Science.gov

Sample records for marine pore waters

  1. Development and application of a marine sediment pore-water toxicity test using Ulva fasciata zoospores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooten, R.L.; Carr, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    An acute (96 h) pore-water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of Ulva fasciata zoospores as endpoints was developed to test the toxicity of marine and estuarine sediment pore-water samples. Tests with an organic toxicant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS), three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn), and ammonia (NH3) were conducted to determine zoospore sensitivity. Zoospore germination and gametophyte growth were as sensitive to SDS as sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development. Zoospore sensitivity to metals was greater than or comparable to that of adult macroalgae. Zoospores were less sensitive to NH3 than were other commonly used toxicity test organisms. Test results using this algal assay with sediment pore-water samples with high NH3 concentrations were compared with results from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development tests for the same samples. Ulva fasciata zoospore germination was not affected by samples with high NH3 concentrations that were toxic in both sea urchin tests. Zoospore tolerance of NH3 and sensitivity to other contaminants indicate that their response may be useful in toxicity identification evaluation studies with pore-water samples that contain high concentrations of unionized NH3.

  2. Development and application of a marine sediment pore-water toxicity test using Ulva fasciata zoospores

    SciTech Connect

    Hooten, R.L.; Carr, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    An acute (96 h) pore-water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of Ulva fasciata zoospores as endpoints was developed to test the toxicity of marine and estuarine sediment pore-water samples. Tests with an organic toxicant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS), three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn), and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) were conducted to determine zoospore sensitivity. Zoospore germination and gametophyte growth were as sensitive to SDS as sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development. Zoospore sensitivity to metals was greater than or comparable to that of adult macroalgae. Zoospores were less sensitive to NH{sub 3} than were other commonly used toxicity test organisms. Test results using this algal assay with sediment pore-water samples with high NH{sub 3} concentrations were compared with results from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development tests for the same samples. Ulva fasciata zoospore germination was not affected by samples with high NH{sub 3} concentrations that were toxic in both sea urchin tests. Zoospore tolerance of NH{sub 3} and sensitivity to other contaminants indicate that their response may be useful in toxicity identification evaluation studies with pore-water samples that contain high concentrations of unionized NH{sub 3}.

  3. Variations of marine pore water salinity and chlorinity in Gulf of Alaska sediments (IODP Expedition 341)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    März, Christian; Mix, Alan C.; McClymont, Erin; Nakamura, Atsunori; Berbel, Glaucia; Gulick, Sean; Jaeger, John; Schneider (LeVay), Leah

    2014-05-01

    Pore waters of marine sediments usually have salinities and chlorinities similar to the overlying sea water, ranging around 34-35 psu (Practical Salinity Units) and around 550 mM Cl-, respectively. This is because these parameters are conservative in the sense that they do not significantly participate in biogeochemical cycles. However, pore water studies carried out in the frame of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and its predecessors have shown that salinities and chlorinities of marine pore waters can substantially deviate from the modern bottom water composition in a number of environmental settings, and various processes have been suggested to explain these phenomena. Also during the recent IODP Expedition 341 that drilled five sites in the Gulf of Alaska (Northeast Pacific Ocean) from the deep Surveyor Fan across the continental slope to the glaciomarine shelf deposits, several occurrences of pore waters with salinities and chlorinities significantly different from respective bottom waters were encountered during shipboard analyses. At the pelagic Sites U1417 and U1418 (~4,200 and ~3,700 m water depth, respectively), salinity and chlorinity maxima occur around 20-50 m sediment depth, but values gradually decrease with increasing drilling depths (down to 30 psu in ~600 m sediment depth). While the pore water freshening at depth is most likely an effect of clay mineral dehydration due to increasing burial depth, the shallow salinity and chlorinity maxima are interpreted as relicts of more saline bottom waters that existed in the North Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum (Adkins et al., 2002). In contrast, the glaciomarine slope and shelf deposits at Site U1419 to U1421 (~200 to 1,000 m water depth) are characterised by unexpectedly low salinitiy and chlorinity values (as low as 16 psu and 295 mM Cl-, respectively) already in very shallow sediment depths (~10 m), and their records do not show systematic trends with sediment depth. Freshening

  4. Relative role of pore water versus ingested sediment in bioavailability of organic contaminants in marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, T.L.; Hansen, R.; Kure, L.K.; Forbes, V.E.; Giessing, A. |

    1998-12-01

    Experimental data for fluoranthene and feeding selectivity in combination with reaction-diffusion modeling suggest that ingestion of contaminated sediment may often be the dominant uptake pathway for deposit-feeding invertebrates in sediments. A dietary absorption efficiency of 56% and accompanying forage ratio of 2.4 were measured using natural sediment that had been dual-labeled ({sup 14}C:{sup 51}Cr) with fluoranthene and fed to the marine deposit-feeding polychaete Capitella species I. Only 3 to 4% of the total absorption could be accounted for by desorption during gut passage. These data were then used as input into a reaction-diffusion model to calculate the importance of uptake from ingested sediment relative to pore-water exposure. The calculations predict a fluoranthene dietary uptake flux that is 20 to 30 times greater than that due to pore water. Factors that act to modify or control the formation of local chemical gradients, boundary layers, or dietary absorption rates including particle selection or burrow construction will be important in determining the relative importance of potential exposure pathways. From a chemical perspective, the kinetics of the adsorption and desorption process are especially important as they will strongly influence the boundary layer immediately surrounding burrowing animals or irrigated tubes. The most important biological factors likely include irrigation behavior and burrow density and size.

  5. Pleistocene meteoric pore water in dated marine sediment cores off Callao, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriete, Cornelia; Suckow, Axel; Harazim, Bodo

    2004-03-01

    During cruise SO 147 of the German research vessel SONNE, a large decrease in salinity with depth was found in the pore water at a site about 10 sea miles off Callao, Lima, Peru. The origin of this freshening was investigated in a multidisciplinary approach using geochemical, geochronological and isotope hydrological methods. The methodology applied is a possible strategy to deal with anomalous pore water freshenings and if necessary to put them into the general framework of submarine groundwater discharge. Concentrations of the major and conservative elements (e.g., Na, K, Cl, B, Br) decrease at the same ratios. Deuterium ( δD) and oxygen-18 ( δ18O) data reveal the meteoric origin of the fresh water end member, indicating a mixture of 30% seawater and 70% fresh water at a depth in sediment of about 10 m. 210Pb and 137Cs sedimentation rates determined by gamma spectrometry range between 2 and 4.5 mm/y for the last century whereas values derived from AMS 14C for the last millennia give mean rates smaller than 1 mm/y. This indicates strongly varying sedimentation conditions. Nevertheless, from the geochronological data it can be concluded that the origin of the fresh water end member is situated in sediments of Pleistocene age. Literature data of the isotope signature of modern water in the nearby Lima aquifer are clearly different from the calculated values for the fresh water end member in the pore waters. On the basis of the isotopic altitude effect described in the literature, the isotopic signature of the fresh pore water end member can be explained as rain water directly infiltrated into the Lima aquifer. In contrast, this infiltration is negligible there under present-day arid climatic conditions. Theoretical considerations on pore water advective and diffusive transport give further indications that the fresh pore water end member is entrapped paleowater of Pleistocene origin. The observed pore water freshening and the geochemical and geochronological data

  6. The marine geochemistry of actinium-227: Evidence for its migration through sediment pore water

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Masatoshi ); Nikaido, Hirofumi )

    1990-10-01

    {sup 227}Ac with a half life of 21.8 years has a potential utility as a tracer of deep water circulation and mixing studies on time scales less than 100 years. Here the authors present the first measurement of {sup 227}Ac profile in the pore water of Northwest Pacific deep-sea sediment and in the {approximately}10,000 m long water column of Izu-Ogasawara Trench. The results clearly show that {sup 227}Ac is supplied from the sediment to the overlying water through migration in the pore water. The model calculation indicates that the molecular diffusion alone through sediment porewater can support only a half of the standing crop of excess {sup 227}Ac in the water column and the enhanced supply of {sup 227}Ac by particle mixing is necessary to account for the remainder. Thus, bioturbation in the deep sea plays an important role in controlling the flux of some short-lived radionuclides such as {sup 227}Ac and {sup 228}Ra across the sediment-water interface.

  7. Vitamin B1 in marine sediments: pore water concentration gradient drives benthic flux with potential biological implications

    PubMed Central

    Monteverde, Danielle R.; Gómez-Consarnau, Laura; Cutter, Lynda; Chong, Lauren; Berelson, William; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B1, or thiamin, can limit primary productivity in marine environments, however the major marine environmental sources of this essential coenzyme remain largely unknown. Vitamin B1 can only be produced by organisms that possess its complete synthesis pathway, while other organisms meet their cellular B1 quota by scavenging the coenzyme from exogenous sources. Due to high bacterial cell density and diversity, marine sediments could represent some of the highest concentrations of putative B1 producers, yet these environments have received little attention as a possible source of B1 to the overlying water column. Here we report the first dissolved pore water profiles of B1 measured in cores collected in two consecutive years from Santa Monica Basin, CA. Vitamin B1 concentrations were fairly consistent between the two years ranging from 30 pM up to 770 pM. A consistent maximum at ~5 cm sediment depth covaried with dissolved concentrations of iron. Pore water concentrations were higher than water column levels and represented some of the highest known environmental concentrations of B1 measured to date, (over two times higher than maximum water column concentrations) suggesting increased rates of cellular production and release within the sediments. A one dimensional diffusion-transport model applied to the B1 profile was used to estimate a diffusive benthic flux of ~0.7 nmol m−2 d−1. This is an estimated flux across the sediment-water interface in a deep sea basin; if similar magnitude B-vitamin fluxes occur in shallow coastal waters, benthic input could prove to be a significant B1-source to the water column and may play an important role in supplying this organic growth factor to auxotrophic primary producers. PMID:26029181

  8. Dissolved N2/Ar Ratios in Sedimentary Pore Waters: A New Twist in Marine Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berelson, W.; Prokopenko, M. G.; Sigman, D. M.; Hammond, D.

    2008-12-01

    The nitrogen cycle is comprised predominantly of biologically mediated pathways, leading to a series of negative feedbacks that stabilize the cycle. Sedimentary denitrification, the major sink in the nitrogen budget, is regulated by the rate of organic carbon rain to the sea floor, as well as oxygen concentrations in overlying bottom waters. The sensitivity of sedimentary denitrification as a negative feedback can be expressed as a ratio between total denitrification (including nitrification sub-cycle) rates integrated over depth (fluxes) and fluxes of remineralized organic carbon out of the sediments, Ndenitr/Coxid_total. We have investigated benthic nitrogen cycling in three, semi-enclosed basins of the California Borderlands: Santa Monica, San Pedro and Santa Barbara located in the regime of seasonal coastal upwelling. Deep water in these basins is separated from the open ocean by sills of various depths, contributing to the low [O2], <1 to10 uM. In this study, we developed a method to sample pore waters for dissolved gas analysis. Ratios between O2, Ar and N2 were determined on extracted pore waters with 1) offline cryogenic extraction and subsequent analysis on Finnigan Delta Plus IRMS with 8 collectors; 2) Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometery (MIMS). Vertical profiles of pore water N2/Ar in the three basins indicate N2 production at depth horizons which exceed by a factor of 5 to 20 the depth of nitrate penetration supported solely by diffusive flux. At depths of maximum subsurface N2 production, we discovered large pools of intracellular nitrate. The relationship between δ15N and δ18O of nitrate are consistent with the activity of a membrane-bound nitrate reductase affecting the measured isotopic composition of the nitrate pool (Granger et al., 2008, in press). In addition, increases in δ15N of pore water NH4 at this depth suggests that at least some of the nitrate might be used for anaerobic ammonium oxidation. Our model estimates up to 25 % of the measured

  9. Authigenic molybdenum formation in marine sediments: A link to pore water sulfide in the Santa Barbara Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zheng, Yen; Anderson, Robert F.; VanGeen, A.; Kuwabara, J.

    2000-01-01

    Pore water and sediment Mo concentrations were measured in a suite of multicores collected at four sites along the northeastern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin to examine the connection between authigenic Mo formation and pore water sulfide concentration. Only at the deepest site (580 m), where pore water sulfide concentrations rise to >0.1 ??M right below the sediment water interface, was there active authigenic Mo formation. At shallower sites (550,430, and 340 m), where pore water sulfide concentrations were consistently <0.05 ??M, Mo precipitation was not occuring at the time of sampling. A sulfide concentration of ???0.1 ??M appears to be a threshold for the onset of Mo-Fe-S co-precipitation. A second threshold sulfide concentration of ???100 ??M is required for Mo precipitation without Fe, possibly as Mo-S or as particle-bound Mo. Mass budgets for Mo were constructed by combining pore water and sediment results for Mo with analyses of sediment trap material from Santa Barbara Basin as well as sediment accumulation rates derived from 210Pb. The calculations show that most of the authigenic Mo in the sediment at the deepest site is supplied by diffusion from overlying bottom waters. There is, however, a non-lithogenic particulate Mo associated with sinking particles that contributes ???15% to the total authigenic Mo accumulation. Analysis of sediment trap samples and supernant brine solutions indicates the presence of non-lithogenic particulate Mo, a large fraction of which is easily remobilized and, perhaps, associated with Mn-oxides. Our observations show that even with the very high flux of organic carbon reaching the sediment of Santa Barbara Basin, active formation of sedimentary authigenic Mo requires a bottom water oxygen concentration below 3 ??M. However, small but measurable rates of authigenic Mo accumulation were observed at sites where bottom water oxygen ranged between 5 and 23 ??M, indicating that the formation of authigenic Mo occured in the

  10. Calcium-ammonium exchange experiments on clay minerals using a (45)Ca tracer technique in marine pore water.

    PubMed

    Ockert, Charlotte; Wehrmann, Laura M; Kaufhold, Stephan; Ferdelman, Tim G; Teichert, Barbara M A; Gussone, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Understanding cation exchange processes is important for evaluating early diagenetic and synsedimentary processes taking place in marine sediments. To quantify calcium (Ca) exchange and Ca-ammonium exchange in a seawater environment, we performed experiments with a radioactive (45)Ca tracer on clay mineral standards (Fithian illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite) and marine sediments from the North Atlantic Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1306A in artificial seawater (ASW). The results show that equilibrium during the initial attachment of Ca as well as the exchange of Ca by [Formula: see text] is attained in less than 2 min. On average 8-20% of the exchangeable sites of the clay minerals were occupied by Ca in a seawater medium. The conditional selectivity coefficient, describing the [Formula: see text] exchange in ASW is mineral specific and it was determined to be 0.07 for montmorillonite, 0.05 for a natural marine sediment and 0.013 for Fithian illite. PMID:24437731

  11. Extending electromagnetic methods to map coastal pore water salinities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, Wm. J.; Kruse, S.; Swarzenski, P.

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of mapping pore water salinity based on surface electromagnetic (EM) methods over land and shallow marine water is examined in a coastal wetland on Tampa Bay, Florida. Forward models predict that useful information on seabed conductivity can be obtained through <1.5 m of saline water, using floating EM-31 and EM-34 instruments from Geonics Ltd. The EM-31 functioned as predicted when compared against resistivity soundings and pore water samples and proved valuable for profiling in otherwise inaccessible terrain due to its relatively small size. Experiments with the EM-34 in marine water, however, did not reproduce the theoretical instrument response. The most effective technique for predicting pore water conductivities based on EM data entailed (1) computing formation factors from resistivity surveys and pore water samples at representative sites and (2) combining these formation factors with onshore and offshore EM-31 readings for broader spatial coverage. This method proved successful for imaging zones of elevated pore water conductivities/ salinities associated with mangrove forests, presumably caused by salt water exclusion by mangrove roots. These zones extend 5 to 10 m seaward from mangrove trunks fringing Tampa Bay. Modeling indicates that EM-31 measurements lack the resolution necessary to image the subtle pore water conductivity variations expected in association with diffuse submarine ground water discharge of fresher water in the marine water of Tampa Bay. The technique has potential for locating high-contrast zones and other pore water salinity anomalies in areas not accessible to conventional marine- or land-based resistivity arrays and hence may be useful for studies of coastal-wetland ecosystems. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  12. Mangrove pore water exchange across a latitudinal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Douglas R.; Maher, Damien T.; Macklin, Paul A.; Santos, Isaac R.

    2016-04-01

    We combined observations of the natural tracer radon (222Rn) with hydrodynamic models across a broad latitudinal gradient covering several climate zones to estimate pore water exchange rates in mangroves. Pore water exchange ranged from 2.1 to 35.5 cm d-1 from temperate to tropical regions and averaged 16.3 ± 5.1 cm d-1. If upscaled to the global weighted mangrove area, pore water exchange in mangroves would recirculate the entire volume of water overlying the continental shelf in less than 153 years. Although pore water exchange (recirculated seawater) and river discharge represent different pathways for water entering the coastal ocean, the estimated global mangrove pore water exchange would be equal to approximately one third of annual global river discharge to the ocean (3.84 × 1013 m3 yr-1). Because biogeochemical processes in mangroves are largely dependent on pore water exchange, these large exchange rates have major implications for coastal nutrient, carbon, and greenhouse gas cycling in tropical marine systems.

  13. Controls on the δ 13C of dissolved inorganic carbon in marine pore waters: An integrated case study of isotope exchange during syndepositional recrystallization of biogenic carbonate sediments (South Florida Platform, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Lynn M.; Ku, Timothy C. W.; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Patterson, William P.; Bonnell, Linda

    2007-06-01

    The carbon isotope systematics of marine carbonates, organic matter and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) play a critical role in quantifying carbonate dissolution fluxes from modern deep-ocean sediments to paleoocean-atmospheric modeling. However, there is a growing body of evidence that C mass and isotope balances in marine pore waters appear incompatible, suggesting that some processes other than mass transport, carbonate dissolution, and organic matter decomposition have significantly increased the value of δ 13C (DIC). We present a comprehensive data set of pore water and sediment geochemistries in biogenic carbonates from well-characterized depositional environments of the South Florida platform. Pore water elemental and δ 13C (DIC) values are integrated with δ 13C values of carbon sources (seawater, organic and inorganic carbon), sediment mixing rates ( 210Pb profiles), microbial sulfate reduction rates (SRR) (radiotracer 35SO 42-), and incubation experiments spiked with low δ 13C (DIC) to estimate the rate and extent of C isotope exchange. Together, these data indicate that biogenic carbonates undergo extensive syndepositional recrystallization at rates comparable to net dissolution rates, permitting significant exchange between isotopically depleted organic C and isotopically enriched inorganic C pools. Significant amounts of net carbonate dissolution are common in the pore waters of these low-Fe sediments, as manifested by Ca 2+/Cl - ratios increased by up to 25% relative to overlying seawater. Despite rapid microbial SRR, degrees of pore water SO 42- reduction usually are maintained below 5% by H 2S oxidation, the main acid source for dissolution. These processes increase pore water DIC concentrations by more than 6 mM, over a 5-fold increase relative to overlying seawater values. Pore water δ 13C (DIC) values are usually greater than -5‰, and sometimes as high as +2‰, despite decomposition of organic matter with low δ 13C values (-9‰ to -15

  14. Determination of 1-chloro-4-[2,2,2-trichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]benzene and related compounds in marine pore water by automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using disposable optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Eganhouse, Robert P; DiFilippo, Erica L

    2015-10-01

    A method is described for determination of ten DDT-related compounds in marine pore water based on equilibrium solid-phase microextraction (SPME) using commercial polydimethylsiloxane-coated optical fiber with analysis by automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). Thermally cleaned fiber was directly exposed to sediments and allowed to reach equilibrium under static conditions at the in situ field temperature. Following removal, fibers were rinsed, dried and cut into appropriate lengths for storage in leak-tight containers at -20°C. Analysis by TD-GC/MS under full scan (FS) and selected ion monitoring (SIM) modes was then performed. Pore-water method detection limits in FS and SIM modes were estimated at 0.05-2.4ng/L and 0.7-16pg/L, respectively. Precision of the method, including contributions from fiber handling, was less than 10%. Analysis of independently prepared solutions containing eight DDT compounds yielded concentrations that were within 6.9±5.5% and 0.1±14% of the actual concentrations in FS and SIM modes, respectively. The use of optical fiber with automated analysis allows for studies at high temporal and/or spatial resolution as well as for monitoring programs over large spatial and/or long temporal scales with adequate sample replication. This greatly enhances the flexibility of the technique and improves the ability to meet quality control objectives at significantly lower cost. PMID:26346188

  15. Enhanced submarine ground water discharge form mixing of pore water and estuarine water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Jonathan B.; Cable, Jaye E.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Lindenberg, Mary K.

    2004-01-01

    Submarine ground water discharge is suggested to be an important pathway for contaminants from continents to coastal zones, but its significance depends on the volume of water and concentrations of contaminants that originate in continental aquifers. Ground water discharge to the Banana River Lagoon, Florida, was estimated by analyzing the temporal and spatial variations of Cl− concentration profiles in the upper 230 cm of pore waters and was measured directly by seepage meters. Total submarine ground water discharge consists of slow discharge at depths > ∼70 cm below seafloor (cmbsf) of largely marine water combined with rapid discharge of mixed pore water and estuarine water above ∼70 cmbsf. Cl− profiles indicate average linear velocities of ∼0.014 cm/d at depths > ∼70 cmbsf. In contrast, seepage meters indicate water discharges across the sediment-water interface at rates between 3.6 and 6.9 cm/d. The discrepancy appears to be caused by mixing in the shallow sediment, which may result from a combination of bioirrigation, wave and tidal pumping, and convection. Wave and tidal pumping and convection would be minor because the tidal range is small, the short fetch of the lagoon limits wave heights, and large density contacts are lacking between lagoon and pore water. Mixing occurs to ∼70 cmbsf, which represents depths greater than previously reported. Mixing of oxygenated water to these depths could be important for remineralization of organic matter.

  16. Displacement of soil pore water by trichloroethylene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Aiken, G.R.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) are important pollutants because of their widespread use as chemical and industrial solvents. An example of the pollution caused by the discharge of DNAPLs is found at the Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where trichloroethylene (TCE) has been discharged directly into the unsaturated zone. This discharge has resulted in the formation of a plume of TCE-contaminated water in the aquifer downgradient of the discharge. A zone of dark-colored groundwater containing a high dissolved organic C content has been found near the point of discharge of the TCE. The colored-water plume extends from the point of discharge at least 30 m (100 feet) downgradient. Fulvic acids isolated from the colored-waters plume, from water from a background well that has not been affected by the discharge of chlorinated solvents, and from soil pore water collected in a lysimeter installed at an uncontaminated site upgradient of the study area have been compared. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fulvic acids from the colored waters and from the lysimeter are very similar, but are markedly different from the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the fulvic acid from the background well. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum and the DOC fractionation profile of the colored groundwater and the soil pore water are very similar to each other, but quite different from those of the background water. It is proposed from these observations that this colored water is soil pore water that has been displaced by a separate DNAPL liquid phase downward to the saturated zone.

  17. Pore networks in continental and marine mudstones: Characteristics and controls on sealing behavior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heath, J.E.; Dewers, T.A.; McPherson, B.J.O.L.; Petrusak, R.; Chidsey, T.C.; Rinehart, A.J.; Mozley, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Mudstone pore networks are strong modifiers of sedimentary basin fluid dynamics and have a critical role in the distribution of hydrocarbons and containment of injected fluids. Using core samples from continental and marine mudstones, we investigate properties of pore types and networks from a variety of geologic environments, together with estimates of capillary beam- scanning electron microscopy, suggest seven dominant mudstone pore types distinguished by geometry and connectivity. A dominant planar pore type occurs in all investigated mudstones and generally has high coordination numbers (i.e., number of neighboring connected pores). Connected networks of pores of this type contribute to high mercury capillary pressures due to small pore throats at the junctions of connected pores and likely control most matrix transport in these mudstones. Other pore types are related to authigenic (e.g., replacement or pore-lining precipitation) clay minerals and pyrite nodules; pores in clay packets adjacent to larger, more competent clastic grains; pores in organic phases; and stylolitic and microfracture-related pores. Pores within regions of authigenic clay minerals often form small isolated networks (<3 ??m). Pores in stringers of organic phases occur as tubular pores or slit- and/or sheet-like pores. These form short, connected lengths in 3D reconstructions, but appear to form networks no larger than a few microns in size. Sealing efficiency of the studied mudstones increases with greater distal depositional environments and greater maximum depth of burial. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  18. Silver speciation in wastewater effluent, surface waters, and pore waters

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, N.W.H.; Kramer, J.R.

    1999-12-01

    Silver, inorganic sulfide, and thiol compounds were measured in municipal wastewater effluent, receiving waters, and pore waters from an anoxic lake sediment in order to predict silver speciation in these systems. The authors found submicromolar concentrations of inorganic sulfide even in fully oxic surface water. This inorganic sulfide is likely to exist in the form of colloidal metal sulfides, which have been shown to be stable under oxidizing conditions for periods of several hours. Inorganic sulfide in both the wastewater effluent and receiving waters was found to be 200 to 300 times in excess of silver concentrations, whereas inorganic sulfide in pore waters was 1,000 to 15,000 times in excess of silver concentrations. With sulfide in excess of silver, the authors predict silver sulfide complexes to dominate silver speciation. Thiols were present at low nanomolar levels in pore waters but were not detectable in wastewater effluent or receiving waters. Thiols do not appear to be important to silver speciation in these freshwater systems. Partitioning of silver into particular, colloidal, and dissolved size fractions showed that a significant proportion of silver is in the colloidal and dissolved phases. Dissolved phase concentrations were relatively constant in the treatment plant effluent and receiving waters, suggesting that silver in the <10-kDa size fraction is strongly complexed by ligands that are not significantly affected by aggregation or sorption processes.

  19. PORE STRUCTURE MODEL OF CEMENT HYDRATES CONSIDERING PORE WATER CONTENT AND REACTION PROCESS UNDER ARBITRARY HUMIDITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikura, Yusuke; Oshita, Hideki

    A simulation model to estimate the pore structure of cement hydrates by curing in arbitrary relative humidity is presented. This paper describes procedures for predicting phase compositions based on the classical hydration model of Portland cement, calculating the particle size distribution of constituent phases and evaluating the pore size distribution by stereological and statistical considerations. And to estimate the water content in pore structure under any relative humidity, we proposed the simulation model of adsorption isotherm model based on the pore structure. To evaluate the effectiveness of this model, simulation results were compared with experimental results of the pore size distribution measured by mercury porosimetry. As a result, it was found that the experimental and simulated results were in close agreement, and the simulated results indicated characterization of the po re structure of cement hydrates.

  20. Fouling Study of Silicon Oxide Pores Exposed to Tap Water

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, J.; Bourcier, W.L.; Lee, J.R.I.; Letant, S.E.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2007-07-12

    We report on the fouling of Focused Ion Beam (FIB)-fabricated silicon oxide nanopores after exposure to tap water for two weeks. Pore clogging was monitored by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) on both bare silicon oxide and chemically functionalized nanopores. While fouling occurred on hydrophilic silicon oxide pore walls, the hydrophobic nature of alkane chains prevented clogging on the chemically functionalized pore walls. These results have implications for nanopore sensing platform design.

  1. The dielectric properties of water within model transbilayer pores.

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, M S; Smith, G R; Adcock, C; Biggin, P C

    1997-01-01

    Ion channels contain extended columns of water molecules within their transbilayer pores. The dynamic properties of such intrapore water have been shown to differ from those of water in its bulk state. In previous molecular dynamics simulations of two classes of model pore (parallel bundles of Ala20 alpha-helices and antiparallel barrels of Ala10 beta-strands), a substantially reduced translational and rotational mobility of waters was observed within the pore relative to bulk water. Molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of a transpore electrostatic field (i.e., a voltage drop along the pore axis) have been used to estimate the resultant polarization (due to reorientation) of the intrapore water, and hence to determine the local dielectric behavior within the pore. It is shown that the local dielectric constant of water within a pore is reduced for models formed by parallel alpha-helix bundles, but not by those formed by beta-barrels. This result is discussed in the context of electrostatics calculations of ion permeation through channels, and the effect of the local dielectric of water within a helix bundle pore is illustrated with a simple Poisson-Boltzmann calculation. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9370434

  2. Marine Biodiversity in Japanese Waters

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, Katsunori; Lindsay, Dhugal; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Nishida, Shuhei; Shirayama, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    To understand marine biodiversity in Japanese waters, we have compiled information on the marine biota in Japanese waters, including the number of described species (species richness), the history of marine biology research in Japan, the state of knowledge, the number of endemic species, the number of identified but undescribed species, the number of known introduced species, and the number of taxonomic experts and identification guides, with consideration of the general ocean environmental background, such as the physical and geological settings. A total of 33,629 species have been reported to occur in Japanese waters. The state of knowledge was extremely variable, with taxa containing many inconspicuous, smaller species tending to be less well known. The total number of identified but undescribed species was at least 121,913. The total number of described species combined with the number of identified but undescribed species reached 155,542. This is the best estimate of the total number of species in Japanese waters and indicates that more than 70% of Japan's marine biodiversity remains un-described. The number of species reported as introduced into Japanese waters was 39. This is the first attempt to estimate species richness for all marine species in Japanese waters. Although its marine biota can be considered relatively well known, at least within the Asian-Pacific region, considering the vast number of different marine environments such as coral reefs, ocean trenches, ice-bound waters, methane seeps, and hydrothermal vents, much work remains to be done. We expect global change to have a tremendous impact on marine biodiversity and ecosystems. Japan is in a particularly suitable geographic situation and has a lot of facilities for conducting marine science research. Japan has an important responsibility to contribute to our understanding of life in the oceans. PMID:20689840

  3. Hydrochemical reactions and origin of offshore relatively fresh pore water from core samples in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Hiu Tung; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    2016-06-01

    The existence of relatively fresh pore water offshore has been well recognised over the globe but studies on the chemistry of the pore water from offshore geological formations are extremely limited. This study aims to characterize the hydrochemistry of the submarine groundwater body in Hong Kong. It looks into the major ion concentrations and the stable isotopic compositions of pore water extracted from core samples from an offshore 42.30-m vibrocore in the southwestern Hong Kong waters. A minimum Cl- level of about one-third of that in typical seawater was noted in the terrestrial sediments, suggesting the presence of offshore relatively fresh water. Unexpectedly high NH4+ levels are attributed to organic matter decomposition in the terrestrial sediments. The leaching of shells due to exposure of marine sediments at sea-level low stands raises the Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentrations. Base Exchange Indices show weak cation exchange reactions in which Na+ and K+ are released while Mg2+ and Ca2+ are adsorbed. Isotopic compositions of pore water reveal that the low-salinity water is probably the relic water sequestered in fluvial systems during relative sea-level low stands. Cores properly stored in a freezer for a long time has been used to study the pore water chemistry. For the first time, this study introduces an approach to correct the measured data by considering the possible evaporation effect during the transportation and storage of the samples. Corrections for evaporation were applied to the major ion concentrations and the stable isotopic compositions of pore water measured. It is found that the corrections determined by the Cl- mass balance approach are more reliable. The corrected measurements give more reasonable observations and hence allow sensible conclusions on the hydrochemical reactions and the origin of pore water.

  4. The effect of pore water pressure on debris flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okura, Y.; Parker, G.; Marr, J. G.; Yu, B.; Ochiai, H.

    2003-12-01

    Pore-water likely plays an important role to reduce shear force in debris flow. In experiments, we observed pore-water pressure during flow to clarify the relationship between the flow speed and pore water pressure which would be affected by flow depth and particle size distribution. Soil materials were prepared with mixing materials of sand, silt and clay. Pore-water pressure on the flume bed, flow depth, velocity and run out distance was observed, and the following results were quantitatively obtained in this series of experiments. 1. A positive relation was observed between strain rate and pore-water pressure ratio in the flow. The strain rate and pressure ratio were dimensionless parameters of the ratios of surface velocity to flow depth and pore-water pressure head to flow depth, respectively. This relationship indicated that shear resistance decreased as the pressure potential leading to acceleration of flow velocity increased. 2. A positive relation was also observed between flow depth and pore-water pressure ratio. This indicated that the pore pressure diffusion became increasingly obstructed as the flow depth increased. 3. The pore-water pressure ratio tended to increase with the uniformity coefficient of debris flow materials. The reason for this might have been that smaller particles suspended in the flow increased pore-water pressure, and the wider range of particle distribution effectively prevented pore-water pressure diffusion. 4. There was an apparently negative correlation between the equivalent coefficient of frictions and the pressure ratios. Equivalent friction is apparent friction during flow. The most likely reason for this is that shear resistance would decrease and run out distance increase as the pressure ratio increased. These results indicated that the effect of pore water fluctuations should be one of the most important factors affecting the shear resistance in debris flows. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation

  5. Deep Water, Shallow Water: Marine Animal Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Examines the diversity of life in the oceans and ways in which teachers can explore ocean habitats with their students without leaving the classroom. Topic areas considered include: restricted habitats, people and marine habitats, pollution, incidental kills, and the commercial and recreational uses of marine waters. (JN)

  6. Do conservative solutes migrate at average pore-water velocity?

    PubMed

    Rovey, Charles W; Niemann, William L

    2005-01-01

    According to common understanding, the advective velocity of a conservative solute equals the average linear pore-water velocity. Yet direct monitoring indicates that the two velocities may be different in heterogeneous media. For example, at the Camp Dodge, Iowa, site the advective velocity of discrete Cl- plumes was less than one tenth of the average pore-water velocity calculated from Darcy's law using the measured hydraulic gradient, effective porosity, and hydraulic conductivity (K) from large-scale three-dimensional (3D) techniques, e.g., pumping tests. Possibly, this difference reflects the influence of different pore systems, if the K relevant to transient solute flux is influenced more by lower-K heterogeneity than a steady or quasi-steady water flux. To test this idea, tracer tests were conducted under controlled laboratory conditions. Under one-dimensional flow conditions, the advective velocity of discrete conservative solutes equaled the average pore-water velocity determined from volumetric flow rates and Darcy's law. In a larger 3D flow system, however, the same solutes migrated at approximately 65% of the average pore-water velocity. These results, coupled with direct observation of dye tracers and their velocities as they migrated through both homogeneous and heterogeneous sections of the same model, demonstrate that heterogeneity can slow the advective velocity of discrete solute plumes relative to the average pore-water velocity within heterogeneous 3D flow sytems. PMID:15726924

  7. A robust model for pore-water chemistry of clayrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaucher, E. C.; Tournassat, C.; Pearson, F. J.; Blanc, P.; Crouzet, C.; Lerouge, C.; Altmann, S.

    2009-11-01

    The chemistry of pore water is an important property of clayrocks being considered as host rocks for long-term storage of radioactive waste. It may be difficult, if not impossible, to obtain water samples for chemical analysis from such rocks because of their low hydraulic conductivity. This paper presents an approach for calculating the pore-water compositions of clayrocks from laboratory-measured properties of core samples, including their leachable Cl and SO 4 concentrations and analysed exchangeable cations, and from mineral and cation exchange equilibria based on the formation mineralogy. New core sampling and analysis procedures are presented that reduce or quantify side reactions such as sample oxidation (e.g. pyrite) and soluble mineral dissolution (celestite, SrSO 4) that affect measured SO 4 concentrations and exchangeable cation distributions. The model considers phase equilibria only with minerals that are observed in the formation including the principal clay phases. The model has been used to calculate the composition of mobile pore water in the Callovo-Oxfordian clayrock and validated against measurements of water chemistry made in an underground research laboratory in that formation. The model reproduces the measured, in situ pore-water composition without any estimated parameters. All required parameters can be obtained from core sample analysis. We highlight the need to consider only those mineral phases which can be shown to be in equilibrium with contacting pore water. The consequence of this is that some conceptual models available in the literature appear not to be appropriate for modelling clayrocks, particularly those considering high temperature and/or high pressure detrital phases as chemical buffers of pore water. The robustness of our model with respect to uncertainties in the log K values of clay phases is also demonstrated. Large uncertainties in log K values for clay minerals have relatively small effects on modelled pore-water

  8. Pore Water Collection, Analysis and Evolution: The Need for Standardization.

    PubMed

    Gruzalski, Jacob G; Markwiese, James T; Carriker, Neil E; Rogers, William J; Vitale, Rock J; Thal, David I

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the ecological impacts of contaminants released into the environment requires integration of multiple lines of evidence. Collection and analysis of interstitial water is an often-used line of evidence for developing benthic exposure estimates in aquatic ecosystems. It is a well-established principle that chemical and toxicity data on interstitial water samples should represent in-situ conditions; i.e., sample integrity must be maintained throughout the sample collection process to avoid alteration of the in-situ geochemical conditions. Unfortunately, collection and processing of pore water is not standardized to address possible geochemical transformations introduced by atmospheric exposure. Furthermore, there are no suitable benchmarks (ecological or human health) against which to evaluate adverse effects from chemicals in pore water; i.e., empirical data is lacking on the toxicity of inorganic contaminants in sediment interstitial water. It is clear that pore water data is best evaluated by considering the bioavailability of trace elements and the partitioning of contaminants between the aqueous and solid phases. It is also evident that there is a need for sediment researchers and regulatory agencies to collaborate in developing a standardized approach for sediment/pore water collection and data evaluation. Without such guidelines, the number of different pore water collection and extraction techniques will continue to expand, and investigators will continue to evaluate potentially questionable data by comparison to inappropriate criteria. PMID:26613987

  9. Pore-water chemistry explains zinc phytotoxicity in soil.

    PubMed

    Kader, Mohammed; Lamb, Dane T; Correll, Ray; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    Zinc (Zn) is a widespread soil contaminant arising from a numerous anthropogenic sources. However, adequately predicting toxicity of Zn to ecological receptors remains difficult due to the complexity of soil characteristics. In this study, we examined solid-solution partitioning using pore-water data and toxicity of Zn to cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) in spiked soils. Pore-water effective concentration (ECx, x=10%, 20% and 50% reduction) values were negatively related to pH, indicating lower Zn pore water concentration were needed to cause phytotoxicity at high pH soils. Total dissolved zinc (Znpw) and free zinc (Zn(2+)) in soil-pore water successfully described 78% and 80.3% of the variation in relative growth (%) in the full dataset. When the complete data set was used (10 soils), the estimated EC50pw was 450 and 79.2 µM for Znpw and Zn(2+), respectively. Total added Zn, soil pore water pH (pHpw) and dissolve organic carbon (DOC) were the best predictors of Znpw and Zn(2+) in pore-water. The EC10 (total loading) values ranged from 179 to 5214 mg/kg, depending on soil type. Only pH measurements in soil were related to ECx total Zn data. The strongest relationship to ECx overall was pHca, although pHw and pHpw were in general related to Zn ECx. Similarly, when a solution-only model was used to predict Zn in shoot, DOC was negatively related to Zn in shoot, indicating a reduction in uptake/ translocation of Zn from solution with increasing DOC. PMID:26283289

  10. Benthic invertebrate bioassays with toxic sediment and pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giesy, John P.; Rosiu, Cornell J.; Graney, Robert L.; Henry, Mary G.

    1990-01-01

    The relative sensitivities of bioassays to determine the toxicity of sediments were investigated and three methods of making the sample dilutions required to generate dose-response relationships were compared. The assays studied were: (a) Microtox®, a 15-min assay ofPhotobacterium phosphoreum bioluminescence inhibition by pore water; (b) 48-h Daphnia magnalethality test in pore water; (c) 10-d subchronic assay of lethality to and reduction of weight gain by Chironomus tentans performed in either whole sediment or pore water; (d) 168-h acute lethality assay of Hexagenia limbata in either whole sediment or pore water. The three methods of diluting sediments were: (a) extracting pore water from the toxic location and dilution with pore water from the control station; (b) diluting whole sediment from the toxic location with control whole sediment from a reference location, then extracting pore water; and (c) diluting toxic, whole sediment with whole sediment from a reference location, then using the whole sediment in bioassays. Based on lethality, H. limbata was the most sensitive organism to the toxicity of Detroit River sediment. Lethality of D. magna in pore water was similar to that of H. limbata in whole sediment and can be used to predict effects of whole sediment toxicity to H. limbata. The concentration required to cause a 50% reduction in C. tentans growth (10-d EC50) was approximately that which caused 50% lethality of D. magna (48-h LC50) and was similar to the toxicity that restricts benthic invertebrate colonization of contaminated sediments. While the three dilution techniques gave similar results with some assays, they gave very different results in other assays. The dose-response relationships determined by the three dilution techniques would be expected to vary with sediment, toxicant and bioassay type, and the dose-response relationship derived from each technique needs to be interpreted accordingly.

  11. Development and deployment of a deep-sea Raman probe for measurement of pore water geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Walz, Peter M.; Kirkwood, William J.; Hester, Keith C.; Ussler, William; Peltzer, Edward T.; Brewer, Peter G.

    2010-02-01

    We have developed, deployed, and tested a novel probe for study of the geochemistry of sediment pore waters based upon Raman spectroscopy. The Raman technique has already been used successfully for in situ measurements of targets of scientific interest including gas and hydrothermal vents and complex gas hydrates, but sediment geochemistry has so far been an intractable problem since the sediments themselves are strongly fluorescent and typically only very small sample volumes are obtainable. The 35 cm long probe extracts pore fluids through a 10 μm sintered metallic frit and draws the sample through a 2 mm diameter channel into a sapphire windowed optical cell within which the laser beam is focused and the spectrum recorded. The dead volume of the system is ˜1 ml and the instrument is ROV deployable with activation of probe insertion and sample withdrawal under direct operator control. The unique features of this mode of detection include observation of the sulfate gradient in marine pore waters as an indicator of diagenesis, direct measurement of the dissolved sulfide species H 2S and HS -, and measurement of dissolved methane; all of which are of primary geochemical interest. Quantitative analysis is achieved by area ratio to known water peaks and from standard calibration curves with a precision of ±5%. We find only very small fluorescence from pore waters measured in situ, but observe rapid increases in fluorescence from cores returned to the surface and exposed to oxygen.

  12. Unstable Pore-Water Flow in Intertidal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Shen, C.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important intertidal wetlands strongly influenced by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Bordered by coastal water, the marsh system undergoes cycles of inundation and exposure driven by the tide. This leads to dynamic, complex pore-water flow and solute transport in the marsh soil. Pore-water circulations occur over vastly different spatial and temporal scales with strong link to the marsh topography. These circulations control solute transport between the marsh soil and the tidal creek, and ultimately affect the overall nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal water. The pore-water flows also dictate the soil condition, particularly aeration, which influences the marsh plant growth. Numerous studies have been carried out to examine the pore-water flow process in the marsh soil driven by tides, focusing on stable flow with the assumption of homogeneity in soil and fluid properties. This assumption, however, is questionable given the actual inhomogeneous conditions in the field. For example, the salinity of surface water in the tidal creek varies temporally and spatially due to the influence of rainfall and evapotranspiration as well as the freshwater input from upland areas to the estuary, creating density gradients across the marsh surface and within the marsh soil. Many marshes possess soil stratigraphy with low-permeability mud typically overlying high-permeability sandy deposits. Macropores such as crab burrows are commonly distributed in salt marsh sediments. All these conditions are prone to the development of non-uniform, unstable preferential pore-water flow in the marsh soil, for example, funnelling and fingering. Here we present results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to explore such unstable flow. In particular, the analysis aims to address how the unstable flow modifies patterns of local pore-water movement and solute transport, as well as the overall exchange between the marsh soil and

  13. Pore water testing and analysis: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Peter M; Wang, Feiyue; Germano, Joseph D; Batley, Graeme

    2002-05-01

    The increasingly common practice of collecting and assessing sediment pore water as a primary measure of sediment quality is reviewed. Good features of this practice include: pore water is a key exposure route for some organisms associated with sediments; pore water testing eliminates particle size effects; pore water analyses and tests can provide useful information regarding contamination and pollution. Bad features include: pore water is not the only exposure route; pore water tests lack chemical or biological realism: their "sensitivity" relative to other tests may be meaningless due to manipulation and laboratory artifacts; many sediment and surface dwelling organisms are not directly influenced by pore water. Bad features can become ugly if: other exposure pathways are not considered (for toxicity or bioaccumulation); manipulation techniques are not appropriate; pore water tests are inappropriately linked to population-level effects. Pore water testing and analyses can be effective tools provided their limitations are well understood by researchers and managers. PMID:12146818

  14. Active exchange of water and nutrients between seawater and shallow pore water in intertidal sandflats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dong-Woon; Kim, Guebuem; Yang, Han Soeb

    2008-12-01

    In order to determine the temporal and spatial variations of nutrient profiles in the shallow pore water columns (upper 30 cm depth) of intertidal sandflats, we measured the salinity and nutrient concentrations in pore water and seawater at various coastal environments along the southern coast of Korea. In the intertidal zone, salinity and nutrient concentrations in pore water showed marked vertical changes with depth, owing to the active exchange between the pore water and overlying seawater, while they are temporally more stable and vertically constant in the sublittoral zone. In some cases, the advective flow of fresh groundwater caused strong vertical gradients of salinity and nutrients in the upper 10 cm depth of surface sediments, indicating the active mixing of the fresher groundwater with overlying seawater. Such upper pore water column profiles clearly signified the temporal fluctuation of lower-salinity and higher-Si seawater intrusion into pore water in an intertidal sandflat near the mouth of an estuary. We also observed a semimonthly fluctuation of pore water nutrients due to spring-neap tide associated recirculation of seawater through the upper sediments. Our study shows that the exchange of water and nutrients between shallow pore water and overlying seawater is most active in the upper 20 cm layer of intertidal sandflats, due to physical forces such as tides, wave set-up, and density-thermal gradient.

  15. Pore connectivity, electrical conductivity, and partial water saturation: Network simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Tang, Y. B.; Bernabé, Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Li, X. F.; Bai, X. Y.; Zhang, L. H.

    2015-06-01

    The electrical conductivity of brine-saturated rock is predominantly dependent on the geometry and topology of the pore space. When a resistive second phase (e.g., air in the vadose zone and oil/gas in hydrocarbon reservoirs) displaces the brine, the geometry and topology of the pore space occupied by the electrically conductive phase are changed. We investigated the effect of these changes on the electrical conductivity of rock partially saturated with brine. We simulated drainage and imbibition as invasion and bond percolation processes, respectively, in pipe networks assumed to be perfectly water-wet. The simulations included the formation of a water film in the pipes invaded by the nonwetting fluid. During simulated drainage/imbibition, we measured the changes in resistivity index as well as a number of relevant microstructural parameters describing the portion of the pore space saturated with water. Except Euler topological number, all quantities considered here showed a significant level of "universality," i.e., insensitivity to the type of lattice used (simple cubic, body-centered cubic, or face-centered cubic). Hence, the coordination number of the pore network appears to be a more effective measure of connectivity than Euler number. In general, the simulated resistivity index did not obey Archie's simple power law. In log-log scale, the resistivity index curves displayed a substantial downward or upward curvature depending on the presence or absence of a water film. Our network simulations compared relatively well with experimental data sets, which were obtained using experimental conditions and procedures consistent with the simulations. Finally, we verified that the connectivity/heterogeneity model proposed by Bernabé et al. (2011) could be extended to the partial brine saturation case when water films were not present.

  16. Controls on soil pore water solutes: An approach for distinguishing between biogenic and lithogenic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Schulz, M.S.; Vivit, D.V.; Blum, A.E.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in pore water compositions are characterized for a deep regolith profile developed on a marine terrace chronosequence near Santa Cruz California. Variations are resolved in terms of the dominance of either a lithogenic process, i.e. chemical weathering, or a biogenic process, i.e. plant nutrient cycling. The concept of elemental fractionation is introduced describing the extent that specific elements are mobilized and cycled as a result of these processes. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydrogeology and hydrodynamics of coral reef pore waters

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, R.W.; Oberdorfer, J.A.

    1988-06-29

    A wide variety of forces can produce head gradients that drive the flow and advective mixing of internal coral reef pore waters. Oscillatory gradients that produce mixing result from wave and tide action. Sustained gradients result from wave and tide-induced setup and ponding, from currents impinging on the reef structure, from groundwater heads, and from density differenced (temperature or salinity gradients). These gradients and the permeabilities and porosities of reef sediments are such that most macropore environments are dominated by advection rather than diffusion. The various driving forces must be analyzed to determine the individual and combined magnitudes of their effects on a specific reef pore-water system. Pore-water movement controls sediment diagenesis, the exchange of nutrients between sediments and benthos, and coastal/island groundwater resources. Because of the complexity of forcing functions, their interactions with specific local reef environments, experimental studies require careful incorporation of these considerations into their design and interpretation. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Integrating mercury injection and nitrogen adsorption data to characterize marine sediment pore systems: An example from the Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, H.; Thomas, B.

    2013-12-01

    Fine-grained, clay-rich marine sediments typically exhibit complex pore geometries due to the presence of high-aspect-ratio clay particles, nannofossils, and diagenetically altered grain fragments. The pore systems in these sediments have a wide range of shapes and may contain significant pore volume in mesopores (1-25 nm radius) and micropores (< 1 nm radius). This renders pore size measurements difficult, even in samples with high porosity. Porosity values from mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) measurements performed on samples from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Sites C0011, C0012, and C0018 in the Nankai Trough offshore Japan were compared to porosity determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in the laboratory. The MICP porosities were systematically lower than the NMR porosities by up to 26% of the NMR porosity value. This porosity mismatch is due to the presence of pores with radii smaller than the effective lower limit of MICP measurements, which is 10-40 nm for this data set. Nitrogen gas adsorption offers a means to characterize pores between ~0.87 nm and ~100 nm radius, thus measuring the portion of the pore size distribution not investigated by MICP measurements. Combining MICP and nitrogen gas adsorption data yields a more complete characterization of the pore system of marine sediments. Merged MICP and nitrogen gas adsorption data obtained for the Nankai Trough samples yield porosity values that more accurately match the NMR porosity values, indicating that the entire pore space of the samples can be measured by a combination of the two techniques. These samples possess significant quantities of porosity below the resolution of MICP (>10% of pore volume), even in samples with porosity exceeding 65%. This work illustrates the complexity of marine sediment pore systems even at shallow depths of burial, and provides a new method for assessing pore sizes in scientific ocean drilling studies.

  19. Elucidating the controls on the Mg isotopic composition of marine pore fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanda, P.; Fantle, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Sr and Mg isotopic composition of pore fluids and carbonates from the Neogene section of Ocean Drilling Project Site 806B are reported (87Sr/86Sr and δ26Mg, measured using a Thermo Scientific Neptune Plus multi-collector ICP-MS). Site 806B, located on the northern margin of the Ontong Java Plateau, hosts a thick (776 m cored, depth to basement ~ 1200 m), relatively continuous, carbonate-rich section (between 83 and 96% CaCO3). Our goal in the current study is to use the Sr and Mg isotope data of pore fluids and carbonates to address open questions regarding (1) the extent to which the pore fluid chemistry is overprinted by calcite recrystallization, (2) the effects of diagenesis on bulk carbonate chemistry, and (3) the likelihood of preserving secular seawater δ26Mg trends in pore fluids. Accordingly, the current study compares and contrasts the isotopic and elemental data between adjacent ODP Sites 806B and 807A, which have similar depositional histories, carbonate contents, and pore fluid chemistries. The measured 87Sr/86Sr ratios of pore fluids at 806B range smoothly from 0.70914 at 4.45 mbsf to 0.70851 at 509.3 mbsf, similar (though offset relative) to the bulk carbonate trend (0.70918 to 0.70877 between 1.11 and 501.94 mbsf). The δ26MgDSM3 of 806B pore fluids generally increases from -0.86‰ at 4.45 mbsf to -0.17‰ at 679.0 mbsf. The overall trend is consistent with previously collected δ26Mg data at 807A [1]; there is, however, a significant difference in pore fluid δ26Mg between the two sites at depths of 300 to 600 mbsf. At these depths, 806B pore fluid δ26Mg values are +0.2 to 0.3‰ relative to 807A at similar depths [1]. The application of a depositional reactive transport model to the Sr isotope data suggests that bulk carbonate recrystallization rates at 806B are similar to those at 807A (<2%/Ma) [2]. An iterative model construct is employed to evaluate the dominant controls on the δ26Mg of marine pore fluids; specifically the relative

  20. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  1. On pore-fluid viscosity and the wave properties of saturated granular materials including marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Michael J

    2007-09-01

    The grain-shearing (GS) theory of wave propagation in a saturated granular material, such as a marine sediment, is extended to include the effects of the viscosity of the molecularly thin layer of pore fluid separating contiguous grains. An equivalent mechanical system consisting of a saturating, strain-hardening dashpot in series with a Hookean spring represents the intergranular interactions. Designated the VGS theory, the new model returns dispersion curves that differ mildly from those of the GS theory at lower frequencies, below 10 kHz, where effects due to the viscosity of the pore fluid may be non-negligible. At higher frequencies, the VGS dispersion curves approach those of the GS theory asymptotically. The VGS theory is shown to match the SAX99 dispersion curves reasonably well over the broad frequency band of the measurements, from 1 to 400 kHz. This includes the frequency regime between 1 and 10 kHz occupied by Schock's chirp sonar data, where the viscosity of the pore fluid appears to have a discernible effect on the dispersion curves. PMID:17927409

  2. Processes in the pore waters of peat deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Levshenko, T.V.; Efremova, A.G.; Galkina, Z.M.; Surkova, T.E.; Tolstov, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    The composition of the waters of modern peat bogs that have developed in the intracontinental regions under the conditions of bogs of the high-moor, mixed, and lowmoor types have been investigated for the case of a number of peat deposits of the Smolensk, Volgorad, and Pskov provinces. During the work the pH of the deposits and the C1-, Alk, SO/sup 2/-, Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, K- contents of the pore water of modern peat beds were studied. The thickness of the deposits studied amounted to 5-7 m. Samples were taken every 0.5 m in depth. The water was separated from the deposits by pressing out.

  3. Pore Water PAH Transport in Amended Sediment Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidley, P. T.; Kwon, S.; Ghosh, U.

    2009-05-01

    Capping is a common remediation strategy for contaminated sediments that creates a physical barrier between contaminated sediments and the water column. Diffusive flux of contaminants through a sediment cap is small. However, under certain hydrodynamic conditions such as groundwater potential and tidal pumping, groundwater advection can accelerate contaminant transport. Hydrophobic organic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could be transported through the cap under advective conditions. To better understand PAH migration under these conditions, physical models of sediment caps were evaluated in the laboratory through direct measurement of pore water using solid phase micro-extraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Contaminated sediment and capping material was obtained from an existing Superfund site that was capped at Eagle Harbor, Washington. A PAH dissolution model linked to an advection-dispersion equation with retardation using published organic carbon-water partitioning coefficients (Koc) was compared to measured PAHs in the sediment and cap porewater of the physical model.

  4. Submarine weathering of silicate minerals and the extent of pore water freshening at active continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Florian; Hensen, Christian; Schmidt, Mark; Geersen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate how submarine weathering processes may affect the water balance of sediments at convergent plate margins, six sediment cores were retrieved off Central Chile at water depth between ˜800 and 4000 m. The sediment solid phase was analyzed for its major element composition and the pore fluids were analyzed for dissolved sulfate, sulfide, total alkalinity, major cations, chloride, bromide, iodide, hydrocarbons as well as the carbon isotopic composition of methane. Because of negligible weathering on land, surface sediments off Central Chile are rich in reactive silicate minerals and have a bulk composition similar to volcanic rocks in the adjacent Andes. Deep-sourced fluxes of alkalinity, cations and chloride indicate that silicate minerals are subject to weathering in the forearc during burial. Comparison of deep-sourced signals with data from nearby Ocean Drilling Program Sites reveals two different types of weathering processes: In shallow (tens of meters), methanic sediments of slope basins with high organic carbon burial rates, reactive silicate minerals undergo incongruent dissolution through reaction with CO2 from methanogenesis. At greater burial depth (hundreds of meters), silicate weathering is dominated by authigenic smectite formation. This process is accompanied by uptake of water into the clay interlayers thus leading to elevated salinities in the surrounding pore water. Deep-seated smectite formation is more widespread than shallow silicate dissolution, as it is independent from the availability of CO2 from methanogenesis. Although solute transport is not focused enough to form cold seeps in the proper sense, tectonically induced, diffuse fluid flow transfers the deep-seated signal of smectite formation into the shallow sediments. The temperature-controlled conversion of smectite to illite is considered the most important dehydration process in marine forearc environments (depth of kilometers). However, in agreement with other

  5. Effects of a nearshore wastewater discharge: Water column and sediment pore water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, P.R.; Carr, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    The relationship between water column and sediment pore water toxicity was investigated near a municipal-industrial wastewater discharge in southern Texas. Toxicity associated with effluent distributions in the water column are known to vary in both time and space. Toxicity of sediment, however, is often more stable over time. Sediment can serve as a long-term integrator of toxicity in areas subject to chronic exposure of effluents. This study addressed the relationship between water column toxicity and that found in the sediments on both spatial and temporal scales. Four 2 Km transacts were established around a nearshore wastewater outfall. Eight stations along each transact were sampled for both surface waters and sediment pore water toxicity. Toxicity was determined using a modified sea urchin fertilization test. Surface waters were sampled and tested for eight consecutive months, while sediment pore waters were sampled on three occasions over the length of this study. Results have shown that toxicity in receiving waters was a good indicator to trace movements of the highly variable effluent plume. The distribution of effluent in the water column, and hence water column toxicity, was primarily driven by local wind conditions. Toxicity in sediment porewater was, much less variable and more evenly distributed over the study site. Sediment pore water toxicity was also a good predictor of the distribution of benthic infaunal invertebrates over much of the study site.

  6. Organic geochemistry and pore water chemistry of sediments from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Simoneit, B.R.T.; MacKenzie, F.T.; Neumann, A.C.; Thorstenson, D.C.; Gerchakov, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Mangrove Lake, Bermuda, is a small coastal, brackish-water lake that has accumulated 14 m of banded, gelatinous, sapropelic sediments in less than 104 yr. Stratigraphic evidence indicates that Mangrove Lake's sedimentary environment has undergone three major depositional changes (peat, freshwater gel, brackish-water gel) as a result of sea level changes. The deposits were examined geochemically in an effort to delineate sedimentological and diagenetic changes. Gas and pore water studies include measurements of sulfides, ammonia, methane, nitrogen gas, calcium, magnesium, chloride, alkalinity, and pH. Results indicate that sulfate reduction is complete, and some evidence is presented for bacterial denitrification and metal sulfide precipitation. The organic-rich sapropel is predominantly algal in origin, composed mostly of carbohydrates and insoluble macromolecular organic matter called humin with minor amounts of proteins, lipids, and humic acids. Carbohydrates and proteins undergo hydrolysis with depth in the marine sapropel but tend to be preserved in the freshwater sapropel. The humin, which has a predominantly aliphatic structure, increases linearly with depth and composes the greatest fraction of the organic matter. Humic acids are minor components and are more like polysaccharides than typical marine humic acids. Fatty acid distributions reveal that the lipids are of an algal and/or terrestrial plant source. Normal alkanes with a total concentration of 75 ppm exhibit two distribution maxima. One is centered about n-C22 with no odd/even predominance, suggestive of a degraded algal source. The other is centered at n-C31 with a distinct odd/even predominance indicative of a vascular plant origin. Stratigraphic changes in the sediment correlate to observed changes in the gas and pore water chemistry and the organic geochemistry. ?? 1982.

  7. The Effect of Pore Connectivity on Water Adsorption Isotherms in Non-activated Graphitic Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    StrioloDr., A; Gubbins, Dr. K. E.; Chialvo, Ariel A; Cummings, Peter T

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption of water in graphitic carbons is usually simulated via a weighted average of the adsorption isotherms simulated in carbon-slit pore of different widths. By following this procedure, details about pore morphology and pore connectivity may be overlooked. Towards a better match between virtual and real experiments, we present simulated adsorption isotherms for SPC/E model water in porous carbons composed by interconnected carbon-slit pores. The pores are separated from each other by one graphene layer. Imperfections (lack of carbon atoms) in the graphene layers result in interconnections between pores. The grand canonical Monte Carlo algorithm is used here to simulate water adsorption. Our results show that while the qualitative features obtained in the simulation of independent slit-shaped pores are reproduced when interconnected pores are considered, the adsorption isotherms rise more gradually and the adsorption/desorption hysteresis loops are narrower in the latter case.

  8. Transient streaming potentials under varying pore-water ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malama, B.

    2014-12-01

    Streaming potentials (SP) are generated when polar fluids such as groundwater flow through porous media that have charged mineral surfaces. This is due to the flow-shearing of the diffuse layer of the electric double layer (EDL), which is known to form in the fluid phase at the fluid-rock interface. Previous works have suggested that the EDL vanishes at high pore-fluid ionic strengths resulting in vanishing SP signals. However, recent observations in sea-water intrusion applications by Jackson and coworkers indicate that measurable SP signals are obtainable in flows of fluids with high ionic strengths through silica sand. We demonstrate the repeatability of these observations through a series of laboratory flow experiments performed on 98% silica sand in a falling-head permeameter with brines of concentrations ranging from 0.001M to about 5 M NaCl. The results of the experiments, which clearly show measurable SP signals even at the highest concentration of 5 M NaCl, are reported. They are also used to estimate the hydraulic conductivity and electrokinetic coupling coefficient. The linearity assumption for the relation between pressure and SP differentials is evaluated for high pore-water NaCl concentrations. Additionally, displacement of one brine by another of different NaCl concentration yields dramatic transient SP responses that may be harnessed in the development of early-detection/warning technologies for sea-water intrusion applications. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S Department of Energy.

  9. Toxicity of ammonia in pore-water and in the water column to freshwater benthic invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, F.W.; Kahl, M.D.; Rau, D.M.; Balcer, M.D.; Ankley, G.T.

    1994-12-31

    Ammonia has been mentioned as both a primary toxicant and a factor that can produce false positive results in laboratory sediment tests using benthic invertebrates. This study developed a sediment dosing system that percolates an ammonia solution through sediment to achieve target porewater ammonia concentrations that remain stable over four and ten day spiked sediment tests. Ten day flow-through water-only tests and ten day spiked sediment tests were used to determine the toxicity of ammonia in the water column and in the sediment pore-water to the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and the midge Chironomus tentans. Four-day tests were run with the amphipod Hyalella azteca. The relationship between water column ammonia toxicity and sediment pore-water ammonia toxicity is influenced by the organism`s association with the sediment. For Lumbriculus variegatus and Chironomus tentans that burrow into the sediment and are in direct contact with the porewater, the pore-water LC50 for ammonia is 30--40% higher than the water-only LC50 for each species. Hyalella azteca is epibenthic and avoids ammonia spiked sediment, thus ammonia in the water column is considerably more toxic than the pore-water ammonia with the porewater LC50 about 800% higher than the water only LC50.

  10. Excess pore water pressure due to ground surface erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn Smith, Stefan; Gagniere, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Erosional unloading is the process whereby surface rocks and soil are removed by external processes, resulting in changes to water pressure within the underlying aquifer. We consider a mathematical model of changes in excess pore water pressure as a result of erosional unloading. Neuzil and Pollock (1983) studied this process in the case where the water table initially coincides with the surface. In contrast, we analyze an ideal aquifer which is initially separated from the ground surface by an unsaturated zone. The model is solved using Laplace Transform methods in conjunction with a boost operator derived by King (1985). The boost operator is used to boost the solution (in the Laplace domain) to a frame of reference moving at constant velocity with respect to the original frame. We use our solution to analyze the evolution of the pressure during erosion of the aquifer itself for small and large erosion rates. We also examine the flux at the upper boundary as a function of time and present a quasi-steady approximation valid for very small erosion rates in the appendix.

  11. METHODS FOR PORE WATER EXTRACTION FROM UNSATURATED ZONE TUFF, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    K.M. SCOFIELD

    2006-03-22

    Assessing the performance of the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires an understanding of the chemistry of the water that moves through the host rock. The uniaxial compression method used to extract pore water from samples of tuffaceous borehole core was successful only for nonwelded tuff. An ultracentrifugation method was adopted to extract pore water from samples of the densely welded tuff of the proposed repository horizon. Tests were performed using both methods to determine the efficiency of pore water extraction and the potential effects on pore water chemistry. Test results indicate that uniaxial compression is most efficient for extracting pore water from nonwelded tuff, while ultracentrifugation is more successful in extracting pore water from densely welded tuff. Pore water splits taken from a single nonwelded tuff core during uniaxial compression tests have shown changes in pore water chemistry with increasing pressure for calcium, chloride, sulfate, and nitrate, while the chemistry of pore water splits from welded and nonwelded tuffs using ultracentrifugation indicates that there is no significant fractionation of solutes.

  12. Influence of Water Table Depth on Pore Water Chemistry and Trihalomethane Formation Potential in Peatlands.

    PubMed

    Gough, Rachel; Holliman, Peter J; Fenner, Nathalie; Peacock, Mike; Freeman, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    Drained peatland catchments are reported to produce more colored, dissolved organic carbon (DOC)-rich water, presenting problems for potable water treatment. The blocking of peatland drainage ditches to restore the water table is increasingly being considered as a strategy to address this deterioration in water quality. However, the effect of ditch blocking on the potential of DOC to form trihalomethanes (THMs) has not been assessed. In this study, the effect of peat rewetting on pore water DOC concentration and characteristics (including THM formation potential [THMFP]) was assessed over 12 months using peat cores collected from two drained peatland sites. The data show little evidence of differences in DOC concentration or characteristics between the different treatments. The absence of any difference in the THMFP of pore water between treatments suggests that, in the short term at least, ditch blocking may not have an effect on the THMFP of waters draining peatland catchments. PMID:26803099

  13. 40 CFR 227.31 - Applicable marine water quality criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicable marine water quality... § 227.31 Applicable marine water quality criteria. Applicable marine water quality criteria means the criteria given for marine waters in the EPA publication “Quality Criteria for Water” as published in...

  14. 40 CFR 227.31 - Applicable marine water quality criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicable marine water quality... § 227.31 Applicable marine water quality criteria. Applicable marine water quality criteria means the criteria given for marine waters in the EPA publication “Quality Criteria for Water” as published in...

  15. 40 CFR 227.31 - Applicable marine water quality criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Applicable marine water quality... § 227.31 Applicable marine water quality criteria. Applicable marine water quality criteria means the criteria given for marine waters in the EPA publication “Quality Criteria for Water” as published in...

  16. Geochemistry of Lake Van pore water and sediment, or How to distinguish climatic from diagenetic signals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecien, Ola; Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Randlett, Marie-Eve; Peterse, Francien; Bechtel, Achim; van der Meer, Marcel; Stockhecke, Mona; Bucher, Stefan; Anselmetti, Flavio; Litt, Thomas; Schubert, Carsten J.; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Lake Van is a terminal soda lake located in a semiarid region (eastern Anatolia, Turkey). Its geographical setting makes Lake Van a superb archive of paleoenvironmental changes. One of the aims of the ICDP PALEOVAN project is the reconstruction of the hydrological and climatic variability in the eastern Mediterranean region and the Near East on glacial/interglacial and millennial time scales. We applied a multi-proxy approach to distinguish the environmental synsedimentary imprint and the postsedimentary diagenetic changes. Microfaunal evidence, carbonate isotopic composition (d18O, d13C), molecular proxies (BIT, ACE) and isotopic composition of lipid biomarkers (dD) are matched with isotopic and elemental composition (d18O, dD, Mg, Ca, Sr, Cl, salinity) of sediment pore-water. An excellent correspondence between these proxies indicates that the elemental composition of pore water in Lake Van does not result from diagenetic changes, but, unlike in many cases known from marine environment, represents to some extent relicts of 'paleolake-water'. On the contrary, the stable isotopic composition of the pore water (d18O, dD) seems to reflect more recent hydrological regime dominated by precipitation/evaporation changes. As salinity and chlorine concentration changes mimic the isotopic composition of biomarkers for the last 140 ka, we use pore-water data to quantify changes in the lake level. Our reconstruction (Tomonaga et al., in review) is in line with previous studies on lake terraces (Kuzucuoglu et al., 2010) and seismic surveys (Cukur et al., 2012) showing a major transgression of up to 105 m with respect to the current lake level during the last interglacial (MIS5e), and a major regression of ~145 m at ~30 ka BP during the last glacial. Kuzucuoglu et al. (2010) Formation of the Upper Pleistocene terraces of Lake Van (Turkey). Journal of Quaternary Science 25, 1124-1137. Cukur et al. (2012) Sedimentary evolution of Lake Van (Eastern Turkey) reconstructed from high

  17. The one-dimensional compression method for extraction of pore water from unsaturated tuff and effects on pore-water chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, J.D.; Burger, P.A.; Yang, L.C.

    1997-12-31

    Study of the hydrologic system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires extraction of pore-water samples from unsaturated tuff bedrock. Two generations of compression cells have been designed and tested for extracting representative, unaltered pore-water samples from unsaturated tuff cores. The one-dimensional compression cell has a maximum compressive stress rating of 552 MPa. Results from 86 tests show that the minimum degree of saturation for successful extraction of pore water was about 14% for non welded tuff and about 61% for densely welded tuff. The high-pressure, one-dimensional compression cell has a maximum compressive stress rating of 827 MPa. Results from 109 tests show that the minimum degree of saturation for successful extraction of pore water was about 7.5% for non welded tuff and about 34% for densely welded tuff. Geochemical analyses show that, in general, there is a decrease in ion concentration of pore waters as extraction pressures increase. Only small changes in pore-water composition occur during the one-dimensional extraction test.

  18. Extrusion of transmitter, water and ions generates forces to close fusion pore.

    PubMed

    Tajparast, M; Glavinović, M I

    2009-05-01

    During exocytosis the fusion pore opens rapidly, then dilates gradually, and may subsequently close completely, but what controls its dynamics is not well understood. In this study we focus our attention on forces acting on the pore wall, and which are generated solely by the passage of transmitter, ions and water through the open fusion pore. The transport through the charged cylindrical nano-size pore is simulated using a coupled system of Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier-Stokes equations and the forces that act radially on the wall of the fusion pore are then estimated. Four forces are considered: a) inertial force, b) pressure, c) viscotic force, and d) electrostatic force. The inertial and viscotic forces are small, but the electrostatic force and the pressure are typically significant. High vesicular pressure tends to open the fusion pore, but the pressure induced by the transport of charged particles (glutamate, ions), which is predominant when the pore wall charge density is high tends to close the pore. The electrostatic force, which also depends on the charge density on the pore wall, is weakly repulsive before the pore dilates, but becomes attractive and pronounced as the pore dilates. Given that the vesicular concentration of free transmitter can change rapidly due to the release, or owing to the dissociation from the gel matrix, we evaluated how much and how rapidly a change of the vesicular K(+)-glutamate(-) concentration affects the concentration of glutamate(-) and ions in the pore and how such changes alter the radial force on the wall of the fusion pore. A step-like rise of the vesicular K(+)-glutamate(-) concentration leads to a chain of events. Pore concentration (and efflux) of both K(+) and glutamate(-) rise reaching their new steady-state values in less than 100 ns. Interestingly within a similar time interval the pore concentration of Na(+) also rises, whereas that of Cl(-) diminishes, although their extra-cellular concentration does not

  19. On equilibration of pore water in column leaching tests.

    PubMed

    Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Column leaching tests are closer to natural conditions than batch shaking tests and in the last years have become more popular for assessing the release potential of pollutants from a variety of solids such as contaminated soils, waste, recycling and construction materials. Uncertainties still exist regarding equilibration of the percolating water with the solids, that might potentially lead to underestimation of contaminant concentrations in the effluent. The intention of this paper is to show that equilibration of pore water in a finite bath is fundamentally different from release of a certain fraction of the pollutant from a sample and that equilibrium is reached much faster at low liquid-to-solid ratios typical for column experiments (<0.25) than in batch tests with much higher liquid-to-solid ratios (e.g., 2-10). Two mass transfer mechanisms are elucidated: First-order type release (film diffusion) and intraparticle diffusion. For the latter, mass transfer slows down with time and sooner or later non-equilibrium conditions are observed at the column outlet after percolation has been started. Time scales of equilibrium leaching can be estimated based on a comparison of column length with the length of the mass transfer zone, which is equivalent to a Damköhler number approach. Mass transfer and diffusion coefficients used in this study apply to mass transfer mechanisms limited by diffusion in water, which is typical for release of organic compounds but also for dissolution of soluble minerals such as calcite, gypsum or similar. As a conclusion based on these theoretical considerations column tests (a) equilibrate much faster than batch leaching tests and (b) the equilibrium concentrations are maintained in the column effluent even for slow intraparticle diffusion limited desorption for extended periods of time (>days). Since for equilibration the specific surface area is crucial, the harmonic mean of the grain size is relevant (small grain sizes result in high

  20. Bottom sediments and pore waters near a hydrothermal vent in Lake Baikal (Frolikha Bay)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granina, L.Z.; Klerkx, J.; Callender, E.; Leermakers, M.; Golobokova, L.P.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the redox environments and the compositions of bottom sediments and sedimentary pore waters in the region of a hydrothermal vent in Frolikha Bay, Lake Baikal. According to our results, the submarine vent and its companion nearby spring on land originate from a common source. The most convincing evidence for their relation comes from the proximity of stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions in pore waters and in the spring water. The isotope composition indicates a meteoric origin of pore waters, but their major- and minor-element chemistry bears imprint of deep water which may seep through permeable faulted crust. Although pore waters near the submarine vent have a specific enrichment in major and minor constituents, hydrothermal discharge at the Baikal bottom causes a minor impact on the lake water chemistry, unlike the case of freshwater geothermal lakes in the East-African Rift and North America. ?? 2007.

  1. Diffusive Release of Uranium from Contaminated Sediments into Capillary Fringe Pore Water

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M.; Harsh, James B.

    2012-09-13

    We investigated the dynamics of U release between pore water fractions, during river stage changes from two contaminated capillary fringe sediments. Samples were from 7.0 m and 7.6 m below ground surface (bgs) in the Hanford 300 area. Sediments were packed into columns and saturated with Hanford groundwater for three to 84 days. After specified times, > 48 µm radius (calculated) sediment pores were drained, followed by draining pores to 15 µm radius. U release in the first two weeks was similar between sediments and pore sizes with a range of 4.4 to 5.6 µM U in the 14 day sample. The 7.0 m bgs sediment U declined in the larger pores to 0.22 µM at day 84, whereas the small pores released U to 6.7 µM at day 84. The 7.6 m bgs sediment released 1.4 µM on day 84, in the large pores, but continuously released U from the smaller pores (13.2 uM on day 84). The continuous release of U has resulted in a diffusion gradient from the smaller to larger pores. The observed differences in U pore-water concentrations between the two sediment samples were attributed to co-precipitation of U with carbonates. A mineral phase in the sediments was also identified as an U-carbonate species, similar to rutherfordine [UO2(CO3)].

  2. Stable isotope geochemistry of pore waters from the New Jersey shelf - No evidence for Pleistocene melt water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geldern, Robert; Hayashi, Takeshi; Böttcher, Michael E.; Mottl, Michael J.; Barth, Johannes A. C.; Stadler, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    Ocean Drilling Program, Volume 313, Tokyo, available at: http://publications.iodp.org/proceedings/313/313toc.htm. van Geldern, R., Hayashi, T., Böttcher, M. E., Mottl, M. J., Barth, J. A. C., and Stadler, S., 2013, Stable isotope geochemistry of pore waters and marine sediments from the New Jersey shelf: Methane formation and fluid origin: Geosphere, v. 9, no. 1, p. in press.

  3. The effects of pore structure on the behavior of water in lignite coal and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Nwaka, Daniel; Tahmasebi, Arash; Tian, Lu; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-09-01

    The effects of physical structure (pore structure) on behavior of water in lignite coal and activated carbon (AC) samples were investigated by using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and low-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. AC samples with different pore structures were prepared at 800°C in steam and the results were compared with that of parent lignite coal. The DSC results confirmed the presence of two types of freezable water that freeze at -8°C (free water) and -42°C (freezable bound water). A shift in peak position of free water (FW) towards lower temperature was observed in AC samples compared to the lignite coal with decreasing water loading. The amount of free water (FW) increased with increasing gasification conversion. The amounts of free and freezable bound water (FBW) in AC samples were calculated and correlated to pore volume and average pore size. The amount of FW in AC samples is well correlated to the pore volume and average pore size of the samples, while an opposite trend was observed for FBW. The low-temperature XRD analysis confirmed the existence of non-freezable water (NFW) in coal and AC with the boundary between the freezable and non-freezable water (NFW) determined. PMID:27254256

  4. Relating salt marsh pore water geochemistry patterns to vegetation zones and hydrologic influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, Kevan B.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    2016-03-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological factors influence vegetation zonation in salt marshes and other wetlands, but connections among these factors could be better understood. If salt marsh vegetation and marsh pore water geochemistry coorganize, e.g., via continuous plant water uptake and persistently unsaturated sediments controlling vegetation zone-specific pore water geochemistry, this could complement known physical mechanisms of marsh self-organization. A high-resolution survey of pore water geochemistry was conducted among five salt marsh vegetation zones at the same intertidal elevation. Sampling transects were arrayed both parallel and perpendicular to tidal channels. Pore water geochemistry patterns were both horizontally differentiated, corresponding to vegetation zonation, and vertically differentiated, relating to root influences. The geochemical patterns across the site were less broadly related to marsh hydrology than to vegetation zonation. Mechanisms contributing to geochemical differentiation included: root-induced oxidation and nutrient (P) depletion, surface and creek-bank sediment flushing by rainfall or tides, evapotranspiration creating aerated pore space for partial sediment flushing in some areas while persistently saturated conditions hindered pore water renewal in others, and evapoconcentration of pore water solutes overall. The concentrated pore waters draining to the tidal creeks accounted for 41% of ebb tide solutes (median of 14 elements), including being a potentially toxic source of Ni but a slight sink for Zn, at least during the short, winter study period in southern San Francisco Bay. Heterogeneous vegetation effects on pore water geochemistry are not only significant locally within the marsh but may broadly influence marsh-estuary solute exchange and ecology.

  5. Pore Water Circulation in Isolated Wetlands: Implications to Internal Nutrient Loading.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadha, J. H.; Perkins, D. B.; Jawitz, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    The potential of wetland soils to accumulate and release pollutants including nutrients has been the motivation for numerous studies related to measuring the concentration, fate, and transport mechanisms of these substances in soils. While external nutrient loading from anthropogenic sources such as agricultural and cattle areas can be addressed through the implementation of Best Management Practices (BMPs), and interception strategies such as construction of storm-water treatment areas (STAs) in Florida, internal loading through shallow sediments has prevented the rapid improvement of water quality in numerous watersheds in South Florida, including the Lake Okeechobee drainage basin. The internal release of nutrients can occur via two different yet equally important mechanisms: advection and diffusion. These processes may mix the pore water not only within the sediment but also with the overlying water column over short periods of time (e.g., days or weeks). This provides sufficient time for diagenesis to alter the reactive chemical components of nutrients that may ultimately increase the nutrient fluxes to the overlying water column. The objectives of this research are to present a plausible and testable technique to collect pore water samples from saturated wetland soils, and to evaluate the importance of pore water circulation as a mechanism for mobilizing nutrients into the water column from within shallow sediments in isolated wetlands. Pore water sampling can be a difficult task to perform in low permeable wetland soils using standard sampling devices such as pore water equilibrators (peepers) and mechanical vises (Rheeburg squeezers). However, our attempt at using Multisamplers, which is in fact a multi-level piezometer capable of collecting up to ten pore water samples to a depth of 110 cm below the soil-water interface in a single deployment, proved to be a success. The ability to collect samples from multiple depths from a single location is an important

  6. Dynamics of water in the amphiphilic pore of amyloid β fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GhattyVenkataKrishna, Pavan K.; Mostofian, Barmak

    2013-09-01

    Alzheimers disease related amyloid peptide, Aβ, forms a fibrillar structure through aggregation. The aggregate is stabilized by a salt bridge that is responsible for the formation of an amphiphilic pore that can accommodate water molecules. None of the reported structures of Aβ, however, contain water. We present results from molecular dynamics simulations on dimeric Aβ fibrils solvated in water. Water penetrates and fills the amphiphilic pore increasing its volume. We observe a thick wire of water that is translationally and rotationally stiff in comparison to bulk water and may be essential for the stabilization of the amyloid Aβ protein.

  7. Pore-Water Extraction Scale-Up Study for the SX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Last, George V.; Lanigan, David C.

    2013-01-15

    The phenomena related to pore-water extraction from unsaturated sediments have been previously examined with limited laboratory experiments and numerical modeling. However, key scale-up issues have not yet been addressed. Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling were conducted to specifically examine pore-water extraction for sediment conditions relevant to the vadose zone beneath the SX Tank Farm at Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Available SX Tank Farm data were evaluated to generate a conceptual model of the subsurface for a targeted pore-water extraction application in areas with elevated moisture and Tc-99 concentration. The hydraulic properties of the types of porous media representative of the SX Tank Farm target application were determined using sediment mixtures prepared in the laboratory based on available borehole sediment particle size data. Numerical modeling was used as an evaluation tool for scale-up of pore-water extraction for targeted field applications.

  8. Cryptic clues as to how water-soluble protein toxins form pores in membranes.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael W

    2003-07-01

    Pore-forming protein toxins possess the remarkable property that they can exist either in a stable water-soluble state or as an integral membrane pore. In order to convert from the water-soluble to the membrane state, the toxin must undergo large conformational changes. Recent work on a class of pore-forming toxins that are rich in beta-sheet content suggests a common mechanism of membrane insertion may exist despite these toxins possessing very different primary, tertiary and quaternary structures. PMID:12893054

  9. Analysis of quasi-periodic pore-network structure of centric marine diatom frustules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohoon, Gregory A.; Alvarez, Christine E.; Meyers, Keith; Deheyn, Dimitri D.; Hildebrand, Mark; Kieu, Khanh; Norwood, Robert A.

    2015-03-01

    Diatoms are a common type of phytoplankton characterized by their silica exoskeleton known as a frustule. The diatom frustule is composed of two valves and a series of connecting girdle bands. Each diatom species has a unique frustule shape and valves in particular species display an intricate pattern of pores resembling a photonic crystal structure. We used several numerical techniques to analyze the periodic and quasi-periodic valve pore-network structure in diatoms of the Coscinodiscophyceae order. We quantitatively identify defect locations and pore spacing in the valve and use this information to better understand the optical and biological properties of the diatom.

  10. Dissolved organic matter in anoxic pore waters from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Hatcher, P.G.; Spiker, E. C.; Szeverenyi, N.M.; Maciel, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter and dissolved inorganic chemical species in anoxic pore water from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda sediments were studied to evaluate the role of pore water in the early diagenesis of organic matter. Dissolved sulphate, titration alkalinity, phosphate, and ammonia concentration versus depth profiles were typical of many nearshore clastic sediments and indicated sulphate reduction in the upper 100 cm of sediment. The dissolved organic matter in the pore water was made up predominantly of large molecules, was concentrated from large quantities of pore water by using ultrafiltration and was extensively tudied by using elemental and stable carbon isotope analysis and high-resolution, solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that this material has a predominantly polysaccharide-like structure and in addition contains a large amount of oxygen-containing functional groups (e.g., carboxyl groups). The 13C nulcear magnetic resonance spectra of the high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter resemble those of the organic matter in the surface sediments of Mangrove Lake. We propose that this high-molecular-weight organic matter in pore waters represents the partially degraded, labile organic components of the sedimentary organic matter and that pore waters serve as a conduit for removal of these labile organic components from the sediments. The more refractory components are, thus, selectively preserved in the sediments as humic substances (primarily humin). ?? 1986.

  11. A vacuum-operated pore-water extractor for estuarine and freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    A vacuum-operated pore-water extractor for estuarine and freshwater sediments was developed and constructed from a fused-glass air stone attached with aquarium airline tubing to a 30 or 60 cc polypropylene syringe. Pore water is extracted by inserting the air stone into the sediment and creating a vacuum by retracting and bracing the syringe plunger. A hand-operated vacuum pump attached to a filtration flask was also evaluated as an alternative vacuum source. The volume and time to extract pore water varies with the number of devices and the sediment particle size. Extraction time is longer for fine sediments than for sandy sediments. Four liters of sediment generally yield between 500 and 1,500 mL of pore water. The sediment that surrounds and accumulates on the air stone acts as a filter, and, except for the first few milliliters, the collected pore water is clear. Because there is no exposure to air or avenue for escape, volatile compounds andin situ characteristics are retained in the extracted pore water.

  12. Pore-size dependence and characteristics of water diffusion in slitlike micropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, S. O.

    2015-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the dynamics of water inside microporous activated carbon fibers (ACF) is investigated by means of incoherent elastic and quasielastic neutron-scattering techniques. The aim is to evaluate the effect of increasing pore size on the water dynamics in these primarily hydrophobic slit-shaped channels. Using two different micropore sizes (˜12 and 18 Å, denoted, respectively, ACF-10 and ACF-20), a clear suppression of the mobility of the water molecules is observed as the pore gap or temperature decreases. This suppression is accompanied by a systematic dependence of the average translational diffusion coefficient Dr and relaxation time <τ0> of the restricted water on pore size and temperature. The observed Dr values are tested against a proposed scaling law, in which the translational diffusion coefficient Dr of water within a porous matrix was found to depend solely on two single parameters, a temperature-independent translational diffusion coefficient Dc associated with the water bound to the pore walls and the ratio θ of this strictly confined water to the total water inside the pore, yielding unique characteristic parameters for water transport in these carbon channels across the investigated temperature range.

  13. Pore-size dependence and characteristics of water diffusion in slitlike micropores

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, S. O.

    2015-07-16

    The temperature dependence of the dynamics of water inside microporous activated carbon fibers (ACF) is investigated by means of incoherent elastic and quasielastic neutron-scattering techniques. The aim is to evaluate the effect of increasing pore size on the water dynamics in these primarily hydrophobic slit-shaped channels. Using two different micropore sizes (similar to 12 and 18 angstrom, denoted, respectively, ACF-10 and ACF-20), a clear suppression of the mobility of the water molecules is observed as the pore gap or temperature decreases. Suppression, we found, is accompanied by a systematic dependence of the average translational diffusion coefficient D-r and relaxation time [tau(0)] of the restricted water on pore size and temperature. We observed D-r values and tested against a proposed scaling law, in which the translational diffusion coefficient D-r of water within a porous matrix was found to depend solely on two single parameters, a temperature-independent translational diffusion coefficient D-c associated with the water bound to the pore walls and the ratio theta of this strictly confined water to the total water inside the pore, yielding unique characteristic parameters for water transport in these carbon channels across the investigated temperature range.

  14. Pore-size dependence and characteristics of water diffusion in slitlike micropores

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Diallo, S. O.

    2015-07-16

    The temperature dependence of the dynamics of water inside microporous activated carbon fibers (ACF) is investigated by means of incoherent elastic and quasielastic neutron-scattering techniques. The aim is to evaluate the effect of increasing pore size on the water dynamics in these primarily hydrophobic slit-shaped channels. Using two different micropore sizes (similar to 12 and 18 angstrom, denoted, respectively, ACF-10 and ACF-20), a clear suppression of the mobility of the water molecules is observed as the pore gap or temperature decreases. Suppression, we found, is accompanied by a systematic dependence of the average translational diffusion coefficient D-r and relaxation timemore » [tau(0)] of the restricted water on pore size and temperature. We observed D-r values and tested against a proposed scaling law, in which the translational diffusion coefficient D-r of water within a porous matrix was found to depend solely on two single parameters, a temperature-independent translational diffusion coefficient D-c associated with the water bound to the pore walls and the ratio theta of this strictly confined water to the total water inside the pore, yielding unique characteristic parameters for water transport in these carbon channels across the investigated temperature range.« less

  15. Inorganic and organic sulfur cycling in salt-marsh pore waters

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, G.W. III; Church, T.M.; Scudlark, J.R.; Cosman, M.

    1986-05-09

    Sulfur species in pore waters of the Great Marsh, Delaware, were analyzed seasonally by polarographic methods. The species determined (and their concentrations in micromoles per liter) included inorganic sulfides (less than or equal to3360), polysulfides (less than or equal to326), thiosulfate (less than or equal to104), tetrathionate (less than or equal to302), organic thiols (less than or equal to2411), and organic disulfides (less than or equal to139). Anticipated were bisulfide increases with depth due to sulfate reduction and subsurface sulfate excesses and pH minima, the result of a seasonal redox cycle. Unanticipated was the pervasive presence of thiols (for example, glutathione), particularly during periods of biological production. Salt marshes appear to be unique among marine systems in producing high concentrations of thiols. Polysulfides, thiosulfate, and tetrathionate also exhibited seasonal subsurface maxima. These results suggest a dynamic seasonal cycling of sulfur in salt marshes involving abiological and biological reactions and dissolved and solid sulfur species. The chemosynthetic turnover of pyrite to organic sulfur is a likely pathway for this sulfur cycling. Thus, material, chemical, and energy cycles in wetlands appear to be optimally synergistic.

  16. Wettability and spontaneous penetration of a water drop into hydrophobic pores.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunho; Liang, Hong

    2016-09-01

    The penetration of a water drop into hydrophobic pores reflects its instability on a porous surface. To understand the mechanism of penetration and to predict the behavior of such a drop, an investigation was conducted through experimental study combined theoretical analysis. Water drops with volumes from 0.5 to 15μL were examined on Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates containing pores of 800μm and less in diameter. Results showed a critical condition at which a drop starts to penetrate into a certain sized pore. The critical condition presents a parabolic relationship between the volume of a water drop and the size of a hydrophobic pore. This behavior was due to a net force resulting from Laplace pressure, and capillary pressure. This force was found to be affected by the porosity, wetting angle, and there after the critical condition. The finding of this research will be beneficial for future design of structured surfaces. PMID:27267040

  17. Eutrophication in the northern Adriatic Sea: Pore water and sediment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, D.E.; Berelson, W.M. ); Giordani, P.; Langone, L.; Frignani, M.; Ravaioli, M. )

    1990-01-09

    The northern Adriatic Sea has been plagued by problems of eutrophication. This area is relatively shallow (maximum depth = 60m), becoming stratified during the summer months which inhibits oxygen transport to bottom waters. Anthropogenic nutrient loading in rivers entering the northern Adriatic (Po River being the largest) has increased nutrient input to this system and stimulated algal growth. Cores were collected for studies of pore water and solid phase chemistry at 6 stations in this region. [sup 210]Pb was used to constrain sediment accumulation rates and a range of 0-0.5 cm/yr was determined at different stations. Excess [sup 234]Th was only found in the upper 1-2 cm, suggesting that bioturbation is largely restricted to shallow depths. Pore water profiles show evidence of irrigation, and mean diffusive fluxes for oxygen, silica phosphate and ammonia are generally 20-90% of the fluxes obtained from benthic chamber measurements. This is consistent with previous work in this area in which studies of radon fluxes indicated that irrigation plays an important role in sediment-water exchange. Pore water profiles in the northern portion of the study area (near the Po River Delta) were markedly different than profiles in the south; sediments in the north are substantially more acidic and have high concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate. From the alkalinity vs. TCO[sub 2] relationship in sediment pore waters it appears that differences in reactions involving the reduction of iron oxides and the exchange of magnesium for iron in clays are responsible for this regional difference in pore water properties. Sediments close to the Po apparently undergo more iron-magnesium exchange, while more distal sediments are limited in their ability to do so. Other pore water observations are limited in their ability to do so. Other pore water observations and trends regarding the shape of the silica profiles (which show shallow maxima) will be discussed.

  18. Adsorption of As(V) inside the pores of porous hematite in water.

    PubMed

    Dai, Min; Xia, Ling; Song, Shaoxian; Peng, Changsheng; Lopez-Valdivieso, Alejandro

    2016-04-15

    As(V) adsorption inside the pores of porous hematite in water has been studied in this work. This study was performed on nonporous hematite and porous hematite prepared from the thermal decomposition of goethite and siderite through the measurements of adsorption isotherm, SEM-EDX, XRD and BET. The results demonstrated that the As(V) adsorption was difficult to be realized inside pores if they were too small. This observation might be due to that the pore entrances were blocked by the adsorbed ions and thus the inside surfaces became invalid for the adsorption. Only if the pore size is large enough, the effective surface area inside pores would be close to that on non-porous hematite for As(V) adsorption. In addition, it was found that siderite is better than goethite for preparing porous hematite with thermal decomposition as adsorbent for arsenic removal. PMID:26799222

  19. Bioavailability of trace contaminants ({sup 241}Am, {sup 57}Co, {sup 137}Cs) to a benthic bivalve from pore waters and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, C.; Stupakoff, I.; Fisher, N.S.

    1995-12-31

    Sediments are major repositories of contaminants in marine ecosystems and can serve as a source of some contaminants for benthic organisms. The authors used the clam Macoma balthica, a species employed in monitoring coastal contamination, to compare experimentally three uptake sources: overlying water, ingested surface sediment and anoxic pore water. They studied the bioavailability of selected radionuclides ({sup 241}Am, {sup 57}Co, {sup 137}Cs) representing a large range of particle reactivity. For comparison, the authors also used CH{sub 3} {sup 203}Hg, which is highly assimilated by marine organisms. Clams were exposed separately to contaminated overlying water, surface oxic sediment and anoxic sediment. Radioactivity in animals was determined at the end of the exposure period. {sup 137}CS, which is not particle reactive in seawater, was not bioaccumulated from any source. {sup 241}Am and {sup 57}Co concentration factors in clams obtained from overlying water were approximately an order of magnitude lower than that of CH{sub 3} {sup 203}Hg. Ingested oxidized sediment particles do not appear to be a significant source for these radionuclides. {sup 241}Am, {sup 57}Co and CH{sub 3} {sup 203}Hg were bioconcentrated from anoxic pore waters, but the highly particle-reactive {sup 241}Am was mostly adsorbed onto the clam`s shell. The bioconcentration of CH{sub 3} {sup 203}Hg from pore waters was, however, only one tenth of that from overlying water.

  20. Mechanisms of water interaction with pore systems of hydrochar and pyrochar from poplar forestry waste.

    PubMed

    Conte, Pellegrino; Hanke, Ulrich M; Marsala, Valentina; Cimò, Giulia; Alonzo, Giuseppe; Glaser, Bruno

    2014-05-28

    The aim of this study was to understand the water-surface interactions of two chars obtained by gasification (pyrochar) and hydrothermal carbonization (hydrochar) of a poplar biomass. The two samples revealed different chemical compositions as evidenced by solid state (13)C NMR spectroscopy. In fact, hydrochar resulted in a lignin-like material still containing oxygenated functionalities. Pyrochar was a polyaromatic system in which no heteronuclei were detected. After saturation with water, hydrochar and pyrochar were analyzed by fast field cycling (FFC) NMR relaxometry. Results showed that water movement in hydrochar was mainly confined in very small pores. Conversely, water movement in pyrochar led to the conclusion that a larger number of transitional and very large pores were present. These results were confirmed by porosity evaluation derived from gas adsorption. Variable-temperature FFC NMR experiments confirmed a slow-motion regime due to a preferential diffusion of water on the solid surface. Conversely, the higher number of large pores in pyrochar allowed slow movement only up to 50 °C. As the temperature was raised to 80 °C, water interactions with the pore surface became weaker, thereby allowing a three-dimensional water exchange with the bulk liquid. This paper has shown that pore size distribution was more important than chemical composition in affecting water movement in two chemically different charred systems. PMID:24814907

  1. Paleo-hydrological history in pore water extracted from sedimentary rocks in the coastal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, R.; Machida, I.; Koshigai, M.; Nishizaki, S.; Marui, A.; Yoshizawa, T.; Ito, N.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past decade, new utilization methods of underground space development such as geological disposal of high level radioactive waste (HLW) and carbon capture and storage (CCS) have been important issues under discussion in Japan. Coastal areas have been identified as suitable candidate sites for such projects. A good understanding of the structure of seawater/freshwater interface and fault is important due to the fact that it serves as a preferential pathway through which radionuclide can be transported by means of groundwater. There is, however, little available information worldwide on deep groundwater studies in coastal areas. There is also virtually no study has been conducted on the behavior of groundwater and pore water in coastal impermeable sedimentary rocks. In this study, large scale core drilling (1000m depth) has been carried out in coastal area at Hamasato in the Horonobe area of Hokkaido, Japan in order to investigate the geological structure and deep groundwater flow system with the residence time. Pore water with various adsorptivity from drilling core samples was gradually collected by centrifugation and squeezing methods and analyzed for water chemistry. This is aimed at estimating the paleo-hydrological history of the coastal environment by geochemical information from the pore water. Lithoface in the study area consists of sandy r and alternate (sandy and silty) layers intercalations up to 250m deep. Below 250m, shows sand and silt layers. Pore water volume collected in the sand layers by centrifugation method was almost same, contrary to that in the silt layers which decreased with depth. On the other hand, the ratio of pore water with high adsorpivity in silt layers increased with depth. Except the surface layer (<50m), electric conductivity (EC) and Cl values in pore water samples increased with depth below 300m. In this study, we report on the characteristics of seawater/freshwater interface and deep groundwater flow system based on

  2. The representativeness of pore water samples collected from the unsaturated zone using pressure-vacuum lysimeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, C.A.; Healy, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have indicated that the chemistry of water samples may be altered by the collection technique, creating concern about the representativeness of the pore water samples obtained. A study using soil water pressure-vacuum lysimeters in outwash sand and glacial till deposits demonstrates that for non-dilute-solution samples the effect of pH of sampling with lysimeters is minimal, and that measured major cation and anion concentrations are representative of the natural pore water; trace-metal concentrations can be significantly altered by collection procedures at low concentrations. -from Authors

  3. Pore Water Geochemistry of IODP Exp 315 and 316: The NanTroSEIZE Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, C. G.; Hulme, S.; Tomaru, H.; Liljedahl, L. C.; Solomon, E.

    2008-12-01

    IODP Exp 315 and 316 drilled six sites as part of the first stage of NanTroSEIZE, an international, multi-year endeavor to elucidate earthquake-related processes. These six sites form a transect southeast of the Kumano Basin, Japan with boreholes that penetrated the Kumano forarc basin (C0002), the megasplay fault region (C0001, C0004, and C0008) and the frontal thrust including sediment from the subducting plate (C0006 and C0007). One element of this drilling is to evaluate the relationship between pore fluid behavior and slip and deformation in the crust. To help address this relationship 322 pore water samples were extracted from sediment whole rounds. Each of the whole rounds was scanned (CT) before it was processed within a nitrogen-filled glove bag and squeezed to express the pore fluid. In addition, 15 samples from C0002 underwent the GRIND technique to gather baseline pore water chemical data for future deep drilling where highly indurated sediments likely exist. Each of these pore water samples underwent a range of analytical procedures at sea. Additional procedures were conducted ashore. Combined, these procedures resulted in data for 30 chemical species including the stable isotopic composition of O and H in water. These data provide the most thorough preliminary reports tables in the history of DSDP, ODP and IODP, and ongoing measurements include a range of isotopic (e.g., I, B, Sr, Li, C), ionic (e.g., REE), and organic measurements. We will present all of the data that appear in the preliminary reports including GRIND samples for comparison to squeezed samples. Our presentation will highlight changes in pore water composition along the transect of boreholes, putting individual site-related pore water chemical profiles in a broader context. Pore water profiles in the upper about 30 m of the sediment column are dominated by microbially mediated reactions with a highly defined sulfate-methane transition. Deeper within the sediment the dissociation of gas

  4. Confined Water Determines Transport Properties of Guest Molecules in Narrow Pores.

    PubMed

    Phan, Anh; Cole, David R; Weiß, R Gregor; Dzubiella, Joachim; Striolo, Alberto

    2016-08-23

    We computed the transport of methane through 1 nm wide slit-shaped pores carved out of solid substrates. Models for silica, magnesium oxide, and alumina were used as solid substrates. The pores were filled with water. The results show that the methane permeability through the hydrated pores is strongly dependent on the solid substrate. Detailed analysis of the simulated systems reveals that local properties of confined water, including its structure, and more importantly, evolution of solvation free energy and hydrogen bond structure are responsible for the pronounced differences observed. The simulations are extended to multicomponent systems representative of natural gas, containing methane, ethane, and H2S. The results show that all pores considered have high affinity for H2S, moderate affinity for methane, and low affinity for ethane. The H2S/methane transport selectivity through the hydrated alumina pore is comparable, or superior, to that reported for existing commercial membranes. A multiscale approach was then implemented to demonstrate that a Smoluchowski one-dimensional model is able to reproduce the molecular-level results for short pores when appropriate values for the local self-diffusion coefficients are used as input parameters. We propose that the model can be extended to predict methane transport through uniform hydrated pores of macroscopic length. When verified by experiments, our simulation results could have important implications in applications such as natural gas sweetening and predictions of methane migration through hydraulically fractured shale formations. PMID:27490280

  5. Pore-Water Extraction Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.

    2011-06-30

    A series of flow cell experiments was conducted to demonstrate the process of water removal through pore-water extraction in unsaturated systems. In this process, a vacuum (negative pressure) is applied at the extraction well establishing gas and water pressure gradients towards the well. The gradient may force water and dissolved contaminants, such as 99Tc, to move towards the well. The tested flow cell configurations consist of packings, with or without fine-grained well pack material, representing, in terms of particle size distribution, subsurface sediments at the SX tank farm. A pore water extraction process should not be considered to be equal to soil vapor extraction because during soil vapor extraction, the main goal may be to maximize gas removal. For pore water extraction systems, pressure gradients in both the gas and water phases need to be considered while for soil vapor extraction purposes, gas phase flow is the only concern. In general, based on the limited set (six) of flow experiments that were conducted, it can be concluded that pore water extraction rates and cumulative outflow are related to water content, the applied vacuum, and the dimensions of the sediment layer providing the extracted water. In particular, it was observed that application of a 100-cm vacuum (negative pressure) in a controlled manner leads to pore-water extraction until the water pressure gradients towards the well approach zero. Increased cumulative outflow was obtained with an increase in initial water content from 0.11 to 0.18, an increase in the applied vacuum to 200 cm, and when the water-supplying sediment was not limited. The experimental matrix was not sufficiently large to come to conclusions regarding maximizing cumulative outflow.

  6. Dynamics of pore-water and salt in estuarine marshes subjected to tide and evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Shen, C.; Li, L.; Lockington, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Salt dynamics in estuarine tidal marshes are strongly associated with their intrinsic hydrological processes and ecological behaviors, which are not well understood. Numerical simulations were carried out to investigate the transport and distribution of pore water and salt in a vertical cross section perpendicular to the tidal creek that subjects to spring-neap tide and evaporation. Vaporizing pore water from unsaturated soil surface with salt left in soils, the time-variant actual evaporation is affected by aerodynamic factors as well as soil conditions, including pore-water saturation, solute concentration and the thickness of salt precipitation above the soil surface (efflorescence). Different simulation cases were performed by adjusting the tidal signal, marsh platform slope and soil properties. The simulation analysis indicates that, the tide-averaged soil salinity increases with the reduction of inundation period in a spring-neap tide cycle. As the salt accumulated by evaporation could leave soil from seepage back to seawater during ebbtide, the pore-water salinity at the surface within the tidal range remains close to that of seawater. With the presence of hyper-saline soil and efflorescence, salt flat develops only in the area where capillary connection between evaporating surface and water-saturated soil is maintained while tidal inundation absent. On the contrary, the sandy supratidal marsh where hydrological connections are disrupted keeps a relatively low soil salinity (40-60 ppt) and pore-water saturation as evaporation remains low throughout the tidal cycles.

  7. Mapping the fluid flow of the Mariana Mounds ridge flank hydrothermal system: Pore water chemical tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, C.G.; McDuff, R.E.

    1995-05-10

    The authors present a conceptual model of fluid circulation in a ridge flank hydrothermal system, the Mariana Mounds. The model is based on chemical data from pore waters extracted from piston cores and from push cores collected by deep-sea research vessel Alvin in small, meter-sized mounds situated on a local topographic high. These mounds are located within a region of heat flow exceeding that calculated from a conductive model and are zones of strong pore water upflow. The authors have interpreted the chemical data with time-dependent transport-reaction models to estimate pore water velocities. In the mounds themselves pore water velocities reach several meters per year to kilometers per year. Within about 100 m from these zones of focused upflow velocities decrease to several centimeters per year up to tens of centimeters per year. A large area of low heat flow surrounds these heat flow and topographic highs, with upwelling pore water velocities less than 2 cm/yr. In some nearby cores, downwelling of bottom seawater is evident but at speeds less than 2 cm/yr. Downwelling through the sediments appears to be a minor source of seawater recharge to the basaltic basement. The authors conclude that the principal source of seawater recharge to basement is where basement outcrops exist, most likely a scarpt about 2-4 km to the east and southeast of the study area. 71 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Mapping the fluid flow of the Mariana Mounds ridge flank hydrothermal system: Pore water chemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; McDuff, Russell E.

    1995-01-01

    We present a conceptual model of fluid circulation in a ridge flank hydrothermal system, the Mariana Mounds. The model is based on chemical data from pore waters extracted from piston cores and from push cores collected by deep-sea research vessel Alvin in small, meter-sized mounds situated on a local topographic high. These mounds are located within a region of heat flow exceeding that calculated from a conductive model and are zones of strong pore water upflow. We have interpreted the chemical data with time-dependent transport-reaction models to estimate pore water velocities. In the mounds themselves pore water velocities reach several meters per year to kilometers per year. Within about 100 m from these zones of focused upflow velocities decrease to several centimeters per year up to tens of centimeters per year. A larger area of low heat flow surrounds these heat flow and topographic highs, with upwelling pore water velocities less than 2 cm/yr. In some nearby cores, downwelling of bottom seawater is evident but at speeds less than 2 cm/yr. Downwelling through the sediments appears to be a minor source of seawater recharge to the basaltic basement. We conclude that the principal source of seawater recharge to basement is where basement outcrops exist, most likely a scarp about 2-4 km to the east and southeast of the study area.

  9. Sediment Core Sectioning and Extraction of Pore Waters under Anoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Keimowitz, Alison R; Zheng, Yan; Lee, Ming-Kuo; Natter, Michael; Keevan, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for sectioning sediment cores and extracting pore waters while maintaining oxygen-free conditions. A simple, inexpensive system is built and can be transported to a temporary work space close to field sampling site(s) to facilitate rapid analysis. Cores are extruded into a portable glove bag, where they are sectioned and each 1-3 cm thick section (depending on core diameter) is sealed into 50 ml centrifuge tubes. Pore waters are separated with centrifugation outside of the glove bag and then returned to the glove bag for separation from the sediment. These extracted pore water samples can be analyzed immediately. Immediate analyses of redox sensitive species, such as sulfide, iron speciation, and arsenic speciation indicate that oxidation of pore waters is minimal; some samples show approximately 100% of the reduced species, e.g. 100% Fe(II) with no detectable Fe(III). Both sediment and pore water samples can be preserved to maintain chemical species for further analysis upon return to the laboratory. PMID:27023267

  10. Rare earth element geochemistry in cold-seep pore waters of Hydrate Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmler, Tobias; Haley, Brian A.; Torres, Marta E.; Klinkhammer, Gary P.; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Peckmann, Jörn

    2013-07-01

    The concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs), sulphate, hydrogen sulphide, total alkalinity, calcium, magnesium and phosphate were measured in shallow (<12 cm below seafloor) pore waters from cold-seep sediments on the northern and southern summits of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon. Downward-decreasing sulphate and coevally increasing sulphide concentrations reveal sulphate reduction as dominant early diagenetic process from ~2 cm depth downwards. A strong increase of total dissolved REE (∑REE) concentrations is evident immediately below the sediment-water interface, which can be related to early diagenetic release of REEs into pore water resulting from the re-mineralization of particulate organic matter. The highest pore water ∑REE concentrations were measured close to the sediment-water interface at ~2 cm depth. Distinct shale-normalized REE patterns point to particulate organic matter and iron oxides as main REE sources in the upper ~2-cm depth interval. In general, the pore waters have shale-normalized patterns reflecting heavy REE (HREE) enrichment, which suggests preferential complexation of HREEs with carbonate ions. Below ~2 cm depth, a downward decrease in ∑REE correlates with a decrease in pore water calcium concentrations. At this depth, the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulphate reduction increases carbonate alkalinity through the production of bicarbonate, which results in the precipitation of carbonate minerals. It seems therefore likely that the REEs and calcium are consumed during vast AOM-induced precipitation of carbonate in shallow Hydrate Ridge sediments. The analysis of pore waters from Hydrate Ridge shed new light on early diagenetic processes at cold seeps, corroborating the great potential of REEs to identify geochemical processes and to constrain environmental conditions.

  11. Pore-size dependent THz absorption of nano-confined water.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chi-Kuang; You, Borwen; Huang, Yu-Ru; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Sato, Shusaku; Irisawa, Akiyoshi; Imamura, Motoki; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-06-15

    We performed a THz absorption spectroscopy study on liquid water confined in mesoporous silica materials, MCM-41-S-18 and MCM-41-S-21, of two different pore sizes at room temperatures. We found that stronger confinement with a smaller pore size causes reduced THz absorption, indicating reduced water mobility due to confinement. Combined with recent theoretical studies showing that the microscopic structure of water inside the nanopores can be separated into a core water region and an interfacial water region, our spectroscopy analysis further reveals a bulk-water-like THz absorption behavior in the core water region and a solid-like THz absorption behavior in the interfacial water region. PMID:26076248

  12. Effect of the hydroaffinity and topology of pore walls on the structure and dynamics of confined water

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, Michael F. Klameth, Felix; Drossel, Barbara; Vogel, Michael

    2015-01-21

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to observe the structure and dynamics of SPC/E water in amorphous silica pores and amorphous ice pores with radii slightly larger than 10 Å. In addition to atomically rough pores, we construct completely smooth pores such that the potential felt at a given distance from the pore wall is an averaged atomic potential. As compared to rough walls, smooth walls induce stronger distortions of water structure for both silica and ice confinements. On the other hand, unlike the smooth pores, the rough pores strongly slow down water dynamics at the pore wall. The slowdown vanishes when reducing the atomic charges in the wall, i.e., when varying the hydroaffinity, while keeping the surface topology, indicating that it is not a geometric effect. Rather, it is due to the fact that the wall atoms provide a static energy landscape along the surface, e.g., fixed anchor-points for hydrogen bonds, to which the water molecules need to adapt, blocking channels for structural rearrangement. In the smooth pores, water dynamics can be faster than in the bulk liquid not only at the pore wall but also in the pore center. Changes in the tetrahedral order rather than in the local density are identified as the main cause for this change of the dynamical behavior in the center of smooth pores.

  13. A simple pore water hydrogen diffusion syringe sampler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is an important intermediate product and electron donor in microbial metabolism. Concentrations of dissolved H 2 are often diagnostic of the predominant terminal electron-accepting processes in ground water systems or aquatic sediments. H2 concentrations are routinely measured in ground water monitoring wells but are rarely measured in saturated aquatic sediments due to a lack of simple and practical sampling methods. This report describes the design and development (including laboratory and field testing) of a simple, syringe-based H 2 sampler in (1) saturated, riparian sediments, (2) surface water bed sediments, and (3) packed intervals of a fractured bedrock borehole that are inaccessible by standard pumped methods. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  14. Distribution of dissolved silver in marine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriada, J. L.; Achterberg, E. P.; Tappin, A.; Truscott, J.

    2003-04-01

    Silver is one of the most toxic heavy metals, surpassed only by mercury [1-3]. Monitoring of dissolved silver concentrations in natural waters is therefore of great importance. The determination of dissolved silver in waters is not without challenges, because of its low (picomolar) concentrations. Consequently, there are only a few reported studies in marine waters, which have been performed in USA [4-6] and Japan [7]. The analytical techniques used in the reported studies for the determination of silver in seawater were Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (GFAAS) after solvent extraction [2,4,5], and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) after solvent extraction or solid phase extraction [7,8]. In this contribution, we will present an optimised Magnetic Sector (MS) ICP-MS technique for the determination of dissolved silver in marine waters. The MS-ICP-MS method used anion exchange column to preconcentrate silver from saline waters, and to remove the saline matrix. The ICP-MS method has been used successfully to determine total dissolved silver in estuarine and oceanic samples. Bibliography 1. H. T. Ratte, Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 1999, 18: p. 89-108. 2. R. T. Herrin, A. W. Andren and D. E. Armstrong, Environ. Sci. Technol. 2001, 35: 1953-1958. 3. D. E. Schildkraut, P. T. Dao, J. P. Twist, A. T. Davis and K. A. Robillard, Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 1998, 17: 642-649. 4. E. Breuer, S. A. Sanudo-Wilhelmy and R. C. Aller, Estuaries. 1999, 22:603-615. 5. A. R. Flegal, S. A. Sanudowilhelmy and G. M. Scelfo, Mar. Chem. 1995, 49: 315-320. 6. S. N. Luoma, Y. B. Ho and G. W. Bryan, Mar. Pollut. Bull. 1995, 31: 44-54. 7. Y. Zhang, H. Amakawa and Y. Nozaki, Mar. Chem. 2001, 75: 151-163. 8. L. Yang and R. E. Sturgeon, J. Anal. At. Spectrom. 2002, 17: 88-93.

  15. Characterizing pore sizes and water structure in stimuli-responsive hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A.S.; Antonsen, K.P.; Ashida, T.; Bohnert, J.L.; Dong, L.C.; Nabeshima, Y.; Nagamatsu, S.; Park, T.G.; Sheu, M.S.; Wu, X.S.; Yan, Q.

    1993-12-31

    Hydrogels have been extensively investigated as potential matrices for drug delivery. In particular, hydrogels responsive to pH and temperature changes have been of greatest interest most recently. Proteins and peptide drugs are especially relevant for delivery from such hydrogel matrices due to the relatively {open_quotes}passive{close_quotes} and biocompatible microenvironment which should exist within the hydrogel aqueous pores. The large molecular size of many proteins requires an interconnected large pore structure. Furthermore, the gel pore {open_quotes}walls{close_quotes} should not provide hydrophobic sites for strong interactions with proteins. In the special case of ion exchange release the protein would be attracted by opposite charges on the polymer backbones. Therefore, it is important both to control and to characterize the pore structure and the water character within a hydrogel to be used or protein or peptide drug delivery. This talk will critically review techniques for estimating these two key parameters in hydrogels.

  16. Effects of macro-pores on water flow in coastal subsurface drainage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Pei; Yu, Xiayang; Lu, Chunhui; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Leaching through subsurface drainage systems has been widely adopted to ameliorate saline soils. The application of this method to remove salt from reclaimed lands in the coastal zone, however, may be impacted by macro-pores such as crab burrows, which are commonly distributed in the soils. We developed a three-dimensional model to investigate water flow in subsurface drainage systems affected by macro-pores distributed deterministically and randomly through Monte Carlo simulations. The results showed that, for subsurface drainage systems under the condition of continuous surface ponding, macro-pores increased the hydraulic head in the deep soil, which in turn reduced the hydraulic gradient between the surface and deep soil. As a consequence, water infiltration across the soil surface was inhibited. Since salt transport in the soil is dominated by advection, the flow simulation results indicated that macro-pores decreased the efficiency of salt leaching by one order of magnitude, in terms of both the elapsed time and the amount of water required to remove salt over the designed soil leaching depth (0.6 m). The reduction of the leaching efficiency was even greater in drainage systems with a layered soil stratigraphy. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that with an increased penetration depth or density of macro-pores, the leaching efficiency decreased further. The revealed impact of macro-pores on water flow represents a significant shortcoming of the salt leaching technique when applied to coastal saline soils. Future designs of soil amelioration schemes in the coastal zone should consider and aim to minimize the bypassing effect caused by macro-pores.

  17. Processes controlling the seasonal and spatial variations in sulfate profiles in the pore water of the sediments surrounding Qi'ao Island, Pearl River Estuary, Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zijun; Zhou, Huaiyang; Ren, Dezhang; Gao, Hang; Li, Jiangtao

    2015-04-01

    Marine sediments are the main sink for seawater sulfate and bacterial sulfate reduction is a major component of the global sulfur cycle. Nevertheless, the factors controlling sulfate reduction in the coastal estuary sediments that undergo spatial and temporal variations are still not fully understood. In this study, we measured the concentrations of SO42-, Cl-, CH4, and DIC, and the δ13C of DIC in the pore water of five sampling stations surrounding the Qi'ao Island, Pearl River Estuary, Southern China during the dry season in November 2011 and during the wet season in May 2012. The results showed that the dilution-mixing of the Pearl River with low-concentration sulfate significantly affects the downcore profiles of the sulfate concentrations in the pore water of these estuary sediments. During the wet season, the dilution-mixing of the layers from the top of the sediments to a depth of 14-18 cm occurred at the different sampling stations. In this layer, the sulfate reduction is not appreciable based on the plot of the pore water Cl- and SO42-. Below the dilution-mixing layers, however, sulfate reduction that is driven by the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) occurs. In our comparison, it appeared that the AOM played more important role in the consumption of the pore water sulfate in May 2012 than in November 2011. Meanwhile, we observed a relatively good correlation (r2=0.64) between the depth of the sulfate-methane interface (SMI) and the sulfate concentration in the pore water of the top sediments in dry season, indicating that the pore water sulfate concentration appears to be a primary controlling factor for the depth of the SMI in this estuary. These results highlight the need for an integrated analysis of the hydrologically driven the variations in the sulfate profiles to improve our understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe and S and their budgets in estuarine environments.

  18. Prediction of pore-water pressure response to rainfall using support vector regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babangida, Nuraddeen Muhammad; Mustafa, Muhammad Raza Ul; Yusuf, Khamaruzaman Wan; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear complex behavior of pore-water pressure responses to rainfall was modelled using support vector regression (SVR). Pore-water pressure can rise to disturbing levels that may result in slope failure during or after rainfall. Traditionally, monitoring slope pore-water pressure responses to rainfall is tedious and expensive, in that the slope must be instrumented with necessary monitors. Data on rainfall and corresponding responses of pore-water pressure were collected from such a monitoring program at a slope site in Malaysia and used to develop SVR models to predict pore-water pressure fluctuations. Three models, based on their different input configurations, were developed. SVR optimum meta-parameters were obtained using k-fold cross validation and a grid search. Model type 3 was adjudged the best among the models and was used to predict three other points on the slope. For each point, lag intervals of 30 min, 1 h and 2 h were used to make the predictions. The SVR model predictions were compared with predictions made by an artificial neural network model; overall, the SVR model showed slightly better results. Uncertainty quantification analysis was also performed for further model assessment. The uncertainty components were found to be low and tolerable, with d-factor of 0.14 and 74 % of observed data falling within the 95 % confidence bound. The study demonstrated that the SVR model is effective in providing an accurate and quick means of obtaining pore-water pressure response, which may be vital in systems where response information is urgently needed.

  19. Scaling Soil Microbe-Water Interactions from Pores to Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, S.; Katul, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial scales relevant to soil microbial activity are much finer than scales relevant to whole-ecosystem function and biogeochemical cycling. On the one hand, how to link such different scales and develop scale-aware biogeochemical and ecohydrological models remains a major challenge. On the other hand, resolving these linkages is becoming necessary for testing ecological hypotheses and resolving data-theory inconsistencies. Here, the relation between microbial respiration and soil moisture expressed in water potential is explored. Such relation mediates the water availability effects on ecosystem-level heterotrophic respiration and is of paramount importance for understanding CO2 emissions under increasingly variable rainfall regimes. Respiration has been shown to decline as the soil dries in a remarkably consistent way across climates and soil types (open triangles in Figure). Empirical models based on these respiration-moisture relations are routinely used in Earth System Models to predict moisture effects on ecosystem respiration. It has been hypothesized that this consistency in microbial respiration decline is due to breakage of water film continuity causing in turn solute diffusion limitations in dry conditions. However, this hypothesis appears to be at odds with what is known about soil hydraulic properties. Water film continuity estimated from soil water retention (SWR) measurements at the 'Darcy' scale breaks at far less negative water potential (<-0.1 MPa) levels than where microbial respiration ceases (approximately -15 MPa) as shown in the Figure (violet frequency distribution). Also, this threshold point inferred from SWR shows strong texture dependence, in contrast to the respiration curves. Employing theoretical tools from percolation theory, it is demonstrated that hydrological measurements can be spatially downscaled at a micro-level relevant to microbial activity. Such downscaling resolves the inconsistency between respiration thresholds and

  20. Water Imbibition into Rock as Affected by Sample Shape, Pore, Conductivity, and Antecedent Water Content

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Ewing

    2005-08-29

    Infiltration is often presumed to follow Philip's equation, I = st{sup 1/2}, where I is cumulative infiltration, s is sorptivity, and t is time. This form of the equation is appropriate for short times, and/or for negligible gravitational effects. For a uniform soil, this equation describes a plot of log(mass imbibed) versus log(time), with a slope (imbibition exponent) of 1/2. The equation has also been applied to low-porosity rocks, where the extremely small pores render gravitational forces negligible. Experiments recently performed on a wide variety of rocks produced imbibition exponents from 0.2 to 0.5. Many rock types showed initial imbibition proceeding as I {approx} t{sup 1/4}, then later switched to ''normal'' (t{sup 1/2}) behavior. The distance to the wetting front that corresponds to this cross-over behavior was found to be related to the sample shape: tall thin samples are more likely to exhibit the exponent 1/4, and to cross over to 1/2-type behavior later, while short, squat samples are less likely to display the 1/4-type behavior at all. Additionally, the exponents are sensitive to antecedent water content, with initially wetter samples having smaller values. In this study, we present the experimental data, and provide a consistent and physically-based explanation using percolation theory. The analogy between imbibition and diffusion is used to model imbibition into samples with low pore connectivity, with the exponents and their crossover behavior emerging from a random walk process. All laboratory phenomena--different exponents, crossover behavior, and effects of sample shape and antecedent water content--are reproduced by the model, with similar patterns across experiment and simulation. We conclude both that diffusion is a useful and powerful conceptual model for understanding imbibition, and also that imbibition experiments, being simpler than diffusion measurements, can be used to examine diffusive behavior in rock.

  1. Field Test Design Simulations of Pore-Water Extraction for the SX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus

    2013-09-01

    A proof of principle test of pore water extraction is being performed by Washington River Protection Solutions for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection. This test is being conducted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) (Ecology et al. 1989) Milestone M 045-20, and is described in RPP-PLAN-53808, 200 West Area Tank Farms Interim Measures Investigation Work Plan. To support design of this test, numerical simulations were conducted to help define equipment and operational parameters. The modeling effort builds from information collected in laboratory studies and from field characterization information collected at the test site near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. Numerical simulations were used to evaluate pore-water extraction performance as a function of the test site properties and for the type of extraction well configuration that can be constructed using the direct-push installation technique. Output of simulations included rates of water and soil-gas production as a function of operational conditions for use in supporting field equipment design. The simulations also investigated the impact of subsurface heterogeneities in sediment properties and moisture distribution on pore-water extraction performance. Phenomena near the extraction well were also investigated because of their importance for pore-water extraction performance.

  2. Effects of soil stratigraphy on pore-water flow in a creek-marsh system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Pei; Kong, Jun; Li, Ling; Barry, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    SummaryIn coastal marshes, low-permeability mud is often found overlying high permeability sandy deposits. A recently developed 3D creek-marsh model was used to investigate the effects of soil stratigraphy (a mud layer overlying a sandy-loam layer) on pore-water flow in the marsh. Simulation results showed significant modifications of tide-induced pore-water flow due to the layered soil. The presence of the lower sandy-loam layer with a relatively high hydraulic conductivity not only increased the pore-water flow speed but also changed the flow direction, particularly in the upper mud layer where enhanced vertical flow dominated. Particle tracking revealed large changes in the overall pore-water circulation pattern, and associated particle travel path and time due to the influence of the soil stratigraphy. While the amount of water exchange between the marsh soil and tidal water increased, the residence time of particles in both soil layers was reduced. Sensitivity analysis showed the importance of soil compressibility, capillary rise and hydraulic conductivity contrast between the soil layers in modulating the effect of soil stratigraphy. In particular, the total net influx and efflux across the marsh surface (including the creek/channel bank and bed) increased proportionally with the square root of the lower layer's hydraulic conductivity. These results demonstrated the interplay of tides, marsh topography and soil stratigraphy in controlling the pore-water flow characteristics, which underpin solute transport and transformation as well as the aeration condition in the marsh soil.

  3. Paradoxical One-ion Pore Behavior of the Long β-Helical Peptide of Marine Cytotoxic Polytheonamide B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Masayuki; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Oiki, Shigetoshi

    2014-01-01

    The cytotoxic 48-mer peptide, polytheonamide B (pTB), from a marine sponge forms a β6.3-helix with an inner diameter of 4 Å and a length of 45 Å, features that allow the selective permeation of monovalent cations across targeted cell membranes. To characterize this long, narrow pore, electrophysiological examination using a planar lipid bilayer method was performed. The single-channel current amplitude exhibited saturation for concentrated Cs+ or K+ solution, and the reversal potential in mixed solutions did not exhibit any anomalous mole-fraction behavior. These results suggest the one-ion permeation mechanism. This is in contrast to the short (26 Å) β6.3-helical gramicidin channel, which holds two ions simultaneously. The paradoxical one-ion permeation through the long pTB channel was modeled with a discrete-state Markov model. Ions permeate through the channel by stepping between two binding sites in the pore, but never occupy these sites simultaneously in either pure or mixed ion solution.

  4. Polymerization and Functionalization of Membrane Pores for Water Related Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) was modified by chemical treatments in order to create active double bonds to obtain covalent grafting of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) on membrane. The attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrum confirms the formation of conjugated C=C double bonds with surface dehydrofluorination. The membrane morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface composition was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The thermal stability of the dehydrofluorinated membrane (Def-PVDF) and functionalized membranes were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. The influence of covalently attached PAA on Def-PVDF membrane has been investigated to determine its effect on the transport of water and charged solute. Variations in the solution pH show an effect on both permeability and solute retention in a reversible fashion. Metal nanoparticles were also immobilized in the membrane for the degradation of toxic chlorinated organics from water. In addition, PVDF membranes with an asymmetric and sponge-like morphology were developed by immersion-precipitation phase-inversion methods in both lab-scale and large-scale. The new type of spongy PVDF membrane shows high surface area with higher yield of PAA functionalization. The ion-capacity with Ca2+ ions was also investigated. PMID:26074669

  5. A multi-level pore-water sampler for permeable sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, J.B.; Hartl, K.M.; Corbett, D.R.; Swarzenski, P.W.; Cable, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    The construction and operation of a multi-level piezometer (multisampler) designed to collect pore water from permeable sediments up to 230 cm below the sediment-water interface is described. Multisamplers are constructed from 1 1/2 inch schedule 80 PVC pipe. One-quarter-inch flexible PVC tubing leads from eight ports at variable depths to a 1 1/2 inch tee fitting at the top of the PVC pipe. Multisamplers are driven into the sediments using standard fence-post drivers. Water is pumped from the PVC tubing with a peristaltic pump. Field tests in Banana River Lagoon, Florida, demonstrate the utility of multisamplers. These tests include collection of multiple samples from the permeable sediments and reveal mixing between shallow pore water and overlying lagoon water.

  6. Relating soil pore geometry to soil water content dynamics decomposed at multiple frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Mingming; Gimenez, Daniel; Cooper, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Soil structure is a critical factor determining the response of soil water content to meteorological inputs such as precipitation. Wavelet analysis can be used to filter a signal into several wavelet components, each characterizing a given frequency. The purpose of this research was to investigate relationships between the geometry of soil pore systems and the various wavelet components derived from soil water content dynamics. The two study sites investigated were located in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Each site was comprised of five soil profiles, the first site was situated along a 300-meter transect with about 10% slope in a tropical semi-deciduous forest, while the second one spanned 230-meter over a Brazilian savanna with a slope of about 6%. For each profile, between two to four Water Content Reflectometer CS615 (Campbell Scientific, Inc.) probes were installed according to horizonation at depths varying between 0.1 m and 2.3 m. Bulk soil, three soil cores, and one undisturbed soil block were sampled from selected horizons for determining particle size distributions, water retention curves, and pore geometry, respectively. Pore shape and size were determined from binary images obtained from resin-impregnated blocks and used to characterize pore geometry. Soil water contents were recorded at a 20-minute interval over a 4-month period. The Mexican hat wavelet was used to decompose soil water content measurements into wavelet components. The responses of wavelet components to wetting and drying cycles were characterized by the median height of the peaks in each wavelet component and were correlated with particular pore shapes and sizes. For instance, large elongated and irregular pores, largely responsible for the transmission of water, were significantly correlated with wavelet components at high frequencies (40 minutes to 48 hours) while rounded pores, typically associated to water retention, were only significantly correlated to lower frequency ranges

  7. Evaporation of J13 and UZ pore waters at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, N D; Gdowski, G E; Knauss, K G

    2000-10-01

    This work is motivated by a need to characterize the chemistry of aqueous films that might form at elevated temperatures on engineered components at the potential high-level, nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Such aqueous films might form through evaporation of water that seeps into the drifts, or by water vapor absorption by hydroscopic salts directly deposited on these components (possibly from previous evaporation events or possibly from air-blown particles drawn into the drifts through a drift ventilation system). There is no consensus at this time on the chemical composition of water that might come in contact with engineered components at Yucca Mountain. Two possibilities have received the most attention: well J13 water and pore waters from the unsaturated zone (UZ) above the repository horizon. These waters represent the two major types of natural waters at Yucca Mountain. Well J13 water is a dilute Na-HCO{sub 3}-CO{sub 3} water, representative of regional perched water and groundwater. The UZ pore waters are Ca-Cl-SO{sub 4}-rich waters with a higher dissolved ion content. These waters are less well-characterized. We have studied the evaporative evolution of these two major types of waters through a series of open system laboratory experiments, with and without crushed repository-horizon tuff present, conducted at sub-boiling temperatures (75 C-85 C).

  8. EFFICIENCY OF SOIL CORE AND SOIL-PORE WATER SAMPLING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory column and field lysimeter study were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of soil core and soil-pore water samples to detect the migration of the organic components of land treated wastes through soil. In the laboratory, column leaching studies were performed by pac...

  9. Estimating the combined toxicity of flufenacet and imazaquin to sorghum with pore water herbicide concentration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Donghong; Zhang, Qian; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Dunli; Yu, Yunlong

    2016-03-01

    Combined toxicity of herbicides to non-target crops is usually resulted from their successive application. The present study was conducted to assess the combined toxicity of flufenacet (FLU) and imazaquin (IMA) to sorghum with their concentration in soil pore water. The concentrations that inhibited growth by 50% (IC50) of FLU and IMA individually and their combination estimated from the herbicide concentrations in soil pore water notably differed from those based on the amended concentrations, due to the decline in bioavailability resulting from adsorption of the herbicides onto soil. According to the amended concentrations, the combined effect of FLU and IMA in soil on sorghum growth was identified as additive action. Based on the concentration in soil pore water, however, it was determined to be antagonism, which was identical to that observed in a test using culture solution. The results revealed that pore water herbicide concentration might be an effective tool to assess the combined toxicity of herbicides in soil to rotational crops. PMID:26969061

  10. Assessment of metal toxicity in sediment pore water from Lake Macquarie, Australia.

    PubMed

    Doyle, C J; Pablo, F; Lim, R P; Hyne, R V

    2003-04-01

    Recent investigations into the level of heavy metal enrichment in the sediments of Lake Macquarie have indicated that significant contamination has occurred over the past 100 years, with elevated levels of lead, zinc, cadmium, copper, and selenium being observed in most parts of the lake. Pore water extracted from sediments showing the greatest contamination by these metals exhibited toxicity to the larval development of the sea urchin Heliocidaris tuberculata. However, an analysis of pore water metal concentrations revealed that the concentrations of these metals were too low to cause toxicity. Rather, pore water toxicity was highly correlated with manganese for the majority of sites sampled; subsequent spiking experiments confirmed manganese as a cause of toxicity. Current levels of manganese in the sediments of Lake Macquarie have arisen from natural sources and are not the result of anthropogenic activities. These results reiterate the importance of identifying the causes of toxicity in assessments of sediment contamination, particularly when testing sediment pore waters using sensitive early life stages. PMID:12712294

  11. Influence of silver nanoparticles on heavy metals of pore water in contaminated river sediments.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wei; Chen, Guiqiu; Zeng, Guangming; Yan, Ming; Chen, Anwei; Guo, Zhi; Huang, Zhenzhen; He, Kai; Hu, Liang; Wang, Lichao

    2016-11-01

    Despite the increasing knowledge on the discharge of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) into the environment and their potential toxicity to microorganisms, the interaction of AgNPs with heavy metals remains poorly understood. This study focused on the effect of AgNPs on heavy metal concentration and form in sediment contaminated with heavy metals from the Xiangjiang River. The results showed that the concentration of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd decreased and then increased with a change in form. The changes in form and concentrations of heavy metals in pore water suggested that Cu and Zn were more likely to be affected compared to Pb and Cd. The concentrations of Hg in sediment pore water in three AgNPs-dosed containers, increased greatly until they reached their peaks at 4.468 ± 0.133, 4.589 ± 0.235, and 5.083 ± 0.084 μg L(-1) in Bare AgNPs, Citrate AgNPs and Tween 80 AgNPs, respectively. The measurements of Hg concentrations in the sediment pore water, combined with SEM and EDX analysis, demonstrated that added AgNPs stabilized in pore water and formed an amalgam with Hg(0), which can affect Hg transportation over long distance. PMID:27494311

  12. Pore Distribution and Water Uptake in a Cenosphere-Cement Paste Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronins, J.; Setina, J.; Sahmenko, G.; Lagzdina, S.; Shishkin, A.

    2015-11-01

    Alumina silicate cenospheres (CS) is a significant waste material from power plants that use a coal. Use CS as Portland cement replacement material gives opportunity to control physical and mechanical properties and makes a product lighter and more cost-effective. In the frame of this study, Portland cement paste samples were produced by adding CS in the concentration range from 0 to 40 volume %. Water uptake of hardened samples was checked and pore size distribution by using the mercury porosimetry was determined. In a cold climate where the temperature often falls below 0 °C, it is important to avoid the amount of micrometer sized pores in the final structure and to decrease water absorption capacity of material. In winter conditions, water fills such pores and causes additional stresses to their walls by expansion while freezing. It was found that generally water uptake capacity for cement paste samples decreased up to 20% by increasing the concentration of CS up to 40 volume %, at the same time, the volume of micrometer sized opened pores increases.

  13. Pore-water pressures associated with clogging of soil pipes: Numerical analysis of laboratory experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clogging of soil pipes due to excessive internal erosion has been hypothesized to cause extreme erosion events such as landslides, debris flows, and gullies, but confirmation of this phenomenon has been lacking. Laboratory and field measurements have failed to measure pore water pressures within pip...

  14. 40 CFR 227.31 - Applicable marine water quality criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicable marine water quality criteria. 227.31 Section 227.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE EVALUATION OF PERMIT APPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN DUMPING OF MATERIALS Definitions § 227.31 Applicable marine water...

  15. Water Desalination Using Nanoporous Single-Layer Graphene with Tunable Pore Size

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Surwade, Sumedh P.; Smirnov, Sergei N.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng; Mahurin, Shannon Mark

    2015-03-23

    Graphene has great potential to serve as a separation membrane due to its unique properties such as chemical and mechanical stability, flexibility and most importantly its one-atom thickness. In this study, we demonstrate first experimental evidence of the use of single-layer porous graphene as a desalination membrane. Nanometer-sized pores are introduced into single layer graphene using a convenient oxygen plasma etching process that permits tuning of the pore size. The resulting porous graphene membrane exhibited high rejection of salt ions and rapid water transport, thus functioning as an efficient water desalination membrane. Salt rejection selectivity of nearly 100% and exceptionallymore » high water fluxes exceeding 105 g m-2 s-1 at 40 C were measured using saturated water vapor as a driving force.« less

  16. Water Desalination Using Nanoporous Single-Layer Graphene with Tunable Pore Size

    SciTech Connect

    Surwade, Sumedh P.; Smirnov, Sergei N.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng; Mahurin, Shannon Mark

    2015-03-23

    Graphene has great potential to serve as a separation membrane due to its unique properties such as chemical and mechanical stability, flexibility and most importantly its one-atom thickness. In this study, we demonstrate first experimental evidence of the use of single-layer porous graphene as a desalination membrane. Nanometer-sized pores are introduced into single layer graphene using a convenient oxygen plasma etching process that permits tuning of the pore size. The resulting porous graphene membrane exhibited high rejection of salt ions and rapid water transport, thus functioning as an efficient water desalination membrane. Salt rejection selectivity of nearly 100% and exceptionally high water fluxes exceeding 105 g m-2 s-1 at 40 C were measured using saturated water vapor as a driving force.

  17. Salt marsh pore water geochemistry does not correlate with microbial community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koretsky, Carla M.; Van Cappellen, Philippe; DiChristina, Thomas J.; Kostka, Joel E.; Lowe, Kristi L.; Moore, Charles M.; Roychoudhury, Alakendra N.; Viollier, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Spatial and temporal trends in pore water geochemistry and sediment microbial community structure are compared at three intertidal sites of a saltmarsh on Sapelo Island, GA. The sites include a heavily bioturbated, unvegetated creek bank, a levee with dense growth of Spartina alterniflora, and a more sparsely vegetated ponded marsh site. The redox chemistry of the pore waters ranges from sulfide-dominated at the ponded marsh site to suboxic at the creek bank site. At the three sites, the vertical redox stratification of the pore waters is more compressed in summer than in winter. The trends in redox chemistry reflect opposing effects of sediment respiration and pore water irrigation. Intense and deep burrowing activity by fiddler crabs at the creek bank site results in the efficient oxidation of reduced byproducts of microbial metabolism and, hence, the persistence of suboxic conditions to depths of 50 cm below the sediment surface. Increased supply of labile organic substrates at the vegetated sites promotes microbial degradation processes, leading to sharper redox gradients. At the levee site, this is partly offset by the higher density and deeper penetration of roots and macrofaunal burrows. Surprisingly, the microbial community structure shows little correlation with the variable vertical redox zonation of the pore waters across the saltmarsh. At the three sites, the highest population densities of aerobic microorganisms, iron- plus manganese-reducing bacteria, and sulfate reducers coexist within the upper 10 cm of sediment. The absence of a clear vertical separation of these microorganisms is ascribed to the high supply of labile organic matter and intense mixing of the topmost sediment via bioturbation.

  18. Pore-water isotopic compositions and unsaturated-zone flow, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, In C.

    2001-04-29

    Isotopic compositions of core-water samples from boreholes USW SD-6 and USW WT-24 indicate that recent water has been introduced at depth. Tritium, carbon, oxygen, and deuterium isotopic compositions all support younger water at depth in the two boreholes. Peaks in tritium concentrations in pore-water samples, indicating younger water than the other samples, observed near the basal vitrophyre of the Topopah Spring Tuff and at the bottom of the CHF and the top of the PP in both boreholes SD-6 and WT-24. Larger {sup 14}C activities in two pore-water samples from WT-24 at the bottom of the CHF and the top of the PP indicate younger water than in other samples from WT-24. More positive {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}D values indicate younger water in samples of pore water at the bottom of the CHF in boreholes SD-6 and WT-24. The isotopic compositions indicating younger water at depth in boreholes SD-6 and WT-24 occur at the basal vitrophyre zone of the Topopah Spring Tuff and the bottom of the CHF/upper part of the PP, probably from lateral preferential flow through connected fractures (fast-flow paths). The source of the young water at borehole WT-24 probably was recharge from The Prow to the north, which then flowed laterally southward through the highly fractured TSw. The source of the young water at borehole SD-6 probably was water flow from the Solitario Canyon fault to the west, which then flowed laterally through the TSw and CHF.

  19. A method for estimating pore water drainage from marsh soils using rainfall and well records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Leonard Robert; Gaines, Emily F.

    2008-08-01

    Rainfall events during low tide exposure cause the water table in marshes to rise. If one has long time series of both rain events and water levels in wells along transects from creek bank to marsh interior, one can correlate well response with rain amount. In cases examined so far the well response is found to be a linear function of rain amount. As it is reasonable to assume that the amount of tidal infiltration required to restore the water table to the elevation of the marsh surface is equal to the amount of rain that would be required to do so, one can estimate the annual drainage of pore water from a well site by dividing the mean drawdown of the water table at low tide by the slope of the response versus rain regression and then multiplying the result by the number of tidal drawdowns in a year. Integration of such results along the transect then gives an estimate of the total annual drainage. An example of the use of this method is given for two well transects in a Typha and a Spartina marsh at the Plum Island Estuary Long Term Ecological Research (PIE-LTER) site in Massachusetts, USA. Both transects yielded pore water drainage rates of about 160 m 3 year -1 per meter of channel length. Although the annual volume of pore water drainage is small compared to the annual volume of the tidal prism, its impact on nutrient budgets in the estuary could be large because of the high concentrations of nutrients in marsh pore waters. We also discuss the possible effects of the capillary fringe, air entrapment and tidal forcing during rain events on these results.

  20. Dating very old pore waters in impermeable rocks by noble gas isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Osenbrueck, K.; Lippmann, J.; Sonntag, C.

    1998-09-01

    The {sup 4}He, {sup 40}Ar, and {sup 136}Xe content dissolved in the pore water of sedimentary rock samples was measured on samples from borehole cores near the repository for nuclear waste in Morsleben, Germany. Due to the very low permeabilities of the rock formations, conventional groundwater sampling was almost impossible. Hence, the authors developed a new sampling method for noble gases in the pore water of freshly drilled rock cores. This method provides vertical noble gas profiles in high depth resolution, even in impermeable rocks. By application of the new technique quantitative age information of groundwater and pore water have been derived. The authors find palaeowaters from the last glaciation depleted in {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O with a {sup 4}He age of about 55 kyr. The high saline pore solutions below are at least 6 Mio years old. This has been concluded from the profiles of radiogenic {sup 4}He and {sup 40}Ar close to diffusion in steady-state and from xenon isotopes produced by spontaneous fission of {sup 238}U in the rocks. A {sup 4}He flux of 2 {center_dot} 10{sup {minus}7} cc STP/cm{sup 2} yr is derived from the profile, which is due to local {sup 4}He production within the investigated sediments.

  1. Advective pore water input of nutrients to the Satilla River Estuary, Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, R. A.; Alexander, C. R.; Kostka, J. E.

    2003-03-01

    In situ benthic flux measurements, pore water nutrient profiles, water column nutrient distributions, sediment grain size distributions and side-scan sonar observations suggest that advective transport of pore waters may be a major input pathway of nutrients into the Satilla River Estuary (coastal Georgia, USA). In situ benthic chamber incubations demonstrate the occurrence of highly variable, but occasionally very large sea floor fluxes of silicate, phosphate, and ammonium. Locally occurring benthic microbial mineralization of organic matter, as estimated by S 35-sulphate reduction rate measurements, is insufficient to support these large fluxes. We hypothesize that the observed interlayering of permeable, sandy sediments with fine-grained, organic-rich sediments in the estuary provides conduits for advective transport of pore water constituents out of the sediments. Because permeable layers may extend significant distances beneath the salt marsh, the large fluxes observed may be supported by remineralization occurring over large areas adjacent to the estuary. Advective transport may be induced by pressure gradients generated by a variety of processes, including landward recharge by meteoric or rain waters if sand layers extend far enough into the maritime coastal lands. Alternatively, tidal variations across the salt marsh sediment surface may hydraulically pump water through the sediment system. Because these fluxes appear to be concentrated into small layers, this source may be a significant input of nutrients to the estuary even if permeable, sandy layers comprise a very small proportion of the seabed.

  2. A Lattice Boltzmann model for simulating water flow at pore scale in unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Crawford, John W.; Young, Iain M.

    2016-07-01

    The Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is an established prominent model for simulating water flow at pore scale in saturated porous media. However, its application in unsaturated soil is less satisfactory because of the difficulties associated with most two-phase LB models in simulating immiscible fluids, such as water and air, which have contrasting densities and viscosities. While progress has been made in developing LB models for fluids with high density ratio, they are still prone to numerical instability and cannot accurately describe the interfacial friction on water-air interface in unsaturated media. Considering that one important application of the LB model in porous materials is to calculate their hydraulic properties when flow is at steady state, we develop a simple LB model to simulate steady water flow at pore scale in unsaturated soils. The method consists of two steps. The first one is to determine water distribution within the soil structure using a morphological model; once the water distribution is known, its interfaces with air are fixed. The second step is to use a single-phase LB model to simulate water flow by treating the water-air interfaces as free-flow boundaries where the shear resistance of air to water flow is assumed to be negligible. We propose a method to solve such free-flow boundaries, and validate the model against analytical solutions of flows of water film over non-slip walls in both two and three dimensions. We then apply the model to calculate water retention and hydraulic properties of a medium acquired using X-ray computed tomography at resolution of 6 μm. The model is quasi-static, similar to the porous network model, but is an improvement as it directly simulates water flow in the pore geometries acquired by tomography without making any further simplifications.

  3. Pore-Water Extraction from Unsaturated Porous Media: Intermediate-Scale Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.

    2014-08-15

    As a remedial approach, vacuum-induced pore-water extraction offers the possibility of contaminant and water removal from the vadose zone, which may be beneficial in reducing the flux of vadose zone contaminants to groundwater. Vadose zone water extraction is being considered at the Hanford Site in Washington State as a means to remove technetium-99 contamination from low permeability sediments with relatively high water contents. A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments have been conducted to improve the fundamental understanding and limitations of the technique. Column experiments were designed to investigate the relations between imposed suctions, water saturations, and water production. Flow cell experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of high-permeability layers and near-well compaction on pore-water extraction efficiency. Results show that water extraction from unsaturated systems can be achieved in low permeability sediments, provided that the initial water saturations are relatively high. The presence of a high-permeability layer decreased the yield, and compaction near the well screen had a limited effect on overall performance. In all experiments, large pressure gradients were observed near the extraction screen. Minimum requirements for water extraction include an imposed vacuum-induced suction larger than the initial sediment capillary pressure, in combination with a fully saturated seepage-face boundary. A numerical multiphase simulator with a coupled seepage-face boundary conditions was used to simulate the experiments. Reasonable matches were obtained between measured and simulated results for both water extraction and capillary pressures, suggesting that numerical simulations may be used as a design tool for field-scale applications of pore-water extraction.

  4. Estimating flow and transport parameters in the unsaturated zone with pore water stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, M.; Volkmann, T. H. M.; Blume, T.; Weiler, M.

    2014-10-01

    Determining the soil hydraulic properties is a prerequisite to physically model transient water flow and solute transport in the vadose zone. Estimating these properties by inverse modelling techniques has become more common within the last two decades. While these inverse approaches usually fit simulations to hydrometric data, we expanded the methodology by using independent information about the stable isotope composition of the soil pore water depth profile as a single or additional optimization target. To demonstrate the potential and limits of this approach, we compared the results of three inverse modelling strategies where the fitting targets were (a) pore water isotope concentrations, (b) a combination of pore water isotope concentrations and soil moisture time series, and (c) a two-step approach using first soil moisture data to determine water flow parameters and then the pore water stable isotope concentrations to estimate the solute transport parameters. The analyses were conducted at three study sites with different soil properties and vegetation. The transient unsaturated water flow was simulated by numerically solving the Richards equation with the finite-element code of Hydrus-1D. The transport of deuterium was simulated with the advection-dispersion equation, and the Hydrus code was modified to allow for deuterium loss during evaporation. The Mualem-van Genuchten and the longitudinal dispersivity parameters were determined for two major soil horizons at each site. The results show that approach (a) using only the pore water isotope content cannot substitute hydrometric information to derive parameter sets that reflect the observed soil moisture dynamics, but gives comparable results when the parameter space is constrained by pedotransfer functions. Approaches (b) and (c) using both, the isotope profiles and the soil moisture time series resulted in satisfying model performances and good parameter identifiability. However, approach (b) has the

  5. Is hot water immersion an effective treatment for marine envenomation?

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, P R T; Boyle, A; Hartin, D; McAuley, D

    2006-01-01

    Envenomation by marine creatures is common. As more people dive and snorkel for leisure, the incidence of envenomation injuries presenting to emergency departments has increased. Although most serious envenomations occur in the temperate or tropical waters of the Indo‐Pacific region, North American and European waters also provide a habitat for many stinging creatures. Marine envenomations can be classified as either surface stings or puncture wounds. Antivenom is available for a limited number of specific marine creatures. Various other treatments such as vinegar, fig juice, boiled cactus, heated stones, hot urine, hot water, and ice have been proposed, although many have little scientific basis. The use of heat therapies, previously reserved for penetrating fish spine injuries, has been suggested as treatment for an increasing variety of marine envenomation. This paper reviews the evidence for the effectiveness of hot water immersion (HWI) and other heat therapies in the management of patients presenting with pain due to marine envenomation. PMID:16794088

  6. Impact cratering in sandstone: The MEMIN pilot study on the effect of pore water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, Thomas; Wünnemann, Kai; Deutsch, Alexander; Poelchau, Michael H.; Schäfer, Frank; Thoma, Klaus

    2011-06-01

    Planetary surfaces are subjected to meteorite bombardment and crater formation. Rocks forming these surfaces are often porous and contain fluids. To understand the role of both parameters on impact cratering, we conducted laboratory experiments with dry and wet sandstone blocks impacted by centimeter-sized steel spheres. We utilized a 40 m two-stage light-gas gun to achieve impact velocities of up to 5.4 km s-1. Cratering efficiency, ejection velocities, and spall volume are enhanced if the pore space of the sandstone is filled with water. In addition, the crater morphologies differ substantially from wet to dry targets, i.e., craters in wet targets are larger, but shallower. We report on the effects of pore water on the excavation flow field and the degree of target damage. We suggest that vaporization of water upon pressure release significantly contributes to the impact process.

  7. Isotopic data of pore water extracted from unsaturated-zone cores at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, I.C.

    1997-12-01

    Isotopic compositions of unsaturated-zone (UZ) ground water ({delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}D, {delta}{sup 13}C and {sup 14}C) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a potential permanent national nuclear waste repository, can be used to infer the origins of water, residence times of the water, water flux, climatic and evaporative history of water, flow paths and velocities. These data can also be used as indicators of transport properties or water-rock interaction. The lack of long-term direct measurements of infiltration requires proxy indicators of water movement through the unsaturated zone to extend the record into the past. This report will discuss {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O data obtained from pore water, along with the {delta}{sup 13}C and {sup 14}C data of gas and water obtained from four boreholes dry-drilled through all UZ lithologic units to infer the existence of nonvertical flowpaths through the mountain and residence times of pore water.

  8. The European Marine Strategy: Noise Monitoring in European Marine Waters from 2014.

    PubMed

    Dekeling, René; Tasker, Mark; Ainslie, Michael; Andersson, Mathias; André, Michel; Borsani, Fabrizio; Brensing, Karsten; Castellote, Manuel; Dalen, John; Folegot, Thomas; van der Graaf, Sandra; Leaper, Russell; Liebschner, Alexander; Pajala, Jukka; Robinson, Stephen; Sigray, Peter; Sutton, Gerry; Thomsen, Frank; Werner, Stefanie; Wittekind, Dietrich; Young, John V

    2016-01-01

    The European Marine Strategy Framework Directive requires European member states to develop strategies for their marine waters leading to programs of measures that achieve or maintain good environmental status (GES) in all European seas by 2020. An essential step toward reaching GES is the establishment of monitoring programs, enabling the state of marine waters to be assessed on a regular basis. A register for impulsive noise-generating activities would enable assessment of their cumulative impacts on wide temporal and spatial scales; monitoring of ambient noise would provide essential insight into current levels and any trend in European waters. PMID:26610961

  9. Cycling of trace metals (Mn, Fe, Mo, U, V, Cr) in deep pore waters of intertidal flat sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Melanie; Dellwig, Olaf; Schnetger, Bernhard; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-06-01

    Trace metals (Mn, Fe, Mo, U, Cr, V) were studied in pore waters of an intertidal flat located in the German Wadden Sea. The study system is an example of a permeable tidal flat system where pore water exchange is affected by tidal driven pressure gradients besides diffusion. Permanently installed in situ samplers were used to extract pore waters down to 5 m depth throughout one year. The samplers were either located close to the tidal flat margin or in central parts of the tidal flat. Despite dynamic sedimentological and hydrological conditions, the general trends with depth in deep tidal flat pore waters are remarkably similar to those observed in deep sea environments. Rates of trace metal cycling must be comparably large in order to maintain the observed pore water profiles. Trace metals further show similar general trends with depth close to the margin and in central parts of the tidal flat. Seasonal sampling revealed that V and Cr vary concurrent with seasonal changes in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration. This effect is most notable close to the tidal flat margin where sulphate, DOC, and nutrients vary with season down to some metres depth. Seasonal variations of Mn, Fe, Mo, and U are by contrast limited to the upper decimetres of the sediment. Their seasonal patterns depend on organic matter supply, redox stratification, and particulate matter deposited on sediment surfaces. Pore water sampling within one tidal cycle provides evidence for pore water advection in margin sediments. During low tide pore water flow towards the creekbank is generated by a hydraulic gradient suggesting that deep pore waters may be seeping out of creekbank sediments. Owing to the enrichment of specific elements like Mn in pore water compared to sea water, seeping pore waters may have an impact on the chemistry of the open water column. Mass balance calculations reveal that the impact of deep pore waters on the Mn budget in the open water column is below 4%. Mn deep pore

  10. Temporal and Spatial Pore Water Pressure Distribution Surrounding a Vertical Landfill Leachate Recirculation Well

    PubMed Central

    Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G.; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit

    2011-01-01

    Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth. PMID:21655145

  11. Temporal and spatial pore water pressure distribution surrounding a vertical landfill leachate recirculation well.

    PubMed

    Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit

    2011-05-01

    Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth. PMID:21655145

  12. Seasonal variations in pore water and sediment geochemistry of littoral lake sediments (Asylum Lake, MI, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Koretsky, Carla M; Haas, Johnson R; Miller, Douglas; Ndenga, Noah T

    2006-01-01

    Background Seasonal changes in pore water and sediment redox geochemistry have been observed in many near-surface sediments. Such changes have the potential to strongly influence trace metal distribution and thus create seasonal fluctuations in metal mobility and bioavailability. Results Seasonal trends in pore water and sediment geochemistry are assessed in the upper 50 cm of littoral kettle lake sediments. Pore waters are always redox stratified, with the least compressed redox stratification observed during fall and the most compressed redox stratification observed during summer. A 2-step sequential sediment extraction yields much more Fe in the first step, targeted at amorphous Fe(III) (hydr)oxides (AEF), then in the second step, which targets Fe(II) monosulfides. Fe extracted in the second step is relatively invariant with depth or season. In contrast, AEF decreases with sediment depth, and is seasonally variable, in agreement with changes in redox stratification inferred from pore water profiles. A 5-step Tessier extraction scheme was used to assess metal association with operationally-defined exchangeable, carbonate, iron and manganese oxide (FMO), organic/sulfide and microwave-digestible residual fractions in cores collected during winter and spring. Distribution of metals in these two seasons is similar. Co, As, Cd, and U concentrations approach detection limits. Fe, Cu and Pb are mostly associated with the organics/sulfides fraction. Cr and Zn are mostly associated with FMO. Mn is primarily associated with carbonates, and Co is nearly equally distributed between the FMO and organics/sulfide fractions. Conclusion This study clearly demonstrates that near-surface lake sediment pore water redox stratification and associated solid phase geochemistry vary significantly with season. This has important ramifications for seasonal changes in the bioavailability and mobility of trace elements. Without rate measurements, it is not possible to quantify the

  13. Marine sponge cyclic peptide theonellamide A disrupts lipid bilayer integrity without forming distinct membrane pores.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, Rafael Atillo; Cornelio, Kimberly; Kinoshita, Masanao; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Murata, Michio; Nishimura, Shinichi; Kakeya, Hideaki; Yoshida, Minoru; Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    Theonellamides (TNMs) are antifungal and cytotoxic bicyclic dodecapeptides derived from the marine sponge Theonella sp. These peptides specifically bind to 3β-hydroxysterols, resulting in 1,3-β-D-glucan overproduction and membrane damage in yeasts. The inclusion of cholesterol or ergosterol in phosphatidylcholine membranes significantly enhanced the membrane affinity of theonellamide A (TNM-A) because of its direct interaction with 3β-hydroxyl groups of sterols. To better understand TNM-induced membrane alterations, we investigated the effects of TNM-A on liposome morphology. (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements revealed that the premixing of TNM-A with lipids induced smaller vesicle formation. When giant unilamellar vesicles were incubated with exogenously added TNM-A, confocal micrographs showed dynamic changes in membrane morphology, which were more frequently observed in cholesterol-containing than sterol-free liposomes. In conjunction with our previous data, these results suggest that the membrane action of TNM-A proceeds in two steps: 1) TNM-A binds to the membrane surface through direct interaction with sterols and 2) accumulated TNM-A modifies the local membrane curvature in a concentration-dependent manner, resulting in dramatic membrane morphological changes and membrane disruption. PMID:27003125

  14. Diagenesis and pore water evolution in the Keuper reservoir, Paris Basin (France)

    SciTech Connect

    Spotl, C.; Matter, A. . Geologisches Inst.); Brevart, O. . Centre Scientifique et Technique Jean Feger)

    1993-09-01

    Keuper (Upper Triassic) fluvial sandstones and nonmarine carbonate rocks form a major oil reservoir in the western Paris Basin at burial depths of [approximately] 2km. Early-diagenetic processes comprise red-bed-type diagenesis and extensive dolocrete formation both in fluvial channels and in fine-grained over-bank sediments. Locally significant paleokarst created vuggy dissolution porosity in the carbonate units and probably also caused leaching of detrital alkali feldspar grains. Oxygen, carbon, and strontium isotope analyses of various eogenetic cements indicate a nonmarine pore-water composition. Ferroan carbonates, authigenic albite and potassium feldspar, quartz, sulfates, sulfides, and clay minerals formed subsequent to major mechanical compaction. Their isotopic compositions record significant changes in the chemistry of the parent pore water. Cl-Br relationships of the present-day pore water reveal that fluids saturated with respect to halite flushed the reservoir during burial. Based on radiogenic dating of illite cements, influx of warm brines into the reservoir most likely occurred during the earliest Cretaceous. The authors suggest that uplift of the Vosges crustal block created a hydraulic head in the eastern part of the basin and established a gravity-driven fluid flow system, displacing interstitial brines from the Keuper evaporites from the eastern part towards the western part of the basin. A second gravity-driven fluid flow system was established during the Oligocene by major uplift, and freshwater flushed the Keuper reservoir, causing brine dilution. The present-day pore water in the study area is still saline and mass-balance calculations indicate that the ratio of basinal brines to Tertiary meteoric water is about 1:2.

  15. Methanotrophy potential versus methane supply by pore water diffusion in peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornibrook, E. R. C.; Bowes, H. L.; Culbert, A.; Gallego-Sala, A. V.

    2008-06-01

    Low affinity methanotrophic bacteria consume a significant quantity of methane in wetland soils in the vicinity of plant roots and at the oxic-anoxic interface. Estimates of the efficiency of methanotrophy in peat soils vary widely in part because of differences in approaches employed to quantify methane cycling. High resolution profiles of dissolved methane abundance measured during the summer of 2003 were used to quantify rates of upward methane flux in four peatlands situated in Wales, UK. Aerobic incubations of peat from a minerotrophic and an ombrogenous mire were used to determine depth distributions of kinetic parameters associated with methane oxidation. The capacity for methanotrophy in a 3 cm thick zone immediately beneath the depth of nil methane abundance in pore water was significantly greater than the rate of upward diffusion of methane in all four peatlands. Rates of methane diffusion in pore water at the minerotrophic peatlands were small (<10%) compared to surface emissions during June to August. The proportions were notably greater in the ombrogenous bogs because of their typically low methane emission rates. Methanotrophy appears to consume entirely methane transported by pore water diffusion in the four peatlands with the exception of 4 of the 33 gas profiles sampled. Flux rates to the atmosphere regardless are high because of gas transport through vascular flora, in particular, at the minerotrophic sites. Cumulative rainfall amount 3-days prior to sampling correlated well with the distance between the water table level and the depth of 0 μmol l-1 methane, indicating that precipitation events can impact methane distributions in pore water. Further work is needed to characterise the kinetics of methane oxidation spatially and temporally in different wetland types in order to determine generalized relationships for methanotrophy in peatlands that can be incorporated into process-based models of methane cycling in peat soils.

  16. Penetration Behavior of a Water Droplet into a Cylindrical Hydrophobic Pore.

    PubMed

    Nonomura, Yoshimune; Tanaka, Tomoya; Mayama, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-28

    Understanding the dynamics with which a water droplet penetrates a pore is important because of its relationship with transfer phenomena in plants and animals. Using a high-speed camera, we observe the penetration processes of a water droplet into a cylindrical pore on a silicone substrate. The force on the water droplet is generated by dropping the substrate plus water droplet from a height of several centimeters onto an acrylic resin substrate. The penetration characteristics depend on pore size Dp, height of release of a drop h, and the viscosity of the droplet liquid and are classified into the following patterns: spreading, penetration, and breaking. During the process of relaxation to the steady state, various interesting deformation or oscillation phenomena occur. Based on high-speed images, we estimate the interfacial energy ΔG during the intermediate states and find an energy barrier ΔG = 1 × 10(-7) J when Dp = 1.0 mm and h = 15 mm for the spreading pattern and ΔG = 0.7 × 10(-7) J when Dp = 1.0 mm and h = 10 mm for the penetration pattern. Finally, based on a theoretical model considering the driving and suppression factors, we explain the experimentally obtained phase diagram including the separation, penetration, and breaking patterns. PMID:27249319

  17. Evaporative Evolution of Carbonate-Rich Brines from Synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff Pore Water, Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, M; Alai, M; Carroll, S A

    2004-04-14

    The evaporation of a range of synthetic pore water solutions representative of the potential high-level-nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV is being investigated. The motivation of this work is to understand and predict the range of brine compositions that may contact the waste containers from evaporation of pore waters, because these brines could form corrosive thin films on the containers and impact their long-term integrity. A relatively complex synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff pore water was progressively concentrated by evaporation in a closed vessel, heated to 95 C in a series of sequential experiments. Periodic samples of the evaporating solution were taken to determine the evolving water chemistry. According to chemical divide theory at 25 C and 95 C our starting solution should evolve towards a high pH carbonate brine. Results at 95 C show that this solution evolves towards a complex brine that contains about 99 mol% Na{sup +} for the cations, and 71 mol% Cl{sup -}, 18 mol% {Sigma}CO{sub 2}(aq), 9 mol%SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for the anions. Initial modeling of the evaporating solution indicates precipitation of aragonite, halite, silica, sulfate and fluoride phases. The experiments have been used to benchmark the use of the EQ3/6 geochemical code in predicting the evolution of carbonate-rich brines during evaporation.

  18. Estimating methane production rates in bogs and landfills by deuterium enrichment of pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siegel, D.I.; Chanton, J.P.; Glaser, P.H.; Chasar, L.S.; Rosenberry, D.O.

    2001-01-01

    Raised bogs and municipal waste landfills harbor large populations of methanogens within their domed deposits of anoxic organic matter. Although the methane emissions from these sites have been estimated by various methods, limited data exist on the activity of the methanogens at depth. We therefore analyzed the stable isotopic signature of the pore waters in two raised bogs from northern Minnesota to identify depth intervals in the peat profile where methanogenic metabolism occurs. Methanogenesis enriched the deuterium (2H) content of the deep peat pore waters by as much as +11% (Vienna Standard Mean Sea Water), which compares to a much greater enrichment factor of +70% in leachate from New York City's Fresh Kills landfill. The bog pore waters were isotopically dated by tritium (3H) to be about 35 years old at 1.5 m depth, whereas the landfill leachate was estimated as ~ 17 years old from Darcy flow calculations. According to an isotopic mass balance the observed deuterium enrichment indicates that about 1.2 g of CH4m-3 d-1 were produced within the deeper peat, compared to about 2.8 g CH4 m-3 d-1 in the landfill. The values for methane production in the bog peat are substantially higher than the flux rates measured at the surface of the bogs or at the landfill, indicating that deeper methane production may be much higher than was previously assumed.

  19. Strontium isotope evolution of pore water and calcite in the Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Brian D.; Futa, Kiyoto

    2001-04-29

    Pore water in the Topopah Spring Tuff has a narrow range of {delta}{sup 87}Sr values that can be calculated from the {delta}{sup 87}Sr values of the rock considering advection through and reaction with the overlying nonwelded tuffs of the PTn. This model can be extended to estimate the variation of {delta}{sup 87}Sr in the pore water through time; this approximates the variation of {delta}{sup 87}Sr measured in calcite fracture coatings. In samples of calcite where no silica can be dated by other methods, strontium isotope data may be the only method to determine ages. In addition, other Sr-bearing minerals in the calcite and opal coatings, such as fluorite, may be dated using the same model.

  20. Mercury cycling in stream ecosystems. 2. Benthic methylmercury production and bed sediment - Pore water partitioning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Lutz, M.A.; Brigham, M.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Aiken, G.R.; Orem, W.H.; Hall, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury speciation, controls on methylmercury (MeHg) production, and bed sediment - pore water partitioning of total Hg (THg) and MeHg were examined in bed sediment from eight geochemically diverse streams where atmospheric deposition was the predominant Hg input. Across all streams, sediment THg concentrations were best described as a combined function of sediment percent fines (%fines; particles < 63 ??m) and organic content. MeHg concentrations were best described as a combined function of organic content and the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community and were comparable to MeHg concentrations in streams with Hg inputs from industrial and mining sources. Whole sediment tin-reducible inorganic reactive Hg (Hg(II)R) was used as a proxy measure for the Hg(II) pool available for microbial methylation. In conjunction with radiotracer-derived rate constants of 203Hg(II) methylation, Hg(II)R was used to calculate MeHg production potential rates and to explain the spatial variability in MeHg concentration. The %Hg(II)R (of THg) was low (2.1 ?? 5.7%) and was inversely related to both microbial sulfate reduction rates and sediment total reduced sulfur concentration. While sediment THg concentrations were higher in urban streams, %MeHg and %Hg(II)R were higher in nonurban streams. Sediment pore water distribution coefficients (log Kd's) for both THg and MeHg were inversely related to the log-transformed ratio of pore water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to bed sediment %fines. The stream with the highest drainage basin wetland density also had the highest pore water DOC ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  1. Development of Layered Sediment Structure and its Effects on Pore Water Transport and Hyporheic Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Packman, Aaron I.; Marion, Andrea; Zaramella, Mattia; Chen, Cheng; Gaillard, Jean-François; Keane, Denis T.

    2008-04-15

    Hyporheic exchange is known to provide an important control on nutrient and contaminant fluxes across the stream-subsurface interface. Similar processes also mediate interfacial transport in other permeable sediments. Recent research has focused on understanding the mechanics of these exchange processes and improving estimation of exchange rates in natural systems. While the structure of sediment beds obviously influences pore water flow rates and patterns, little is known about the interplay of typical sedimentary structures, hyporheic exchange, and other transport processes in fluvial/alluvial sediments. Here we discuss several processes that contribute to local-scale sediment heterogeneity and present results that illustrate the interaction of overlying flow conditions, the development of sediment structure, pore water transport, and stream-subsurface exchange. Layered structures are shown to develop at several scales within sediment beds. Surface sampling is used to analyze the development of an armor layer in a sand-and-gravel bed, while innovative synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography is used to observe patterns of grain sorting within sand bedforms. We show that layered bed structures involving coarsening of the bed surface increase interfacial solute flux but produce an effective anisotropy that favors horizontal pore water transport while limiting vertical penetration.

  2. Ecological impacts of lead mining on Ozark streams: Toxicity of sediment and pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Allert, A.L.; Poulton, B.C.; Schmitt, C.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the toxicity of sediments downstream of lead-zinc mining areas in southeast Missouri, using chronic sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and pore-water toxicity tests with the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Tests conducted in 2002 documented reduced survival of amphipods in stream sediments collected near mining areas and reduced survival and reproduction of daphnids in most pore waters tested. Additional amphipod tests conducted in 2004 documented significant toxic effects of sediments from three streams downstream of mining areas: Strother Creek, West Fork Black River, and Bee Fork. Greatest toxicity occurred in sediments from a 6-km reach of upper Strother Creek, but significant toxic effects occurred in sediments collected at least 14 km downstream of mining in all three watersheds. Toxic effects were significantly correlated with metal concentrations (nickel, zinc, cadmium, and lead) in sediments and pore waters and were generally consistent with predictions of metal toxicity risks based on sediment quality guidelines, although ammonia and manganese may also have contributed to toxicity at a few sites. Responses of amphipods in sediment toxicity tests were significantly correlated with characteristics of benthic invertebrate communities in study streams. These results indicate that toxicity of metals associated with sediments contributes to adverse ecological effects in streams draining the Viburnum Trend mining district.

  3. Sulfide controls on mercury speciation and bioavailability to methylating bacteria in sediment pore waters

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, J.M.; Gilmour, C.C.; Heyes, A.; Mason, R.P.

    1999-03-15

    A chemical equilibrium model for Hg complexation in sediments with sulfidic pore waters is presented. The purpose of the model was to explain observed relationships between pore water sulfide, dissolved inorganic Hg (Hg{sub D}), and bulk methylmercury (MeHg) in surficial sediments of two biogeochemically different ecosystems, the Florida Everglades and Patuxent River, MD. The model was constructed to test the hypothesis that the availability of Hg for methylation in sediments is a function of the concentration of neutral dissolved Hg complexes rather than Hg{sup 2+} or total Hg{sub D}. The model included interaction of mercury with solids containing one or two sulfide groups, and it was able to reproduce observed Hg{sub D} and bulk MeHg trends in the two ecosystems. The model is consistent with HgS{sup 0} as the dominant neutral Hg complex and the form of Hg accumulated by methylating bacteria in sulfidic pore waters. The model-estimated decline in HgS{sup 0} with increasing sulfide was consistent with the observed decline in bulk sediments MeHg. Since bacterial Hg uptake rate is one of the factors affecting methylation rate, Hg complexation models such as the one presented are helpful in understanding the factors that control MeHg production and accumulation in aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Characteristics of fluoride in pore-water at accidental hydrofluoric acid spillage site, Gumi, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, E. H.; Lee, H. A.; Lee, J.; Kim, D.; Lee, S.; Yoon, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    A leakage accident of hydrofluoric acid (HF) occurred in Gumi, South Korea at Sep. 2012. The study site is located in the borderline between a large-scale industrial complex and a rural area. The HF plume was made immediately, and moved toward the rural area through air. After the accident, 212 ha of farm land were influenced and most of crops were withered. To recover the soil, CaO was applied after six months. Although several studies have done to estimate the extension and movement of HF plume in the air and to assess the impact on human health or plant after the incident, the long-term fate of fluoride (F) in the affected soils is not identified clearly. Thus, this study aimed to understand the behavior of F in the soil after HF releasing from accident site through chemical analysis and geochemical modeling. Within the radius of 1 km of accident site, 16 pore-water and soil samples were collected. The semi-quantitative soil composition (i.e., Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Ti), total F, total P, OM contents in soil, and soil pH have already been measured, and pore-water compositions are also identified. From these experimental and modeling data, we could be evaluate if impact of accident exists until now, and also could be select and identify existing form of fluoride in soil and pore-water.

  5. Mapping of accumulated nitrogen in the sediment pore water of a eutrophic lake in Iowa, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iqbal, M.Z.; Fields, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    A large pool of nitrogen in the sediment pore fluid of a eutrophic lake in Iowa, USA, was mapped in this study. Previously, the lake had supported fishing and boating, but today it no longer supports its designated uses as a recreational water body. In the top 5 cm of the lake bottom, the pore water nitrogen ranges between 3.1 and 1,250 ??g/cm3 of sediments, with an average of 160.3 ??g/cm3. Vertically, nitrate concentrations were measured as 153 ??g/cm3 at 0-10 cm, 162 ??g/cm3 at 10-20 cm, and 32 ??g/cm3 at 20-30 cm. Nitrate mass distribution was quantified as 3.67 ?? 103 kg (65%) in the bottom sediments, 172 kg (3%) in suspended particulates, and 1.83 ?? 103 kg (32%) in the dissolved phase. Soil runoff nutrients arrive at the lake from the heavily fertilized lands in the watershed. Upon sedimentation, a large mass of nitrogen desorbs from mineral particles to the relatively immobile pore fluid. Under favorable conditions, this nitrogen diffuses back into the water column, thereby dramatically limiting the lake's capability to process incoming nutrients from farmlands. Consequently, a condition of oxygen deficiency disrupts the post-season biological activities in the lake. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Pore Water Extraction Test Near 241-SX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Eberlein, Susan J.; Parker, Danny L.; Tabor, Cynthia L.; Holm, Melissa J.

    2013-11-11

    A proof-of-principle test is underway near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. The test will evaluate a potential remediation technology that will use tank farm-deployable equipment to remove contaminated pore water from vadose zone soils. The test system was designed and built to address the constraints of working within a tank farm. Due to radioactive soil contamination and limitations in drilling near tanks, small-diameter direct push drilling techniques applicable to tank farms are being utilized for well placement. To address space and weight limitations in working around tanks and obstacles within tank farms, the above ground portions of the test system have been constructed to allow deployment flexibility. The test system utilizes low vacuum over a sealed well screen to establish flow into an extraction well. Extracted pore water is collected in a well sump,and then pumped to the surface using a small-diameter bladder pump.If pore water extraction using this system can be successfully demonstrated, it may be possible to target local contamination in the vadose zone around underground storage tanks. It is anticipated that the results of this proof-of-principle test will support future decision making regarding interim and final actions for soil contamination within the tank farms.

  7. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M.; Harsh, James B.

    2012-10-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility at the Hanford site (Washington State), leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a reason of continued U supply to ground water. We investigated the release of U from Hanford capillary fringe sediments to pore water. Contaminated Hanford sediments were packed into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturated with Columbia River water for 3 to 84 days at varying solution-to-solid ratios (1:3, 1:1, 5:1, 10:1, 25:1 mL:g). After specified times, samples were centrifuged to a gravimetric water content of 0.11 ± 0.06 g g-1. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U from the sediments into the pore water, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14 days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios (1:3 and 1:1 mL:g) showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO3-. Geochemist workbench simulations, conducted using measured solution concentrations from experiments, indicated that calcite could precipitate in the 1:3 solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the 5:1, 10:1, and 25:1 solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. Up to 22% of total U was released on day 84 for the 25:1 solution-to-solid ratio reaction. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics.

  8. Burial diagenesis, hydraulic conductivity and pore water chemistry in the Marshall Sandstone regional aquifer, Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, K.F.; Sibley, D.F.; Long, D.T. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Marshall Sandstone (MS) is a regional aquifer and local natural-gas reservoir in the Michigan basin. Hydraulic conductivities measured of sandstone cores range from 10[sup [minus]4] to 10[sup [minus]9] cm/s. Low hydraulic conductivities were measured in samples with abundant kaolinite, chlorite and illite; quartz and carbonate cemented sandstones have consistently higher values. Dissolved solids concentrations of the water from the MS range from 260 to 418, 169 mg/l. Geochemical modeling of pore water elemental composition and stable isotopes indicates mixing between meteoric water and evaporated seawater. The authors analyzed cements precipitated in the MS to determine whether or not they reflect this mixture of brine and meteoric water. Chlorite is a pre- to syn-compaction cement. Dolomite-ankerite is a syn- to post-compaction cement. Kaolinite and illite are post-compaction cements. Kaolinite overlies and therefore post-dates the carbonate cements. Illite overlies and therefore post-dates the kaolinite. Cement stable isotopes and a mineral paragenesis are consistent with carbonate and phyllosilicate precipitation during burial diagenesis at approximately 50--120 C in brine similar to the brine in the saline portion of the aquifer today. Cements occur throughout the basin, regardless of present pore water composition. Also, secondary porosity due to feldspar and carbonate dissolution occurs throughout the basin. Solid phase analyses and pore water analyses indicate that mixing of meteoric water and brine may have caused some carbonate cement dissolution but otherwise has not influenced mineral paragenesis or hydraulic properties.

  9. Estimating flow and transport parameters in the unsaturated zone with pore water stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, M.; Volkmann, T. H. M.; Blume, T.; Weiler, M.

    2015-06-01

    Determining the soil hydraulic properties is a prerequisite to physically model transient water flow and solute transport in the vadose zone. Estimating these properties by inverse modelling techniques has become more common within the last 2 decades. While these inverse approaches usually fit simulations to hydrometric data, we expanded the methodology by using independent information about the stable isotope composition of the soil pore water depth profile as a single or additional optimization target. To demonstrate the potential and limits of this approach, we compared the results of three inverse modelling strategies where the fitting targets were (a) pore water isotope concentrations, (b) a combination of pore water isotope concentrations and soil moisture time series, and (c) a two-step approach using first soil moisture data to determine water flow parameters and then the pore water stable isotope concentrations to estimate the solute transport parameters. The analyses were conducted at three study sites with different soil properties and vegetation. The transient unsaturated water flow was simulated by solving the Richards equation numerically with the finite-element code of HYDRUS-1D. The transport of deuterium was simulated with the advection-dispersion equation, and a modified version of HYDRUS was used, allowing deuterium loss during evaporation. The Mualem-van Genuchten and the longitudinal dispersivity parameters were determined for two major soil horizons at each site. The results show that approach (a), using only the pore water isotope content, cannot substitute hydrometric information to derive parameter sets that reflect the observed soil moisture dynamics but gives comparable results when the parameter space is constrained by pedotransfer functions. Approaches (b) and (c), using both the isotope profiles and the soil moisture time series, resulted in good simulation results with regard to the Kling-Gupta efficiency and good parameter

  10. Elucidating the mechanical effects of pore water pressure increase on the stability of unsaturated soil slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarnera, G.

    2012-12-01

    The increase of the pore water pressure due to rain infiltration can be a dominant component in the activation of slope failures. This paper shows an application of the theory of material stability to the triggering analysis of this important class of natural hazards. The goal is to identify the mechanisms through which the process of suction removal promotes the initiation of mechanical instabilities. The interplay between increase in pore water pressure, and failure mechanisms is investigated at material point level. In order to account for multiple failure mechanisms, the second-order work criterion is used and different stability indices are devised. The paper shows that the theory of material stability can assess the risk of shear failure and static liquefaction in both saturated and unsaturated contexts. It is shown that the combined use of an enhanced definition of second-order work for unsaturated porous media and a hydro-mechanical constitutive framework enables to retrieve bifurcation conditions for water-infiltration processes in unsaturated deposits. This finding discloses the importance of the coupling terms that incorporate the interaction between the solid skeleton and the pore fluids. As a consequence, these theoretical results suggest that some material properties that are not directly associated with the shearing resistance (e.g., the potential for wetting compaction) can play an important role in the initiation of slope failures. According to the proposed interpretation, the process of pore pressure increase can be understood as a trigger of uncontrolled strains, which at material point level are reflected by the onset of bifurcation conditions.

  11. Distribution of Dissolved Hydrogen in Pore Water at Cold Seep Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, T.; Maegawa, K.; Tsunogai, U.; Ashi, J.; Kinoshita, M.; Gamo, T.

    2005-12-01

    White patches have been observed at the Oomine Ridge (33°7.32'N, 136°28.75'E) on the Nankai accretionary prism. During the KY04-11 cruise (2004. 9. 5 ~ 2004. 10. 2) of the R/V Kaiyo (JAMSTEC), a sediment sample was obtained with a piston corer from the seafloor at the Oomine Ridge. The recovered sediment was 268.5 cm long. Subsampled sediments for gas analysis were taken and were treated for the extraction of dissolved gas in the pore water. The gas samples were measured for CH4, δ13C(CH4), CO2, δ13C(CO2), and H2. The other subsamples for pore water analysis were taken from the residual sediment in the corer. The retrieved pore water samples were analyzed for NH4+, Cl-, SO42-, CH4, δ13C(CH4), CO2, δ13C(CO2), δ18O(H2O), and δD(H2O). Chloride concentrations and both isotopic signatures (δ18O and δD) of the pore water decreased with depth, suggesting that the pore water in this site was affected by seeping fluid characterized by Cl, δ18O, and δD-depleted. Sulfate concentrations rapidly decreased within 2 m, indicating that sulfate consumption occurred in the surface sediments and/or sulfate-free fluid flowing upward. Ammonium concentrations increased with depth even after sulfate was completely reduced, which indicates that there are processes of organic matter decomposition that are capable of producing ammonium after sulfate reduction is complete. Methane concentrations showed concave-upward depth profile and carbon isotopic compositions of methane were as low as _E0 ‰PDB, indicating that methane is derived from microbial production in sediments. We observed a significant H2 peak reaching 500 μmol/kg at the deepest sample, which would be produced as an intermediate during processes of organic matter decomposition in oxide-free environments.

  12. Data Qualification Report: Pore Water Data for Use on the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    H. Miller; R. Monks; C. Warren; W. Wowak

    2000-06-09

    Pore water data associated with Data Tracking Number (DTN) No.LL990702804244.100 are referenced in the Analysis and Model Reports (AMRs) prepared to support the Site Recommendation in determining the suitability of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a repository for high-level nuclear waste. It has been determined, in accordance with procedure AP-3.15Q Rev. 1, ICN 1, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs'', Attachment 6 , that the DTN-referenced data are used in AMRs that provide a direct calculation of ''Principal Factors'' for the Post-closure Safety Case or Potentially Disruptive Processes or Events. Therefore, in accordance with the requirements of procedure AP-SIII.2Q, Rev 0, ICN 2, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data and the Documentation of Rationale for Accepted Data'', Section 5.3.1 .a, a Data Qualification Report has been prepared for submittal to the Assistant Manager, Office of Project Execution for concurrence. This report summarizes the findings of the Data Qualification Team assembled to evaluate unqualified ''pore water data'' represented by DTN No. LL990702804244.100. This DTN is currently used in the following AMRs: Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models (CRWMS M&O 2000a), Environment of the Surfaces of the Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier (CRWMS M&O 2000b), and Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model (CRWMS M&O 2000c). Mineral composition of pore water submitted to the Technical Data Management System (TDMS) using the subject DTN were acquired data from the analysis pore water samples sent to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) by UFA Ventures, Inc. and analyzed by LLNL's Analytical Sciences/Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ASD). The purpose and scope of the AMRs that reference the subject DTN and the potential application of pore water data is described below. These AMRs use only that data associated with the specific samples: ESF-HD-PERM-1, ESF-HD-PERM-2, and ESF-HD-PERM-3

  13. Methylation of inorganic mercury in polar marine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnherr, Igor; St. Louis, Vincent L.; Hintelmann, Holger; Kirk, Jane L.

    2011-05-01

    Monomethylmercury is a neurotoxin that accumulates in marine organisms, with serious implications for human health. The toxin is of particular concern to northern Inuit peoples, for example, whose traditional diets are composed primarily of marine mammals and fish. The ultimate source of monomethylmercury to marine organisms has remained uncertain, although various potential sources have been proposed, including export from coastal and deep-sea sediments and major river systems, atmospheric deposition and water-column production. Here, we report results from incubation experiments in which we added isotopically labelled inorganic mercury and monomethylmercury to seawater samples collected from a range of sites in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Monomethylmercury formed from the methylation of inorganic mercury in all samples. Demethylation of monomethylmercury was also observed in water from all sites. We determined steady-state concentrations of monomethylmercury in marine waters by incorporating the rate constants for monomethylmercury formation and degradation derived from these experiments into a numerical model. We estimate that the conversion of inorganic mercury to monomethylmercury in the water column accounts for around 47% (+/-62%, standard deviation) of the monomethylmercury present in polar marine waters, with site-to-site differences in inorganic mercury and monomethylmercury levels accounting for most of the variability. We suggest that water-column methylation of inorganic mercury is a significant source of monomethylmercury in pelagic marine food webs in the Arctic, and possibly in the world's oceans in general.

  14. Meteoric-like fabrics forming in marine waters. Implications for the use of petrography to identify diagenetic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Melim, L.A.; Swart, P.K.; Maliva, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    Petrographic fabrics have long been used to identify meteoric diagnesis of carbonate sediments. However, on the basis of oxygen isotopic data, we document similar fabrics forming in marine pore fluids in the shallow subsurface of Great Bahama Bank. Therefore, petrographic fabrics alone are not reliable indicators of diagenetic environments, even for shallow-water sediments. In our study, skeletal grainstones show two distinct diagenetic assemblages: either dissolution of aragonitic grains and minimal cementation (high-permeability intervals) or abundant blocky spar cement and neomorphism of aragonitic skeletal grains (low-permeability intervals). These marine-burial fabrics are present as shallow as 110 m below sea level, well above the aragonite compensation depth, a feature that must be considered for models of diagenesis in ancient carbonate sediments. Marine-burial diagenesis may be important in ancient carbonate sediments deposited in moderate water depths or in shallow water during rising sea level where meteoric diagenesis is suppressed. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Pore water evolution during sediment burial from isotopic and mineral chemistry of calcite, dolomite and siderite concretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, C. D.; Coleman, M. L.; Love, L. G.

    1986-10-01

    Coal measures often contain concretions; segregations of diagenetic minerals originally formed within unconsolidated sediments. Three different types (calcite/pyrite, dolomite/pyrite and siderite) occurring spatially quite close together in the Central Pennine Region of England vary widely in carbon isotope composition (+10.35%. > δ13C > -21.49%.) and in major cation chemistry (Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn). Within some siderite concretions, very high Mn/Fe ratios were found in central subsamples; these were also most enriched in 13C. The Fe/Mg ratio decreases systematically from centre to edge (early, shallow to deeper, later precipitation). The calcite/pyrite and dolomite/pyrite concretions developed completely prior to significant burial. Both have high Mn/Fe ratios but negative δ 13C values (calcite -21.49%., dolomite -8.67 to -10.48%.). All of these patterns can be equated precisely with theories of pore water evolution developed on the basis of geochemical investigations of modem sediments. Microbial processes (sulphate reduction, methanogenesis) contributed significantly, as did thermal decarboxylation (to siderite precipitated at considerable burial depth). Mn(IV) and Fe(III) acted differentially as oxidants; producing CO 2 and increasing alkalinity. The interplay of fresh and marine depositional waters is seen most obviously in the presence or absence of sulphate reduction. This controlled mineral type (iron sulphide or carbonate) as well as isotopic and mineral chemistry.

  16. Confined water in controlled pore glass CPG-10-120 studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šauša, O.; Mat'ko, I.; Illeková, E.; Macová, E.; Berek, D.

    2015-06-01

    The solidification and melting of water confined in the controlled pore glass (CPG) with average pore size 12.6 nm has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The fully-filled sample of CPG by water as well as the samples of CPG with different content of water were used. The measurements show the presence of amorphous and crystalline phases of water in this type and size of pores, freezing point depression of a confined liquid and presence of certain transitions at lower temperatures, which could be detected only for cooling regime. The localization of confined water in the partially filled pores of CPG at room temperature was studied.

  17. A USANS/SANS study of the accessibility of pores in the Barnett Shale to methane and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Sakurovs, Richard; Blach, Tomasz P.; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B.; Mildner, David F.; Alcantar-Lopez, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Shale is an increasingly important source of natural gas in the United States. The gas is held in fine pores that need to be accessed by horizontal drilling and hydrofracturing techniques. Understanding the nature of the pores may provide clues to making gas extraction more efficient. We have investigated two Mississippian Barnett Shale samples, combining small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS) to determine the pore size distribution of the shale over the size range 10 nm to 10 μm. By adding deuterated methane (CD4) and, separately, deuterated water (D2O) to the shale, we have identified the fraction of pores that are accessible to these compounds over this size range. The total pore size distribution is essentially identical for the two samples. At pore sizes >250 nm, >85% of the pores in both samples are accessible to both CD4 and D2O. However, differences in accessibility to CD4 are observed in the smaller pore sizes (~25 nm). In one sample, CD4 penetrated the smallest pores as effectively as it did the larger ones. In the other sample, less than 70% of the smallest pores (4, but they were still largely penetrable by water, suggesting that small-scale heterogeneities in methane accessibility occur in the shale samples even though the total porosity does not differ. An additional study investigating the dependence of scattered intensity with pressure of CD4 allows for an accurate estimation of the pressure at which the scattered intensity is at a minimum. This study provides information about the composition of the material immediately surrounding the pores. Most of the accessible (open) pores in the 25 nm size range can be associated with either mineral matter or high reflectance organic material. However, a complementary scanning electron microscopy investigation shows that most of the pores in these shale samples are contained in the organic components. The neutron scattering results indicate that the pores are

  18. Accumulation of Nitrogen in the Pore Water of Anoxic Lake Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M. Z.; Fields, C. L.

    2005-05-01

    The impact of soil runoff nitrogen on the Silver Lake of Iowa was assessed in this study. Currently, the lake cannot support its designated uses as a recreational water body. Extensive algal blooms characterize the lake in late summer, lowering the dissolved oxygen content in water (< 2.0 mg/L). The goal of this study was to map the buildup of nitrogen in the pore water of lake sediments and come up with recommendations for restoration strategies. Sediment cores were taken from 20 sites along 5 transects in the lake. In the top 5 cm of the sediments, the pore water nitrogen ranges between 1.8 and 733.1 micro-gm of nitrate per gm of sediments. The average concentration is 94 micro-g/gm. Vertically, nitrate concentrations were measured at 90 micro-g/gm at 0-10 cm, 95 micro-g/gm at 10-20 cm, and 19 micro-g/gm at 20-30 cm. The sharp decline in nitrate below the 20 cm depth in the sediment is attributed to biochemical reduction of nitrate through denitrification in relatively older, much anoxic sediments. The above results indicate that sediments in Silver Lake are heavily contaminated with N trapped in the pore water. The primary sources of N are the surrounding croplands and an active hog lot on the southeastern lakeshore. The average rate of sedimentation in the lake has been 1 cm/year in the last 32 years. Upon sedimentation, the pore water N is slowly released to the lake water, thereby dramatically limiting the lake's capability to process incoming nutrients. The mass distribution of N in the lake was estimated as 3.66 x 103 kg (65%) in bottom sediments, 172 kg (3%) in suspended particulates, and 1.83 x 103 kg (32%) in the dissolved phase. Some of the recommendations made through this study include dredging the top 25 cm of lake sediments, applying buffer strips along the lake's northern and eastern shorelines, and reducing the application of N and P-based fertilizers.

  19. STRONTIUM ISOTOPE EVOLUTION OF PORE WATER AND CALCITE IN THE TOPOPAH SPRING TUFF, YUCCA MOUNTAIN , NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Marshall; K. Futa

    2001-02-07

    Yucca Mountain, a ridge of Miocene volcanic rocks in southwest Nevada, is being characterized as a site for a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. One issue of concern for the future performance of the potential repository is the movement of water in and around the potential repository horizon. Past water movement in this unsaturated zone is indicated by fluid inclusions trapped in calcite coatings on fracture footwall surfaces and in some lithophysal cavities. Some of the fluid inclusions have homogenization temperatures above the present-day geotherm (J.F. Whelan, written communication), so determining the ages of the calcite associated with those fluid inclusions is important in understanding the thermal history of the potential repository site. Calcite ages have been constrained by uranium-lead dating of silica polymorphs (opal and chalcedony) that are present in most coatings. The opal and chalcedony ages indicate that deposition of the calcite and opal coatings in the welded part of the Topopah Spring Tuff (TSw hydrogeologic unit) spanned nearly the entire history of the 12.8-million-year-old rock mass at fairly uniform overall long-term rates of deposition (within a factor of five). Constraining the age of a layer of calcite associated with specific fluid inclusions is complicated. Calcite is commonly bladed with complex textural relations, and datable opal or chalcedony may be millions of years older or younger than the calcite layer or may be absent from the coating entirely. Therefore, a more direct method of dating the calcite is presented in this paper by developing a model for strontium evolution in pore water in the TSw as recorded by the strontium coprecipitated with calcium in the calcite. Although the water that precipitated the calcite in fractures and cavities may not have been in local isotopic equilibrium with the pore water, the strontium isotope composition of all water in the TSw is primarily controlled by water

  20. Transgenic nematodes as biosensors for metal stress in soil pore water samples.

    PubMed

    Anbalagan, Charumathi; Lafayette, Ivan; Antoniou-Kourounioti, Melissa; Haque, Mainul; King, John; Johnsen, Bob; Baillie, David; Gutierrez, Carmen; Martin, Jose A Rodriguez; de Pomerai, David

    2012-03-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans strains carrying stress-reporter green fluorescent protein transgenes were used to explore patterns of response to metals. Multiple stress pathways were induced at high doses by most metals tested, including members of the heat shock, oxidative stress, metallothionein (mtl) and xenobiotic response gene families. A mathematical model (to be published separately) of the gene regulatory circuit controlling mtl production predicted that chemically similar divalent metals (classic inducers) should show additive effects on mtl gene induction, whereas chemically dissimilar metals should show interference. These predictions were verified experimentally; thus cadmium and mercury showed additive effects, whereas ferric iron (a weak inducer) significantly reduced the effect of mercury. We applied a similar battery of tests to diluted samples of soil pore water extracted centrifugally after mixing 20% w/w ultrapure water with air-dried soil from an abandoned lead/zinc mine in the Murcia region of Spain. In addition, metal contents of both soil and soil pore water were determined by ICP-MS, and simplified mixtures of soluble metal salts were tested at equivalent final concentrations. The effects of extracted soil pore water (after tenfold dilution) were closely mimicked by mixtures of its principal component ions, and even by the single most prevalent contaminant (zinc) alone, though other metals modulated its effects both positively and negatively. In general, mixtures containing similar (divalent) metal ions exhibited mainly additive effects, whereas admixture of dissimilar (e.g. trivalent) ions often resulted in interference, reducing overall levels of stress-gene induction. These findings were also consistent with model predictions. PMID:22037694

  1. Triaxial- and uniaxial-compression testing methods developed for extraction of pore water from unsaturated tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Mower, T.E.; Higgins, J.D.; Yang, I.C.

    1989-12-31

    To support the study of hydrologic system in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, two extraction methods were examined to obtain representative, uncontaminated pore-water samples from unsaturated tuff. Results indicate that triaxial compression, which uses a standard cell, can remove pore water from nonwelded tuff that has an initial moisture content greater than 11% by weight; uniaxial compression, which uses a specifically fabricated cell, can extract pore water from nonwelded tuff that has an initial moisture content greater than 8% and from welded tuff that has an initial moisture content greater than 6.5%. For the ambient moisture conditions of Yucca Mountain tuffs, uniaxial compression is the most efficient method of pore-water extraction. 12 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. PORE-WATER ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION AND UNSATURATED-ZONE FLOW, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    C. Yang

    2000-10-23

    Site characterization at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository, has included studies of recharge, flow paths, percolation flux, perched water bodies, and chemical compositions of the water in the thick unsaturated zone (UZ). Samples of pore water from cores of two recently drilled boreholes, USW SD-6 near the ridge top of Yucca Mountain and USW WT-24 north of Yucca mountain, were analyzed for isotopic compositions as part of a study by the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, under Interagency Agreement DE-AI08-97NV12033. The purpose of this report is to interpret {sup 14}C, {delta}{sup 13}C, {sup 3}H, {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O isotopic compositions of pore water from the core of boreholes USW SD-6 and USW WT-24 in relation to sources of recharge and flow paths in the UZ at Yucca Mountain. Borehole designation USW SD-6 and USW WT-24 subsequently will be referred to as SD-6 and WT-24. The sources of recharge and flow paths are important parameters that can be used in a UZ flow model, total system performance assessment (TSPA), and the license application (LA) for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

  3. Praziquantel degradation in marine aquarium water

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Matthew R.; Ellis, Helen; Stamper, M. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Praziquantel (PZQ) is a drug commonly utilized to treat both human schistosomiasis and some parasitic infections and infestations in animals. In the aquarium industry, PZQ can be administered in a “bath” to treat the presence of ectoparasites on both the gills and skin of fish and elasmobranchs. In order to fully treat an infestation, the bath treatment has to maintain therapeutic levels of PZQ over a period of days or weeks. It has long been assumed that, once administered, PZQ is stable in a marine environment throughout the treatment interval and must be mechanically removed, but no controlled experiments have been conducted to validate that claim. This study aimed to determine if PZQ would break down naturally within a marine aquarium below its 2 ppm therapeutic level during a typical 30-day treatment: and if so, does the presence of fish or the elimination of all living biological material impact the degradation of PZQ? Three 650 L marine aquarium systems, each containing 12 fish (French grunts: Haemulon flavolineatum), and three 650 L marine aquariums each containing no fish were treated with PZQ (2 ppm) and concentrations were measured daily for 30 days. After one round of treatment, the PZQ was no longer detectable in any system after 8 (±1) days. The subsequent two PZQ treatments yielded even faster PZQ breakdown (non-detectable after 2 days and 2 ± 1 day, respectively) with slight variations between systems. Linear mixed effects models of the data indicate that day and trial most impact PZQ degradation, while the presence of fish was not a factor in the best-fit models. In a completely sterilized marine system (0.5 L) PZQ concentration remained unchanged over 15 days, suggesting that PZQ may be stable in a marine system during this time period. The degradation observed in non-sterile marine systems in this study may be microbial in nature. This work should be taken into consideration when providing PZQ bath treatments to marine animals to ensure

  4. Praziquantel degradation in marine aquarium water.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Amber; Dawson, Matthew R; Ellis, Helen; Stamper, M Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Praziquantel (PZQ) is a drug commonly utilized to treat both human schistosomiasis and some parasitic infections and infestations in animals. In the aquarium industry, PZQ can be administered in a "bath" to treat the presence of ectoparasites on both the gills and skin of fish and elasmobranchs. In order to fully treat an infestation, the bath treatment has to maintain therapeutic levels of PZQ over a period of days or weeks. It has long been assumed that, once administered, PZQ is stable in a marine environment throughout the treatment interval and must be mechanically removed, but no controlled experiments have been conducted to validate that claim. This study aimed to determine if PZQ would break down naturally within a marine aquarium below its 2 ppm therapeutic level during a typical 30-day treatment: and if so, does the presence of fish or the elimination of all living biological material impact the degradation of PZQ? Three 650 L marine aquarium systems, each containing 12 fish (French grunts: Haemulon flavolineatum), and three 650 L marine aquariums each containing no fish were treated with PZQ (2 ppm) and concentrations were measured daily for 30 days. After one round of treatment, the PZQ was no longer detectable in any system after 8 (±1) days. The subsequent two PZQ treatments yielded even faster PZQ breakdown (non-detectable after 2 days and 2 ± 1 day, respectively) with slight variations between systems. Linear mixed effects models of the data indicate that day and trial most impact PZQ degradation, while the presence of fish was not a factor in the best-fit models. In a completely sterilized marine system (0.5 L) PZQ concentration remained unchanged over 15 days, suggesting that PZQ may be stable in a marine system during this time period. The degradation observed in non-sterile marine systems in this study may be microbial in nature. This work should be taken into consideration when providing PZQ bath treatments to marine animals to ensure maximum

  5. The radiocarbon age of calcite dissolving at the sea floor: Estimates from pore water data

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.R.; McNichol, A.P.; McCorkle, D.C.

    2000-04-01

    The authors measured the radiocarbon content and stable isotopic composition of pore water and bottom water {Sigma}CO{sub 2}, sedimentary organic carbon, and CaCO{sub 3} at two sites on the Ceara Rise, one underlying bottom water that is supersaturated with respect to calcite (Site B), the other underlying under saturated bottom water (Site G). The results were combined with pore water O{sub 2}, {Sigma}CO{sub 2}, and Ca{sup 2+} profiles (Martin and Sayles, 1996) to estimate the radiocarbon content of the CaCO{sub 3} that is dissolving in the sediment mixed layer. At Site G, the CaCO{sub 3} that is dissolving in the upper 2 cm of the sediments is clearly younger (richer in {sup 14}C) than the bulk sedimentary CaCO{sub 3}, indicating that nonhomogeneous CaCO{sub 3} dissolution occurs there. The case for nonhomogeneous dissolution is much weaker at the site underlying supersaturated bottom water. The results indicate that nonhomogeneous dissolution occurs in sediments underlying under saturated bottom water, that the dissolution is rapid relative to the rate of homogenization of the CaCO{sub 3} in the mixed layer by bioturbation, and that the dissolution rate of CaCO{sub 3} decreases as it ages in the sediment mixed layer. The results support the hypothesis, based on solid phase analyses, that the preferential dissolution of young (i.e., radiocarbon-rich) CaCO{sub 3} leads to a pattern of increasing radiocarbon age of mixed-layer CaCO{sub 3} as the degree of under saturation of bottom water increases (Keir, 1984; Broecker et al., 1991).

  6. Polyethylene passive samplers to determine sediment-pore water distribution coefficients of persistent organic pollutants in five heavily contaminated dredged sediments.

    PubMed

    Charrasse, Benoit; Tixier, Céline; Hennebert, Pierre; Doumenq, Pierre

    2014-02-15

    Pore concentration and partition coefficients of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in sediments from five distinct contaminated sites in France (marine harbour, rivers canals and highway sedimentation tank). The assessment of the risk caused by such micropollutants requires, in most cases, the measurement of their availability. To assess this availability, low density polyethylene (LDPE) membrane samplers were exposed to these sediments under constant and low-level agitation over a period of 46 days. Freely dissolved pore water contaminant concentrations were estimated from the concentration at equilibrium in the LDPE membrane. The depletion of contaminants in the sediments was monitored by the use of performance reference compounds (PRCs). Marked differences in freely dissolved PAH and PCB concentrations and resulting sediment-pore water partition coefficients between these five sediments were observed. Data set was tested onto different empirical and mechanistic models. As final findings, triple domain sorption (a total organic carbon, black carbon and oil phase model) could model PCB data successfully whereas the best fitting for PAH partitioning was obtained by Raoult's Law model. PMID:24360917

  7. Aeration effects on the partitioning of a PCB to anoxic estuarine sediment pore water dissolved organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, J.A.; Gabelich, C.J.; Lin, C.H.; Suffet, I.H.

    1999-05-01

    Pore water dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in the distribution, mobility, and bioavailability of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) in sediment environments. The effect of aeration on the partitioning of 2,2{prime},4,4{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TeCB) to anoxic pore water DOM from three estuarine sites was investigated. Pore water DOM was fractionated into molecular size and polarity fractions by ultrafiltration and XAD-8 resin chromatography. Total organic carbon analysis was utilized to determine shifts in molecular size and polarity distributions. Changes in functional groups and aromaticity were evaluated for whole and fractionated pore waters by specific UV absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA{sub 254}). The solubility enhancement method was used to determine the partitioning of TeCB to whole and fractionated pore water DOM. At two sites, the overall TeCB-DOM distribution coefficient decreased by an order of magnitude after aeration. The higher molecular size and all polarity fractions exhibited a decrease in partitioning behavior upon aeration. The aromaticity and TeCB-DOM distribution coefficient of the lowest molecular size fraction decreased upon aeration. The highest and lowest molecular size fractions contributed the most to overall partitioning. The observed aeration effects in anoxic estuarine sediment pore waters differed significantly from those previously reported in freshwater systems.

  8. Pore water chemistry reveals gradients in mineral transformation across a model basaltic hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmann, Michael; Dontsova, Katerina; Root, Robert; Ruiz, Joaquin; Troch, Peter; Chorover, Jon

    2016-06-01

    The extent of weathering incongruency during soil formation from rock controls local carbon and nutrient cycling in ecosystems, as well as the evolution of hydrologic flow paths. Prior studies of basalt weathering, including those that have quantified the dynamics of well-mixed, bench-scale laboratory reactors or characterized the structure and integrated response of field systems, indicate a strong influence of system scale on weathering rate and trajectory. For example, integrated catchment response tends to produce lower weathering rates than do well mixed reactors, but the mechanisms underlying these disparities remain unclear. Here we present pore water geochemistry and physical sensor data gathered during two controlled rainfall-runoff events on a large-scale convergent model hillslope mantled with 1 m uniform depth of granular basaltic porous media. The dense sampler and sensor array (1488 samplers and sensors embedded in 330 m3 of basalt) showed that rainfall-induced dissolution of basaltic glass produced supersaturation of pore waters with respect to multiple secondary solids including allophane, gibbsite, ferrihydrite, birnessite and calcite. The spatial distribution of saturation state was heterogeneous, suggesting an accumulation of solutes leading to precipitation of secondary solids along hydrologic flow paths. Rapid dissolution of primary silicates was widespread throughout the entire hillslope, irrespective of up-gradient flowpath length. However, coherent spatial variations in solution chemistry and saturation indices were observed in depth profiles and between distinct topographic regions of the hillslope. Colloids (110-2000 nm) enriched in iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), and phosphorus (P) were mobile in soil pore waters.

  9. Upwelling of hydrothermal solutions through ridge flank sediments shown by pore water profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Maris, C.R.P.; Bender, M.L.

    1982-05-07

    High calcium ion and low magnesium ion concentrations in sediment pore waters in cores from the Galapagos Mounds Hydrothermal Field on the flank of the Galapagos Spreading Center are believed to be due to a calcium-magnesium exchange reaction between circulating seawater and basement basalt. The nonlinearity of the calcium ions and magnesium ion gradients indicates that these discharging hydrothermal solutions on the ridge flank are upwelling at the rate of about 1 centimeter per year through the pelagic sediments of the Mounds Field and at about 20 centimeters per year through the hydrothermal mounds themselves.

  10. Liquid CO2 displacement of water in a dual-permeability pore network micromodel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Mart; Grate, Jay W; Wietsma, Thomas W; Warner, Marvin G

    2011-09-01

    Permeability contrasts exist in multilayer geological formations under consideration for carbon sequestration. To improve our understanding of heterogeneous pore-scale displacements, liquid CO(2) (LCO(2))-water displacement was evaluated in a pore network micromodel with two distinct permeability zones. Due to the low viscosity ratio (logM = -1.1), unstable displacement occurred at all injection rates over 2 orders of magnitude. LCO(2) displaced water only in the high permeability zone at low injection rates with the mechanism shifting from capillary fingering to viscous fingering with increasing flow rate. At high injection rates, LCO(2) displaced water in the low permeability zone with capillary fingering as the dominant mechanism. LCO(2) saturation (S(LCO2)) as a function of injection rate was quantified using fluorescent microscopy. In all experiments, more than 50% of LCO(2) resided in the active flowpaths, and this fraction increased as displacement transitioned from capillary to viscous fingering. A continuum-scale two-phase flow model with independently determined fluid and hydraulic parameters was used to predict S(LCO2) in the dual-permeability field. Agreement with the micromodel experiments was obtained for low injection rates. However, the numerical model does not account for the unstable viscous fingering processes observed experimentally at higher rates and hence overestimated S(LCO2). PMID:21774502

  11. Sequestration of priority pollutant PAHs from sediment pore water employing semipermeable membrane devices.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Kelly S; Petty, Jimmie D; Huckins, James N; Lebo, Jon A; Kaiser, Edwin M

    2002-11-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were employed to sample sediment pore water in static exposure studies under controlled laboratory conditions using (control pond and formulated) sediments fortified with 15 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPPAHs). The sediment fortification level of 750 ng/g was selected on the basis of what might be detected in a sediment sample from a contaminated area. The sampling interval consisted of 0, 4, 7, 14, and 28 days for each study. The analytical methodologies, as well as the extraction and sample cleanup procedures used in the isolation, characterization, and quantitation of 15 PPPAHs at different fortification levels in SPMDs, water, and sediment were reported previously (Williamson, M.S. Thesis, University of Missouri-Columbia, USA; Williamson et al., Chemosphere (This issue--PII: S0045-6535(02)00394-6)) and used for this project. Average (mean) extraction recoveries for each PPPAH congener in each matrix are reported and discussed. No procedural blank extracts (controls) were found to contain any PPPAH residues above the method quantitation limit, therefore, no matrix interferences were detected. The focus of this publication is to demonstrate the ability to sequester environmental contaminants, specifically PPPAHs, from sediment pore water using SPMDs and two different types of fortified sediment. PMID:12431008

  12. Measuring pyrethroids in sediment pore water using matrix-solid phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Wesley; Yang, Yu; Reichenberg, Fredrik; Mayer, Philipp; Gan, Jianying

    2009-01-01

    Pyrethroids are hydrophobic insecticides commonly used in both agricultural and urban environments. Their high toxicity to aquatic organisms, including benthic invertebrates, and detection in the sediment at many locations in California, U.S.A., have spawned interest in understanding their bioavailability in bed sediments. A recent study showed good correlation between uptake of 14C-permethrin in Chironomus tentans and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers in sediments. The present study was directed at the development of an SPME technique applicable to trace levels of nonlabeled pyrethroids in sediment. Disposable polydimethylsiloxane fibers were used to detect freely dissolved pore-water concentrations of bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, cis-permethrin, trans-permethrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, and esfenvalerate under agitated and static conditions. Partition equilibrium between fiber and sediment was reached in <5 d when the samples were agitated on a shaker at low speed, while much longer times (>23 d) were needed without agitation. Polydimethylsiloxane to water partition ratios (K(PDMS)) of the seven pyrethroids were measured separately and ranged from 2.83 x 10(5) to 1.89 x 10(6). When applied to field-contaminated sediments, agitated matrix-SPME was able to detect pore-water concentrations as low as 0.1 ng/L. The method developed in the present study may be coupled with bioassays to gain mechanistic understanding of factors affecting pyrethroid toxicities, and applied to field samples to better predict sediment toxicities from pyrethroid contamination. PMID:18712946

  13. Sequestration of priority pollutant PAHs from sediment pore water employing semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, K.S.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Lebo, J.A.; Kaiser, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were employed to sample sediment pore water in static exposure studies under controlled laboratory conditions using (control pond and formulated) sediments fortified with 15 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPPAHs). The sediment fortification level of 750 ng/g was selected on the basis of what might be detected in a sediment sample from a contaminated area. The sampling interval consisted of 0, 4, 7, 14, and 28 days for each study. The analytical methodologies, as well as the extraction and sample cleanup procedures used in the isolation, characterization, and quantitation of 15 PPPAHs at different fortification levels in SPMDs, water, and sediment were reported previously (Williamson, M.S. Thesis, University of Missouri - Columbia, USA; Williamson et al., Chemosphere (This issue - PII: S0045-6535(02)00394-6)) and used for this project. Average (mean) extraction recoveries for each PPPAH congener in each matrix are reported and discussed. No procedural blank extracts (controls) were found to contain any PPPAH residues above the method quantitation limit, therefore, no matrix interferences were detected. The focus of this publication is to demonstrate the ability to sequester environmental contaminants, specifically PPPAHs, from sediment pore water using SPMDs and two different types of fortified sediment.

  14. Water vapor weathering of Taurus-Littrow orange soil - A pore-structure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadenhead, D. A.; Mikhail, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A pore-volume analysis was performed on water vapor adsorption data previously obtained on a fresh sample of Taurus-Littrow orange soil, and the analysis was repeated on the same sample after its exposure to moist air for a period of approximately six months. The results indicate that exposure of an outgassed sample to high relative pressures of water vapor can result in the formation of substantial micropore structure, the precise amount being dependent on the sample pretreatment, particularly the outgassing temperature. Micropore formation is explained in terms of water penetration into surface defects. In contrast, long-term exposure to moist air at low relative pressures appears to reverse the process with the elimination of micropores and enlargement of mesopores possibly through surface diffusion of metastable adsorbent material. The results are considered with reference to the storage of lunar samples.

  15. Pore water nutrient characteristics and the fluxes across the sediment in the Pearl River estuary and adjacent waters, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Lu; Yin, Kedong; Lü, Ying; Zhang, Derong; Yang, Yongqiang; Huang, Xiaoping

    2013-11-01

    Spatio-temporal distribution of pore water nutrients and the fluxes at the sediment-water interface (SWI) were investigated to probe into the geochemical behavior of nutrients associated with early diagenesis of organic matter (OM), and to study the accumulation and transformation processes of nutrients at the SWI, as well as to discuss the impact of riverine inputs on nutrients in the Pearl River estuary (PRE) and adjacent offshore areas. Nutrient concentrations decreased from the upper to the lower reaches of the estuary, suggesting that there was a high input of anthropogenic nutrients and the estuary was acting as a nutrient sink. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN: the sum of NH4-N, NO3-N and NO2-N) concentrations in the water column and the pore water were higher in the estuary than at offshore areas due to the riverine discharge and the high accumulation rate in the estuary. NO3-N concentration was the highest of the three forms of DIN in the overlying water and showed a sharp decrease from the surficial sediment with increasing sediment depth, indicating that there was strong denitrification at the SWI. NH4-N, mainly deriving from the anaerobic degradation of OM, was the main form of DIN in the pore water and increased with depth. Negative NO3-N fluxes (into the sediment) and positive NH4-N fluxes (from the sediment) were commonly observed from incubation experiments, indicating the denitrification occurred at the SWI. DIN flux suggested that the sediment was a sink of DIN in spring, however, the sediment was the source of DIN in summer and winter. Nutrients dominantly diffused out of the sediment, suggesting that the sediment was the source of nutrients in spring at adjacent offshore areas. The fluxes directed that PO4-P mainly diffused into the sediment while SiO4-Si mainly diffused out of the sediment.

  16. Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance unambiguously quantifies pore and collagen-bound water in cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Henry H.; Wright, Alexander C.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2012-01-01

    Bone water (BW) plays a pivotal role in nutrient transport and conferring bone with its viscoelastic mechanical properties. BW is partitioned between the pore spaces of the Haversian and lacuno-canalicular system, and water predominantly bound to the matrix proteins (essentially collagen). The general model of BW is that the former predominantly experiences fast isotropic molecular reorientation, whereas water in the bone matrix undergoes slower anisotropic rotational diffusion. Here, we provide direct evidence for the correctness of this model and show that unambiguous quantification in situ of these two functionally and dynamically different BW fractions is possible. The approach chosen relies on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of deuterium (2H) that unambiguously separates and quantifies the two fractions on the basis of their distinguishing microdynamic properties. Twenty-four specimens of the human tibial cortex from six donors (3 male, 3 female, ages 27-83 years) were cored and 2H spectra recorded at 62 MHz (9.4 Tesla) on a Bruker Instruments DMX 400 spectrometer after exchange of native BW with 2H2O. Spectra consisted of a doublet signal resulting from quadrupole interaction of water bound to collagen. Doublet splittings were found to depend on the orientation of the osteonal axis with respect to the magnetic field direction (8.2 and 4.3 kHz for parallel and perpendicular orientation, respectively). In contrast, the isotropically reorienting pore-resident water yielded a single resonance line superimposed on the doublet. Nulling of the singlet resonance allowed separation of the two fractions. The results indicate that in human cortical bone 60-80% of detectable BW is collagen-bound. Porosity determined as the difference between total BW and collagen bound water fraction was found to strongly parallel μCT based measurements (R2 = 0.91). Our method provides means for direct validation of emerging relaxation-based measurements of cortical bone porosity by

  17. Occurrence and significance of polychlorinated biphenyls in water, sediment pore water and surface sediments of Umgeni River, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Gakuba, Emmanuel; Moodley, Brenda; Ndungu, Patrick; Birungi, Grace

    2015-09-01

    The Umgeni River is one of the main sources of water in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; however; there is currently a lack of information on the presence and distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in its sediment, sediment pore water and surface water. This study aims to determine the occurrence and significance of selected PCBs in the surface water, sediment pore water and surface sediment samples from the Umgeni River. Liquid-liquid and soxhlet extractions were used for water or pore water, and sediments, respectively. Extracts were cleaned up using a florisil column and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The total concentrations of eight polychlorinated biphenyls were 6.91-21.69 ng/mL, 40.67-252.30 ng/mL and 102.60-427.80 ng/g (dry weight), in unfiltered surface water, unfiltered sediment pore water and surface sediments, respectively. The percentage contributions of various matrices were 4, 36 and 60 % for unfiltered surface water, unfiltered pore water and sediment, respectively. The highest concentrations of PCBs were found in water, pore water and sediment collected from sampling sites close to the Northern Wastewater Treatment Works. The highest chlorinated biphenyl, PCB 180, was the most abundant at almost all sampling sites. To our knowledge, this is the first report on occurrence of polychlorinated biphenyls in the Umgeni River water, pore water and sediment system and our results provide valuable information regarding the partitioning of the PCBs between the water and sediment systems as well as the organic chemical quality of the water. PMID:26266899

  18. Predicting copper phytotoxicity based on pore-water pCu.

    PubMed

    Kader, Mohammed; Lamb, Dane T; Wang, Liang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-04-01

    The free ion activity and "biotic ligand" models predict that the free metal ion and other pore-water parameters describe terrestrial phytotoxicity. In this study, pore-water chemistry and measured Cu(2+) was used to describe phytotoxicity of cucumber (Cucumis sativa L) in 10 contrasting soils at different soil Cu loadings. Both soil solution Cu (Cu(pw)) and Cu(2+) successfully described the response variable for all ten soils with R(2) values of 0.73 and 0.66, respectively. Separation of soils as acid and alkaline and fitting separately showed that there was a strongly significant fit for both log Cu(2+) and log Cu(pw) in acidic soils (R(2) = 0.92 and 0.86, respectively) but weakly significant fit for alkaline soils. The pCu EC50 and EC10 values in all acidic soils for cucumber were 5.83 (6.03-5.63) and 7.53 (8.27-7.00), respectively. In our dataset alkaline soils need to be treated individually. In addition, pCu could be predicted based on pH and total concentration alone. Despite only 12 weeks 'ageing' there was quantitative agreement between pCu model from this study and predicted pCu from Sauvé et al. This agreement from studies performed independently indicates that, at least in the case of Cu(2+), the difference in an ageing period of ≥10 years appears minimal. PMID:26738879

  19. Toxicity identification evaluation of metal-contaminated sediments using an artificial pore water containing dissolved organic carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, A.M.; Watzin, M.C.

    1999-03-01

    Recent investigations of sediment-associated pollutants in Lake Champlain indicated significant contamination with As, Mn, and Ni in Outer Malletts Bay, Vermont, US. Ceriodaphnia dubia exposed to sediment pore water from several sites in Outer Malletts Bay showed repeatable, acute mortality at only one site. A toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) was conducted on pore water to determine the contaminants causing mortality at this site. Unlike most TIE applications, the dilution water used in these tests was formulated to match the hardness, alkalinity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved organic carbon content of the pore water. Results from phase 1 of the TIE indicated that divalent metals may be responsible for toxicity. Phase 2 results revealed levels of Mn above LC50 values. Spiking experiments employed in phase 3 confirmed Mn as the principal toxicant in sediment pore water. The formulated pore water worked well and helped ensure that toxicant behavior was influenced primarily by each TIE manipulation and not by physical and chemical differences between the dilution and site water. Although the Mn toxicity at this site may be the result of its unique geomorphology, this situation underscores the need to look broadly for potential toxicants when evaluating contaminated sites.

  20. A summary of global 129I in marine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peng; Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.; Hou, X. L.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the many investigations concerning the occurrence of anthropogenic iodine-129 in the atmosphere, terrestrial and marine environments, there is a lack of a comprehensive collection of data on the distribution of the isotope in marine waters. The temporal and spatial variability of anthropogenic 129I is strongly linked to the major point sources in the Irish Sea and the English Channel and the global marine spreading pathways are partly outlined from these sources. The temporal evolution is still, however, not well defined when transport and dissipation are considered in the different oceans and ocean compartments. We here summarize available published literature data on 129I temporal and spatial distribution in the global marine water. The results show presence of numerous data sets for the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans where strong variability in terms of water depth, time and location also occur. Scarcity of data on 129I from the Pacific, Indian and South Atlantic Oceans demonstrates gaps in the coverage of the isotope spatial extent. These shortcomings in the spatial coverage may relate to the understanding that the anthropogenic 129I signal will take a long time to be transported, if at all, from the North Atlantic into other oceans. Data from recent expeditions in the Southern oceans and the Geotraces ocean profiling will reveal additional information about 129I distribution in the marine waters.

  1. SeamountFlux: Pore water geochemistry and sediment characteristics (Guatemala Basin, East Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, T.; Poonchai, W.; Schmidt-Schierhorn, F.; Villinger, H. W.

    2011-12-01

    The scientific goal of the project "SeamountFlux" is to study a process, which can possibly contribute significantly to large scale cooling of the oceanic crust. The focus of the study is to investigate the exchange of matter and energy between the ocean and the upper young oceanic crust in the vicinity of unexplained circular depressions in the sedimentary cover, which are widely spread in the equatorial Pacific. A possible model for the formation of these so-called "hydrothermal pits" is the dissolution of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals by upward flowing warm fluids, which are under-saturated in CaCO3. Seamounts are suspected to act as an entrance point for cold seawater, which then equilibrates with the basaltic oceanic crust prior to exiting through the pits. Such a process should affect the thermal structure in and around the pits as well as the geochemistry of the pore water. During cruise SO207 (June/July 2010 on the German RV Sonne) in the vicinity of ODP/IODP Site 1256 and ODP site 844 (Guatemala Basin, eastern equatorial Pacific) we collected 24 gravity cores varying in length between 3.3 m and 10.6 m from 3 distinct working areas. The cores were generally taken along a transect, starting in the center of a pit, across the pit slope to the surrounding seafloor. From these cores a total of 451 pore water samples were collected and analyzed onboard (pH, Eh, Fe, NH4 and alkalinity), as well as in the laboratory (Cl, SO4, Na, Mg, K, Ca, Sr and Mn). First results do not show any obvious evidence for the "hydrothermal" hypotheses. Pore water profiles were more or less identical, whether collected from within or from outside a pit. Chloride, SO4, Na, Mg, K, Ca, and Sr concentrations were identical to those in seawater. Particularly higher Ca and Sr concentrations were to be expected if calcium carbonate dissolution took place within the sediments. With respect to sediment composition and physico-chemical conditions in the pore waters, we observed larger

  2. Pore water pressure variations in Subpermafrost groundwater : Numerical modeling compared with experimental modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, Agnès.; Goncalves, Julio; Jost, Anne; Font, Marianne

    2010-05-01

    Development and degradation of permafrost directly affect numerous hydrogeological processes such as thermal regime, exchange between river and groundwater, groundwater flows patterns and groundwater recharge (Michel, 1994). Groundwater in permafrost area is subdivided into two zones: suprapermafrost and subpermafrost which are separated by permafrost. As a result of the volumetric expansion of water upon freezing and assuming ice lenses and frost heave do not form freezing in a saturated aquifer, the progressive formation of permafrost leads to the pressurization of the subpermafrost groundwater (Wang, 2006). Therefore disappearance or aggradation of permafrost modifies the confined or unconfined state of subpermafrost groundwater. Our study focuses on modifications of pore water pressure of subpermafrost groundwater which could appear during thawing and freezing of soil. Numerical simulation allows elucidation of some of these processes. Our numerical model accounts for phase changes for coupled heat transport and variably saturated flow involving cycles of freezing and thawing. The flow model is a combination of a one-dimensional channel flow model which uses Manning-Strickler equation and a two-dimensional vertically groundwater flow model using Richards equation. Numerical simulation of heat transport consisted in a two dimensional model accounting for the effects of latent heat of phase change of water associated with melting/freezing cycles which incorporated the advection-diffusion equation describing heat-transfer in porous media. The change of hydraulic conductivity and thermal conductivity are considered by our numerical model. The model was evaluated by comparing predictions with data from laboratory freezing experiments. Experimental design was undertaken at the Laboratory M2C (Univesité de Caen-Basse Normandie, CNRS, France). The device consisted of a Plexiglas box insulated on all sides except on the top. Precipitation and ambient temperature are

  3. Pore-Filling Ice Diffusively Derived From Atmospheric Water Vapor Under Mars Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, T. L.; Aharonson, O.; Oslund, K.; Siegler, M.; Schorghofer, N.

    2007-12-01

    Conditions during previous climate epochs on Mars may have allowed subsurface ice to form via diffusion from a moist atmosphere. The deposition and recharge of such reservoirs is driven by subsurface humidity gradients; an atmospheric frostpoint greater than that of the subsurface results in a net influx of vapor which deposits in pore space as ice. Observations of the hydrogen distribution by Mars Odyssey indicate that the ice content of some high-latitude regions (e.g. Olympia Undae) exceeds 70% by volume. Reconciliation of this concentration with typically lower porosities of soils demands a process of ice segregation (lensing) and mechanical expansion, or direct precipitation. We investigate the possibility and consequences of volumetrically significant subsurface ice derived from the Mars atmosphere by vapor diffusion, at present and in the past. Experiments conducted at the Mars Simulation and Ice Laboratory at Caltech demonstrate that diffusion processes produce significant pore-filling ice under controlled lab conditions. Atmospherically derived water vapor is deposited within an initially dry porous medium subject to a strong (~15~K/cm) temperature gradient forcing a humidity gradient. This mimics the humidity gradient caused by time varying temperatures in the shallow subsurface of Mars with a static experimental setup. The vertical profile of water content is determined at the end of the experiment by gravimetric analysis and the thermal conductivity of the ice-bearing sample is calculated. Pore filling fractions up to 100% have been measured. Profiles with a marked transition in ice content at the frostpoint depth are observed corresponding to a subsurface ice table. The data enable calculation of time-varying diffusion coefficients which exhibit a reduction of up to an order of magnitude with respect to ice-free regolith. These are compared to numerical models of vapor diffusion incorporating ice deposition and pore constriction. Formation theories of

  4. Partitioning of PAHs in pore water from mangrove wetlands in Shantou, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qi min; Wang, Hua; Qin, Jian qiao; Chen, Gui zhu; Zhang, Yong bei

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the trend of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) partitioning, fifteen pore water samples collected from the sediments of three mangrove wetlands were analyzed, and the partition coefficients and the partition model for the PAHs were determined by the correlation between K(oc) and octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)). The results revealed that the mean Kp values in inner mangrove wetlands were between 143 and 1031 L /Kg; the particulate organic carbon (POC) could strongly adsorb low-ring PAHs; the PAHs partitioning was on a obvious trend transported to particle phase. We suggest that the classic equilibrium model of organic carbon normalized (K(p)=K(oc)f(oc)) may be used to predict the trend of the selected PAHs partitioning. PMID:25450913

  5. Changes in14c activity over time during vacuum distillation of carbon from rock pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davidson, G.R.; Yang, I.C.

    1999-01-01

    The radiocarbon activity of carbon collected by vacuum distillation from a single partially saturated tuff began to decline after approximately 60% of the water and carbon had been extracted. Disproportionate changes in 14C activity and ??13C during distillation rule out simple isotopic fractionation as a causative explanation. Additional phenomena such as matrix diffusion and ion exclusion in micropores may play a role in altering the isotopic value of extracted carbon, but neither can fully account for the observed changes. The most plausible explanation is that distillation recovers carbon from an adsorbed phase that is depleted in 14C relative to DIC in the bulk pore water. ?? 1999 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF MARINE WATER QUALITY CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protectional Agency has developed guidelines for deriving numerical national water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic organisms and their uses. These guidelines provide the method for deriving water quality criteria, including minimum data base...

  7. Investigation of Two Novel Approaches for Detection of Sulfate Ion and Methane Dissolved in Sediment Pore Water Using Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zengfeng; Chen, Jing; Ye, Wangquan; Guo, Jinjia; Zhang, Xin; Zheng, Ronger

    2015-01-01

    The levels of dissolved sulfate and methane are crucial indicators in the geochemical analysis of pore water. Compositional analysis of pore water samples obtained from sea trials was conducted using Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the concentration of SO42− in pore water samples decreases as the depth increases, while the expected Raman signal of methane has not been observed. A possible reason for this is that the methane escaped after sampling and the remaining concentration of methane is too low to be detected. To find more effective ways to analyze the composition of pore water, two novel approaches are proposed. One is based on Liquid Core Optical Fiber (LCOF) for detection of SO42−. The other one is an enrichment process for the detection of CH4. With the aid of LCOF, the Raman signal of SO42− is found to be enhanced over 10 times compared to that obtained by a conventional Raman setup. The enrichment process is also found to be effective in the investigation to the prepared sample of methane dissolved in water. By CCl4 extraction, methane at a concentration below 1.14 mmol/L has been detected by conventional Raman spectroscopy. All the obtained results suggest that the approach proposed in this paper has great potential to be developed as a sensor for SO42− and CH4 detection in pore water. PMID:26016919

  8. Unexpected Arsenate/Arsenite Gradients in Pore-Water Profiles From a Shallow-Water Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, R. E.; Pichler, T.; Amend, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    The shallow-water submarine hot-springs near Ambitle Island in eastern Papua New Guinea provide us with the exceptional opportunity to study the biogeochemistry of arsenic (As) along a horizontal and a vertical gradient. Hydrothermal venting occurs as discharge of a clear, two-phase fluid from discrete orifices, 10-15 cm in diameter, with minor phase separation (boiling) at the sea floor. In addition diffuse seepage of the same fluid, but without phase separation occurs throughout the area. Fluid temperatures for individual springs range from 89 to 98/degC, while diffuse seepage temperatures are generally lower. The hydrothermal fluids contain up to 1000 μg/L As, which is exclusively present as the trivalent species arsenite (As(III)). Stepping away to a distance of 300 m from the area of focused venting, we collected 10 pore-water profiles down to a depth of 1 m in 10-cm intervals. The profiles were collected with a 10-port sampler by simultaneously filling 10 syringes to reduce vertical flow. In those samples 10 cm below the seawater-sediment interface, total As concentrations decreased from 900 μg/L closest to the vents to 6 μg/L at 300 m away. The 6 μg/L at 300 m is still 3-times the expected value for seawater, thus indicating the potential extension of hydrothermal influence. As(V)/As(III) ratios were determined to investigate the transport and fate of As(III) and to evaluate horizontal and vertical redox gradients. Surprisingly, As in the vertical pore-water profiles occurs predominantly as the oxidized form, As(V), with As(V)/As(III) ratios ranging from 0.05 to 0.1, whereas vertical pore-water profiles from a "non-hydrothermal" control site show a redox gradient with a ratio ranging from 0.5 to 1.0. Along the horizontal gradient the 10 cm pore-water samples show an increase in the As(V)/As(III) ratio, from 0.07 near the vents to 1.75 at 300 m away. These unexpected ratios suggest that microbes may be catalyzing the oxidation of hydrothermal As(III) to

  9. 77 FR 60687 - Record of Decision for the U.S. Marine Corps Basewide Water Infrastructure Project at Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... construction, operation, and maintenance of a new Northern Advanced Water Treatment plant and associated... Department of the Navy Record of Decision for the U.S. Marine Corps Basewide Water Infrastructure Project at... decision to upgrade and improve the Basewide water infrastructure at Marine Corps Base Camp...

  10. Origin and transport of pore fluids in the Nankai accretionary prism inferred from chemical and isotopic compositions of pore water at cold seep sites off Kumano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, Tomohiro; Higa, Ryosaku; Ijiri, Akira; Tsunogai, Urumu; Ashi, Juichiro

    2014-12-01

    We used push corers during manned submersible dives to obtain sediment samples of up to 30 cm from the subseafloor at the Oomine Ridge. The concentrations of B in pore water extracted from the sediment samples from cold seep sites were higher than could be explained by organic matter decomposition, suggesting that the seepage fluid at the site was influenced by B derived from smectite-illite alteration, which occurs between 50°C and 160°C. Although the negative δ18OH2O and δDH2O values of the pore fluids cannot be explained by freshwater derived from clay mineral dehydration (CMD), we considered the contribution of pore fluids in the shallow sediments of the accretionary prism, which showed negative δ18OH2O and δDH2O values according to the results obtained during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expeditions 315 and 316. We calculated the mixing ratios based on a four-end-member mixing model including freshwater derived from CMD, pore fluids in the shallow (SPF) accretionary prism sediment, seawater (SW), and freshwater derived from methane hydrate (MH) dissociation. However, the Oomine seep fluids were unable to be explained without four end members, suggesting that deep-sourced fluids in the accretionary prism influenced the seeping fluids from this area. This finding presents the first evidence of deep-sourced fluids at cold seep sites in the Oomine Ridge, indicating that a megasplay fault is a potential pathway for the deep-sourced fluids.

  11. Effect of pore water velocities and solute input methods on chloride transport in the undisturbed soil columns of Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, BeiBei; Wang, QuanJiu

    2016-04-01

    Studies on solute transport under different pore water velocity and solute input methods in undisturbed soil could play instructive roles for crop production. Based on the experiments in the laboratory, the effect of solute input methods with small pulse input and large pulse input, as well as four pore water velocities, on chloride transport in the undisturbed soil columns obtained from the Loess Plateau under controlled condition was studied. Chloride breakthrough curves (BTCs) were generated using the miscible displacement method under water-saturated, steady flow conditions. Using the 0.15 mol L-1 CaCl2 solution as a tracer, a small pulse (0.1 pore volumes) was first induced, and then, after all the solution was wash off, a large pulse (0.5 pore volumes) was conducted. The convection-dispersion equation (CDE) and the two-region model (T-R) were used to describe the BTCs, and their prediction accuracies and fitted parameters were compared as well. All the BTCs obtained for the different input methods and the four pore water velocities were all smooth. However, the shapes of the BTCs varied greatly; small pulse inputs resulted in more rapid attainment of peak values that appeared earlier with increases in pore water velocity, whereas large pulse inputs resulted in an opposite trend. Both models could fit the experimental data well, but the prediction accuracy of the T-R was better. The values of the dispersivity, λ, calculated from the dispersion coefficient obtained from the CDE were about one order of magnitude larger than those calculated from the dispersion coefficient given by the T-R, but the calculated Peclet number, Pe, was lower. The mobile-immobile partition coefficient, β, decreased, while the mass exchange coefficient increased with increases in pore water velocity.

  12. Monitoring water transport between pores and voids in aerated gypsum using two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance exchange measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyung-Min; Mitchell, Jonathan; Jaffel, Hamouda; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the connectivity between aeration voids (radius 200-300 µm) and pores (radius 20 µm) in aerated gypsum plaster using two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance T2-T2 relaxation time exchange experiments. These measurements provide an estimate of diffusive exchange rates for water molecules moving between environments differentiated by relaxation time. Aerated gypsum is a lightweight material manufactured by the inclusion of voids to reduce the bulk density. Such materials exhibit a multi-modal distribution of pore and void sizes and are associated with novel water imbibition processes. Here, we use T2-T2 exchange experiments to characterize the extent of fluid communication between the voids and pores to better understand the structure-transport relationships in these systems. In turn, this will aid the design of gypsum plasters with improved physical and mechanical properties. Utilizing an analytical model based on diffusion-driven exchange, we extract exchange times and hence diffusive length-scales, which are equivalent to the pore diameter. Overall, we conclude that the voids and pores are well connected. This confirms our previous hypothesis that water uptake occurs via capillary-driven imbibition through a continuum of voids and pores in aerated gypsum.

  13. Release of Escherichia coli from Foreshore Sand and Pore Water during Intensified Wave Conditions at a Recreational Beach.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Laura J; O'Carroll, Denis M; Edge, Thomas A; Robinson, Clare E

    2016-06-01

    Foreshore beach sands and pore water may act as a reservoir and nonpoint source of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) to surface waters. This paper presents data collected at a fine sand beach on Lake Huron, Canada over three field events. The data show that foreshore sand erosion as wave height increases results in elevated Escherichia coli concentrations in surface water, as well as depletion of E. coli from the foreshore sand and pore water. E. coli initially attached to foreshore sand rather than initially residing in the pore water was found to be the main contributor to elevated surface water concentrations. Surface water E. coli concentrations were a function of not only wave height (and associated sand erosion) but also the time elapsed since a preceding period of high wave intensity. This finding is important for statistical regression models used to predict beach advisories. While calculations suggest that foreshore sand erosion may be the dominant mechanism for releasing E. coli to surface water during intensified wave conditions at a fine sand beach, comparative characterization of the E. coli distribution at a coarse sand-cobble beach suggests that interstitial pore water flow and discharge may be more important for coarser sand beaches. PMID:27120087

  14. Active Sampling Device for Determining Pollutants in Surface and Pore Water - the In Situ Sampler for Biphasic Water Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Supowit, Samuel D; Roll, Isaac B; Dang, Viet D; Kroll, Kevin J; Denslow, Nancy D; Halden, Rolf U

    2016-01-01

    We designed and evaluated an active sampling device, using as analytical targets a family of pesticides purported to contribute to honeybee colony collapse disorder. Simultaneous sampling of bulk water and pore water was accomplished using a low-flow, multi-channel pump to deliver water to an array of solid-phase extraction cartridges. Analytes were separated using either liquid or gas chromatography, and analysis was performed using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Achieved recoveries of fipronil and degradates in water spiked to nominal concentrations of 0.1, 1, and 10 ng/L ranged from 77 ± 12 to 110 ± 18%. Method detection limits (MDLs) were as low as 0.040-0.8 ng/L. Extraction and quantitation of total fiproles at a wastewater-receiving wetland yielded concentrations in surface water and pore water ranging from 9.9 ± 4.6 to 18.1 ± 4.6 ng/L and 9.1 ± 3.0 to 12.6 ± 2.1 ng/L, respectively. Detected concentrations were statistically indistinguishable from those determined by conventional, more laborious techniques (p > 0.2 for the three most abundant fiproles). Aside from offering time-averaged sampling capabilities for two phases simultaneously with picogram-per-liter MDLs, the novel methodology eliminates the need for water and sediment transport via in situ solid phase extraction. PMID:26905924

  15. Active Sampling Device for Determining Pollutants in Surface and Pore Water - the In Situ Sampler for Biphasic Water Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supowit, Samuel D.; Roll, Isaac B.; Dang, Viet D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2016-02-01

    We designed and evaluated an active sampling device, using as analytical targets a family of pesticides purported to contribute to honeybee colony collapse disorder. Simultaneous sampling of bulk water and pore water was accomplished using a low-flow, multi-channel pump to deliver water to an array of solid-phase extraction cartridges. Analytes were separated using either liquid or gas chromatography, and analysis was performed using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Achieved recoveries of fipronil and degradates in water spiked to nominal concentrations of 0.1, 1, and 10 ng/L ranged from 77 ± 12 to 110 ± 18%. Method detection limits (MDLs) were as low as 0.040-0.8 ng/L. Extraction and quantitation of total fiproles at a wastewater-receiving wetland yielded concentrations in surface water and pore water ranging from 9.9 ± 4.6 to 18.1 ± 4.6 ng/L and 9.1 ± 3.0 to 12.6 ± 2.1 ng/L, respectively. Detected concentrations were statistically indistinguishable from those determined by conventional, more laborious techniques (p > 0.2 for the three most abundant fiproles). Aside from offering time-averaged sampling capabilities for two phases simultaneously with picogram-per-liter MDLs, the novel methodology eliminates the need for water and sediment transport via in situ solid phase extraction.

  16. Active Sampling Device for Determining Pollutants in Surface and Pore Water – the In Situ Sampler for Biphasic Water Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Supowit, Samuel D.; Roll, Isaac B.; Dang, Viet D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2016-01-01

    We designed and evaluated an active sampling device, using as analytical targets a family of pesticides purported to contribute to honeybee colony collapse disorder. Simultaneous sampling of bulk water and pore water was accomplished using a low-flow, multi-channel pump to deliver water to an array of solid-phase extraction cartridges. Analytes were separated using either liquid or gas chromatography, and analysis was performed using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Achieved recoveries of fipronil and degradates in water spiked to nominal concentrations of 0.1, 1, and 10 ng/L ranged from 77 ± 12 to 110 ± 18%. Method detection limits (MDLs) were as low as 0.040–0.8 ng/L. Extraction and quantitation of total fiproles at a wastewater-receiving wetland yielded concentrations in surface water and pore water ranging from 9.9 ± 4.6 to 18.1 ± 4.6 ng/L and 9.1 ± 3.0 to 12.6 ± 2.1 ng/L, respectively. Detected concentrations were statistically indistinguishable from those determined by conventional, more laborious techniques (p > 0.2 for the three most abundant fiproles). Aside from offering time-averaged sampling capabilities for two phases simultaneously with picogram-per-liter MDLs, the novel methodology eliminates the need for water and sediment transport via in situ solid phase extraction. PMID:26905924

  17. Mercury cycling in boreal ecosystems: The long-term effect of acid rain constituents on peatland pore water methylmercury concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branfireun, Brian A.; Bishop, Kevin; Roulet, Nigel T.; Granberg, Gunnar; Nilsson, Mats

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria have been identified as primary methylators of mercury (Hg) in the laboratory and in field investigations. However, no studies have investigated the effect of long-term deposition of sulphate on methylmercury (MeHg) dynamics in peatlands, which are known to be significant sources of MeHg to downstream waters in the boreal forest zone. As an ancillary experiment to a larger project investigating the effects of acid rain constituents on peatland carbon dynamics, the influence of experimentally elevated Na2SO4 and/or NH4NO3 deposition on peat pore water MeHg concentrations was determined using a simple mesocosm experimental design. After three years, additions of S in amounts equivalent to the 1980s dry and wet deposition in Southern Sweden resulted in peat pore water MeHg concentrations up to six times above background levels. Elevated N loads had no effect on pore water MeHg concentrations.

  18. Mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash from a MSW fluidized-bed incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bodenan, F.; Guyonnet, D.; Piantone, P.; Blanc, P.

    2010-07-15

    This paper presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large percolation column experiment. A particular focus is on the redox behaviour of Cr(VI) in relation to metal aluminium Al{sup 0}, as chromium may represent an environmental or health hazard. The leaching behaviour and interaction between Cr(VI) and Al{sup 0} are interpreted on the basis of mineralogical evolutions observed over the 18-month period and of saturation indices calculated with the geochemical code PhreeqC and reviewed thermodynamic data. Results of mineralogical analyses show in particular the alteration of mineral phases during leaching (e.g. quartz and metal aluminium grains), while geochemical calculations suggest equilibria of percolating fluids with respect to specific mineral phases (e.g. monohydrocalcite and aluminium hydroxide). The combination of leaching data on a large scale and mineralogical analyses document the coupled leaching behaviour of aluminium and chromium, with chromium appearing in the pore fluids in its hexavalent and mobile state once metal aluminium is no longer available for chromium reduction.

  19. Mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash from a MSW fluidized-bed incinerator.

    PubMed

    Bodénan, F; Guyonnet, D; Piantone, P; Blanc, P

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large percolation column experiment. A particular focus is on the redox behaviour of Cr(VI) in relation to metal aluminium Al(0), as chromium may represent an environmental or health hazard. The leaching behaviour and interaction between Cr(VI) and Al(0) are interpreted on the basis of mineralogical evolutions observed over the 18-month period and of saturation indices calculated with the geochemical code PhreeqC and reviewed thermodynamic data. Results of mineralogical analyses show in particular the alteration of mineral phases during leaching (e.g. quartz and metal aluminium grains), while geochemical calculations suggest equilibria of percolating fluids with respect to specific mineral phases (e.g. monohydrocalcite and aluminium hydroxide). The combination of leaching data on a large scale and mineralogical analyses document the coupled leaching behaviour of aluminium and chromium, with chromium appearing in the pore fluids in its hexavalent and mobile state once metal aluminium is no longer available for chromium reduction. PMID:20153161

  20. Solid-state 13C NMR studies of dissolved organic matter in pore waters from different depositional environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in pore waters from sediments of a number of different depositional environments was isolated by ultrafiltration using membranes with a nominal molecular weight cutoff of 500. This > 500 molecular weight DOM represents 70-98% of the total DOM in these pore waters. We determined the gross chemical structure of this material using both solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Our results show that the DOM in these pore waters appears to exist as two major types: one type dominated by carbohydrates and paraffinic structures and the second dominated by paraffinic and aromatic structures. We suggest that the dominance of one or the other structural type of DOM in the pore water depends on the relative oxidizing/reducing nature of the sediments as well as the source of the detrital organic matter. Under dominantly anaerobic conditions carbohydrates in the sediments are degraded by bacteria and accumulate in the pore water as DOM. However, little or no degradation of lignin occurs under these conditions. In contrast, sediments thought to be predominantly aerobic in character have DOM with diminished carbohydrate and enhanced aromatic character. The aromatic structures in the DOM from these sediments are thought to arise from the degradation of lignin. The large amounts of paraffinic structures in both types of DOM may be due to the degradation of unidentified paraffinic materials in algal or bacterial remains. ?? 1987.

  1. Water-Organic-Rock Reactions Recorded in Pores in Shales from the Marcellus and Rose Hill Formations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, S. L.; Jin, L.; Rother, G.; Cole, D. R.; gu, X.; Balashov, V. N.

    2013-12-01

    The porosity of shales varies depending upon such attributes as the mineralogy, grain size, organic content, depth and duration of burial, and extent of water-rock reaction. Today, shales are being exploited when they contain significant natural gas, and the connectivity of pores are important toward controlling both recovery of gas after hydrofracking. In fact, the fine-scale nature of the pores controls aspects of release of natural gas and brines during hydrofracturing and gas exploitation. Despite the importance of shale as a source rock for natural gas and petroleum, it remains difficult to quantify and image porosity in shales because of their fine-scale nature. We are using neutron scattering, FIB SEM, CT microtomography, and other techniques to understand pores in a black (Marcellus) and a grey shale (Rose Hill formation) sampled in Pennsylvania. Samples were recovered both from outcrop and from depth in wellbores. We also report a new approach for investigating pores in shales by using neutron scattering before and after removal of organic matter. Pores in the two shales are observed to be isotropic (i.e. in the plane of bedding) or anisotropic (i.e. perpendicular to bedding), as expected for sediments that have been compacted after burial. Some nanometer-sized pores are observed in the organic matter of the Marcellus to be spherical; other pores are observed to be present in pyrite framboids and among silicate grains in that rock. We have no evidence that significant porosity is present in the organic matter in the Rose Hill formation, a relatively organic-poor shale, but pores are observed between and in clay particles. We also investigate how progressive water-rock reaction changes the primary porosity in the shales by investigating weathering samples. FIB SEM images document that organic matter is oxidized and removed significantly from the weathering Marcellus before the rock turns to soil, leaving behind porosity. Pyrite oxidation and dissolution

  2. Pilot-scale in situ bioremediation of HMX and RDX in soil pore water in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Payne, Zachary M; Lamichhane, Krishna M; Babcock, Roger W; Turnbull, Stephen J

    2013-10-01

    A nine-month in situ bioremediation study was conducted in Makua Military Reservation (MMR) in Oahu, Hawaii (USA) to evaluate the potential of molasses to enhance biodegradation of royal demolition explosive (RDX) and high-melting explosive (HMX) contaminated soil below the root zone. MMR has been in operation since the 1940's resulting in subsurface contamination that in some locations exceeds USEPA preliminary remediation goals for these chemicals. A molasses-water mixture (1 : 40 dilution) was applied to a treatment plot and clean water was applied to a control plot via seven flood irrigation events. Pore water samples were collected from 12 lysimeters installed at different depths in 3 boreholes in each test plot. The difference in mean concentrations of RDX in pore water samples from the two test plots was very highly significant (p < 0.001). The concentrations differences with depth were also very highly significant (p < 0.001) and degradation was greatly enhanced at depths from 5 to 13.5 ft. biodegradation was modeled as first order and the rate constant was 0.063 per day at 5 ft and decreased to 0.023 per day at 11 ft to 13.5 ft depth. Enhanced biodegradation of HMX was also observed in molasses treated plot samples but only at a depth of 5 ft. The difference in mean TOC concentration (surrogate for molasses) was highly significant with depth (p = 0.003) and very highly significant with treatment (p < 0.001). Mean total nitrogen concentrations also differed significantly with treatment (p < 0.001) and depth (p = 0.059). The molasses water mixture had a similar infiltration rate to that of plain water (average 4.12 ft per day) and reached the deepest sensor (31 ft) within 5 days of application. Most of the molasses was consumed by soil microorganisms by about 13.5 feet below ground surface and treatment of deeper depths may require greater molasses concentrations and/or more frequent flood irrigation. Use of the bioremediation method described herein

  3. Sediment-pore water interactions controlling cementation in the NanTroSEIZE drilling transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, W.; Spinelli, G. A.; Torres, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    One goal of the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) is to understand how changes in subducting sediment control the transition from aseismic to seismogenic behavior in subduction zones. In the sediment entering the Nankai subduction zone, dramatic changes in physical and chemical properties occur across a diagenetic boundary; they are thought to affect sediment strength and deformation. The dissolution of disseminated volcanic ash and precipitation of silica cement may be responsible for these changes in physical properties, but the mechanism controlling cementation was unclear (Spinelli et al., 2007). In this study, we used CrunchFlow (Steefel, 2009) to simulate chemical reactions and fluid flow through 1-D sediment columns at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) sites on the incoming plate in Nankai Trough. The simulations include the thermodynamics and kinetics of sediment-water interactions, advection of pore water and sediment due to compaction, and multi-component diffusion in an accumulating sediment column. Key reactions in the simulations are: ash dissolution, amorphous silica precipitation and dissolution, and zeolite precipitation. The rate of ash decomposition was constrained using Sr isotope data of Joseph et al. (2012). Our model reproduces the distinct diagenetic boundary observed in sediment and pore water chemistry, which defines two zones. Above this boundary (zone 1), dissolved and amorphous silicate contents are high and the potassium concentration remains near seawater values or gradually decreases toward the boundary. Below the boundary, both dissolved and amorphous silicate content drop rapidly, concomitant with a decrease in dissolved potassium. Our model shows that these changes in the system are driven by formation of clinoptilolite in response to changes in pore fluid pH. The low pH values (<7.6) above the diagenetic boundary accelerate ash decomposition and maintain clinoptilolite slightly undersaturated. The

  4. Marine water quality under climate change conditions/scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Jonathan; Torresan, Silvia; Critto, Andrea; Zabeo, Alex; Brigolin, Daniele; Carniel, Sandro; Pastres, Roberto; Marcomini, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    The increase of sea temperature and the changes in marine currents are generating impacts on coastal waters such as changes in water biogeochemical and physical parameters (e.g. primary production, pH, salinity) leading to progressive degradation of the marine environment. With the main aim of analysing the potential impacts of climate change on coastal water quality, a Regional Risk Assessment (RRA) methodology was developed and applied to coastal marine waters of the North Adriatic (i.e. coastal water bodies of the Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia regions, Italy). RRA integrates the outputs of regional models providing information on macronutrients (i.e. dissolved inorganic nitrogen e reactive phosphorus), dissolved oxygen, pH, salinity and temperature, etc., under future climate change scenarios with site-specific environmental and socio-economic indicators (e.g. biotic index, presence and extension of seagrasses, presence of aquaculture). The presented approach uses Geographic Information Systems to manage, analyse, and visualize data and employs Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis for the integration of stakeholders preferences and experts judgments into the evaluation process. RRA outputs are hazard, exposure, vulnerability, risk and damage maps useful for the identification and prioritization of hot-spot areas and vulnerable targets in the considered region. Therefore, the main aim of this contribution is to apply the RRA methodology to integrate, visualize, and rank according to spatial distribution, physical and chemical data concerning the coastal waters of the North Adriatic Sea in order to predict possible changes of the actual water quality.

  5. 40 CFR 227.31 - Applicable marine water quality criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicable marine water quality criteria. 227.31 Section 227.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE EVALUATION OF PERMIT APPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN DUMPING OF MATERIALS...

  6. Hydrologic inferences from strontium isotopes in pore water from the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.D.; Futa, K.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1997-12-31

    Calcite is ubiquitous at Yucca Mountain, occurring in the soils and as fracture and cavity coatings within the volcanic tuff section. Strontium is a trace element in calcite, generally at the tens to hundreds of ppm level. Because calcite contains very little rubidium and the half-life of the {sup 87}Rb parent is billions of years, the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios of the calcite record the ratio in the water from which the calcite precipitated. Dissolution and reprecipitation does not alter these compositions so that, in the absence of other sources of strontium, one would expect the strontium ratios along a flow path to preserve variations inherited from strontium in the soil zone. Strontium isotope compositions of calcites from various settings in the Yucca Mountain region have contributed to the understanding of the unsaturated zone (UZ), especially in distinguishing unsaturated zone calcite from saturated zone calcite. Different populations of calcite have been compared, either to group them together or distinguish them from each other in terms of their strontium isotope compositions. Ground water and perched water have also been analyzed; this paper presents strontium isotope data obtained on pore water.

  7. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M; Harsh, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility, leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford site 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a source for U supply to ground water. We investigated U release from Hanford capillary fringe sediments by packing sediments into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturated with Columbia River water for 3 to 84 days at varying solution-to-solid ratios. After specified times, samples were centrifuged. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14 days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO3-. Geochemical modeling indicated that calcite could precipitate in the narrowest solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the wide solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics.

  8. The Mg isotopic composition of marine pore fluids from ODP Site 807A (Ontong Java Plateau): Implications for the Cenozoic Mg chemistry of the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantle, M. S.; Teng, F.

    2011-12-01

    carbonates exchange Mg with pore fluids over long time scales, as has been suggested previously [1-2], then the use of Mg isotopes as a paleo-proxy in marine carbonates is complicated. In addition, there is considerable structure in the pore fluid δ26Mg values as a function of depth. Neither the pore fluid isotopic data nor the Mg concentration data fit a simple concave up diffusion profile with depth. Therefore, we hypothesize that there is a component of the pore fluid Mg isotope geochemistry that reflects variations in the Mg isotopic composition of seawater over time, similar to previous attempts at reconstructing seawater Mg concentrations [1]. We use numerical models to simulate deposition, recrystallization, and diffusion over million-year time scales in order to determine seawater δ26Mg over time, constraining recrystallization rates based on previous work [1-2]. References [1] Fantle and DePaolo (2006) GCA, 70, 3883-3904 [2] Fantle and DePaolo (2007), GCA, 71, 2524-2546 [3] Higgins and Schrag (2010), GCA, 74, 5039-5053

  9. Pore water chemistry of an alkaline rift valley lake: Lake Turkana, Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Cerling, T.E.; Johnson, T.C.; Halfman, J.D.; Lister, G.

    1985-01-01

    Lake Turkana is the largest closed basin lake in the African rift system. It has evolved through the past 5000 years to become a moderately alkaline lake. Previous mass balance argument suggest that sulfate is removed from the lake by sulfate reduction in the sediments, and that the lake is accumulating in chloride, sodium, and alkalinity. Studies of pore water from 12 meter cores collected in November 1984 show that sulfate is reduced in the sediment column with a net production of alkalinity. Some sodium is lost from the lake and diffuses into the sediment to maintain charge balance. At several meters depth, organic matter is destroyed by methanogenic bacteria, as shown by the high delta /sup 13/C values for dissolved inorganic carbon. Magnesium and calcium molar ratios change with depth; chloride, sodium, and alkalinity also change with depth.

  10. Microanalysis of dissolved iron and phosphate in pore waters of hypersaline sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, R.; Shaw, T.

    1985-01-01

    Diurnal fluctuations of reduced iron concentrations, expected to occur in reduced sediments in the photic zone, were studied. Iron concentration was compared to O2-H2S, a microcanalysis of sulfate reduction was performed, as well as an examination of diurnal concentration of dissolved phosphate and changes in interstitial CO2. The iron profiles suggest a strong correlation between iron remobilization and processes occurring in the light. Phosphate profiles suggest the removal of phosphate is strongly correlated with precipitation of oxidized iron in the upper 2 mm to 5 mm of the sediments. Pore water CO2 concentrations and carbon isotope ratios are presented. These data are from the analyses of minisediment cores collected from the 42 per mil salt pond and incubated in the laboratory under light and dark conditions.

  11. Method for determining stable isotope ratios of dissolved organic carbon in interstitial and other natural marine waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. E.; Haddad, R. I.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure is described for the analysis of the stable carbon isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in natural waters from marine and higher-salinity environments. Rapid (less than 5 min) and complete oxidation of DOC is achieved using a modification of previous photochemical oxidation techniques. The CO2 evolved from DOC oxidation can be collected in less than 10 min for isotopic analysis. The procedure is at present suitable for oxidation and collection of 1-5 micromoles of carbon and has an associated blank of 0.1-0.2 micromole of carbon. Complete photochemical oxidation of DOC standards was demonstrated by quantitative recovery of CO2 as measured manometrically. Isotopic analyses of standards by photochemical and high-temperature sealed-tube combustion methods agreed to within 0.3%. Photochemical oxidation of DOC in a representative sediment pore-water sample was also quantitative, as shown by the excellent agreement between the photochemical and sealed-tube methods. The delta 13C values obtained for pore-water DOC using the two methods of oxidation were identical, suggesting that the modified photochemical method is adequate for the isotopically non-fractionated oxidation of pore-water DOC. The procedure was evaluated through an analysis of DOC in pond and pore waters from a hypersaline microbial mat environment. Concentrations of DOC in the water column over the mat displayed a diel pattern, but the isotopic composition of this DOC remained relatively constant (average delta 13C = -12.4%). Pore-water DOC exhibited a distinct concentration maximum in the mat surface layer, and delta 13C of pore-water DOC was nearly 8% lighter at 1.5-2.0-cm depth than in the mat surface layer (0-0.5-cm depth). These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the method in elucidating differences in DOC concentration and delta 13C over biogeochemically relevant spatial and temporal scales. Carbon isotopic analysis of DOC in natural waters, especially pore waters

  12. SWRC fit - a nonlinear fitting program with a water retention curve for soils having unimodal and bimodal pore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, K.

    2007-02-01

    The soil hydraulic parameters for analyzing soil water movement can be determined by fitting a soil water retention curve to a certain function, i.e., a soil hydraulic model. For this purpose, the program "SWRC Fit," which performs nonlinear fitting of soil water retention curves to 5 models by Levenberg-Marquardt method, was developed. The five models are the Brooks and Corey model, the van Genuchten model, Kosugi's log-normal pore-size distribution model, Durner's bimodal pore-size distribution model, and a bimodal log-normal pore-size distribution model propose in this study. This program automatically determines all the necessary conditions for the nonlinear fitting, such as the initial estimate of the parameters, and, therefore, users can simply input the soil water retention data to obtain the necessary parameters. The program can be executed directly from a web page at http://purl.org/net/swrc/; a client version of the software written in numeric calculation language GNU Octave is included in the electronic supplement of this paper. The program was used for determining the soil hydraulic parameters of 420 soils in UNSODA database. After comparing the root mean square error of the unimodal models, the van Genuchten and Kosugi's models were better than the Brooks and Corey model. The bimodal log-normal pore-size distribution model had similar fitting performance to Durner's bimodal pore-size distribution model.

  13. Micron-pore-sized metallic filter tube membranes for filtration of particulates and water purification

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, Tommy Joe; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Bischoff, Brian L; Miller, Curtis Jack; Drake, Meghan M; Judkins, Roddie Reagan

    2008-01-01

    Robust filtering techniques capable of efficiently removing particulates and biological agents from water or air suffer from plugging, poor rejuvenation, low permeance, and high backpressure. Operational characteristics of pressure-driven separations are in part controlled by the membrane pore size, charge of particulates, transmembrane pressure and the requirement for sufficient water flux to overcome fouling. With long term use filters decline in permeance due to filter-cake plugging of pores, fouling, or filter deterioration. Though metallic filter tube development at ORNL has focused almost exclusively on gas separations, a small study examined the applicability of these membranes for tangential filtering of aqueous suspensions of bacterial-sized particles. A mixture of fluorescent polystyrene microspheres ranging in size from 0.5 to 6 {micro}m in diameter simulated microorganisms in filtration studies. Compared to a commercial filter, the ORNL 0.6 {micro}m filter averaged approximately 10-fold greater filtration efficiency of the small particles, several-fold greater permeance after considerable use and it returned to approximately 85% of the initial flow upon backflushing versus 30% for the commercial filter. After filtering several liters of the particle-containing suspension, the ORNL composite filter still exhibited greater than 50% of its initial permeance while the commercial filter had decreased to less than 20%. When considering a greater filtration efficiency, greater permeance per unit mass, greater percentage of rejuvenation upon backflushing (up to 3-fold), and likely greater performance with extended use, the ORNL 0.6 {micro}m filters can potentially outperform the commercial filter by factors of 100-1000 fold.

  14. Rare earth elements in pore waters from Cabo Friós western boundary upwelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoak, J. M.; Silva-Filho, E. V.; Rousseau, T.; Albuquerque, A. L.; Caldeira, P. P.; Moreira, M.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are a group of reactive trace elements in aqueous media, they have a coherent chemical behavior with however a subtle and gradual shift in physicochemical properties allowing their use as tracers of sources and processes. Uncertainties on their oceanic inputs and outputs still remains [Arsouze et al., 2009; Siddall et al., 2008; Tachikawa et al., 2003]. The water-sediment interface were early on identified as a relevant REE source due to the high distribution coefficient between sediments and pore waters [Elderfield and Sholkovitz, 1987] and substantially higher concentration then the water column [Abbott et al., 2015; Haley et al., 2004; Sholkovitz et al., 1989; Soyol-Erdene and Huh, 2013]. Here we present a cross shelf transect of 4 short pore waters REE profiles on a 680 km2 mud bank located in the region of Cabo Frio, Brazil. This study reveals similar trends at the four sites: a REE production zone reflected by a maximum in concentration at the top of the sediment evolving with depth toward a REE consumption zone reflected by a minimum in REE concentrations. PAAS normalized patterns shows 1) a progressive depletion in LREE with depth with HREE/LREE ratios comprised between 1.1 and 1.6 in the 2 first centimeters evolving gradually to ratios comprised between 2.8 and 4.7 above 7 cm 2) A sharp gradient in negative Ce anomaly with Ce/Ce* values reaching 0.3. With maximum Nd concentrations comprised between 780 and 1200 pmol.kg and considering that seawater Nd concentrations of Brazilian shelf bottom waters are comprised between 24 and 50 pmol.Kg-1 we apply the Fick´s First Law of diffusion and estimate that 340 +/- 90 nmol. m-2 Y-1 of Nd is released in the Cabo frio´s mudbank. This flux is in the same order of magnitude of recent estimates by [Abbott et al., 2015] in the slope of Oregon´s margin. Unraveling processes responsible for the REE production zone will help to refine the global REE fluxes estimates.

  15. The Water Permeability and Pore Entrance Structure of Aquaporin-4 Depend on Lipid Bilayer Thickness.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jihong; Wu, Zhe; Briggs, Margaret M; Schulten, Klaus; McIntosh, Thomas J

    2016-07-12

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4), the primary water channel in glial cells of the mammalian brain, plays a critical role in water transport in the central nervous system. Previous experiments have shown that the water permeability of AQP4 depends on the cholesterol content in the lipid bilayer, but it was not clear whether changes in permeability were due to direct cholesterol-AQP4 interactions or to indirect effects caused by cholesterol-induced changes in bilayer elasticity or bilayer thickness. To determine the effects resulting only from bilayer thickness, here we use a combination of experiments and simulations to analyze AQP4 in cholesterol-free phospholipid bilayers with similar elastic properties but different hydrocarbon core thicknesses previously determined by x-ray diffraction. The channel (unit) water permeabilities of AQP4 measured by osmotic-gradient experiments were 3.5 ± 0.2 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s (mean ± SE), 3.0 ± 0.3 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s, 2.5 ± 0.2 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s, and 0.9 ± 0.1 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s in bilayers containing (C22:1)(C22:1)PC, (C20:1)(C20:1)PC, (C16:0)(C18:1)PC, and (C13:0)(C13:0)PC, respectively. Channel permeabilities obtained by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were 3.3 ± 0.1 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s and 2.5 ± 0.1 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s in (C22:1)(C22:1)PC and (C14:0)(C14:0)PC bilayers, respectively. Both the osmotic-gradient and MD-simulation results indicated that AQP4 channel permeability decreased with decreasing bilayer hydrocarbon thickness. The MD simulations also suggested structural modifications in AQP4 in response to changes in bilayer thickness. Although the simulations showed no appreciable changes to the radius of the pore located in the hydrocarbon region of the bilayers, the simulations indicated that there were changes in both pore length and α-helix organization near the cytoplasmic vestibule of the channel. These structural changes, caused by mismatch between the hydrophobic length of AQP4 and the bilayer hydrocarbon

  16. Intermittent particle dynamics in marine coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renosh, P. R.; Schmitt, F. G.; Loisel, H.

    2015-10-01

    Marine coastal processes are highly variable over different space scales and timescales. In this paper we analyse the intermittency properties of particle size distribution (PSD) recorded every second using a LISST instrument (Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry). The particle concentrations have been recorded over 32 size classes from 2.5 to 500 μm, at 1 Hz resolution. Such information is used to estimate at each time step the hyperbolic slope of the particle size distribution, and to consider its dynamics. Shannon entropy, as an indicator of the randomness, is estimated at each time step and its dynamics is analysed. Furthermore, particles are separated into four classes according to their size, and the intermittent properties of these classes are considered. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is used, associated with arbitrary-order Hilbert spectral analysis (AHSA), in order to retrieve scaling multifractal moment functions, for scales from 10 s to 8 min. The intermittent properties of two other indicators of particle concentration are also considered in the same range of scales: the total volume concentration Cvol-total and the particulate beam attenuation coefficient cp(670). Both show quite similar intermittent dynamics and are characterised by the same exponents. Globally we find here negative Hurst exponents (meaning the small scales show larger fluctuation than large scales) for each time series considered, and nonlinear moment functions.

  17. Assessing sulfate reduction and methane cycling in a high salinity pore water system in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohlman, J.W.; Ruppel, C.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Downer, R.; Coffin, R.B.

    2008-01-01

    Pore waters extracted from 18 piston cores obtained on and near a salt-cored bathymetric high in Keathley Canyon lease block 151 in the northern Gulf of Mexico contain elevated concentrations of chloride (up to 838 mM) and have pore water chemical concentration profiles that exhibit extensive departures (concavity) from steady-state (linear) diffusive equilibrium with depth. Minimum ??13C dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) values of -55.9??? to -64.8??? at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) strongly suggest active anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) throughout the study region. However, the nonlinear pore water chemistry-depth profiles make it impossible to determine the vertical extent of active AOM or the potential role of alternate sulfate reduction pathways. Here we utilize the conservative (non-reactive) nature of dissolved chloride to differentiate the effects of biogeochemical activity (e.g., AOM and/or organoclastic sulfate reduction) relative to physical mixing in high salinity Keathley Canyon sediments. In most cases, the DIC and sulfate concentrations in pore waters are consistent with a conservative mixing model that uses chloride concentrations at the seafloor and the SMT as endmembers. Conservative mixing of pore water constituents implies that an undetermined physical process is primarily responsible for the nonlinearity of the pore water-depth profiles. In limited cases where the sulfate and DIC concentrations deviated from conservative mixing between the seafloor and SMT, the ??13C-DIC mixing diagrams suggest that the excess DIC is produced from a 13C-depleted source that could only be accounted for by microbial methane, the dominant form of methane identified during this study. We conclude that AOM is the most prevalent sink for sulfate and that it occurs primarily at the SMT at this Keathley Canyon site.

  18. Determination of acute Zn toxicity in pore water from soils previously treated with sewage sludge using bioluminescence assays

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudri, A.M.; Knight, B.P.; Barbosa-Jefferson, V.L.

    1999-06-01

    The effects of increasing concentrations of Zn and Cu in soil pore water from soils of a long-term sewage sludge field experiment on microbial bioluminescence were investigated. Concentrations of total soluble Zn, free Zn{sup 2+}, and soluble Cu increased sharply in soil pore water with increasing total soil metal concentrations above 140 mg of Zn kg{sup {minus}1} or 100 mg of Cu kg{sup {minus}1}. Two luminescence bioassays were tested, based on two bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) with the lux genes encoding bacterial luminescence inserted into them. The bioluminescence response of the two microorganisms declined as total soil Zn, soil pore water soluble Zn, and soil pore water free Zn{sup 2+} concentrations increased. The EC{sub 25} values for E. coli and P. fluorescens were 1.3 {+-} 0.2 and 4.3 {+-} 0.5 mg L{sup {minus}1} on a free Zn{sup 2+} basis, respectively. The EC{sub 50} values were 2.5 {+-} 0.2 and 9.6 {+-} 0.9 mg of free Zn{sup 2+} L{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Copper had no significant effect on bioluminescence in the two assays, even at the largest soil pore water concentration of about 620 {micro}g L{sup {minus}1}, corresponding to a total Cu concentration in bulk soil of about 350 mg kg{sup {minus}1}. Thus, the decline in bioluminescence of the two assays was ascribed to increasing soil pore water free Zn{sup 2+} and not soluble Cu.

  19. Ether Lipids of Planktonic Archaea in the Marine Water Column

    PubMed Central

    Hoefs, M.; Schouten, S.; De Leeuw, J. W.; King, L. L.; Wakeham, S. G.; Damste, J.

    1997-01-01

    Acyclic and cyclic biphytanes derived from the membrane ether lipids of archaea were found in water column particulate and sedimentary organic matter from several oxic and anoxic marine environments. Compound-specific isotope analyses of the carbon skeletons suggest that planktonic archaea utilize an isotopically heavy carbon source such as algal carbohydrates and proteins or dissolved bicarbonate. Due to their high preservation potential, these lipids provide a fossil record of planktonic archaea and suggest that they have thrived in marine environments for more than 50 million years. PMID:16535669

  20. The lipid geochemistry of interstitial waters of recent marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Saliot, A.; Brault, M.; Boussuge, C. )

    1988-04-01

    To elucidate the nature of biogeochemical processes occurring at the water-sediment interface, the authors have analyzed fatty acids, n-alkanes and sterols contained in interstitial waters collected from oxic and anoxic marine sediments in the eastern and western intertropical Atlantic Ocean and in the Arabian Sea. Lipid concentrations in interstitial waters vary widely and are generally much higher than concentrations encountered in the overlying sea water. Higher concentrations in interstitial water are observed in environments favorable for organic input and preservation of the organic matter in the water column and in the surficial sediment. The analysis of biogeochemical markers in the various media of occurrence of the organic matter such as sea water, suspended particles, settling particles and sediment is discussed in terms of differences existing between these media and bio-transformations of the organic matter at the water-sediment interface.

  1. Testing geochemical models of bentonite pore water evolution against laboratory experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, David; Arthur, Randy; Watson, Claire; Wilson, James; Strömberg, Bo

    The determination of a bentonite pore water composition and understanding its evolution with time underpins many radioactive waste disposal issues, such as buffer erosion, canister corrosion, and radionuclide solubility, sorption, and diffusion, inter alia. Previous modelling approaches have tended to ignore clay dissolution-precipitation reactions, a consequence of which is that montmorillonite is theoretically preserved indefinitely in the repository system. Here, we investigate the applicability of an alternative clay pore fluid evolution model, that incorporates clay dissolution-precipitation reactions as an integral component and test it against well-characterised laboratory experimental data, where key geochemical parameters, Eh and pH, have been measured directly in compacted bentonite. Simulations have been conducted using different computer codes (Geochemist’s Workbench, PHREEQC, and QPAC) to test the applicability of this model. Thermodynamic data for the Gibb’s free energy of formation of MX-80 smectite used in the calculations were estimated using two different methods (‘Polymer’ and ‘Vieillard’ Models). Simulations of ‘end-point’ pH measurements in batch bentonite-water slurry experiments showed different pH values according to the complexity of the system studied. The most complete system investigated revealed pH values were a strong function of partial pressure of carbon dioxide, with pH increasing with decreasing PCO 2 (with log PCO 2 values ranging from -3.5 to -7.5 bars produced pH values ranging from 7.9 to 9.6). A second set of calculations investigated disequilibrium between clay and pore fluid in laboratory squeezing cell tests involving pure water (pH = 9.0) or a 1 M NaOH solution (pH = 12.1). Simulations carried out for 100 days (the same timescale as the experiments) showed that smectite remained far from equilibrium throughout, and that the lowering of pH due to smectite hydrolysis was trivial. However, extending the

  2. Multiphase Reactive Transport modeling of Stable Isotope Fractionation of Infiltrating Unsaturated Zone Pore Water and Vapor Using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, Michael J.; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-08-28

    Numerical simulations of transport and isotope fractionation provide a method to quantitatively interpret vadose zone pore water stable isotope depth profiles based on soil properties, climatic conditions, and infiltration. We incorporate the temperature-dependent equilibration of stable isotopic species between water and water vapor, and their differing diffusive transport properties into the thermodynamic database of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. These simulations are used to illustrate the evolution of stable isotope profiles in semiarid regions where recharge during wet seasons disturbs the drying profile traditionally associated with vadose zone pore waters. Alternating wet and dry seasons lead to annual fluctuations in moisture content, capillary pressure, and stable isotope compositions in the vadose zone. Periodic infiltration models capture the effects of seasonal increases in precipitation and predict stable isotope profiles that are distinct from those observed under drying (zero infiltration) conditions. After infiltration, evaporation causes a shift to higher 18O and D values, which are preserved in the deeper pore waters. The magnitude of the isotopic composition shift preserved in deep vadose zone pore waters varies inversely with the rate of infiltration.

  3. MONITORING OF PORE WATER PRESSURE AND WATER CONTENT AROUND A HORIZONTAL DRIFT THROUGH EXCAVATION - MEASUREMENT AT THE 140m GALLERY IN THE HORONOBE URL -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuuchi, Satoshi; Kunimaru, Takanori; Kishi, Atsuyasu; Komatsu, Mitsuru

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been conducting the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory (URL) project in Horonobe, Hokkaido, as a part of the research and development program on geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Pore water pressure and water content around a horizontal drift in the URL have been monitored for over 18 months since before the drift excavation was started. During the drift excavation, both pore water pressure and water content were decreasing. Pore water pressure has been still positive though it continued to decrease with its gradient gradually smaller after excavation, while water content turned to increase about 6 months after the completion of the excavation. It turned to fall again about 5 months later. An unsaturated zone containing gases which were dissolved in groundwater may have been formed around the horizontal drift.

  4. Analysis of intracellular and extracellular microcystin variants in sediments and pore waters by accelerated solvent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zastepa, Arthur; Pick, Frances R; Blais, Jules M; Saleem, Ammar

    2015-05-01

    The fate and persistence of microcystin cyanotoxins in aquatic ecosystems remains poorly understood in part due to the lack of analytical methods for microcystins in sediments. Existing methods have been limited to the extraction of a few extracellular microcystins of similar chemistry. We developed a single analytical method, consisting of accelerated solvent extraction, hydrophilic-lipophilic balance solid phase extraction, and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, suitable for the extraction and quantitation of both intracellular and extracellular cyanotoxins in sediments as well as pore waters. Recoveries of nine microcystins, representing the chemical diversity of microcystins, and nodularin (a marine analogue) ranged between 75 and 98% with one, microcystin-RR (MC-RR), at 50%. Chromatographic separation of these analytes was achieved within 7.5 min and the method detection limits were between 1.1 and 2.5 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw). The robustness of the method was demonstrated on sediment cores collected from seven Canadian lakes of diverse geography and trophic states. Individual microcystin variants reached a maximum concentration of 829 ng g(-1) dw on sediment particles and 132 ng mL(-1) in pore waters and could be detected in sediments as deep as 41 cm (>100 years in age). MC-LR, -RR, and -LA were more often detected while MC-YR, -LY, -LF, and -LW were less common. The analytical method enabled us to estimate sediment-pore water distribution coefficients (K(d)), MC-RR had the highest affinity for sediment particles (log K(d)=1.3) while MC-LA had the lowest affinity (log K(d)=-0.4), partitioning mainly into pore waters. Our findings confirm that sediments serve as a reservoir for microcystins but suggest that some variants may diffuse into overlying water thereby constituting a new route of exposure following the dissipation of toxic blooms. The method is well suited to determine the fate and persistence of different

  5. Monitoring and Analysis of Transient Pore Water Pressures in Large Suspended Rock Slides near Poschiavo, CH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Palézieux, Larissa; Loew, Simon; Zwahlen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Many mountain slopes in the Alps exhibit large compound rock slides or Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformations. Due to the basal rupture plane geometry and the cumulative displacement magnitude such landslide bodies are often strongly deformed, highly fractured and - at least locally - very permeable. This can lead to high infiltration rates and low phreatic groundwater tables. This is also the situation in the studied mountain slopes southwest of Poschiavo, where large suspended rockslides occur, with very little surface runoff at high elevations, and torrents developing only at the elevation of the basal rupture planes. Below the landslide toes, at altitudes below ca. 1700 m a.s.l., groundwater appears forming spring lines or distributed spring clusters. Within the scope of the design of a hydropower pump storage plant in the Poschiavo valley by Lagobianco SA (Repower AG), numerous cored and deep boreholes (of 50 to 300 m depth) have been drilled along the planned pressure tunnel alignement at elevations ranging from 963 to 2538 m a.s.l. in the years 2010 and 2012. In several boreholes Lugeon and transient pressure tests were executed and pore water pressure sensors installed in short monitoring sections at various depths. Most of these boreholes intersect deep rockslides in crystalline rocks and limestones, showing highly fragmented rock masses and cohesionless cataclastic shear zones of several tens of meters thickness. This study explores these borehole observations in landslides and adjacent stable slopes and links them to the general hydrologic and hydrogeologic framework. The analysis of the pore water pressure data shows significant variability in seasonal trends and short-term events (from snow melt and summer rain storms) and remarkable pressure differences over short horizontal and vertical distances. This reflects rock mass damage within landslide bodies and important sealing horizons at their base. Based on water balances, the estimated effective

  6. Pore-Scale Investigation of CO2 Exsolution from Carbonated Water in Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, L.; Zhang, C. Y.; Falta, R. W.; Benson, S. M.

    2012-04-01

    Geologic sequestration of supercritical CO2 in saline aquifers and depleted oil and gas fields will cause large volumes of brine to become saturated with dissolved CO2 at concentrations of 50 g/L or more due to the high CO2 solubility in brine at elevated pressure and temperature. While dissolution of CO2 improves storage security by removing buoyancy forces, risks still exist if CO2 saturated brine escapes from the reservoir as the solubility of CO2 decreases with hydrostatic pressure. The CO2, released from solution, would expand or even form a separate phase at shallower depths after being transported through caprocks or seals. Previous studies (Zuo et al., 2011) have shown that exsolution results in a separate CO2 phase with very low mobility. We hypothesized that the low mobility resulted from the dispersed morphology of CO2 bubbles. The objective of this study is to understand the dynamics of CO2 exsolution and the effects on reservoir flows at a microscope scale. In this study, a silicon-glass micromodel was fabricated based on images of a thin section of a Mount Simon sandstone from Illinois, USA. The micromodel mimics the complexity of pore structures existing in real porous media in two dimensions and has a minimum aperture of 3um. Carbon dioxide exsolution was created by slowly extracting fluids from the micromodel, which was initially saturated with carbonated water under reservoir conditions (9MPa and 45C). An optical microscope was used to monitor and record the entire process. Instantaneous nucleation was observed in the micromodel at a constant pressure drop rate of 1MPa/h, followed by a rapid process of bubble expansion and cluster growth. Carbon dioxide bubbles were highly dispersed and poorly interconnected, even when the gas saturation reached as high as 53%. Compared to a drainage process in the same micromodel, at the same gas saturation, exsolution resulted in a greater number of bubbles, but with a smaller average size. Forty to sixty

  7. Nitrogen Fixation in Denitrified Marine Waters

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Camila; Farías, Laura; Ulloa, Osvaldo

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation is an essential process that biologically transforms atmospheric dinitrogen gas to ammonia, therefore compensating for nitrogen losses occurring via denitrification and anammox. Currently, inputs and losses of nitrogen to the ocean resulting from these processes are thought to be spatially separated: nitrogen fixation takes place primarily in open ocean environments (mainly through diazotrophic cyanobacteria), whereas nitrogen losses occur in oxygen-depleted intermediate waters and sediments (mostly via denitrifying and anammox bacteria). Here we report on rates of nitrogen fixation obtained during two oceanographic cruises in 2005 and 2007 in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP), a region characterized by the presence of coastal upwelling and a major permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Our results show significant rates of nitrogen fixation in the water column; however, integrated rates from the surface down to 120 m varied by ∼30 fold between cruises (7.5±4.6 versus 190±82.3 µmol m−2 d−1). Moreover, rates were measured down to 400 m depth in 2007, indicating that the contribution to the integrated rates of the subsurface oxygen-deficient layer was ∼5 times higher (574±294 µmol m−2 d−1) than the oxic euphotic layer (48±68 µmol m−2 d−1). Concurrent molecular measurements detected the dinitrogenase reductase gene nifH in surface and subsurface waters. Phylogenetic analysis of the nifH sequences showed the presence of a diverse diazotrophic community at the time of the highest measured nitrogen fixation rates. Our results thus demonstrate the occurrence of nitrogen fixation in nutrient-rich coastal upwelling systems and, importantly, within the underlying OMZ. They also suggest that nitrogen fixation is a widespread process that can sporadically provide a supplementary source of fixed nitrogen in these regions. PMID:21687726

  8. Concentrations, diffusive fluxes and toxicity of heavy metals in pore water of the Fuyang River, Haihe Basin.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenzhong; Duan, Shenghui; Shan, Baoqing; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Wenqiang; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-05-01

    While the concentrations of heavy metals in pore water provide important information about their bioavailability, to date few studies have focused on this topic. In this study, pore water in river sediments collected from nine sampling sites (S1-S9) was examined to determine the concentrations, fluxes, and toxicity of heavy metals in the Fuyang River. The results showed that the average concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu, As, Zn, and Pb in pore water were 17.06, 15.97, 20.93, 19.08, 43.72, and 0.56μgL(-1), respectively; these concentrations varied as the pore water depth increased. The diffusive fluxes of Cr, Ni, Cu, As, Zn, and Pb were in the following range: (-0.37) to 3.17, (-1.37) to 2.63, (-4.61) to 3.44, 0.17-6.02, (-180.26) to 7.51, and (-0.92) to (-0.29)μg(m(2)day)(-1), respectively. There was a potential risk of toxicity from Cu to aquatic organisms, as indicated by a value of the Interstitial Water Criteria Toxic Units that exceeded 1.0. Values of the Nemeraw Index were 2.06, 0.48, 0.11, 0.20, 1.11, 1.03, 0.99, 0.88, and 0.89 from S1 to S9, respectively. Only S1 was moderately polluted by heavy metals in pore water. PMID:26802565

  9. A mini drivepoint sampler for measuring pore water solute concentrations in the hyporheic zone of sand-bottom streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duff, J.H.; Murphy, F.; Fuller, C.C.; Triska, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    A new method for collecting pore-water samples in sand and gravel streambeds is presented. We developed a mini drivepoint solution sampling (MINIPOINT) technique to collect pore-water samples at 2.5-cm vertical resolution. The sampler consisted of six small-diameter stainless steel drivepoints arranged in a 10-cm-diameter circular array. In a simple procedure, the sampler was installed in the streambed to preset drivepoint depths of 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0, 12.5, and 15.0 cm. Sampler performance was evaluated in the Shingobee River, Minnesota, and Pinal Creek, Arizona, by measuring the vertical gradient of chloride concentration in pore water beneath the streambed that was established by the uninterrupted injection to the stream for 3 d. Pore-water samples were withdrawn from all drivepoints simultaneously. In the first evaluation, the vertical chloride gradient was unchanged at withdrawal rates between 0.3 and 4.0 ml min-1 but was disturbed at higher rates. In the second evaluation, up to 70 ml of pore water was withdrawn from each drivepoint at a withdrawal rate of 2.5 ml min-1 without disturbing the vertical chloride gradient. Background concentrations of other solutes were also determined with MINIPOINT sampling. Steep vertical gradients were present for biologically reactive solutes such as DO, NH4/+, NO3/-, and dissolved organic C in the top 20 cm of the streambed. These detailed solute profiles in the hyporheic zone could not have been determined without a method for close interval vertical sampling that does not disturb natural hydrologic mixing between stream water and groundwater.

  10. Ciliates along oxyclines of permanently stratified marine water columns.

    PubMed

    Edgcomb, Virginia P; Pachiadaki, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Studies of microbial communities in areas of the world where permanent marine water column oxyclines exist suggest they are "hotspots" of microbial activity, and that these water features and the anoxic waters below them are inhabited by diverse protist taxa, including ciliates. These communities have minimal taxonomic overlap with those in overlying oxic water columns. Some ciliate taxa have been detected in multiple locations where these stable water column oxyclines exist; however, differences in such factors as hydrochemistry in the habitats that have been studied suggest local selection for distinct communities. We compare published data on ciliate communities from studies of deep marine water column oxyclines in Caricao Basin, Venezuela, and the Black Sea, with data from coastal, shallower oxycline waters in Framvaren and Mariager fjords, and from several deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Putative symbioses between Bacteria, Archaea, and ciliates observed along these oxyclines suggests a strategy of cooperative metabolism for survival that includes chemosynthetic autotrophy and exchanges of metabolic intermediates or end products between hosts and their prokaryotic partners. PMID:24801774

  11. Chlorofluorocarbon-11 removal in anoxic marine waters

    SciTech Connect

    Bullister, J.L.; Lee, B.S.

    1995-07-15

    Measurements of the chlorofluorocarbons CCl{sub 3}F (F-11) and CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2}(F-12) made in the subsurface anoxic zones of the Black Sea and Saanich Inlet, B.C., Canada show a pronounced depletion of dissolved F-11. These zones are strongly reducing and are characterized by the absence of dissolved nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) and the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S). Models incorporating the atmospheric input histories of these CFCs and the observed distributions are used to estimate residence times for water in these zones and first order in-situ removal rates for F-11. In contrast, measurements in the mid-depth low-oxygen zone of the eastern Pacific (where NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} is present and H{sub 2}S is below detection limits) do not show evidence of similar rapid F-11 removal. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Use of pore-water composition to reconstruct past dissolved inorganic carbon concentration and alkalinity in Pacific bottom water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, J. F.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329 shipboard scientific party

    2011-12-01

    The carbonate system is a crucial component in controlling the pH of the world's oceans and the distribution of CO2 within the ocean, as well as between the ocean and atmosphere. Consequently, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity reconstructions bear lots of promise for improving understanding of the ocean's role in the global carbon cycle and climate. We propose and test a method to quantify in situ concentrations of deep-sea carbonate-system components (DIC, alkalinity, CO32-, Ca2+, and minor component concentrations) in pore fluid of deep-sea sediment cores. These concentrations can in turn be used to reconstruct deep-sea carbonate-system chemistry of the geologic past. Alkalinity, DIC and Ca2+ concentrations measured on research vessels differ from in situ values because temperature and pressure changes during core recovery, storage and extraction induce calcium carbonate precipitation and in this way alter the original composition. To reconstruct in situ values, we developed a method that takes advantage of the mathematically over-determined state of the system if three components are measured, given that CaCO3 is saturated and the dissolved carbonate system is at equilibrium in situ. As a result, based on the measured alkalinity, DIC and Ca2+ concentrations, in situ CO2aq, HCO3-, CO32-, and minor species concentrations are calculated by applying an iteration process. This approach allows us to calculate the amount of CaCO3 precipitated during sediment recovery from the seafloor, and hence in situ carbonate system components. We apply our model to pore-water data from two SPG sites rich in calcium carbonate and drilled by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329 (Sites 1367 and 1368). We compared two sample types for this study, (i) samples squeezed and processed within minutes of recovery (rapidly processed) and (ii) samples processed in the following hours/days, and as consequence prone to some substantial alteration (slowly processed

  13. The effects of pressure, temperature, and pore water on velocities in Westerly granite. [for seismic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. W., Jr.; Nur, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of an experimental assembly which has been developed to conduct concurrent measurements of compressional and shear wave velocities in rocks at high temperatures and confining pressures and with independent control of the pore pressure. The apparatus was used in studies of the joint effects of temperature, external confining pressure, and internal pore water on sonic velocities in Westerly granite. It was found that at a given temperature, confining pressure has a larger accelerating effect on compressional waves in dry rock, whereas at a given confining pressure, temperature has a larger retarding effect on shear waves.

  14. Contaminated marine sediments: Water column and interstitial toxic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, R.M.; McKinney, R.A. ); Schweitzer, K.A. ); Phelps, D.K. )

    1993-01-01

    The toxicity that contaminated sediments may introduce into the water column has not been measured extensively. In order to quantify this potential toxicity, the seawater overlying two uncontaminated and three contaminated marine sediments was evaluated in the laboratory with the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata fertilization test. Concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and copper, as representative contaminants, were also measured. To characterize sources of toxicity, samples were chemically manipulated using reversed-phase chromatography, cation exchange, and chelation. Water column toxicity and contaminant concentrations were higher in the suspended exposures than in bedded exposures. Interstitial water toxicity and contaminant concentrations were generally greater than either bedded or suspended exposures. Chemical manipulation indicated that the observed toxicity in water column exposures was probably caused by metallic and/or nonionic organic contaminants. Conversely, manipulation of interstitial water did not result in significantly reduced toxicity, suggesting that other toxicants such as ammonia and hydrogen sulfide may be active.

  15. Contaminated marine sediments: Water column and interstitial toxic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, R.M.; Schweitzer, K.A.; McKinney, R.A.; Phelps, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    The toxicity that contaminated sediments may introduce into the water column has not been measured extensively. In order to quantify this potential toxicity, the seawater overlying two uncontaminated and three contaminated marine sediments was evaluated in the laboratory with the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata fertilization test. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and copper, as representative contaminants, were also measured. To characterize sources of toxicity, samples were chemically manipulated using reversed-phase chromatography, cation exchange, and chelation. Water column toxicity and contaminant concentrations were higher in the suspended exposures than in bedded exposures. Interstitial water toxicity and contaminant concentrations were generally greater than either bedded or suspended exposures. Chemical manipulation indicated that the observed toxicity in water column exposures was probably caused by metallic and/or nonionic organic contaminants. Conversely, manipulation of interstitial waters did not result in significantly reduced toxicity, suggesting that other toxicants such as ammonia and hydrogen sulfide may be active.

  16. Chemical analyses of pore water from boreholes USW SD-6 and USW WT-24, Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Yang, In C; Peterman, Zell E; Scofield, Kevin M

    2003-01-01

    Analyses of pore water extracted from cores of boreholes USW SD-6 in the central part and USW WT-24 in the northern part of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, show significant vertical and lateral variations in dissolved-ion concentrations. Analyses of samples of only a few milliliters of pore water extracted by uniaxial or triaxial compression and by ultracentrifugation methods from adjacent core samples are generally in agreement, within the analytical error of 10% to 15%. However, the values of silica for water obtained by ultracentrifugation are consistently lower than values for water obtained by compression. The larger concentrations probably are due to localized pressure solution of silicate minerals during compression. The shallower water from core in borehole USW SD-6 was extracted from nonwelded units collectively referred to as the Paintbrush Tuff nonwelded (PTn). The deeper water was from core in both boreholes USW SD-6 and USW WT-24 in the nonwelded units referred to as the Calico Hills nonwelded (CHn). Significant differences in mean dissolved-ion concentrations in pore water between the PTn and CHn are (1) decreases in Ca, Mg, SO(4), and NO(3) and (2) increases in HCO(3) and (Na+K)/(Ca+Mg) ratios. The decrease in NO(3) and the increase in HCO(3) could be the result of denitrification through the oxidation of organic matter. The decrease in Ca and associated increase in (Na+K)/(Ca+Mg) is the result of ion exchange with zeolites in the CHn in borehole USW WT-24. This effect is not nearly as pronounced in borehole USW SD-6, probably reflecting a smaller amount of zeolitization of the CHn in USW SD-6. Geochemical calculations using the PHREEQC code indicate that the pore water from both boreholes USW SD-6 and USW WT-24 is uniformly undersaturated in anhydrite, gypsum, and amorphous silica, but supersaturated in quartz and chalcedony. The saturation of calcite, aragonite, sepiolite, and dolomite is more variable from sample to sample. PMID:12714300

  17. Specific features of soil water exchange and chemistry of pore and ground waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muromtsev, N. A.; Pylenok, P. I.; Semenov, N. A.; Anisimov, K. B.

    2015-07-01

    The regularities of water infiltration and evaporation of groundwater at different depths of the groundwater table were established for soddy-podzolic and dark gray forest soils. The recharge of the soils with moisture from the groundwater decreased with a lowering of its table, and the infiltration increased. At the high groundwater table (70 cm from the surface), the moisture recharge of the soddy-podzolic soil amounted to 86 mm and the infiltration amounted to 17 mm; at the groundwater table of 145 cm, these values were 13 and 51 mm, respectively. The concentrations of chemical elements in the lysimeters with the high groundwater table were 2-4 times greater than those in the lysimeters with the low groundwater table.

  18. Measuring Temporal Variability of Methylmercury and Methane in the Pore Waters of a Chesapeake Bay Tidal Marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, K. R.; Oster, J.; Lapham, L.; Heyes, A.

    2015-12-01

    This study assesses the use of OsmoSampler technology to monitor methylmercury production in a tidal marsh and examines temporal variability of methylmercury in relation to controlling factors. We collected pore water samples in a Chesapeake Bay marsh using continuous pore-fluid sampling devices called OsmoSamplers. OsmoSampler technology has not previously been used to investigate mercury cycling. We designed systems using OsmoSamplers to collect pore water samples for methylmercury, methane, chloride, and sulfate analysis, sampling in a vegetated area and an area devegetated by clipping. Samples were collected over a 27 day period and stored in coils to create a temporal data set of in situ concentrations. This time series allows us to explore the methane-methylmercury connection and the effects of vegetation removal on methylmercury production. Some methanogens are known to methylate mercury, but the relative importance of the methane community in mercury methylation is not well understood. We hypothesized a positive correlation between methane and methylmercury production and a decrease in methylmercury production corresponding to vegetation removal. We also sought to demonstrate the feasibility of using OsmoSamplers to look at methylmercury flux in relation to these controls on mercury methylation. This study is a preliminary exploration of this technology in a marsh environment. Using our system we have successfully collected pore water samples. We present the temporal variability of measured concentrations with a discussion of adjustments for future long-term deployment.

  19. Level and degradation of Deepwater Horizon spilled oil in coastal marsh sediments and pore-water.

    PubMed

    Natter, Michael; Keevan, Jeff; Wang, Yang; Keimowitz, Alison R; Okeke, Benedict C; Son, Ahjeong; Lee, Ming-Kuo

    2012-06-01

    This research investigates the level and degradation of oil at ten selected Gulf saltmarsh sites months after the 2010 BP Macondo-1 well oil spill. Very high levels (10-28%) of organic carbon within the heavily oiled sediments are clearly distinguished from those in pristine sediments (<3%). Dissolved organic carbon in contaminated pore-waters, ranging up to hundreds of mg/kg, are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those at pristine sites. Heavily oiled sediments are characterized by very high sulfide concentrations (up to 80 mg/kg) and abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria. Geochemical biomarkers and stable carbon isotope analyses fingerprint the presence of oils in sediments. Ratios of selected parameters calculated from the gas chromatograph spectra are in a remarkable narrow range among spilled oils and initial BP crude. At oiled sites dominated by C(4) plants, δ(13)C values of sediments (-20.8 ± 2.0‰) have been shifted significantly lower compared to marsh plants (-14.8 ± 0.6‰) due to the inflow of isotopically lighter oil (-27 ± 0.2‰). Our results show that (1) lighter compounds of oil are quickly degraded by microbes while the heavier fractions of oil still remain and (2) higher inputs of organic matter from the oil spill enhance the key microbial processes associated with sulfate reducing bacteria. PMID:22571231

  20. Estimation of water saturated permeability of soils, using 3D soil tomographic images and pore-level transport phenomena modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorski, Krzysztof; Sławiński, Cezary; Barna, Gyöngyi

    2014-05-01

    There are some important macroscopic properties of the soil porous media such as: saturated permeability and water retention characteristics. These soil characteristics are very important as they determine soil transport processes and are commonly used as a parameters of general models of soil transport processes used extensively for scientific developments and engineering practise. These characteristics are usually measured or estimated using some statistical or phenomenological modelling, i.e. pedotransfer functions. On the physical basis, saturated soil permeability arises from physical transport processes occurring at the pore level. Current progress in modelling techniques, computational methods and X-ray micro-tomographic technology gives opportunity to use direct methods of physical modelling for pore level transport processes. Physically valid description of transport processes at micro-scale based on Navier-Stokes type modelling approach gives chance to recover macroscopic porous medium characteristics from micro-flow modelling. Water microflow transport processes occurring at the pore level are dependent on the microstructure of porous body and interactions between the fluid and the medium. In case of soils, i.e. the medium there exist relatively big pores in which water can move easily but also finer pores are present in which water transport processes are dominated by strong interactions between the medium and the fluid - full physical description of these phenomena is a challenge. Ten samples of different soils were scanned using X-ray computational microtomograph. The diameter of samples was 5 mm. The voxel resolution of CT scan was 2.5 µm. Resulting 3D soil samples images were used for reconstruction of the pore space for further modelling. 3D image threshholding was made to determine the soil grain surface. This surface was triangulated and used for computational mesh construction for the pore space. Numerical modelling of water flow through the

  1. Pore Water Composition at Gas Seeps in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: Understanding Flow Regime and Chemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, L. A.; Dugan, B.; Dickens, G. R.

    2006-12-01

    Cold seeps on continental slopes discharge large quantities of gas and fluid to the ocean. The expulsion rate and composition of seep fluids can vary significantly in space and time, which can affect local biological and chemical processes. The factors influencing variability in flux and composition, however, are not fully documented. For this study, we have collected and analyzed pore fluids at four sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico: Atwater Valley (AV), Mississippi Canyon (MC), Garden Banks (GB) and Keathley Canyon (KC). The magnitude of fluid discharge is likely highest at the GB and MC sites where active mounds are comparatively larger in size, high heat flux exists across the mounds, and recent mudflow deposits flank the mounds. The AV site samples characterize a smaller mound that may still be growing. Fluxes at the KC site are diffusive and methane-charged, but no mound exists. A comparison of the major ions and trace metals in the pore fluids shows large differences in composition. Pore water barium (Ba2+) values demonstrate the most variation between sites. The maximum Ba2+ values at the GB and MC sites reach 7,800 μM and 12,000 μM. This is two orders of magnitude greater than maximum values at the AV (176 μM) and KC (31 μM) sites. Other components, such as salinity, calcium (Ca2+) and strontium (Sr2+) also record differences in composition between the sites. Pore water salinity values measured at the MC and GB sites reach a maximum of 130 ‰, which is at least 2 times greater than values measured at the AV and KC sites. Differences in pore water Ca2+ and Sr2+ are similar to salinity; in general, maximum values are two times greater at GB and MC than at Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon. The observed differences in pore water composition are the result of the seep fluid source and the chemical processes (e.g., dissolution and precipitation) that occur during migration. Fluid sources and reaction pathways will be evaluated by integrating pore water

  2. Interaction of Ammonia Gas with Sediments and Pore Water and Induced Uranium Immobilization under Vadose Zone Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Szecsody, J. E.; Truex, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Preliminary studies have demonstrated the potential of ammonia gas (NH3) treatment on contaminated sediment as a vadose zone uranium remediation approach. In this work, we conducted batch, column, and flow wedge experiments to study the ammonia gas transport and interaction with sediments and pore water. The uranium immobilization effectiveness of the ammonia gas treatment technology was also evaluated. Ammonia gas quickly partitions into sediment pore water and significantly increases the pH (up to ~13.2) and the electrical conductivity (EC). The rate and range of the increase in both pH and EC are dependent on the ammonia concentration in the gas and the pore water content and chemistry. The pH and EC changes follow a similar pattern. During an ammonia gas injection into a heterogeneous system, it was observed that the NH3 front proceeded faster in layers of lower water content compared to the same sediment layers of higher water content. Elevated pH values (11 to 13.2) initially resulted from the NH3 gas partitioning into the pore water was buffered down to ~ 9 after 7 months of sediment exposure to the air. The rate of NH3 diffusion in sediment is a function of the water content in the sediment. Higher cation/anion concentrations during the ammonia gas treatment indicated mineral dissolution due to pH increase, while lower ionic concentrations after the pH buffering revealed significant mineral precipitation. This precipitation incorporates uranium into mineral structures or provides a coating to uranium minerals, therefore achieving uranium immobilization. Treatment with 5% v/v NH3 gas for one week followed by three weeks buffering resulted in a 75% reduction in the mobile uranium mass. After 2 to 12 months of treatment, the immobile phase of uranium mass increased by up to 2.3 times.

  3. The Influence of Sulphate Deposition on the Seasonal Variation of Peat Pore Water Methyl Hg in a Boreal Mire

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Inger; Bishop, Kevin; Tu, Qiang; Frech, Wolfgang; Åkerblom, Staffan; Nilsson, Mats

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the hypothesis that long-term sulphate (SO42−) deposition has made peatlands a larger source of methyl mercury (MeHg) to remote boreal lakes. This was done on experimental plots at a boreal, low sedge mire where the effect of long-term addition of SO42− on peat pore water MeHg concentrations was observed weekly throughout the snow-free portion of 1999. The additions of SO42− started in 1995. The seasonal mean of the pore water MeHg concentrations on the plots with 17 kg ha−1 yr−1 of sulphur (S) addition (1.3±0.08 ng L−1, SE; n = 44) was significantly (p<0.0001) higher than the mean MeHg concentration on the plots with 3 kg ha−1 yr−1 of ambient S deposition (0.6±0.02 ng L−1, SE; n = 44). The temporal variation in pore water MeHg concentrations during the snow free season was larger in the S-addition plots, with an amplitude of >2 ng L−1 compared to +/−0.5 ng L−1 in the ambient S deposition plots. The concentrations of pore water MeHg in the S-addition plots were positively correlated (r2 = 0.21; p = 0.001) to the groundwater level, with the lowest concentrations of MeHg during the period with the lowest groundwater levels. The pore water MeHg concentrations were not correlated to total Hg, DOC concentration or pH. The results from this study indicate that the persistently higher pore water concentrations of MeHg in the S-addition plots are caused by the long-term additions of SO42− to the mire surface. Since these waters are an important source of runoff, the results support the hypothesis that SO42− deposition has increased the contribution of peatlands to MeHg in downstream aquatic systems. This would mean that the increased deposition of SO42− in acid rain has contributed to the modern increase in the MeHg burdens of remote lakes hydrologically connected to peatlands. PMID:23029086

  4. The influence of sulphate deposition on the seasonal variation of peat pore water methyl Hg in a boreal mire.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Inger; Bishop, Kevin; Tu, Qiang; Frech, Wolfgang; Åkerblom, Staffan; Nilsson, Mats

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the hypothesis that long-term sulphate (SO(4) (2-)) deposition has made peatlands a larger source of methyl mercury (MeHg) to remote boreal lakes. This was done on experimental plots at a boreal, low sedge mire where the effect of long-term addition of SO(4) (2-) on peat pore water MeHg concentrations was observed weekly throughout the snow-free portion of 1999. The additions of SO(4) (2-) started in 1995. The seasonal mean of the pore water MeHg concentrations on the plots with 17 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) of sulphur (S) addition (1.3±0.08 ng L(-1), SE; n = 44) was significantly (p<0.0001) higher than the mean MeHg concentration on the plots with 3 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) of ambient S deposition (0.6±0.02 ng L(-1), SE; n = 44). The temporal variation in pore water MeHg concentrations during the snow free season was larger in the S-addition plots, with an amplitude of >2 ng L(-1) compared to +/-0.5 ng L(-1) in the ambient S deposition plots. The concentrations of pore water MeHg in the S-addition plots were positively correlated (r(2) = 0.21; p = 0.001) to the groundwater level, with the lowest concentrations of MeHg during the period with the lowest groundwater levels. The pore water MeHg concentrations were not correlated to total Hg, DOC concentration or pH. The results from this study indicate that the persistently higher pore water concentrations of MeHg in the S-addition plots are caused by the long-term additions of SO(4) (2-) to the mire surface. Since these waters are an important source of runoff, the results support the hypothesis that SO(4) (2-) deposition has increased the contribution of peatlands to MeHg in downstream aquatic systems. This would mean that the increased deposition of SO(4) (2-) in acid rain has contributed to the modern increase in the MeHg burdens of remote lakes hydrologically connected to peatlands. PMID:23029086

  5. Benthic response to shellfish farming in Thau lagoon: Pore water signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, E.; Simonucci, C.; Viollier, E.; Sarazin, G.; Prévot, F.; Jézéquel, D.

    2007-04-01

    Vertical distributions of dissolved species across the sediment-water interface (SWI), including major cations (sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium), minor cations (lithium, strontium, barium), redox sensitive species (dissolved manganese, iron, sulfate, sulfide, ammonium) and other chemical parameters (pH, alkalinity, soluble reactive phosphorous, dissolved silica) were studied in a Mediterranean lagoon used for intensive shellfish farming. In order to quantify the impact of this activity on diagenetic processes and the influence of seasonal changes, two stations contrasted with respect to organic carbon fluxes were sampled in Thau lagoon from March 2001 to August 2002 during four field campaigns in winter, spring, summer and fall. Well-defined layers enriched with redox sensitive species were observed following the conventional sequence of early diagenetic reactions. However, differences were observed between both stations in depths and thickness layers. Concentration gradients extended down to more than 92 cm depth at the central position of the lagoon (station C4 - 8 m depth) and down to 40 cm depth inside shellfish farming zones (station C5 - 9 m depth). Station C4 showed an unusual diagenetic signature: sharp dissolved oxygen, iron, nitrate and manganese gradients existed at the SWI but gradients of dissolved sulfide and alkalinity as well as other parameters (dissolved silica, Ba, etc.) were recorded only from 25 to 30 cm depth downward. Seasonal changes were observed in pore water composition as deep as 30-50 cm in station C4 (only 15 cm in station C5). The center of the lagoon is not directly subjected to biodeposits deriving from shellfish activity. Isotopic and bioturbation data allowed to rule out a reworking of the sediment deeper than a few centimeters. In addition to organic content of the sediment, physical parameters were likely to induce the 10-20 cm gap between dissolved iron and sulfide profile as well as the higher vertical extent of

  6. Canadian water quality guidelines. Appendix 22: Interim marine and estuarine water quality guidelines for general variables

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This document has been prepared in response to the need for marine water quality guidelines for general water quality variables. It presents interim guidelines, summaries of existing guidelines if any, the rationale for the guidelines, and variable-specific background information, and notes gaps in data, for the following variables: Debris, including floating or submerged litter, and settleable matter; dissolved oxygen; pH; salinity; temperature; and suspended solids and turbidity. For the purpose of this document, the marine environment includes shorelines, estuaries up to the freshwater limit, and nearshore and offshore waters.

  7. Bioavailability of PAHs in aluminum smelter affected sediments: evaluation through assessment of pore water concentrations and in vivo bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Ruus, Anders; Bøyum, Olav; Grung, Merete; Næs, Kristoffer

    2010-12-15

    Bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from coal tar pitch polluted sediments was predicted by (1) a generic approach based on organic carbon-water partitioning and Gibbs linear free energy relationship (between K(OW) and K(OC)), and (2) measurements of freely dissolved concentrations of PAHs in the sediment pore water, using passive samplers and solid phase extraction. Results from these predictions were compared with those from in vivo bioaccumulation experiments using Nereis diversicolor (Polychaeta), Hinia reticulata (Gastropoda), and Nuculoma tenuis (Bivalvia). Measured sediment/water partition coefficients were higher than predicted by the generic approach. Furthermore, predicted biota-to-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) derived from measured pore water concentrations were more in agreement with the bioaccumulation observed for two of the three species. Discrepancies associated with the third species (N. tenuis) were likely a result of particles remaining in the intestine (as shown by microscopic evaluation). These results indicate the importance of conducting site-specific evaluations of pore water concentrations and/or bioaccumulation studies by direct measurements to accurately provide a basis for risk assessment and remediation plans. The importance of knowledge regarding specific characteristics of model organisms is emphasized. PMID:21077669

  8. Water permeability and chloride ion diffusion in portland cement mortars: Relationship to sand content and critical pore diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Halamickova, P.; Detwiler, R.J.; Bentz, D.P.; Garboczi, E.J.

    1995-05-01

    The pore structure of hydrated cement in mortar and concrete is quite different from that of neat cement paste. The porous transition zones formed at the aggregate-paste interfaces affect the pore size distribution. The effect of the sand content on the development of pore structure, the permeability to water, and the diffusivity of chloride ions was studied on portland cement mortars. Mortars of two water-to-cement ratios and three sand volume fractions were cast together with pastes and tested at degrees of hydration ranging from 45 to 70%. An electrically-accelerated concentration cell test was used to determine the coefficient of chloride ion diffusion while a high pressure permeability cell was employed to assess liquid permeability. The coefficient of chloride ion diffusion varied linearly with the critical pore radius as determined by mercury intrusion porosimetry while permeability was found to follow a power-law relationship vs. this critical radius. The data set provides an opportunity to directly examine the application of the Katz-Thompson relationship to cement-based materials.

  9. Pore-scale simulation of liquid CO2 displacement of water using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haihu; Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles J.; Kang, Oinjun; Oostrom, Martinus

    2014-11-01

    A lattice Boltzmann color-fluid model, which was recently proposed by Liu et al. [H. Liu, A.J. Valocchi, and Q. Kang. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible two-phase flow simulations. Phys. Rev. E, 85:046309, 2012.] based on a concept of continuum surface force, is improved to simulate immiscible two-phase flows in porous media. The new improvements allow the model to account for different kinematic viscosities of both fluids and to model fluid-solid interactions. The capability and accuracy of this model is first validated by two benchmark tests: a layered two-phase flow with a viscosity ratio, and a dynamic capillary intrusion. This model is then used to simulate liquid CO2 (LCO2) displacing water in a dual-permeability pore network. The extent and behavior of LCO2 preferential flow (i.e., fingering) is found to depend on the capillary number (Ca), and three different displacement patterns observed in previous micromodel experiments are reproduced. The predicted variation of LCO2 saturation with Ca, as well as variation of specific interfacial length with LCO2 saturation, are both in good agreement with the experimental observations. To understand the effect of heterogeneity on pore-scale displacement, we also simulate LCO2 displacing water in a randomly heterogeneous pore network, which has the same size and porosity as the dual-permeability pore network. In comparison to the dual-permeability case, the transition from capillary fingering to viscous fingering occurs at a higher Ca, and LCO2 saturation is higher at low Ca but lower at high Ca. In either pore network, the LCO2-water specific interfacial length is found to obey a power-law dependence on LCO2 saturation.

  10. Sediment pore-water toxicity test results and preliminary toxicity identification of post-landfall pore-water samples collected following the Deepwater Horizon oil release, Gulf of Mexico, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biedenbach, James M.; Carr, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Pore water from coastal beach and marsh sediments from the northern Gulf of Mexico, pre- and post-landfall of the Deepwater Horizon oil release, were collected and evaluated for toxicity with the sea urchin fertilization and embryological development assays. There were 17 pre-landfall samples and 49 post-landfall samples tested using both assays. Toxicity was determined in four pre-landfall sites and in seven post-landfall sites in one or both assays as compared to a known reference sediment pore-water sample collected in Aransas Bay, Texas. Further analysis and testing of five of the post-landfall toxic samples utilizing Toxicity Identification Evaluation techniques indicated that ammonia, and to a lesser extent metals, contributed to most, if not all, of the observed toxicity in four of the five samples. Results of one sample (MS-39) indicated evidence that ammonia, metals, and non-ionic organics were contributing to the observed toxicity.