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  1. The evolution of the US ESCO industry: From ESCO to SuperESCO

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, E.; Nakagami, Hidetoshi; Murakoshi, Chiharu

    1998-10-01

    As the restructuring of the U.S. electric utility industry proceeds, utility companies are expected to be either competing or partnering with Super ESCOs to provide energy-efficiency services and energy to utility customers. In this paper, Super ESCOs and utilities were interviewed to see how these organizations are currently interacting and planning to interact in the future. As part of this investigation, the types of products and services Super ESCOs will be providing in the future and how utility restructuring will affect their business were examined.

  2. Assessing U.S. ESCO industry performance and market trends: Results from the NAESCO database project

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, Julie; Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Singer, Terry

    2002-05-15

    The U.S. Energy Services Company (ESCO) industry is often cited as the most successful model for the private sector delivery of energy-efficiency services. This study documents actual performance of the ESCO industry in order to provide policymakers and investors with objective informative and customers with a resource for benchmarking proposed projects relative to industry performance. We have assembled a database of nearly 1500 case studies of energy-efficiency projects - the most comprehensive data set of the U.S. ESCO industry available. These projects include $2.55B of work completed by 51 ESCOs and span much of the history of this industry.

  3. Market trends in the U.S. ESCO industry: Results from the NAESCO database project

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Charles A.; Osborn, Julie G.; Hopper, Nicole C.; Singer, Terry E.

    2002-05-01

    The U.S. Energy Services Company (ESCO) industry is often cited as the most successful model for the private sector delivery of energy-efficiency services. This study documents actual performance of the ESCO industry in order to provide policymakers and investors with objective information and customers with a resource for benchmarking proposed projects relative to industry performance. We have assembled a database of nearly 1500 case studies of energy-efficiency projects-the most comprehensive data set of the U.S. ESCO industry available. These projects include $2.55B of work completed by 51 ESCOs and span much of the history of this industry. We estimate that the ESCO industry completed $1.8-2.1B of projects in 2000. The industry has grown rapidly over the last decade with revenues increasing at a 24% annualized rate. We summarize and compare project characteristics and costs and analyze energy savings, including the relationship between predicted and actual savings. ESCOs typically invested about $2.30/ft{sup 2} per project in various energy efficiency improvements, although there is large variation in project costs within and across market segments. We find that lighting-only projects report median electricity savings of 47% of targeted equipment consumption; the median for lighting-&-non-lighting projects is 23% of the total electric bill baseline. We examine project economics, including project net benefits, benefit/cost ratio and simple payback time. Median simple payback time is seven years for institutional sector projects and three years in the private sector. We estimate direct economic benefits of $1.62 billion for the 1080 projects in our database with both cost and savings data. The median benefit/cost ratio is 2.1 for 309 private sector projects and 1.6 for 771 institutional sector projects. We discuss the role of policies and programs adopted by state/federal legislatures and agencies that have played an important role in stimulating ESCO activity in various markets. Finally, we estimate the overall size and growth of the energy-efficiency services industry over the last ten years based on a survey of 63 ESCOs.

  4. Review of U.S. ESCO industry market trends: An empirical analysis of project data

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Charles A.; Hopper, Nicole C.; Osborn, Julie G.; Singer, Terry E.

    2003-03-01

    This article summarizes a comprehensive empirical analysis of U.S. Energy Service Company (ESCO) industry trends and performance. We employ two parallel analytical approaches: a comprehensive survey of firms to estimate total industry size and a database of {approx}1500 ESCO projects, from which we report target markets and typical project characteristics, energy savings and customer economics. We estimate that industry investment for energy-efficiency related services reached US $2 billion in 2000 following a decade of strong growth. ESCO activity is concentrated in states with high economic activity and strong policy support. Typical projects save 150-200 MJ/m2/year and are cost-effective with median benefit/cost ratios of 1.6 and 2.1 for institutional and private sector projects. The median simple payback time is 7 years among institutional customers; 3 years is typical in the private sector. Reliance on DSM incentives has decreased since 1995. Preliminary evidence suggests that state enabling policies have boosted the industry in medium-sized states. ESCOs have proven resilient in the face of restructuring and will probably shift toward selling ''energy solutions,'' with energy efficiency part of a package. We conclude that a private sector energy-efficiency services industry that targets large commercial and industrial customers is viable and self-sustaining with appropriate policy support both financial and non-financial.

  5. A Survey of the U.S. ESCO Industry: Market Growth and Development from 2008 to 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Satchwell, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Larsen, Peter; Gilligan, Donald; Singer, Terry

    2010-06-08

    In this study, LBNL analyzes the current size of the Energy Service Company (ESCO) industry, industry growth projections to 2011, and market trends in order to provide policymakers with a more indepth understanding of energy efficiency activity among private sector firms. We draw heavily on information from interviews with ESCOs conducted from October 2009 to February 2010 and from our review of publicly available financial information regarding individual ESCOs. A significant ramp-up in energy efficiency activities is occurring at the local, state, and federal level. These activities include the establishment in {approx}18 states of statewide energy savings goals to be obtained from adoption of an Energy Efficiency Resource Standard (EERS), legislative or state regulatory directives to obtain all cost-effective demand-side resources (Barbose et al 2009), and a significant increase in federal funding for energy efficiency programs as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). As part of this increased focus on energy efficiency, policymakers are evaluating the role of private sector companies, including ESCOs, in delivering cost-effective energy savings to end-users. The U.S. ESCO industry has long been recognized for its role in successfully delivering comprehensive energy projects in the public sector. This study analyzes the current size of the ESCO industry, industry growth projections, and market trends in order to provide policymakers with a more in-depth understanding of energy efficiency activity among private sector firms. This study may also be of interest to policymakers abroad who are exploring options to encourage development of a private-sector energy services industry in their own countries. This study draws heavily on information from interviews with ESCOs conducted from October 2009 to February 2010 and is part of a series of ESCO industry reports prepared by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in collaboration with the National Association of Energy Services Companies (NAESCO). The analysis builds on previous ESCO industry reports (see Goldman et al. 2005 and Hopper et al. 2007) and provides updated estimates of ESCO industry revenues and ESCO views on perceived trends in costs and savings.

  6. ESCO market and industry trends: Updated results from the NAESCO database project

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, Julie G.; Goldman, Charles A.; Hopper, Nicole C.

    2001-10-15

    Today's U.S. energy efficiency services industry is one of the most successful examples of private sector energy efficiency services in the world, yet little empirical information is available on the actual market activity of this industry. LBNL, together with the National Association of Energy Services Companies (NAESCO), has compiled the most comprehensive dataset of the energy efficiency services industry: nearly 1,500 case studies of energy efficiency projects. Our analysis of these projects helps shed light on some of the conventional wisdom regarding industry performance and evolution. We report key statistics about typical projects and industry trends that will aid state, federal, and international policymakers, and other investors interested in the development of a private sector energy efficiency services industry.

  7. International ESCO business opportunities and challenges: a Japanese case study

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, E.; Murakoshi, C.

    1997-10-01

    Recently, US energy service companies (ESCOs) have begun to actively explore markets outside the US. Despite the needs of many countries for ESCO involvement, ESCOs face many challenges (i.e., marketing, financial, institutional, political and cultural barriers). Consequently, most of these firms pursue international project opportunities very selectively due to the costs and risks associated with project development. Despite these barriers, some ESCOs view international work as a strategic expansion of their business, assuming that there will be adequate business in the future to repay them for their initial investment. In this paper, the authors present the findings from a recently completed study on the proposed development of an ESCO industry in Japan. The study was based on four sources of information: (1) a review of the published and unpublished literature on ESCOs; (2) interviews with 26 ESCOs in the US, the US Department of Energy, and the National Association of Energy Service Companies (NAESCO); (3) ESCO presentations at the October 1996 NAESCO meeting; and (4) informal discussions with ESCO experts in the US. They believe that the lessons learned in this study can be transferred or applied to other countries interested in developing an ESCO industry. While energy prices have remained relatively stable over the last several years in Japan and energy capacity is not perceived as a near-term problem, other ``market drivers`` necessary for the emergence of a successful and vibrant ESCO industry exist in Japan. Despite the presence of these market drivers, significant barriers to the successful development of an ESCO industry exist in Japan.

  8. Tapping the Potential for Energy Efficiency: The Role of ESCOs in the Czech Republic, Ukraine and Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Meredydd

    2000-12-31

    Energy service companies have played a significant role in stimulating energy efficiency in many industrialized countries, including the United States. Many policymakers and development experts consider energy performance contracting an important mechanism for boosting energy efficiency in other countries as well. The experience of ESCOs in transition economies, however, is decidedly mixed. The Czech Republic has been able to foster a thriving ESCO industry with numerous players competing for business, although ESCOs have encountered problems along the way. In Russia and Ukraine, ESCOs have developed slowly, and few true performance contracts exist. This paper reviews the experience of ESCOs in the Czech Republic, Ukraine and Russia and then explores the factors shaping the diverse trends in these countries. The paper draws on the experience of the national energy efficiency centers, development banks, bilateral assistance organizations and individual ESCOs in promoting ESCO industries. Factors that have influenced ESCOs to date include the economy, the price of energy, the financial situation of potential clients, the legislative basis for ESCO activities, the business experience of ESCO staff and access to information about the ESCO concept. Financing has also proven to be a critical factor in developing ESCOs. Lack of project financing and guarantees, for example, is a major problem in the former Soviet Union. The paper concludes by drawing recommendations for policymakers and industry on promoting ESCOs.

  9. A Guide to Performance Contracting with ESCOs

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, Michael C.

    2011-09-01

    An energy services company (ESCO) can identify energy improvements, provide the capital required and installs improvements, offers turn-key installation services, and guarantees energy savings. Companies pay the ESCO back over a period of years from the energy cost savings generated from the project. Hiring an ESCO is a proven strategy for identifying and implementing energy saving capital improvements, while managing risks inherent in such projects.

  10. Public and Institutional Markets for ESCO Services: ComparingPrograms, Practices and Prformance

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; McWilliams, Jennifer; Birr,Dave; Stoughton McMordie, Kate

    2005-03-01

    Throughout the U.S. energy services company (ESCO) industry's history, public and institutional sector customers have provided the greatest opportunities for ESCOs to develop projects. Generally speaking, these facilities are large, possess aging infrastructure, and have limited capital budgets for improvements. The convergence of these factors with strong enabling policy support makes performance contracting an attractive and viable option for these customers. Yet despite these shared characteristics and drivers, there is surprising variety of experience among public/institutional customers and projects. This collaborative study examines the public/institutional markets in detail by comparing the overarching models and project performance in the federal government and the ''MUSH'' markets municipal agencies (state/local government), universities/colleges, K-12 schools,and hospitals that have traditionally played host to much of the ESCO industry's activity. Results are drawn from a database of 1634 completed projects held in partnership by the National Association of Energy Services Companies and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (the NAESCO/LBNL database), including 129 federal Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC) provided by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Strajnic and Nealon 2003). Project data results are supplemented by interviews with ESCOs.

  11. Role of gas cooling in tomorrow`s energy services industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    This article discusses the marketing approach and opportunities for suppliers and manufacturers of gas cooling equipment to partner with energy service companies (ESCOs). The author`s viewpoint is that in educating and partnering with ESCOs the gas cooling industry enables their technology to reach its potential in the projects that the ESCOs develop.

  12. The federal market for ESCO services: How does it measure up?

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Birr, Dave

    2004-05-17

    The federal market has been a source of strong energy service company (ESCO) industry growth over the last decade as traditional MUSH markets municipal/state governments, universities, schools and hospitals have matured. Federal alternative financing programs Utility Energy Services Contracts (UESC) and Department of Energy (DOE) Super, Army and Air Force Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC) have enabled this growth, but recent events threaten the ESPC programs. We compare the federal and MUSH markets by analyzing {approx} ;1550 completed projects and interviewing ESCO representatives. Federal ESPC market activity is estimated at {approx} ;$1.6 billion (B) over 10-15 years; activity in 2002 was {approx} ;$230 million (M). MUSH markets have produced {approx} ; $12-16B in projects over 20 years, and {approx} ;$0.8-1.0B in 2002. Federal sector projects have longer average contract terms than MUSH (14 vs. 9.5 years respectively). Federal projects are larger (median costs are $1.85M vs. $0.98M for MUSH), but costs per square foot are lower (median costs are $2.08/ft2 vs. $2.93/ft2 for MUSH), and annual energy savings are higher (18 vs. 14 kBtu/ft2). Non-energy savings are more often counted in federal projects (58 percent vs. 35 percent of MUSH projects) but when counted represent a higher proportion of savings in MUSH projects. Median payback times in the federal market are shorter than MUSH (7.7 vs. 8.8 years) and calculated net economic benefits of 214 federal projects amount to {approx} ;$550M, compared to {approx} ;$1.2B for 965 MUSH projects.

  13. Cohesin recruits the Esco1 acetyltransferase genome wide to repress transcription and promote cohesion in somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Sadia; Jones, Mathew J. K.; Jallepalli, Prasad V.

    2015-01-01

    The cohesin complex links DNA molecules and plays key roles in the organization, expression, repair, and segregation of eukaryotic genomes. In vertebrates the Esco1 and Esco2 acetyltransferases both modify cohesin’s Smc3 subunit to establish sister chromatid cohesion during S phase, but differ in their N-terminal domains and expression during development and across the cell cycle. Here we show that Esco1 and Esco2 also differ dramatically in their interaction with chromatin, as Esco1 is recruited by cohesin to over 11,000 sites, whereas Esco2 is infrequently enriched at REST/NRSF target genes. Esco1’s colocalization with cohesin occurs throughout the cell cycle and depends on two short motifs (the A-box and B-box) present in and unique to all Esco1 orthologs. Deleting either motif led to the derepression of Esco1-proximal genes and functional uncoupling of cohesion from Smc3 acetylation. In contrast, other mutations that preserved Esco1’s recruitment separated its roles in cohesion establishment and gene silencing. We conclude that Esco1 uses cohesin as both a substrate and a scaffold for coordinating multiple chromatin-based transactions in somatic cells. PMID:26305936

  14. Esco2 is a novel corepressor that associates with various chromatin modifying enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Beom-Jun; Kang, Kyung-Min; Jung, Sung Yun; Choi, Hyun-Kyung; Seo, Jong-Hun; Chae, Ji-Hye; Cho, Eun-Jung; Youn, Hong-Duk; Qin, Jun; Kim, Seong-Tae

    2008-07-25

    Accurate chromosome segregation during cell division requires that sister chromatids are kept together by cohesin complex until anaphase, when the chromatids separate and distribute to the two daughter cells. Esco2 is an acetyltransferase that is required for the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion during S phase. Here, we report that Esco2 interacts with several component proteins of the CoREST complex, including a transcription corepressor CoREST, histone demethlyase LSD1, HDAC1, HDAC2, BRAF35, and PHF21A. Esco2 also interacts with various histone methyltransferases Suv39h1, SETDB1 and G9a. Esco2 complex purified from HeLa nuclear extract possesses histone H3 K9 methylation activity and functions as a transcription repressor. Esco2 fused to Gal4 DNA binding domain represses transcription by increasing methylation of histone H3 K9 in the promoter region. These results suggest a novel function of Esco2 in transcription repression through modulation of the chromatin structure.

  15. Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Peter; Goldman, Charles A.; Satchwell, Andrew

    2012-05-08

    The U.S. energy service company (ESCO) industry is an example of a private sector business model where energy savings are delivered to customers primarily through the use of performance-based contracts. This study was conceived as a snapshot of the ESCO industry prior to the economic slowdown and the introduction of federal stimulus funding mandated by enactment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). This study utilizes two parallel analytic approaches to characterize ESCO industry and market trends in the U.S.: (1) a “top-down” approach involving a survey of individual ESCOs to estimate aggregate industry activity and (2) a “bottom-up” analysis of a database of -3,265 projects (representing over $8B in project investment) that reports market trends including installed EE retrofit strategies, project installation costs and savings, project payback times, and benefit-cost ratios over time. Despite the onset of an economic recession, the U.S. ESCO industry managed to grow at about 7% per year between 2006 and 2008. ESCO industry revenues are relatively small compared to total U.S. energy expenditures (about $4.1 billion in 2008), but ESCOs anticipated accelerated growth through 2011 (25% per year). We found that 2,484 ESCO projects in our database generated -$4.0 billion ($2009) in net, direct economic benefits to their customers. We estimate that the ESCO project database includes about 20% of all U.S. ESCO market activity from 1990-2008. Assuming the net benefits per project are comparable for ESCO projects that are not included in the LBNL database, this would suggest that the ESCO industry has generated -$23 billion in net direct economic benefits for customers at projects installed between 1990 and 2008. We found that nearly 85% of all public and institutional projects met or exceeded the guaranteed level of savings. We estimated that a typical ESCO project generated $1.5 dollars of direct benefits for every dollar of customer investment. There is empirical evidence confirming that the industry is responding to customer demand by installing more comprehensive and complex measures—including onsite generation and measures to address deferred maintenance—but this evolution has significant implications for customer project economics, especially at K-12 schools. We found that the median simple payback time has increased from 1.9 to 3.2 years in private sector projects since the early-to-mid 1990s and from 5.2 to 10.5 years in public sector projects for the same time period.

  16. U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Satchwell, Andrew

    2012-08-21

    The U.S. energy service company (ESCO) industry is an example of a private sector business model where energy savings are delivered to customers primarily through the use of performance-based contracts. This study was conceived as a snapshot of the ESCO industry prior to the economic slowdown and the introduction of federal stimulus funding mandated by enactment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). This study utilizes two parallel analytic approaches to characterize ESCO industry and market trends in the U.S.: (1) a ?top-down? approach involving a survey of individual ESCOs to estimate aggregate industry activity and (2) a ?bottom-up? analysis of a database of ~;;3,250 projects (representing over $8B in project investment) that reports market trends including installed EE retrofit strategies, project installation costs and savings, project payback times, and benefit-cost ratios over time. Despite the onset of a severe economic recession, the U.S. ESCO industry managed to grow at about 7percent per year between 2006 and 2008. ESCO industry revenues were about $4.1 billion in 2008 and ESCOs anticipate accelerated growth through 2011 (25percent per year). We found that 2,484 ESCO projects in our database generated ~;;$4.0 billion ($2009) in net, direct economic benefits to their customers. We estimate that the ESCO project database includes about 20percent of all U.S. ESCO market activity from 1990-2008. Assuming the net benefits per project are comparable for ESCO projects that are not included in the LBNL database, this would suggest that the ESCO industry has generated ~;;$23 billion in net direct economic benefits for customers at projects installed between 1990 and 2008. There is empirical evidence confirming that the industry is evolving by installing more comprehensive and complex measures?including onsite generation and measures to address deferred maintenance?but this evolution has significant implications for customer project economics, especially at K-12 schools. We found that the median simple payback time has increased from 1.9 to 3.2 years in private sector projects since the early-to-mid 1990s and from 5.2 to 10.5 years in public sector projects for the same time period.

  17. ESCOE Engineering Program. Quarterly report, July 1, 1983-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Ksander, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the Liquefaction Technology Data Base (LTDB) is to assist PETC in developing and proof testing the LTDB and in interfacing with the private sector and Engineering Societies for the purpose of achieving the highest validity of and credibility in the LTDB. Effective July 1, ESCOE was authorized to increase the level of effort being applied to the process engineering component of LTDB. ESCOE personnel provided on-site data acquisition support. ESCOE has outlined plans to begin topical multiprocess crosscutting studies using the LTDB resource as soon as the computer-stored data base of SRC-II information is augmented by information from other liquefaction processes (such as H-Coal). To facilitate such studies, an initial version of a computer-readable generalized liquefaction flowsheet was prepared. ESCOE recommends that publicly available FE-numbered topical, quarterly and annual reports on the H-Coal, EDS and SRC-I technologies be processed for entry into the LTDB as soon as possible. This will facilitate the early trials on cross-cut analyses. Review was also performed on the available engineering summaries of SRC-II reports in the LTDB for purposes of quality enhancement and guidance for near-term activities. The purpose of the Advanced Coal Conversion Processes task is to assist PETC in the technical evaluation of experimental facilities.

  18. Amplifying Real Estate Value through Energy&WaterManagement: From ESCO to 'Energy Services Partner'

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Evan

    2004-06-08

    The energy service company (ESCO) business model could become significantly more effective by integrating the energy-efficiency purveyor and their capital into the underlying building ownership and operation partnership, rather than the current model in which the ESCO remains an outsider with higher transaction costs and limited interest and participation in the value created by the cost savings. Resource conservation advocates rarely use the language of real estate to articulate the cost effectiveness of capital improvements aimed at reducing utility costs in commercial and residential income properties. Conventional methods that rely on rarefied academic notions of simple payback time or a narrow definition of return on investment fail to capture a significant component of the true market value created by virtue of reduced operating expenses. Improvements in energy and water efficiency can increase the fundamental profitability of real estate investments by raising Net Operating Income (NOI), and hence returns during the holding period, and, ultimately, proceeds at time of sale. We introduce the concept of an Energy Services Partner, who takes an equity interest in a real estate partnership in exchange for providing the expertise and capital required to reduce utility operating costs. Profit to all partners increases considerably as a result. This approach would also help to address a crisis facing ESCOs today stemming from their considerable liabilities (through guaranteed savings) and negligible offsetting assets.

  19. Variations in dysfunction of sister chromatid cohesion in esco2 mutant zebrafish reflect the phenotypic diversity of Roberts syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Stefanie M.; Thomas, Holly R.; Amsterdam, Adam; Carroll, Andrew J.; Lees, Jacqueline A.; Yost, H. Joseph; Parant, John M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in ESCO2, one of two establishment of cohesion factors necessary for proper sister chromatid cohesion (SCC), cause a spectrum of developmental defects in the autosomal-recessive disorder Roberts syndrome (RBS), warranting in vivo analysis of the consequence of cohesion dysfunction. Through a genetic screen in zebrafish targeting embryonic-lethal mutants that have increased genomic instability, we have identified an esco2 mutant zebrafish. Utilizing the natural transparency of zebrafish embryos, we have developed a novel technique to observe chromosome dynamics within a single cell during mitosis in a live vertebrate embryo. Within esco2 mutant embryos, we observed premature chromatid separation, a unique chromosome scattering, prolonged mitotic delay, and genomic instability in the form of anaphase bridges and micronuclei formation. Cytogenetic studies indicated complete chromatid separation and high levels of aneuploidy within mutant embryos. Amongst aneuploid spreads, we predominantly observed decreases in chromosome number, suggesting that either cells with micronuclei or micronuclei themselves are eliminated. We also demonstrated that the genomic instability leads to p53-dependent neural tube apoptosis. Surprisingly, although many cells required Esco2 to establish cohesion, 10-20% of cells had only weakened cohesion in the absence of Esco2, suggesting that compensatory cohesion mechanisms exist in these cells that undergo a normal mitotic division. These studies provide a unique in vivo vertebrate view of the mitotic defects and consequences of cohesion establishment loss, and they provide a compensation-based model to explain the RBS phenotypes. PMID:26044958

  20. Variations in dysfunction of sister chromatid cohesion in esco2 mutant zebrafish reflect the phenotypic diversity of Roberts syndrome.

    PubMed

    Percival, Stefanie M; Thomas, Holly R; Amsterdam, Adam; Carroll, Andrew J; Lees, Jacqueline A; Yost, H Joseph; Parant, John M

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in ESCO2, one of two establishment of cohesion factors necessary for proper sister chromatid cohesion (SCC), cause a spectrum of developmental defects in the autosomal-recessive disorder Roberts syndrome (RBS), warranting in vivo analysis of the consequence of cohesion dysfunction. Through a genetic screen in zebrafish targeting embryonic-lethal mutants that have increased genomic instability, we have identified an esco2 mutant zebrafish. Utilizing the natural transparency of zebrafish embryos, we have developed a novel technique to observe chromosome dynamics within a single cell during mitosis in a live vertebrate embryo. Within esco2 mutant embryos, we observed premature chromatid separation, a unique chromosome scattering, prolonged mitotic delay, and genomic instability in the form of anaphase bridges and micronuclei formation. Cytogenetic studies indicated complete chromatid separation and high levels of aneuploidy within mutant embryos. Amongst aneuploid spreads, we predominantly observed decreases in chromosome number, suggesting that either cells with micronuclei or micronuclei themselves are eliminated. We also demonstrated that the genomic instability leads to p53-dependent neural tube apoptosis. Surprisingly, although many cells required Esco2 to establish cohesion, 10-20% of cells had only weakened cohesion in the absence of Esco2, suggesting that compensatory cohesion mechanisms exist in these cells that undergo a normal mitotic division. These studies provide a unique in vivo vertebrate view of the mitotic defects and consequences of cohesion establishment loss, and they provide a compensation-based model to explain the RBS phenotypes. PMID:26044958

  1. ESCOE engineering program. Quarterly report, October 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Ksander, Y.

    1981-01-01

    ESCOE is working to design a structure for the Liquefaction Technology Data Base (LTDB) to satisfy the following broad functional requirements: technical information collection, storage, processing, and retrieval by technology experts; a centralized, technology-specific data repository with standardized criteria for data evaluation, validation and analysis; a technology data base comprised of contract deliverables, plus detailed backup information; uniform methods of cross-referencing and cross-cutting projects/programs based on well-defined data validation and utilization. Task 310 will encompass research and comparative evaluation of information available on US and German high-pressure coal liquefaction processes and technologies. Task 330 will review and evaluate the Fuel Combustion and Synfuel Utilization Program at PETC. Task 340 will involve research and evaluation of information available and develop criteria for a comparison of the advanced versus the second generation coal conversion processes.

  2. ESCOE Engineering Program. Quarterly report, April 1, 1984-June 30, 1984. [Gravimelt, JPL and GE Microwave processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    ESCOE's continuing work consists of: (1) work with PETC to develop and test a Liquefaction Technology Data Base (LTDB) having the highest validity and credibility. (2) Evaluation (with PETC) of experimental results from DOE-funded two-stage liquefaction pilot plants. A particular problem discussed in some detail is the resolution of material and elemental balance problems in ITSL runs 242 through 245 at the Wilsonville plant. (3) The technical feasibility and economics of the TRW Gravimelt, GE Microwave and JPL Chlorinolysis Coal Cleaning processes. Also, the use of such cleaned coals in new or retrofitted boilers, advanced gas turbines and diesel engines. (LTN)

  3. Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

  4. EscO, a Functional and Structural Analog of the Flagellar FliJ Protein, Is a Positive Regulator of EscN ATPase Activity of the Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Injectisome

    PubMed Central

    Romo-Castillo, Mariana; Andrade, Angel; Espinosa, Norma; Monjarás Feria, Julia; Soto, Eduardo; Díaz-Guerrero, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are multiprotein molecular devices used by many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. A T3SS is also used for protein export in flagellar assembly, which promotes bacterial motility. The two systems are evolutionarily related, possessing highly conserved components in their export apparatuses. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) employs a T3SS, encoded by genes in the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island, to colonize the human intestine and cause diarrheal disease. In the present work, we investigated the role of the LEE-encoded EscO protein (previously Orf15 or EscA) in T3SS biogenesis. We show that EscO shares similar properties with the flagellar FliJ and the Yersinia YscO protein families. Our findings demonstrate that EscO is essential for secretion of all categories of T3SS substrates. Consistent with its central role in protein secretion, it was found to interact with the ATPase EscN and its negative regulator, EscL, of the export apparatus. Moreover, we show that EscO stimulates EscN enzymatic activity; however, it is unable to upregulate ATP hydrolysis in the presence of EscL. Remarkably, EscO partially restored the swimming defect of a Salmonella flagellar fliJ mutant and was able to stimulate the ATPase activity of FliI. Overall, our data indicate that EscO is the virulence counterpart of the flagellar FliJ protein. PMID:24706741

  5. Could what that ESCO sales rep said really be true? Savings realization rates in ESPC versus bid-to-spec projects

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Philip; Earni, Shankar; Williams, Charles

    2014-08-11

    Claims that savings realization is greater in energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) are rampant at least among energy service company representatives and other ESPC cheerleaders. But hard supporting evidence for these claims has been virtually non-existent. The Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program uses its Compliance Tracking System (CTS) database to document the performance of federal buildings and projects towards meeting various federal energy-saving goals. This paper focuses on preliminary analysis from CTS to understand and compare the performance of federal ESPCs with projects that have been implemented with more conventional government appropriations funding. The authors have found preliminary evidence using CTS that shows markedly higher savings realization rates among ESPC projects than appropriations-funded ones. There are numerous caveats to the data comparison that clamor for further study, but the difference is still intriguing. If borne out, this finding will provide concrete support to the idea that ESPCs guarantees and measurement and verification, long touted by energy service companies (ESCOs) as offering savings assurance, may truly yield substantial benefits. If ESPCs actually do perform better (i.e., have higher realization rates and savings persistence) than conventional bid-to-spec projects, the perceived premium for conducting them may look like a very good deal after all.

  6. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the industrial diamond industry is provided. More than 90 percent of the industrial diamond consumed in the U.S. and the rest of the world is manufactured diamond. Ireland, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. produce 75 percent of the global industrial diamond output. In 2000, the U.S. was the largest market for industrial diamond. Industrial diamond applications, prices for industrial diamonds, imports and exports of industrial diamonds, the National Defense Stockpile of industrial diamonds, and the outlook for the industrial diamond market are discussed.

  7. Industrial garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    A general overview of the industrial garnet industry is provided. About 20 percent of global industrial garnet production takes place in the U.S. During 2000, an estimated 300 kt of industrial garnets were produced worldwide. The U.S. is the world's largest consumer of industrial garnet, consuming 56.9 kt in 2000.

  8. Involving Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Consists of eight articles on the theme of school-industry partnerships in agricultural mechanics. Topics include (1) educational quality, (2) the industry perspective, (3) industry involvement, (4) the industry-agricultural mechanics relationship (5) an experiential learning project, (6) industry and teacher education programs, and (7)…

  9. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Statistics on the production, consumption, cost, trade, and government stockpile of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are provided. The outlook for the industrial diamond market is also considered.

  10. Industrial Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradbury, James C.

    1978-01-01

    The past year is seen as not particularly good for industrial minerals and for industry in general. Environmental concerns continued to trouble the industry with unacceptable asbestos concentrations and chlorofluorocarbon effects on ozone. A halting U.S. economy also affected industrial progress. (MA)

  11. Industry Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article illustrates projected employment change by industry and industry sector over 2010-20 decade. Workers are grouped into an industry according to the type of good produced or service provided by the establishment for which they work. Industry employment projections are shown in terms of numeric change (growth or decline in the total…

  12. Purchasing energy and related services in a restructured electricity industry

    SciTech Connect

    Golove, W.; Goldman, C.; Pickle, S.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of approximately thirty Request for Qualifications/Proposals (RFQ/RFPs) for electricity and related energy services issued by a mix of government, large commercial and industrial energy consumers. The authors evaluate the RFQ/RFPs on a variety of issues such as: economic sector is issuer, specific services requested, pricing approaches, and criteria used to select service provider. They have augmented the analysis with a series of interviews of representatives of the issuing firms. These solicitations are useful in understanding revealed preferences of large customers as retail competition develops. These solicitations also enable us to evaluate a variety of efficiency-related issues, such as potential roles for energy service companies (ESCOs), the specific efficiency services desired, and concerns regarding purchasing power and efficiency services from single suppliers. Initial findings include: (1) solicitations have a number of uses beyond simple purchase mechanisms, such as learning about the emerging market and influencing legislators and regulators; (2) a variety of pricing approaches are emerging depending, significantly, on the objectives of the potential purchaser; (3) providing a green power option is important to many aggregators intending to include residential customers in their aggregations; and (4) customers appear interested in exploring a wide variety of value-added services, in addition to the purchase of commodity electricity.

  13. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. A review of the state of the global industrial diamond industry in 1999 is presented. World consumption of industrial diamond has increased annually in recent years, with an estimated 500 million carats valued between $650 million and $800 million consumed in 1999. In 1999, the U.S. was the world's largest market for industrial diamond and was also one of the world's main producers; the others were Ireland, Russia, and South Africa. Uses of industrial diamonds are discussed, and prices of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are reported.

  14. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. Supply and demand data for industrial diamond are provided. Topics discussed are consumption, prices, imports and exports, government stockpiles, and the outlook for 2004.

  15. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Estimated 2011 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2011, natural industrial diamonds were produced in more than 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 13 countries. About 98 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. China is the world's leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by Russia and the United States.

  16. Industry Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article illustrates projected employment change from an industry perspective over the 2008-2018 decade. Workers are grouped into an industry according to the type of good produced or service provided by the establishment in which they work. Industry employment projections are shown in terms of numeric change (growth or decline in the total…

  17. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was 630 million carats. Natural industrial diamond deposits were found in more than 35 countries. Synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries. More than 81% of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States.

  18. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.44 billion carats in 2010. Natural industrial diamond deposits have been found in more than 35 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries.

  19. Industrial Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demain, Arnold L.; Solomon, Nadine A.

    1981-01-01

    Presents an overview of the field of industrial microbiology, providing historical backgrounds of scientific discoveries in the field and descriptions of industrially important microorganisms. Applied research in industry is also detailed, with mention of gene amplification, DNA recombination, pharmaceutical approaches, and detoxification and…

  20. ESCOs: Helping Schools Save Money and Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Planning & Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the use of energy savings performance contracts to help reduce costs and improve school infrastructure and the educational environment. Further discussed are how indoor air quality reduces health, productivity, and costs; and examples are provided of how other schools have achieved better school environments and reduced energy costs. (GR)

  1. Industrial Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Lawrence L.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses trends in and factors related to the production of industrial minerals during 1982, indicating that, as 1981 marked a downturn in production of industrial minerals, 1982 continued the trend with temporary and permanent cutbacks in mine and plant production. Includes highlights of several conferences/conference papers in this field.…

  2. Industrial Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Dean; Harden, Thomas K.

    Robots are mechanical devices that can be programmed to perform some task of manipulation or locomotion under automatic control. This paper discusses: (1) early developments of the robotics industry in the United States; (2) the present structure of the industry; (3) noneconomic factors related to the use of robots; (4) labor considerations…

  3. Industrial Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Dean; Harden, Thomas K.

    Robots are mechanical devices that can be programmed to perform some task of manipulation or locomotion under automatic control. This paper discusses: (1) early developments of the robotics industry in the United States; (2) the present structure of the industry; (3) noneconomic factors related to the use of robots; (4) labor considerations

  4. Industrial garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    The state of the global industrial garnet industry in 1999 is discussed. Industrial garnet mined in the U.S., which accounts for approximately one-third of the world's total, is usually a solid-solution of almandine and pyrope. The U.S. is the largest consumer of industrial garnet, using an estimated 47,800 st in 1999 as an abrasive and as a filtration medium in the petroleum industry, filtration plants, aircraft and motor vehicle manufacture, shipbuilding, wood furniture finishing operations, electronic component manufacture, ceramics manufacture, and glass production. Prices for crude concentrates ranged from approximately $50 to $110/st and refined garnet from $50 to $215/st in 1999, depending on type, source, quantity purchased, quality, and application.

  5. Industrial ecology.

    PubMed

    Patel, C K

    1992-02-01

    Industrial ecology addresses issues that will impact future production, use, and disposal technologies; proper use of the concept should reduce significantly the resources devoted to potential remediation in the future. This cradle-to-reincarnation production philosophy includes industrial processes that are environmentally sound and products that are environmentally safe during use and economically recyclable after use without adverse impact on the environment or on the net cost to society. This will require an industry-university-government round table to set the strategy and agenda for progress. PMID:11607254

  6. Industrial Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajdas, C.; Karpińska, A.; Kulczycki, A.

    'Industrial lubricant' gaseous, liquid and solid products cover many applications. A new systems analysis approach is used combining heterogeneous catalysis and tribochemistry. Bearing lubricant applications are discussed in terms of the bearing film thickness and tribological regimes, for liquid and solid lubricants. Compressor and vacuum pump lubricant applications are described. The various classes of hydraulic fluids for industrial applications are explained. The properties, applications and selection of various industrial lubricants for different gears are described. Steam and industrial gas turbine lubricant formulations are discussed and the effects of their degradation products, particularly for valves and filters, are presented. Metalworking lubricant applications are divided into cutting and forming operations and their actions are described. Speciality applications such as process, textile, food-grade, slideway, cylinder and wire rope lubricants are explained.

  7. Industrial bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting more air into the workplace or wearing masks to filter out the offending dust particles may ... Control dust in industrial settings by wearing face masks and protective clothing, and by treating textiles. Stop ...

  8. INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document contains: federal legislation, NRDC consent degree, regulations, the research program, and the different treatments used for petrochemistry, pesticides, inorganic chemicals, batteries, metal finishing, iron and steel, electric power, textiles and leather industries.

  9. Industrial Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Stanley R.

    1984-12-01

    Industrial morphology combines the dominant paradigms of machine vision, image processing and pattern recognition, into a cohesive framework of algebraic fundamentals and operational systems. Machine vision systems based on the principles of industrial morphology represent a logical advancement in machine vision technology, combining the flexibility and speed of special parallel architectures for image processing, high level languages for application programming, and statistical classification and learning for interactive, menu driven calibration and setup.

  10. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Estimated 2012 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2012, natural industrial diamonds were produced in at least 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 12 countries. About 99 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Belarus, China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. During 2012, China was the world’s leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by the United States and Russia. In 2012, the two U.S. synthetic producers, one in Pennsylvania and the other in Ohio, had an estimated output of 103 million carats, valued at about $70.6 million. This was an estimated 43.7 million carats of synthetic diamond bort, grit, and dust and powder with a value of $14.5 million combined with an estimated 59.7 million carats of synthetic diamond stone with a value of $56.1 million. Also in 2012, nine U.S. firms manufactured polycrystalline diamond (PCD) from synthetic diamond grit and powder. The United States government does not collect or maintain data for either domestic PCD producers or domestic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond producers for quantity or value of annual production. Current trade and consumption quantity data are not available for PCD or for CVD diamond. For these reasons, PCD and CVD diamond are not included in the industrial diamond quantitative data reported here.

  11. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    World production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 648 million carats in 2006, with 79 percent of the production coming from Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa, and the U.S. U.S. consumption was was an estimated 602 million carats, imports were over 391 million carats, and exports were about 83 million carats. About 87 percent of the industrial diamonds market uses synthetic diamonds, which are expected to become less expensive as technology improves and competition from low-cost producers increases.

  12. Industrial garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, US production of crude garnet concentrate for industrial use was 28.4 kt valued at $3.05 million. Refined garnet material sold or used was 30.4 kt valued at $10 million. For the year, the US was one of the world's leading consumers of industrial garnet. Domestic values for crude concentrates for different applications ranged from about $53 to $120/t. In the short term, excess production capacity, combined with suppliers that vary in quality, grain size and mineral type, will keep prices down.

  13. Fermentation Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, C. P. L., Jr.; Grady, J. K.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from the fermentation industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review focuses on: (1) alcoholic beverage production; (2) pharmaceuticals and biochemicals production; and (3) biomass production. A list of 62 references is also presented. (HM)

  14. Industrial Microorganisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phaff, Herman J.

    1981-01-01

    Describes industrially important yeasts, molds, bacteria, and actinomycetes. Discussed in detail are microbial products, such as primary metabolites, secondary metabolites, enzymes, and capsular polysaccharides. Traces the historical background of human cell culture, mentioning recombinant DNA research and hybridization of normal mammalian cells…

  15. Industrial garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Garnet has been used as a gemstone since the Bronze Age. However, garnet's angular fractures, relatively high hardness and specific gravity, chemical inertness, and nontoxicity make it ideal for many industrial applications. It is also free of crystalline silica and can be recycled.

  16. Industrial garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Garnet has been used as a gemstone since the Bronze Age. However, garnet's angular fractures, relatively high hardness and specific gravity, chemical inertness and nontoxicity make it ideal for many industrial applications. It is also free of crystalline silica and can be recycled.

  17. Industrial garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Garnet has been used as a gemstone since the Bronze Age. However, garnet’s angular fractures, relatively high hardness and specific gravity, chemical inertness and nontoxicity make it ideal for many industrial applications. It is also free of crystalline silica and can be recycled.

  18. Industrial garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, U.S. production of crude garnet concentrate for industrial use was estimated to be 56.5 kt (62,300 st), valued at about $8.85 million. This was a 10-percent decrease in quantity compared with 2008 production. Refined garnet material sold or used was 28 kt (31,000 st) valued at $7.96 million.

  19. Industrial Microorganisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phaff, Herman J.

    1981-01-01

    Describes industrially important yeasts, molds, bacteria, and actinomycetes. Discussed in detail are microbial products, such as primary metabolites, secondary metabolites, enzymes, and capsular polysaccharides. Traces the historical background of human cell culture, mentioning recombinant DNA research and hybridization of normal mammalian cells

  20. Industrial Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasor, Leslie; Brooks, Valerie

    These eight modules for an industrial orientation class were developed by a project to design an interdisciplinary program of basic skills training for disadvantaged students in a Construction Technology Program (see Note). The Drafting module overviews drafting career opportunities, job markets, salaries, educational requirements, and basic…

  1. Industrial alliances

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, K.V.

    1993-09-13

    The United States is emerging from the Cold War era into an exciting, but challenging future. Improving the economic competitiveness of our Nation is essential both for improving the quality of life in the United States and maintaining a strong national security. The research and technical skills used to maintain a leading edge in defense and energy now should be used to help meet the challenge of maintaining, regaining, and establishing US leadership in industrial technologies. Companies recognize that success in the world marketplace depends on products that are at the leading edge of technology, with competitive cost, quality, and performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory and its Industrial Partnership Center (IPC) has the strategic goal to make a strong contribution to the nation`s economic competitiveness by leveraging the government`s investment at the Laboratory: personnel, infrastructure, and technological expertise.

  2. Industrial bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, W K

    1978-11-01

    For many years there has been much argument whether workers in the dusty trades are prone to chronic bronchitis. In 1966 the Medical Research Council issued a report of a Select Committee which concluded that occupationally induced bronchitis did not play a significant part in the aetiology of airways obstruction in dust-exposed men. Since then epidemiological studies have demonstrated that the prolonged inhalation of dust leads to an increase in prevalence of cough and sputum. Furthermore, new physiological techniques have demonstrated a slight decrement in ventilatory capacity as a result of industrial bronchitis, and which is related to lifetime dust exposure. Unlike bronchitis induced by cigarette smoke, the predominant effect of industrial bronchitis is on large rather than small airways and the condition is not accompanied by emphysema. PMID:367424

  3. Industrial radiointroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliuev, V. V.; Leonov, B. I.; Gusev, E. A.

    The operating principles and design of various types of radiointroscopes used in industry for fault inspection are described, together with the sources of penetrating radiation, radiooptic image converters, and image amplifiers. The theory of image formation by a radiointroscope and mathematical models of the image formation are discussed. Consideration is given to the design of radioscope television systems, and their optical characteristics, resolving power, signal/noise characteristics, contrast sensitivity, and the transmission band of the communication channel.

  4. Industrial garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    World production of industrial garnet was about 326 kt in 2006, with the U.S. producing about 11 percent of this total. U.S. consumption, imports, and exports were estimated at 74.3 kt, 52.3 kt, and 13.2 kt, respectively. The most important exporters are Australia, China, and India. Although demand is expected to rise over the next 5 years, prices are expected to remain low in the short term.

  5. Industrial concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    Physics in industry is worth reporting, but deciding what counts can be a challenge "If a man can make a better mousetrap than his neighbour...the world will make a beaten path to his door." That quotation, which was apparently inspired by a comment that the American essayist Ralph Waldo Emerson made during a lecture in 1871, has long been used to illustrate the power of invention and innovation. While the lowly mousetrap may hardly seem the pinnacle of technology in today's world of iPhones and Blu-ray DVDs, an effective tool to kill mice was certainly a desirable object in Emerson's day (p52).

  6. Industrial ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, H. D.

    Industrial ventilation design methodology, using computers and using fluid dynamic models, is considered. It is noted that the design of a ventilation system must be incorporated into the plant design and layout at the earliest conceptual stage of the project. A checklist of activities concerning the methodology for the design of a ventilation system for a new facility is given. A flow diagram of the computer ventilation model shows a typical input, the initialization and iteration loop, and the output. The application of the fluid dynamic modeling techniques include external and internal flow fields, and individual sources of heat and contaminants. Major activities for a ventilation field test program are also addressed.

  7. Industrial robot

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, R.H.

    1987-06-09

    This patent describes a three axis outer arm assembly for an industrial robot comprising: a hand assembly including a frame member, a transverse wrist pin mounted to the frame member, and a wrist rotary member rotatably mounted with respect to the frame member; a first tubular member, with the wrist pin of the hand assembly being transversely mounted at one end thereof, a second tubular member rotatably mounted coaxially within the first tubular member; first gear means; a second gear means; drive means; and means mounting the second and third tubular members.

  8. Industrial furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Shostak, V.M.; Tolochko, A.I.; Volkov, V.P.; Maradudin, G.I.; Schekin, N.G.; Popov, M.I.; Shepelev, D.N.; Matveev, A.I.; Butnyakov, A.I.; Rzhavichev, A.P.

    1986-09-02

    An industrial furnace is described which consists of: a bath made of a refractory material for filling with a melt; a direct current source; main current-carrying elements having free ends extending to an operating area of the refractory material of the bath below and above the melt, and the main current-carrying elements extending to the operating area below the melt being connected with opposite terminals of the current source from the main current-carrying elements extending to the operating area above the melt; and additional current-carrying elements having free ends sunk in the refractory material of the bath below and above the melt and the additional current-carrying elements being connected with the terminals of the power source of opposite polarity with respect to the connection of the main current-carrying elements of a corresponding part of the operating area.

  9. Industry Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is responsible for the Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Project, a sub-element task of the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) Project of the NASA Aviation System Capacity Program (ASC). The AC/ATM Project is developing new communications technologies and tools that will improve throughput in the U.S. Air Traffic Control System. The goal of the AC/ATM Project is to enable a communications infrastructure providing the capacity, efficiency, and flexibility necessary to realize benefits of the future mature Free-Flight environment. The capabilities and scope of communications technologies needed to accomplish this goal depend on characteristics of the future Free-Flight environment. There are many operational concepts being proposed for a future ATM system to enable user flexibility and efficiency. GRC s focus is on developing new technologies and techniques to support the digital communication of information involving airborne and ground-based users. However, the technologies and techniques must be integrated with the systems and services that industry and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are developing. Thus, GRC needs to monitor and provide input to the various industry and FAA organizations and committees that are specifying new systems and services. Adoption of technologies by the FAA is partially dependent on acceptance of the technology by the aviation community. The commercial aviation community in particular would like to adopt technologies that can be used throughout the world. As a result, the adoption of common or at least compatible technologies by European countries is a key factor in getting commitments to those technologies by the US aviation community. GRC desires to keep informed of European activities that relate to aviation communication technologies, particularly those that are being supported by Eurocontrol.

  10. Office of Industrial Technologies: Industry partnerships

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    US industries are making progress in turning the vision of the future into reality: More effective competition in global markets, increased industrial efficiency, more jobs, reduced waste generation and greenhouse gas emissions (to 1990 levels), improved environment. DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies is catalyzing and supporting industry progress in many ways. This pamphlet gives an overview of OIT.

  11. Industrial Arts Curriculum Guide for Industrial Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational and Adult Education.

    This curriculum guide for industrial ceramics courses is part of a series of curriculum guides for use in the industrial arts curriculum in Connecticut. The guide provides information on the scope and sequence of the industrial arts curriculum, specific guidelines for industrial arts, and program goals and objectives. The content of the industrial…

  12. Industrial Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    NASTRAN is an offshoot of the computer-design technique used in construction of airplanes and spacecraft. [n this technique engineers create a mathematical model of the aeronautical or space vehicle and "fly" it on the ground by means of computer simulation. The technique enables them to study performance and structural behavior of a number of different designs before settling on the final configuration and proceeding with construction. From this base of aerospace experience, NASA-Goddard developed the NASTRAN general purpose computer program, which offers an exceptionally wide range of analytic capability with regard to structures. NASTRAN has been applied to autos, trucks, railroad cars, ships, nuclear power reactors, steam turbines, bridges, and office buildings. NASA-Langley provides program maintenance services regarded as vital by many NASTRAN users. NASTRAN is essentially a predictive tool. It takes an electronic look at a computerire$.dedgn and reports how the structure will react under a great many different conditions. It can, for example, note areas where high stress levels will occur-potential failure points that need strengthening. Conversely, it can identify over-designed areas where weight and material might be saved safely. NASTRAN can tell how pipes stand up under strong fluid flow, how metals are affected by high temperatures, how a building will fare in an earthquake or how powerful winds will cause a bridge to oscillate. NASTRAN analysis is quick and inexpensive. It minimizes trial-and-error in the design process and makes possible better, safe, lighter structures affording large-scale savings in development time and materials. Some examples of the broad utility NASTRAN is finding among industrial firms are shown on these pages.

  13. Professors and Industry Meet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheriff, Robert E.

    1974-01-01

    Describes backgrounds of geophysics graduates that are desired for employment by industry. Also listed are areas in which industry could help universities concerning the development of programs to meet the future manpower needs in industry. (BR)

  14. Chemicals Industry Vision

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1996-12-01

    Chemical industry leaders articulated a long-term vision for the industry, its markets, and its technology in the groundbreaking 1996 document Technology Vision 2020 - The U.S. Chemical Industry. (PDF 310 KB).

  15. A View of Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Richard A., Ed.; And Others

    This monograph describes industry at a point in time from the perspective of the faculty in Industrial Education at the University of Minnesota. Section 1 describes the effort to define industry from the perspective of the industrial, business, and economic literature. The remainder of this section is divided into the two components of analysis…

  16. A View of Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Richard A., Ed.; And Others

    This monograph describes industry at a point in time from the perspective of the faculty in Industrial Education at the University of Minnesota. Section 1 describes the effort to define industry from the perspective of the industrial, business, and economic literature. The remainder of this section is divided into the two components of analysis

  17. Energy conservation in industry

    SciTech Connect

    Strub, A.S.; Ehringer, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses combustion and heat recovery, engines and batteries, and applications and technologies. Some of the topics covered include: energy-saving technologies; heat exchangers, fluidized bed exchangers, industrial heat pumps; fluidized bed combustion; waste heat recovery; orc machines and cascading; engines and flywheels; new types of engines; advanced batteries; fuel cell; chemical industry and catalysis; metallurgy; textile industry; food industry; microwave applications; and cement and glass ceramic industry.

  18. Industrial storage applications overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duscha, R. A.

    1980-03-01

    The implementation of a technology demonstration for the food processing industry, development and technology demonstrations for selected near-term, in-plant applications and advanced industrial applications of thermal energy storage are overviewed.

  19. Teaching Teachers Industrial Organic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes a teacher seminar held at the University of Minnesota to introduce the addition of courses of industrial chemistry into higher education science curriculums in order to better prepare college science graduates for positions in industry. (SL)

  20. METHANE: INDUSTRIAL SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter provides qualitative information on the magnitude of industrial sources of methane and, where possible, provides information to allow the reader to quantify methane emissions. One difficulty in quantifying methane emissions from industry is the inconsistent treatment ...

  1. The World Oil Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rand, Christopher T.

    1976-01-01

    America's domestic petroleum industry and the international industry have been dominated by seven major firms. Although production costs decreased, sale prices soared with developing political-corporate interrelationships. (MR)

  2. 2011 Training Industry Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents "Training" magazine's exclusive analysis of the U.S. training industry, featuring 2011 training expenditures, budgetary allocations, delivery methods, and training priorities. Now in its 30th year, The Industry Report is recognized as the training industry's most trusted source of data on budgets, staffing, and programs. This…

  3. FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter focuses on methane emissions from the coal and natural gas industries. The petroleum industry is not addressed because of the lack of related quality data. Emission points are identified for each industry, and a discussion of factors affecting emissions is presented. ...

  4. Industrial Fire Brigade Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    Organized as a teaching outline for an industrial plant fire brigade course, this manual contains a rationale for an industrial plant brigade as an adjunct to the local firefighting services; information to the instructor concerning the implementation of an industrial fire brigade program; and a teaching outline consisting of eleven sections: (1)…

  5. Photovoltaics industry profile

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    A description of the status of the US photovoltaics industry is given. Principal end-user industries are identified, domestic and foreign market trends are discussed, and industry-organized and US government-organized trade promotion events are listed. Trade associations and trade journals are listed, and a photovoltaic product manufacturers list is included. (WHK)

  6. Industry`s turnaround looks real

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the industry outlook for North American gas and oil industries. In a robust Canada, land sales are setting records, drilling is up, and output is rising beyond last year`s 21% growth. A perception among US operators that wellhead prices will remain stable is translating to increased spending. The USA, Canada, Mexico, Cuba are evaluated separately, with brief evaluations of Greenland, Guatemala, Belize, and Costa Rico. Data are presented on drilling activities.

  7. Uranium industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-05

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  8. Uranium industry annual 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  9. Nursing assessment in industry.

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, P

    1976-01-01

    In order to be able to offer nursing service to industry, a community health agency must have some knowledge of the industry and the daily problesm faced by both management and worker. The nursing process can serve as a framework for the gathering of necessary information and planning of sound care. The five-step nursing process, which includes assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation and evaluation, is discussed and annotated model Assessment Guide for Nursing in Industry is given (Appendix A). The six areas from which information should be gathered when assessing an industry are the following: I. The community in which the industry is located: II. The industry, its historical development, policies, and projections; III. The plant or physical structure; IV. The working population; V. The industrial process of the plant; VII. The existing health program. Once the assessment is completed and a diagnosis formulated, services can be offered based on specific, defined needs. PMID:961943

  10. Metalcasting Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1998-01-01

    The Roadmap sets out the strategy for pursuing near-, mid-, and long-term goals set out by industry and for carrying out the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and industry. The Roadmap outlines key goals for products and markets, materials technology, manufacturing technology, environmental technology, human resources, and industry health programs. The Roadmap sets out the strategy for pursuing near-, mid-, and long-term goals set out by industry and for carrying out the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and industry. The Roadmap sets out the strategy for pursuing near-, mid-, and long-term goals set out by industry and for carrying out the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and industry.

  11. Industrial sand and gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, domestic production of industrial sand and gravel was about 31 Mt, a 5% increase from 2004. This increase was bouyed by robust construction and petroleum sectors of the US economy. Based on estimated world production figures, the United States was the world's leading producer and consumer of industrial sand and gravel. In the short term, local shortages of industrial sand and gravel will continue to increase.

  12. Heat pumps for industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-09-01

    Research activities, both in the laboratory and in the field, confirm that heat pumps can improve energy efficiency and productivity for a multitude of process types. By using heat pumps, process industries can save significant amounts of energy and money and successfully control emissions. Those industries with special needs, such as recovering solvents, can meet them more energy efficiently and cost effectively with heat pumps. Through the years, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) has helped industry solve its energy problems by joining in cooperative agreements with companies willing to do the research. The companies involved in these agreements share the costs of the research and benefit directly from the technology developed. OIT then has information from demonstration projects that it can pass on to others within industry. All the projects described in this brochure were joint ventures between DOE and industry participants. OIT will assist in accelerating the use of heat pumps in the industrial marketplace by continuing to work with industry on research and demonstration projects and to transfer research results and project performance information to the rest of industry. Successfully transferring this technology could conserve as much as 1.5 quads of energy annually at a savings of more than $4 billion at today's prices.

  13. The methanol industry`s missed opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Throughout its history the methanol industry has been backward in research and development and in industry cooperation on public image and regulatory matters. It has been extremely reticent as to the virtue of its product for new uses, especially for motor fuel. While this is perhaps understandable looking back, it is inexcusable looking forward. The industry needs to cooperate on a worldwide basis in research and market development, on the one hand, and in image-building and political influence, on the other, staying, of course, within the US and European and other regional antitrust regulations. Unless the industry develops the motor fuel market, and especially the exciting new approach through fuel cell operated EVs, to siphon off incremental capacity and keep plants running at 90% or more of capacity, it will continue to live in a price roller-coaster climate. A few low-cost producers will do reasonably well and the rest will just get along or drop out here and there along the way, as in the past. Having come so far from such a humble beginning, it is a shame not to realize the full potential that is clearly there: a potential to nearly double sales dollars without new plants and to produce from a plentiful resource, at least for the next half-century, all the methanol that can be imagined to be needed. Beyond that the industry can turn to renewable energy--the sun--via biomass growth, to make their product. In so doing, it can perhaps apply methanol as a plant growth stimulant, in effect making the product fully self-sustainable. The world needs to know what methanol can do to provide--economically and reliably--the things upon which a better life rests.

  14. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect

    1992-03-01

    This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of the March 1992 `Recent Developments` section of Nuexco. Specific issues mentioned are: (1) closure of Yankee Rowe, (2) steam-generator tube plugging at Trojan, (3) laser enrichment in South Africa, (4) the US uranium industry, (5) planning for two nuclear units in Taiwan, and (6) the establishment of a Czech/French joint venture.

  15. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS LABORATORY GUIDE WAS DEVELOPED FOR AN 80-HOUR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES TRAINING TO BECOME BEGINNING RADIOGRAPHERS. IT IS USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH TWO OTHER VOLUMES--(1) INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, AND (2) INUDSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY MANUAL. THE PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED BY A COMMITTEE OF REPRESENTATIVES…

  16. 2010 Training Industry Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Now in its 29th year, The Industry Report is recognized as the training industry's most trusted source of data on budgets, staffing, and programs. This year, the study was conducted by an outside research firm in June-August 2010, when members from the "Training" magazine database were e-mailed an invitation to participate in an online survey.…

  17. Rebuilding America's Industrial Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    It's no secret within the academic or manufacturing communities that community colleges are the nation's training ground for industrial-skilled trade careers. But outside community college classrooms and industrial plants, many people are in the dark about the growing numbers of these often-well-paid and in-demand jobs. This article introduces the…

  18. Industrial Psychology in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Montmollin, Maurice

    1977-01-01

    The current status of French industrial psychology is evaluated. Within the social and economic context of contemporary France, varying ideologies and scarce resources have created a gap between applied and academic industrial psychology. Personnel practices and systems and organizational research are noted. (Editor)

  19. Analysis of Industrial Wastewaters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancy, K. H.; Weber, W. J., Jr.

    A comprehensive, documented discussion of certain operating principles useful as guidelines for the analysis of industrial wastewaters is presented. Intended primarily for the chemist, engineer, or other professional person concerned with all aspects of industrial wastewater analysis, it is not to be considered as a substitute for standard manuals

  20. Foundry Industry Training Committee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Training Journal, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Foundry Industry Training Committee has encouraged the foundry industry in developing systematic manpower training and development programs at all levels. Features developed include competitions as a technique of standard setting, recommendations for technician training, and a widely used manpower information system. (MW)

  1. Rebuilding America's Industrial Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    It's no secret within the academic or manufacturing communities that community colleges are the nation's training ground for industrial-skilled trade careers. But outside community college classrooms and industrial plants, many people are in the dark about the growing numbers of these often-well-paid and in-demand jobs. This article introduces the

  2. INDUSTRIAL TRAINING RESEARCH REGISTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Labour, London (England).

    IN THIS CLASSIFIED REGISTER OF CURRENT AND RECENTLY COMPLETED STUDIES OF INDUSTRIAL TRAINING IN GREAT BRITAIN, INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS ARE ARRANGED BY THE ITEM NUMBER JUDGED MOST IMPORTANT, AND THE NUMBERS OF OTHER RELEVANT INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH PROJECTS ARE INSERTED AT THE END OF EACH SECTION TO PROVIDE CROSS REFERENCES. DESCRIPTIONS INCLUDE THE TITLE

  3. Industrial sand and gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2012 was about 49.5 Mt (55 million st), increasing 13 percent compared with that of 2011. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  4. Industrial sand and gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2011-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2010 was about 26.5 Mt (29.2 million st), a 6-percent increased from 2009. Certain end uses of industrial sand and gravel, such as sand for container glass, golf course sand, recreational sand, specialty glass and water filtration, showed increased demand in 2010.

  5. Industrial sand and gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2012-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2011 was about 30 Mt (33 million st), increasing slightly compared with 2010. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  6. Internationalizing Industrial Organization Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Margaret

    1992-01-01

    Suggests ways of increasing the international focus of industrial organization courses. Discusses four areas of international topics that could be integrated into such courses. Includes imperfect markets, trade, and industrial policy; theory of the firm; exchange rates and market behavior; and issues in antitrust. Evaluates the extent and adequacy…

  7. The Industrial City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohl, Raymond

    1976-01-01

    This article, the sixth installment in Environment's "Looking Back" series, traces the woes of America's industrialized cities to the movement that developed cities primarily as centers for industrial enterprise rather than as places for people to live. Today's social ills, from pollution to poverty, developed from that movement. (BT)

  8. Exploring the Industrial Subculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Barry A.

    This book is an attempt to create a theoretical vocabulary for those who believe that the sociology of industrial organizations should concern itself with discovering the ways in which people in industry define their life-position and with examining the collective and organizational consequences of these views which they hold of themselves. Using

  9. Training in British Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Willis

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the need for, and development of, further education and practical training for recruits into industry. Design/methodology/approach: The paper discusses how, at the time of writing, many firms were developing and operating training schemes for industrial personnel. Firms benefit themselves from…

  10. Analysis of Industrial Wastewaters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancy, K. H.; Weber, W. J., Jr.

    A comprehensive, documented discussion of certain operating principles useful as guidelines for the analysis of industrial wastewaters is presented. Intended primarily for the chemist, engineer, or other professional person concerned with all aspects of industrial wastewater analysis, it is not to be considered as a substitute for standard manuals…

  11. Commercial Banking Industry Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright Horizons Children's Centers, Cambridge, MA.

    Work and family programs are becoming increasingly important in the commercial banking industry. The objective of this survey was to collect information and prepare a commercial banking industry profile on work and family programs. Fifty-nine top American commercial banks from the Fortune 500 list were invited to participate. Twenty-two…

  12. Aluminum Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2003-02-01

    This roadmap describes the industry's R&D strategy, priorities, milestones, and performance targets for achieving its long-term goals. It accounts for changes in the industry and the global marketplace since the first roadmap was published in 1997. An updated roadmap was published November 2001. (PDF 1.1 MB).

  13. INDUSTRIAL ARTS HANDBOOK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOHNSON, ALLEN

    TO AID TEACHERS, GUIDANCE COUNSELORS, AND ADMINISTRATORS, AS WELL AS THE STUDENT HIMSELF, THE HANDBOOK OFFERED PURPOSES AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN THE FIELD OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS. IT APPLIED TO ELEMENTARY, JUNIOR HIGH, AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS. INDUSTRIAL ARTS PROVIDED AN OPPORTUNITY FOR STUDENTS TO DISCOVER THEIR APTITUDES AND ABILITIES IN…

  14. Handbook of industrial robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Nof, S.Y.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on the application of artificial intelligence to robots used in industrial plants. Topics considered include vision systems, elements of industrial robot software, robot teaching, the off-line programming of robots, a structured programming robot language, task-level manipulator programming, expert systems, and the role of the computer in robot intelligence.

  15. ETHICS FOR INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The discipline of "Industrial Technology" as we know it today has a rich history. Significant contributions, both at the national and international level, have been made by affiliates of the discipline. Industrial technology has produced leaders that have created new jobs and promoted the growth of...

  16. Geothermal industry assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    An assessment of the geothermal industry is presented, focusing on industry structure, corporate activities and strategies, and detailed analysis of the technological, economic, financial, and institutional issues important to government policy formulation. The study is based principally on confidential interviews with executives of 75 companies active in the field. (MHR)

  17. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  18. Solar energy - Industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, D.; Lewandowski, A.

    1983-12-01

    Improved system efficiencies and reduced capital costs are identified as goals in the operation of solar energy industrial projects. An analysis by the Solar Energy Research Institute and DOE of the field performance of six industrial systems using the computer code SOLIPH showed that for well-designed and constructed steam systems a range of thermal efficiencies of 30 to 35 percent can be expected. The Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit program of Sandia National Laboratories is examined. The economics of industrial solar systems is considered with emphasis on technology costs and major economic parameters. It was found that the solar industrial process heat system was potentially competitive, both in the present and through 1998, only under the most favorable conditions. Local energy rates, solar conditions, land availability and tax incentives are shown to impact strongly on the feasibility of individual projects.

  19. Mask Industry Assessment: 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. David

    2011-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the tenth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report has been used as one of the baselines to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It continues to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was essentially the same as the 2005 through 2010 surveys. Questions are grouped into following categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  20. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Industrial Chemistry Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmor, Solomon

    1985-01-01

    Presented is a bibliography of articles published in the "Journal of Chemical Education" (1968-1983) which focused on industrial chemistry. Items are listed under these headings: real world of industrial chemistry; industrial notes; subject matter articles; industrial chemistry experiments/demonstrations; academic-industrial interface; industrial…

  1. Industrial Process Surveillance System

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W; Singer, Ralph M.; Mott, Jack E.

    2001-01-30

    A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

  2. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Singer, R.M.; Mott, J.E.

    1998-06-09

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy. 96 figs.

  3. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.; Singer, Ralph M.; Mott, Jack E.

    1998-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

  4. Industrial Energy Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Traylor, T.D.; Pitsenbarger, J.

    1995-10-01

    Industrial Energy Technology (IET) is published bimonthly. Each issue of IET presents an article of interest to these in the field; contains abstracts of the most current world literature pertaining to industrial energy efficiency; and announces upcoming meetings, conferences, and symposia in the field of industrial energy conservation. This publication contains the abstracts of Department of Energy (DOE) reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past two months. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements.

  5. Computers Transform an Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simich, Jack

    1982-01-01

    Describes the use of computer technology in the graphics communication industry. Areas that are examined include typesetting, color scanners, communications satellites, page make-up systems, and the business office. (CT)

  6. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  7. Vocational/Industrial Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of notable school vocational/industrial arts facilities, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

  8. Drawing in industrial customers

    SciTech Connect

    Pittman, R. )

    1994-10-01

    Gas companies have long played a role in attracting businesses to their service territories. Along with railroad companies, utilities were among the first to practice economic development, having established departments for these activities as early as the 1920s. Today, firms that want to expand or relocate sat that utilities are a preferred source of information, offering confidentiality, good service, professionalism and reliable data. One thing industrial customers say they want is energy-cost comparisons among different locations around the country. Another issue important to industrial users is the gas company's pricing method. Finally, US industry has taken careful note of the effects of Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Order 636, which unbundled pipeline services. Industrial customers want the same freedom to choose the service they receive and pay for. At the same time, they want some assurance about the reliability of gas supplies, since gas may be coming from several sources at different contract prices and under different terms.

  9. Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    J. Kelly Kissock; Becky Blust

    2007-04-17

    The University of Dayton (UD) performed energy assessments, trained students and supported USDOE objectives. In particular, the UD Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed 96 industrial energy assessment days for mid-sized manufacturers. The average identified and implemented savings on each assessment were $261,080 per year and $54,790 per year. The assessments served as direct training in industrial energy efficiency for 16 UD IAC students. The assessments also served as a mechanism for the UD IAC to understand manufacturing energy use and improve upon the science of manufacturing energy efficiency. Specific research results were published in 16 conference proceedings and journals, disseminated in 22 additional invited lectures, and shared with the industrial energy community through the UD IAC website.

  10. Chromatography in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenmakers, Peter

    2009-07-01

    This review focuses on the chromatography research that has been carried out within industry or in close cooperation with industry and that has been reported in the scientific literature between 2006 and mid-2008. Companies in the health care sector, such as pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, are the largest contributors. Industrial research seems to take place in an open environment in cooperation with academia, peer companies, and institutions. Industry appears ready to embrace new technologies as they emerge, but they focus strongly on making chromatography work robustly, reliably, rapidly, and automatically. “Hyphenated” systems that incorporate on-line sample-preparation techniques and mass-spectrometric detection are the rule rather than the exception. Various multidimensional separation methods are finding numerous applications. Strategies aimed at speeding up the development of new chromatographic methods remain the focus of attention. Also, there is a clear trend toward exploring chromatographic methods for parallel processing along with other strategies for high-throughput analysis.

  11. An Industrial Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, D. J.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes the commercial uses, industrial production and laboratory production of 2-methylpentane-2,4-diol. Suggests extensions for the experiment in the areas of boiling point/composition curves and alkaline depolymerization. (GS)

  12. Industrial robots: Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, Iu. G.

    Topics covered include terms, definitions, and classification; operator-directed manipulators; autooperators as used in automated pressure casting; construction and application of industrial robots; and the operating bases of automated systems. Attention is given to adaptive and interactive robots; gripping mechanisms; applications to foundary production, press-forging plants, heat treatment, welding, and assembly operations. A review of design recommendations includes a determination of fundamental structural and technological indicators for industrial robots and a consideration of drive mechanisms.

  13. Analyzing the automotive industry

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, M.N.

    1995-08-01

    What is happening in the car market is a very, very interesting trend, an interesting phenomena. There seems to be absolutely no limit to both the auto industry and the consumer`s appetite for electronic features that assist in improving safety and performance. This paper presents an analysis of the automotive industry and the market created for accessory items, electric batteries, and other features to improve performance.

  14. Mask industry assessment: 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2003-12-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask technology and mask supply issues of cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was initiated in 2002 with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition.1 This paper presents the results of the second annual survey which is an enhanced version of the inaugural survey building upon its strengths and improving the weak points. The original survey was designed with the input of member company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. The assessment is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the critical mask industry. An objective is to create a valuable reference to identify strengths and opportunities and to guide investments on critical-path issues. As subsequent years are added, historical profiles can also be created. This assessment includes inputs from ten major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers representing approximately 80% of the global mask market (using revenue as the measure) and making this the most comprehensive mask industry survey ever. The participating companies are: Compugraphics, Dai Nippon Printing, Dupont Photomask, Hoya, IBM, Infineon, Intel, Taiwan Mask Company, Toppan, and TSMC. Questions are grouped into five categories: General Business Profile Information; Data Processing; Yields and Yield loss Mechanisms; Delivery Time; and Returns and Services. Within each category are a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry.

  15. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  16. Indonesia's developing forest industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Richard C.; Straka, Thomas J.; Watson, William F.

    1986-11-01

    Indonesia is a major exporter of tropical hardwoods. The country's goal is to establish integrated wood industries by reducing the export of unprocessed sawlogs. The value of hardwood sawlog exports has decreased by twothirds in 1986 dollars since 1978, while the value of hardwood sawnwood and plywood exports has increased sixfold. Sawlog exports are now banned. This article contrasts the official governmental policy on forest industry development with the operational realities of doing business in Indonesia.

  17. Ethics and Industrial Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Daniel

    The development of nanotechnology seems inevitable, for it alone would be able to solve or circumvent the huge difficulties to be faced by industrial and post-industrial societies, in both their private and their public aspects, and including the ageing population and its expectations with regard to health, the evolution of the climate, pollution, the management of food resources and raw materials, access to drinking water, control of energy production and consumption, equitable and sustainable development, etc.

  18. Industrial graphene metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyle, Jennifer Reiber; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Ozkan, Mihrimah

    2012-06-01

    Graphene is an allotrope of carbon whose structure is based on one-atom-thick planar sheets of carbon atoms that are densely packed in a honeycomb crystal lattice. Its unique electrical and optical properties raised worldwide interest towards the design and fabrication of future electronic and optical devices with unmatched performance. At the moment, extensive efforts are underway to evaluate the reliability and performance of a number of such devices. With the recent advances in synthesizing large-area graphene sheets, engineers have begun investigating viable methodologies for conducting graphene metrology and quality control at industrial scales to understand a variety of reliability issues including defects, patternability, electrical, and physical properties. This review summarizes the current state of industrial graphene metrology and provides an overview of graphene metrology techniques. In addition, a recently developed large-area graphene metrology technique based on fluorescence quenching is introduced. For each metrology technique, the industrial metrics it measures are identified - layer thickness, edge structure, defects, Fermi level, and thermal conductivity - and a detailed description is provided as to how the measurements are performed. Additionally, the potential advantages of each technique for industrial use are identified, including throughput, scalability, sensitivity to substrate/environment, and on their demonstrated ability to achieve quantified results. The recently developed fluorescence-quenching metrology technique is shown to meet all the necessary criteria for industrial applications, rendering it the first industry-ready graphene metrology technique.

  19. OCT for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guiju; Harding, Kevin

    2012-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT), as an interferometric method, has been studied as a distance ranger. As a technology capable of producing high-resolution, depth-resolved images of biological tissue, OCT had been widely used for the application of ophthalmology and has been commercialized in the market today. Enlightened by the emerging research interest in biomedical domain, the applications of OCT in industrial inspection were rejuvenated by a few groups to explore its potential for characterizing new materials, imaging or inspecting industrial parts as a service solution[3]. Benefiting from novel photonics components and devices, the industrial application of the older concepts in OCT can be re-visited with respect to the unique performance and availability. Commercial OCT developers such as Michelson Diagnostics (MDL; Orpington, U.K.) and Thorlabs (Newton, NJ) are actively exploring the application of OCT to industrial applications and they have outlined meaningful path toward the metrology application in emerging industry[3]. In this chapter, we will introduce the fundamental concepts of OCT and discuss its current and potential industrial applications.

  20. Mask industry assessment: 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Hector, Scott

    2005-11-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was created with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of mask technologists from semiconductor manufacturers, merchant mask suppliers, and makers of equipment for mask fabrication. This year's assessment is the fourth in the current series of annual reports and is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the mask industry. This report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results may be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. This year's survey contains all of the 2004 survey questions to provide an ongoing database. Additional questions were added to the survey covering operating cost factors and equipment utilization. Questions are grouped into categories: general business profile information, data processing, yields and yield loss mechanisms, delivery times, returns and services, operating cost factors and equipment utilization. Within each category are a many questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. This assessment includes inputs from eight major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers whose revenue represents approximately 85% of the global mask market. This participation rate is reduced by one captive from 2004. Note: Toppan, DuPont Photomasks Inc and AMTC (new) were consolidated into one input therefore the 2004 and 2005 surveys are basically equivalent.

  1. NEMS industrial module documentation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2010) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of output of industrial activity. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

  2. Developing an energy efficiency service industry in Shanghai

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiang; Goldman, Charles; Levine, Mark; Hopper, Nicole

    2004-02-10

    The rapid development of the Chinese economy over the past two decades has led to significant growth in China's energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Between 1980 and 2000, China's energy consumption more than doubled from 602 million to 1.3 billion tons of coal-equivalent (NBS, 2003). In 2000, China's GHG emissions were about 12% of the global total, ranked second behind only the US. According to the latest national development plan issued by the Chinese government, China's energy demand is likely to double again by 2020 (DRC, 2004), based on a quadrupling of its gross domestic product (GDP). The objectives of the national development plan imply that China needs to significantly raise the energy efficiency of its economy, i.e., cutting the energy intensity of its economy by half. Such goals are extremely ambitious, but not infeasible. China has achieved such reductions in the past, and its current overall level of energy efficiency remains far behind those observed in other developed economies. However, challenges remain whether China can put together an appropriate policy framework and the institutions needed to improve the energy efficiency of its economy under a more market-based economy today. Shanghai, located at the heart of the Yangtze River Delta, is the most dynamic economic and financial center in the booming Chinese economy. With 1% of Chinese population (13 million inhabitants), its GDP in 2000 stood at 455 billion RMB yuan (5% of the national total), with an annual growth rate of 12%--much higher than the national average. It is a major destination for foreign as well as Chinese domestic investment. In 2003, Shanghai absorbed 10% of actual foreign investment in all China (''Economist'', January 17-23, 2004). Construction in Shanghai continues at a breakneck pace, with an annual addition of approximately 200 million square foot of residential property and 100 million square foot of commercial and industrial space over the last 5 years. It is one reason that China consumed over 60% of the world's cement production in 2003 (NBS 2004). Energy consumption in Shanghai has been growing at 6-8% annually, with the growth of electricity demand at over 10% per year. Shanghai, with very limited local energy resources, relies heavily on imported coal, oil, natural gas, and electricity. While coal still constitutes over half of Shanghai's energy consumption, oil and natural gas use have been growing in importance. Shanghai is the major market for China's West to East (natural gas) Pipeline (WEP). With the input from WEP and off-shore pipelines, it is expected that natural gas consumption will grow from 250 million cubic meters in 2000 to 3000-3500 million cubic meters in 2005. In order to secure energy supply to power Shanghai's fast-growing economy, the Shanghai government has set three priorities in its energy strategy: (1) diversification of its energy structure, (2) improving its energy efficiency, and (3) developing renewable and other cleaner forms of energy. Efficiency improvements are likely to be most critical, particularly in the near future, in addressing Shanghai's energy security, especially the recent electricity shortage in Shanghai. Commercial buildings and industries consume the majority of Shanghai's, as well as China's, commercial energy. In the building sector, Shanghai has been very active implementing energy efficiency codes for commercial and residential buildings. Following a workshop on building codes implementation held at LBNL for senior Shanghai policy makers in 2001, the Shanghai government recently introduced an implementation guideline on residential building energy code compliance for the downtown area of Shanghai to commence in April, 2004, with other areas of the city to follow in 2005. A draft code for commercial buildings has been developed as well. In the industrial sector, the Shanghai government started an ambitious initiative in 2002 to induce private capital to invest in energy efficiency improvements via energy management/services companies (EMC/ESCOs). In particular, the government is developing a policy framework to encourage the use of energy performance contracting as the catalyst to stimulate the market for energy efficiency services. In September 2003, the Shanghai Economic Commission, the Shanghai Construction and Management Commission, the Shanghai Foreign Expert Bureau, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory sponsored the International Workshop on Energy Efficiency Services Industries to share experiences of energy services industry development in the US, Japan, and China. The major findings of the workshop are summarized in this report.

  3. Industrial Section Convenor's Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, M.; Riboni, P.

    2002-11-01

    Over the years this conference has gained a solid reputation as an appropriate rostrum for illustrating new concepts in the relations between industry and the scientific world and for introducing new technologies to a large assistance of junior and more experienced scientists. In fact, from the very beginning the founders of this endeavour announced: "The conference is aimed for promoting contacts among scientists involved in particle and fundamental physics, among experimental physicists in other fields and representatives from industry." Facilities at the Conference are designed to fulfil the task: space and general facilities are offered to industry representatives to display their products. This year a more accessible and luminous space arrangement was made available to the exhibitors. At the same time two plenary sessions have been dedicated to selected speakers to illustrate new trends in Technology Transfer, analysis of environment affecting our community, examples of historical successes in the merging of science and industry. We have identified in "GRID" and in "E-Publishing" two major promising areas where our Community will play a prime role as "User" and it was of the general interest to have them illustrated by two personalities directly involved in their development. The flow of knowledge is of course more massive from "Industry" to "Science" than vice-versa, but "Science" to "Industry" move offers an intensive added value. The technology transfer concept with the "Patents" as fund raising tool proved less glorious than expected. Trademark, licensing agreement and " Patents" can assure intellectual properties. But patent is an issue to be used cautiously. Evidence exists that much more efficient transfer of "Science" knowledge to "Economy" is achieved by venture capital move and start-up companies. These two facets of the Technology Transfer business have been covered by Routti's and Bourgeois's lectures.There are two examples of Companies who moved recently into the areas of interest of our community (Hourdakis and Intrasoft) and the examples of an Industry historically committed to a strong R&D effort (SAES-Getters). Finally a case of involvement of industry in a "Big Science" project (CMS) completed the palette of the contributions to this Industry Section. The full set of transparencies of the lectures, are filed and made available at the conference site: .

  4. The international electronics industry.

    PubMed

    LaDou, J; Rohm, T

    1998-01-01

    High-technology microelectronics has a major presence in countries such as China, India, Indonesia, and Malaysia, now the third-largest manufacturer of semiconductor chips. The migration of European, Japanese, and American companies accommodates regional markets. Low wage rates and limited enforcement of environmental regulations in developing countries also serve as incentives for the dramatic global migration of this industry. The manufacture of microelectonics products is accompanied by a high incidence of occupational illnesses, which may reflect the widespread use of toxic materials. Metals, photoactive chemicals, solvents, acids, and toxic gases are used in a wide variety of combinations and workplace settings. The industry also presents problems of radiation exposure and various occupational stressors, including some unresolved ergonomic issues. The fast-paced changes of the technology underlying this industry, as well as the stringent security precautions, have added to the difficulty of instituting proper health and safety measures. Epidemiologic studies reveal an alarming increase in spontaneous abortions among cleanroom manufacturing workers; no definitive study has yet identified its cause. Other health issues, including occupational cancer, are yet to be studied. The microelectronics industry is a good example of an industry that is exported to many areas of the world before health and safety problems are properly addressed and resolved. PMID:10026464

  5. Doctors and pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Beran, Roy G

    2009-09-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is seen as seducing doctors by providing expensive gifts, subsidising travel and underwriting practice expenses in return for those doctors prescribing products that otherwise they would not use. This paints doctors in a very negative light; suggests doctors are available to the highest bidder; implies doctors do not adequately act as independent agents; and that doctors are driven more by self-interest than by patient needs. Similar practices, in other industries, are accepted as normal business behaviour but it is automatically assumed to be improper if the pharmaceutical industry supports doctors. Should the pharmaceutical industry withdraw educational grants then there would be: fewer scientific meetings; reduced attendance at conferences; limited post graduate education; and a depreciated level of maintenance of professional standards. To suggest that doctors prescribe inappropriately in return for largesse maligns their integrity but where there is no scientific reason to choose between different treatments then there can be little argument against selecting the product manufactured by a company that has invested in the doctor and the question arises as to whether this represents bad medicine? This paper will examine what constitutes non-professional conduct in response to inducements by the pharmaceutical industry. It will review: conflict of interest; relationships between doctors and pharma and the consequences for patients; and the need for critical appraisal before automatically decrying this relationship while accepting that there remain those who do not practice ethical medicine. PMID:20157968

  6. PACS industry in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee-Joung

    2002-05-01

    PACS industry in Korea has been rapidly growing, since government had supported collaborative PACS project between industry and university hospital. In the beginning, PACS industry had focused on developing peripheral PACS solutions, while the Korea PACS society was being formed. A few companies had started developing and installing domestic large-scale full-PACS system for teaching hospitals. Several years later, many hospitals have installed full-PACS system with national policy of reimbursement for PACS exams in November 1999. Both experiences of full-PACS installation and national policy generated tremendous intellectual and technological expertise about PACS at all levels, clinical, hospital management, education, and industrial sectors. There are now more than 20 domestic PACS companies. They have enough experiences which are capable of installing a truly full-PACS system for large-scale teaching hospitals. As an example, a domestic company had installed more than 40 full-PACS systems within 2-3 years. Enough experiences of full-PACS installation in Korea lead PACS industry to start exporting their full-PACS solutions. However, further understanding and timely implementation of continuously evolving international standard and integrated healthcare enterprise concepts may be necessary for international leading of PACS technologies for the future.

  7. The international petrochemical industry

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, K.

    1991-01-01

    The petrochemical industry occupies a crucial place in economic, strategic and political terms in the twentieth century. The author explains its growth and international distribution from the 1920s tot he present, relating the particular experience of petrochemicals to the processes that have shaped the long-term evolution of industry in general. The geographical coverage of this book extends from the regional to international scale, and its historical scope embraces one hundred years from the laboratory origins of polymer science and petrochemistry to the massive operations of modern industry. It represents the result of twenty years of research, and reflects the author's privileged access to company sources in both the U.S. and Europe.

  8. Industrial cogeneration case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, D. R.; Isser, S.; Hinkle, B.; Friedman, N. R.

    1980-09-01

    Studies were performed on a number of operating cogeneration systems to determine application, economics, and attitudes of industrial and utility executives toward cogeneration. A literature survey was conducted and an identification of candidate cogeneration sites was carried out. This was followed by a screening of these sites down to 20 to 30 candidate sites. The screening was carried out on the basis of cogeneration capacity, geographical diversity, generation type, and industrial diversity. The remaining sites were contacted as to their willingness to work with EPRI, and an industrial questionnaire was developed on technical, economic, and institutional cogeneration issues. Each of the seventeen sites was visited during this task. A utility questionnaire was developed and utilities with cogeneration systems studied in this survey were contacted as to their attitudes toward cogeneration. In addition, a compilation of a list of operating cogeneration systems was performed.

  9. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Dereje Agonafer

    2007-11-30

    The work described in this report was performed under the direction of the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at University of Texas at Arlington. The IAC at The University of Texas at Arlington is managed by Rutgers University under agreement with the United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology, which financially supports the program. The objective of the IAC is to identify, evaluate, and recommend, through analysis of an industrial plant’s operations, opportunities to conserve energy and prevent pollution, thereby reducing the associated costs. IAC team members visit and survey the plant. Based upon observations made in the plant, preventive/corrective actions are recommended. At all times we try to offer specific and quantitative recommendations of cost savings, energy conservation, and pollution prevention to the plants we serve.

  10. Industrial Code Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1991-01-01

    The industrial codes will consist of modules of 2-D and simplified 2-D or 1-D codes, intended for expeditious parametric studies, analysis, and design of a wide variety of seals. Integration into a unified system is accomplished by the industrial Knowledge Based System (KBS), which will also provide user friendly interaction, contact sensitive and hypertext help, design guidance, and an expandable database. The types of analysis to be included with the industrial codes are interfacial performance (leakage, load, stiffness, friction losses, etc.), thermoelastic distortions, and dynamic response to rotor excursions. The first three codes to be completed and which are presently being incorporated into the KBS are the incompressible cylindrical code, ICYL, and the compressible cylindrical code, GCYL.

  11. Pharmaceutical Industry in Syria

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the development of the pharmaceutical industry in Syria using national and international public data sources. At the end of the 80ies, the pharmaceutical industry in Syria was very poor, covering 6% of the national needs. In less than 20 years, with the government support in terms of legal frame and strategic political engagement, the Syrian pharmaceutical industry finally covered almost 90% of the national needs, in terms of drugs, and exported drugs in around 52 Arabian countries. Beyond covering the local market, the main added values of this huge development consisted in exporting drugs in amount of 150 million dollars per year and providing jobs for 17000 Syrian people, out of which around 85% are women. Strong and weak points of the pharmaceutical sector are taken into consideration in the article and further interventions to support a sustainable development are proposed by the author. PMID:20945828

  12. Emulsified industrial oils recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Gabris, T.

    1982-04-01

    The industrial lubricant market has been analyzed with emphasis on current and/or developing recycling and re-refining technologies. This task has been performed for the United States and other industrialized countries, specifically France, West Germany, Italy and Japan. Attention has been focused at emulsion-type fluids regardless of the industrial application involved. It was found that emulsion-type fluids in the United States represent a much higher percentage of the total fluids used than in other industrialized countries. While recycling is an active matter explored by the industry, re-refining is rather a result of other issues than the mere fact that oil can be regenerated from a used industrial emulsion. To extend the longevity of an emulsion is a logical step to keep expenses down by using the emulsion as long as possible. There is, however, another important factor influencing this issue: regulations governing the disposal of such fluids. The ecological question, the respect for nature and the natural balances, is often seen now as everybody's task. Regulations forbid dumping used emulsions in the environment without prior treatment of the water phase and separation of the oil phase. This is a costly procedure, so recycling is attractive since it postpones the problem. It is questionable whether re-refining of these emulsions - as a business - could stand on its own if these emulsions did not have to be taken apart for disposal purposes. Once the emulsion is separated into a water and an oil phase, however, re-refining of the oil does become economical.

  13. Industrial linguistic control

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.E.; Karonis, F.

    1983-01-01

    The use of various types of controllers and control techniques for industrial process is discussed. An ongoing research and development project is reported on the application of intelligent linguistic controllers to processes in the cement industry in Greece which have, in the past, been controllable only by human operators. Prototype linguistic controllers using fuzzy logic have been implemented and tested on a rotary kiln precalciner flash furnace (3-input 3-output) and on a cement mill separator (3-input 2-output) with good results. Originally implemented on a supervisory minicomputer, the algorithms have been transferred to microcomputers which form the heart of this class of intelligent linguistic controllers. 6 references.

  14. US industrial battery forecast

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, V. III

    1996-09-01

    Last year was strong year for the US industrial battery market with growth in all segments. Sales of industrial batteries in North America grew 19.2% in 1995, exceeding last year`s forecasted growth rate of 11.6%. The results of the recently completed BCI Membership Survey forecast 1996 sales to be up 10.5%, and to continue to increase at a 10.4% compound annual rate through the year 2000. This year`s survey includes further detail on the stationary battery market with the inclusion of less than 25 Ampere-Hour batteries for the first time.

  15. INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    ASFAW BEYENE

    2008-09-29

    Since its establishment in 1990, San Diego State University’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) has served close to 400 small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in Southern California. SDSU/IAC’s efforts to transfer state-of-the-art technologies to industry have increased revenues, cultivated creativity, improved efficiencies, and benefited the environment. A substantial benefit from the program has been the ongoing training of engineering faculty and students. During this funding cycle, SDSU/IAC has trained 31 students, 7 of the graduate. A total of 92 assessments and 108 assessment days were completed, resulting in 638 assessment recommendations.

  16. Industrial sand and gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2010-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2009 was about 27 Mt (30 million st), declining by 10 percent compared with 2008. Certain end uses of industrial sand and gravel, such as foundry and glassmaking sand, may have declined by a factor greater than 10 percent in 2009. U.S. apparent consumption was 24.7 Mt (27.2 million st) in 2009, down by 10 percent from the previous year, and imports declined to 83 kt (91,000 st).

  17. Solar industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsdaine, E.

    1981-04-01

    The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

  18. Transferring Technology to Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenbarger, J. Ken

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology transfer processes in which JPL has been involved to assist in transferring the technology derived from aerospace research and development to industry. California Institute of Technology (CalTech), the organization that runs JPL, is the leading institute in patents for all U.S. universities. There are several mechanisms that are available to JPL to inform industry of these technological advances: (1) a dedicated organization at JPL, National Space Technology Applications (NSTA), (2) Tech Brief Magazine, (3) Spinoff magazine, and (4) JPL publications. There have also been many start-up organizations and businesses from CalTech.

  19. Burlington Industries: Modernize or Perish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeycutt, Earl D., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, Burlington Industries was the largest textile firm in the world, and in 1973 the U. S. textile industry employed more than 1 million workers. Dynamic change came to the textile industry beginning in the 1960s, and in 2001 Burlington Industries filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. This case traces the dynamics of the market and the…

  20. Frontiers in Industrial Arts Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonnell, Elisabeth, Ed.; Strosnider, Floy, Ed.

    Presentation topics of the 28th annual American Industrial Arts Association Convention include: (1) "Where We Are in Federal Legislation Programs," (2) "Frontiers in Industrial Arts Education," and (3) "Industry's Cooperation with Education." Eleven symposia were conducted on the topic of "Implementing Frontier Ideas in Industrial Arts Education…

  1. INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

    2010-05-28

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

  2. Manufacturing (Industrial) Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 35 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of manufacturing (industrial) technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific…

  3. Computer Technology for Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1982

    1982-01-01

    A special National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) service is contributing to national productivity by providing industry with reusable, low-cost, government-developed computer programs. Located at the University of Georgia, NASA's Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) has developed programs for equipment…

  4. Vocational/Industrial Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents high school and college vocational/industrial arts buildings considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting unique concepts and ideas. For each citation, the article offers information on the…

  5. Today's Business Simulation Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    New technologies are transforming the business simulation industry. The technologies come from research in computational fields of science, and they endow simulations with new capabilities and qualities. These capabilities and qualities include computerized behavioral simulations, online feedback and coaching, advanced interfaces, learning on

  6. Industrial Radiography Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Harry D.

    This text was developed for use by students in an 80-hour course for industrial radiographers. Chapter headings are: (1) The Structure of Matter, (2) Radiation and Radiation Machines, (3) Nuclear Reactions and Radioisotopes, (4) Interaction of Radiation with Matter, (5) Radiation Detection and Measurement, (6) The Nature and Consequences of…

  7. Energy for industry

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.H. ); Steinmeyer, D. )

    1990-09-01

    Economic growth and energy use once marched in lockstep. Now industrial output is climbing while energy use declines. In practice, companies reduce energy consumption by optimizing the cost of existing processes, by introducing process refinements and by making breakthroughs that lead to entirely new methods of manufacture. Each of these are described with examples of each.

  8. Steel Industry Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidtke, N. W.; Averill, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from steel industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers: (1) coke production; (2) iron and steel production; (3) rolling operations; and (4) surface treatment. A list of 133 references is also presented. (NM)

  9. Petroleum industry in Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Farideh, A.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the oil industry in Iran from the early discovery of oil nearly two hundred years ago in Mazandaran (north part) to the development of a giant modern industry in the twentieth century. Chapter I presents a brief historical setting to introduce the reader to the importance of oil in Iran. It focuses on the economic implications of the early oil concessions in the period 1901 to 1951. Chapter II discusses the nationalization of the Iranian oil industry and creation of NIOC in 1951 and the international political and economic implication of these activities. Chapter III explains the activities of NIOC in Iran. Exploration and drilling, production, exports, refineries, natural gas, petrochemicals and internal distributions are studied. Chapter IV discusses the role of the development planning of Iran. A brief presentation of the First Development Plan through the Fifth Development Plan is given. Sources and uses of funds by plan organization during these Five Plans is studied. The Iran and Iraq War is also studied briefly, but the uncertainty of its resolution prevents any close analysis of its impact on the Iranian oil industry. One conclusion, however, is certain; oil has been a vital resource in Iran's past and it will remain the lifetime of its economic development in the future.

  10. An Industry Redefined

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2007-01-01

    Activities in 2006 pointed to strategic shifts in library automation. The dynamics of the business environment changed rapidly from a fragmented industry to a highly consolidated one. Though the integrated library system (ILS) continues to represent the largest portion of revenue, products that deal with electronic content and deliver better…

  11. Working with Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullman, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    As community colleges focus on becoming more efficient and preparing more students for success in a climate of reduced state and federal funding, many institutions are reaching out to neighbors in business and industry, forming partnerships and working together to achieve goals that require money and resources colleges are unlikely to raise on…

  12. Water Pollution Control Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1974

    1974-01-01

    A special report on the state of the water pollution control industry reveals that due to forthcoming federal requirements, sales and the backlogs should increase; problems may ensue because of shortages of materials and inflation. Included are reports from various individual companies. (MLB)

  13. RETRAINING BY PRIVATE INDUSTRY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HOOS, IDA R.

    SEVERAL SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA COMPANIES WERE EXAMINED FOR SPECIFIC PROGRAMS FOR DISPLACED EMPLOYEES. ARMOUR AND COMPANY SOUGHT TO GUIDE DISPLACED EMPLOYEES TO CLASSES OR COURSES OF ACTION OUTSIDE ITS OWN SPHERE OF OPERATION. LOCKHEED HAS PROVIDED UNUSUALLY WELL FOR UPGRADING AND RETRAINING, MAINLY BECAUSE OF INDUSTRY FLUCTUATIONS AND RAPID…

  14. Industrial Efficiency and Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Crowden, G. P.

    1930-01-01

    The problems of industrial efficiency and fatigue offer increasing scope for the use of that special knowledge of human life with which medical men are equipped by their training. Success and prosperity of industry depend as much on health and efficiency of workers as on the efficiency of machines. Impetus given by European War to study of this human factor; national necessity led to establishment of Health of Munition Workers Committee which later developed into the Industrial Fatigue Research—now the Industrial Health Research—Board of the Medical Research Council. In Germany extensive investigations are now pursued at the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institut für Arbeitsphysiologie, at Dortmund, into such problems as relationship of age to capacity for heavy muscular work, influence of diet and nutrition on human efficiency, and optimum height of stairs up which loads have to be carried; new system of training apprentices developed in Germany since the war. Factors influencing efficiency and capacity for work of employees may be placed in two general groups, intra-factory conditions, and extra-factory conditions. Many of these factors have been investigated in this country and in America. In particular, the effect of the environmental conditions of temperature, humidity and air-movement on human efficiency has been studied: but much remains to be done. PMID:19987375

  15. Teleoperators - A growth industry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    Teleoperators (remote operators), equipped with TV systems, manipulators, and highly mobile vehicles, can extend man's manipulative and sensory capabilities into distant or hazadous environments. It is shown how teleoperator technology will lead to autonomous robots, and from them and special purpose teleoperators, to a completely new industrial system. Various applications are described, and it is pointed out that teleoperators do not replace workers.

  16. Industrial Radiography Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Harry D.

    The curriculum guide was developed for teacher use in an 80-hour course for industrial radiographers. The units include: (1) The Structure of Matter and Radiation, (2) Nuclear Reactions and Radioisotopes, (3) The Nature and Consequences of Radiation Exposure, (4) Radiation Attenuation, (5) Absorption of Radiation, (6) Radiation Detection and…

  17. Industrial Education. "Small Engines".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Part of a series of curriculum guides dealing with industrial education in junior high schools, this guide provides the student with information and manipulative experiences on small gasoline engines. Included are sections on shop adjustment, safety, small engines, internal combustion, engine construction, four stroke engines, two stroke engines,…

  18. Lipases, industrial uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of triglycerides to glycerol and fatty acids. Microbial lipases are relatively stable and are capable of catalyzing a variety of reactions; they are potentially of importance for diverse industrial applications. Lipases can be divided generally into...

  19. University-industry interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, Daniel E.

    1990-01-01

    It is posited that university industry interaction is highly desirable from the viewpoint of the long term economic development of the country as well as being desirable for the Space Grant Programs. The present and future possible interactions are reviewed for the three university levels namely, undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research.

  20. Industrial cogeneration optimization program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to identify up to 10 good near-term opportunities for cogeneration in 5 major energy-consuming industries which produce food, textiles, paper, chemicals, and refined petroleum; select, characterize, and optimize cogeneration systems for these identified opportunities to achieve maximum energy savings for minimum investment using currently available components of cogenerating systems; and to identify technical, institutional, and regulatory obstacles hindering the use of industrial cogeneration systems. The analysis methods used and results obtained are described. Plants with fuel demands from 100,000 Btu/h to 3 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h were considered. It was concluded that the major impediments to industrial cogeneration are financial, e.g., high capital investment and high charges by electric utilities during short-term cogeneration facility outages. In the plants considered an average energy savings from cogeneration of 15 to 18% compared to separate generation of process steam and electric power was calculated. On a national basis for the 5 industries considered, this extrapolates to saving 1.3 to 1.6 quads per yr or between 630,000 to 750,000 bbl/d of oil. Properly applied, federal activity can do much to realize a substantial fraction of this potential by lowering the barriers to cogeneration and by stimulating wider implementation of this technology. (LCL)

  1. Engineering Industry Training Board

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Training International, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Engineering Industry Training Board has produced a method enabling the office supervisor or departmental manager to control the critical parts of his systems--the Commercial Systems Practice (CSP). The systems plot, the staff/task matrix, performance indicators, and benefits of the CSP technique are discussed. (Author/MW)

  2. Reshaping the power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Flaving, C.; Lenssen, N.K.

    1995-05-01

    This paper discusses some of the trends that are reshaping the traditional electric power industry. These include shutting down expensive nuclear reactors, investment in renewable energy technologies, encouragement of customers to install energy efficient lights, windows, and appliances, construction of small, independent power generation plants, retail wheeling, and diversification of utilities into the service sector.

  3. TRAINING IN INDUSTRY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GLASER, ROBERT

    THIS CHAPTER IN A LARGER WORK ON INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY DEALS LARGELY WITH THE NEED TO SPECIFY TRAINING OBJECTIVES THROUGH JOB ANALYSIS, USES OF TESTING IN TRAINEE SELECTION, TRAINING VARIABLES AND LEARNING PROCESSES, TRAINING TECHNOLOGY (MAINLY THE CHARACTERISTICS OF PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION), THE EVALUATION OF PROFICIENCY, THE VALUE OF

  4. Air Pollution and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, R. D., Ed.

    This book is an authoritative reference and practical guide designed to help the plant engineer identify and solve industrial air pollution problems in order to be able to meet current air pollution regulations. Prepared under the editorial supervision of an experienced chemical engineer, with each chapter contributed by an expert in his field,

  5. The changing solar industry

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.

    1990-03-01

    The July 1989 announcement that Atlantic Richfield had agreed to sell its ARCO Solar division to Siemens of West Germany sent shock waves throughout the U.S. photovoltaics (PV) industry, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and among investigators. The largest PV manufacturer in the world was being sold because it had failed to make enough money for its parent company, and a foreign company was purchasing it - presumably because no U.S. company or investor package had come up with a high enough offer. Given the millions of dollars in government financed research and development funds that ARCO had benefited from, some government officials talked of blocking the sale, an effort that could only have succeeded if it was demonstrated that the sale would compromise national security - which was not the case. With the acquisition scheduled to be completed on February 28, 1990 - the newly acquired company will be called Siemens Solar Industries - many in the industry were wondering what the impact on the industry would be. Would buy-America sentiment help Siemens Solar's competitors Would investors become nervous over the potential profitability of any PV companies and pull back Would it become more difficult to obtain R D funds from a now gun-shy Department of Energy These questions are discussed.

  6. The Earthscan Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Spurred by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) technological advances, a budding industry is manufacturing equipment and providing services toward better management of earth's resources. Topics discussed include image processing, multispectral photography, ground use sensor, and weather data receiver. (Author/JN)

  7. Industrial Ceramics: Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The expanding use of ceramic products in today's world can be seen in the areas of communications, construction, aerospace, textiles, metallurgy, atomic energy, and electronics. The demands of science have brought ceramics from an art to an industry using mass production and automated processes which requires the services of great numbers as the…

  8. Commercial and Industrial Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; Flowers, Gary

    This module is the third in a series of three wiring publications, includes additional technical knowledge and applications required for job entry in the commercial and industrial wiring trade. The module contains 15 instructional units that cover the following topics: blueprint reading and load calculations; tools and equipment; service;…

  9. Industrial Organic Electrosynthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagenknecht, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Four examples of industrial electrochemical synthesis of organic compounds are described. These include acrylonitrile dimerization, tetramethyl lead, electrochemical fluorination, and production of diacetone-2-keto-L-gulonic acid. Additional examples are also cited, including the production of several compounds by the BASF company of Germany. (JN)

  10. Air Pollution and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, R. D., Ed.

    This book is an authoritative reference and practical guide designed to help the plant engineer identify and solve industrial air pollution problems in order to be able to meet current air pollution regulations. Prepared under the editorial supervision of an experienced chemical engineer, with each chapter contributed by an expert in his field,…

  11. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect

    1990-05-01

    Recent nuclear industry briefs are presented. These briefs in include: Comanche Peak 1 receives operating license; Crow Butte Project receives permit to mine; Japan`s Socialist Party supports nuclear energy; nuclear power generated 17% of electricity in 1989; South Africa`s first quarter production; Malapa: sale agreement reached; Swedish nuclear phaseout delay more likely; and VEW signs reprocessing contract with BNFL.

  12. Industrial Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This handbook contains a competency-based curriculum for teaching industrial education in Alaska. Competencies are listed for the following areas: employability, auto maintenance, building maintenance, commercial fishing, communications, construction, drafting, electronics, energy and power, forestry and logging, graphics, high technology,…

  13. Industrial Education Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This guide was developed as a supplement to the Alaska Department of Education's industrial education curriculum. The special topics included in it focus on competencies from the curriculum for which materials were not readily available to Alaskan teachers and provide information that may not be sufficiently covered by existing curricula. Each…

  14. Industrial Education. "Small Engines".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Part of a series of curriculum guides dealing with industrial education in junior high schools, this guide provides the student with information and manipulative experiences on small gasoline engines. Included are sections on shop adjustment, safety, small engines, internal combustion, engine construction, four stroke engines, two stroke engines,

  15. An Industry Redefined

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2007-01-01

    Activities in 2006 pointed to strategic shifts in library automation. The dynamics of the business environment changed rapidly from a fragmented industry to a highly consolidated one. Though the integrated library system (ILS) continues to represent the largest portion of revenue, products that deal with electronic content and deliver better

  16. Industrial Training Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beverstock, A.G.

    Based primarily on British conditions, this volume concentrates on methods of industrial training for production workers, craftsmen and technicians, office personnel, technicians and technologists, supervisors, marketing and sales personnel, and the junior, middle, and senior or executive levels of management. General principles and fundamental

  17. Manufacturing (Industrial) Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 35 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of manufacturing (industrial) technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific

  18. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect

    1990-07-01

    Recent nuclear industry briefs are presented. These briefs include: Japan to build to nuclear power plants; RWE buys Degussa`s interest in Nukem; Soviet-East German Uranium Project restructured; Chinon A3 shut down; Italy to close last two nuclear units; Rio Algom buys into Uranium Resources; Duke to sell partial interest in LES; and China to accelerate nuclear power program.

  19. Industrial Arts Test Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Industrial Arts Education.

    The booklet is designed to assist teachers in improving locally developed classroom tests. It is a collection of 674 sample multiple-choice questions (with scoring keys) intended primarily for use as pretests, quizzes, or final examinations by secondary level teachers. The questions are organized around four industrial arts subject areas: drawing,…

  20. Outflanking the Rankings Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author argues that American higher education is allowing itself to be held hostage by the rankings industry, which can lead institutions to consider actions harmful to the public interest and encourage the public's infatuation with celebrity at the expense of substance. Instead of sitting quietly by during the upcoming ratings…

  1. Moving up in industry.

    PubMed

    Covell, Charlotte

    2016-01-23

    Charlotte Covell is commercial business manager at Virbac UK, a role that gives her responsibility for the company's sales to corporate practices, some buying groups and internet pharmacies. She began her career as a veterinary nurse, but moved into industry and now has a role in senior business management. PMID:26795866

  2. Turning industry visions into reality

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This brochure outlines the activities of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) in the Department of Energy. OIT activities are aimed at industry adoption of energy-efficient, pollution-reducing technologies and include research and development on advanced technologies, financing, technical assistance, information dissemination, education, and bringing together industry groups, universities, National Laboratories, states, and environmentalists. OIT`s core initiative is to facilitate partnerships within seven materials and process industries: aluminum, chemicals, forest products, glass, metalcasting, petroleum refining, and steel industries.

  3. Robotics and industrial inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Casasent, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    Image processing algorithms are discussed, taking into account hidden information in early visual processing, three-dimensional shape recognition by moirecorrelation, spatial-frequency representations of images with scale invariant properties, image-based focusing, the computational structure for the Walsh-Hadamard transform, a hybrid optical/digital moment-based robotic pattern recognition system, affordable implementations of image processing algorithms, and an analysis of low-level computer vision algorithms for implementation on a very large scale integrated processor array. Other topics considered are related to government programs and needs in robotics, DoD research and applications in robotics, time-varying image processing and control, industrial robotics, industrial applications of computer vision, and object perception and mensuration for robotics. Attention is given to laser scanning techniques for automatic inspection of heat-sealed film packages, computer software for robotic vision, and computerized tomography on a logarithmic polar grid.

  4. Industrialization of Biology.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Douglas C; Ellington, Andrew D

    2015-10-16

    The advancement of synthetic biology over the past decade has contributed substantially to the growing bioeconomy. A recent report by the National Academies highlighted several areas of advancement that will be needed for further expansion of industrial biotechnology, including new focuses on design, feedstocks, processing, organism development, and tools for testing and measurement; more particularly, a focus on expanded chassis and end-to-end design in an effort to move beyond the use of E. coli and S. cerivisiea to organisms better suited to fermentation and production; second, continued efforts in systems biology and high-throughput screening with a focus on more rapid techniques that will provide the needed information for moving to larger scale; and finally, work to accelerate the building of a holacratic community with collaboration and engagement between the relevant government agencies, industry, academia, and the public. PMID:26471233

  5. Industrial process models

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.

    1983-05-01

    The National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems at Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed process optimization models of the U.S. pulp and paper, iron and steel, and aluminum industries. Given fuel price and product demand projections, the models project modes of operation and energy consumption characteristics that minimize the cost of meeting the expected demands over a 25-year time horizon. Each model includes energy-conserving options to conventional technologies. Examples are vapor recompression, hydropyrolysis, scrap preheating, induction reheating, and titanium diboride cathodes. Model results include fuel use by type and time period as well as use of new technologies. Users can examine the effects of fuel prices, tax policies, product demands, and alternative investment scenarios on fuel and electricity use in each industry.

  6. Tobacco industry tactics.

    PubMed

    Sweda, E L; Daynard, R A

    1996-01-01

    The tobacco industry's strong-arm tactics have been used consistently over many years. These tactics include: using the industry's size, wealth, and legal resources to intimidate individuals and local governmental bodies; setting up 'front groups' to make it appear that it has more allies than it really does; spending large sums of money to frame the public debate about smoking regulations around 'rights and liberty' rather than health and portraying its tobacco company adversaries as extremists; 'investing' thousands of dollars in campaign contributions to politicians; and using financial resources to influence science. These tactics are designed to produce delay, giving the nicotine cartel more time to collect even more profits at the direct expense of millions of lives around the world. PMID:8746306

  7. LBL industry review

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, D. )

    1993-01-01

    This is a general summary of a meeting on March 16, 1993 of the LBL Industry Review Panel on Exploration and Reservoir Technology. It met in three subpanels to consider (1) exploration for new discoveries (2) mapping reservoir properties and monitoring production/injection (3) well testing, reservoir simulation, and predicting future reservoir performance. This very brief meeting only allowed very broad coverage of concerns. There is a growing commercial development of liquid based geothermal reservoirs, and they are encountering problems for which they are asking for research dollars. This will probably cause a shift in research spending as there is a limited number of dollars available, and the vapor based Geysers has received most funding to this point. All three panels felt the need to see more case studies, whether they reached positive or negative conclusions. This may be forthcoming as consolidation in the industry is reducing the need to shield information from competitors.

  8. Industry perspective on Maglev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-06-01

    Most of the recent discussion and proposed legislation concerning Maglev (magnetic levitation) assumes that U.S. industry has a strong interest in Maglev and will be willing to take a proactive, cost-sharing role in the development of Maglev systems. As part of the preliminary feasibility studies on Maglev, the Federal Railroad Administration obtained the perceptions of several major U.S. corporations and identified their interest in a Maglev program, their willingness to participate, and any potential barriers to their participation. The industry perspectives were obtained through an independent and unbiased external study that included in-depth interviews with senior executives from 22 major U.S. corporations. The study, conducted during April and May 1990, was primarily directed at the development and implementation of a next-generation leapfrog Maglev system in the United States.

  9. Coal industry annual 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-06

    Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

  10. Coal industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  11. Other Industrial Aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    In another industrial spinoff, O. Z. Gedney Co.,Terryville, Conn., found the answer to a problem in a NASA Tech Brief describing research in adhesive bonding for the Space Shuttle. Gedney, which makes electrical fittings for industrial plants, was developing a new "fire stop," a device that prevents the spread of fire through holes where cables and pipes penetrate fire barriers in buildings. The company wanted to bond a metal disc on the fire stop to a layer of "instumescent" material, material that swells under heat and fills the gap caused by melted cable insulation, thus blocking passage of fire and smoke. At the company's request, NASA supplied a technical information package which identified the best adhesive and the proper bonding technique. The fire-stop fitting is now in production.

  12. [Metalworking industry management evolution].

    PubMed

    Mattucci, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the evolution drivers of the management systems in the metalworking industry, mainly characterized as "automotive", starting with the "mass production" model, followed for the development of Italian industry in the '50. Through the socio-economic changes of the '90/10, the metalworking plants were deeply restructured with the introduction of computers in the production systems, and then with the first global benchmarks such as the "lean production", towards the needed operational flexibility to respond to the market dynamics. Plants change radically, company networks become real, ICT services are fundamental elements for the integration. These trends help visualizing a new "Factory of the Future" for the years 2020/30, where the competition will be based on the socio-economical, technological and environmental factors included in the "Competitive Sustainable Manufacturing" paradigm. PMID:22073665

  13. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect

    1992-11-01

    This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s November 1992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific items discussed include: (1) restart of Chernobyl-3 and Kozloduy-4, (2) licensing of a waste repository in Spain, (3) record operation of Limerick-2 and Kashiwazaki-Kariwa, (4) purchase of uranium properties in Autralia, (5) licensing of Obrigheim, (6) operation of Bradwell-1, (7) enrichment services in Europe, (8) decommissioning of Trojan, (9) nuclear uncertainties in Finland, and (10) restart of Japanese enrichment facilities.

  14. Industrial Analytics Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Industrial Analytics Corporation

    2004-01-30

    The lost foam casting process is sensitive to the properties of the EPS patterns used for the casting operation. In this project Industrial Analytics Corporation (IAC) has developed a new low voltage x-ray instrument for x-ray radiography of very low mass EPS patterns. IAC has also developed a transmitted visible light method for characterizing the properties of EPS patterns. The systems developed are also applicable to other low density materials including graphite foams.

  15. Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rue, David M.; Servaites, James; Wolf, Warren

    2007-08-01

    This is a study on energy use and potential savings, or "bandwidth" study, for several glassmaking processes. Intended to provide a realistic estimate of the potential amount of energy that can be saved in an industrial process, the "bandwidth" refers to the difference between the amount of energy that would be consumed in a process using commercially available technology versus the minimum amount of energy needed to achieve those same results.

  16. Glass Industry Bandwidth Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rue, David M.

    2006-07-01

    This is a study on energy use and potential savings, or "bandwidth" study, for several glassmaking processes. Intended to provide a realistic estimate of the potential amount of energy that can be saved in an industrial process, the "bandwidth" refers to the difference between the amount of energy that would be consumed in a process using commercially available technology versus the minimum amount of energy needed to achieve those same results.

  17. Industrial Computer Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1996-01-01

    This is an overview of new and updated industrial codes for seal design and testing. GCYLT (gas cylindrical seals -- turbulent), SPIRALI (spiral-groove seals -- incompressible), KTK (knife to knife) Labyrinth Seal Code, and DYSEAL (dynamic seal analysis) are covered. CGYLT uses G-factors for Poiseuille and Couette turbulence coefficients. SPIRALI is updated to include turbulence and inertia, but maintains the narrow groove theory. KTK labyrinth seal code handles straight or stepped seals. And DYSEAL provides dynamics for the seal geometry.

  18. Industrial labor relations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Industrial Labor Relations Manual provides internal guidelines and procedures to assist NASA Field Installations in dealing with contractor labor management disputes, Service Contract Act variance hearings, and to provide access of Labor Union Representatives to NASA for the purpose of maintaining schedules and goals in connection with vital NASA programs. This manual will be revised by page changes as revisions become necessary. Initial distribution of this manual has been made to NASA Headquarters and Field Installations.

  19. Poultry Industry Energy Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The poultry industry, a multi-billion dollar business in the United States, uses great amounts of energy in such operations as broiler growing, feed manufacturing, poultry processing and packing. Higher costs and limited supply of fuels common to the industry are predicted, so poultry producers are seeking ways to reduce energy expenditure. NASA is providing assistance to Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc., an association of some 4,000 growers and suppliers in one of the nation's largest poultry production areas. Delmarva is the East Coast peninsula that includes Delaware and parts of Maryland and Virginia. The upper right photo shows a weather station in the Delmarva area (wind indicator on the pole, other instruments in the elevated box). The station is located at the University of Maryland's Broiler Sub-station, Salisbury; Maryland, where the university conducts research on poultry production and processing. The sub-station is investigating ways of conserving energy in broiler production and also exploring the potential of solar collectors as an alternative energy source. For these studies, it is essential that researchers have continuous data on temperature, pressure, wind speed and direction, solar intensity and cloud cover. Equipment to acquire such data was loaned and installed by NASA's Wallops Flight Center, Wallops Island, Virginia.

  20. Distance collaborations with industry

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, A.; Swyler, K.

    1998-06-01

    The college industry relationship has been identified as a key policy issue in Engineering Education. Collaborations between academic institutions and the industrial sector have a long history and a bright future. For Engineering and Engineering Technology programs in particular, industry has played a crucial role in many areas including advisement, financial support, and practical training of both faculty and students. Among the most important and intimate interactions are collaborative projects and formal cooperative education arrangements. Most recently, such collaborations have taken on a new dimension, as advances in technology have made possible meaningful technical collaboration at a distance. There are several obvious technology areas that have contributed significantly to this trend. Foremost is the ubiquitous presence of the Internet. Perhaps almost as important are advances in computer based imaging. Because visual images offer a compelling user experience, it affords greater knowledge transfer efficiency than other modes of delivery. Furthermore, the quality of the image appears to have a strongly correlated effect on insight. A good visualization facility offers both a means for communication and a shared information space for the subjects, which are among the essential features of both peer collaboration and distance learning.

  1. EDITORIAL: Industrial Process Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton Johansen, Geir; Wang, Mi

    2008-09-01

    There has been tremendous development within measurement science and technology over the past couple of decades. New sensor technologies and compact versatile signal recovery electronics are continuously expanding the limits of what can be measured and the accuracy with which this can be done. Miniaturization of sensors and the use of nanotechnology push these limits further. Also, thanks to powerful and cost-effective computer systems, sophisticated measurement and reconstruction algorithms previously only accessible in advanced laboratories are now available for in situ online measurement systems. The process industries increasingly require more process-related information, motivated by key issues such as improved process control, process utilization and process yields, ultimately driven by cost-effectiveness, quality assurance, environmental and safety demands. Industrial process tomography methods have taken advantage of the general progress in measurement science, and aim at providing more information, both quantitatively and qualitatively, on multiphase systems and their dynamics. The typical approach for such systems has been to carry out one local or bulk measurement and assume that this is representative of the whole system. In some cases, this is sufficient. However, there are many complex systems where the component distribution varies continuously and often unpredictably in space and time. The foundation of industrial tomography is to conduct several measurements around the periphery of a multiphase process, and use these measurements to unravel the cross-sectional distribution of the process components in time and space. This information is used in the design and optimization of industrial processes and process equipment, and also to improve the accuracy of multiphase system measurements in general. In this issue we are proud to present a selection of the 145 papers presented at the 5th World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography in Bergen, September 2007. Interestingly, x-ray technologies, one of the first imaging modalities available, keep on moving the limits on both spatial and temporal measurement resolution; experimental results of less than 100 nm and several thousand frames/s are reported, respectively. Important progress is demonstrated in research and development on sensor technologies and algorithms for data processing and image reconstruction, including unconventional sensor design and adaptation of the sensors to the application in question. The number of applications to which tomographic methods are applied is steadily increasing, and results obtained in a representative selection of applications are included. As guest editors we would like express our appreciation and thanks to all authors who have contributed and to IOP staff for excellent collaboration in the process of finalizing this special feature.

  2. States industries of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, J.E.

    1999-07-01

    Industries of the Future (IOD), a partnership strategy of the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), has successfully facilitated development of industry visions and roadmaps for the Agriculture, Aluminum, Chemical, Forest Products, Glass, Metalcasting, Mining, and Steel industries. (Similar documents are expected from the Petroleum refining industry in the near future.) OIT is now forming partnership with states to pursue these industry-defined visions and roadmaps on a state level. The goals of this initiative are to boost industrial efficiency and productivity by working with states with significant activity in one or more of the nine target industries. A typical state approach establishes a state team, targets specific industries, promotes industry alliances, builds industry interest and leadership, identifies business and technology needs, outlines a state strategy, and generates action plans and partnerships. State benefits include potential industry and job growth alignment of customer and supplier base with core industries, improved environmental performance, increased resource efficiency, and enhanced ability to compete for national resources. In Fiscal Year 1998, DOE awarded 16 grants to 20 states for a range of States Industries of the Future and deployment projects. This paper highlights four projects: Industries of the Future--West Virginia; the Northeast Collaborative project led by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA); Michigan Industries of the Future; and Alabama Industries of the Future. These projects have demonstrated effective techniques for building partnerships and have produced many lessons learned. A broad range of tools is available to assist states in initiating and supporting state-level IOF activities.

  3. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 13. PLASTICIZERS INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The Plasticizer ...

  4. The Rationale for Industrial Technology/Industrial Arts in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    The goal of industrial technology for industrial arts education in Texas is the education of society to enable its members to function efficiently in the world of advancing technology. Policymakers in Texas have chosen to organize the industrial technology curriculum around three technology clusters: visual communication, production, and energy

  5. The Rationale for Industrial Technology/Industrial Arts in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    The goal of industrial technology for industrial arts education in Texas is the education of society to enable its members to function efficiently in the world of advancing technology. Policymakers in Texas have chosen to organize the industrial technology curriculum around three technology clusters: visual communication, production, and energy…

  6. Forest Products Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the forest products industry's research and development priorities. The original technology roadmap published by the industry in 1999 and was most recently updated in April 2010.

  7. Report of Industry Panel Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, Simon; Gier, Jochen; Heitland, Greg; Povinelli, Louis; Sharma, Om; VandeWall, Allen

    2006-01-01

    A final report is presented from the industry panel group. The contents include: 1) General comments; 2) Positive progress since Minnowbrook IV; 3) Industry panel outcome; 4) Prioritized turbine projects; 5) Prioritized compressor projects; and 6) Miscellaneous.

  8. Safety with industrial manufacturing lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, W. I.

    A review of British safety standards relative to lasers in the industrial workplace is presented. Classification of laser outputs according to wavelength and power and the necessary precautions to be taken when employing them in industrial production situations are examined.

  9. Industrial Arts at San Jose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohn, Ralph C.

    1969-01-01

    San Jose State College in California has special features in its course for industrial arts teachers. Ralph C. Bohn, Chairman of the College's Department of Industrial Studies, describes the course and the reasons for its special character. (Editor)

  10. Industrial Engineering Education: A Prospective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsayed, E. A.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an overview of the origin of the industrial engineering discipline and how the subject was taught in the early stages of its development. Describes current changes in the curricula to meet new requirements in industry. (Author/CCM)

  11. Dermatitis in rubber manufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect

    White, I.R.

    1988-01-01

    This review describes the history of rubber technology and the manufacturing techniques used in rubber manufacturing industries. The important aspects of the acquisition of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis within the industry are presented for the reader.

  12. Technological Diversification of Japanese Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodama, Fumio

    1986-01-01

    Describes an approach for measuring industrial technological diversification behavior. Identifies sectoral patterns of Japanese industry as related to diversification behaviors. Delineates the mechanisms and effectiveness of Japanese corporate and government policies relevant to diversification. (ML)

  13. EDITORIAL: Industrial Process Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Robert M.

    2004-07-01

    Industrial process tomography remains a multidisciplinary field with considerable interest for many varied participants. Indeed this adds greatly to its appeal. It is a pleasure and a privilege to once again act as guest editor for a special feature issue of Measurement Science and Technology on industrial process tomography, the last being in December 2002. Those involved in the subject appreciate the efforts of Measurement Science and Technology in producing another issue and I thank the journal on their behalf. It can be seen that there are considerable differences in the composition of material covered in this issue compared with previous publications. The dominance of electrical impedance and electrical capacitance techniques is reduced and there is increased emphasis on general utility of tomographic methods. This is encompassed in the papers of Hoyle and Jia (visualization) and Dierick et al (Octopus). Electrical capacitance tomography has been a core modality for industrial applications. This issue includes new work in two very interesting aspects of image reconstruction: pattern matching (Takei and Saito) and simulated annealing (Ortiz-Aleman et al). It is important to take advantage of knowledge of the process such as the presence of only two components, and then to have robust reconstruction methods provided by pattern matching and by simulated annealing. Although crude reconstruction methods such as approximation by linear back projection were utilized for initial work on electrical impedance tomography, the techniques published here are much more advanced. The paper by Kim et al includes modelling of a two-component system permitting an adaption-related approach; the paper by Tossavainen et al models free surface boundaries to enable the estimation of shapes of objects within the target. There are clear improvements on the previous crude and blurred reconstructions where boundaries were merely inferred rather than estimated as in these new developments. Interest in magnetic induction tomography has evolved recently and I am pleased to note the inclusion of new work in that modality by Casanova et al. Note that this work also makes full use of prior information to improve reconstruction results. A modality that is relatively new to industrial applications is featured by Holstein et al, namely acoustic tomography. The novelty is provided by using measurements of the speed of sound in gas (air) to identify temperature distributions. Two well chosen applications illustrate the technique. Hard-field tomography, that is the modalities of x-ray and gamma-ray tomography, has always been of interest for some industrial applications. Often this has been for the high resolution of reconstructions available with these techniques, but there application has been restricted due to concerns about use of ionizing radiation. Cattle et al include an application to a process where the material to be imaged is a gamma emitter, i.e. only passive sources are used. The novelty here is that both source and attenuation information is used concurrently to obtain reconstructions. I thank the authors for a fascinating collection of papers that reflect current interest in the subject of industrial process tomography.

  14. Industrial plasmas in academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenstein, Ch; Howling, AA; Guittienne, Ph; Furno, I.

    2015-01-01

    The present review, written at the occasion of the 2014 EPS Innovation award, will give a short overview of the research and development of industrial plasmas within the last 30 years and will also provide a first glimpse into future developments of this important topic of plasma physics and plasma chemistry. In the present contribution, some of the industrial plasmas studied at the CRPP/EPFL at Lausanne are highlighted and their influence on modern plasma physics and also discharge physics is discussed. One of the most important problems is the treatment of large surfaces, such as that used in solar cells, but also in more daily applications, such as the packaging industry. In this contribution, the advantages and disadvantages of some of the most prominent plasmas such as capacitively- and inductively-coupled plasmas are discussed. Electromagnetic problems due to the related radio frequency and its consequences on the plasma reactor performance, and also dust formation due to chemical reactions in plasma, are highlighted. Arcing and parasitic discharges occurring in plasma reactors can lead to plasma reactor damages. Some specific problems, such as the gas supply of a large area reactor, are discussed in more detail. Other topics of interest have been dc discharges such as those used in plasma spraying where thermal plasmas are applied for advanced material processing. Modern plasma diagnostics make it possible to investigate sparks in electrical discharge machining, which surprisingly show properties of weakly-coupled plasmas. Nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasmas have been applied to more speculative topics such as applications in aerodynamics and will surely be important in the future for ignition and combustion. Most of the commonly-used plasma sources have been shown to be limited in their performance. Therefore new, more effective plasma sources are urgently required. With the recent development of novel resonant network antennas for new advanced large area or large volume plasma sources, an important step towards high performance plasmas and new fast processes is made.

  15. SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucena, Angel; Raines, Matthew; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Mata, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) have very limited diagnostic and no prognostic capabilities, while current smart sensor designs do not have the capability to communicate over Fieldbus networks. The aim is to interface smart sensors with PLCs so that health and status information, such as failure mode identification and measurement tolerance, can be communicated via an industrial Fieldbus such as ControlNet. The SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface (SIFI) is an embedded device that acts as a communication module in a networked smart sensor. The purpose is to enable a smart sensor to communicate health and status information to other devices, such as PLCs, via an industrial Fieldbus networking protocol. The SNE (Smart Network Element) is attached to a commercial off-the-shelf Any bus-S interface module through the SIFI. Numerous Anybus-S modules are available, each one designed to interface with a specific Fieldbus. Development of the SIFI focused on communications using the ControlNet protocol, but any of the Anybus-S modules can be used. The SIFI communicates with the Any-bus module via a data buffer and mailbox system on the Anybus module, and supplies power to the module. The Anybus module transmits and receives data on the Fieldbus using the proper protocol. The SIFI is intended to be connected to other existing SNE modules in order to monitor the health and status of a transducer. The SIFI can also monitor aspects of its own health using an onboard watchdog timer and voltage monitors. The SIFI also has the hardware to drive a touchscreen LCD (liquid crystal display) unit for manual configuration and status monitoring.

  16. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect

    1992-09-01

    This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s September 1992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific iems discussed include: (1) merger of Urangesellschaft and Interuran, (2) cessation of uranium mining in Bulgaria, (3) record operation of Limerick-2 and Tokai-2, (4) MRS in Wyoming, (5) low-level waste facilities at Perry, (6) closure of Trojan, (7) restart of Kozloduy-6, (8) agreements between Cogema and Minatom, (9) planning for a large nuclear power plant in Japan moves forward, (10) order of a new reactor at Civaux, (11) relicensing of Yankee Rowe, (12) operation of Bradwell-2, and (13) high-level waste management in Japan.

  17. Magnesium industry overview

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, B.B.

    1996-10-01

    Magnesium products provide an excellent strength-to-weight ratio, good fatigue strength, high impact strength, good corrosion resistance, high-speed machinability, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. As a result, applications are expanding in almost every industry. Dozens of automotive components are now made of magnesium, including steering wheels, valve covers, and seat frames. Magnesium alloys are also used in computer housings, in-line roller skates, golf clubs, tennis racquets, and baseball bats. Good strength and stiffness at both room and elevated temperatures make magnesium alloys especially valuable for aerospace applications. This article presents an overview of magnesium technology, world production, increasing demand, and recycling.

  18. Industrial energy: Manager's sourcebook

    SciTech Connect

    Koral, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book gives a definitive guide to implementing an industrial energy conservation program. The author has compiled data of 20 years experience, and he provides full details on the fundamentals of environmental, heat recovery, computer control, economics and management practices which the energy manager needs to apply. It explains the dynamic relationships among various system components. The topics also covered heat pump systems, absorption systems, cooling towers, trash-to-power systems, and well water systems. Detailed information is presented on energy-efficient motors and power factor correction, use and operation of boilers, and successful energy management programs in some of the nation's largest corporations.

  19. Coal industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  20. Industrial application experiment series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluhm, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Two procurements within the Industrial Application Experiment Series of the Thermal Power Systems Project are discussed. The first procurement, initiated in April 1980, resulted in an award to the Applied Concepts Corporation for the Capital Concrete Experiment: two Fresnel concentrating collectors will be evaluated in single-unit installations at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Parabolic Dish Test Site and at Capitol Concrete Products, Topeka, Kansas. The second procurement, initiated in March 1981, is titled, "Thermal System Engineering Experiment B." The objective of the procurement is the rapid deployment of developed parabolic dish collectors.

  1. Coal Industry Annual 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

  2. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect

    1990-06-01

    Recent nuclear industry briefs are presented. These briefs include: Chernobyl closure announced; Pakaistan reopens Baghalchar Uranium Mine; Czechoslovakia delays Temelin-1 and -2; Queensland Mines Ltd. to sell stockpile; Cameco locates major deposit at McArthur River; South Africa likely to sign nonproliferation treaty; EdF seeks approval to build seven new plants; New Orleans Public Service sale tabled; Operation license issued for Melox Plant; NRC to announce proposed rule for extending plant licenses for 20 years; Swiss nuclear utilities plan to increase unit capacities; and Vandellos 1 permanently closed.

  3. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect

    1992-08-01

    This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s August 1992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific items mentioned include: (1) restart of Darlington-1, (2) transfer of land for the waste isolation pilot project, (3) discussion of the monitored retrievable storage facility, (4) uranium mining in Saskatchewan, (5) spent fuel storage facilities at Praire Island, (6) the end of Ontario Hydro`s membership in the Canadian Nuclear Association, and (7) the closure of uranium recovery operations at the New Wales, Florida phosphate facility.

  4. Industrial Needs for ICME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konter, A. W. A.; Farivar, H.; Post, J.; Prahl, U.

    2016-01-01

    The potential of the evolving technology known as integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) is acknowledged by many stakeholders. Good progress has been made in computational tools for both the understanding of the material behavior and the understanding of the structural behavior. Several examples illustrate the potential of a tighter integration between both sciences. Industry is still reluctant to integrate the computational material science developments in its daily structural analysis science, however. The various reasons for this reluctance are indicated in this article, and the coordinated actions to extend the applicability of ICME are discussed. The ICME Expert group is already performing several of these actions to improve application of ICME.

  5. Technological Change in Regulated Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capron, William M., Ed.

    The articles in this volume discuss how well industries operating under government regulation respond to technical innovation: do the effects of regulations vary among industries, and if so, does this result from variations in the regulatory approach, the organization of the firms, or the nature of the technology? Industries considered include

  6. Aluminum: Industry of the future

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    For over a century, the US aluminum industry has led the global market with advances in technology, product development, and marketing. Industry leaders recognize both the opportunities and challenges they face as they head into the 21st century, and that cooperative R and D is key to their success. In a unique partnership, aluminum industry leaders have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to focus on innovative technologies that will help to strengthen the competitive position of the US aluminum industry and, at the same time, further important national goals. This industry-led partnership, the Aluminum Industry of the Future, promotes technologies that optimize the use of energy and materials in operations and reduce wastes and energy-related emissions. Led by The Aluminum Association, industry leaders began by developing a unified vision of future market, business, energy, and environmental goals. Their vision document, Partnerships for the Future, articulates a compelling vision for the next 20 years: to maintain and grow the aluminum industry through the manufacture and sale of competitively priced, socially desirable, and ecologically sustainable products. Continued global leadership in materials markets will require the combined resources of industry, universities, and government laboratories. By developing a unified vision, the aluminum industry has provided a framework for the next step in the Industries of the Future process, the development of a technology roadmap designed to facilitate cooperative R and D.

  7. New Books for Industrial Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Shop, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The most recent book releases in the field of industrial-technical education are listed alphabetically under: automotive/power mechanics; building trades; drafting; electricity/electronics; graphic arts, industrial arts, vocational, technical and career education; industrial mathematics; machine shop/metalworking; metrics; radio/television;…

  8. Technological Change in Regulated Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capron, William M., Ed.

    The articles in this volume discuss how well industries operating under government regulation respond to technical innovation: do the effects of regulations vary among industries, and if so, does this result from variations in the regulatory approach, the organization of the firms, or the nature of the technology? Industries considered include…

  9. Industrial ammonia gassing

    PubMed Central

    Walton, M.

    1973-01-01

    Walton, M. (1972).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 78-86. Industrial ammonia gassing. Seven cases of ammonia gassing are described with follow-up for five years of the six survivors and the post-mortem findings of the fatal case. All the survivors attributed continuing symptoms to the gassing. The study failed to demonstrate permanent ill effects in the one case of mild exposure. Of the more serious cases one has stopped smoking and taken up physical training teaching. He now has above average lung function. Two serious cases who continued to smoke have the lung function abnormalities expected from their smoking. In the other two seriously exposed cases, who also continued to smoke, there is a persistent reduction in ventilation and gas transfer which seems to be due to the ammonia gassing. The post-mortem findings in the fatal case showed acute congestion and oedema of the mucosa of the respiratory tract, the bronchial walls being stripped of their lining epithelium and the alveoli stuffed with red blood cells and oedema fluid. Images PMID:4685304

  10. Computer Technology for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In this age of the computer, more and more business firms are automating their operations for increased efficiency in a great variety of jobs, from simple accounting to managing inventories, from precise machining to analyzing complex structures. In the interest of national productivity, NASA is providing assistance both to longtime computer users and newcomers to automated operations. Through a special technology utilization service, NASA saves industry time and money by making available already developed computer programs which have secondary utility. A computer program is essentially a set of instructions which tells the computer how to produce desired information or effect by drawing upon its stored input. Developing a new program from scratch can be costly and time-consuming. Very often, however, a program developed for one purpose can readily be adapted to a totally different application. To help industry take advantage of existing computer technology, NASA operates the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC)(registered TradeMark),located at the University of Georgia. COSMIC maintains a large library of computer programs developed for NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy and other technology-generating agencies of the government. The Center gets a continual flow of software packages, screens them for adaptability to private sector usage, stores them and informs potential customers of their availability.

  11. Drug industry in "depression".

    PubMed

    Almog, Dov M

    2005-01-01

    The productivity crisis in pharmaceuticals is an important problem that should be seriously addressed by academic scientists and NIH administrators. It is true that most academic scientists avidly practice the reductionist approach and tend to neglect the big picture. However, in light of the crisis, that should change. To stimulate such a change, scientists should see publications addressing big picture issues, and specifically publications which present analyses of the productivity crisis in pharmaceuticals. Although the public media recently published a series of articles reporting the crisis, so far, the peer-reviewed professionaljournals tended to avoid the issue. There seems to be a consensus that there is no successful drug discovery without reasonable biology. The Drug industry in "Depression" paper provides an opportunity to balance the picture and entice discussions on the relationships between academic research practices, NIH policies, and success in drug discovery. Academia and the drug industry must adopt a unified biomedical research approach rather than a multitude of what appears to be unrelated reduction methodologies, especially the basic science/biology end of it. PMID:15614206

  12. 2013 mask industry survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive survey was sent to merchant and captive mask shops to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. 2013 marks the 12th consecutive year for this process. Historical topics including general mask profile, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, maintenance, and returns were included and new topics were added. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. While each year's survey includes minor updates based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics, the bulk of the survey and reporting structure have remained relatively constant. A series of improvements is being phased in beginning in 2013 to add value to a wider audience, while at the same time retaining the historical content required for trend analyses of the traditional metrics. Additions in 2013 include topics such as top challenges, future concerns, and additional details in key aspects of mask masking, such as the number of masks per mask set per ground rule, minimum mask resolution shipped, and yield by ground rule. These expansions beyond the historical topics are aimed at identifying common issues, gaps, and needs. They will also provide a better understanding of real-life mask requirements and capabilities for comparison to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).

  13. The Implications of Industrial Management for the Administration of Industrial Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Michael R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses the functions and principles of industrial management, compares educational and industrial organization, and notes industrial management techniques applicable to industrial education administration. (MF)

  14. Biohydrogen production from industrial wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Andrade, Iván; Moreno, Gloria; Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Buitrón, Germán

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of producing hydrogen from various industrial wastes, such as vinasses (sugar and tequila industries), and raw and physicochemical-treated wastewater from the plastic industry and toilet aircraft wastewater, was evaluated. The results showed that the tequila vinasses presented the maximum hydrogen generation potential, followed by the raw plastic industry wastewater, aircraft wastewater, and physicochemical-treated wastewater from the plastic industry and sugar vinasses, respectively. The hydrogen production from the aircraft wastewater was increased by the adaptation of the microorganisms in the anaerobic sequencing batch reactor. PMID:25607676

  15. Network structure of inter-industry flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNerney, James; Fath, Brian D.; Silverberg, Gerald

    2013-12-01

    We study the structure of inter-industry relationships using networks of money flows between industries in 45 national economies. We find these networks vary around a typical structure characterized by a Weibull link weight distribution, exponential industry size distribution, and a common community structure. The community structure is hierarchical, with the top level of the hierarchy comprising five industry communities: food industries, chemical industries, manufacturing industries, service industries, and extraction industries.

  16. Industrial Inspection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Lixi, Inc. has built a thriving business on NASA-developed x-ray technology. The Low Intensity X-ray Imaging scope (LIXI) was designed to use less than one percent of radiation required by conventional x-ray devices. It is portable and can be used for a variety of industrial inspection systems as well as medical devices. A food processing plant uses the new LIXI Conveyor system to identify small bone fragments in chicken. The chicken packages on a conveyor belt enter an x-ray chamber and the image is displayed on a monitor. Defects measuring less than a millimeter can be detected. An important advantage of the system is its ability to inspect 100 percent of the product right on the production line.

  17. Robots in modern industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heer, E.

    1981-09-01

    A survey is presented of robotic device types and capabilities, and an assessment is made of the relative benefits they confer in present and planned numbers on such industrial countries as Japan, the U.S., and West Germany. Attention is also given to possible social impacts of large-scale implementation, and the need for close consultation between management and labor is stressed. It is reported that, while the hourly cost of robot labor remained at between $4.00 and $4.60 over the period 1960-present, human hourly labor costs (including fringe benefits) have risen from less than $4.00 to nearly $17.00. Among the types of devices described are: (1) remotely controlled manipulator vehicles; (2) undersea robotic craft; (3) servo-controlled robots; and (4) articulated robots. Also covered are robot programming languages derived from such standard languages as ALGOL, FORTRAN, and BASIC.

  18. Industrial Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Maxwell

    1982-01-01

    There are many known chemical and physical causes of industrial lung cancer. Their common feature is a long latent period—usually ten to 40 years—between initial exposure to the carcinogen and clinical recognition of the lesion. Occupationally induced lung cancer is indistinguishable from lung cancer of unknown etiology or that caused by cigaret smoking. Smoking alone is responsible for a very large proportion of all lung cancer and it potentiates the effect of most other carcinogens. Most cases of lung cancer in the next 20-30 years will be the result of exposures which have already occurred. In these cases, early diagnosis of pre-invasive resectable lesions offers the only hope for prolonging life. PMID:21286559

  19. Industrial hygiene forum

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, O.M.; Hoiem, K.H.

    1987-01-01

    On routine blood tests, two employees of a hospital Dental Service unit had elevated mercury levels. On 23 June 1986, an industrial hygienist made a mercury vapor survey of the area with the use of Jerome direct reading mercury vapor meter and collection on mercury vapor sampling tubes for laboratory analysis by flameless atomic absorption. No work practices were observed that would account for the elevated mercury levels in the blood. All airborne mercury levels were well below detectable limits. A box of Monoject purple top blood collection tubes used for collection of blood for mercury determination was examined. The box listed sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate as the antimicrobial agent additive. The use of a mercurial preservative on samples for mercury determinations seemed totally inappropriate. Mercury vapor measurements that were made inside these tubes clearly indicated the presence of mercury.

  20. Research Projects in Industrial Technology.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

  1. Determinant factors of industrial symbiosis: greening Pasir Gudang industrial park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, B. T.; Ho, C. S.; Matsuoka, Y.; Chau, L. W.; Gomi, K.

    2014-02-01

    Green industry has been identified as an important element in attaining greater sustainability. It calls for harmonizing robust economic growth with environment protection. Industries, particularly in developing and transitional nations such as Malaysia, are in need of a reform. Many experts and international organizations suggest the concept of industrial symbiosis. Mainly, there are successful cases of industrial symbiosis practices around the world. However, there are numerous cases of failure too. As industrial symbiosis is an emerging new approach, with a short history of two decades, a lot of researches are generally focused on narrow context and technical details. There is a lack of concerted efforts to look into the drivers and barriers of industrial symbiosis across different cases. This paper aims to examine the factors influencing the development of industrial symbiosis from various countries to supports such networks to evolve in Pasir Gudang. The findings show institution, law and regulation, finance, awareness and capacity building, technology, research and development, information, collaboration, market, geography proximity, environmental issues and industry structure affect the formation of industrial symbiosis.

  2. Financial risk of the biotech industry versus the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Golec, Joseph; Vernon, John A

    2009-01-01

    The biotech industry now accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of total R&D spending on new medicines. However, compared with the pharmaceutical industry, the biotech industry is financially fragile. This article illustrates the financial fragility of the biotech and pharmaceutical industries in the US and the implications of this fragility for the effects that government regulation could have on biotech firms. Graphical analysis and statistical tests were used to show how the biotech industry differs from the pharmaceutical industry. The two industries' characteristics were measured and compared, along with various measures of firms' financial risk and sensitivity to government regulation. Data from firms' financial statements provided accounting-based measures and firms' stock returns applied to a multifactor asset pricing model provided financial market measures. The biotech industry was by far the most research-intensive industry in the US, averaging 38% R&D intensity (ratio of R&D spending to total firm assets) over the past 25 years, compared with an average of 25% for the pharmaceutical industry and 3% for all other industries. Biotech firms exhibited lower and more volatile profits and higher market-related and size-related risk, and they suffered more negative stock returns in response to threatened government price regulation. Biotech firms' financial risks increase their costs of capital and make them more sensitive to government regulations that affect their financial prospects. As biotech products grow to represent a larger share of new medicines, general stock market conditions and government regulations could have a greater impact on the level of innovation of new medicines. PMID:19799470

  3. Industrial laser marketplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belforte, David A.

    1990-05-01

    Introduction: Gary Forrest As with medical, we have a specific individual, Dave Belforte, who, in addition to writing for Laser Focus, publishes with Laser Focus the Industrial Laser Review. Again, this is an area that has some really unique aspects to it which is why we have a specialist at the magazine who tracks this as well as having his own business interests. I just have one quick example. One of the things that I've noticed and I've put this in your handout is it's always interesting to me to see why how the lasers actually impact on finished goods that people buy. So I just clipped out one recent article that mentions some of the different areas when lasers are used in automotive production. There's an ad for the Infinity car of course they've had a strange ad program anyway, but the latest version is "Look at the paint." It's a super high gloss paint. I know in Japan, what I would call laser priming, the use of laser in surface preparation of the metal to obtain a super high gloss is something that's become popular. Now I don't know whether the Infinity is using that or not but it's another example as Moe Levitt indicated earlier lasers have moved into the industrial segment maybe not in the volume that people would like but in a quality sense that is definitely starting to have an impact on the people who are buying those finished products. So I'll give you Dave for the details. David Belforte: The answer is yes, the Infinity has a body which has been processed in what is called laser texturizing process. In Japan, it's known as a mirror finish, and it's not actually applied to the steel of the car. It's a texturizing process on the rolls that reduce the steel down to body thickness. They emboss on that steel a regular pattern which tends to trap radiated light and reflect it back to your eye in a much more intense pattern to give you what appears to be brighter paint. But that was not developed in Japan. It was developed in Belgium actually.

  4. Industrial Hygiene Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brisbin, Steven G.

    1999-01-01

    This breakout session is a traditional conference instrument used by the NASA industrial hygiene personnel as a method to convene personnel across the Agency with common interests. This particular session focused on two key topics, training systems and automation of industrial hygiene data. During the FY 98 NASA Occupational Health Benchmarking study, the training system under development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was deemed to represent a "best business practice." The EPA has invested extensively in the development of computer based training covering a broad range of safety, health and environmental topics. Currently, five compact disks have been developed covering the topics listed: Safety, Health and Environmental Management Training for Field Inspection Activities; EPA Basic Radiation Training Safety Course; The OSHA 600 Collateral Duty Safety and Health Course; and Key program topics in environmental compliance, health and safety. Mr. Chris Johnson presented an overview of the EPA compact disk-based training system and answered questions on its deployment and use across the EPA. This training system has also recently been broadly distributed across other Federal Agencies. The EPA training system is considered "public domain" and, as such, is available to NASA at no cost in its current form. Copies of the five CD set of training programs were distributed to each NASA Center represented in the breakout session. Mr. Brisbin requested that each NASA Center review the training materials and determine whether there is interest in using the materials as it is or requesting that EPA tailor the training modules to suit NASA's training program needs. The Safety, Health and Medical Services organization at Ames Research Center has completed automation of several key program areas. Mr. Patrick Hogan, Safety Program Manager for Ames Research Center, presented a demonstration of the automated systems, which are described by the following: (1) Safety, Health and Environmental Training. This system includes an assessment of training needs for every NASA Center organization, course descriptions, schedules and automated course scheduling, and presentation of training program metrics; (2) Safety and Health Inspection Information. This system documents the findings from each facility inspection, tracks abatement status on those findings and presents metrics on each department for senior management review; (3) Safety Performance Evaluation Profile. The survey system used by NASA to evaluate employee and supervisory perceptions of safety programs is automated in this system; and (4) Documentation Tracking System. Electronic archive and retrieval of all correspondence and technical reports generated by the Safety, Health and Medical Services Office are provided by this system.

  5. Petroleum--Industry of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    2001-01-23

    This 8-page brochure describes the Office of Industrial Technologies' Petroleum Industry of The Future, a partnership between the Department of Energy and the petroleum refining industry established to increase industrial energy and cost efficiency.

  6. Agriculture--Industry of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    2001-01-23

    This 8-page brochure describes the Office of Industrial Technologies' Agriculture Industry of the Future, a partnership between the Department of Energy and the agriculture industry established to increase industrial energy and cost efficiency.

  7. Chemicals--Industry of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    2001-01-23

    This 8-page brochure describes the Office of Industrial Technologies' Chemicals Industry of The Future, a partnership between the Department of Energy and the chemicals industry established to increase industrial energy and cost efficiency.

  8. Industrial Applications of Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciora, Radu Adrian; Simion, Carmen Mihaela

    2014-11-01

    The recent advances in sensors quality and processing power provide us with excellent tools for designing more complex image processing and pattern recognition tasks. In this paper we review the existing applications of image processing and pattern recognition in industrial engineering. First we define the role of vision in an industrial. Then a dissemination of some image processing techniques, feature extraction, object recognition and industrial robotic guidance is presented. Moreover, examples of implementations of such techniques in industry are presented. Such implementations include automated visual inspection, process control, part identification, robots control. Finally, we present some conclusions regarding the investigated topics and directions for future investigation

  9. Advanced technologies: Improving industrial efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents details on a wide range of practical new energy efficient industrial technologies. Based on the results of 54 efficiency improvement projects, information covered in this book ranges from applications which embrace all industries to specific process improvements having application in a variety of specific industries. Topics include waste heat recovery techniques, waste products utilization, combustion efficiency improvement, and advanced topping and bottoming cycles for a variety of industries and process types. In addition, more specialized energy conservation techniques for extraction, reduction and melting, and for grinding and classification systems are presented.

  10. Industrial Safety and Accidents Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Sajjad Akbar

    2006-07-01

    Accident Hazards, dangers, losses and risk are what we would to like to eliminate, minimize or avoid in industry. Modern industries have created many opportunities for these against which man's primitive instincts offer no protection. In today's complex industrial environment safety has become major preoccupation, especially after the realization that there is a clear economic incentive to do so. Industrial hazards may cause by human error or by physical or mechanical malfunction, it is very often possible to eliminate the worst consequences of human error by engineering modification. But the modification also needs checking very thoroughly to ensue that it has not introduced some new and unsuspected hazard. (author)

  11. Tapping private industry.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon, B

    1986-12-01

    Many firms throughout Japan and around the world have come to realize that family planning is good for employee morale and company profits. Japanese and Indian efforts prove that family planning programs not only bring welfare benefits to workers, but commercial advantages to businesses. Because workers' family welfare is closely linked to labor welfare and productivity, the trade union movement has started to become active in promoting family planning activities. Factory-based family planning programs have often cut pregnancy rates in half. Godrej Enterprises of India started promoting family planning in 1957; it provides a model of how family planning has been incorporated into a comprehensive employee welfare system in a factory complex on the outskirts of Bombay, where about 1/2 the workers live in high-rise apartments in the company township of Pirojsha Nagar. Similar programs are presented in India, Thailand, Indonesia, Jamaica, Guatemala, Colombia, Korea, and Turkey. Limiting family size enriches workers' lives and improves the quality of the workforce. The International Labor Organization, through its Workers' Education Program on Population, has played an important role in stimulating industrial sector interest in family planning throughout the world. PMID:12341236

  12. General Industrial Electronics. Oklahoma Trade and Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwick, Jim; Siebert, Leo

    This curriculum guide, part of a series of curriculum guides dealing with industrial electricity and electronics, is designed for use in teaching a course in general industrial electronics. Covered in the first half of the guide are units on the following electronic components: semiconductors, solid-state diodes, bipolar transistors, and special…

  13. Chemicals: Industry of the future: Office of Industrial Technologies brochure

    SciTech Connect

    Mallory, M.; Jones, A.

    1999-02-05

    A new industry-led partnership with the US Department of Energy is strengthening the US chemical industry's competitive position and furthering national economic goals. This document describes how the partnership is promoting advanced technologies that optimize energy efficiency in operations and reduce waste and energy-related emissions.

  14. General Industrial Electronics. Oklahoma Trade and Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwick, Jim; Siebert, Leo

    This curriculum guide, part of a series of curriculum guides dealing with industrial electricity and electronics, is designed for use in teaching a course in general industrial electronics. Covered in the first half of the guide are units on the following electronic components: semiconductors, solid-state diodes, bipolar transistors, and special

  15. Industrial Ecology Instructional Guide for the Industrial Arts Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Oswego. Coll. at Oswego. Dept. of Industrial Arts and Technology.

    The detailed guide was prepared to help industrial arts personnel direct their students in a unit on environmental education, specifically geared for the industrial arts laboratory, which employs the Maryland Plan for implementing the unit method of instruction. Guidelines for implementing the program are based on experience with pilot projects…

  16. AVLIS industrial access program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    This document deals with the procurements planned for the construction of an Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) production plant. Several large-scale AVLIS facilities have already been built and tested; a full-scale engineering demonstration facility is currently under construction. The experience gained from these projects provides the procurement basis for the production plant construction and operation. In this document, the status of the AVLIS process procurement is presented from two viewpoints. The AVLIS Production Plant Work Breakdown Structure is referenced at the level of the items to be procured. The availability of suppliers for the items at this level is discussed. In addition, the work that will result from the AVLIS enrichment plant project is broken down by general procurement categories (construction, mechanical equipment, etc.) and the current AVLIS suppliers are listed according to these categories. A large number of companies in all categories are currently providing AVLIS equipment for the Full-Scale Demonstration Facility in Livermore, California. These companies form an existing and expanding supplier network for the AVLIS program. Finally, this document examines the relationship between the AVLIS construction project/operational facility and established commercial suppliers. The goal is to utilize existing industrial capability to meet the needs of the project in a competitive procurement situation. As a result, costs and procurement risks are both reduced because the products provided come from within the AVLIS suppliers' experience base. At the same time, suppliers can benefit by the potential to participate in AVLIS technology spin-off markets. 35 figures.

  17. Uranium industry annual 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  18. Dental Erosion in Industry

    PubMed Central

    Cate, H. J. Ten Bruggen

    1968-01-01

    Five hundred and fifty-five acid workers were examined between March 1962 and October 1964. One hundred and seventy-six (317%) were affected by industrial dental erosion at the first examinations. In 33 cases (60%) the dentine was affected. During the period of the survey, 66 (204%) of 324 workers examined more than once showed evidence that erosion was progressing. The prevalence and incidence of erosion were highest among battery formation workers, lower among picklers, and least among other processes covered by the survey. The age of workers did not appear to influence their susceptibility to erosion. The habit of working with the lips slightly parted had little effect. Erosion superimposed upon attrition predisposed to more severe loss of tooth structure than either operating alone. Little inconvenience or functional disability was suffered by acid workers due to erosion. Twenty-seven (237%) of 114 erosions were considered to be disfiguring. Regular dental treatment was sought less by acid workers than by controls, and the oral hygiene of the latter was superior. There was no evidence to show any difference between caries experience among acid workers and controls. Calculus and periodontal disease were more prevalent among acid workers than among controls, but it was not possible to attribute this to the working environment. Black staining in iron picklers was considered to be due to the working environment. The use of closed acid containers or lip extraction on open acid vats prevented significant atmospheric contamination and diminished the prevalence of erosion. The use of wall fans and detergent foaming agents was helpful. Images PMID:5723349

  19. EDUCATION IN BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DECARLO, CHARLES R.; ROBINSON, ORMSBEE W.

    CONTINUING EDUCATION IS DISCUSSED AS VITAL TO THE PROSPERITY OF BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY WHEN TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES REQUIRE CONTINUAL READJUSTMENT OF JOB REQUIREMENTS. ROLES OF INDUSTRY, UNIVERSITIES, AND GOVERNMENT COOPERATING TO PROVIDE THE RESOURCES, MATERIALS, AND INCENTIVES FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION ARE PROPOSED. DISCUSSIONS INCLUDE--(1) PROBLEMS…

  20. Manpower Impacts of Industrial Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Dept. of Labor, Albany. Research and Statistics Office.

    The effects of technological change on the manpower and training needs of New York State industry were studied in a survey of 281 Industrial situations. The study was designed to help answer questions about the effects of factory and related technological change in displacing workers, in creating recruitment and training needs, and in altering the…

  1. Predictions bullish for industry's future.

    PubMed

    Senior, R J; Farmer, R; Stefoff, J; Leonard, W

    1991-05-01

    What's around the corner and down the road for the textile rental industry? Four CEOs--Richard Farmer, William Leonard, Richard Senior, and James Stefoff--give their views on future industry profitability, evolutionary trends and specialization, healthcare market stability, and survival tactics. PMID:10111302

  2. Industrial Arts Facility Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Thomas A., Jr.; And Others

    This guidebook presents facility guidelines to aid the school planner in determining appropriate facilities for a model curriculum. The first of four major sections, The Intent of Industrial Arts, discusses the mission and goals, instructional objectives, function of industrial arts, and the model curriculum. Section 2 focuses on facilities for…

  3. Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Sharon S.

    1988-01-01

    This review compares "Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry" with the "Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology," two prominent encyclopedias of chemical technology and industry. Cost, quantity of information, organization, illustrations, authorship, abbreviations, online availability, and content of articles are discussed. (MES)

  4. Industrial Chemistry at Michigan Tech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, D. K.; Ponter, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses factors leading to the development of a four-year industrial chemistry program at Michigan Technological University and provides details of its structure. Includes brief descriptions of courses required in industrial chemistry but not in the traditional chemistry program and list of optional courses. (JN)

  5. Road Transport Industry Training Board

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Training International, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The Road Transport Industry Training Board has recognized that manpower planning was the key to estimating the industry's training needs. The effective training methods discussed are: management training, Group Training Associations, apprentice training, direct training, and mobile-training service. (Author/BP)

  6. Japanese Industry Boosts Pollution Spending

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAbee, Michael K.

    1975-01-01

    In response to tightening emission standards imposed by the government, Japanese industry will increase its capital spending on pollution control equipment to account for about 20 percent of all industrial capital spending. Preferential treatment and loans from government-affiliated financial institutions are available for projects. (Author/MLH)

  7. Solar array manufacturing industry simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; Firnett, P. J.; Kleine, B.

    1980-01-01

    Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Simulation (SAMIS) program is a standardized model of industry to manufacture silicon solar modules for use in electricity generation. Model is used to develop financial reports that detail requirements, including amounts and prices for materials, labor, facilities, and equipment required by companies.

  8. Careers in the Music Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Peter J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes jobs in the music industry, including instrument designer, sales representative, instrument repair-person, retail music sales-person, recording engineer, and careers in the new video music industry. Educational requirements, personal qualifications, and the advantages and disadvantages of each job are discussed. (AM)

  9. Automation; The New Industrial Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnstein, George E.

    Automation is a word that describes the workings of computers and the innovations of automatic transfer machines in the factory. As the hallmark of the new industrial revolution, computers displace workers and create a need for new skills and retraining programs. With improved communication between industry and the educational community to

  10. Industry's Struggle for Skilled Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Don

    1979-01-01

    The growing shortage of skilled workers in industrial maintenance, the growing complexity of equipment, and the automation of production processes call for improved and increased employee training and retraining. A General Motors training supervisor notes how education and industry can cooperate to provide this education and training. (MF)

  11. Petroleum industry assists hurricane relief

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-14

    This paper reports that the petroleum industry is aiding victims of last month's Hurricane Andrew with cash, clothing, food, water, and other supplies. Cash contributions announced as of last week totaled more than $2.7 million for distribution in South Florida and South Louisiana. Petroleum industry employees were collecting relief items such as bottled water and diapers for distribution in those areas.

  12. Instructional Design Parameters in Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Kathleen M.

    The Restructuring Education in the Sciences for Industrial Alignment (RESIA) project examined the feasibility of combining college science faculty and industrial experts to produce instructional materials. These materials were intended for on-the-job training and college credit. Through informal contact, professors were identified who were willing…

  13. Accreditation of Industrial Engineering Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, George H.

    The guidelines used in the accreditation of industrial engineering programs are discussed. Changes that have taken place in engineering curriculum are described, along with the philosophy of educators in formulating industrial engineering program requirements in the areas of faculty, facilities, curriculum, administration, and scholastic work.…

  14. Job Prospects for Industrial Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1986-01-01

    Because of the impetus on how to improve productivity in companies, the demand for graduating industrial engineers continues to be strong from a variety of sources. Starting salary offers for graduates have been averaging $26,784. Enrollments in industrial engineering programs are increasing (with 3,923 graduates in 1984). (JN)

  15. The South Dakota Ethanol Industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the need for biorenewable fuels increases, the ethanol industry in the U.S. continues to thrive and grow. The same is true here in South Dakota as well. In fact, South Dakota has been a leader in ethanol production for years, and will continue to be for years to come. This industry is making a...

  16. An Introduction to Industrial Archaeology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, Dianne

    1983-01-01

    Industrial archaeology, a new branch of history that promotes an understanding of the industrial past by focusing on its physical remains and by combining the insights of field work and more traditional historical research, holds enormous potential for expanding historical consciousness and for linking history to a wider curriculum. (RM)

  17. Tobacco Industry Seeks New Recruits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator: The Professional Journal of the American Federation of Teachers, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Presents four cartoons that take aim at the claims that the tobacco industry makes in its advertising. Focus is on smoking industry advertisements aimed at getting children and youth to buy and smoke cigarettes. They are intended to be shared with students to heighten their awareness of advertising ploys. (SLD)

  18. Biotechnology and the Food Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jenny; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Traditional and novel uses of enzymes and microbes in the baking, brewing, and dairy industries are described. Cheese, yogurt, baking, brewing, vinegar, soy sauce, single-cell proteins, enzymes, food modification, vanilla, citric acid, monosodium glutamate, xanthan gum, aspartame, and cochineal are discussed. Industrial links with firms involved…

  19. Biotechnology and the Food Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jenny; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Traditional and novel uses of enzymes and microbes in the baking, brewing, and dairy industries are described. Cheese, yogurt, baking, brewing, vinegar, soy sauce, single-cell proteins, enzymes, food modification, vanilla, citric acid, monosodium glutamate, xanthan gum, aspartame, and cochineal are discussed. Industrial links with firms involved

  20. Industry-University Research Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kenneth A.

    1984-01-01

    Points out advantages and disadvantages of industry-university research programs from industry and university viewpoints. Identifies conditions essential for long-term success of such arrangements. Also provides a case study of practices at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), discussing policy guidelines and giving examples of joint…

  1. Industrial ecology: concepts and approaches.

    PubMed Central

    Jelinski, L W; Graedel, T E; Laudise, R A; McCall, D W; Patel, C K

    1992-01-01

    Industrial ecology is a new approach to the industrial design of products and processes and the implementation of sustainable manufacturing strategies. It is a concept in which an industrial system is viewed not in isolation from its surrounding systems but in concert with them. Industrial ecology seeks to optimize the total materials cycle from virgin material to finished material, to component, to product, to waste product, and to ultimate disposal. To better characterize the topic, the National Academy of Sciences convened a colloquium from which were derived a number of salient contributions. This paper sets the stage for the contributions that follow and discusses how each fits into the framework of industrial ecology. PMID:11607253

  2. Industrial waste management in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Y.

    1986-12-01

    Systematic management for industrial waste in Japan has been carried out based on the Waste Disposal and Public Cleansing Law which was enacted in 1970. The law and its ordinances designate 19 kinds of waste materials discharged from business activities as industrial waste and prescribe the generator's responsibility, requirements for treatment contractors, standards for consignment, specific personnel, etc. from the view of proper management. And they also prescribe disposal standards, structure, and maintenance standards for treatment facilities, including final disposal sites, from the view of proper treatment and disposal. The Standard for Verification provides criteria to categorize as hazardous or nonhazardous industrial waste which is subjected to treatment and disposal in conformity with each standard. The fundamental policies to cope with industrial waste focus on reduction of generation, promotion of recycling, establishment of a comprehensive information management system and participation of the public which can contribute well to prevent environmental pollution caused by inappropriate management of industrial waste.

  3. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarik, William J.

    2007-02-26

    Over the five-year period (2002-2006) the Oklahoma State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed energy assessments for 106 different clients, writing 835 recommendations, for a total of $23,937,099 in potential estimated annual savings. IAC clients served consisted of small and medium-sized manufacturers ranging from food manufactures to foundries. The OSU IAC served clients in Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. In addition to client service, student training and instruction was a major accomplishment. The OSU IAC employed (and trained) 12 baccalaureate-level students, 17 masters-level graduate students, and 7 doctoral-level graduate students. Most are practicing in the energy management area. Training was focused on both energy assessment and safety. Safety training was both center-based training as well as on-site training. Energy management related training was focused on classroom (for academic credit) work at both the undergraduate and graduate level. IEM 4923 (Energy and Water Management) was developed to serve both the IAC as well as non-IAC students. It was delivered once per year, with enrollments of typically 10 to 20 students. This course was required for IAC student employees, both undergraduate and graduate. This course was patterned after the AEE CEM (five-day) course for practicing professionals. IEM 4923 required each student to attend at least one on-site assessment and write at least one recommendation for their client’s report. Hence, a hands-on approach was practiced. Advance level courses were used to train graduate students. Two courses played major roles here: IEM 5923 (Advanced Energy and Water Management) and IEM 5943 (Hazardous Material and Waste). Graduate student participation in these courses helped the IAC to gain additional perspectives in on-site assessment and resulting recommendations. Numerous hands-on demonstration/training was conducted by directors and graduate students in order to gain proficiency in using the combustion analyzer, IR camera, logging equipment, light metering equipment, and other equipment. Instruction included usage and basic maintenance. While undergraduate students worked with the coursework and on-the-job training, graduate students were expected to do more. A typical MS student was required to complete a 3-hour independent study in some interesting facet of energy management under the supervision of a director. PhD students were expected to complete from three to six hours of independent study work in the energy management field, as well as center their dissertation research in the general area of energy/productivity/quality management. During the project period, two PhDs were completed, with several more near completion.

  4. Causes for Retail Industry Globalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesha, M.

    2012-12-01

    The heading of this article itself pushing me to think why retail industry is globalizing! Because to increase their presence worldwide and profit on the onside and for the sake of ìname and fameî in industry is other side, but todayís trend and compitetitation force industrial giants to forget the word ìname and fameî globalization is the only strategy to compensate their market share or profit from one country to another country or domestic market. The presence of retail industry in the global level from centuries, but the global recognaization of retail industry came to limelight only two decades ago. As soon as restrictions are removed in this sector, all the retail industry big giants spread across the world to extend their operations especially in emerging markets. Is this a good sign for retailers? Off course it is good sign for some countries and some countries are stick to their own perceptions. Some of the countries welcome this move because the FDI will improve their economic structure. On the other side employment opportunity is also one of the issues in globalization of retail sector. Because retail industry needs huge workforce, so significance of retail has been undoubted.

  5. MUTAGENISTIC TESTING OF INDUSTRIAL WASTES FROM REPRESENTATIVE ORGANIC CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The general applicability of the Ames test for screening wastewater samples was investigated. Application of the Ames test to raw and treated wastewaters from representative organic chemical industries involved the investigation of several problems: (1) the feasibility of using t...

  6. Merging industry and the University: Developing the Industrial Energy Center

    SciTech Connect

    Risi, J.D.; Mashburn, W.H.

    1995-06-01

    As a result of defense cutbacks at the national level, research funding for universities has declined proportionally. Many are not seeking to expand the research and service role into the industrial sector. Both state and federal funds are being made available to assist industry, particularly in the transition from the manufacture of defense goods to commercial products. One major mistake being made by both universities and funding agencies is the attempt to be everything to everybody. Past history is littered with failed projects that sent people out to call on industry with a broad charter of tackling any and every problem encountered. Such efforts should instead start with a focused approach that utilizes special skills that may be inherent with the service organization. Here at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) we are focusing on solutions to energy and environmental problems encountered in the industrial sector.

  7. Technical change in US industry: A cross-industry analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. R. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The nature of the public policies which have influenced the pace and pattern of technical progress in a number of American industries is studied with the view of assessing the broad effects of these policies. The industries studied are agriculture, pharmaceuticals, semiconductors, computers, civil aircraft, automobiles and residential construction. The policies considered include research and development funding as well as government procurement, education, information dissemination, patent protection, licensing, regulations, and anti-trust policies.

  8. Knowledge industry: a powerful mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miguelote, Vera Regina da Silva; Camargo Jr, Kenneth Rochel de

    2010-02-01

    The paper deals with the pharmaceutical industry's links to the knowledge industry, through powerful marketing strategies. With the aim of scientifically legitimizing its products, the pharmaceutical industry interferes with the production of medical knowledge. In the form of a mechanism for directing economic interests, it funds drug research, biases its results and stimulates the production and publication of scientific papers. This is a mechanism that threatens important ethical issues: it transforms the process of scientific legitimization into a marketing strategy, compromises the credibility of the process of constructing medical knowledge and encourages distortions of the criteria for evaluating the quality of scientific papers. PMID:20140344

  9. API industrial hygiene research program

    SciTech Connect

    Bachman, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    (1) The current research program of the API Industrial Hygiene Committee described is designed to address petroleum refinery needs for evaluating employee exposure to health hazards, controlling exposures, and complying with appropriate governmental regulations. Health risks associated with maintenance, delayed coking sampling and gaging, and laboratory activities are investigated . New measurement and evaluation methodologies, such as passive samplers, solvent mixture evaluation, and alternate sampling strategies are also included. Special risks associated with catalyst handling are considered also. This research will result in guidelines and standards which will be useful in assisting industrial hygiene and safety personnel throughout the petroleum refining industry.

  10. Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2007-07-01

    The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) relies on analytical studies to identify large energy reduction opportunities in energy-intensive industries and uses these results to guide its R&D portfolio. The energy bandwidth illustrates the total energy-saving opportunity that exists in the industry if the current processes are improved by implementing more energy-efficient practices and by using advanced technologies. This bandwidth analysis report was conducted to assist the ITP Mining R&D program in identifying energy-saving opportunities in coal, metals, and mineral mining. These opportunities were analyzed in key mining processes of blasting, dewatering, drilling, digging, ventilation, materials handling, crushing, grinding, and separations.

  11. Financing the Air Transportation Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd-Jones, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    The basic characteristics of the air transportation industry are outlined and it is shown how they affect financing requirements and patterns of production. The choice of financial timing is imperative in order to get the best interest rates available and to insure a fair return to investors. The fact that the industry cannot store its products has a fairly major effect on the amount of equipment to purchase, the amount of capital investment required, and the amount of return required to offset industry depriciation.

  12. Industrial processes influenced by gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon

    1988-01-01

    In considering new directions for low gravity research with particular regard to broadening the number and types of industrial involvements, it is noted that transport phenomena play a vital role in diverse processes in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and biotech industries. Relatively little attention has been given to the role of gravity in such processes. Accordingly, numerous industrial processes and phenomena are identified which involve gravity and/or surface tension forces. Phase separations and mixing are examples that will be significantly different in low gravity conditions. A basis is presented for expanding the scope of the low gravity research program and the potential benefits of such research is indicated.

  13. Economic considerations in space industrialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, R. U.; Ayres, L. W.; Criswell, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The industrial categories of the United States economy are surveyed to identify those which can function using dominantly lunar raw materials or lunar derived feedstocks (LDF) and solar energy. Sixty-four standard industrial categories (SIC) appear to be compatible with LDF inputs; another 166 SIC's might be adaptable to LDF and space industry if substitution of materials and/or terrestrial supplements were introduced. Analytic tools are presented to use in deciding optimal strategies by which a generalized economy can be developed in space in an optimal manner within given constraints of capital, products derived at a given time, local production costs, cost of import from earth and other factors.

  14. Agricultural and industrial process heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollard, J.

    1978-01-01

    The application of solar energy to agricultural and industrial process heat requirements is discussed. This energy end use sector has been the largest and it appears that solar energy can, when fully developed and commercialized, displace from three to eight or more quads of oil and natural gas in U.S. industry. This potential for fossil fuel displacement in the agricultural and industrial process heat area sector represents a possible savings of 1.4 to 3.8 million barrels of oil daily.

  15. Irradiation technology — Industrial use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyball, A.

    1995-02-01

    The most important applications of the radiation technology are the crosslinking of polymers and sterilisation. Although extensive experience about the use of this technology is available and powerful and dependable radiation facilities can be obtained, as yet the radiation technology has not found the acceptance it deserves in the industry. The main reason herefore has to do with how the question of radiation or the term radiation is presented to the industry and among the population. This paper will deal with considerations and ways in which the industrial use of the radiation technology can be expanded.

  16. [Development, health-industrial complex and industrial policy].

    PubMed

    Gadelha, Carlos Augusto Grabois

    2006-08-01

    This paper puts health questions within the context of national development and industrial policy. It follows the idea of structuralist, Marxist and Schumpeterian approaches, in which industry and innovations form determining factors for the dynamism in capitalist economies and relative positions within the world economy. All countries that have developed and started to compete under better conditions with advanced countries have had an association between strong industry and an endogenous knowledge, learning and innovation base. However, in the field of health, this vision presents problems because business interests move according to the economic logic of profit rather than to meet health needs. The notion of the health-industrial complex is an attempt to provide a theoretical reference that enables linkage between two distinct types of logic: health and economic development. This study has sought to show, on the basis of foreign trade data, how disregard for the logic of health policy development has led to a situation of economic vulnerability in this sector, which may limit the objectives of universality, equality and comprehensiveness. Within this context, a cognitive and political break with these antagonistic visions that put health needs on one side and industrial needs on the other is proposed. A country that aims to reach a condition of development and independence requires strong innovative industries and an inclusive and universal health system, at the same time. PMID:16924298

  17. Business Trends In The Laser Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kales, David

    1989-06-01

    The laser industry's dynamic movement that characterized the industry of 1988 was acquisitions and mergers. The laser industry is undergoing its own version of perestroika or restructuring. Shakeouts and consolidations which have marked the industry for the past two years continued to reshape the laser industry landscape in 1988.

  18. Full Employment in Industrialized Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Argues that full employment must be acceptable on both social and economic grounds. Examines profound changes in industrialized economies since the 1970s and the diversity of employment contracts. Suggests that difficult policy decisions surround full employment. (SK)

  19. Industrial Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  20. Opportunities in the Turfgrass Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, W. F.; Long, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The growth and development of the turfgrass industry makes it an increasingly important source of employment for vocational agriculture students in the areas of professional and research worker, managerial occupations, landscape contractor, technical superintendents and service workers. (EA)

  1. The Technical Illustrator in Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trapp, Roy G.; Geerts, Dennis J.

    1978-01-01

    A combination of artist and draftsman, the technical illustrator is becoming increasingly essential to industry. This article describes the tasks of a technical illustrator, employment opportunities, and preparation and background. (BM)

  2. Campus/Industry Joint Ventures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene J.

    1985-01-01

    Opportunities for joint economic ventures of colleges and industry are discussed, and a variety of ventures undertaken by Duke University are outlined, including a health club, hotel, and office building. Tax and financing considerations are noted. (MSE)

  3. Explosion safety in industrial electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, S. V.; Kiss, I.; Berta, I.

    2011-01-01

    Complicated industrial systems are often endangered by electrostatic hazards, both from atmospheric (lightning phenomenon, primary and secondary lightning protection) and industrial (technological problems caused by static charging and fire and explosion hazards.) According to the classical approach protective methods have to be used in order to remove electrostatic charging and to avoid damages, however no attempt to compute the risk before and after applying the protective method is made, relying instead on well-educated and practiced expertise. The Budapest School of Electrostatics - in close cooperation with industrial partners - develops new suitable solutions for probability based decision support (Static Control Up-to-date Technology, SCOUT) using soft computing methods. This new approach can be used to assess and audit existing systems and - using the predictive power of the models - to design and plan activities in industrial electrostatics.

  4. Industrial relevance of thermophilic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Egorova, Ksenia; Antranikian, Garabed

    2005-12-01

    The dramatic increase of newly isolated extremophilic microorganisms, analysis of their genomes and investigations of their enzymes by academic and industrial laboratories demonstrate the great potential of extremophiles in industrial (white) biotechnology. Enzymes derived from extremophiles (extremozymes) are superior to the traditional catalysts because they can perform industrial processes even under harsh conditions, under which conventional proteins are completely denatured. In particular, enzymes from thermophilic and hyperthermophilic Archaea have industrial relevance. Despite intensive investigations, our knowledge of the structure-function relationships of their enzymes is still limited. Information concerning the molecular properties of their enzymes and genes has to be obtained to be able to understand the mechanisms that are responsible for catalytic activity and stability at the boiling point of water. PMID:16257257

  5. Production Methods in Industrial Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaden, Elmer L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Compares two methods (batch and continuous) in which microorganisms are used to produce industrial chemicals. Describes batch and continuous stirred-tank reactors and offers reasons why the batch method may be preferred. (JN)

  6. Industrial Beamline Technologies And Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehnel, M. P.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes industrial charged particle beamline technologies and design approaches. Beamlines accommodate myriad constraints in the radioisotope production, electron beam processing, and ion implantation market segments, and some very strange yet interesting solutions result. In this paper, a detailed look at a particular injection beamline solution gives some sense of the complexity of research and development required, and the sophistication of the beamline solutions that are utilized. A brief review of beamline applications in each industrial segment follows.

  7. Industrial water reuse in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoflinan, H.W. Jr.

    1999-11-01

    The use of treated wastewater effluent for industrial purposes holds the promise of an economical source of water in a State with limited conventional fresh water resources such as Texas. By combining water reuse and increased water use efficiency with the development of conventional resources such as groundwater and new surface water reservoirs, they can ensure that water is available for industrial growth into the foreseeable future. Reuse holds some specific advantages as a future resource for industry, including: (1) Effluent from municipal wastewater plants is a drought-proof water source; (2) Treated effluent is the ONLY source of water that automatically increases in volume as economic and population growth occurs in the community; and (3) The treated effluent is usually located near the intended use, not at a yet-to-be developed distant reservoir or well field. In order to provide for the orderly, environmentally sound, and economical development of the State`s water resources, Texas has embarked on a major new water resource planning effort under Senate Bill 1 which was passed by the Texas Legislature in 1997. Industry should carefully follow this process since it provides both an opportunity for industry to make its needs known and specifically provides economic and tax incentives for industries which employ water reuse and water conservation in the future.

  8. Industrial unionism and the Oklahoma coal industry, 1870-1935

    SciTech Connect

    Sewall, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    This study traces the development of industrial unionism in Oklahoma's coal industry from the beginnings of the industry in 1870 to its decline in 1935. Chapter topics include the early years of the coal industry, life in the coal towns, and the series of strikes that occurred from 1894 to 1932. The study draws from both labor and management materials, but also from primary sources that reflect the role of both the state and federal governments during strikes. The study also utilizes the newspapers of the coal towns. They are a bountiful source on life in Oklahoma's coal towns. Study concludes that Oklahoma's coal towns were a perfect breeding ground for industrial unionism. Working in the most dangerous mines in the United States, the miners of Oklahoma turned to unionism in their efforts to improve working conditions and to secure a living wage. Above ground, the miners battled to break the company towns system. There the union achieved success in eliminating the company store and company housing, the two principal components of the company town system. At the same time, the miners created a union culture under which miners of all nationalities were welcome.

  9. Market Report for the Industrial Sector, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Sastri, Bhima; Brueske, Sabine; de los Reyes, Pamela; Jamison, Keith; Justiniano, Mauricio; Margolis, Nancy; Monfort, Joe; Raghunathan, Anand; Sabouni, Ridah

    2009-07-01

    This report provides an overview of trends in industrial-sector energy use. It focuses on some of the largest and most energy-intensive industrial subsectors and several emerging technologies that could transform key segments of industry.

  10. INDUSTRIAL USE OF STORMWATER: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a cost analysis of stormwater reclamation for industrial subportable water supply, including industrial cooling and process, irrigation, and recreational water supply.
    As population and industry grow, water demand increases and water supply becomes more o...

  11. Industrial enzymology: the application of enzymes in industry

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, T.; Reichelt, J.

    1982-01-01

    This reference book contains detailed data on kinetics of enzymes which relate mathematical models to actual industrial practice; comments on legislative thinking, toxicology, test systems, and guidance on industrial safety when working with enzymes; and explains the uses of enzymes for the following products or processes: potable alcohol, fuel alcohol, analytical applications, baking, brewing, dairy, detergents, effluents/by-products/biogas, flavors and colors, juice, leather, paper, plant tissues, proteins, starch, textiles, and wine. Seven biotechnical specialities are described: yeast processing, immobilized enzymes, membrane cleaning, glucose oxidase, edible oil processing, mineral oil/drilling muds, and dextranase and sugar processing. One chapter is devoted to a comparison of key characteristics of industrial enzymes by type and source. Another chapter lists enzyme groupings, specific data on suppliers, natural sources, current assays, and biochemical criteria. (CKK)

  12. Industry involvement in IPAD through the Industry Technical Advisory Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    In 1976 NASA awarded The Boeing Company a contract to develop IPAD (Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design). This contract included a requirement for Boeing to form an Industrial Technical Advisory Board (ITAB), with members representing major aerospace and computer companies. The purpose of this board was to guide the development of IPAD. The specific goal of IPAD is to increase United States aerospace industry productivity through the application of computers to manage engineering data. This goal clearly is attainable; in fact, IPAD's influence can reach beyond the aerospace industry to many businesses where product development is based on the design-building process. An enhanced IPAD, therefore, is a national asset of significance. The role of ITAB in guiding the development of this system is described.

  13. University Research Gets Boost from Industry Funds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Today, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Reviews current and future research endeavors supported by funds from industry focusing on research and development centers at various universities and industries which support scientific research. (SK)

  14. Industry Raps OSHA's Proposed Cancer Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents the response of the American Industrial Health Council (AIHC) to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) genetic proposal for regulating chemical carcinogens in industry. (HM)

  15. Economics of the Mineral Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Vogely, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    This edition of Economics of the Mineral Industries is completely rewritten to address the state of the mineral sectors and of mineral economic principles as of 1984. Since the 3rd edition was written in the early 1970s there have been major changes both in the structure of these industries and in the tools of analysis of them, as well as in public policy. This edition has three objectives: (1) to provide a book suitable for use in a wide variety of courses at universities and colleges; (2) to provide AIME members with a reference to which they can turn for an understanding of the principles and applications of economics, geostatistics, modeling, and other analytical techniques to the mineral industries; and (3) to provide an objective review of the public policy issues concerning minerals that the US faces. The book is divided into five parts: Minerals and the Economy; Principles of Mineral Economics; Mineral Industry Analysis; Structure and Performance of the Major Mineral Sectors; Public Policy and the Mineral Industries. There are 19 chapters or subchapters in the five sections.

  16. Phospholipases and their industrial applications.

    PubMed

    De Maria, L; Vind, J; Oxenbøll, K M; Svendsen, A; Patkar, S

    2007-02-01

    Phospholipids are present in all living organisms. They are a major component of all biological membranes, along with glycolipids and cholesterol. Enzymes aimed at modifying phospholipids, namely, phospholipases, are consequently widespread in nature, playing very diverse roles from aggression in snake venom to signal transduction and digestion in humans. In this review, we give a general overview of phospholipases A1, A2, C and D from a sequence and structural perspective and their industrial application. The use of phospholipases in industrial processes has grown hand-in-hand with our ability to clone and express the genes in microbial hosts with commercially attractive amounts. Further, the use in industrial processes is increasing by optimizing the enzymes by protein engineering. Here, we give a perspective on the work done to date to express phospholipases in heterologous hosts and the efforts to optimize them by protein engineering. We will draw attention to the industrial processes where phospholipases play a key role and show how the use of a phospholipase for oil degumming leads to substantial environmental benefits. This illustrates a very general trend: the use of enzymes as an alternative to chemical processes to make products often provides a cleaner solution for the industrial processes. In a world with great demands on non-polluting, energy saving technical solutions--white biotechnology is a strong alternative. PMID:17221199

  17. [Genome editing of industrial microorganism].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linjiang; Li, Qi

    2015-03-01

    Genome editing is defined as highly-effective and precise modification of cellular genome in a large scale. In recent years, such genome-editing methods have been rapidly developed in the field of industrial strain improvement. The quickly-updating methods thoroughly change the old mode of inefficient genetic modification, which is "one modification, one selection marker, and one target site". Highly-effective modification mode in genome editing have been developed including simultaneous modification of multiplex genes, highly-effective insertion, replacement, and deletion of target genes in the genome scale, cut-paste of a large DNA fragment. These new tools for microbial genome editing will certainly be applied widely, and increase the efficiency of industrial strain improvement, and promote the revolution of traditional fermentation industry and rapid development of novel industrial biotechnology like production of biofuel and biomaterial. The technological principle of these genome-editing methods and their applications were summarized in this review, which can benefit engineering and construction of industrial microorganism. PMID:26204755

  18. Industry's Commercial Initiatives on ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, C. E.; Kessler, C.; Lavitola, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    For more than ten years, private industry has worked to develop a commercial human space market and to create a sustainable ISS commercial utilization customer base. Before ISS assembly was underway - and long before NASA and the international space agencies began to craft ISS commercial business terms and conditions - industry planted and nurtured the seeds of interest in exploiting human space utilization for commerce. These early initiatives have yielded the impetus and framework for industry approaches to ISS commercial utilization today and for NASA's and the International Partners' planned accommodation of private sector interests and desires on the ISS. This paper chronicles major industry initiatives for commercial ISS utilization, emphasizing successful marketing and business approaches and why these approaches have a higher likelihood of success than others. It provides an overview of individual companies' initiatives, as well as collaborative efforts that cross company lines and country borders; and it assesses the relative success of each. Rather than emphasize negative issues and barriers, this paper characterizes and prioritizes actionable success factors for industry and government to make ISS commercial utilization a sustainable reality.

  19. Health care becomes an industry.

    PubMed

    Rastegar, Darius A

    2004-01-01

    The delivery of health care is in the process of "industrialization" in that it is undergoing changes in the organization of work which mirror those that began in other industries a century ago. This process is characterized by an increasing division of labor, standardization of roles and tasks, the rise of a managerial superstructure, and the degradation (or de-skilling) of work. The consolidation of the health care industry, the fragmentation of physician roles, and the increasing numbers of nonphysician clinicians will likely accelerate this process. Although these changes hold the promise of more efficient and effective health care, physicians should be concerned about the resultant loss of autonomy, disruption of continuity of care, and the potential erosion of professional values. PMID:15053287

  20. The chemical industry, by country

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-03-01

    Beijing will be the site for the third ACHEMASIA, international petrochemical and chemical exhibition and conference, May 15--20, 1995. In preparation for this conference, Hydrocarbon Processing contacted executives of petrochemical/chemical industries and trade associations, seeking views on the state of the industry. The Asia-Pacific region is the center of new construction and expanded capacity and also a mixture of mature, developing and emerging petrochemical industries. Established countries must mold and grow with emerging economies as the newcomers access natural resources and develop their own petrochemical infrastructures. The following nation reports focus on product supply/demand trends, economic forecasts, new construction, etc. Space limitations prohibit publishing commentaries from all countries that have petrochemical/chemical capacity. Reports are published from the following countries: Australia, China, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam.

  1. A Testing Service for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A small isolated NASA facility provides assistance to industry in the design, testing, and operation of oxygen systems. White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was originally established to test rocket propulsion systems for the Apollo program. The facility's role was later expanded into testing characterization, flammability and toxicity characteristics of materials. Its materials and components test methods were adopted by the American society for Testing and Materials. When research and testing results became known, industry requested assistance, and in 1980, NASA authorized WSTF to open its facility to private firms, a valuable service, as oxygen systems testing is often too expensive and too hazardous for many companies. Today, some of the best known American industries utilize White Sands testing capabilities.

  2. Steel Industry Energy Bandwidth Study

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2004-10-01

    ITP conducted a study on energy use and potential savings, or "bandwidth" study, in major steelmaking processes. Intended to provide a realistic estimate of the potential amount of energy that can be saved in an industrial process, the "bandwidth" refers to the difference between the amount of energy that would be consumed in a process using commercially available technology versus the minimum amount of energy needed to achieve those same results based on the 2nd law of thermodynamics. The Steel Industry Energy Bandwidth Study (PDF 133 KB) also estimates steel industry energy use in the year 2010, and uses that value as a basis for comparison against the minimum requirements. This energy savings opportunity for 2010 will aid focus on longer term R&D.

  3. Chemistry in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, Graham S.; Pendri, Yadagiri; Snyder, Lawrence B.; Yevich, Joseph P.; Deshpande, Milind

    This chapter will discuss the role of chemistry within the pharmaceutical industry. Although the focus will be upon the industry within the United States, much of the discussion is equally relevant to pharmaceutical companies based in other first world nations such as Japan and those in Europe. The major objective of the pharmaceutical industry is the discovery, development, and marketing of efficacious and safe drugs for the treatment of human disease. Of course drug companies do not exist as altruistic, charitable organizations but like other share-holder owned corporations within our capitalistic society must achieve profits in order to remain viable and competitive. Thus, there exists a conundrum between the dual goals of enhancing the quality and duration of human life and that of increasing stock-holder equity. Much has been written and spoken in the lay media about the high prices of prescription drugs and the hardships this places upon the elderly and others of limited income.

  4. Industrial materials science and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Murr, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    This volume assumes some background in metallurgy and the materials sciences, in chemistry, physics and advanced mathematics through differential equations. It was developed from a series of lectures providing state-of-the-art exposure for business and industry and for a wide range of industrial and manufacturing scientists and engineers. It provides also an overview of modern materials properties and behavior in selected areas for the practicing professional and for students in solid-state physics and chemistry, metallurgy, ceramics, materials science and engineering, and industrial and manufacturing engineering. Contents, abridged: Metallic glass materials. Physical modification of properties of semi-crystalline polymers. Rapid solidification technology: particulate production and consolidation. Optical and tribological coatings produced by vapor deposition techniques. Advanced in-situ composites. Materials and characterization produced using ion, electron, and photon probes. Problem solutions and discussion. Index.

  5. The impact of industrial biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Soetaert, Wim; Vandamme, Erick

    2006-01-01

    In this review, the impact of industrial (or "white") biotechnology can have on our society and economy is discussed. An overview is given of industrial biotechnology and its applications in a number of product categories ranging from food ingredients, vitamins, bio-colorants, solvents, plastics and biofuels. The use of fossil resources is compared with renewable resources as the preferred feedstock for industrial biotechnology. A brief discussion is also given of the expected changes in society and technology, ranging from the shift in the supply of resources, the growing need for efficiency and sustainability of the production systems, changing consumer perception and behaviour and changing agricultural systems and practices. Many of these changes are expected to speed up the transition from a fossil-based to a bio-based economy and society. PMID:16897819

  6. Public concern about industrial hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Stallen, P.J.M.; Tomas, A.

    1988-06-01

    In this paper the authors propose adopting a noncognitive perspective for the understanding of people's anxiety or, its opposite, feelings of security about living near hazardous industrial facilities. Results of their empirical investigations among residents of a heavily industrialized area indicate that at least four qualitatively different response patterns exist: the Secure, the Accepting, the Defensive, and the Vigilant response. In this order manifest anxiety increases, which increase is shown to be a function of the assessment of the threat, of the opportunities for personal control (specific), and of hope (generalized) to bring about a better environment by one's own action. As an application of the usefulness of this typology they discuss the various explanations for the often-observed male/female difference in anxiety regarding industrial threat.

  7. Industrial ecology: a philosophical introduction.

    PubMed Central

    Frosch, R A

    1992-01-01

    By analogy with natural ecosystems, an industrial ecology system, in addition to minimizing waste production in processes, would maximize the economical use of waste materials and of products at the ends of their lives as inputs to other processes and industries. This possibility can be made real only if a number of potential problems can be solved. These include the design of wastes along with the design of products and processes, the economics of such a system, the internalizing of the costs of waste disposal to the design and choice of processes and products, the effects of regulations intended for other purposes, and problems of responsibility and liability. The various stakeholders in making the effects of industry on the environment more benign will need to adopt some new behaviors if the possibility is to become real. PMID:11607255

  8. Industry liaison section implementation plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakowske, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    The Industry Liaison Section is a new function of the Army/NASA Aircrew-Aircraft Integration (AAAI) Program that is intended to bridge an existing gap between Government developers (including contractors) and outside organizations who are potential users of products and services developed by the AAAI Program. Currently in its sixth year, the Program is experiencing considerable pull from industry and other government organizations to disseminate products. Since the AAAI Program's charter is exploratory and research in nature, and satisfying proper dissemination requirements is in conflict with the rapid prototyping approach utilized by the design team, the AAAI Program has elected to create an Industry Liaison Section (ILS) to serve as the Program's technology transfer focal point. The process by which the ILS may be established, organized and managed is described, including the baseline organizational structure, duties, functions, authority, responsibilities, relations and policies and procedures relevant to the conduct of the ILS.

  9. Biorefinery: Toward an industrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Octave, Stéphane; Thomas, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Fossil fuel reserves are running out, global warming is becoming a reality, waste recycling is becoming ever more costly and problematic, and unrelenting population growth will require more and more energy and consumer products. There is now an alternative to the 100% oil economy; it is a renewable resource based on agroresources by using the whole plant. Production and development of these new products are based on biorefinery concept. Each constituent of the plant can be extracted and functionalized in order to produce non-food and food fractions, intermediate agro-industrial products and synthons. Three major industrial domains can be concerned: molecules, materials and energy. Molecules can be used as solvent surfactants or chemical intermediates in substitution of petrol derivatives. Fibers can be valorized in materials like composites. Sugars and oils are currently used to produce biofuels like bioethanol or biodiesel, but second-generation biofuels will use lignocellulosic biomass as raw material. Lipids can be used to produce a large diversity of products like solvent, lubricants, pastes or surfactants. Industrial biorefinery will be linked to the creation of new processes based on the twelve principles of green chemistry (clean processes, atom economy, renewable feedstocks...). Biotechnology, especially white biotechnology, will take a major part into these new processes with biotransformations (enzymology, micro-organisms...) and fermentation. The substitution of oil products by biobased products will develop a new bioeconomy and new industrial processes respecting the sustainable development concept. Industrial biorefinery can be developed on the principle that any residues of one can then be exploited as raw material by others in an industrial metabolism. PMID:19332104

  10. High technology industries: Profiles and outlooks. The semiconductor industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This profile is designed to assess the international competitive position of the U.S. Semiconductor Industry; pinpoint the major foreign and domestic challenges to American semiconductor manufacturers; and present for discussion possible options in terms of U.S. government policies affecting the sector's international standing.

  11. Industrial Electricity: Motors. Oklahoma Trade and Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teague, Cash; Pewewardy, Garner

    This curriculum guide provides competency-based instructional materials for training in the field of industrial electricity. Materials are not geared to a specific grade level and may be used with secondary and postsecondary students as well as part- and full-time adult students. The guide includes three sections and ten instructional units. Each…

  12. Industrial Electronics Curriculum Guide. Michigan Trade and Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for industrial electronics is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a career ladder, a matrix relating duty/task numbers to job titles, and a task list. Each task…

  13. Industrial Electronics Curriculum Guide. Michigan Trade and Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for industrial electronics is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a career ladder, a matrix relating duty/task numbers to job titles, and a task list. Each task

  14. Industrial Electricity: Motors. Oklahoma Trade and Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teague, Cash; Pewewardy, Garner

    This curriculum guide provides competency-based instructional materials for training in the field of industrial electricity. Materials are not geared to a specific grade level and may be used with secondary and postsecondary students as well as part- and full-time adult students. The guide includes three sections and ten instructional units. Each

  15. Industrial Biotechnology: Discovery to Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotani, Gopal K.; Dodge, Timothy C.; Gaertner, Alfred L.; Arbige, Michael V.

    Fermentation products have penetrated almost every sector of our daily lives. They are used in ethical and generic drugs, clinical and home diagnostics, defense products, nutritional supplements, personal care products, food and animal feed ingredients, cleaning and textile processing, and in industrial applications such as fuel ethanol production. Even before knowing about the existence of microorganisms, for thousands of years ancient people routinely used them for making cheese, soy sauces, yogurt, and bread. Although humans have used fermentation as the method of choice for manufacturing for a long time, it is only now being recognized for its potential towards sustainable industrial development.

  16. Coal conversion products industrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkin, J. H.; Warren, D.

    1980-01-01

    Coal-based synthetic fuels complexes under development consideration by NASA/MSFC will produce large quantities of synthetic fuels, primarily medium BTU gas, which could be sold commercially to industries located in South Central Tennessee and Northern Alabama. The complexes would be modular in construction, and subsequent modules may produce liquid fuels or fuels for electric power production. Current and projected industries in the two states which have a propensity for utilizing coal-based synthetic fuels were identified, and a data base was compiled to support MFSC activities.

  17. NICE3: Industrial Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, P.

    1999-09-29

    Energy Concepts has developed an absorption-augmented system as a cost-effective means of achieving more cooling capacity with a substantial reduction in energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions for industrial refrigeration. It cuts fuel consumption by 30% by combining an internal combustion engine with a mechanical compression refrigeration system and an absorption refrigeration system. The absorption system is powered by engine waste heat. Conventional industrial refrigeration uses mechanical vapor compression, powered by electric motors, which results in higher energy costs. By the year 2010, the new system could cut fuel consumption by 19 trillion Btu and greenhouse emissions by more than 1 million tons per year.

  18. Industrial uses of wood char

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Gupta, R.C.

    1998-08-01

    The quality and feasibility of wood char utilization in various industries are reported. Wood char provides fuel not only for cooking and domestic heating but also for many industrial purposes, such as manufacture of iron and some ferro-alloys, recovery of gold and other nonferrous metals from their leached solutions, manufacture of chemicals and medicines, burning of bricks and glass, and removal of toxic substances from their solutions. The selection of wood char for these purposes is made on the basis of its properties, such as chemical composition, reactivity, heating value, electrical resistivity, adsorption capacity, and strength.

  19. Industry turns its attention south

    SciTech Connect

    Marhefka, D.

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the gas and oil industries in the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Significant foreign investment continues to elude Russia`s oil and gas industry, so the Caspian nations of Kazakhstan and Azerbaijan are picking up the slack, welcoming the flow of foreign capital to their energy projects. Separate evaluations are given for Russia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Moldova, Tajikstan, Uzbekistan, Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Serbia.

  20. 29 CFR 697.1 - Industry definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and transportation. This industry shall include the transportation of passengers and cargo by water or... transportation industry. (e) Construction. This industry shall include all construction, reconstruction... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Industry definitions. 697.1 Section 697.1 Labor...

  1. 29 CFR 697.1 - Industry definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and transportation. This industry shall include the transportation of passengers and cargo by water or... transportation industry. (e) Construction. This industry shall include all construction, reconstruction... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Industry definitions. 697.1 Section 697.1 Labor...

  2. 29 CFR 697.1 - Industry definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and transportation. This industry shall include the transportation of passengers and cargo by water or... transportation industry. (e) Construction. This industry shall include all construction, reconstruction... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Industry definitions. 697.1 Section 697.1 Labor...

  3. Government, Higher Education and the Industrial Ethic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasker, Mary; Packham, David

    This paper argues that the values of industry and higher education are incompatible and that imposition of industrial values on universities must necessarily destroy traditional academic values. Any dialogue between industry and higher education must grapple with this value conflict. The industrial ethic is based on unlimited growth, exploitation…

  4. 29 CFR 697.1 - Industry definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Industry definitions. 697.1 Section 697.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS INDUSTRIES IN AMERICAN SAMOA § 697.1 Industry definitions. (a) Government employees. This industry includes all activities of employees of the Government...

  5. Women in the Hotel and Catering Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Training Board, Wembley (England).

    A study of the employment of women in the hotel and catering industry indicated that the industry employs nearly 17 percent of the entire paid female work force in the United Kingdom. Women constitute 75 percent of the industry's work force, and 47 percent of its managers are women. Women's position in the industry is characterized by their…

  6. 49 CFR 173.411 - Industrial packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... record retention applicable to Industrial Packaging Type 1 (IP-1), Industrial Packaging Type 2 (IP-2), and Industrial Packaging Type 3 (IP-3). (b) Industrial packaging certification and tests. (1) Each IP... radiation levels recorded or calculated at the external surfaces for the condition before the test. (3)...

  7. Industriology--The Science of Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Univ., Platteville. Coll. of Industry.

    This overview of an industrial arts curriculum project, resulting from comprehensive studies of industry by the staff and graduate students of the College of Industry at Wisconsin State University through federally funded institutional grants and fellowship programs, focuses on "industriology"--the science of industry. Intended to update and…

  8. Industrial applications of laser micromachining.

    PubMed

    Gower, M C

    2000-07-17

    The use of pulsed lasers for microprocessing material in several manufacturing industries is presented. Microvia, ink jet printer nozzle and biomedical catheter hole drilling, thin-film scribing and micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) fabrication applications are reviewed. PMID:19404370

  9. INDUSTRIAL OILS FROM TRANSGENIC PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unusual fatty acids with useful industrial properties occur widely in seed oils of many non-agronomic plant species. Numerous biotechnological efforts have been undertaken to produce high levels of these fatty acids in seeds of existing crop plants. cDNAs for a wide variety of unusual fatty acid b...

  10. Using Metrics in Industrial Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bame, E. Allen

    This metric supplement is intended as a guide to aid the industrial arts teacher in incorporating metrics in the classroom. A list of student objectives for measurement skills is followed by an overview of the history of measurement, an argument for change to the metric system in the United States, and a discussion of metric basics (common terms).…

  11. The Carlisle Indian Industrial School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlee, Anita

    The Carlisle Indian Industrial School was the first off-reservation boarding school and began the social experiment of assimilation of Native Americans into American culture. For almost 40 years, from 1879 to 1918, the school sought to civilize "savage" Indian children. Richard H. Pratt, founder of the school, believed that the school was the…

  12. Handbook for Monitoring Industrial Wastewater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Associated Water & Air Resources Engineers, Inc., Nashville, TN.

    This manual for industrial wastewater monitoring covers the philosophy of monitoring needs, planning, sampling, measuring, and analysis. Sufficient detail is given for those who wish to explore more deeply some of the practical and theoretical aspects of any of the phases of a monitoring program. A logical procedure is suggested and direction

  13. METHANE EMISSIONS FROM INDUSTRIAL SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter identifies and describes major industrial sources of methane (CH4) emissions. or each source type examined, it identifies CH4 release points and discusses in detail the factors affecting emissions. t also summarizes and discusses available global and country-specific ...

  14. Industrial Mechanics Occupational Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Frank

    This guide, developed by the Oregon Department of Education, is intended to assist the vocational teacher in designing and implementing a cluster program in industrial mechanics. It suggests teaching ideas and is aimed at high school students, as well as those wishing to enter community college, university, or apprenticeship programs. The guide is…

  15. Industrial Art: Mission to Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Mike

    2009-01-01

    This is a story about industrial art. It is certainly not a story about smart studios and fashionable galleries, subtle techniques and aesthetic beauty. This is a story of sheet rock, nails, and low-grade lumber in the hands of unskilled teenage laborers. While this story boasts of no future museum pieces, it tells a heartwarming story of rare…

  16. University-Industry Research Collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Charles

    2000-03-01

    University-industry research collaborations take many forms. Perhaps the simplest is unsponsored one-on-one collaborations between individuals. A more formal but less intimate arrangement is industrial sponsorship of individual or collective work on campus, e.g., via an outright gift or membership in an industrial affiliates consortium. A more intimate institutional collaboration is a mutually sanctioned joint project, sponsored by either a governmental funding agency or an industrial entity, the terms and conditions of which (funds flows, reports, intellectual property ownership, etc.) are governed by formal arrangements. Partnerships, e.g., support of an on-campus joint venture funded in part by one or more firms and in part by a third party, are the most intimate and complex form of such collaborations. During the past two decades Xerox has engaged in all four forms of collaborations. I give examples of each, and indicate the attributes which distinguish the more successful from the less successful collaborations, as well as recent trends in their nature and purposes.

  17. ACS Proposes Industrial Internship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1972

    1972-01-01

    The American Chemical Society has proposed a federal program which would enable 1500 unemployed chemists and chemical engineers possessing master's or higher degrees to serve from one to two years as interns in industrial research and development installations. (Author/TS)

  18. Industrial Education. Drafting. [Grade 9].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Part of a series of curriculum guides dealing with industrial education in junior high schools, this guide provides a course on drafting to be used in the ninth grade. Thirteen goals are identified for the students to demonstrate: (1) a knowledge of the relationship between drafting and the work of designers, engineers, and architects; (2) an…

  19. Putting Industrial Arts on Wheels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwaar, Walter L.

    1967-01-01

    A discussion augmented by plans of a partially transportable industrial arts learning laboratory. The design calls for four laboratories, parts of which are fixed and parts of which are capsule sections which can be rotated between four junior high schools on a nine week basis. Advantages and disadvantages of the design are discussed in sections…

  20. Enriching Planning through Industry Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Mario; Wolverton, Mimi

    2009-01-01

    Strategic planning is an important tool, but the sole dependence on it across departments and campuses has resulted in the underutilization of equally important methods of analysis. The evolution of higher and postsecondary education necessitates a systemic industry analysis, as the combination of new providers and delivery mechanisms and changing…

  1. Bringing Industry to the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoachlander, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Multiple pathways connect college-preparatory curriculums with exceptional career and technical education, motivating students to learn by helping them answer the question, Why do I need to know this? Real-world learning is organized around such industry sectors as finance and business; health science and medical technology; building and…

  2. An Industrial-Strength Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Michael; Brown, Donna

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Merck Institute for Science Education whose goals are to communicate the excitement and relevance of science to students through science teaching, and to work with teachers and instill in them an understanding and appreciation of science. Involves industry volunteers contributing to the professional development of teachers and

  3. Industry Training: Causes and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew; Freeland, Brett

    Research on Australian organizations in five industry sectors--building and construction, food processing, electronics manufacturing, retailing, and finance and banking--has identified these three key drivers of enterprise training: workplace change, quality assurance, and new technology. Operation of the training drivers is moderated by a range…

  4. INDUSTRIAL REUSE OF URBAN STORMWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As population and industry grow, water demand increases, and water supply becomes more of a problem. It has been estimated that the total gross water intake for all purposes in the United States will exceed the total available water supply of 650 billion gal/day (2.5 billion cu m...

  5. The uranium industry of Bulgaria

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, T.C.

    1991-07-01

    For 45 years, the Bulgarian uranium industry operated behind an impenetrable veil of secrecy. As this veil is slowly lifted, the breadth and structure of the industry are becoming apparent-and so are the problems. Bulgaria`s uranium industry began in 1945 with the evaluation of several uranium mineral occurrences in the Balkan Mountains. These occurrences provided to be mineable deposits and became the foundation for a continuing program of exploration and development. Mining commenced in 1946, and all production was exported under contract to the Soviet Union in exchange for an eventual supply of fabricated nuclear fuel. In concert with most other countries of the COMECON block, Bulgaria`s exploration and development program reached its zenith in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Like other COMECON countries, the contract with the Soviet Union was reduced during the 1980s and finally terminated. The Bulgarian uranium industry now is under substantial pressure to: (1) Maintain uranium production as a base of support for its 10,000 employees. (2) Develop mineral deposits other than uranium as a replacement for high-cost uranium production. (3) Clean up past and present production sites, most of which have significant environmental problems. The probability of successfully completing these three tasks without outside assistance is limited. Bulgaria`s almost complete dependence for four and a half decades on Soviet aid, contracts, and technology has taken its toll.

  6. Conservation and the industry sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The following six highly energy intensive industries were studied as targets of energy conservation opportunity: food and kindred products, paper and allied products, chemicals and allied products, petroleum and coal products, stone, glass and clay products, and primary manufacturing. After studying conservation actions within each industry the actions were grouped under three broad categories: increased combustion efficiency, process improvement, and good housekeeping. Some of the results were: (1) approximately 2.18 quads could be saved in 1980 and 2.57 quads in 1985 by installing cogenerative facilities in 50% of the industries, (2) regenerative air-preheaters could result in a 10-15% increase in furnace efficiency representing a 15-25% fuel savings (2.3 to 3.9 quads in 1980 and 2.7 to 4.5 quads in 1985), (3) several major industries have potential for energy savings by recycling-aluminum (0.2 quads), steel (1 quad), glass (0.006 quads), paper and cement (0.08 quads).

  7. Job Prospects for Industrial Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    Recent economic growth and improved manufacturing profitability are supporting increased employment for industrial engineers. Promising areas include modernizing manufacturing technology and productivity with large amounts of hiring in aerospace, electronics, and instrumentation. Percentages of women employed in these fields for 1982 and 1983 are…

  8. When Research Criticizes an Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2007-01-01

    When Robert W. Van Kirk released a study in January about selenium contamination in trout streams in southeastern Idaho, he expected some flak from the influential phosphate-mining industry. He did not expect to feel pressured by the administration of his own institution, Idaho State University, where he is an associate professor of mathematics.…

  9. Technology in the Agricultural Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiegers, George W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Vocational agriculture must continue to be sensitive to the labor market needs of the agricultural industry. As technology changes the world of work, it inevitably affects workers and students. School curriculum and vocational agriculture teachers must keep up-to-date with these changes. (LRA)

  10. Industrial Art: Mission to Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Mike

    2009-01-01

    This is a story about industrial art. It is certainly not a story about smart studios and fashionable galleries, subtle techniques and aesthetic beauty. This is a story of sheet rock, nails, and low-grade lumber in the hands of unskilled teenage laborers. While this story boasts of no future museum pieces, it tells a heartwarming story of rare

  11. Industrial Arts in Pennsylvania: Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    Intended to facilitate the improvement of industrial arts education in Pennsylvania, the guidelines for planning and development emphasize an interdisciplinary approach. They are aimed at professional personnel and are divided into general provisions which are applied (with changes in specific content where appropriate) to elementary, middle…

  12. Undergraduate Training for Industrial Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stehney, Ann K.

    1983-01-01

    Forty-eight mathematicians in industry, business, and government replied to a questionnaire on the relative merits of the traditional undergraduate curriculum, advanced topics in pure mathematics, computer programing, additional computer science, and specialized or applied topics. They favored programing and applied mathematics, along with a…

  13. Bibliography for the Hospitality Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Elizabeth A.

    This annotated bibliography is a sample collection of reference materials in the hospitality industry suitable for a small academic library. It is assumed that the library has a general reference collection. Publication dates range from 1992-96, with two publication dates in the 1980s. No periodicals are included. The 41 reference materials are…

  14. The Coronary Patient in Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, B.

    1971-01-01

    The coronary patient, as he pertains to industry particularly NASA, is discussed. Concepts of precoronary care, acute attacks which may develop while on the job, and the return of the cardiac patient to work are covered. Major emphasis was on the prevention of sudden death due to coronary disease.

  15. Industrial applications of THz systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wietzke, S.; Jansen, C.; Jördens, C.; Krumbholz, N.; Vieweg, N.; Scheller, M.; Shakfa, M. K.; Romeike, D.; Hochrein, T.; Mikulics, M.; Koch, M.

    2009-07-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz TDS) holds high potential as a non-destructive, non-contact testing tool. We have identified a plethora of emerging industrial applications such as quality control of industrial processes and products in the plastics industry. Polymers are transparent to THz waves while additives show a significantly higher permittivity. This dielectric contrast allows for detecting the additive concentration and the degree of dispersion. We present a first inline configuration of a THz TDS spectrometer for monitoring polymeric compounding processes. To evaluate plastic components, non-destructive testing is strongly recommended. For instance, THz imaging is capable of inspecting plastic weld joints or revealing the orientation of fiber reinforcements. Water strongly absorbs THz radiation. However, this sensitivity to water can be employed in order to investigate the moisture absorption in plastics and the water content in plants. Furthermore, applications in food technology are discussed. Moreover, security scanning applications are addressed in terms of identifying liquid explosives. We present the vision and first components of a handheld security scanner. In addition, a new approach for parameter extraction of THz TDS data is presented. All in all, we give an overview how industry can benefit from THz TDS completing the tool box of non-destructive evaluation.

  16. Private Industry and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autry, James A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses recent changes in industry practices designed to make worklife more accommodating to family life. Cites examples of companies which are establishing new work schedules (flex-time, four-day weeks), providing counseling services and day care, and giving increased consideration to family impact when making job transfer decisions. (SJL)

  17. Careers in the Aerospace Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Office of General Aviation.

    The document briefly presents career information in the field of aerospace industry. Employment exists in three areas: (1) professional and technical occupations in research and development (engineers, scientists, and technicians); (2) administrative, clerical, and related occupations (engineers, scientists, technicians, clerks, secretaries,…

  18. 1992 Canadian oil industry directory

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.

    1992-01-01

    This book lists address, phone, fax, and personnel of companies active in the Canadian petroleum industry. It includes E and P, drilling, oilfield service, supply, manufacturing, and engineering companies, associations, and government agencies. It also describes activities, provides branch office and subsidiary information and company personnel indices.indices.

  19. Task Analysis for Industrial Plastics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Coordinating Council for Occupational Education, Olympia.

    The guide is designed to provide a basis for effective communication between local education agencies and local advisory committees regarding industrial plastics eudcation and to communicate national and statewide program requirements so that local advisory committees may recommend program requirements that meet local needs with due concern for…

  20. Energy saver for industrial lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arline, J.; Lapalme, J.; Warren, C.

    1980-01-01

    Electronic controller switches lights on or off in response to amount of sunlight available. Is application in offices and industrial installations where electrical energy is wasted by using artificial light in sunlit areas. Device utilizes electronic monitor that varies artificial lighting according to amount of sunlight in given area.

  1. Program Budgeting for Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gramberg, Merlyn Ludwig

    In recognition of the increasing concern for the expenditure of tax dollars and the resulting need for accountability in budgeting, this study provides a model for program budgeting at the collegiate level in industrial education. Course outlines for drafting and woodworking at the University of Northern Colorado were analyzed and activities were…

  2. Benchmarks for industrial energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Amarnath, K.R.; Kumana, J.D.; Shah, J.V.

    1996-12-31

    What are the standards for improving energy efficiency for industries such as petroleum refining, chemicals, and glass manufacture? How can different industries in emerging markets and developing accelerate the pace of improvements? This paper discusses several case studies and experiences relating to this subject emphasizing the use of energy efficiency benchmarks. Two important benchmarks are discussed. The first is based on a track record of outstanding performers in the related industry segment; the second benchmark is based on site specific factors. Using energy use reduction targets or benchmarks, projects have been implemented in Mexico, Poland, India, Venezuela, Brazil, China, Thailand, Malaysia, Republic of South Africa and Russia. Improvements identified through these projects include a variety of recommendations. The use of oxy-fuel and electric furnaces in the glass industry in Poland; reconfiguration of process heat recovery systems for refineries in China, Malaysia, and Russia; recycling and reuse of process wastewater in Republic of South Africa; cogeneration plant in Venezuela. The paper will discuss three case studies of efforts undertaken in emerging market countries to improve energy efficiency.

  3. Pennsylvania Industrial Arts Safety Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoudt, John Y., Ed.; And Others

    Safety education information is provided in this guide designed for Pennsylvania industrial arts teachers. Twelve sections and section topics include the following: introduction (policy statement on safety); responsibility (school board and superintendent, principal and/or department head, the teacher); emergency action (primary concerns,…

  4. Photovoltaic industry progress through 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, R.L.; Smith, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.

    1985-04-01

    The growth of the US photovoltaics (PV) industry over the past decade has been impressive. First designed to provide power for satellites using high-cost production techniques, PV is now the economical choice in many remote terrestrial applications. The remarkable growth of PV in terms of quality of cells and modules, production techniques, and system design, was initiated by a cooperative effort of the US Government and the domestic PV manufacturers. European and Japanese firms entered the PV industry later, but are also growing rapidy. The Europeans continue to supply PV systems for village electrification and water pumping to many Third World countries. The Japanese have been developing the amorphous silicon (A-Si) technology by expanding its use in consumer goods. The world PV industry saw dramatic changes in industry ownership and in the emphasis on developing new and improved technology during 1984. The objective of this report is to present information on the developments of the world PV industry and focuses on developments occurring in 1984. Information is presented on a regional basis (US, Europe, Japan, other) to avoid disclosing company-confidential data. All information was gleaned from several sources, including a review of the technical literature and direct contacts with PV manufacturers. Prior to publishing the regional totals, all numbers were compared with those of other sources. The information contained in this report is prepared for use by the Department of Energy for their use in long-term R and D planning. However, this information should also be of interest by PV manufacturers and to those who may be contemplating entering the PV market. PV shipments for 1984, government supports for PV, and various PV market sectors are discussed.

  5. Industrial energy performance indicator reports

    SciTech Connect

    Munroe, V.

    1999-07-01

    The mandate for this work originated in December, 1996, when a joint meeting of federal and provincial Ministers of Energy and Environment, in addressing their responsibility to provide leadership on the Greenhouse Gases/Climate Change agenda, endorsed the following statement ({number{underscore}sign}13 of 45 initiatives launches at that time): Industrial establishments will be provided with a confidential benchmarking report on their energy efficiency progress, including how they compare to national and international averages for their sector. Information will also be provided on energy management best practices in their industries. The goal of the initiative is to use information provided on the state of energy practice to prompt, motivate, and induce companies to implement further energy efficiency measures. And one premise underlying it is that useful guidance on the state of energy practice in a company can be obtained from existing data sources, primarily the Industrial Consumption of Energy (ICE) survey and the Annual Survey of Manufacturers (ASM), both products of Statistics Canada. In addition, there are existing surveys which include energy consumption that are undertaken by associations such as the Canadian Portland Cement Association, the Canadian Chemical Producers Association, the Canadian Pulp and Paper Association, etc. Since the commitment was made, Natural Resources Canada staff have undertaken a large amount of investigative and developmental work which will be presented. Existing data from three sectors, pulp, cement and fluid milk, has been analyzed and will be delivered with draft context and energy efficiency guidance notes to the management of about 100 establishments. The author will also be able to report on how this information was received by these managers, and on the recommendations that will have been collected from industry on the more specific nature and frequency of industrial energy performance reporting desired.

  6. Optical media standards for industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, Kenneth J.

    1993-01-01

    Optical storage is a new and growing area of technology that can serve to meet some of the mass storage needs of the computer industry. Optical storage is characterized by information being stored and retrieved by means of diode lasers. When most people refer to optical storage, they mean rotating disk media, but there are 1 or 2 products that use lasers to read and write to tape. Optical media also usually means removable media. Because of its removability, there is a recognized need for standardization, both of the media and of the recording method. Industry standards can come about in one or more different ways. An industry supported body can sanction and publish a formal standard. A company may ship enough of a product that it so dominates an application or industry that it acquires 'standard' status without an official sanction. Such de facto standards are almost always copied by other companies with varying degrees of success. A governmental body can issue a rule or law that requires conformance to a standard. The standard may have been created by the government, or adopted from among many proposed by industry. These are often known as de jure standards. Standards are either open or proprietary. If approved by a government or sanctioning body, the standard is open. A de facto standard may be either open or proprietary. Optical media is too new to have de facto standards accepted by the marketplace yet. The proliferation of non-compatible media types in the last 5 years of optical market development have convinced many of the need for recognized media standards.

  7. Inflatable packers move from petroleum industry to environmental industry

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, B.J.

    1995-09-01

    Inflatable packers have been used extensively in the petroleum industry for cementing, testing, fracturing, plugging, and treatment of wells. Today the technology is being applied increasingly in the environmental and geotechnical areas, and the use of inflatable packers has become standard practice in these fields. With emerging applications, new tools are continually being developed. This paper describes three relatively new applications for inflatable packers in the environmental industry: (1) operating and sealing Class I injection wells, (2) isolating bedrock intervals for hydrogeological testing and sampling, and (3) pneumatic and hydraulic fracturing to increase recovery of contaminants. Electronic instrumentation is making possible the real time acquisition of data essential to the new applications. The use of a tipple tranducer sub-assembly for formation testing will be described. A purging and sampling technique employing packers that was developed at the Love Canal hazardous waste site will be briefly described.

  8. Industrial applications of thermal sprayed coatings in Venezuelan steelmaking industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liscano, S.; Nuñez, E.; Gil, L.; Zerpa, R.

    2013-11-01

    The metal components subjected to high temperature conditions, abrasive wear, corrosion, impact, etc.; tend to present degradation of manufacturing material, causing the failure imminent of the component. One of the alternatives to minimize or eliminate such effect is the application of ceramic coatings, which are thermal insulators and exhibit high mechanical strength. Its extreme hardness, coupled with the low friction properties and chemical stability, allowing its use in a wide variety of applications. Therefore, the following paper describes the application of thermal sprayed coatings obtained by HVOF and Plasma technologies like alternative to protect the metallic equipment in different venezuelan industrial sectors, such as to operate under aggressive conditions of service, such as the steelmaking nationals industries. This study presents applications cases of ceramic-based coatings, in order to minimize the sticking of metallic material in components of reduction reactor of FINMET® and MIDREXTM process.

  9. Information Services of Maritime Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazov, Atanas; Stefanov, Asen

    2015-04-01

    The ultimate goal of modern oceanography is an end user oriented product. Beneficiaries are the governmental services, coast-based enterprises and research institutions that make use of the products generated by operational oceanography. Direct potential users and customers are coastal managers, shipping, offshore industry, ports and harbours, fishing, tourism and recreation industry, and scientific community. Indirect beneficiaries, through climate forecasting based on ocean observations, are food, energy, water and medical suppliers. Five general classes of users for data and information are specified: (1) operational users that analyze the collected data and produce different forecasts serving to impose regulation measures; (2) authorities and managers of large-scale projects needing timely oceanographic information, including statistics and climatic trends; (3) industrial enterprises, safety of structures and avoiding of pollution; (4) tourism and recreation related users aiming protection of human health; (5) scientists, engineers, and economists carrying out special researches, strategic design studies, and other investigations to advance the application of marine data. The analysis of information received during the extensive inquiry among all potential end users reveals variety of data and information needs encompassing physical, chemical, biological and hydrometeorological observation. Nevertheless, the common requirement concerns development of observing and forecasting systems providing accurate real-time or near-real time data and information supporting decision making and environmental management. Availability of updated information on the actual state as well as forecast for the future changes of marine environment are essential for the success and safety of maritime operations in the offshore industry. For this purpose different systems have been developed to collect data and to produce forecasts on the state of the marine environment and to provide them in real-time to the users in applying the latest advances in instrument-building, information and communication technologies. In the Bulgarian sector of the Black Sea have been developed and putted in operation several systems for the collection and presentation of marine data for the needs of different users. The systems are located both along the coast and in the open sea and the information they provide is used by both the maritime industry and the widest range of users. Combining them into a national operational marine observational system is a task that has to be solved, and that will allow to get a more complete and comprehensive picture of the state of the marine environment in the Bulgarian sector of the Black Sea. Such a system will help to support the activities of the offshore industry.

  10. 77 FR 20615 - DAU Industry Day: “Affordability, Efficiency, and the Industrial Base”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... of the Secretary DAU Industry Day: ``Affordability, Efficiency, and the Industrial Base'' AGENCY..., President of Defense Acquisition University, will host a forum with industry to discuss affordability... Industry Day: ``Affordability, Efficiency, and the Industrial Base''. DATES: Tuesday, May 1, 2012, from...

  11. Three Studies in Industrial Economics: Competition and Industry Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Jan

    Chapter 1 reviews alternative theories of competition - the standard Neoclassical view, the contribution of the Chicago School as well as the two dynamic lines of thought which are part of Austrian economics and Classical Political Economy. The latter is presented as a consistent alternative to the other existing theories. Of special interest is the question if and how industry structure matters in these approaches, how profitability differentials are explained and what role market share concentration and mobility barriers play. Their predictions and implications for empirical research are compared. Ways to test and evaluate these different approaches are described. Chapter 2 investigates econometrically how industry and micro level variables determine persistent differentials in the rate of return on assets in the U.S. The analysis is the first to use business segment data to explain long term profitability differentials. It presents new market concentration indicators that are superior to concentration ratios and allow to analyze an unpreceded amount of concentration and other data back to 1977. Critical concentration levels, non-linearities, interaction effects and previously ignored important control variables like industrial unionization are being considered. Concentration is found to have significant negative effects on profitability differentials. Barrier indicators are insignificant while market shares are positively correlated with long-run profitability. Concentration thus increases, not diminishes the degree of industrial competition. This is interpreted as evidence in support of Classical Political Economic competition theory. Chapter 3 presents a costs of production based industry analytical study that aims at consistency with Classical Political Economic thought. It investigates how growth of renewable electricity in Germany forces conventional power plants to shift towards more flexible operating regimes. The simulation of individual power plant load uses different current and future as well as alternative price and energy policy scenarios, four years of 15-minute interval data on system and renewable load as well as an unpreceded degree of detail on plant cost structures and technical characteristics. I find that the costs of electricity generation of cleaner, flexible thermal plants are positively effected by the transition. The competitiveness of inflexible baseload plants falls as they become more expensive than renewables. Lignite and nuclear power turns out to be unsuited to supplement renewable energy: a future exit reduces the average costs of electricity generation from conventional plants.

  12. The future of the chemical industries

    SciTech Connect

    Shinnar, R.

    1991-01-01

    As Lincoln, we first must ask where we are before we ask whither. I'd therefore like to define where our industry is and how it got there before we look at the challenges facing us. If we view the chemical and petroleum industries through the glass of macroeconomics, they look very healthy. Let's start with size. Table 1 shows that these two industries each provide about 10% of the total U.S. manufacturing output. This paper shows the fraction of the total GNP contributed by the chemical industry and by the petroleum industry and compares them with total manufacturing. The authors note that total manufacturing grew more slowly than the total GNP, whereas over the last 40 years, the chemical industry grew close to the rate of the GNP. For a large industry, this is the best we can hope for. The chemical industry is one of the very few major industries that has consistently maintained a positive trade balance.

  13. Parallel programming of industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, M; Koniges, A; Simon, H

    1998-07-21

    In the introductory material, we overview the typical MPP environment for real application computing and the special tools available such as parallel debuggers and performance analyzers. Next, we draw from a series of real applications codes and discuss the specific challenges and problems that are encountered in parallelizing these individual applications. The application areas drawn from include biomedical sciences, materials processing and design, plasma and fluid dynamics, and others. We show how it was possible to get a particular application to run efficiently and what steps were necessary. Finally we end with a summary of the lessons learned from these applications and predictions for the future of industrial parallel computing. This tutorial is based on material from a forthcoming book entitled: "Industrial Strength Parallel Computing" to be published by Morgan Kaufmann Publishers (ISBN l-55860-54).

  14. Translational informatics: an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Michael N

    2012-01-01

    Translational informatics (TI) is extremely important for the pharmaceutical industry, especially as the bar for regulatory approval of new medications is set higher and higher. This paper will explore three specific areas in the drug development lifecycle, from tools developed by precompetitive consortia to standardized clinical data collection to the effective delivery of medications using clinical decision support, in which TI has a major role to play. Advancing TI will require investment in new tools and algorithms, as well as ensuring that translational issues are addressed early in the design process of informatics projects, and also given higher weight in funding or publication decisions. Ultimately, the source of translational tools and differences between academia and industry are secondary, as long as they move towards the shared goal of improving health. PMID:22237867

  15. Hepatocellular carcinoma and industrial epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Braillon, Alain; Dubois, Gérard

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, the burden of the non viral causes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is usually underestimated. Clearly industrial goods, tobacco, alcohol and processed foods are the agents of new epidemics in modern times which far outscore the burden of infectious agents on morbidity and mortality. Smoking, a dose-related contributing factor for HCC, receives too little attention in clinical practice. In France, tobacco, hepatitis B and C virus and alcohol are the main risk factors for HCC mortality (33%, 31% and 26%, respectively). In developing countries, where tobacco consumption is dramatically increasing, this epidemic may soon surpass hepatitis B. Obesity and diabetes are the contributing factors too. The role of industrial processed foods in the increase of the prevalence of obesity and diabetes cannot be ignored. PMID:21734811

  16. Industrial use of immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    DiCosimo, Robert; McAuliffe, Joseph; Poulose, Ayrookaran J; Bohlmann, Gregory

    2013-08-01

    Although many methods for enzyme immobilization have been described in patents and publications, relatively few processes employing immobilized enzymes have been successfully commercialized. The cost of most industrial enzymes is often only a minor component in overall process economics, and in these instances, the additional costs associated with enzyme immobilization are often not justified. More commonly the benefit realized from enzyme immobilization relates to the process advantages that an immobilized catalyst offers, for example, enabling continuous production, improved stability and the absence of the biocatalyst in the product stream. The development and attributes of several established and emerging industrial applications for immobilized enzymes, including high-fructose corn syrup production, pectin hydrolysis, debittering of fruit juices, interesterification of food fats and oils, biodiesel production, and carbon dioxide capture are reviewed herein, highlighting factors that define the advantages of enzyme immobilization. PMID:23436023

  17. Industry Perspective on Alopecia Areata.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Amanda T

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the autoimmune basis of alopecia areata provide an opportunity to create novel effective pharmaceutical interventions. The current lack of approved therapies for alopecia areata presents a high unmet medical need, as well as a potentially attractive market opportunity. From an industry perspective, achieving clinical proof of concept (PoC) gates investments into larger approval studies. Recent investigator-initiated experience suggests that it may be possible to demonstrate rigorous PoC for new therapies in an attractive time frame with relatively fewer patients than were believed necessary in the past. However, the lack of prior regulatory approval precedent for pharmaceuticals to treat alopecia areata poses significant development challenges, and early interaction with the FDA and other stakeholders will be critically important in evaluating the path to approval and reimbursement for new treatments for this indication. This paper presents a brief industry perspective on the potential development of new alopecia areata therapeutics. PMID:26551953

  18. Health Care Becomes an Industry

    PubMed Central

    Rastegar, Darius A.

    2004-01-01

    The delivery of health care is in the process of “industrialization” in that it is undergoing changes in the organization of work which mirror those that began in other industries a century ago. This process is characterized by an increasing division of labor, standardization of roles and tasks, the rise of a managerial superstructure, and the degradation (or de-skilling) of work. The consolidation of the health care industry, the fragmentation of physician roles, and the increasing numbers of nonphysician clinicians will likely accelerate this process. Although these changes hold the promise of more efficient and effective health care, physicians should be concerned about the resultant loss of autonomy, disruption of continuity of care, and the potential erosion of professional values. PMID:15053287

  19. Advanced glossmeters for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuivalainen, Kalle; Oksman, Antti; Juuti, Mikko; Myller, Kari; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we present three new types of diffractive-optical-element (DOE)-based glossmeters (DOGs) that have been developed for both laboratory and online local specular gloss measurements of objects in industrial processes. The three are denoted as the handheld wireless glossmeter, µDOG two-dimensional (2D) and µDOG one-dimensional (1D), respectively. These glossmeters are designed to operate under conditions where gloss measurement with conventional glossmeters is impossible or difficult, or when fine structures of the gloss over a surface are an issue. Here, we show the applicability of the handheld glossmeter and µDOG 2D in the inspection of gloss from rough stainless steel plates finished by different machining methods. We also briefly introduce the concept of online gauge µDOG 1D for gloss assessment in industrial measurement environments.

  20. Biotechnology in the wood industry.

    PubMed

    Mai, C; Kües, U; Militz, H

    2004-02-01

    Wood is a natural, biodegradable and renewable raw material, used in construction and as a feedstock in the paper and wood product industries and in fuel production. Traditionally, biotechnology found little attention in the wood product industries, apart from in paper manufacture. Now, due to growing environmental concern and increasing scientific knowledge, legal restrictions to conventional processes have altered the situation. Biotechnological approaches in the area of wood protection aim at enhancing the treatability of wood with preservatives and replacing chemicals with biological control agents. The substitution of conventional chemical glues in the manufacturing of board materials is achieved through the application of fungal cultures and isolated fungal enzymes. Moreover, biotechnology plays an important role in the waste remediation of preservative-treated waste wood. PMID:12937955

  1. Translational informatics: an industry perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Translational informatics (TI) is extremely important for the pharmaceutical industry, especially as the bar for regulatory approval of new medications is set higher and higher. This paper will explore three specific areas in the drug development lifecycle, from tools developed by precompetitive consortia to standardized clinical data collection to the effective delivery of medications using clinical decision support, in which TI has a major role to play. Advancing TI will require investment in new tools and algorithms, as well as ensuring that translational issues are addressed early in the design process of informatics projects, and also given higher weight in funding or publication decisions. Ultimately, the source of translational tools and differences between academia and industry are secondary, as long as they move towards the shared goal of improving health. PMID:22237867

  2. Optimization in the airline industry

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhart, C.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, we discuss applications of operations research techniques in the airline industry. Specifically, we present models and solution procedures for crew scheduling, fleet assignment and service design. The crew scheduling problem involves the assignment of crews to scheduled flights, and the fleet assignment problem involves the assignment of aircraft to flights. Service design requires the determination of both the flight schedule and the fleet assignment. We summarize our computational experiences in solving various problems for large domestic and international airlines.

  3. Industrial applications of neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Felcher, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron diffraction (or, to be more general, neutron scattering) is a most versatile and universal tool, which has been widely employed to probe the structure, the dynamics and the magnetism of condensed matter. Traditionally used for fundamental research in solid state physics, this technique more recently has been applied to problems of immediate industrial interest, as illustrated in examples covering the main fields of endeavour. 14 refs., 14 figs.

  4. Industrial Materials Processing Laser Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Followwill, Dorman

    1989-03-01

    The way I would like to handle this morning is first, to give you an overview before I put anything up in terms of slides. An overview of the study that we produced a couple of months ago. It is entitled "Industrial Materials Processing Laser Markets", and if you want information on that particular study, then you can speak with me at the coffee break.

  5. California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; RafaelFriedmann; Rufo, Mike

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the modeling approach andhighlights key findings of a California industrial energy efficiencypotential study. In addition to providing estimates of technical andeconomic potential, the study examines achievable program potential undervarious program-funding scenarios. The focus is on electricity andnatural gas savings for manufacturing in the service territories ofCalifornia's investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The assessment is conductedby industry type and by end use. Both crosscutting technologies andindustry-specific process measures are examined. Measure penetration intothe marketplace is modeled as a function of customer awareness, measurecost effectiveness, and perceived market barriers. Data for the studycomes from a variety of sources, including: utility billing records, theEnergy Information Association (EIA) Manufacturing Energy ConsumptionSurvey (MECS), state-sponsored avoided cost studies, energy efficiencyprogram filings, and technology savings and cost data developed throughLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The study identifies 1,706GWh and 47 Mth (million therms) per year of achievable potential over thenext twelve years under recent levels of program expenditures, accountingfor 5.2 percent of industrial electricity consumption and 1.3 percent ofindustrial natural gas consumption. These estimates grow to 2,748 GWh and192 Mth per year if all cost-effective and achievable opportunities arepursued. Key industrial electricity end uses, in terms of energy savingspotential, include compressed air and pumping systems that combine toaccount for about half of the total achievable potential estimates. Fornatural gas, savings are concentrated in the boiler and process heatingend uses, accounting for over 99 percent to total achievablepotential.

  6. Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2005-09-01

    The Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis (PDF 347 KB) identifies opportunities for developing advanced technologies and estimates both the necessary funding and the potential payoff. This analysis determines what portion of the energy bandwidth can be captured through the adoption of state-of-the-art technology and practices. R&D opportunities for addressing the remainder of the bandwidth are characterized and plotted on a marginal opportunity curve.

  7. Tobacco and the movie industry.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Annemarie; Glantz, Stanton A

    2006-01-01

    Despite the tobacco industry's voluntary restrictions and its agreement with the state attorneys general prohibiting direct and indirect cigarette marketing to youth and paid product placement, tobacco use remains prevalent in movies. Extensive research provides strong and consistent evidence that smoking in the movies promotes smoking. This article summarizes the evidence on the nature and effect of smoking in the movies on adolescents (and others) and proposes several solutions to reduce adolescent exposure to movie smoking and subsequent smoking. PMID:16446255

  8. The pregnant woman in industry.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, W D

    1976-07-01

    The intent of this paper is to relate current thought in proper perspective to the mounting concern for the pregnant woman in industry. Embryo toxicology may demonstrate a need for lowered standards of exposure for the woman worker during a pregnancy. Lastly, a plan is offered to obtain data for comparison of female work populations which may or may not be exposed to certain, primarily airborn, contaminants. PMID:961601

  9. Furnace for treating industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, T.D.

    1982-08-31

    A furnace for treating sewage sludge, ash from municipal incinerators or other industrial wastes by melting the waste with a high-temperature bed formed from a combustible carbonaceous material for the reuse of the resulting molten product, for example, as aggregate. A gas for combustion is supplied to the bed at an intermediate portion between its upper and lower portions while causing the resulting combustion gas to flow through the bed dividedly upward and downward.

  10. Astronautics Degrees for Space Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruntman, M.; Brodsky, R.; Erwin, D.; Kunc, J.

    The Astronautics Program (http://astronautics.usc.edu) of the University of Southern California (USC) offers a full set of undergraduate and graduate degree programs in Aerospace Engineering with emphasis in Astronautics. The Bachelor of Science degree program in Astronautics combines basic science and engineering classes with specialized astronautics classes. The Master of Science degree program in Astronautics offers classes in various areas of space technology. The Certificate in Astronautics targets practicing engineers and scientists who enter space-related fields and/or who want to obtain training in specific space-related areas. Many specialized graduate classes are taught by adjunct faculty working at the leading space companies. The Master of Science degree and Certificate are available through the USC Distance Education Network (DEN). Today, the Internet allows us to reach students anywhere in the world through webcasting. The majority of our graduate students, as well as those pursuing the Certificate, work full time as engineers in the space industry and government research and development centers. The new world of distance learning presents new challenges and opens new opportunities. We show how the transformation of distance learning and particularly the introduction of webcasting transform organization of the program and class delivery. We will describe in detail the academic focus of the program, student reach, and structure of program components. Program development is illustrated by the student enrollment dynamics and related industrial trends; the lessons learned emphasize the importance of feedback from the students and from the space industry.

  11. Accrediting industrial safety training programs

    SciTech Connect

    Beitel, L.

    1992-01-01

    There are job-specific training requirements established by regulations that Impose stringent training requirements on a contractor, for example, the Occupational Safety Health Act (OSHA). Failure to comply with OSHA training requirements can result in severe penalties being levied against a company. Although an accredited training program is expensive, it is a possible solution for minimizing risks associated with job-specific training requirements for employees. Operating DOE contractors direct approximately 10 percent of the operating funds toward training activities. Training needs for contractors span a broad range, from requirements awareness training for managers, to general training required on a one-time basis for all employees, to highly specialized training programs for employees involved In clean-up operations at hazardous waste sites. With this kind of an investment in training, it is logical to maximize the most return on an investment of training funds and to limit exposure to liability suits whenever possible. This presentation will provide an overview of accredited industrial safety programs. The criteria for accredited industrial safety programs will be defined. The question of whether accredited training programs are necessary will be examined. Finally, advantages and disadvantages will be identified for accrediting industrial safety training programs.

  12. Accrediting industrial safety training programs

    SciTech Connect

    Beitel, L.

    1992-12-31

    There are job-specific training requirements established by regulations that Impose stringent training requirements on a contractor, for example, the Occupational Safety & Health Act (OSHA). Failure to comply with OSHA training requirements can result in severe penalties being levied against a company. Although an accredited training program is expensive, it is a possible solution for minimizing risks associated with job-specific training requirements for employees. Operating DOE contractors direct approximately 10 percent of the operating funds toward training activities. Training needs for contractors span a broad range, from requirements awareness training for managers, to general training required on a one-time basis for all employees, to highly specialized training programs for employees involved In clean-up operations at hazardous waste sites. With this kind of an investment in training, it is logical to maximize the most return on an investment of training funds and to limit exposure to liability suits whenever possible. This presentation will provide an overview of accredited industrial safety programs. The criteria for accredited industrial safety programs will be defined. The question of whether accredited training programs are necessary will be examined. Finally, advantages and disadvantages will be identified for accrediting industrial safety training programs.

  13. Biomonitoring for the photovoltaics industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholc, N.M.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1995-07-01

    Biomonitoring often is used as a method for estimating the dose to an individual. Therefore, a parameter of measurement, or biomarkers must be identified. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of biomonitoring protocols for metals used in the photovoltaics industry. Special attention is given to areas that often are skimmed over, to gain insights into some of the problems that may arise when these tasks are carried out. Biological monitoring can be used to determine current human exposures to chemicals, as well as to detect past exposures, and the effects that these exposures may have on human health. It is used in conjunction with environmental monitoring to describe more completely worker`s exposures to, and absorption of, chemicals in the workplace. Biological specimens (e.g., blood, hair or urine) are analyzed for chemical agents, metabolites, or for some specific effect on the person (Lowry 1994). Biomonitoring can assess a workers exposure to industrial chemicals by all routes including skin absorption and ingestion. Although the methodology still is in its infancy, in cases where the procedures have been developed, it can be an invaluable component of an ongoing program of industrial hygiene monitoring. Like any technology, there are limitations to its effectiveness because of a lack of knowledge, contamination of specimens, and the introduction of errors.

  14. Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook.

    SciTech Connect

    Electrotek Concepts.

    1995-03-01

    Power factor is a way of measuring the percentage of reactive power in an electrical system. Reactive power represents wasted energy--electricity that does no useful work because the electrical current is out of phase with the voltage. Reactive power is used by inductive loads (such as, motors, transformers, fluorescent lights, arc welders and induction furnaces) to sustain their magnetic fields. Electric systems with many motors exhibit low power factors, increased conductor and transformer losses, and lower voltages. Utilities must supply both active and reactive power and compensate for these losses. Power factor can be improved by the addition of shunt capacitors. Capacitors act in opposition to inductive loads, thereby minimizing the reactive power required to serve them. In raising the power factor, shunt capacitors release energy to the system, reduce system losses, and ultimately decrease power costs. Improving system power factor can reduce reactive and active power losses for both industry and utilities through the addition of shunt capacitors. This Guide Book gives electric utility technical staff, industrial end-users, consultants and BPA employees a step-by-step method for evaluating the cost effectiveness of installing power factor correction capacitors in an industrial plant.

  15. What is industry's deepwater capability

    SciTech Connect

    Hammett, D.

    1980-11-01

    Industry now has drilled many wells in water depths of from 2000 to 5000 ft offshore countries like Canada, Surinam, Australia, UK, Spain, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Gabon, Brazil, Mauritania, Indonesia, Morocco and Ireland. The US has the world's best technology and the world's best experience and most of the world's proven deepwater drilling equipment and contractors are in the US. However, the US has not released for exploration its deepwater areas. The OCS out to 600+ ft is being exlored in a routine manner by mobile, bottom-supported and floating drilling equipment. The continental slope (600 to 5000 ft.) is being explored by the special deepwater floating drilling units. The continental rise (5000 to 13,000 ft.) is industry's next objective for exploration. The technology and experience used in exploration drilling is applied to producing oil/gas in deepwater. Production is handled by a floating platform resembling a semi drilling rig with a production riser substituting for the drilling riser. Industry takes small, steady steps to develop its techniques for drilling and producing. (DP)

  16. Industrial jet noise: Coanda nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Halliwell, N. A.

    1985-04-01

    Within the U.K. manufacturing industries noise from industrial jets ranks third as a major contributor to industrial deafness. Noise control is hindered because use is made of the air once it has exuded from the nozzle exit. Important tasks include swarf removal, paint spreading, cooling, etc. Nozzles which employ the Coanda effect appear to offer the possibility of significant noise reduction whilst maintaining high thrust efficiency when compared with the commonly used simple open pipe or ordinary convergent nozzle. In this paper the performance of Coanda-type nozzles is examined in detail and an index rating for nozzle performance is introduced. Results show that far field stagnation pressure distributions are Gaussian and similar in all cases with a dispersion coefficient σ = 0·64. Noise reduction and thrust efficiency are shown to be closely related to the design geometry of the central body of the nozzle. Performance is based on four fundamental characteristics, these being the noise level at 1 m from the exit and at a 90° station to the nozzle axis, and the thrust on a chosen profile, the noise reduction and the thrust efficiency. Physically, performance is attributed to flow near field effects where, although all nozzles are choked, shock cell associated noise is absent.

  17. Microbial Cellulases and Their Industrial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kuhad, Ramesh Chander; Gupta, Rishi; Singh, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Microbial cellulases have shown their potential application in various industries including pulp and paper, textile, laundry, biofuel production, food and feed industry, brewing, and agriculture. Due to the complexity of enzyme system and immense industrial potential, cellulases have been a potential candidate for research by both the academic and industrial research groups. Nowadays, significant attentions have been devoted to the current knowledge of cellulase production and the challenges in cellulase research especially in the direction of improving the process economics of various industries. Scientific and technological developments and the future prospects for application of cellulases in different industries are discussed in this paper. PMID:21912738

  18. The relationship between industry and surgery.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kevin C; Kotsis, Sandra V; Berger, Richard A; Van Ummersen, Gordon

    2011-08-01

    This article examines industry's involvement in medicine, particularly with respect to surgeons and clinical research, as well as continuing medical education. We describe some historical events involving industry and how these events have led to guidelines by various organizations to handle conflicts of interest. We also review the advantages and disadvantages of collaborating with industry and provide practical guides for interactions with industry in terms of clinical research, continuing medical education, and clinical practice. With careful consideration to protect all parties involved, collaboration with industry can be advantageous to surgeons, industry, and patients. PMID:21664768

  19. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE. CHAPTER 10. THE PLASTICS AND RESINS PRODUCTION INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents a detailed analysis of the plastics and resins production industry, which includes operations that convert industrial organic chemicals into solid or liquid polymers. Elements of the analysis include an industry definition, raw materials, products and manufact...

  20. Family planning in industrial units.

    PubMed

    1970-01-01

    The Family Planning Association of Pakistan conducted a survey of existing Family Planning Services in industrial units in cooperation with the Government of Pakistan, Family Planning Division. In East Pakistan the Association in cooperation with the Family Planning Council selected 3 areas for this survey, in Khulna a Jute Mill, in Sylhet a Tea Estate, and in Naryangnaj (a suburb of Dacca), a cotton mill. The purpose of the survey was to ascertain the extent of the knowledge, attitude, and practice of family planning in an industrial sample in the context of the national family planning program. A further objective was to explore the possibilities of establishing family planning motivational centers in industrial units. This was the first study of its kind undertaken in Pakistan. Monogamy is the practice among the industrial laborers. 83.99% of the respondents married once only, and 97.4% have 1 wife currently with them. The mean number of years of married life is 12.88 years. The estimated mean age of all respondents is 37.2 years. At present the mean number of living children is 4.08, 2.13 boys and 1.95 girls. The desired number of children is 4.35, 1.76 girls and 2.59 boys. 69.98% of the respondents have knowledge of family planning, and level of education is closely associated. Vasectomy is the best known method followed by tubal ligation. Of the 1349 respondents, 735 or 55.97% were in favor of family planning. Only 54 persons or 4% are currently using family planning methods. It is clear from the survey that a great number of laborers are aware of the family planning program. They are also aware of the family planning methods, their uses, and their necessity. On the basis of the findings the establishment of motivational centers with full family planning services in 3 industrial units is recommended. Registration of the eligible couples for easy identification for giving family planning services and follow-ups is also recommended, and it is suggested that there be continual follow-up studies. PMID:12332197

  1. Industrial Crafts (Production.) Industrial Arts, Senior High--Level II. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claus, Robert; And Others

    This course guide for an industrial crafts course is one of four developed for the production area in the North Dakota senior high industrial arts education program. (Eight other guides are available for two other areas of Industrial Arts--energy/power and graphic communications.) Part 1 provides such introductory information as a definition and

  2. Foundations for Excellence in the Chemical Process Industries. Voluntary Industry Standards for Chemical Process Industries Technical Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstader, Robert; Chapman, Kenneth

    This document discusses the Voluntary Industry Standards for Chemical Process Industries Technical Workers Project and issues of relevance to the education and employment of chemical laboratory technicians (CLTs) and process technicians (PTs). Section 1 consists of the following background information: overview of the chemical process industries,…

  3. Industrial Crafts (Production.) Industrial Arts, Senior High--Level II. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claus, Robert; And Others

    This course guide for an industrial crafts course is one of four developed for the production area in the North Dakota senior high industrial arts education program. (Eight other guides are available for two other areas of Industrial Arts--energy/power and graphic communications.) Part 1 provides such introductory information as a definition and…

  4. Industrial Growth Showing Concern for the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, William

    1993-01-01

    Reports on the work of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization. Describes three technical projects that encourage environmentally sound industrial development in 160 nations. Provides information for teachers to obtain instructional resources on this topic. (CFR)

  5. Opportunities in a high-tech industry

    SciTech Connect

    Balzhiser, R.E. )

    1988-01-01

    The author discusses challenges in the electric service industry. This paper focuses on four areas of proposed opportunity: superconductivity, power electronics, electric vehicles, and clean power generation. An overview of the history of the electric service industry is also presented.

  6. Strategic analysis of the industry for '93.

    PubMed

    1992-09-01

    Continued industry consolidation and head-to-head competition, especially among large industrial companies is expected once again for 1993. Industry growth exceeding gross domestic product (GDP) also should continue. Although much of the industry experienced recession-imposed margin pressures during the past year, the low-inflation economy is providing a positive environment for improved profitability. The industry's core customer base continues to be stable. In fact, six of those industries--health and medical services, telecommunication services, communications, motor vehicles and parts, travel/transportation services, and food and related products--are among the top 12 U.S. industries picked for growth. TRSA's Long Range Planning Committee and association staff have developed this strategic analysis of the industry to help member companies develop their own action plans. PMID:10121719

  7. An Alternative for Industrial Arts: Communication Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, George R., Jr.; Ritz, John M.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a rationale for including the study of communication technology as a part of the general education process in industrial arts. Analyzes communication technology and suggests methods of implementing the technology in industrial arts. (CSS)

  8. 2008 Industrial Technologies Market Report, May 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Energetics; DOE

    2009-07-01

    The industrial sector is a critical component of the U.S. economy, providing an array of consumer, transportation, and national defense-related goods we rely on every day. Unlike many other economic sectors, however, the industrial sector must compete globally for raw materials, production, and sales. Though our homes, stores, hospitals, and vehicles are located within our borders, elements of our goods-producing industries could potentially be moved offshore. Keeping U.S. industry competitive is essential to maintaining and growing the U.S. economy. This report begins with an overview of trends in industrial sector energy use. The next section of the report focuses on some of the largest and most energy-intensive industrial subsectors. The report also highlights several emerging technologies that could transform key segments of industry. Finally, the report presents policies, incentives, and drivers that can influence the competitiveness of U.S. industrial firms.

  9. Gypsum: A School-Industry Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, P. F.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes the British Gypsum, a school-industry science project, designed to link the school with local industry. Teaching strategy, some experiments, and evaluation of the project are also included. (HM)

  10. Second Symposium on Space Industrialization. [space commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jernigan, C. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The policy, legal, and economic aspects of space industrialization are considered along with satellite communications, material processing, remote sensing, and the role of space carriers and a space station in space industrialization.

  11. Environmental Education for Industrial Arts Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Arthur E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Examining the role industrial arts should play in environmental education, this article describes (1) school projects related to environmental education, (2) industrial pollution, and (3) reference materials available in the area of environmental education. (LRA)

  12. The Proper Study of Industrial Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higham, T. M.

    1979-01-01

    The experiences of a company that employed industrial psychologists are discussed with specific reference to the psychologists' involvement in placement and recruiting. Industrial psychology that uses a humanistic approach is viewed as beneficial for both employer and employee. (BH)

  13. An Open Letter to American Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schimmels, Cliff

    1985-01-01

    Citing the rising frequency of automobile recalls as proof of the decline of the automobile industry, this article humorously proposes six suggestions for reforming the industry. The suggestions are remarkably similar to recent proposals for the reform of schooling. (PGD)

  14. Chemistry in the 1980's: Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstacker, Carl A.

    1979-01-01

    Focuses on the problems facing the chemical industry during the decade ahead. Government regulations, political activity by the industry, environmental concerns of the public, research and development, and competition are the major concerns discussed. (SA)

  15. Industrial and Systems Engineering Applications in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivers, Charles H.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the many applications of Industrial and Systems Engineering used for safe NASA missions is shown. The topics include: 1) NASA Information; 2) Industrial Engineering; 3) Systems Engineering; and 4) Major NASA Programs.

  16. Schooling in a Post-Industrial Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doll, William, E. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Explores the coming post-industrial society for its possible effects on the education-schooling syndrome we now have. Emphasizes the sociological writings of the "father" of post-industrialism, Daniel Bell. (Author/RK)

  17. Program Guides Students on Industry Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes efforts by the Younger Chemists Committee of the American Chemical Society to bridge the gap between university and industry so that college students are familiarized with expectations of business and industry. (CP)

  18. Buckminster Fuller Reflects on Industry and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrem, William A.

    1983-01-01

    Fuller offers insights into the meanings of industry and technology and how they have acquired undeserved connotations. He examines capitalism, enterprise, and integrity as exemplified by Henry Ford and the consequences of the current lack of integrity in industry. (SK)

  19. BARREL AND DRUM RECONDITIONING INDUSTRY STATUS PROFILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is an industry profile of drum reconditioning process characteristics and the current status of pollutant generation and disposal. An overview of the reconditioning industry describes number, location, and types of facilities, and estimates the volumes of drums proces...

  20. Has branding failed the utility industry?

    SciTech Connect

    Brew, A.; Phelps, L.

    1998-11-01

    Some flawed, and now discredited, experiments have thrown a shadow over the value of branding in the utility industry. But brands do have power in the energy industry, if they are well conceived and their execution is well supported. Branding has been enthusiastically embraced by those industries that are bearing the brunt of regulatory and technological changes. At the forefront of these are the telecommunications, airlines, financial services, and power utilities industries.

  1. Conservation and renewable energy technologies for industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-10-01

    This publication presents current efforts by the US DOE Office of Industrial Technologies to increase national end-use efficiency and promote renewable energy use in industrial applications. This also entails reducing industrial and municipal waste and the associated environmental impacts and hazards. The transfer of research results to commercial practice in such industries as petroleum refining, chemicals, primary metals, pulp and paper, food, and textiles is a vital step in energy conservation.

  2. Industrial Hygiene Laboratory accreditation: The JSC experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fadner, Dawn E.

    1993-01-01

    The American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) is a society of professionals dedicated to the health and safety of workers and community. With more than 10,000 members, the AIHA is the largest international association serving occupational and environmental health professionals practicing industrial hygiene in private industry, academia, government, labor, and independent organizations. In 1973, AIHA developed a National Industrial Hygiene Laboratory Accreditation Program. The purposes of this program are shown.

  3. Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Industrial Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Brian K.

    2010-08-01

    The document provides a methodology to estimate unmetered industrial water use for evaporative cooling systems, steam generating boiler systems, batch process applications, and wash systems. For each category standard mathematical relationships are summarized and provided in a single resource to assist Federal agencies in developing an initial estimate of their industrial water use. The approach incorporates industry norms, general rules of thumb, and industry survey information to provide methodologies for each section.

  4. Human Settlements, Energy, and Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Michael J.; Gupta, Sujata; Jauregui, Ernesto; Nwafor, James; Satterthwaite, David; Wanasinghe, Yapa; Wilbanks, Thomas; Yoshino, Masatoshi; Kelkar, Ulka

    2001-01-15

    Human settlements are integrators of many of the climate impacts initially felt in other sectors, and differ from each other in geographic location, size, economic circumstances, and political and social capacity. The most wide-spread serious potential impact is flooding and landslides, followed by tropical cyclones. A growing literature suggests that a very wide variety of settlements in nearly every climate zone may be affected, although the specific evidence is still very limited. Settlements with little economic diversification and where a high percentage of incomes derive from climate sensitive primary resource industries (agriculture, forestry and fisheries) are more sensitive than more diversified settlements

  5. Industrial Pleuropulmonary Disorders: Radiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garland, L. Henry

    1965-01-01

    Industrial pleuropulmonary disorders may result from exposure of the human respiratory tract to diverse types of dusts and fumes, visible and invisible, benign and toxic, organic and inorganic. Meticulous radiological examination, combined with history and physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, and the exclusion of other disorders which could produce similar changes, is essential for correct diagnosis. Criteria for the radiological diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis, of generalized emphysema, and of cor pulmonale are outlined. The commoner types of pneumoconiosis are discussed in some detail, and the possible relationship of various inhaled noxa to primary bronchial carcinoma is considered. PMID:14288143

  6. Titanium fasteners. [for aircraft industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Titanium fasteners are used in large quantities throughout the aircraft industry. Most of this usage is in aluminum structure; where titanium structure exists, titanium fasteners are logically used as well. Titanium fasteners offer potential weight savings to the designer at a cost of approximately $30 per pound of weight saved. Proper and least cost usage must take into consideration type of fastener per application, galvanic couples and installation characteristics of protective coatings, cosmetic appearance, paint adhesion, installation forces and methods available and fatigue performance required.

  7. Industrial safety glasses -- an update.

    PubMed

    Sherr, A E

    1980-02-01

    A review is presented of recent significant developments in industrial protective eyewear. Many of these developments apply to everyday practice. The new plastic protective, prescription, and plano lenses are discussed, and their merits presented. Needs for protection in the ultraviolet and near-infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum are described. It is shown that such spectral protection is now available in plastic lenses, but care must be taken to insure that the plastic has the required ultraviolet and near-infrared absorption. Eye protection standards have been improved. Specific changes in the standards are discussed. PMID:7372974

  8. Liposome Technology for Industrial Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andreas; Vorauer-Uhl, Karola

    2011-01-01

    Liposomes, spherical vesicles consisting of one or more phospholipid bilayers, were first described in the mid 60s by Bangham and coworkers. Since then, liposomes have made their way to the market. Today, numerous lab scale but only a few large-scale techniques are available. However, a lot of these methods have serious limitations in terms of entrapment of sensitive molecules due to their exposure to mechanical and/or chemical stress. This paper summarizes exclusively scalable techniques and focuses on strengths, respectively, limitations in respect to industrial applicability. An additional point of view was taken to regulatory requirements concerning liposomal drug formulations based on FDA and EMEA documents. PMID:21490754

  9. Industry as a metabolic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Smart, B

    1992-01-01

    The concept of "industrial economic metabolism" can provide a bridge to better understanding between environmentalists and industry. In nature each individual or species reacts to natural stimuli, competing with others for resources, extending its domain until it loses comparative advantage and comes to equilibrium with an adjacent competitor. Those species that succeed over time flourish; those that do not, diminish or disappear. Nature's rule book has no moral or ethical ingredient beyond self-interest. Corporate metabolisms are remarkably similar to those of nature. They too react to stimuli, collect and use resources, and grow or perish based on how effectively they compete. Corporate management recognizes and responds naturally and efficiently to cost and price signals. Through them it selects resources and converts them into useful products. The efficiency with which this is done is measured by profit, the lifeblood of the corporation and its means of growth. Profit thus provides a discipline on corporate behavior, encouraging efficient performers, and, by its absence, weeding out others. Unfettered by influences other than economics, the path to corporate success is unlikely to be a compassionate one. The dilemma of the manager is that to do what is socially "right" often conflicts with what must be done to survive and prosper. Fortunately, corporations' behavior can be altered by society when their purely economic role comes into conflict with other human values. The environment and the economy are not separate systems but intertwined to form a complex natural and social setting. The human-designed economic system depends on natural resource inputs, and in turn its metabolic wastes can overload the ecological system, threatening the long-term survivability of both. Increasing concern for the environment now gives the farsighted manager new latitude. There are competitive benefits in some pollution prevention. But there are not sufficiently strong forces to correct all current ills. In addition, we must harness the metabolism of the industrial world to the realities of the natural one by recognizing the immense value of depletable natural resources and ecosystems. Considering these resources as "cheap" or "free" encourages their overuse. What is needed are adjustments that price these resources at their true longterm value. Corporations will respond naturally, quickly, and efficiently to such signals. If we can send our metabolic industry the economic signals it can understand, we can retrofit our human economic system to live in harmony with the natural ecosystem of which we are a part. If we do not, nature assuredly will not accommodate our failure by changing its ways. PMID:11607256

  10. Design of industrial ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alden, J.L.; Kane, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This latest edition has a title change to reflect an expansion to cover the interrelated areas of general exhaust ventilation and makeup air supply. More coverage is also given the need for energy conservation and for the physical isolation of the workspace from major contaminant generation zones. Excellent and generous illustrative matter is included. Contents, abridged are as follows: flow of fluids; air flow through hoods; pipe resistance; piping design; centrifugal exhaust fans; axial-flow fans; monitoring industrial ventilization systems; isolation; and energy conservation.

  11. Industry as a metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Smart, B

    1992-02-01

    The concept of "industrial economic metabolism" can provide a bridge to better understanding between environmentalists and industry. In nature each individual or species reacts to natural stimuli, competing with others for resources, extending its domain until it loses comparative advantage and comes to equilibrium with an adjacent competitor. Those species that succeed over time flourish; those that do not, diminish or disappear. Nature's rule book has no moral or ethical ingredient beyond self-interest. Corporate metabolisms are remarkably similar to those of nature. They too react to stimuli, collect and use resources, and grow or perish based on how effectively they compete. Corporate management recognizes and responds naturally and efficiently to cost and price signals. Through them it selects resources and converts them into useful products. The efficiency with which this is done is measured by profit, the lifeblood of the corporation and its means of growth. Profit thus provides a discipline on corporate behavior, encouraging efficient performers, and, by its absence, weeding out others. Unfettered by influences other than economics, the path to corporate success is unlikely to be a compassionate one. The dilemma of the manager is that to do what is socially "right" often conflicts with what must be done to survive and prosper. Fortunately, corporations' behavior can be altered by society when their purely economic role comes into conflict with other human values. The environment and the economy are not separate systems but intertwined to form a complex natural and social setting. The human-designed economic system depends on natural resource inputs, and in turn its metabolic wastes can overload the ecological system, threatening the long-term survivability of both. Increasing concern for the environment now gives the farsighted manager new latitude. There are competitive benefits in some pollution prevention. But there are not sufficiently strong forces to correct all current ills. In addition, we must harness the metabolism of the industrial world to the realities of the natural one by recognizing the immense value of depletable natural resources and ecosystems. Considering these resources as "cheap" or "free" encourages their overuse. What is needed are adjustments that price these resources at their true longterm value. Corporations will respond naturally, quickly, and efficiently to such signals. If we can send our metabolic industry the economic signals it can understand, we can retrofit our human economic system to live in harmony with the natural ecosystem of which we are a part. If we do not, nature assuredly will not accommodate our failure by changing its ways. PMID:11607256

  12. INDUSTRIAL INJURIES OF FARM WORKERS

    PubMed Central

    LaTourette, Donald P.

    1957-01-01

    Most industrial employees receive physical examinations to evaluate their physical fitness in relation to their work. The farm worker is neglected in this matter, in that he is hired for almost any type of work without physical evaluation. As a result, his accident rate is high. His efficiency at his work is low. His time loss from work because of sickness and accident is high, and the employer pays a very high rate of insurance for the patient's care and his own legal protection. Physical fitness cards should be carried by all farm laborers so that they would be put in properly graded jobs. PMID:13460719

  13. Holography in an industrial environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. J.; Jones, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    Various applications of holography to mechanical problems are discussed. All major fields where holographic interferometry is applied are considered, including flow visualization, nondestrucive testing, vibration analysis, and holographic contouring, with special attention given to the respective techniques and to the problems encountered and overcome in applying these techniques. The use of high-power pulsed lasers allowed holography to be used routinely in normal component test areas in the industrial environment away from the laboratory. Examples from recent work, including pulsed holography of large vibrating assemblies, holographic vibrometry on rotating components, holographic flow visualization in wind tunnels, and pulsed holography in rotating transonic flows, are presented.

  14. Industry group assails climate chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.

    1996-06-21

    the scientific debate about whether human activity is warming global climate subsided late last year when the world`s leading climate researchers agreed that the answer is probably yes. But recently the political debate heated up by several degrees when an industry group charged that revisions to a crucial chapter in a UN report on climate change violated peer review and amounted to scientific cleansing of doubts about human influences on climate. This article describes the controversy from both points of view - the business group and the scientists involved.

  15. Beef and pork packing industries.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, James M

    2003-07-01

    A remarkable transformation of the meatpacking industry occurred in the last 25 years. That transformation consolidated the industry into one that could deliver large volumes of meat at low costs. Slaughter plants grew much larger and realized economies of scale from their size, and operations within plants were rationalized to emphasize the delivery of a small set of consistent major products (boxed beef, cut-up pork, and by-products) to retailers, wholesalers, and other processors. Similar developments occurred in livestock feeding whereby the industry realized significant cost reductions by consolidating production in very large cattle feedlots and hog farms. Gains from scale have largely been met (absent the development of new technologies that are not yet on the horizon); therefore, we are unlikely to see similar shifts in plant sizes in the next 25 years. The major forces affecting meatpacking and livestock feeding in the near future are more likely to revolve around tighter coordination among livestock production, meatpacking, wholesaling, and retailing. Although much of the recent response to food safety concerns took the form of investments in equipment, testing, and training within meatpacking plants, packers and retailers are likely to focus more on assurance of livestock production quality and methods in the future. Such assurance can be met through vertical integration or through a greater reliance on tightly drawn contracts; producers who attempt to provide the assurance while still selling through cash markets will need to develop paper trails of testing and quality assurance that will move through the marketing chain with livestock. Similarly, because of likely increased future demand for meats of assured consumer qualities, such as organically grown products or branded meat products with very specific traits, producers will likely need to provide similar indicators of assurance throughout the marketing chain. Finally, the funding offered through federal environmental assistance programs such as the USDA's Environmental Quality Incentives Program along with related regulations governing waste management will likely lead to greater control over livestock production practices by investors, financiers, integrators, and packers through contractual design. Shifts toward tighter vertical coordination will force continuing changes in traditional ways of doing business in livestock production and in meatpacking. In turn, public policy discussions and corporate strategies in meatpacking are likely to focus continuing attention on the particulars of contract design: how to meet consumers', retailers', and regulators' requirements for quality assurance while ensuring efficient low-cost production without retarding competition in the industry. PMID:12951741

  16. A Leak Monitor for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    GenCorp Aerojet Industrial Products, Lewis Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Case Western Reserve University developed a gas leak detection system, originally for use with the Space Shuttle propulsion system and reusable launch vehicles. The Model HG200 Automated Gas Leak Detection System has miniaturized sensors that can identify extremely low concentrations of hydrogen without requiring oxygen. A microprocessor-based hardware/software system monitors the sensors and displays the source and magnitude of hydrogen leaks in real time. The system detects trace hydrogen around pipes, connectors, flanges and pressure tanks, and has been used by Ford Motor Company in the production of a natural gas-powered car.

  17. Pollution prevention in electroplating industries

    SciTech Connect

    Altmayer, F.

    1995-09-01

    The electroplating industry utilizes numerous recovery-and-recycle techniques to return a portion or all of the process chemical to the origin. The most commonly practiced pollution prevention option in electroplating is the utilization of drag-out rinses. The typical plater will first evaluate the efficacy of drag-out rinsing; will determine if a viable, less polluting or nonpolluting substitute exists; and will make those changes before investing in recovery-and-recycle equipment. This chapter focuses on the equipment and chemical processes available for a pollution prevention program in electroplating.

  18. Building the electronic industry's roadmaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulton, William R.

    1995-01-01

    JTEC panelists found a strong consistency among the electronics firms they visited: all the firms had clear visions or roadmaps for their research and development activities and had committed resources to ensure that they achieve targeted results. The overarching vision driving Japan's electronics industry is that of achieving market success through developing appealing, high-quality, low-cost consumer goods - ahead of the competition. Specifics of the vision include improving performance, quality, and portability of consumer electronics products. Such visions help Japanese companies define in detail the roadmaps they will follow to develop new and improved electronic packaging technologies.

  19. Industrial Applications of Terahertz Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, J. Axel; Shen, Yao-Chun

    This chapter gives a concise overview of potential industrial applications for terahertz imaging that have been reported over the past decade with a discussion of the major advantages and limitations of each approach. In the second half of the chapter we discuss in more detail how terahertz imaging can be used to investigate the microstructure of pharmaceutical dosage forms. A particular focus in this context is the nondestructive measurement of the coating thickness of polymer coated tablets, both by means of high resolution offline imaging in research and development as well as for in-line quality control during production.

  20. Industry-Supported Team Students' Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glozman, Vladimir

    The industry-supported team students' project enhances professional, intellectual, and personal development of students while addressing the needs of local industry. In addition to achieving academic excellence, the students are exposed to industry requirements, and excel in effective oral communication and cooperative teamwork. The teamwork…

  1. Partnership with Industry: Film Production Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rietveld, Richard; And Others

    The 1988 final report of a task force from the Florida Postsecondary Education Planning Commission stated that in order to ensure continued growth of the motion picture film industry in the state, the postsecondary community must provide a well-trained and competent work force adept in all aspects of the industry. The film industry is a growing…

  2. 29 CFR 779.323 - Particular industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Particular industry. 779.323 Section 779.323 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL... Retail âin the Particular Industryâ § 779.323 Particular industry. In order to determine whether a...

  3. 49 CFR 8.31 - Industrial security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Industrial security. 8.31 Section 8.31.../ACCESS Access to Information § 8.31 Industrial security. (a) Background. The National Industrial Security... classified pursuant to Executive Order 12356 of April 2, 1982, National Security Information, or...

  4. Symposium on Industrial Arts Education, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Delmar W., And Others

    Five papers presented at six California colleges in July of 1968 are presented. "Industrial Arts and Technology" by Delmar W. Olson outlines the bases for a contemporary industrial arts program, its possible purposes, and several elements which need consideration when desiging such a program. "Contemporary Industrial Arts Programs in the United

  5. 49 CFR 173.411 - Industrial packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Industrial packagings. 173.411 Section 173.411... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.411 Industrial packagings. (a) General. Each industrial packaging must comply with the requirements of this section which specifies packaging tests,...

  6. Programmed Learning in Integrated Industrial Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirley-Smith, Katalin

    Beginning with the system of industrial training boards and other background considerations, this British work gives detailed, practical guidance on applying programed instruction (PI) principles in various job functions and industries. Potential advantages of PI in industrial training are summarized, along with uses of audiovisual aids and…

  7. Insights into Industry and Technology. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck.

    One of a set of six guides for an industrial arts curriculum at the junior high school level, this guide provides the basic foundation to develop a one-semester course based on the following cluster concept: insights into industry and technology. An overview of industry and technology is provided to serve as an integrator or unifier of industry…

  8. Cooperative Education: Industrial Chemistry in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paige, Harvey L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses reasons for including industrial chemistry into the college chemistry curriculum. One reason is that chemistry students, and students generally, should appreciate the role of the chemical industry in our history, economy, and culture. Problems associated with teaching industrial chemistry are addressed and a British university/industry…

  9. Is Industry Managing Its Wastes Properly?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Industry is faced with handling, disposing and recovering vast amounts of waste, much of it as a result of present pollution control technology. Industry has found the technology available, expensive and, without regulation, easy to ignore. Many industries are therefore improperly managing their wastes. (BT)

  10. Tailoring Continuing Education to Construction Industry Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Harry P.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a regionally oriented continuing education program for people in the construction industry which has been cooperatively developed by representatives from university programs in technology and by industry leaders concerned with regional needs for housing, industrial building, transportation, pollution abatement, and other…

  11. Educating Biotechnicians for Future Industry Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Madeline

    2008-01-01

    How to strengthen technician education to meet the needs of the biotechnology industry was the question before the 50 people who participated in the "Educating Biotechnicians for Future Industry Needs" conference from April 28 to 30 in Scottsdale, Arizona. The participants were from higher education, secondary schools, industry, government, and…

  12. What Are the "Needs of Industry"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasker, Mary; Packham, David

    If the purpose of industry is the good of society or of the planet as a whole, then how does higher education meet the needs of industry, particularly in the United Kingdom? Industry needs a trained work force of high quality recruits who are both educated and morally and environmentally aware. However, in the current debate over moral training,…

  13. Technology Education: Industrial Arts in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Barbara

    During the past 10 years, the field of industrial arts, stimulated by rapid technological changes, has changed its name and its focus to technology education. Industrial arts goals chronicled from the 1920s to the present indicate an increased emphasis on the study of industry and technology, critical consumerism, and the development of…

  14. 49 CFR 8.31 - Industrial security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Industrial security. 8.31 Section 8.31.../ACCESS Access to Information § 8.31 Industrial security. (a) Background. The National Industrial Security... classified pursuant to Executive Order 12356 of April 2, 1982, National Security Information, or...

  15. The Story of the Plastics Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masson, Don, Ed.

    This is an illustrated informative booklet, designed to serve members of the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc., and the plastics industry as a whole. It provides basic information about the industry's history and growth, plastics raw materials, typical uses of plastics, properties, and methods of processing and fabricating. (Author/DS)

  16. Deregulation-restructuring: Evidence for individual industries

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, K.W.; Graniere, R.J.

    1997-05-01

    Several studies have measured the effects of regulation on a particular industry. These studies range widely in sophistication, from simple observation (comparison) of pre-transformation and post-transformation actual industry performance to econometric analysis that attempt to separate the effects of deregulation from other factors in explaining changes in an industry`s performance. The major problem with observation studies is that they are unable to measure the effect of one particular event, such as deregulation, on an industry`s performance. For example, at the same time that the United Kingdom privatized its electric power industry, it also radically restructured the industry to encourage competition and instituted a price-cap mechanism to regulate the prices of transmission, distribution, and bundled retail services. Subsequent to these changes in 1991, real prices for most UK electricity customers have fallen. It is not certain however, which of these factors was most important or even contributed to the decline in price. In any event, one must be cautious in interpreting the results of studies that attempt to measure the effect of deregulation per se for a specific industry. This report highlights major outcomes for five industries undergoing deregulation or major regulatory and restructuring reforms. These include the natural gas, transportation, UK electric power, financial, and telecommunications industries. Particular attention was given to the historical development of events in the telecommunications industry.

  17. Industrial Arts and Space Age Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamm, Colleen P., Ed.

    The 33rd annual American Industrial Arts Association (AIAA) convention was held in Miami in 1971. Topics for the AIAA general session addresses were: (1) "Technology--and a Time of Crisis-II," and (2) "Goals, Accountability, and Action for the Industrial Arts." Twenty-four addresses from sessions of the American Council of Industrial Arts Teacher…

  18. The American Arts Industry: Size and Significance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartrand, Harry Hillman

    In this study, the U.S. arts industry is conceptually defined and measured with respect to statistical size. The contribution and significance of the arts industry to the economy is then assessed within the context of national competitiveness and the emerging knowledge economy. Study findings indicate that the arts industry contributes between 5%…

  19. Connecting with Industry: Bridging the Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Judith

    2008-01-01

    The shifting funding climate in Australian higher education encourages universities to enter into research partnerships with industry. Yet, studies of industries' experiences of their research links with universities are rare. Consequently, research managers often find themselves attempting to promote and facilitate industry engagement with…

  20. What Industry Wants: Employers' Preferences for Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Erica; Kemmis, Ros Brennan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse what retail and hospitality industry employers want from training and trainers. Design/methodology/approach: The research project was undertaken for Service Skills Australia, the Australian Industry Skills Council that oversees formal training for a range of service industries in…