the specimens reached their highest ETRmax in spring in the Lagoon, but in summer in the Mediterranean, coinciding with their maximum biomass peak. The species exhibited a dynamic photoinhibition. Except C. compressa, they showed a lower decrease in Fv/Fm and higher recovery rates in the Mediterranean populations when exposed to high irradiance. The higher salinity and temperature of the lagoon could impair the photoprotection mechanisms. The acclimation to lagoon environments is species-specific and involves complex regulatory mechanisms. The results underline the importance of N in repair, avoidance, quenching and scavenging mechanisms. In general, Lagoon specimens showed higher pigment concentration. Although xanthophylls play important photo-protective and antioxidant roles, the observed trend is more likely to be explained by the higher temperatures reached in the lagoon compared to Mediterranean. Therefore the studied photosynthetic and biochemical mechanisms can be effective not only for high irradiance, but also for higher temperatures in a climate change scenario, but are highly dependent on nutrient availability. PMID:25164017

  8. Genome sequence of the marine bacterium Corynebacterium maris type strain Coryn-1(T) (= DSM 45190(T)).

    PubMed

    Schaffert, Lena; Albersmeier, Andreas; Bednarz, Hanna; Niehaus, Karsten; Kalinowski, Jörn; Rückert, Christian

    2013-07-30

    Corynebacterium maris Coryn-1(T) Ben-Dov et al. 2009 is a member of the genus Corynebacterium which contains Gram-positive, non-spore forming bacteria with a high G+C content. C. maris was isolated from the mucus of the Scleractinian coral Fungia granulosa and belongs to the aerobic and non-haemolytic corynebacteria. It displays tolerance to salts (up to 10%) and is related to the soil bacterium Corynebacterium halotolerans. As this is a type strain in a subgroup of Corynebacterium without complete genome sequences, this project, describing the 2.78 Mbp long chromosome and the 45.97 kbp plasmid pCmaris1, with their 2,584 protein-coding and 67 RNA genes, will aid the G enomic E ncyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:24501635

  9. Thermally Induced Leakage from Vibrio marinus, an Obligately Psychrophilic Marine Bacterium1

    PubMed Central

    Haight, Roger D.; Morita, Richard Y.

    1966-01-01

    Haight, Rodger D. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Richard Y. Morita. Thermally induced leakage from Vibrio marinus, an obligately psychrophilic bacterium. J. Bacteriol. 92:1388–1393. 1966.—Leakage of various cellular components into the surrounding menstruum occurred when Vibrio marinus was subjected to temperatures above 20 C (organism's maximal growth temperature). These materials, listed in decreasing rates of leakage, were identified as protein, deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and amino acids. The amount of polar amino acids increased as the time and temperature of heat treatment were increased, whereas the nonpolar amino acids decreased. The ribonucleic acid in the supernatant fluid resulting from heat treatment was both polymeric and nonpolymeric. Leakage of cellular components may be one of the reasons that V. marinus MP-1 loses viability when exposed to temperatures above its maximal temperature for growth. PMID:5924270

  10. A halotolerant thermostable lipase from the marine bacterium Oceanobacillus sp. PUMB02 with an ability to disrupt bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Seghal Kiran, George; Nishanth Lipton, Anuj; Kennedy, Jonathan; Dobson, Alan DW; Selvin, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    A halotolerant thermostable lipase was purified and characterized from the marine bacterium Oceanobacillus sp. PUMB02. This lipase displayed a high degree of stability over a wide range of conditions including pH, salinity, and temperature. It was optimally active at 30 °C and pH 8.0 respectively and was stable at higher temperatures (50–70 °C) and alkaline pH. The molecular mass of the lipase was approximately 31 kDa based on SDS-PAGE and MALDI-ToF fingerprint analysis. Conditions for enhanced production of lipase by Oceanobacillus sp. PUMB02 were attained in response surface method-guided optimization with factors such as olive oil, sucrose, potassium chromate, and NaCl being evaluated, resulting in levels of 58.84 U/ml being achieved. The biofilm disruption potential of the PUMB02 lipase was evaluated and compared with a marine sponge metagenome derived halotolerant lipase Lpc53E1. Good biofilm disruption activity was observed with both lipases against potential food pathogens such as Bacillus cereus MTCC1272, Listeria sp. MTCC1143, Serratia sp. MTCC4822, Escherichia coli MTCC443, Pseudomonas fluorescens MTCC1748, and Vibrio parahemolyticus MTCC459. Phase contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed very effective disruption of pathogenic biofilms. This study reveals that marine derived hydrolytic enzymes such as lipases may have potential utility in inhibiting biofilm formation in a food processing environment and is the first report of the potential application of lipases from the genus Oceanobacillus in biofilm disruption strategies. PMID:25482232

  11. A halotolerant thermostable lipase from the marine bacterium Oceanobacillus sp. PUMB02 with an ability to disrupt bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Seghal Kiran, George; Nishanth Lipton, Anuj; Kennedy, Jonathan; Dobson, Alan D W; Selvin, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    A halotolerant thermostable lipase was purified and characterized from the marine bacterium Oceanobacillus sp. PUMB02. This lipase displayed a high degree of stability over a wide range of conditions including pH, salinity, and temperature. It was optimally active at 30 °C and pH 8.0 respectively and was stable at higher temperatures (50-70 °C) and alkaline pH. The molecular mass of the lipase was approximately 31 kDa based on SDS-PAGE and MALDI-ToF fingerprint analysis. Conditions for enhanced production of lipase by Oceanobacillus sp. PUMB02 were attained in response surface method-guided optimization with factors such as olive oil, sucrose, potassium chromate, and NaCl being evaluated, resulting in levels of 58.84 U/ml being achieved. The biofilm disruption potential of the PUMB02 lipase was evaluated and compared with a marine sponge metagenome derived halotolerant lipase Lpc53E1. Good biofilm disruption activity was observed with both lipases against potential food pathogens such as Bacillus cereus MTCC1272, Listeria sp. MTCC1143, Serratia sp. MTCC4822, Escherichia coli MTCC443, Pseudomonas fluorescens MTCC1748, and Vibrio parahemolyticus MTCC459. Phase contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed very effective disruption of pathogenic biofilms. This study reveals that marine derived hydrolytic enzymes such as lipases may have potential utility in inhibiting biofilm formation in a food processing environment and is the first report of the potential application of lipases from the genus Oceanobacillus in biofilm disruption strategies. PMID:25482232

  12. Genome Sequence of the Agar-Degrading Marine Bacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. Strain G7

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min-Jung; Song, Ju Yeon; Kim, Byung Kwon; Chi, Won-Jae; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Choi, Soobeom; Chang, Yong-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of the agar-degrading marine gammaproteobacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. strain G7, which was isolated from coastal seawater to be utilized as a bioresource for production of agar-derived biofuels. The 3.91-Mb genome contains a number of genes encoding algal polysaccharide-degrading enzymes such as agarases and sulfatases. PMID:23209220

  13. Excited state coherent dynamics in light-harvesting complexes from photosynthetic marine algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, G. H.; Wilk, K. E.; Curmi, P. M. G.; Quiney, H. M.; Davis, J. A.

    2012-08-01

    We explore coherence dynamics in light-harvesting complexes and their interactions with other electronic states and vibrational modes. This is achieved by utilizing a two-colour four-wave mixing spectroscopy to excite and analyse a specific coherence pathway in the phycocyanin-645 (PC645) light-harvesting complex. We observe the dephasing rate increase as a function of temperature and oscillations in the signal intensity as a function of waiting time which reveals coherent excitation of pathways not directly resonant with the laser pulses. This coherent excitation of non-resonant electronic states implies strong coupling to phonon modes, which is necessary if coherent energy transfer between non-resonant states is to play any role in photosynthetic energy transfer.

  14. Iron(III) coordination chemistry of alterobactin A: a siderophore from the marine bacterium Alteromonas luteoviolacea.

    PubMed

    Holt, Pamela D; Reid, Richard R; Lewis, Brent L; Luther, George W; Butler, Alison

    2005-10-17

    Alterobactin A is a siderophore produced by the oceanic bacterium Alteromonas luteoviolacea. The thermodynamic stability constant of the ferric alterobactin A (Alt-A) complex was estimated from electrochemical measurements on the basis of a previously reported linear relationship between the reduction potentials and the pH-independent stability constants for known iron(III) complexes. The reduction potential of the ferric alterobactin A complex determined by square wave voltammetry is -0.972 V vs SCE and reversible, corresponding to a thermodynamic stability constant of 10(51+/-2). Potentiometric titration of Fe(III)-Alt-A shows the release of six protons on complexation of Fe(III) to Alt-A. The 1H NMR resonances of the Ga(III)-Alt-A complex show that the C-4, C-5, and C-6 catecholate protons and the C(alpha) and C(beta) protons of both beta-hydroxyaspartate moieties are shifted downfield relative to the free ligand, which along with the potentiometric titration data is consistent with a complex in which Fe(III) is coordinated by both catecholate oxygen atoms and both oxygen atoms of each beta-hydroxyaspartate. The UV-vis spectrum of Fe(III)-Alt-A is invariant over the pH range 4-9, indicating the coordination does not change over a wide pH range. In addition, in the absence of a coordinated metal ion, the serine ester of Alt-A hydrolyzes forming Alt-B. PMID:16212394

  15. Extracellular haem peroxidases mediate Mn(II) oxidation in a marine Roseobacter bacterium via superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Andeer, Peter F; Learman, Deric R; McIlvin, Matt; Dunn, James A; Hansel, Colleen M

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in environmental systems. A number of biotic and abiotic pathways induce the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn oxides. Here, we use a combination of proteomic analyses and activity assays, to identify the enzyme(s) responsible for extracellular superoxide-mediated Mn oxide formation by a bacterium within the ubiquitous Roseobacter clade. We show that animal haem peroxidases (AHPs) located on the outer membrane and within the secretome are responsible for Mn(II) oxidation. These novel peroxidases have previously been implicated in direct Mn(II) oxidation by phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Yet, we show that in this Roseobacter species, AHPs mediate Mn(II) oxidation not through a direct reaction but by producing superoxide and likely also by degrading hydrogen peroxide. These findings point to a eukaryotic-like oscillatory oxidative-peroxidative enzymatic cycle by these AHPs that leads to Mn oxide formation by this organism. AHP expression appears unaffected by Mn(II), yet the large energetic investment required to produce and secrete these enzymes points to an as yet unknown physiological function. These findings are further evidence that bacterial peroxidases and secreted enzymes, in general, are unappreciated controls on the cycling of metals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and by extension carbon, in natural systems. PMID:25923595

  16. Pseudomonas glareae sp. nov., a marine sediment-derived bacterium with antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Tanaka, Naoto; Svetashev, Vassilii I; Mikhailov, Valery V

    2015-06-01

    An aerobic, Gram-negative, motile, rod-shaped bacterium designated KMM 9500(T) was isolated from a sediment sample collected from the Sea of Japan seashore. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis affiliated strain KMM 9500(T) to the genus Pseudomonas as a distinct subline clustered with Pseudomonas marincola KMM 3042(T) and Pseudomonas segetis KCTC 12331(T) sharing the highest similarities of 98 and 97.9 %, respectively. Strain KMM 9500(T) was characterized by mainly possessing ubiquinone Q-9, and by the predominance of C18:1 ω7c, C16:1 ω7c, and C16:0 followed by C12:0 in its fatty acid profile. Polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unknown aminophospholipid, and unknown phospholipids. Strain KMM 9500(T) was found to inhibit growth of Gram-negative and Gram-positive indicatory microorganisms. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and distinctive phenotypic characteristics, strain 9500(T) is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas glareae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the species is strain KMM 9500(T) (=NRIC 0939(T)). PMID:25787010

  17. Homologues of insecticidal toxin complex genes within a genomic island in the marine bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kathy F J; Lightner, Donald V

    2014-10-01

    Three insecticidal toxin complex (tc)-like genes were identified in Vibrio parahaemolyticus 13-028/A3, which can cause acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease in penaeid shrimp. The three genes are a tcdA-like gene (7710 bp), predicted to code for a 284-kDa protein; a tcdB-like gene (4272 bp), predicted to code for a 158-kDa protein; and a tccC3-like gene (2916 bp), predicted to encode a 107-kDa protein. All three predicted proteins contain conserved domains that are characteristic of their respective Tc proteins. By RT-PCR, all three tc-like genes were found to be expressed in this bacterium. Through genome walking and the use of PCR to join contigs surrounding these three genes, a genomic island (87 712 bp, named tc-GIvp) was found on chromosome II localized next to the tRNA Gly. The GC content of this island, which is not found in other Vibrio species, is 40%. The tc-GIvp is characterized to have 60 ORFs encoding regulatory or virulence factors. These include a type 6 secretion protein VgrG, EAL domain-containing proteins, fimbriae subunits and assembly proteins, invasin-like proteins, peptidoglycan-binding proteins, and Tc proteins. The tc-GIvp also contains 21 transposase genes, suggesting that it was acquired through horizontal transfer from other organisms. PMID:25272969

  18. Potent Inhibitors of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Production Produced by a Marine-Derived Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Strangman, Wendy K.; Kwon, Hak Cheol; Broide, David; Jensen, Paul R.; Fenical, William

    2009-01-01

    Cytokines produced through the Antigen Presenting Cell (APC)–T-cell interaction play a key role in the activation of the allergic asthmatic response. Evaluating small molecules that inhibit the production of these pro-inflammatory proteins is therefore important for the discovery of novel chemical structures with potential anti-asthma activity. We adapted a mouse splenocyte cytokine assay to screen a library of 2,500 marine microbial extracts for their ability to inhibit TH2 cytokine release and identified potent activity in a marine-derived strain CNQ431, identified as a Streptomyces species. Bioactivity guided fractionation of the organic extract of this strain led to the isolation of ten new 9-membered bis-lactones, splenocins A-J (1–10). The new compounds display potent biological activities, comparable to that of the corticosteroid dexamethasone, with IC50 values from 2–50 nanomolar in the splenocyte cytokine assay. This study provides the foundation for the optimization of these potent anti-inflammatory compounds for development in the treatment of asthma. PMID:19323483

  19. Novel bioactive metabolites from a marine derived bacterium Nocardia sp. ALAA 2000.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Mervat M A; Hawas, Usama W; Jaspars, Marcel

    2008-06-01

    Extracts of the Egyptian marine actinomycete, Nocardia sp. ALAA 2000, were found to be highly bioactive. It was isolated from the marine red alga Laurenica spectabilis collected off the Ras-Gharib coast of the Red Sea, Egypt. According to detailed identification studies, the strain was classified as a member of the genus Nocardia. The cultivation and chemical analysis of this species yielded four structurally related compounds namely, chrysophanol 8-methyl ether (1), asphodelin; 4,7'-bichrysophanol (2) and justicidin B (3), in addition to a novel bioactive compound ayamycin; 1,1-dichloro-4-ethyl-5-(4-nitro-phenyl)-hexan-2-one (4) which is unique in contain both chlorination and a rarely observed nitro group. The compounds were isolated by a series of chromatographic steps and their structures of 1approximately 3 secured by detailed spectroscopic analysis of the MS and NMR data whereas that of 4 was elucidated by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These compounds displayed different potent antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi with MIC ranging from 0.1 to 10 microg/ml. PMID:18667786

  20. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Marine, Chemolithoautotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosococcus oceani ATCC19707

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, M G; Arp, D J; Chain, P S; El-Sheikh, A F; Hauser, L J; Hommes, N G; Larimer, F W; Malfatti, S A; Norton, J M; Poret-Peterson, A T; Vergez, L M; Ward, B B

    2006-08-03

    The Gammaproteobacterium, Nitrosococcus oceani (ATCC 19707), is a Gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy and reducing power from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Sequencing and annotation of the genome revealed a single circular chromosome (3,481,691 bp; 50.4% G+C) and a plasmid (40,420 bp) that contain 3052 and 41 candidate protein-encoding genes, respectively. The genes encoding proteins necessary for the function of known modes of lithotrophy and autotrophy were identified. In contrast to betaproteobacterial nitrifier genomes, the N. oceani genome contained two complete rrn operons. In contrast, only one copy of the genes needed to synthesize functional ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase, as well as the proteins that relay the extracted electrons to a terminal electron acceptor were identified. The N. oceani genome contained genes for 13 complete two-component systems. The genome also contained all the genes needed to reconstruct complete central pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnass and pentose phosphate pathways. The N. oceani genome contains the genes required to store and utilize energy from glycogen inclusion bodies and sucrose. Polyphosphate and pyrophosphate appear to be integrated in this bacterium's energy metabolism, stress tolerance and the ability to assimilate carbon via gluconeogenesis. One set of genes for type I RuBisCO was identified, while genes necessary for methanotrophy and for carboxysome formation were not identified. The N. oceani genome contains two copies each of the genes or operons necessary to assemble functional complexes I and IV as well as ATP synthase (one H{sup +}-dependent F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-type, one Na{sup +}-dependent V-type).

  1. Shewanella algicola sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from brown algae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Young; Yoo, Han-Su; Lee, Dong-Heon; Park, So-Hyun; Kim, Young-Ju; Oh, Duck-Chul

    2016-06-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium motile by means of a single polar flagella, strain ST-6T, was isolated from a brown alga (Sargassum thunbergii) collected in Jeju, Republic of Korea. Strain ST-6T was psychrotolerant, growing at 4-30 °C (optimum 20 °C). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences revealed that strain ST-6T belonged to a distinct lineage in the genus Shewanella. Strain ST-6T was related most closely to Shewanella basaltis J83T, S. gaetbuli TF-27T, S. arctica IT12T, S. vesiculosa M7T and S. aestuarii SC18T, showing 96-97 % and 85-70 % 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences similarities, respectively. DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain ST-6T and the type strains of two species of the genus Shewanella were <22.6 %. The major cellular fatty acids (>5 %) were summed feature 3 (comprising C16:1ω7c and/ or iso-C15:0 2-OH), C16:0, iso-C13:0 and C17:1ω8c. The DNA G+C content of strain ST-6Twas 42.4 mol%, and the predominant isoprenoid quinones were menaquinone MK-7 and ubiquinones Q-7 and Q-8. On the basis of its phenotypic properties and phylogenetic distinctiveness, strain ST-6T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Shewanella, for which the name Shewanella algicola sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ST-6T (= KCTC 23253T = JCM 31091T). PMID:26962005

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the Marine, Chemolithoautotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosococcus oceani ATCC 19707

    SciTech Connect

    Klots, Martin G.; Arp, D J; Chain, Patrick S; El-Sheikh, Amal F.; Hauser, Loren John; Hommes, Norman G.; Larimer, Frank W; Malfatti, Stephanie; Norton, Jeanette M.; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Vergez, Lisa; Ward, Bess B.

    2006-01-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Nitrosococcus oceani (ATCC 19707) is a gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy and reducing power from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Sequencing and annotation of the genome revealed a single circular chromosome (3,481,691 bp; G+C content of 50.4%) and a plasmid (40,420 bp) that contain 3,052 and 41 candidate protein-encoding genes, respectively. The genes encoding proteins necessary for the function of known modes of lithotrophy and autotrophy were identified. Contrary to betaproteobacterial nitrifier genomes, the N. oceani genome contained two complete rrn operons. In contrast, only one copy of the genes needed to synthesize functional ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase, as well as the proteins that relay the extracted electrons to a terminal electron acceptor, were identified. The N. oceani genome contained genes for 13 complete two-component systems. The genome also contained all the genes needed to reconstruct complete central pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnass and pentose phosphate pathways. The N. oceani genome contains the genes required to store and utilize energy from glycogen inclusion bodies and sucrose. Polyphosphate and pyrophosphate appear to be integrated in this bacterium's energy metabolism, stress tolerance, and ability to assimilate carbon via gluconeogenesis. One set of genes for type I ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was identified, while genes necessary for methanotrophy and for carboxysome formation were not identified. The N. oceani genome contains two copies each of the genes or operons necessary to assemble functional complexes I and IV as well as ATP synthase (one H+-dependent F0F1 type, one Na+-dependent V type).

  3. Alkalimicrobium pacificum gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium in the family Rhodobacteraceae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaiyun; Yang, Yanliu; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Zhilei; Jiao, Kailin

    2015-08-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain F15T, was isolated from a deep-sea sediment of the western Pacific Ocean. The temperature, pH and NaCl ranges for growth were 4-50 °C, pH 6-11 and 0-10 % (w/v), respectively. Strain F15T showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Sagittula stellata E-37T (96.4%), followed by Ponticoccus litoralis CL-GR66T (96.4%), Antarctobacter heliothermus EL-219T (96.3%) and Thalassococcus lentus YCS-24T (96.0%). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data showed that strain F15T formed a lineage within the family Rhodobacteraceae of the class Alphaproteobacteria. The polar lipid profile of strain F15T comprised significant amounts of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, one unidentified glycolipid and one unidentified phospholipid. The predominant cellular fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c, 40.2%), anteiso-C15 : 0 (30.4%) and anteiso-C17 : 0 (9.7%). The genomic DNA G+C content of strain F15T was 60.2 mol% and the major respiratory quinone was Q-10. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic data, strain F15T is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus within the family Rhodobacteraceae, for which the name Alkalimicrobium pacificum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is F15T ( = LMG 28107T = JCM 19851T = CGMCC 1.12763T = MCCC 1A09948T). PMID:25908713

  4. Zooshikella marina sp. nov. a cycloprodigiosin- and prodigiosin-producing marine bacterium isolated from beach sand.

    PubMed

    Ramaprasad, E V V; Bharti, Dave; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2015-12-01

    A red-pigmented bacterium producing a metallic green sheen, designated strain JC333T, was isolated from a sand sample collected from Shivrajpur-Kachigad beach, Gujarat, India. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain JC333T showed highest sequence similarity to Zooshikella ganghwensis JC2044T (99.24 %) and less than 91.94 % similarity with other members of the class Gammaproteobacteria. DNA-DNA hybridizations between JC333T and Z. ganghwensis JC2044T showed low relatedness values of 19 ± 1.3 % (reciprocal 21 ± 2.2 %). The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone-9 (Q9) and the polar lipid profile was composed of the major components diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified aminophospholipid and an unidentified lipid. The presence of C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c, C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω7c and C12 : 0 as major fatty acids supported the affiliation of strain JC333T to the genus Zooshikella. Prodigiosin, cycloprodigiosin and eight other prodigiosin analogues were the pigments of JC333T. Characterization based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, physiological parameters, pigment analysis, ubiquinone, and polar lipid and fatty acid compositions revealed that JC333T represents a novel species of the genus Zooshikella, for which the name Zooshikella marina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JC333T ( = KCTC 42659T = LMG 28823T). PMID:26409875

  5. Genome Sequence of Polycyclovorans algicola Strain TG408, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Haydn F.; Angelova, Angelina; Whitman, William B.; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N.; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclovorans algicola strain TG408 is a recently discovered bacterium associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and exhibits the ability to utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) almost exclusively as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 3,653,213 bp, with 3,477 genes and an average G+C content of 63.8%. PMID:25814607

  6. Genome Sequence of Polycyclovorans algicola Strain TG408, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Thompson, Haydn F; Angelova, Angelina; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclovorans algicola strain TG408 is a recently discovered bacterium associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and exhibits the ability to utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) almost exclusively as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 3,653,213 bp, with 3,477 genes and an average G+C content of 63.8%. PMID:25814607

  7. Genome Sequence of Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus Strain MCTG13d, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus strain MCTG13d is a recently discovered bacterium that is associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and that almost exclusively utilizes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole source of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 2,474,654 bp with 2,385 genes and has an average G+C content of 53.1%. PMID:26089431

  8. Photosynthetic water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1981-01-01

    The photosynthetic unit of hydrogen evolution, the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production, and hydrogenic photosynthesis are discussed in the section on previous work. Recent results are given on simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen, kinetic studies, microscopic marine algae-seaweeds, and oxygen profiles.

  9. Vertical distribution of major photosynthetic picoeukaryotic groups in stratified marine waters.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Ana M; Latasa, Mikel; Forn, Irene; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G; Massana, Ramon

    2016-05-01

    Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPEs) are fundamental contributors to oceanic primary production and form diverse communities dominated by prymnesiophytes, chlorophytes, pelagophytes and chrysophytes. Here, we studied the vertical distribution of these major groups in two offshore regions of the northern Iberian Peninsula during summer stratification. We performed a fine-scale vertical sampling (every ∼2 m) across the DCM and used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to determine the PPE composition and to explore the possible segregation of target groups in the light, nutrient and temperature gradients. Chlorophytes, pelagophytes and prymnesiophytes, in this order of abundance, accounted for the total PPEs recorded by flow cytometry in the Avilés canyon, and for more than half in the Galicia Bank, whereas chrysophytes were undetected. Among the three detected groups, often the prymnesiophytes were dominant in biomass. In general, all groups were present throughout the water column with abundance peaks around the DCM, but their distributions differed: pelagophytes were located deeper than the other two groups, chlorophytes presented two peaks and prymnesiophytes exhibited surface abundances comparable to those at the DCM. This study offers first indications that the vertical distribution of different PPE groups is heterogeneous within the DCM. PMID:26971724

  10. Production of cold-adapted amylase by marine bacterium Wangia sp. C52: optimization, modeling, and partial characterization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Hu; Dang, Hongyue; Lu, Jianren; Cui, Zhanfeng

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to optimize the fermentation parameters in the shake-flask culture of marine bacterium Wangia sp. C52 to increase cold-adapted amylase production using two statistical experimental methods including Plackett-Burman design, which was applied to find the key ingredients for the best medium composition, and response surface methodology, which was used to determine the optimal concentrations of these components. The results showed starch, tryptone, and initial pH had significant effects on the cold-adapted amylase production. A central composite design was then employed to further optimize these three factors. The experimental results indicated that the optimized composition of medium was 6.38 g  L(-1) starch, 33.84 g  L(-1) tryptone, 3.00 g  L(-1) yeast extract, 30 g  L(-1) NaCl, 0.60 g  L(-1) MgSO(4) and 0.56 g  L(-1) CaCl(2). The optimized cultivation conditions for amylase production were pH 7.18, a temperature of 20°C, and a shaking speed of 180 rpm. Under the proposed optimized conditions, the amylase experimental yield (676.63 U  mL(-1)) closely matched the yield (685.60 U  mL(-1)) predicted by the statistical model. The optimization of the medium contributed to tenfold higher amylase production than that of the control in shake-flask experiments. PMID:21365455

  11. Cloning and characterization of two thermo- and salt-tolerant oligoalginate lyases from marine bacterium Halomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuemei; Li, Shangyong; Wu, Ying; Yu, Wengong; Han, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Two new alginate lyase genes, oalY1 and oalY2, have been cloned from the newly isolated marine bacterium Halomonas sp. QY114 and expressed in Escherichia coli The deduced alginate lyases, OalY1 and OalY2, belonged to polysaccharide lyase (PL) family 17 and showed less than 45% amino acid identity with all of the characterized oligoalginate lyases. OalY1 and OalY2 exhibited the highest activities at 45°C and 50°C, respectively. Both of them showed more than 50% of the highest activity at 60°C, and 20% at 80°C. In addition, they were salt-dependent and salt-tolerant since both of them showed the highest activity in the presence of 0.5 M NaCl and preserved 63% and 68% of activity in the presence of 3 M NaCl. Significantly, OalY1 and OalY2 could degrade both polyM and polyG blocks into alginate monosaccharides in an exo-lytic type, indicating that they are bifunctional alginate lyases. In conclusion, our study indicated that OalY1 and OalY2 are good candidates for alginate saccharification application, and the salt-tolerance may present an exciting new concept for biofuel production from native brown seaweeds. PMID:27030725

  12. Horizontal transfer of chromosomal DNA between the marine bacterium Vibrio furnissii and Escherichia coli revealed by sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Charbit, A; Autret, N

    1998-01-01

    Previous in silico analysis of the 67.4-76.0 minutes region of the Escherichia coli genome led to the identification of a gene cluster (named aga) comprising five genes encoding homologs of the mannose transporter of E. coli, a member of the sugar-specific phosphoenolypyruvate/sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). In the present work, we compared the aga gene cluster of E. coli, which has been considered to be involved in N-acetylgalactosamine or N-acetylmannosamine transport and metabolism, to the region comprising the recently identified mannose transporter of the marine bacterium Vibrio furnissii. Our analysis revealed that the proteins encoded by three genes (agaV, agaW, and agaA), located in the proximal portion of the aga gene cluster, shared striking similarities with the proteins encoded by the manX (IIBMan), manY (IICMan), and manD (a putative deacetylase) genes of V. furnissii, respectively (70%-82.3% identity among the three pairs of proteins). Moreover, we found that the two following aga genes (agaS and agaY) were homologous to the sequences flanking the mannose operon of V. furnissii. These observations strongly support the idea of a horizontal transfer of the chromosomally encoded man operon of V. furnissii into the E. coli genome. PMID:9697096

  13. Reduction of carbon monoxide to formaldehyde by the terminal oxidase of the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica strain 617.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, S; Malatesta, F; Denis, M

    1992-01-27

    When exposed to CO, the aerobic respiratory system of the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica strain 617, previously reduced with dithionite, undergoes reoxidation. When dealing with the purified oxidase (dithionite reduced) exposure of the enzyme to CO induces its reoxidation (collapse of its alpha band). Under our experimental conditions, this form of the oxidase could not be reduced again by dithionite. Addition of formaldehyde to the native oxidized enzyme resulted in full inhibition of the oxidase reduction by dithionite, presumably due to complex formation. We hypothesized a reduction of CO into formaldehyde and a locking of the active site by the reaction product. By using flash photolysis, it was possible to turn over the enzyme, accumulate the reaction product and identify it as formaldehyde. When using the membrane-bound enzyme, formaldehyde accumulated without the help of flash photolysis. This unusual reduction of CO to formaldehyde could be related to the previously reported uncommon features of the P. nautica oxidase, in particular O2 reduction into H2O2 as end product [(1989) FEBS Lett. 247, 475-479]. PMID:1537399

  14. Experimental Identification of Small Non-Coding RNAs in the Model Marine Bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3

    PubMed Central

    Rivers, Adam R.; Burns, Andrew S.; Chan, Leong-Keat; Moran, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    In oligotrophic ocean waters where bacteria are often subjected to chronic nutrient limitation, community transcriptome sequencing has pointed to the presence of highly abundant small RNAs (sRNAs). The role of sRNAs in regulating response to nutrient stress was investigated in a model heterotrophic marine bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi grown in continuous culture under carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) limitation. RNAseq analysis identified 99 putative sRNAs. Sixty-nine were cis-encoded and located antisense to a presumed target gene. Thirty were trans-encoded and initial target prediction was performed computationally. The most prevalent functional roles of genes anti-sense to the cis-sRNAs were transport, cell-cell interactions, signal transduction, and transcriptional regulation. Most sRNAs were transcribed equally under both C and N limitation, and may be involved in a general stress response. However, 14 were regulated differentially between the C and N treatments and may respond to specific nutrient limitations. A network analysis of the predicted target genes of the R. pomeroyi cis-sRNAs indicated that they average fewer connections than typical protein-encoding genes, and appear to be more important in peripheral or niche-defining functions encoded in the pan genome. PMID:27065955

  15. Characterization of the biochemical properties of recombinant Xyn10C from a marine bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans 2-40.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ja Kyong; Ko, Hyeokjin; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Choi, In-Geol

    2016-04-01

    Endo-1,4-β-xylanases are mostly classified into glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 or 11. In this study, we examined the catalytic functions of a recombinant endo-1,4-β-xylanase belonging to GH10 (Xyn10C) from a marine bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans 2-40. Optimal activity of this enzyme was evident at 30 °C and pH 7.0, but activity remained even at low temperatures, indicating its adaptation to cold. With respect to other xylanases known to be active in cold temperatures, Xyn10C is unique in that it showed maximal activity in the presence of 2 M of NaCl. The action patterns of recombinant Xyn10C on xylans from hardwood and softwood differed in part, but the enzyme hydrolyzed polysaccharidic substrates primarily to xylobiose and xylotriose through xylo-oligosaccharides, releasing a small amount of xylose. The K m and V max values on birchwood xylan were 10.4 mg mL(-1) and 253 µmol mg(-1) min(-1), respectively. The efficient catalytic function of Xyn10C on short-length xylo-oligosaccharide chains was similar to the typical function of other known GH10 xylanases. PMID:26809714

  16. A novel bifunctional hybrid with marine bacterium alkaline phosphatase and Far Eastern holothurian mannan-binding lectin activities.

    PubMed

    Balabanova, Larissa; Golotin, Vasily; Kovalchuk, Svetlana; Bulgakov, Alexander; Likhatskaya, Galina; Son, Oksana; Rasskazov, Valery

    2014-01-01

    A fusion between the genes encoding the marine bacterium Cobetia marina alkaline phosphatase (CmAP) and Far Eastern holothurian Apostichopus japonicus mannan-binding C-type lectin (MBL-AJ) was performed. Expression of the fusion gene in E. coli cells resulted in yield of soluble recombinant chimeric protein CmAP/MBL-AJ with the high alkaline phosphatase activity and specificity of the lectin MBL-AJ. The bifunctional hybrid CmAP/MBL-AJ was produced as a dimer with the molecular mass of 200 kDa. The CmAP/MBL-AJ dimer model showed the two-subunit lectin part that is associated with two molecules of alkaline phosphatase functioning independently from each other. The highly active CmAP label genetically linked to MBL-AJ has advantaged the lectin-binding assay in its sensitivity and time. The double substitution A156N/F159K in the lectin domain of CmAP/MBL-AJ has enhanced its lectin activity by 25 ± 5%. The bifunctional hybrid holothurian's lectin could be promising tool for developing non-invasive methods for biological markers assessment, particularly for improving the MBL-AJ-based method for early detection of a malignant condition in cervical specimens. PMID:25397876

  17. Enhancing production of a 24-membered ring macrolide compound by a marine bacterium using response surface methodology*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Wu, Mian-bin; Chen, Zheng-jie; Wang, Ming-lu; Lin, Jian-ping; Yang, Li-rong

    2013-01-01

    A 24-membered ring macrolide compound, macrolactin A has potential applications in pharmaceuticals for its anti-infectious and antiviral activity. In this study, macrolactin A was produced by a marine bacterium, which was identified as Bacillus subtilis by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence analysis. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses were used to characterize this compound. To improve the production, response surface methodology (RSM) involving Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed. Faeces bombycis, the main by-product in sericulture, was used as a nitrogen source in fermentation. The interactions between three significant factors, F. bombycis, soluble starch, and (NH4)2SO4 were investigated. A quadratic model was constructed to fit the production and the factors. Optimum medium composition was obtained by analysis of the model. When cultivated in the optimum medium, the production of macrolactin A was increased to 851 mg/L, 2.7 times as compared to the original. This study is also useful to find another way in utilizing F. bombycis. PMID:23549852

  18. Characterization of a novel thiosulfate dehydrogenase from a marine acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strain SH.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Sultana; Yoshino, Eriko; Kanao, Tadayoshi; Kamimura, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    A marine acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strain SH, was isolated to develop a bioleaching process for NaCl-containing sulfide minerals. Because the sulfur moiety of sulfide minerals is metabolized to sulfate via thiosulfate as an intermediate, we purified and characterized the thiosulfate dehydrogenase (TSD) from strain SH. The enzyme had an apparent molecular mass of 44 kDa and was purified 71-fold from the solubilized membrane fraction. Tetrathionate was the product of the TSD-oxidized thiosulfate and ferricyanide or ubiquinone was the electron acceptor. Maximum enzyme activity was observed at pH 4.0, 40 °C, and 200 mM NaCl. To our knowledge, this is the first report of NaCl-stimulated TSD activity. TSD was structurally different from the previously reported thiosulfate-oxidizing enzymes. In addition, TSD activity was strongly inhibited by 2-heptyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline N-oxide, suggesting that the TSD is a novel thiosulfate:quinone reductase. PMID:26393925

  19. Purification and Characterization of a New κ-Carrageenase from the Marine Bacterium Vibrio sp. NJ-2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Benwei; Ning, Limin

    2016-02-01

    The carrageenan-degrading marine bacterium Vibrio sp. strain NJ-2 was isolated from rotten red algae, and κ-carrageenase with high activity was purified from the culture supernatant. The purified enzyme with molecular mass of 33 kDa showed the maximal activity of 937 U/mg at 40°C and pH 8.0. It maintained 80% of total activity below 40°C and between pH 6.0 and 10.0. The kinetics experiment showed the Km and Vmax values were 2.54 mg/ml and 138.89 mmol/min/mg, respectively. The thin layer chromatography and ESI-MS analysis of hydrolysates indicated that the enzyme can endolytically depolymerize the kappa-carrageenan into oligosaccharides with degrees of depolymerization of 2-8. Owing to its high activity, it could be a valuable tool to produce κ-carrageenan oligosaccharides with various biological activities. PMID:26528532

  20. Isolation and identification of a bacterium from marine shrimp digestive tract: A new degrader of starch and protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiqiu; Tan, Beiping; Mai, Kangsen

    2011-09-01

    It is a practical approach to select candidate probiotic bacterial stains on the basis of their special traits. Production of digestive enzyme was used as a trait to select a candidate probiotic bacterial strain in this study. In order to select a bacterium with the ability to degrade both starch and protein, an ideal bacterial strain STE was isolated from marine shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) intestines by using multiple selective media. The selected isolate STE was identified on the basis of its morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics as well as molecular analyses. Results of degradation experiments confirmed the ability of the selected isolate to degrade both starch and casein. The isolate STE was aerobic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, motile and non-spore-forming, and had catalase and oxidase activities but no glucose fermentation activity. Among the tested carbon/nitrogen sources, only Tween40, alanyl-glycine, aspartyl-glycine, and glycyl-l-glutamic acid were utilized by the isolate STE. Results of homology comparison analyses of the 16S rDNA sequences showed that the isolate STE had a high similarity to several Pseudoalteromonas species and, in the phylogenetic tree, grouped with P. ruthenica with maximum bootstrap support (100%). In conclusion, the isolate STE was characterized as a novel strain belonging to the genus Pseudoalteromonas. This study provides a further example of a probiotic bacterial strain with specific characteristics isolated from the host gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Tepidicaulis marinus gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium that reduces nitrate to nitrous oxide under strictly microaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Mio; Yamagishi, Takao; Kamagata, Yoichi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Katayama, Taiki; Hanada, Satoshi; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Marumo, Katsumi; Maeda, Hiroto; Nedachi, Munetomo; Iwasaki, Wataru; Suwa, Yuichi; Sakata, Susumu

    2015-06-01

    A moderately thermophilic, aerobic, stalked bacterium (strain MA2T) was isolated from marine sediments in Kagoshima Bay, Japan. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain MA2T was most closely related to the genera Rhodobium,Parvibaculum, and Rhodoligotrophos (92-93 % similarity) within the class Alphaproteobacteria. Strain MA2T was a Gram-stain-negative and stalked dimorphic bacteria. The temperature range for growth was 16-48 °C (optimum growth at 42 °C). This strain required yeast extract and NaCl (>1 %, w/v) for growth, tolerated up to 11 % (w/v) NaCl, and was capable of utilizing various carbon sources. The major cellular fatty acid and major respiratory quinone were C18 : 1ω7c and ubiquinone-10, respectively. The DNA G+C content was 60.7 mol%. Strain MA2T performed denitrification and produced N2O from nitrate under strictly microaerobic conditions. Strain MA2T possessed periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) genes but not membrane-bound nitrate reductase (Nar) genes. On the basis of this morphological, physiological, biochemical and genetic information a novel genus and species, Tepidicaulis marinus gen. nov., sp. nov., are proposed, with MA2T ( = NBRC 109643T = DSM 27167T) as the type strain of the species. PMID:25740933

  2. Pseudoalteromonas bacteriolytica sp. nov., a marine bacterium that is the causative agent of red spot disease of Laminaria japonica.

    PubMed

    Sawabe, T; Makino, H; Tatsumi, M; Nakano, K; Tajima, K; Iqbal, M M; Yumoto, I; Ezura, Y; Christen, R

    1998-07-01

    An aerobic, polarly flagellated marine bacterium that produces a prodigiosin-like pigment was isolated from the red-spotted culture beds of Laminaria japonica. Five isolates had unique bacteriolytic activity for both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, which had never been observed among Alteromonas or related species. The isolates were identified as the causative agent of red spot disease of L. japonica seeds. The phenotypic features of the isolates were similar to these of Pseudoalteromonas rubra ATCC 29570T, but they could be differentiated using 10 traits (growth at 37 degrees C, requirement for organic growth factors, bacteriolytic activity, utilization of sucrose, N-acetylglucosamine, fumarate, succinate, D-galactose, L-proline and acetate). The G+C content of DNAs from the isolates was 44-46 mol%. The isolates constitute a new species, distinct from the other Alteromonas and Pseudoalteromonas species, as shown by DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and phylogenetic clustering of 16S rRNA gene sequences, for which the name Pseudoalteromonas bacteriolytica sp. nov. (type strain = IAM 14595T) is proposed. A set of phenotypic features which differentiate this new species from closely related Pseudoalteromonas and Alteromonas species is provided. PMID:9734030

  3. A Novel Bifunctional Hybrid with Marine Bacterium Alkaline Phosphatase and Far Eastern Holothurian Mannan-Binding Lectin Activities

    PubMed Central

    Balabanova, Larissa; Golotin, Vasily; Kovalchuk, Svetlana; Bulgakov, Alexander; Likhatskaya, Galina; Son, Oksana; Rasskazov, Valery

    2014-01-01

    A fusion between the genes encoding the marine bacterium Cobetia marina alkaline phosphatase (CmAP) and Far Eastern holothurian Apostichopus japonicus mannan-binding C-type lectin (MBL-AJ) was performed. Expression of the fusion gene in E. coli cells resulted in yield of soluble recombinant chimeric protein CmAP/MBL-AJ with the high alkaline phosphatase activity and specificity of the lectin MBL-AJ. The bifunctional hybrid CmAP/MBL-AJ was produced as a dimer with the molecular mass of 200 kDa. The CmAP/MBL-AJ dimer model showed the two-subunit lectin part that is associated with two molecules of alkaline phosphatase functioning independently from each other. The highly active CmAP label genetically linked to MBL-AJ has advantaged the lectin-binding assay in its sensitivity and time. The double substitution A156N/F159K in the lectin domain of CmAP/MBL-AJ has enhanced its lectin activity by 25±5%. The bifunctional hybrid holothurian's lectin could be promising tool for developing non-invasive methods for biological markers assessment, particularly for improving the MBL-AJ-based method for early detection of a malignant condition in cervical specimens. PMID:25397876

  4. Feifantangia zhejiangensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from seawater of the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gang; Chen, Zuo-Guo; Jiang, Ri-Jin; Yang, Zhi-Jian

    2015-12-01

    A marine bacterium, NMD7(T), was isolated from seawater of the East China Sea. The cells were found to be aerobic, Gram-stain negative, non-motile rods. Growth of strain NMD7(T) could be observed in the medium without Na(+). Flexirubin-type pigments were observed to be produced. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain NMD7(T) is an authentic member of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum, forming a monophyletic clade as retrieved in neighbor-joining, maximum-likelihood and maximum-parsimony phylogenetic trees, and is closely related to Formosa spongicola A2(T) (96.0 %). The predominant respiratory quinone was determined to be MK-6. Major cellular fatty acids were identified as iso-C15:0, iso-C15:1 G and iso-C17:0 3-OH. The main polar lipids were found to consist of phosphatidylethanolamine, one aminophospholipid, three aminolipids and five unidentified lipids. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic characteristics, it is proposed that strain NMD7(T) be classified as representing a new genus, Feifantangia gen. nov. and a new species, Feifantangia zhejiangensis sp. nov. The type strain is NMD7(T) (=KCTC 42445T =MCCC 1K00458T). PMID:26410371

  5. Ieodoglucomide C and Ieodoglycolipid, New Glycolipids from a Marine-Derived Bacterium Bacillus licheniformis 09IDYM23.

    PubMed

    Tareq, Fakir Shahidullah; Lee, Hyi-Seung; Lee, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Jong Seok; Shin, Hee Jae

    2015-05-01

    Chemical examination of the ethyl acetate extract from the fermentation broth of the marine-derived bacterium Bacillus licheniformis resulted in the isolation of two new glycolipids, ieodoglucomide C (1) and ieodoglycolipid (2). The structural characterization of 1 and 2 was achieved by extensive spectroscopic evidence, including 2D NMR experiments. A combination of chemical derivatization techniques followed by NMR studies, LC-MS data analysis and a literature review was deployed for the establishment of the stereo-configurations of 1 and 2. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited good antibiotic properties against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MICs ranging from 0.01 to 0.05 μM. Furthermore, the antifungal activity of 1 and 2 was evaluated against plant pathogenic fungi Aspergillus niger, Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum acutatum as well as the human pathogen Candida albicans. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited the mycelial growth of these pathogens with MIC values of 0.03-0.05 μM, revealing that these compounds are good candidates for the development of new fungicides. PMID:25893812

  6. Characterization of the dihemic cytochrome c549 from the marine denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, L M; Besson, S; Fauque, G; Moura, I

    1994-03-30

    A dihemic ferricytochrome c549 (21 kDa) was purified and characterized from cells of the marine denitrifier Pseudomonas nautica strain 617. Several spectroscopic techniques, including UV-visible, NMR and EPR spectroscopies were applied to the characterization of this cytochrome. The visible and the 1H-NMR spectra show that both hemes have histidine-methionine as axial ligands. The dihemic cytochrome c549 has mid-point redox potentials of +230 mV and +250 mV, at pH 7.6 and its NH2-terminal sequence presents a high degree of similarity with those of cytochromes c4. The EPR studies allowed the determination of the orientation between the two axial ligands, indicating an axial ligand field for one of the hemes of cytochrome c549 and a rhombic symmetry for the other heme. PMID:8147872

  7. The abundant marine bacterium Pelagibacter simultaneously catabolizes dimethylsulfoniopropionate to the gases dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Todd, Jonathan D; Thrash, J Cameron; Qian, Yanping; Qian, Michael C; Temperton, Ben; Guo, Jiazhen; Fowler, Emily K; Aldrich, Joshua T; Nicora, Carrie D; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D; De Leenheer, Patrick; Payne, Samuel H; Johnston, Andrew W B; Davie-Martin, Cleo L; Halsey, Kimberly H; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton produce ∼10(9) tonnes of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) per year(1,2), an estimated 10% of which is catabolized by bacteria through the DMSP cleavage pathway to the climatically active gas dimethyl sulfide(3,4). SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria (order Pelagibacterales), the most abundant chemo-organotrophic bacteria in the oceans, have been shown to assimilate DMSP into biomass, thereby supplying this cell's unusual requirement for reduced sulfur(5,6). Here, we report that Pelagibacter HTCC1062 produces the gas methanethiol, and that a second DMSP catabolic pathway, mediated by a cupin-like DMSP lyase, DddK, simultaneously shunts as much as 59% of DMSP uptake to dimethyl sulfide production. We propose a model in which the allocation of DMSP between these pathways is kinetically controlled to release increasing amounts of dimethyl sulfide as the supply of DMSP exceeds cellular sulfur demands for biosynthesis. PMID:27573103

  8. Antibiofilm Activity of the Marine Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain 3J6▿

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Alexandra; Soum-Soutéra, Emmanuelle; Klein, Géraldine L.; Bazire, Alexis; Compère, Chantal; Haras, Dominique; Dufour, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Biofilm formation results in medical threats or economic losses and is therefore a major concern in a variety of domains. In two-species biofilms of marine bacteria grown under dynamic conditions, Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain 3J6 formed mixed biofilms with Bacillus sp. strain 4J6 but was largely predominant over Paracoccus sp. strain 4M6 and Vibrio sp. strain D01. The supernatant of Pseudoalteromonas sp. 3J6 liquid culture (SN3J6) was devoid of antibacterial activity against free-living Paracoccus sp. 4M6 and Vibrio sp. D01 cells, but it impaired their ability to grow as single-species biofilms and led to higher percentages of nonviable cells in 48-h biofilms. Antibiofilm molecules of SN3J6 were able to coat the glass surfaces used to grow biofilms and reduced bacterial attachment about 2-fold, which might partly explain the biofilm formation defect but not the loss of cell viability. SN3J6 had a wide spectrum of activity since it affected all Gram-negative marine strains tested except other Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilm biovolumes of the sensitive strains were reduced 3- to 530-fold, and the percentages of nonviable cells were increased 3- to 225-fold. Interestingly, SN3J6 also impaired biofilm formation by three strains belonging to the human-pathogenic species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli. Such an antibiofilm activity is original and opens up a variety of applications for Pseudoalteromonas sp. 3J6 and/or its active exoproducts in biofilm prevention strategies. PMID:20363799

  9. Molecular Uptake of Chitooligosaccharides through Chitoporin from the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Suginta, Wipa; Chumjan, Watcharin; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Janning, Petra; Schulte, Albert; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Background Chitin is the most abundant biopolymer in marine ecosystems. However, there is no accumulation of chitin in the ocean-floor sediments, since marine bacteria Vibrios are mainly responsible for a rapid turnover of chitin biomaterials. The catabolic pathway of chitin by Vibrios is a multi-step process that involves chitin attachment and degradation, followed by chitooligosaccharide uptake across the bacterial membranes, and catabolism of the transport products to fructose-6-phosphate, acetate and NH3. Principal Findings This study reports the isolation of the gene corresponding to an outer membrane chitoporin from the genome of Vibrio harveyi. This porin, expressed in E. coli, (so called VhChiP) was found to be a SDS-resistant, heat-sensitive trimer. Immunoblotting using anti-ChiP polyclonal antibody confirmed the expression of the recombinant ChiP, as well as endogenous expression of the native protein in the V. harveyi cells. The specific function of VhChiP was investigated using planar lipid membrane reconstitution technique. VhChiP nicely inserted into artificial membranes and formed stable, trimeric channels with average single conductance of 1.8±0.13 nS. Single channel recordings at microsecond-time resolution resolved translocation of chitooligosaccharides, with the greatest rate being observed for chitohexaose. Liposome swelling assays showed no permeation of other oligosaccharides, including maltose, sucrose, maltopentaose, maltohexaose and raffinose, indicating that VhChiP is a highly-specific channel for chitooligosaccharides. Conclusion/Significance We provide the first evidence that chitoporin from V. harveyi is a chitooligosaccharide specific channel. The results obtained from this study help to establish the fundamental role of VhChiP in the chitin catabolic cascade as the molecular gateway that Vibrios employ for chitooligosaccharide uptake for energy production. PMID:23383078

  10. Ecology, inhibitory activity, and morphogenesis of a marine antagonistic bacterium belonging to the Roseobacter clade.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Hjelm, Mette; Hansen, Michael; Bresciani, José; Schulz, Stefan; Gram, Lone

    2005-11-01

    Roseobacter strain 27-4 has been isolated from a turbot larval rearing unit and is capable of reducing mortality in turbot egg yolk sac larvae. Here, we demonstrate that the supernatant of Roseobacter 27-4 is lethal to the larval pathogens Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio splendidus in a buffer system and inhibited their growth in marine broth. Liquid chromatography (LC) with both UV spectral detection and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) identified the known antibacterial compound thiotropocin or its closely related precursor tropodithietic acid in the bioactive fractions. Antibacterial activity correlated with the appearance of a brownish pigment and was only formed in marine broth under static growth conditions. A thick biofilm of multicellular star-shaped aggregated cells formed at the air-liquid interface under static growth conditions. Here, the bioactive compound was the base peak in the LC-UV chromatograms of the extracts where it constituted 15% of the total peak area. Aerated conditions results in 10-fold-higher cell yield, however, cultures were nonpigmented, did not produce antibacterial activity, and grew as single cells. Production of antibacterial compounds may be quorum regulated, and we identified the acylated homoserine lactone (3-hydroxy-decanoyl homoserine lactone) from cultures of Roseobacter 27-4 using LC-HR-MS. The signal molecule was primarily detected in stagnant cultures. Roseobacter 27-4 grew between 10 and 30 degrees C but died rapidly at 37 degrees C. Also, the antibacterial compounds was sensitive to heat and was inactivated at 37 degrees C in less than 2 days and at 25 degrees C in 8 days. Using Roseobacter 27-4 as a probiotic culture will require that is be established in stagnant or adhered conditions and, due to the temperature sensitivity of the active compound, constant production must be ensured. PMID:16269767

  11. Toxic Effect of a Marine Bacterium on Aquatic Organisms and Its Algicidal Substances against Phaeocystis globosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiuchan; Chen, Lina; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Ling; Yin, Pinghe; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms have caused enormous damage to the marine ecosystem and the coastal economy in China. In this paper, a bacterial strain B1, which had strong algicidal activity against Phaeocystis globosa, was isolated from the coastal waters of Zhuhai in China. The strain B1 was identified as Bacillus sp. on the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequence and morphological characteristics. To evaluate the ecological safety of the algicidal substances produced by strain B1, their toxic effects on marine organisms were tested. Results showed that there were no adverse effects observed in the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, Chaetoceros muelleri, and Isochrystis galbana after exposure to the algicidal substances at a concentration of 1.0% (v/v) for 96 h. The 48h LC50 values for Brachionus plicatilis, Moina mongolica Daday and Paralichthys olivaceus were 5.7, 9.0 and 12.1% (v/v), respectively. Subsequently, the algicidal substances from strain B1 culture were isolated and purified by silica gel column, Sephadex G-15 column and high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and PeakView Software, the purified substances were identified as prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine. Algicidal mechanism indicated that prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine inhibited the growth of P. globosa by disrupting the antioxidant systems. In the acute toxicity assessment using M. mongolica, 24h LC50 values of prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine were 7.0 and 13.8 g/L, respectively. The active substances produced by strain B1 can be considered as ecologically and environmentally biological agents for controlling harmful algal blooms. PMID:25646807

  12. Biogeography and Photosynthetic Biomass of Arctic Marine Pico-Eukaroytes during Summer of the Record Sea Ice Minimum 2012.

    PubMed

    Metfies, Katja; von Appen, Wilken-Jon; Kilias, Estelle; Nicolaus, Anja; Nöthig, Eva-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Information on recent photosynthetic biomass distribution and biogeography of Arctic marine pico-eukaryotes (0.2-3 μm) is needed to better understand consequences of environmental change for Arctic marine ecosystems. We analysed pico-eukaryote biomass and community composition in Fram Strait and large parts of the Central Arctic Ocean (Nansen Basin, Amundsen Basin) using chlorophyll a (Chl a) measurements, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and 454-pyrosequencing. Samples were collected during summer 2012, the year with the most recent record sea ice minimum. Chl a concentrations were highest in eastern Fram Strait and pico-plankton accounted for 60-90% of Chl a biomass during the observation period. ARISA-patterns and 454-pyrosequencing revealed that pico-eukaryote distribution is closely related to water mass distribution in the euphotic zone of the Arctic Ocean. Phaeocystaceae, Micromonas sp., Dinophyceae and Syndiniales constitute a high proportion of sequence reads, while sequence abundance of autotrophic Phaeocystaceae and mixotrophic Micromonas sp. was inversely correlated. Highest sequence abundances of Phaeocystaceae were observed in the warm Atlantic Waters in Fram Strait, while Micromonas sp. dominated the abundant biosphere in the arctic halocline. Our results are of particular interest considering existing hypotheses that environmental conditions in Nansen Basin might become more similar to the current conditions in Fram Strait. We propose that in response, biodiversity and biomass of pico-eukaryotes in Nansen Basin could resemble those currently observed in Fram Strait in the future. This would significantly alter biogeochemical cycles in a large part of the Central Arctic Ocean. PMID:26895333

  13. Biogeography and Photosynthetic Biomass of Arctic Marine Pico-Eukaroytes during Summer of the Record Sea Ice Minimum 2012

    PubMed Central

    Metfies, Katja; von Appen, Wilken-Jon; Kilias, Estelle; Nicolaus, Anja; Nöthig, Eva-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Information on recent photosynthetic biomass distribution and biogeography of Arctic marine pico-eukaryotes (0.2–3 μm) is needed to better understand consequences of environmental change for Arctic marine ecosystems. We analysed pico-eukaryote biomass and community composition in Fram Strait and large parts of the Central Arctic Ocean (Nansen Basin, Amundsen Basin) using chlorophyll a (Chl a) measurements, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and 454-pyrosequencing. Samples were collected during summer 2012, the year with the most recent record sea ice minimum. Chl a concentrations were highest in eastern Fram Strait and pico-plankton accounted for 60–90% of Chl a biomass during the observation period. ARISA-patterns and 454-pyrosequencing revealed that pico-eukaryote distribution is closely related to water mass distribution in the euphotic zone of the Arctic Ocean. Phaeocystaceae, Micromonas sp., Dinophyceae and Syndiniales constitute a high proportion of sequence reads, while sequence abundance of autotrophic Phaeocystaceae and mixotrophic Micromonas sp. was inversely correlated. Highest sequence abundances of Phaeocystaceae were observed in the warm Atlantic Waters in Fram Strait, while Micromonas sp. dominated the abundant biosphere in the arctic halocline. Our results are of particular interest considering existing hypotheses that environmental conditions in Nansen Basin might become more similar to the current conditions in Fram Strait. We propose that in response, biodiversity and biomass of pico-eukaryotes in Nansen Basin could resemble those currently observed in Fram Strait in the future. This would significantly alter biogeochemical cycles in a large part of the Central Arctic Ocean. PMID:26895333

  14. Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., an aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium found associated with laboratory cultures of marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Green, David H; Nichols, Peter D; Whitman, William B; Semple, Kirk T; Aitken, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    A strictly aerobic, halotolerant, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain TG408, was isolated from a laboratory culture of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum (CCAP1077/1C) by enrichment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole carbon source. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed this organism within the order Xanthomonadales of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Its closest relatives included representatives of the Hydrocarboniphaga-Nevskia-Sinobacter clade (<92% sequence similarity) in the family Sinobacteraceae. The strain exhibited a narrow nutritional spectrum, preferring to utilize aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon compounds and small organic acids. Notably, it displayed versatility in degrading two- and three-ring PAHs. Moreover, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was detected in lysates, indicating that this strain utilizes the meta-cleavage pathway for aromatic compound degradation. Cells produced surface blebs and contained a single polar flagellum. The predominant isoprenoid quinone of strain TG408 was Q-8, and the dominant fatty acids were C(16:0), C(16:1) ω7c, and C(18:1) ω7c. The G+C content of the isolate's DNA was 64.3 mol% ± 0.34 mol%. On the basis of distinct phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain TG408 represents a novel genus and species in the class Gammaproteobacteria for which the name Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. Quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of this strain were developed and used to show that this organism is found associated with other species of marine phytoplankton. Phytoplankton may be a natural biotope in the ocean where new species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria await discovery and which contribute significantly to natural remediation processes. PMID:23087039

  15. Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., an Aromatic-Hydrocarbon-Degrading Marine Bacterium Found Associated with Laboratory Cultures of Marine Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Green, David H.; Nichols, Peter D.; Whitman, William B.; Semple, Kirk T.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A strictly aerobic, halotolerant, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain TG408, was isolated from a laboratory culture of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum (CCAP1077/1C) by enrichment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole carbon source. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed this organism within the order Xanthomonadales of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Its closest relatives included representatives of the Hydrocarboniphaga-Nevskia-Sinobacter clade (<92% sequence similarity) in the family Sinobacteraceae. The strain exhibited a narrow nutritional spectrum, preferring to utilize aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon compounds and small organic acids. Notably, it displayed versatility in degrading two- and three-ring PAHs. Moreover, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was detected in lysates, indicating that this strain utilizes the meta-cleavage pathway for aromatic compound degradation. Cells produced surface blebs and contained a single polar flagellum. The predominant isoprenoid quinone of strain TG408 was Q-8, and the dominant fatty acids were C16:0, C16:1 ω7c, and C18:1 ω7c. The G+C content of the isolate's DNA was 64.3 mol% ± 0.34 mol%. On the basis of distinct phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain TG408 represents a novel genus and species in the class Gammaproteobacteria for which the name Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. Quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of this strain were developed and used to show that this organism is found associated with other species of marine phytoplankton. Phytoplankton may be a natural biotope in the ocean where new species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria await discovery and which contribute significantly to natural remediation processes. PMID:23087039

  16. Analysis of the Expression and Activity of Nitric Oxide Synthase from Marine Photosynthetic Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Foresi, Noelia; Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; Santolini, Jerome; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signaling molecule in many biological processes in species belonging to all kingdoms of life. In animal cells, NO is synthesized primarily by NO synthase (NOS), an enzyme that catalyze the NADPH-dependent oxidation of L-arginine to NO and L-citrulline. Three NOS isoforms have been identified, the constitutive neuronal NOS (nNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS) and one inducible (iNOS). Plant NO synthesis is complex and is a matter of ongoing investigation and debate. Despite evidence of an Arg-dependent pathway for NO synthesis in plants, no plant NOS homologs to animal forms have been identified to date. In plants, there is also evidence for a nitrate-dependent mechanism of NO synthesis, catalyzed by cytosolic nitrate reductase. The existence of a NOS enzyme in the plant kingdom, from the tiny single-celled green alga Ostreococcus tauri was reported in 2010. O. tauri shares a common ancestor with higher plants and is considered to be part of an early diverging class within the green plant lineage.In this chapter we describe detailed protocols to study the expression and characterization of the enzymatic activity of NOS from O. tauri. The most used methods for the characterization of a canonical NOS are the analysis of spectral properties of the oxyferrous complex in the heme domain, the oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb) and citrulline assays and the NADPH oxidation for in vitro analysis of its activity or the use of fluorescent probes and Griess assay for in vivo NO determination. We further discuss the advantages and drawbacks of each method. Finally, we remark factors associated to the measurement of NOS activity in photosynthetic organisms that can generate misunderstandings in the interpretation of results. PMID:27094418

  17. Shimia sagamensis sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from cold-seep sediment.

    PubMed

    Nogi, Yuichi; Mori, Kozue; Uchida, Hiromi; Hatada, Yuji

    2015-09-01

    A novel marine bacterial strain designated JAMH 011(T) was isolated from the cold-seep sediment in Sagami Bay, Japan. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming, aerobic chemo-organotrophs and motile by means of a single polar flagellum. Growth occurred at temperatures below 31 °C, with the optimum at 25 °C. The major respiratory quinone was Q-10. The predominant fatty acid was C18 : 1ω7c. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolated strain was closely affiliated with members of the genus Shimia in the class Alphaproteobacteria, and the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of the novel isolate with the type strain of the closest related species, Shimia haliotis WM35(T), was 98.1%. The DNA G+C content of the novel strain was 57.3 mol%. The hybridization values for DNA-DNA relatedness between strain JAMH 011(T) and reference strains belonging to the genus Shimia were less than 9.4 ± 0.7%. Based on differences in taxonomic characteristics, the isolated strain represents a novel species of the genus Shimia, for which the name Shimia sagamensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JAMH 011(T) ( = JCM 30583(T) = DSM 29734(T)). PMID:25977284

  18. Structural properties of the tubular appendage spinae from marine bacterium Roseobacter sp. strain YSCB

    PubMed Central

    Bernadac, A.; Wu, L.-F.; Santini, C.-L.; Vidaud, C.; Sturgis, J. N.; Menguy, N.; Bergam, P.; Nicoletti, C.; Xiao, T.

    2012-01-01

    Spinae are tubular surface appendages broadly found in Gram-negative bacteria. Little is known about their architecture, function or origin. Here, we report structural characterization of the spinae from marine bacteria Roseobacter sp. YSCB. Electron cryo-tomography revealed that a single filament winds into a hollow flared base with progressive change to a cylinder. Proteinase K unwound the spinae into proteolysis-resistant filaments. Thermal treatment ripped the spinae into ribbons that were melted with prolonged heating. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed a dominant beta-structure of the spinae. Differential scanning calorimetry analyses showed three endothermic transformations at 50–85°C, 98°C and 123°C, respectively. The heating almost completely disintegrated the spinae, abolished the 98°C transition and destroyed the beta-structure. Infrared spectroscopy identified the amide I spectrum maximum at a position similar to that of amyloid fibrils. Therefore, the spinae distinguish from other bacterial appendages, e.g. flagella and stalks, in both the structure and mechanism of assembly. PMID:23230515

  19. Phage infection of an environmentally relevant marine bacterium alters host metabolism and lysate composition

    PubMed Central

    Ankrah, Nana Yaw D; May, Amanda L; Middleton, Jesse L; Jones, Daniel R; Hadden, Mary K; Gooding, Jessica R; LeCleir, Gary R; Wilhelm, Steven W; Campagna, Shawn R; Buchan, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Viruses contribute to the mortality of marine microbes, consequentially altering biological species composition and system biogeochemistry. Although it is well established that host cells provide metabolic resources for virus replication, the extent to which infection reshapes host metabolism at a global level and the effect of this alteration on the cellular material released following viral lysis is less understood. To address this knowledge gap, the growth dynamics, metabolism and extracellular lysate of roseophage-infected Sulfitobacter sp. 2047 was studied using a variety of techniques, including liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based metabolomics. Quantitative estimates of the total amount of carbon and nitrogen sequestered into particulate biomass indicate that phage infection redirects ∼75% of nutrients into virions. Intracellular concentrations for 82 metabolites were measured at seven time points over the infection cycle. By the end of this period, 71% of the detected metabolites were significantly elevated in infected populations, and stable isotope-based flux measurements showed that these cells had elevated metabolic activity. In contrast to simple hypothetical models that assume that extracellular compounds increase because of lysis, a profile of metabolites from infected cultures showed that >70% of the 56 quantified compounds had decreased concentrations in the lysate relative to uninfected controls, suggesting that these small, labile nutrients were being utilized by surviving cells. These results indicate that virus-infected cells are physiologically distinct from their uninfected counterparts, which has implications for microbial community ecology and biogeochemistry. PMID:24304672

  20. Determination of the number of detergent molecules associated with the reaction center protein isolated from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis. Effects of the amphiphilic molecule 1,2,3-heptanetriol.

    PubMed

    Gast, P; Hemelrijk, P; Hoff, A J

    1994-01-01

    Detergent-free reaction center (RC) proteins from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis were obtained using Bio-Beads SM-2. With these RCs, the amount of detergent molecules associated with the protein was measured by determining the detergent concentration at which re-solubilization occurred as a function of the RC concentration. For N,N-dimethyl dodecylamine-N-oxide (LDAO), Triton X-100 and beta-octylglucoside 260 +/- 30,105 +/- 10 and 360 +/- 100 detergent molecules were necessary to dissolve the protein, respectively. With this technique we have studied the effect of the amphiphilic molecule 1,2,3-heptanetriol, which is essential in the crystallization process of these RCs. Addition of 5% 1,2,3-heptanetriol reduces the value for LDAO to 120 +/- 20 LDAO/RC, supporting the notion that crystallization of the RCs is promoted by increasing the number of protein-protein contacts. PMID:8276109

  1. Biogeochemical controls and isotopic signatures of nitrous oxide production by a marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frame, C. H.; Casciotti, K. L.

    2010-09-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a trace gas that contributes to the greenhouse effect and stratospheric ozone depletion. The N2O yield from nitrification (moles N2O-N produced per mole ammonium-N consumed) has been used to estimate marine N2O production rates from measured nitrification rates and global estimates of oceanic export production. However, the N2O yield from nitrification is not constant. Previous culture-based measurements indicate that N2O yield increases as oxygen (O2) concentration decreases and as nitrite (NO2-) concentration increases. Here, we have measured yields of N2O from cultures of the marine β-proteobacterium Nitrosomonas marina C-113a as they grew on low-ammonium (50 μM) media. These yields, which were typically between 4 × 10-4 and 7 × 10-4 for cultures with cell densities between 2 × 102 and 2.1 × 104 cells ml-1, were lower than previous reports for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The observed impact of O2 concentration on yield was also smaller than previously reported under all conditions except at high starting cell densities (1.5 × 106 cells ml-1), where 160-fold higher yields were observed at 0.5% O2 (5.1 μM dissolved O2) compared with 20% O2 (203 μM dissolved O2). At lower cell densities (2 × 102 and 2.1 × 104 cells ml-1), cultures grown under 0.5% O2 had yields that were only 1.25- to 1.73-fold higher than cultures grown under 20% O2. Thus, previously reported many-fold increases in N2O yield with dropping O2 could be reproduced only at cell densities that far exceeded those of ammonia oxidizers in the ocean. The presence of excess NO2- (up to 1 mM) in the growth medium also increased N2O yields by an average of 70% to 87% depending on O2 concentration. We made stable isotopic measurements on N2O from these cultures to identify the biochemical mechanisms behind variations in N2O yield. Based on measurements of δ15Nbulk, site preference (SP = δ15Nα-δ15Nβ), and δ18O of N2O (δ18O-N2O), we estimate that nitrifier

  2. Biogeochemical controls and isotopic signatures of nitrous oxide production by a marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frame, C. H.; Casciotti, K. L.

    2010-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a trace gas that contributes to greenhouse warming of the atmosphere and stratospheric ozone depletion. The N2O yield from nitrification (moles N2O-N produced/mole ammonium-N consumed) has been used to estimate marine N2O production rates from measured nitrification rates and global estimates of oceanic export production. However, the N2O yield from nitrification is not constant. Previous culture-based measurements indicate that N2O yield increases as oxygen (O2) concentration decreases and as nitrite (NO2-) concentration increases. These results were obtained in substrate-rich conditions and may not reflect N2O production in the ocean. Here, we have measured yields of N2O from cultures of the marine β-proteobacterium Nitrosomonas marina C-113a as they grew on low-ammonium (50 μM) media. These yields were lower than previous reports, between 4×10-4 and 7×10-4 (moles N/mole N). The observed impact of O2 concentration on yield was also smaller than previously reported under all conditions except at high starting cell densities (1.5×10

  3. Algibacter psychrophilus sp. nov., a psychrophilic bacterium isolated from marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Jung, You-Jung; Lee, Yung Mi; Baek, Kiwoon; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Cho, Yirang; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ji Hee; Lee, Hong Kum

    2015-06-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, yellow-pigmented, flexirubin-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile and psychrophilic bacterial strain, PAMC 27237T, was isolated from marine sediment of the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Strain PAMC 27237T grew at 0-20 °C (optimally at 17 °C), at pH 5.0-9.5 (optimally at pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0-3.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimally at 1.5-2.5 %). The major fatty acids (≥5 %) were iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, C17 : 0 2-OH, anteiso-C15 : 0, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω6c/C16 : 1ω7c), iso-C15 : 0 3-OH, anteiso-C17 : 1ω9c, anteiso-C15 : 1 A, iso-C16 : 0 3-OH and iso-C15 : 1 G. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminolipids, four unidentified lipids and a glycolipid. The major respiratory quinone was MK-6. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain PAMC 27237T belongs to the genus Algibacter, showing high similarities with the type strains of Algibacter agarivorans (97.2 %), Algibacter agarilyticus (97.0 %) and Algibacter mikhailovii (96.4 %). Average nucleotide identity values between strain PAMC 27237T and the type strains of A. agarivorans and A. agarilyticuswere 83.1 and 84.2 %, respectively, and mean genome-to-genome distances were 22.4-24.2 %, indicating that strain PAMC 27237T is clearly distinguished from the most closely related species of the genus Algibacter. The genomic DNA G+C content calculated from genome sequences was 33.5 mol%. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data presented, strain PAMC 27237T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Algibacter, for which the name Algibacter psychrophilus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PAMC 27237T ( = KCTC 42130T = JCM 30370T). PMID:25740931

  4. Lutibacter litoralis gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong H; Cho, Byung C

    2006-04-01

    A rod-shaped marine bacterium, designated strain CL-TF09T, isolated from a tidal flat in Ganghwa, Korea, was characterized based on its physiological and biochemical features, fatty acid profile and phylogenetic position. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed a clear affiliation with the family Flavobacteriaceae. Strain CL-TF09T showed the closest phylogenetic relationship with the genera Tenacibaculum and Polaribacter; sequence similarities between CL-TF09T and the type strains of Tenacibaculum and Polaribacter species ranged from 90.7 to 91.8 %. Cells of strain CL-TF09T were non-motile and grew on solid media as yellow colonies. The strain grew in the presence of 1-5 % sea salts, within a temperature range of 5-30 degrees C and at pH 7-8. The strain had iso-C(15 : 0) 3-OH (17.4 %), iso-C(15 : 0) (16.7 %), anteiso-C(15 : 0) (15.1 %) and iso-C(16 : 0) 3-OH (13.4 %) as predominant fatty acids. The DNA G+C content was 33.9 mol%. Based on the physiological, fatty acid composition and phylogenetic data presented, strain CL-TF09T is considered to represent a novel genus and species of the family Flavobacteriaceae, for which the name Lutibacter litoralis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CL-TF09T (=KCCM 42118T = JCM 13034T). PMID:16585692

  5. Photobacterium panuliri sp. nov., an alkalitolerant marine bacterium isolated from eggs of spiny lobster, Panulirus penicillatus from Andaman Sea.

    PubMed

    Deep, Kamal; Poddar, Abhijit; Das, Subrata K

    2014-11-01

    A facultative anaerobe, alkalitolerant, gram-negative marine bacterium strain LBS5(T), was isolated from eggs carried on the pleopods of female spiny lobster (Panulirus penicillatus) in Andaman Sea from a depth of 3.5 m. Heterotrophic growth was observed at 15-38 °C and pH 5.5-11. Optimum growth occurred at 28 °C and pH 7.5. It can grow in the presence of 0.5-7 % NaCl (w/v), and the optimal NaCl required for growth was 2-4 %. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the strain LBS5(T) belongs to the genus Photobacterium and showed 99.6 % similarity with P. aquae AE6(T), 98.2 % with P. aphoticum M46(T), 97 % with P. rosenbergii CC1(T), 96.9 % with P. lutimaris DF-42(T), and 96.6 % with P. halotolerans MACL01(T). The DNA-DNA similarities between strains LBS5(T) with other closely related strains were well below 70 %. The DNA G + C content was 50.52 (±0.9) mol%. The major fatty acids were C16:1w7c/w6c, C18:1w6c/w7c, C16:0, C15:0 iso, C16:0 10-methyl/17:1 iso w9c, C17:0 iso. Polar lipids included a phosphatidylglycerol, a diphosphatidylglycerol, a phosphatidylethanolamine, and one unidentified lipid. Based on the polyphasic evidences, strain LBS5(T) represents a novel species of the genus Photobacterium for which Photobacterium panuliri sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LBS5(T) (=DSM 27646(T) = LMG 27617(T) = JCM 19199(T)). PMID:24962598

  6. Characterization of the metabolic pathway and catabolic gene expression in biphenyl degrading marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa JP-11.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Jaya; Das, Surajit

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic pathway of biphenyl assimilation and the catabolic gene expression in a marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa JP-11, isolated from the coastal sediments of Odisha, India have been studied. This strain utilized 98.86% ± 2.29% of biphenyl within 72 h when supplied as the sole source of carbon, however, preferential utilization of glucose was observed over catechol and biphenyl when grown in a complex medium. Combination of chromatographic and spectrophotometric techniques confirmed the catechol pathway and identified 2-Hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2, 4-dienoate as the intermediate metabolic product. Assimilation of biphenyl was initiated by its dioxygenation, forming cis-2, 3-dihydro-2, 3-dihydroxybiphenyl subsequently transformed to 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2, 4-dienoate. In the lower pathway, cis-1, 6-dihydroxy-2, 4-cyclohexadiene-1-carboxylic acid was detected which formed catechol before entering into the Krebs cycle. Detection of key enzyme catechol-1, 2-dioxygenase in the cell-free extract of P. aeruginosa JP-11 supported the proposed degradation pathway. The primary enzyme for biphenyl assimilation, biphenyl dioxygenase encoded by bphA gene was found in the genome of the isolate. On increasing biphenyl stress (50, 100, 150 and 200 mg L(-1)), bphA gene showed a significant (P < 0.01) up-regulation upto 43.5 folds. Production of biosurfactant was confirmed and the rhamnolipid synthesizing gene rhlAB was amplified. This gene also showed a significant (P < 0.01) up-regulation upto 258 folds on increasing biphenyl stress. PMID:26519802

  7. Vibrio oceanisediminis sp. nov., a nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from an artificial oil-spill marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang Rim; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Lee, Sang-Seob

    2015-10-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, halophilic, facultatively anaerobic, motile, rod-shaped and nitrogen-fixing bacterium, designated strain S37T, was isolated from an artificial oil-spill sediment sample from the coast of Taean, South Korea. Cells grew at 10-37 °C and pH 5.0-9.0, with optimal growth at 28 °C and pH 6.0-8.0. Growth was observed with 1-9 % (w/v) NaCl in marine broth, with optimal growth with 3-5 % NaCl, but no growth was observed in the absence of NaCl. According to the results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain S37T represents a member of the genus Vibrio of the class Gammaproteobacteria and forms a clade with Vibrio plantisponsor MSSRF60T (97.38 %), Vibrio diazotrophicus ATCC 33466T (97.31 %), Vibrio aestuarianus ATCC 35048T (97.07 %) Vibrio areninigrae J74T (96.76 %) and Vibrio hispanicus LMG 13240T (96.76 %). The major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c and C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c. The DNA G+C content was 41.9 %. The DNA-DNA hybridization analysis results showed a 30.2 % association value with the closely related type strain V. plantisponsor DSM 21026T. On the basis of phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain S37T represents a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio oceanisediminis sp. nov., is proposed with the type strain S37T ( = KEMB 2255-005T = JCM 30409T). PMID:26296768

  8. Molecular characterization of a homolog of the ferric-uptake regulator, Fur, from the marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893.

    PubMed

    Barker, Ryan A; Tisnado, Jerrell; Lambert, Lisa A; Gärdes, Astrid; Carrano, Mary W; Carrano, Paul N; Gillian, Christopher; Carrano, Carl J

    2015-02-01

    Full length recombinant iron regulatory protein, Fur, has been isolated and characterized from the algal-associated marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893. Under nondenaturing conditions the Fur protein behaves on size exclusion chromatography as a dimer while it is monomeric under SDS PAGE conditions. ICP-MS and fluorescence quenching experiments show that Mb-Fur binds a single metal ion (Zn, Mn, or Co) per monomer. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to probe the interaction of Mb-Fur with the purported Fur box in the promoter region upstream of the vibrioferrin biosynthetic operon. Interaction of Mb-Fur with a 100 bp DNA fragment containing the Fur box in the presence of 10 µM Mn, Co or Zn(II) resulted in decreased migration of DNA on a 7.5% polyacrylamide gel. In the absence of the Fur protein or the metal, no interaction is seen. The presence of EDTA in the binding, loading or running buffers also abolished all activity demonstrating the importance of the metal in formation of the promoter-repressor complex. Based on a high degree of similarity between Mb-Fur and its homolog from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) whose X-ray structure is known we developed a structural model for the former which suggested that only one of the several metal binding sites found in other Fur's would be functional. This is consistent with the single metal binding stoichiometry we observed. Since the purported metal binding site was one that has been described as "structural" rather than "functional" in PA and yet the monometallic Mb-Fur retains DNA Fur box binding ability it reopens the question of which site is which, or if different species have adapted the sites for different purposes. PMID:25528647

  9. Identification of the Antibacterial Compound Produced by the Marine Epiphytic Bacterium Pseudovibrio sp. D323 and Related Sponge-Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Penesyan, Anahit; Tebben, Jan; Lee, Matthew; Thomas, Torsten; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Harder, Tilmann; Egan, Suhelen

    2011-01-01

    Surface-associated marine bacteria often produce secondary metabolites with antagonistic activities. In this study, tropodithietic acid (TDA) was identified to be responsible for the antibacterial activity of the marine epiphytic bacterium Pseudovibrio sp. D323 and related strains. Phenol was also produced by these bacteria but was not directly related to the antibacterial activity. TDA was shown to effectively inhibit a range of marine bacteria from various phylogenetic groups. However TDA-producers themselves were resistant and are likely to possess resistance mechanism preventing autoinhibition. We propose that TDA in isolate D323 and related eukaryote-associated bacteria plays a role in defending the host organism against unwanted microbial colonisation and, possibly, bacterial pathogens. PMID:21892353

  10. Quantitative measurement of the growth rate of the PHA-producing photosynthetic bacterium Rhodocyclus gelatinous CBS-2[PolyHydroxyAlkanoate

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfrum, E.J.; Weaver, P.F.

    1999-07-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been investigating the use of model photosynthetic microorganisms that use sunlight and two-carbon organic substrates (e.g., ethanol, acetate) to produce biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) copolymers as carbon storage compounds. Use of these biological PHAs in single-use plastics applications, followed by their post-consumer composting or anaerobic digestion, could impact petroleum consumption as well as the overloading of landfills. The large-scale production of PHA polymers by photosynthetic bacteria will require large-scale reactor systems utilizing either sunlight or artificial illumination. The first step in the scale-up process is to quantify the microbial growth rates and the PHA production rates as a function of reaction conditions such as nutrient concentration, temperature, and light quality and intensity.

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Carbon Flow into Photosynthetic Products Functioning as Carbon Storage in the Marine Coccolithophore, Emiliania huxleyi.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Iwane; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    The bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) is a dominant marine phytoplankton, cells of which are covered with calcareous plates (coccoliths). E. huxleyi produces unique lipids of C37-C40 long-chain ketones (alkenones) with two to four trans-unsaturated bonds, β-glucan (but not α-glucan) and acid polysaccharide (AP) associated with the morphogenesis of CaCO3 crystals in coccoliths. Despite such unique features, there is no detailed information on the patterns of carbon allocation into these compounds. Therefore, we performed quantitative estimation of carbon flow into various macromolecular products by conducting (14)C-radiotracer experiments using NaH(14)CO3 as a substrate. Photosynthetic (14)C incorporation into low molecular-mass compounds (LMC), extracellular AP, alkenones, and total lipids except alkenones was estimated to be 35, 13, 17, and 25 % of total (14)C fixation in logarithmic growth phase cells and 33, 19, 18, and 18 % in stationary growth phase cells, respectively. However, less than 1 % of (14)C was incorporated into β-glucan in both cells. (14)C-mannitol occupied ca. 5 % of total fixed (14)C as the most dominant LMC product. Levels of all (14)C compounds decreased in the dark. Therefore, alkenones and LMC (including mannitol), but not β-glucan, function in carbon/energy storage in E. huxleyi, irrespective of the growth phase. Compared with other algae, the low carbon flux into β-glucan is a unique feature of carbon metabolism in E. huxelyi. PMID:25874681

  12. Molecular topology of the photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment complex, peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein, from marine dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Song, P S; Koka, P; Prézelin, B B; Haxo, F T

    1976-10-01

    The photosynthetic light-harvesting complex, peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein, was isolated from several marine dinoflagellates including Glenodinium sp. by Sephadex and ion-exchange chromatography. The carotenoid (peridinin)-chlorophyll a ratio in the complex is estimated to be 4:1. The fluorescence excitation spectrum of the complex indicates that energy absorbed by the carotenoid is transferred to the chlorophyll a molecule with 100% efficiency. Fluorescence lifetime measurements indicate that the energy transfer is much faster than fluorescence emission from chlorophyll a. The four peridinin molecules within the complex appear to form two allowed exciton bands which split the main absorption band of the carotenoid into two circular dichronic bands (with negative ellipticity band at 538 nm and positive band at 463 nm in the case of peridinin-chlorophyl a-protein complex from Glenodinium sp.). The fluorescence polarization of chlorophyll a in the complex at 200 K is about 0.1 in both circular dichroic excitation bands of the carotenoid chromophore. From these circular dichroic and fluorescence polarization data, a possible molecular arrangement of the four peridinin and chlorophyll molecules has been deduced for the complex. The structure of the complex deduced is also consistent with the magnitude of the exciton spliting (ca. greater than 3000 cm-1) at the intermolecular distance in the dimer pair of peridinin (ca. 12 A). This structural feature accounts for the efficient light-harvesting process of dinoflagellates as the exciton interaction lengthens the lifetime of peridinin (radiative) and the complex topology increases the energy transfer probability. The complex is, therefore, a useful molecular model for elucidating the mechanism and efficiency of solar energy conversion in vivo as well as in vitro. PMID:987799

  13. A novel algicide: evidence of the effect of a fatty acid compound from the marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. BS02 on the harmful dinoflagellate, Alexandrium tamarense.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Huajun; Fu, Lijun; An, Xinli; Zhang, Bangzhou; Li, Yi; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Yi, Lin; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-01-01

    Alexandrium tamarense is a notorious bloom-forming dinoflagellate, which adversely impacts water quality and human health. In this study we present a new algicide against A. tamarense, which was isolated from the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. BS02. MALDI-TOF-MS, NMR and algicidal activity analysis reveal that this compound corresponds to palmitoleic acid, which shows algicidal activity against A. tamarense with an EC50 of 40 μg/mL. The effects of palmitoleic acid on the growth of other algal species were also studied. The results indicate that palmitoleic acid has potential for selective control of the Harmful algal blooms (HABs). Over extended periods of contact, transmission electron microscopy shows severe ultrastructural damage to the algae at 40 μg/mL concentrations of palmitoleic acid. All of these results indicate potential for controlling HABs by using the special algicidal bacterium and its active agent. PMID:24626054

  14. Genome sequence of the pink-pigmented marine bacterium Loktanella hongkongensis type strain (UST950701-009P(T)), a representative of the Roseobacter group.

    PubMed

    Lau, Stanley Ck; Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Petersen, Jörn; Ivanova, Natalia N; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Loktanella hongkongensis UST950701-009P(T) is a Gram-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium isolated from a marine biofilm in the subtropical seawater of Hong Kong. When growing as a monospecies biofilm on polystyrene surfaces, this bacterium is able to induce larval settlement and metamorphosis of a ubiquitous polychaete tubeworm Hydroides elegans. The inductive cues are low-molecular weight compounds bound to the exopolymeric matrix of the bacterial cells. In the present study we describe the features of L. hongkongensis strain DSM 17492(T) together with its genome sequence and annotation and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 3,198,444 bp long genome sequence encodes 3104 protein-coding genes and 57 RNA genes. The two unambiguously identified extrachromosomal replicons contain replication modules of the RepB and the Rhodobacteraceae-specific DnaA-like type, respectively. PMID:26380639

  15. Genome sequence of the pink–pigmented marine bacterium Loktanella hongkongensis type strain (UST950701–009PT), a representative of the Roseobacter group

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Stanley CK; Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Petersen, Jörn; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-08-11

    Loktanella hongkongensis UST950701-009PT is a Gram-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium isolated from a marine biofilm in the subtropical seawater of Hong Kong. When growing as a monospecies biofilm on polystyrene surfaces, this bacterium is able to induce larval settlement and metamorphosis of a ubiquitous polychaete tubeworm Hydroides elegans. The inductive cues are low-molecular weight compounds bound to the exopolymeric matrix of the bacterial cells. In the present study we describe the features of L. hongkongensis strain DSM 17492T together with its genome sequence and annotation and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 3,198,444 bp long genome sequence encodes 3104 protein-coding genes and 57 RNA genes. Lastly, the two unambiguously identified extrachromosomal replicons contain replication modules of the RepB and the Rhodobacteraceae-specific DnaA-like type, respectively.

  16. Genome sequence of the pink–pigmented marine bacterium Loktanella hongkongensis type strain (UST950701–009PT), a representative of the Roseobacter group

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lau, Stanley CK; Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Petersen, Jörn; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; et al

    2015-08-11

    Loktanella hongkongensis UST950701-009PT is a Gram-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium isolated from a marine biofilm in the subtropical seawater of Hong Kong. When growing as a monospecies biofilm on polystyrene surfaces, this bacterium is able to induce larval settlement and metamorphosis of a ubiquitous polychaete tubeworm Hydroides elegans. The inductive cues are low-molecular weight compounds bound to the exopolymeric matrix of the bacterial cells. In the present study we describe the features of L. hongkongensis strain DSM 17492T together with its genome sequence and annotation and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 3,198,444 bp long genome sequence encodes 3104 protein-codingmore » genes and 57 RNA genes. Lastly, the two unambiguously identified extrachromosomal replicons contain replication modules of the RepB and the Rhodobacteraceae-specific DnaA-like type, respectively.« less

  17. Synchrotron Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Investigation on Integral Membrane Protein Light-Harvesting Complex LH2 from Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas Acidophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lu-Chao; Weng, Yu-Xiang; Hong, Xin-Guo; Xian, Ding-Chang; Kobayashi, Katsumi

    2006-07-01

    Structures of membrane protein in solution are different from that in crystal phase. We present the primary results of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) resolved topological structures of a light harvesting antenna membrane protein complex LH2 from photosynthetic bacteria Rhodopseudomonas acidophila in detergent solution for the first time. Our results show that the elliptical shape of the LH2 complex in solution clearly deviates from its circular structure in crystal phase determined by x-ray diffraction. This result provides an insight into the structure and function interplay in LH2.

  18. A Novel Type II NAD+-Specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from the Marine Bacterium Congregibacter litoralis KT71

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Cai; Tian, Chang-Qing; Cheng, Hong-Mei; Xu, Lei; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In most living organisms, isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) convert isocitrate into ɑ-ketoglutarate (ɑ-KG). Phylogenetic analyses divide the IDH protein family into two subgroups: types I and II. Based on cofactor usage, IDHs are either NAD+-specific (NAD-IDH) or NADP+-specific (NADP-IDH); NADP-IDH evolved from NAD-IDH. Type I IDHs include NAD-IDHs and NADP-IDHs; however, no type II NAD-IDHs have been reported to date. This study reports a novel type II NAD-IDH from the marine bacterium Congregibacter litoralis KT71 (ClIDH, GenBank accession no. EAQ96042). His-tagged recombinant ClIDH was produced in Escherichia coli and purified; the recombinant enzyme was NAD+-specific and showed no detectable activity with NADP+. The Km values of the enzyme for NAD+ were 262.6±7.4 μM or 309.1±11.2 μM with Mg2+ or Mn2+ as the divalent cation, respectively. The coenzyme specificity of a ClIDH Asp487Arg/Leu488His mutant was altered, and the preference of the mutant for NADP+ was approximately 24-fold higher than that for NAD+, suggesting that ClIDH is an NAD+-specific ancestral enzyme in the type II IDH subgroup. Gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation analyses revealed the homohexameric structure of ClIDH, which is the first IDH hexamer discovered thus far. A 163-amino acid segment of CIIDH is essential to maintain its polymerization structure and activity, as a truncated version lacking this region forms a non-functional monomer. ClIDH was dependent on divalent cations, the most effective being Mn2+. The maximal activity of purified recombinant ClIDH was achieved at 35°C and pH 7.5, and a heat inactivation experiment showed that a 20-min incubation at 33°C caused a 50% loss of ClIDH activity. The discovery of a NAD+-specific, type II IDH fills a gap in the current classification of IDHs, and sheds light on the evolution of type II IDHs. PMID:25942017

  19. System Responses to Equal Doses of Photosynthetically Usable Radiation of Blue, Green, and Red Light in the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Kristin Collier; Nymark, Marianne; Aamot, Inga; Hancke, Kasper; Winge, Per; Andresen, Kjersti; Johnsen, Geir; Brembu, Tore; Bones, Atle M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the selective attenuation of solar light and the absorption properties of seawater and seawater constituents, free-floating photosynthetic organisms have to cope with rapid and unpredictable changes in both intensity and spectral quality. We have studied the transcriptional, metabolic and photo-physiological responses to light of different spectral quality in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum through time-series studies of cultures exposed to equal doses of photosynthetically usable radiation of blue, green and red light. The experiments showed that short-term differences in gene expression and profiles are mainly light quality-dependent. Transcription of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes was activated mainly through a light quality-independent mechanism likely to rely on chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling. In contrast, genes encoding proteins important for photoprotection and PSII repair were highly dependent on a blue light receptor-mediated signal. Changes in energy transfer efficiency by light-harvesting pigments were spectrally dependent; furthermore, a declining trend in photosynthetic efficiency was observed in red light. The combined results suggest that diatoms possess a light quality-dependent ability to activate photoprotection and efficient repair of photodamaged PSII. In spite of approximately equal numbers of PSII-absorbed quanta in blue, green and red light, the spectral quality of light is important for diatom responses to ambient light conditions. PMID:25470731

  20. System responses to equal doses of photosynthetically usable radiation of blue, green, and red light in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Valle, Kristin Collier; Nymark, Marianne; Aamot, Inga; Hancke, Kasper; Winge, Per; Andresen, Kjersti; Johnsen, Geir; Brembu, Tore; Bones, Atle M

    2014-01-01

    Due to the selective attenuation of solar light and the absorption properties of seawater and seawater constituents, free-floating photosynthetic organisms have to cope with rapid and unpredictable changes in both intensity and spectral quality. We have studied the transcriptional, metabolic and photo-physiological responses to light of different spectral quality in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum through time-series studies of cultures exposed to equal doses of photosynthetically usable radiation of blue, green and red light. The experiments showed that short-term differences in gene expression and profiles are mainly light quality-dependent. Transcription of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes was activated mainly through a light quality-independent mechanism likely to rely on chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling. In contrast, genes encoding proteins important for photoprotection and PSII repair were highly dependent on a blue light receptor-mediated signal. Changes in energy transfer efficiency by light-harvesting pigments were spectrally dependent; furthermore, a declining trend in photosynthetic efficiency was observed in red light. The combined results suggest that diatoms possess a light quality-dependent ability to activate photoprotection and efficient repair of photodamaged PSII. In spite of approximately equal numbers of PSII-absorbed quanta in blue, green and red light, the spectral quality of light is important for diatom responses to ambient light conditions. PMID:25470731

  1. Inhibitory activity of an extract from a marine bacterium Halomonas sp. HSB07 against the red-tide microalga Gymnodinium sp. (Pyrrophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Li, Fuchao; Liu, Ling; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Zhaopu

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, red tides occurred frequently in coastal areas worldwide. Various methods based on the use of clay, copper sulfate, and bacteria have been successful in controlling red tides to some extent. As a new defensive agent, marine microorganisms are important sources of compounds with potent inhibitory bioactivities against red-tide microalgae, such as Gymnodinium sp. (Pyrrophyta). In this study, we isolated a marine bacterium, HSB07, from seawater collected from Hongsha Bay, Sanya, South China Sea. Based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence and biochemical characteristics, the isolated strain HSB07 was identified as a member of the genus Halomonas. A crude ethyl acetate extract of strain HSB07 showed moderate inhibition activity against Gymnodinium sp. in a bioactive prescreening experiment. The extract was further separated into fractions A, B, and C by silica gel column chromatography. Fractions B and C showed strong inhibition activities against Gymnodinium. This is the first report of inhibitory activity of secondary metabolites of a Halomonas bacterium against a red-tide-causing microalga.

  2. Exciton interactions in reaction centers of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis probed by optical triplet-minus-singlet polarization spectroscopy at 1.2 K monitored through absorbance-detected magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Lous, E J; Hoff, A J

    1987-09-01

    Linear dichroic triplet-minus-singlet [LD-(T - S)] spectra of isolated reaction centers of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis have been measured at 1.2 K with the linear dichroic absorbance-detected magnetic resonance (LD-ADMR) technique for two mutually perpendicular directions of the preferred axis. The LD-(T - S) spectra have been calibrated with respect to the corresponding (T - S) spectra as a function of applied microwave power and quantitatively interpreted using the formalism of photoselection. The transition moment of the optical transition at 1007 nm makes angles of 72 degrees +/- 5 degrees and 15 degrees +/- 5 degrees with the triplet x and y spin axes, respectively. The experimental spectra have been simulated employing exciton theory and using the atomic coordinates of the resolved crystal structure of the reaction center. The spectral interpretation yields the angles between the transition moments of the various absorption bands of the (T - S) spectra and the triplet axes, and between the moments themselves, with the triplet state of the primary donor (3)P localized on the P-bacteriochlorophyll b in the "active" (L) chain. PMID:16578814

  3. Influence of Cd2+ on the spin state of non-heme iron and on protein local motions in reactions centers from purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirilium rubrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipińska, M.; Orzechowska, A.; Fiedor, J.; Chumakov, A. I.; Ślȩzak, T.; Zając, M.; Matlak, K.; Korecki, J.; Hałas, A.; Strzałka, K.; Fiedor, L.; Burda, K.

    2010-03-01

    Non-heme Fe is a conservative component of the Q-type photosynthetic reaction centers but its function remains unknown. Applying Mössbauer spectroscopy we show that in Rhodospirillum rubrum the non-heme Fe exists mostly in a ferrous low spin state. The binding of Cd2+ ions in the vicinity of the quinone-Fe complex changes the high spin state of the non-heme Fe into a low spin one characterized by hyperfine parameters similar to those obtained for the non-heme Fe low spin state in untreated reaction centers, as confirmed by Mössbauer measurements. The nuclear inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation experiments show that the contribution of vibrations at low energies, between 3-15 meV, activated at 240 K are damped in the bacterial reaction centers treated with CdCl2. No influence of Cd2+ ions is observed on the soft vibrational states at 60 K. These results suggest that binding of cadmium cations within the reaction centers may enhance decoupling of the non-heme Fe from the surrounding protein matrix at temperatures higher than 200 K, what can explain the slowing down of electron transfer between the QA and QB quinones by Cd2+.

  4. Relaxation dynamics of the LH2 complex from a photosynthetic purple bacterium Thiorhodospira sibirica studied by the near-IR femtosecond pump-probe method

    SciTech Connect

    Razjivin, A P; Pishchal'nikov, R Yu; Kozlovskii, V S; Kompanets, V O; Chekalin, Sergei V; Moskalenko, A A; Makhneva, Z K

    2005-01-31

    Photoinduced changes in the absorption spectrum of the LH2 (B800-830-850) complex from a Thiorhodospira sibirica (Trs. sibirica) bacterium are studied by the pump-probe method. The complex has the anomalous absorption spectrum exhibiting three bands in the near-IR region at 793, 826.5, and 846.5 nm. At room temperature, the excitation energy transfer from the B800, B830, and B859 bands was detected with the time constants {tau}{sub 1{approx}}0.5 ps, {tau}{sub 2{approx}}2.5 ps, and {tau}{sub 3} of the order of a few hundreds of picoseconds, respectively. A rapid energy transfer from the B830 band compared to energy transfer from the B850 band ({tau}{sub 2}||{tau}{sub 3}) suggests that all the three bands belong to the same complex (i.e., that the LH2 complex from Trs. sibirica is homogeneous). A slower energy transfer (by three - five times) from the B830 band of the LH2 complex from Trs. sibirica compared to energy transfer from the B800 band of the LH2 complexes (B800-850 and especially B800-820) from other purple bacteria suggests that the electronic structures of ensembles of bacteriochlorophyll molecules in these complexes are substantially different. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. Carotenoid-to-Bacteriochlorophyll Energy Transfer in the LH1-RC Core Complex of a Bacteriochlorophyll b Containing Purple Photosynthetic Bacterium Blastochloris viridis.

    PubMed

    Magdaong, Nikki Cecil M; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Goodson, Carrie; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-06-16

    Carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer has been widely investigated in bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a-containing light harvesting complexes. Blastochloris viridis utilizes BChl b, whose absorption spectrum is more red-shifted than that of BChl a. This has implications on the efficiency and pathways of carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer in this organism. The carotenoids that comprise the light-harvesting reaction center core complex (LH1-RC) of B. viridis are 1,2-dihydroneurosporene and 1,2-dihydrolycopene, which are derivatives of carotenoids found in the light harvesting complexes of several BChl a-containing purple photosynthetic bacteria. Steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopic measurements were performed on the LH1-RC complex of B. viridis at room and cryogenic temperatures. The overall efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer obtained from steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements were determined to be ∼27% and ∼36% for 1,2-dihydroneurosporene and 1,2-dihydrolycopene, respectively. These results were combined with global fitting and target analyses of the transient absorption data to elucidate the energetic pathways by which the carotenoids decay and transfer excitation energy to BChl b. 1,2-Dihydrolycopene transfers energy to BChl b via the S2 → Qx channel with kET2 = (500 fs)(-1) while 1,2-dihydroneurosporene transfers energy via S1→ Qy (kET1 = (84 ps)(-1)) and S2 → Qx (kET2 = (2.2 ps)(-1)) channels. PMID:27218197

  6. Influence of nitrogen substrates and substrate C:N ratios on the nitrogen isotopic composition of amino acids from the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, K.; Ohkouchi, N.; Chikaraishi, Y.; Fukuda, H.; Miyajima, T.; Nagata, T.

    2014-09-01

    Nitrogen (N) isotopic compositions of individual hydrolysable amino acids (δ15NAAs) in N pools have been increasingly used for trophic position assessment and evaluation of sources and transformation processes of organic matter in marine environments. However, there are limited data about variability in δ15NAAs patterns and how this variability influences marine bacteria, an important mediator of trophic transfer and organic matter transformation. We explored whether marine bacterial δ15NAAs profiles change depending on the type and C:N ratio of the substrate. The δ15NAAs profile of a marine bacterium, Vibrio harveyi, was examined using medium containing either glutamate, alanine or ammonium as the N source [substrate C:N ratios (range, 3 to 20) were adjusted with glucose]. The data were interpreted as a reflection of isotope fractionations associated with de novo synthesis of amino acids by bacteria. Principal component analysis (PCA) using the δ15N offset values normalized to glutamate + glutamine δ15N revealed that δ15NAAs profiles differed depending on the N source and C:N ratio of the substrate. High variability in the δ15N offset of alanine and valine largely explained this bacterial δ15NAAs profile variability. PCA was also conducted using bacterial and phytoplankton (cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae) δ15NAAs profile data reported previously. The results revealed that bacterial δ15NAAs patterns were distinct from those of phytoplankton. Therefore, the δ15NAAs profile is a useful indicator of biochemical responses of bacteria to changes in substrate conditions, serving as a potentially useful method for identifying organic matter sources in marine environments.

  7. Isolation of a phenol-utilizing marine bacterium from Durban Harbour (South Africa) and its preliminary characterization as Marinobacter sp. KM2.

    PubMed

    Moxley, Karis; Schmidt, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Many aromatic hydrocarbons assigned to the so-called high production volume chemicals (HPVCs) are frequently encountered constituents of wastewaters that end up in the sea. Although the pollutant-degrading capabilities of freshwater bacteria are well known, the catabolism of pollutants by marine bacteria has received limited attention. A marine bacterium with the ability to aerobically utilize phenol - an HPVC and common aromatic pollutant - as its sole source of carbon and energy, was isolated from water samples from Durban Harbour, South Africa. The isolate, designated strain KM2, was assigned to the genus Marinobacter based on a variety of phenotypic properties and by analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence. The isolate displays an absolute growth requirement for NaCl which cannot be offset by replacement of NaCl with other salts. In addition to 4-methylphenol and 3,4-dimethylphenol, it utilizes a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons such as butan-1-ol and hexadecane under aerobic conditions. The transient formation of an intermediate exhibiting the UV-Vis spectral characteristics for 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde in cultures growing on phenol suggests that the isolate catabolizes this compound via the meta cleavage pathway. These results indicate that members of the genus Marinobacter might participate in the elimination of aromatic pollutants in South African marine environments. PMID:22339030

  8. A putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400: cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Inês B; Fonseca, Bruno M; Matias, Pedro M; Louro, Ricardo O; Moe, Elin

    2016-09-01

    Siderophore-binding proteins (SIPs) perform a key role in iron acquisition in multiple organisms. In the genome of the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the gene tagged as SFRI_RS12295 encodes a protein from this family. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of this protein are reported, together with its preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis to 1.35 Å resolution. The SIP crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.04, b = 78.31, c = 67.71 Å, α = 90, β = 99.94, γ = 90°, and are predicted to contain two molecules per asymmetric unit. Structure determination by molecular replacement and the use of previously determined ∼2 Å resolution SIP structures with ∼30% sequence identity as templates are ongoing. PMID:27599855

  9. A putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400: cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Inês B.; Fonseca, Bruno M.; Matias, Pedro M.; Louro, Ricardo O.; Moe, Elin

    2016-01-01

    Siderophore-binding proteins (SIPs) perform a key role in iron acquisition in multiple organisms. In the genome of the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the gene tagged as SFRI_RS12295 encodes a protein from this family. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of this protein are reported, together with its preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis to 1.35 Å resolution. The SIP crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.04, b = 78.31, c = 67.71 Å, α = 90, β = 99.94, γ = 90°, and are predicted to contain two molecules per asymmetric unit. Structure determination by molecular replacement and the use of previously determined ∼2 Å resolution SIP structures with ∼30% sequence identity as templates are ongoing. PMID:27599855

  10. GlnD is essential for NifA activation, NtrB/NtrC-regulated gene expression, and posttranslational regulation of nitrogenase activity in the photosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaoping; Pohlmann, Edward L; Roberts, Gary P

    2005-02-01

    GlnD is a bifunctional uridylyltransferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme and is thought to be the primary sensor of nitrogen status in the cell. It plays an important role in nitrogen assimilation and metabolism by reversibly regulating the modification of P(II) proteins, which in turn regulate a variety of other proteins. We report here the characterization of glnD mutants from the photosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum and the analysis of the roles of GlnD in the regulation of nitrogen fixation. Unlike glnD mutations in Azotobacter vinelandii and some other bacteria, glnD deletion mutations are not lethal in R. rubrum. Such mutants grew well in minimal medium with glutamate as the sole nitrogen source, although they grew slowly with ammonium as the sole nitrogen source (MN medium) and were unable to fix N(2). The slow growth in MN medium is apparently due to low glutamine synthetase activity, because a DeltaglnD strain with an altered glutamine synthetase that cannot be adenylylated can grow well in MN medium. Various mutation and complementation studies were used to show that the critical uridylyltransferase activity of GlnD is localized to the N-terminal region. Mutants with intermediate levels of uridylyltransferase activity are differentially defective in nif gene expression, the posttranslational regulation of nitrogenase, and NtrB/NtrC function, indicating the complexity of the physiological role of GlnD. These results have implications for the interpretation of results obtained with GlnD in many other organisms. PMID:15687189