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Sample records for marrow allografts prevention

  1. Induction of tolerance to cardiac allografts in lethally irradiated rats reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Generally, organ grafts from one individual animal to another are rejected in one-two weeks. However, if the recipients are given Total Body Irradiation (TBI) just prior to grafting, followed by reconstitution of hemopoietic function with syngeneic (recipient-type) bone marrow cells, then vascularized organ grafts are permanently accepted. Initially after irradiation, it is possible to induce tolerance to many strain combinations in rats. This thesis examines the system of TBI as applied to the induction of tolerance in LEW recipients of WF cardiac allografts. These two rat strains are mismatched across the entire major histocompatibility complex. When the LEW recipient are given 860 rads, a WF cardiac allograft and LEW bone marrow on the same day, 60% of the grafts are accepted. Methods employed to improve the rate of graft acceptance include: treating either donor or recipient with small amounts of methotrexate, or waiting until two days after irradiation to repopulate with bone marrow. It seems from these investigations of some of the early events in the induction of tolerance to allografts following TBI and syngeneic marrow reconstitution that an immature cell population in the bone marrow interacts with a radioresistant cell population in the spleen to produce tolerance to completely MHC-mismatched allografts.

  2. Articular Cartilage Repair Using Marrow Stimulation Augmented with a Viable Chondral Allograft: 9-Month Postoperative Histological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, James K.; Geraghty, Sandra; Protzman, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Marrow stimulation is frequently employed to treat focal chondral defects of the knee. However, marrow stimulation typically results in fibrocartilage repair tissue rather than healthy hyaline cartilage, which, over time, predisposes the repair to failure. Recently, a cryopreserved viable chondral allograft was developed to augment marrow stimulation. The chondral allograft is comprised of native viable chondrocytes, chondrogenic growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins within the superficial, transitional, and radial zones of hyaline cartilage. Therefore, host mesenchymal stem cells that infiltrate the graft from the underlying bone marrow following marrow stimulation are provided with the optimal microenvironment to undergo chondrogenesis. The present report describes treatment of a trochlear defect with marrow stimulation augmented with this novel chondral allograft, along with nine month postoperative histological results. At nine months, the patient demonstrated complete resolution of pain and improvement in function, and the repair tissue consisted of 85% hyaline cartilage. For comparison, a biopsy obtained from a patient 8.2 months after treatment with marrow stimulation alone contained only 5% hyaline cartilage. These outcomes suggest that augmenting marrow stimulation with the viable chondral allograft can eliminate pain and improve outcomes, compared with marrow stimulation alone. PMID:25628907

  3. Articular cartilage repair using marrow stimulation augmented with a viable chondral allograft: 9-month postoperative histological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, James K; Geraghty, Sandra; Protzman, Nicole M

    2015-01-01

    Marrow stimulation is frequently employed to treat focal chondral defects of the knee. However, marrow stimulation typically results in fibrocartilage repair tissue rather than healthy hyaline cartilage, which, over time, predisposes the repair to failure. Recently, a cryopreserved viable chondral allograft was developed to augment marrow stimulation. The chondral allograft is comprised of native viable chondrocytes, chondrogenic growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins within the superficial, transitional, and radial zones of hyaline cartilage. Therefore, host mesenchymal stem cells that infiltrate the graft from the underlying bone marrow following marrow stimulation are provided with the optimal microenvironment to undergo chondrogenesis. The present report describes treatment of a trochlear defect with marrow stimulation augmented with this novel chondral allograft, along with nine month postoperative histological results. At nine months, the patient demonstrated complete resolution of pain and improvement in function, and the repair tissue consisted of 85% hyaline cartilage. For comparison, a biopsy obtained from a patient 8.2 months after treatment with marrow stimulation alone contained only 5% hyaline cartilage. These outcomes suggest that augmenting marrow stimulation with the viable chondral allograft can eliminate pain and improve outcomes, compared with marrow stimulation alone. PMID:25628907

  4. Enhancement by dimethyl myleran of donor type chimerism in murine recipients of bone marrow allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidot, T.; Terenzi, A.; Singer, T.S.; Salomon, O.; Reisner, Y. )

    1989-05-15

    A major problem in using murine models for studies of bone marrow allograft rejection in leukemia patients is the narrow margin in which graft rejection can be analyzed. In mice irradiated with greater than 9 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) rejection is minimal, whereas after administration of 8 Gy TBI, which spares a significant number of clonable T cells, a substantial frequency of host stem cells can also be detected. In current murine models, unlike in humans, bone marrow allograft rejection is generally associated with full autologous hematopoietic reconstitution. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the myeloablative drug dimethyl myleran (DMM) on chimerism status following transplantation of T cell-depleted allogenic bone marrow (using C57BL/6 donors and C3H/HeJ recipients, conditioned with 8 Gy TBI). Donor type chimerism 1 to 2 months post-transplant of 1 to 3 x 10(6) bone marrow cells was markedly enhanced by using DMM one day after TBI and prior to transplantation. Conditioning with cyclophosphamide instead of DMM, in combination with 8 Gy TBI, did not enhance engraftment of donor type cells. Artificial reconstitution of T cells, after conditioning with TBI plus DMM, by adding mature thymocytes, or presensitization with irradiated donor type spleen cells 1 week before TBI and DMM, led to strong graft rejection and consequently to severe anemia. The anti-donor responses in these models were proportional to the number of added T cells and to the number of cells used for presensitization, and they could be neutralized by increasing the bone marrow inoculum.

  5. Fractionated sublethal total body irradiation and donor bone marrow infusion for induction of specific allograft tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, G.E.; Kimler, B.F.; Thomas, J.H.; Watts, L.M.; Kinnaman, M.L.

    1981-03-01

    Fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (FT-lymphoid-I) plus donor bone marrow (BM) can induce tolerance to skin allografts. In the present study, fractionated total body irradiation (FT-body-I) was studied as an alternative to FT-lymphoid-I. FT-body-I produces less pulmonary and gastrointestinal injury than does single exposure total body irradiation, but because of the decreased capacity of lymphoid tissues to recover from the effects of irradiation between fractions, the effect of FT-body-I on lymphoid cells, when delivered within 24 h, is approximately the same as an equivalent single exposure of total body irradiation. Therefore, FT-body-I, like FT-lymphoid-I, has some selectivity for lymphoid tissues and has the advantage that it can be delivered within the time constraints of ex vivo organ preservation.

  6. Long-term survival of intestinal allografts induced by costimulation blockade, busulfan and donor bone marrow infusion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhong; Wang, Jun; Dong, Ying; Adams, Andrew B; Shirasugi, Nozomu; Kim, Oliver; Hart, John; Newton-West, Marvin; Pearson, Thomas C; Larsen, Christian P; Newell, Kenneth A

    2003-09-01

    Tolerance-inducing strategies that infuse donor bone marrow cells in conjunction with costimulation blockade have not been applied to intestinal transplantation. Intestines from BALB/c mice were transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients treated with anti-CD40L mAb, CTLA4-Ig, donor bone marrow, and busulfan. The majority of mice transplanted after completion of this regimen developed hematopoietic macrochimerism, although the degree of chimerism varied widely between recipients, and experienced long-term allograft survival. T cells from these mice demonstrated donor-specific hyporesponsiveness in vitro. However, T cells from chimeric mice proliferated to donor alloantigen in vivo. Furthermore, chimeric mice bearing intestinal allografts were capable of rejecting subsequently placed donor-strain skin grafts. These data suggest that although long-term allograft survival occurs in the absence of acute or chronic rejection, recipient mice are not completely unresponsive to donor alloantigens. When intestinal transplantation was performed at the time of initial bone marrow infusion (initiation of the chimerism protocol), most recipients failed to develop chimerism and promptly rejected the intestinal allograft. Although this is the most effective protocol that we have tested using this stringent model of transplantation, our observations suggest that modifications will be necessary before it can be reliably applied to the transplantation of highly immunogeneic organs like the intestine. PMID:12919088

  7. Renal Allograft Compartment Syndrome: Is It Possible to Prevent?

    PubMed

    Damiano, G; Maione, C; Maffongelli, A; Ficarella, S; Carmina, L; Buscemi, S; Palumbo, V D; De Luca, S; Spinelli, G; Lo Monte, A I; Buscemi, G

    2016-03-01

    Renal allograft compartment syndrome (RACS) is a complication characterized by increased pressure over 15 to 20 mm Hg of the iliac fossa site of transplanted kidney that can lead to a reduction of the blood supply to the graft, resulting in organ ischemia. This study aims to evaluate, through a review of the literature, the incidence, detection, treatment, and possible prevention of RACS. The incidence of this complication, which appears generally in the immediate post-transplantation period, is currently approximately 1% to 2% and is underestimated because of poor nosography for the presence of symptoms common to other post-transplantation complications. Doppler ultrasound is indispensable to evaluate the graft function in the immediate postoperative period and in the following days. The onset of RACS involves a surgical decompression of the graft and the subsequent closure of the abdominal wall with tension-free technique. Several authors agree that only the immediate surgical decompression following an early diagnosis can ensure a recovery of the graft. Early detection of the RACS is the key to preventing the loss of the graft. It is desirable to prevent this syndrome by reducing the discrepancy in weight between donor and recipient by 17%. However the shortage of organs makes such a selection not easy; therefore, in cases at risk for RACS, a close instrumental and clinical monitoring of the patient during post-transplantation recovery is recommended, so a prompt surgical decompression can be performed if RACS is suspected. PMID:27109951

  8. In vitro allograft irradiation prevents graft-versus-host disease in small-bowel transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.K.; Schraut, W.H.

    1985-04-01

    In small-bowel transplantation, the transfer of large numbers of donor lymphocytes with the intestinal allograft may provoke a lethal graft-versus-host reaction. The effectiveness of allograft irradiation in vitro as a method of preventing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was studied in a rat model of small-bowel transplantation, with the Lewis----Lewis X Brown Norway F1 hybrid strain combination. Cold harvested small-bowel allografts were irradiated immediately prior to heterotopic or orthotopic transplantation. Animals that had received heterotopic allografts irradiated with 0, 250, or 500 rad all died of GVHD after 14.4 +/- 3.0, 15.0 +/- 1.3, and 14.2 +/- 1.9 days, respectively. None of the animals that had received allografts treated with 1000 rad developed clinical or pathologic evidence of GVHD, however, and all survived for more than 6 months (P less than 0.001). Allograft function was studied in animals that underwent orthotopic transplantation. Recipients of nonirradiated orthotopic allografts all died of GVHD after 14.0 +/- 0.7 days, whereas recipients of allografts irradiated with 1000 rad all survived for more than 5 months (P less than 0.001). After 120 days, weight gain (51.8 +/- 11.7%), serum albumin (3.9 +/- 0.7 g/dl), serum triglycerides (67.0 +/- 24.3 mg/dl), CBC, and differential in these animals were not statistically different from those in either age-matched isograft recipients or normal animals, and when the rats were sacrificed, irradiated allografts showed no changes suggestive of radiation injury. These results indicate that irradiation of small-bowel allografts in vitro prevents development of GVHD, and that this can be achieved at a dose which does not cause injury to or malfunction of the allograft.

  9. The effect of bone allografts combined with bone marrow stromal cells on the healing of segmental bone defects in a sheep model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The repair of large bone defects is a major orthopedic challenge because autologous bone grafts are not available in large amounts and because harvesting is often associated with donor-site morbidity. Considering that bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) are responsible for the maintenance of bone turnover throughout life, we investigated bone repair at a site of a critically sized segmental defect in sheep tibia treated with BMSCs loaded onto allografts. The defect was created in the mid-portion of the tibial diaphysis of eight adult sheep, and the sheep were treated with ex-vivo expanded autologous BMSCs isolated from marrow aspirates and loaded onto cortical allografts (n = 4). The treated sheep were compared with control sheep that had been treated with cell-free allografts (n = 4) obtained from donors of the same breed as the receptor sheep. Results The healing response was monitored by radiographs monthly and by computed tomography and histology at six, ten, fourteen, and eighteen weeks after surgery. For the cell-loaded allografts, union was established more rapidly at the interface between the host bone and the allograft, and the healing process was more conspicuous. Remodeling of the allograft was complete at 18 weeks in the cell-treated animals. Histologically, the marrow cavity was reestablished, with intertrabecular spaces being filled with adipose marrow and with evidence of focal hematopoiesis. Conclusions Allografts cellularized with AOCs (allografts of osteoprogenitor cells) can generate great clinical outcomes to noncellularized allografts to consolidate, reshape, structurally and morphologically reconstruct bone and bone marrow in a relatively short period of time. These features make this strategy very attractive for clinical use in orthopedic bioengineering. PMID:24495743

  10. Repair of peripheral nerve defects with chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts loaded with neurotrophic factors-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Ru; Ka, Ka; Zhang, Ge-Chen; Zhang, Hui; Shang, Yan; Zhao, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Wen-Hua

    2015-09-01

    Chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts loaded with brain-derived neurotrophic factor-transfected or ciliary neurotrophic factor-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to repair sciatic nerve injury better than chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts alone, or chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts loaded with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. We hypothesized that these allografts compounded with both brain-derived neurotrophic factor- and ciliary neurotrophic factor-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells may demonstrate even better effects in the repair of peripheral nerve injury. We cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor and/or ciliary neurotrophic factor and used them to treat sciatic nerve injury in rats. We observed an increase in sciatic functional index, triceps wet weight recovery rate, myelin thickness, number of myelinated nerve fibers, amplitude of motor-evoked potentials and nerve conduction velocity, and a shortened latency of motor-evoked potentials when allografts loaded with both neurotrophic factors were used, compared with allografts loaded with just one factor. Thus, the combination of both brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can greatly improve nerve injury. PMID:26604913

  11. Repair of peripheral nerve defects with chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts loaded with neurotrophic factors-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-ru; Ka, Ka; Zhang, Ge-chen; Zhang, Hui; Shang, Yan; Zhao, Guo-qiang; Huang, Wen-hua

    2015-01-01

    Chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts loaded with brain-derived neurotrophic factor-transfected or ciliary neurotrophic factor-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to repair sciatic nerve injury better than chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts alone, or chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts loaded with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. We hypothesized that these allografts compounded with both brain-derived neurotrophic factor- and ciliary neurotrophic factor-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells may demonstrate even better effects in the repair of peripheral nerve injury. We cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor and/or ciliary neurotrophic factor and used them to treat sciatic nerve injury in rats. We observed an increase in sciatic functional index, triceps wet weight recovery rate, myelin thickness, number of myelinated nerve fibers, amplitude of motor-evoked potentials and nerve conduction velocity, and a shortened latency of motor-evoked potentials when allografts loaded with both neurotrophic factors were used, compared with allografts loaded with just one factor. Thus, the combination of both brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can greatly improve nerve injury. PMID:26604913

  12. Bioactive lipid coating of bone allografts directs engraftment and fate determination of bone marrow-derived cells in rat GFP chimeras.

    PubMed

    Das, Anusuya; Segar, Claire E; Chu, Yihsuan; Wang, Tiffany W; Lin, Yong; Yang, Chunxi; Du, Xeujun; Ogle, Roy C; Cui, Quanjun; Botchwey, Edward A

    2015-09-01

    Bone grafting procedures are performed to treat wounds incurred during wartime trauma, accidents, and tumor resections. Endogenous mechanisms of repair are often insufficient to ensure integration between host and donor bone and subsequent restoration of function. We investigated the role that bone marrow-derived cells play in bone regeneration and sought to increase their contributions by functionalizing bone allografts with bioactive lipid coatings. Polymer-coated allografts were used to locally deliver the immunomodulatory small molecule FTY720 in tibial defects created in rat bone marrow chimeras containing genetically-labeled bone marrow for monitoring cell origin and fate. Donor bone marrow contributed significantly to both myeloid and osteogenic cells in remodeling tissue surrounding allografts. FTY720 coatings altered the phenotype of immune cells two weeks post-injury, which was associated with increased vascularization and bone formation surrounding allografts. Consequently, degradable polymer coating strategies that deliver small molecule growth factors such as FTY720 represent a novel therapeutic strategy for harnessing endogenous bone marrow-derived progenitors and enhancing healing in load-bearing bone defects. PMID:26125501

  13. The haemopoietic and immunogenic capacities of living hybrid bone marrow cells tested in tumour allograft rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Kerckhaert, J A; Hofhuis, F M; Willers, J M

    1975-01-01

    In irradiated mice the capacity to reject allogenic tumours can be reconstituted with syngeneic lymphoid cells if the transferred cells are primed with the allogenicantigen. Living semi-allogeneic cells proved to be 30-100-times more acitve as priming antigen than cell membrane fractions. The tumour-suppressive activity of primed lymphoid cells increased in the following order: bone marrow less than Peyer's patches less than thymus less than spleen less than lymph node cells. Even bone marrowcells showed a considerable suppressing activity after priming with live antigen. It was a great advantage that 2 times 10-6 semi-allogeneic bone marrow cells could be used both for the restoration of the haemopoietic system after irradiation and for stimulation of the transferred parental lymphocytes. Priming with large numbers of semi-allogeneic spleen cells abolished the tumour-suppressive activity of the transferred lymphoid cells. This tolerogenic effect disappeared when the priming cells were pretreated with mitomycin. Tolerance could be induced when the cell donors were treated with cyclophosphamide in combination with the living cells. Cell membranes were not effective. PMID:1150311

  14. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Does Not Prevent or Delay Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Byttebier, Paul; Eeckhoudt, Annelies; Victor, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Meniscal tears are common knee injuries. Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) has been advocated to alleviate symptoms and delay osteoarthritis (OA) after meniscectomy. We investigated (1) the long-term outcome of MAT as a treatment of symptomatic meniscectomy, (2) most important factors affecting survivorship and (3) OA progression. Methods From 1989 till 2013, 329 MAT were performed in 313 patients. Clinical and radiographic results and MAT survival were evaluated retrospectively. Failure was defined as conversion to knee arthroplasty (KA) or total removal of the MAT. Results Mean age at surgery was 33 years (15–57); 60% were males. No-to-mild cartilage damage was found in 156 cases, moderate-to-severe damage in 130. Simultaneous procedures in 118 patients included cartilage procedures, osteotomy or ACL-reconstruction. At a mean follow-up of 6.8 years (0.2–24.3years), 5 patients were deceased and 48 lost (14.6%), 186 MAT were in situ (56.5%) whilst 90 (27.4%) had been removed, including 63 converted to a KA (19.2%). Cumulative allograft survivorship was 15.1% (95% CI:13.9–16.3) at 24.0 years. In patients <35 years at surgery, survival was significantly better (24.1%) compared to ≥35 years (8.0%) (p = 0.017). In knees with no-to-mild cartilage damage more allografts survived (43.0%) compared to moderate-to-severe damage (6.6%) (p = 0.003). Simultaneous osteotomy significantly deteriorated survival (0% at 24.0 years) (p = 0.010). 61% of patients underwent at least one additional surgery (1–11) for clinical symptoms after MAT. Consecutive radiographs showed significant OA progression at a mean of 3.8 years (p<0.0001). Incremental Kellgren-Lawrence grade was +1,1 grade per 1000 days (2,7yrs). Conclusions MAT did not delay or prevent tibiofemoral OA progression. 19.2% were converted to a knee prosthesis at a mean of 10.3 years. Patients younger than 35 with no-to-mild cartilage damage may benefit from MAT for relief of symptoms (survivorship

  15. Filgrastim-Stimulated Bone Marrow Compared with Filgrastim-Mobilized Peripheral Blood in Myeloablative Sibling Allografting for Patients with Hematologic Malignancies: A Randomized Canadian Blood and Marrow Transplant Group Study.

    PubMed

    Couban, Stephen; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Lachance, Sylvie; Walker, Irwin; Toze, Cynthia; Rubinger, Morel; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Lee, Stephanie J; Szer, Richard; Doocey, R; Lewis, Ian D; Huebsch, Lothar; Howson-Jan, Kang; Lalancette, Michel; Almohareb, Fahad; Chaudhri, Nadeem; Ivison, Sabine; Broady, Raewyn; Levings, Megan; Fairclough, Diane; Devins, Gerald; Szwajcer, David; Foley, Ronan; Smith, Clayton; Panzarella, Tony; Kerr, Holly; Kariminia, Amina; Schultz, Kirk R

    2016-08-01

    In adult hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), filgrastim-mobilized peripheral blood (G-PB) has largely replaced unstimulated marrow for allografting. Although the use of G-PB results in faster hematopoietic recovery, it is also associated with more chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD). A potential alternative allograft is filgrastim-stimulated marrow (G-BM), which we hypothesized may be associated with prompt hematopoietic recovery but with less cGVHD. We conducted a phase 3, open-label, multicenter randomized trial of 230 adults with hematologic malignancies receiving allografts from siblings after myeloablative conditioning to compare G-PB with G-BM. The primary endpoint was time to treatment failure, defined as a composite of extensive cGVHD, relapse/disease progression, and death. With a median follow-up of 36 months (range, 9.6 to 48), comparing G-BM with G-PB, there was no difference between the 2 arms with respect to the primary outcome of this study (hazard ratio [HR], .91; 95% confidence interval [CI], .68 to 1.22; P = .52). However, the cumulative incidence of overall cGVHD was lower with G-BM (HR, .66; 95% CI, .46 to .95; P = .007) and there was no difference in the risk of relapse or progression (P = .35). The median times to neutrophil recovery (P = .0004) and platelet recovery (P = .012) were 3 days shorter for recipients allocated to G-PB compared with those allocated to G-BM, but there were no differences in secondary engraftment-related outcomes, such as time to first hospital discharge (P = .17). In addition, there were no graft failures in either arm. This trial demonstrates that, compared with G-PB, the use of G-BM allografts leads to a significantly lower rate of overall cGVHD without a loss of the graft-versus-tumor effect and comparable overall survival. Our findings suggest that further study of this type of allograft is warranted. PMID:27154847

  16. Corticosteroid-loaded biodegradable nanoparticles for prevention of corneal allograft rejection in rats.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qing; Xu, Qingguo; Boylan, Nicholas J; Lamb, Nicholas W; Emmert, David G; Yang, Jeh-Chang; Tang, Li; Heflin, Tom; Alwadani, Saeed; Eberhart, Charles G; Stark, Walter J; Hanes, Justin

    2015-03-10

    Immunologic graft rejection is one of the main causes of short and long-term graft failure in corneal transplantation. Steroids are the most commonly used immunosuppressive agents for postoperative management and prevention of corneal graft rejection. However, steroids delivered in eye drops are rapidly cleared from the surface of the eye, so the required frequency of dosing for corneal graft rejection management can be as high as once every 2h. Additionally, these eye drops are often prescribed for daily use for 1 year or longer, which can result in poor patient compliance and steroid-related side effects. Here, we report a biodegradable nanoparticle system composed of Generally Regarded as Safe (GRAS) materials that can provide sustained release of corticosteroids to prevent corneal graft rejection following subconjunctival injection provided initially during transplant surgery. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) exhibited a size of 200 nm, 8 wt.% drug loading, and sustained drug release over 15 days in vitro under sink conditions. DSP-loaded nanoparticles provided sustained ocular drug levels for at least 7 days after subconjunctival administration in rats, and prevented corneal allograft rejection over the entire 9-week study when administered weekly. In contrast, control treatment groups that received weekly injections of either placebo nanoparticles, saline, or DSP in solution demonstrated corneal graft rejection accompanied by severe corneal edema, neovascularization and opacity that occurred in ≤ 4 weeks. Local controlled release of corticosteroids may reduce the rate of corneal graft rejection, perhaps especially in the days immediately following surgery when risk of rejection is highest and when typical steroid eye drop administration requirements are particularly onerous. PMID:25576786

  17. Prevention and treatment of fungal infections in bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif B

    2003-07-01

    There has not been as much success in the prevention and treatment of invasive fungal infections, particularly aspergillosis, compared to the prevention and treatment of cytomegalovirus infection and graft-versus-host disease in bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients. Allogeneic BMT recipients who develop graft-versus-host disease and remain immunosuppressed for long periods are at major risk for development of these infections. Prevention of environmental exposure, antifungal chemoprophylaxis, and attempts at early diagnosis are essential for the reduction of mortality from invasive fungal infections. Chest computerized axial tomography is extremely useful in diagnosing pulmonary aspergillosis. However, microbiologic or histologic identification of infection remains essential. Unfortunately, the response to therapy in BMT recipients remains suboptimal. With the development of the lipid formulations of amphotericin B, the newer azoles, and the echinocandins, safer and more efficacious options have become available. The optimal use of antifungal agents or their combinations remains to be determined. PMID:12901327

  18. Abrogation of bone marrow allograft resistance in mice by increased total body irradiation correlates with eradication of host clonable T cells and alloreactive cytotoxic precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, E.; Lapidot, T.; Gozes, D.; Singer, T.S.; Reisner, Y.

    1987-01-15

    Host-vs-graft activity presents a major obstacle for transplantation of T cell-depleted bone marrow in HLA-mismatched patients. In a primate model, conditioned exactly like leukemia patients, it was shown that residual host clonable T cells, as well as alloreactive cytotoxic precursors, were present in peripheral blood and spleen after completion of cytoreduction. We have now extended this study in a mouse model for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. C/sub 3/H/HeJ mice were treated by 9 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), and 24 hr later their spleen cells were cultured in the presence of T cell growth factor and phytohemagglutinin according to the limit dilution procedure. After 7 days of culture the average frequency of clonable cells was 2.5 X 10(-3) compared with 37 X 10(-3) in the spleens of normal mice. The T cell derivation of the growing cells was ascertained by complement-mediated cytotoxicity with anti-Thy-1 as well as with anti-Lyt-2 and anti-Ly-3T4. In parallel, we found that the initial engraftment rate of bone marrow allograft in mice given 9 Gy TBI was lower than that found in recipients of syngeneic marrow. The initial engraftment rate was measured by the number of colony-forming units in the spleen and by splenic uptake of /sup 125/IUdR. A slight increase in TBI from 9 Gy to 11 Gy markedly reduced the difference in the number of spleen colony-forming units or the IUdR uptake between recipients of allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow. This increase in TBI also coincided with eradication of detectable clonable T cells. Moreover, in mice transplanted with T cell-depleted bone marrow after 9 Gy TBI, we also demonstrate that cytotoxicity against donor-type target cells is present in the spleen 10 to 14 days posttransplantation, whereas in mice treated by 11 Gy TBI such alloreactivity could not be detected.

  19. Immune Privilege of Corneal Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y.; Larkin, D. Frank P.

    2013-01-01

    Corneal transplantation has been performed successfully for over 100 years. Normally, HLA typing and systemic immunosuppressive drugs are not utilized, yet 90% of corneal allografts survive. In rodents, corneal allografts representing maximal histoincompatibility enjoy >50% survival even without immunosuppressive drugs. By contrast, other categories of transplants are invariably rejected in such donor/host combinations. The acceptance of corneal allografts compared to other categories of allografts is called immune privilege. The cornea expresses factors that contribute to immune privilege by preventing the induction and expression of immune responses to histocompatibility antigens on the corneal allograft. Among these are soluble and cell membrane molecules that block immune effector elements and also apoptosis of T lymphocytes. However, some conditions rob the corneal allograft of its immune privilege and promote rejection, which remains the leading cause of corneal allograft failure. Recent studies have examined new strategies for restoring immune privilege to such high-risk hosts. PMID:20482389

  20. Localized bone marrow transplantation leads to skin allograft acceptance in nonmyeloablated recipients: comparison of intra-bone marrow and isolated limb perfusion.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow cells (BMC) induces tolerance to antigen-matched organs, and infusion of a megadose of cells improves the success of engraftment of T-cell-depleted BMC. This study explores intra-bone marrow injection (IB) and isolated limb perfusion (IL) as means of localized bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and assesses their tolerogenic effect. Intravenous (i.v.), IB, and IL infusion of syngeneic and allogeneic whole BMC rescued 90%-100% of myeloablated recipients. Tracing of PKH-labeled cells revealed early systemic dissipation after IB injection, indicating that it was equivalent to i.v. transplantation. In contrast, IL perfusion led to initial localization of donor BMC. BALB/c recipients conditioned with 70 microg/g busulfan had 58% +/- 5% and 44% +/- 4% donor lymphocytes at 4 weeks after i.v. and IL infusion, respectively, of 10(7) whole BMC from B10 donors. This suggests that cells migrated out of the IL femur and seeded other bones. All recipients accepted donor-matched skin grafts and acutely rejected third party grafts. T-cell depletion lowered the engraftment efficiency of i.v.-BMT by 35% (p < 0.001 versus whole BMC), but not when infused IL (p < 0.001). It is concluded that IL-BMT is a procedure for initial localization of donor cells, which is as efficient as i.v.- and IB-BMT in rescue of myeloablated mice, induction of hemopoietic chimerism, and donor-specific immune nonresponsiveness to secondary skin grafts without myeloablative conditioning. The megadose effect achieved by inoculation of a small hemopoietic space improved engraftment of T-cell-depleted BMC. This approach may have clinical applications. PMID:11796926

  1. The use of potential of bone marrow allograft and whole-body irradiation in the treatment of leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.D.

    1982-10-15

    A brief history of the clinical application of marrow transplantation based on knowledge gained from ten years work utilizing the dog as an animal model is summarized. The techniques for marrow transplantation, donor selection, and conditioning of the recipient are described. Thirteen of the first 110 endstage leukemic patients who received allogeneic grafts and six of 16 patients who received syngeneic grafts are alive 6-11 years after grafting. Encouraged by the apparent ''cure'' of leukemia in these poor-risk patients, the Seattle transplant group in 1976 decided to give patients transplants earlier in the course of their disease. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in second or subsequent relapse were considered to have a poor prognosis. Twenty-two such patients received transplants, with seven surviving in remission 3-5 years later. Nineteen patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia received transplants in first remission and 11 are living in remission 3.5-5.5 years after grafting. The median survival will not be less than 42 months. The problems associated with graft-versus-host disease and recurrence of leukemia and methods aimed at eliminating these problems are discussed.

  2. Combination therapies prevent the neuropathic, proinflammatory characteristics of bone marrow in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, James M; Yorek, Mark A; Grant, Maria B

    2015-02-01

    We previously showed that peripheral neuropathy of the bone marrow was associated with loss of circadian rhythmicity of stem/progenitor cell release into the circulation. Bone marrow neuropathy results in dramatic changes in hematopoiesis that lead to microvascular complications, inflammation, and reduced endothelial repair. This series of events represents early pathogenesis before development of diabetic retinopathy. In this study we characterized early alterations within the bone marrow of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats following treatments that prevent experimental peripheral neuropathy. We asked whether bone marrow neuropathy and the associated bone marrow pathology were reversed with treatments that prevent peripheral neuropathy. Three strategies were tested: inhibition of neutral endopeptidase, inhibition of aldose reductase plus lipoic acid supplementation, and insulin therapy with antioxidants. All strategies prevented loss of nerve conduction velocity resulting from STZ-induced diabetes and corrected the STZ-induced diabetes-associated increase of immunoreactivity of neuropeptide Y, tyrosine hydroxylase, and somatostatin. The treatments also reduced concentrations of interleukin-1β, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 in STZ-induced diabetic bone marrow supernatant and decreased the expression of NADPH oxidase 2, nitric oxide synthase 2, and nuclear factor-κB1 mRNA in bone marrow progenitor cells. These therapies represent novel approaches to attenuate the diabetic phenotype within the bone marrow and may constitute an important therapeutic strategy for diabetic microvascular complications. PMID:25204979

  3. Induction of donor-type chimerism in murine recipients of bone marrow allografts by different radiation regimens currently used in treatment of leukemia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, O.; Lapidot, T.; Terenzi, A.; Lubin, I.; Rabi, I.; Reisner, Y. )

    1990-11-01

    Three radiation protocols currently used in treatment of leukemia patients before bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were investigated in a murine model (C57BL/6----C3H/HeJ) for BM allograft rejection. These include (a) a single dose of total body irradiation (8.5 Gy TBI delivered at a dose rate of 0.2 Gy/min), (b) fractionated TBI 12 Gy administered in six fractions, 2 Gy twice a day in 3 days, delivered at a dose rate of 0.1 Gy/min, and (c) hyperfractionated TBI (14.4 Gy administered in 12 fractions, 1.2 Gy three times a day in 3 days, delivered at a dose rate of 0.1 Gy/min). Donor-type chimerism 6 to 8 weeks after BMT and hematologic reconstitution on day 12 after BMT found in these groups were compared with results obtained in mice conditioned with 8 Gy TBI delivered at a dose rate of 0.67 Gy/min, routinely used in this murine model. The results in both parameters showed a marked advantage for the single dose 8.5 Gy TBI over all the other treatments. This advantage was found to be equivalent to three- to fourfold increment in the BM inoculum when compared with hyperfractionated radiation, which afforded the least favorable conditions for development of donor-type chimerism. The fractionated radiation protocol was equivalent in its efficacy to results obtained in mice irradiated by single-dose 8 Gy TBI, both of which afforded a smaller but not significant advantage over the hyperfractionated protocol. This model was also used to test the effect of radiation dose rate on the development of donor-type chimerism. A significant enhancement was found after an increase in dose rate from 0.1 to 0.7 Gy/min. Further enhancement could be achieved when the dose rate was increased to 1.3 Gy/min, but survival at this high dose rate was reduced.

  4. Rat Cytomegalovirus Vaccine Prevents Accelerated Chronic Rejection in CMV-Naïve Recipients of Infected Donor Allograft Hearts.

    PubMed

    Streblow, D N; Hwee, Y K; Kreklywich, C N; Andoh, T; Denton, M; Smith, P; Hart, E; Broekel, R; Pallett, C; Rogers, K; Streblow, A D; Chuop, M; Perry, A; Slifka, M; Messaoudi, I; Orloff, S L

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus accelerates transplant vascular sclerosis (TVS) and chronic rejection (CR) in solid organ transplants; however, the mechanisms involved are unclear. We determined the efficacy of a CMV vaccine in preventing CMV-accelerated rat cardiac allograft rejection in naïve recipients of CMV+ donor hearts. F344 donor rats were infected with RCMV 5 days prior to heterotopic cardiac transplantation into CMV-naïve or H2 O2 -inactivated RCMV-vaccinated Lewis recipients. Recipients of RCMV-infected donor hearts rejected at POD59, whereas vaccinated recipients exhibited a significantly prolonged time to rejection-POD97, similar to recipients of uninfected donor hearts (POD108). Although all of the donor hearts were preinfected, the vaccinated recipients had lower graft and PBMC viral loads at POD 7 compared to unvaccinated controls. Adoptive T cell and passive antibody transfers from vaccinated Lewis rats into naïve recipients demonstrate that both T-cell and B-cell arms of the adaptive immune response provide protection against CMV-accelerated rejection. Similar findings were obtained when testing three different adjuvants in passive transfer experiments. We have determined that the timing of the vaccine prior to transplantation and the specific adjuvant play critical roles in mediating anti-viral responses and promoting graft survival. CMV vaccination prior to transplantation may effectively increase graft survival. PMID:25766876

  5. Myelodysplasia and Acute Leukemia as Late Complications of Marrow Failure; Future Prospects for Leukemia Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bagby, Grover C.; Meyers, Gabrielle

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Patients with acquired and inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are at risk for the development of clonal neoplasms including AML, MDS, and PNH. This chapter reviews the evidence supporting a model of clonal selection, a paradigm that provides a reasonable expectation that these often fatal complications might be prevented in the future. PMID:19327589

  6. Enhancement of bone marrow allografts from nude mice into mismatched recipients by T cells void of graft-versus-host activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidot, T.; Lubin, I.; Terenzi, A.; Faktorowich, Y.; Erlich, P.; Reisner, Y. )

    1990-06-01

    Transplantation of 8 x 10(6) C57BL/6-Nu+/Nu+ (nude) bone marrow cells into C3H/HeJ recipients after conditioning with 8 Gy of total body irradiation has resulted in a markedly higher rate of graft rejection or graft failure compared to that found in recipients of normal C57BL/6 or C57BL/6-Bg+/Bg+ (beige) T-cell-depleted bone marrow. Mixing experiments using different numbers of nude bone marrow cells with or without mature thymocytes (unagglutinated by peanut agglutinin) revealed that engraftment of allogeneic T-cell-depleted bone marrow is T-cell dependent. To ensure engraftment, a large inoculum of nude bone marrow must be supplemented with a trace number of donor T cells, whereas a small bone marrow dose from nude donors requires a much larger number of T cells for engraftment. Marked enhancement of donor type chimerism was also found when F1 thymocytes were added to nude bone marrow cells, indicating that the enhancement of bone marrow engraftment by T cells is not only mediated by alloreactivity against residual host cells but may rather be generated by growth factors, the release of which may require specific interactions between T cells and stem cells or between T cells and bone marrow stroma cells.

  7. Complement Inhibition for Prevention and Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Renal Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Jordan, S C; Choi, J; Kahwaji, J; Vo, A

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic interventions aimed at the human complement system are recognized as potentially important strategies for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases because there is often evidence of complement-mediated injury according to pathologic assessments. In addition, there are a large number of potential targets, both soluble and cell bound, that might offer potential for new drug development, but progress in this area has met with significant challenges. Currently, 2 drugs are approved aimed at inhibition of complement activation. The first option is eculizumab (anti-C5), which is approved for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab has also been studied in human transplantation for the treatment and prevention of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Initial data from uncontrolled studies suggested a significant benefit of eculizumab for the prevention of ABMR in highly HLA-sensitized patients, but a subsequent randomized, placebo-controlled trial failed to meet its primary endpoint. Anecdotal data, primarily from case studies, showed benefits in treating complement-mediated ABMR. A second approved complement-inhibiting therapy is C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), which is approved for use in patients with hereditary angioedema, a condition caused by mutations in the gene that codes for C1-INH. A recent placebo-controlled trial of C1-INH for prevention of ABMR in HLA-sensitized patients found that the drug was safe, with evidence for inhibition of systemic complement activation and complement-activating donor-specific antibodies. Other drugs are now under development. PMID:27234741

  8. Captopril and platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist prevent cardiac allograft vasculopathy in rats: role of endogenous PAF and PAF-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Crawford, S E; Huang, L; Hsueh, W; Takami, H; Gonzalez-Crussi, F; Backer, C L; Mu, Y; Liu, H; Mavroudis, C

    1999-05-01

    Accelerated coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of late mortality following cardiac transplantation. The vascular lesions are characterized by myointimal proliferation and perivascular mononuclear inflammatory infiltrates. Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is a potent phospholipid mediator produced by inflammatory cells and activated endothelial cells. Angiotensin II is known to activate phospholipase A2, a critical enzyme in PAF synthesis. Using a rat heterotopic cardiac transplant model known to induce graft CAD, we previously reported that chronic administration of captopril, an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, reduces intimal proliferation and maintains luminal patency. The purpose of the current study was to determine if captopril regulates vascular remodeling by suppressing PAF synthesis and whether administration of a PAF antagonist ameliorates graft CAD. Captopril was found to decrease levels of PAF and PAF-like compounds as well as reduce intimal lesions, decrease cellular rejection grade, and diminish allograft heart weights. Treatment with a PAF antagonist significantly decreased proliferation of the intimal component of the vasculopathy and caused regression of the cardiac hypertrophy, but had no significant effect on cellular rejection. In contrast, untreated animals had elevated plasma PAF levels, elevated heart weights, and severe myointimal proliferation with luminal stenosis 21 days post-transplantation. These observations suggest that graft CAD is mediated, in part, by PAF and PAF-like compounds, and suppression of endogenous PAF may prevent cardiac allograft vasculopathy. PMID:10363692

  9. Genetic or Pharmaceutical Blockade of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase P110δ Prevents Chronic Rejection of Heart Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Marlene L.; McCormack, Ann M.; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Marelli-Berg, Federica M.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic rejection is the major cause of long-term heart allograft failure, characterized by tissue infiltration by recipient T cells with indirect allospecificity. Phosphoinositol-3-kinase p110δ is a key mediator of T cell receptor signaling, regulating both T cell activation and migration of primed T cells to non-lymphoid antigen-rich tissue. We investigated the effect of genetic or pharmacologic inactivation of PI3K p110δ on the development of chronic allograft rejection in a murine model in which HY-mismatched male hearts were transplanted into female recipients. We show that suppression of p110δ activity significantly attenuates the development of chronic rejection of heart grafts in the absence of any additional immunosuppressive treatment by impairing the localization of antigen-specific T cells to the grafts, while not inducing specific T cell tolerance. p110δ pharmacologic inactivation is effective when initiated after transplantation. Targeting p110δ activity might be a viable strategy for the treatment of heart chronic rejection in humans. PMID:22479345

  10. Use of lymphokine-activated killer cells to prevent bone marrow graft rejection and lethal graft-vs-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Kaplan, J. )

    1989-09-01

    Prompted by our recent finding that lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells mediate both veto and natural suppression, we tested the ability of adoptively transferred LAK cells to block two in vivo alloreactions which complicate bone marrow transplantation: resistance to transplanted allogeneic bone marrow cells, and lethal graft-vs-host disease. Adoptive transfer of either donor type B6D2 or recipient-type B6 lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells, cells found to have strong LAK activity, abrogated or inhibited the resistance of irradiated B6 mice to both B6D2 marrow and third party-unrelated C3H marrow as measured by CFU in spleen on day 7. The ability of lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells to abrogate allogeneic resistance was eliminated by C lysis depletion of cells expressing asialo-GM1, NK1.1, and, to a variable degree, Thy-1, but not by depletion of cells expressing Lyt-2, indicating that the responsible cells had a LAK cell phenotype. Similar findings were obtained by using splenic LAK cells generated by 3 to 7 days of culture with rIL-2. Demonstration that allogeneic resistance could be blocked by a cloned LAK cell line provided direct evidence that LAK cells inhibit allogeneic resistance. In addition to inhibiting allogeneic resistance, adoptively transferred recipient-type LAK cells prevented lethal graft-vs-host disease, and permitted long term engraftment of allogeneic marrow. Irradiation prevented LAK cell inhibition of both allogeneic resistance and lethal graft-vs-host disease. These findings suggest that adoptive immunotherapy with LAK cells may prove useful in preventing graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease in human bone marrow transplant recipients.

  11. Bone marrow transplantation in the prevention of intellectual disability due to inherited metabolic disease: ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Louhiala, P

    2009-07-01

    Many inherited metabolic diseases may lead to varying degrees of brain damage and thus also to intellectual disability. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been used for over two decades as a form of secondary prevention to stop or reverse the progress of the disease process in some of these conditions. At the population level the impact of BMT on the prevalence of intellectual disability is minute, but at the individual level its impact on the prognosis of the disease and the well-being of the patient can be substantial. The dark side of BMT use is the burden of side effects, complications and transplantation-related mortality in less successful cases. The ethical issues involved in this therapy are discussed in this review. PMID:19567689

  12. Kidney allograft survival in dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, R.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Lum, C.T.; Lewis, W.I.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is immunosuppressive and, in rodents, can induce a state where transplantation of allogenic bone marrow results in chimerism and permanent acceptance of organ allografts from the donor strain. Twelve splenectomized dogs were treated with TLI (150 rads per fraction, total dose 1950 to 3000 rads) before bilateral nephrectomy and renal allotransplantation. Eight dogs received bone marrow from the kidney donor. In 13 untreated control dogs renal allografts functioned for a mean +- (SE) of 4.7 +- 0.3 days. In the four TLI treated dogs who did not receive bone marrow the renal allografts functioned for 15 to 76 days (two dogs died with functioning grafts). In the eight TLI treated dogs who received donor bone marrow, two died immediately after transplantation, two rejected at 3 and 13 days, one died at 13 days with a functioning graft, and two have had the grafts function for longer than 500 days. Chimerism was not detected in the one dog tested. The response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to stimulation with phytohemaglutinin and in mixed lymphocyte culture was suppressed for at least one month after TLI. The results confirm the immunosuppressive effect of TLI. The absence of kidney rejection in two recipients of donor bone marrow show the potential of this approach to induce long-term immunologic unresponsiveness as to an organ allograft, but the outcome is unpredictable and further experiments are needed to define the optimal conditions for administration of TLI and bone marrow to the recipients.

  13. Prevention of graft-versus-host disease by intrabone marrow injection of donor T cells: involvement of bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, T; Inaba, M; Fukui, J; Ueda, Y; Hosaka, N; Kamiyama, Y; Ikehara, S

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new and effective method for bone marrow transplantation (BMT): bone marrow cells (BMCs) are injected directly into the bone marrow (BM) cavity of recipient mice. The intrabone marrow injection of BMCs (IBM-BMT) greatly facilitates the engraftment of donor-derived cells, and IBM-BMT can attenuate graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR), in contrast to conventional intravenous BMT (i.v.-BMT). Here, we examine the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of IBM-BMT on GVHR using animal models where GVHR is elicited. Recipient mice (C57BL/6) were irradiated and splenic T cells (as donor lymphocyte infusion: DLI) from major histocompatibility complex-disparate donors (BALB/c) were injected directly into the BM cavity (IBM-DLI) or injected intravenously (i.v.-DLI) along with IBM-BMT. The BM stromal cells (BMSCs) from these recipients were collected and related cytokines were examined. The recipient mice that had been treated with IBM-BMT + i.v.-DLI showed severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in contrast to those treated with IBM-BMT + IBM-DLI. The suppressive activity of BMSCs in this GVHD model was determined. The cultured BMSCs from the recipients treated with IBM-BMT + IBM-DLI suppressed the proliferation of responder T cells remarkably when compared with those from the recipients of IBM-BMT + i.v.-DLI in mixed leucocyte reaction. Furthermore, the level of transforming growth factor-β and hepatocyte growth factor in cultured BMSCs from IBM-BMT + IBM-DLI increased significantly when compared with those from the recipients of IBM-BMT + i.v.-DLI. Thus, the prevention of GVHD observed in the recipients of IBM-BMT + IBM-DLI was attributable to the increased production of immunosuppressive cytokines from BMSCs after interaction with host reactive T cells (in DLI). PMID:18307515

  14. Neonatal bone marrow transplantation prevents bone pathology in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I

    PubMed Central

    Pievani, Alice; Azario, Isabella; Antolini, Laura; Shimada, Tsutomu; Patel, Pravin; Remoli, Cristina; Rambaldi, Benedetta; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Riminucci, Mara; Biondi, Andrea; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity for genetic disorders by providing sustainable levels of the missing protein at birth, thus preventing tissue damage. We tested this concept in mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS IH; Hurler syndrome), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-l-iduronidase. MPS IH is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, including severe progressive skeletal abnormalities. Although BMT increases the life span of patients with MPS IH, musculoskeletal manifestations are only minimally responsive if the timing of BMT delays, suggesting already irreversible bone damage. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that transplanting normal BM into newborn MPS I mice soon after birth can prevent skeletal dysplasia. We observed that neonatal BMT was effective at restoring α-l-iduronidase activity and clearing elevated glycosaminoglycans in blood and multiple organs. At 37 weeks of age, we observed an almost complete normalization of all bone tissue parameters, using radiographic, microcomputed tomography, biochemical, and histological analyses. Overall, the magnitude of improvements correlated with the extent of hematopoietic engraftment. We conclude that BMT at a very early stage in life markedly reduces signs and symptoms of MPS I before they appear. PMID:25298037

  15. Neonatal bone marrow transplantation prevents bone pathology in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I.

    PubMed

    Pievani, Alice; Azario, Isabella; Antolini, Laura; Shimada, Tsutomu; Patel, Pravin; Remoli, Cristina; Rambaldi, Benedetta; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Riminucci, Mara; Biondi, Andrea; Tomatsu, Shunji; Serafini, Marta

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity for genetic disorders by providing sustainable levels of the missing protein at birth, thus preventing tissue damage. We tested this concept in mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS IH; Hurler syndrome), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-l-iduronidase. MPS IH is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, including severe progressive skeletal abnormalities. Although BMT increases the life span of patients with MPS IH, musculoskeletal manifestations are only minimally responsive if the timing of BMT delays, suggesting already irreversible bone damage. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that transplanting normal BM into newborn MPS I mice soon after birth can prevent skeletal dysplasia. We observed that neonatal BMT was effective at restoring α-l-iduronidase activity and clearing elevated glycosaminoglycans in blood and multiple organs. At 37 weeks of age, we observed an almost complete normalization of all bone tissue parameters, using radiographic, microcomputed tomography, biochemical, and histological analyses. Overall, the magnitude of improvements correlated with the extent of hematopoietic engraftment. We conclude that BMT at a very early stage in life markedly reduces signs and symptoms of MPS I before they appear. PMID:25298037

  16. Salvianolic Acid B Prevents Bone Loss in Prednisone-Treated Rats through Stimulation of Osteogenesis and Bone Marrow Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liao; Li, Ting; Liu, Yuyu; Zhou, Le; Li, Pinghua; Xu, Bilian; Huang, Lianfang; Chen, Yan; Liu, Yanzhi; Tian, Xiaoyan; Jee, Webster S. S.; Wu, Tie

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) induced osteoporosis (GIO) is caused by the long-term use of GC for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The GC related disruption of bone marrow microcirculation and increased adipogenesis contribute to GIO development. However, neither currently available anti-osteoporosis agent is completely addressed to microcirculation and bone marrow adipogenesis. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is a polyphenolic compound from a Chinese herbal medicine, Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Sal B on osteoblast bone formation, angiogenesis and adipogenesis-associated GIO by performing marrow adipogenesis and microcirculation dilation and bone histomorphometry analyses. (1) In vivo study: Bone loss in GC treated rats was confirmed by significantly decreased BMD, bone strength, cancellous bone mass and architecture, osteoblast distribution, bone formation, marrow microvessel density and diameter along with down-regulation of marrow BMPs expression and increased adipogenesis. Daily treatment with Sal B (40 mg/kg/d) for 12 weeks in GC male rats prevented GC-induced cancellous bone loss and increased adipogenesis while increasing cancellous bone formation rate with improved local microcirculation by capillary dilation. Treatment with Sal B at a higher dose (80 mg/kg/d) not only prevented GC-induced osteopenia, but also increased cancellous bone mass and thickness, associated with increase of marrow BMPs expression, inhibited adipogenesis and further increased microvessel diameters. (2) In vitro study: In concentration from 10−6 mol/L to 10−7 mol/L, Sal B stimulated bone marrow stromal cell (MSC) differentiation to osteoblast and increased osteoblast activities, decreased GC associated adipogenic differentiation by down-regulation of PPARγ mRNA expression, increased Runx2 mRNA expression without osteoblast inducement, and, furthermore, Sal B decreased Dickkopf-1 and increased β-catenin mRNA expression with

  17. The Ca2+-Activated K+ Channel KCa3.1 as a Potential New Target for the Prevention of Allograft Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Je; Lam, Jenny; Gregory, Clare R.; Schrepfer, Sonja; Wulff, Heike

    2013-01-01

    Allograft vasculopathy (AV) remains one of the major challenges to the long-term functioning of solid organ transplants. Although its exact pathogenesis remains unclear, AV is characterized by both fibromuscular proliferation and infiltration of CD4+ memory T cells. We here tested whether two experimental immunosuppressants targeting K+ channels might be useful for preventing AV. PAP-1 inhibits the voltage-gated Kv1.3 channel, which is overexpressed on CCR7− memory T cells and we therefore hypothesize that it should suppress the memory T cell component of AV. Based on its previous efficacy in restenosis and kidney fibrosis we expected that the KCa3.1 blocker TRAM-34 would primarily affect smooth muscle and fibroblast proliferation and thus reduce intimal hyperplasia. Using immunohistochemistry we demonstrated the presence of Kv1.3 on infiltrating T cells and of KCa3.1 on lymphocytes as well as on proliferating neointimal smooth muscle cells in human vasculopathy samples and in a rat aorta transplant model developing chronic AV. Treatment of PVG rats receiving orthotopically transplanted aortas from ACI rats with TRAM-34 dose-dependently reduced aortic luminal occlusion, intimal hyperplasia, mononuclear cell infiltration and collagen deposition 120 days after transplantation. The Kv1.3 blocker PAP-1 in contrast did not reduce intima hyperplasia despite drastically reducing plasma IFN-γ levels and inhibiting lymphocyte infiltration. Our findings suggest that KCa3.1 channels play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic AV and constitute an attractive target for the prevention of arteriopathy. PMID:24312257

  18. The Impact of Infection on Chronic Allograft Dysfunction and Allograft Survival After Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gandul, C; Mueller, N J; Pascual, M; Manuel, O

    2015-12-01

    Infectious diseases after solid organ transplantation (SOT) are a significant cause of morbidity and reduced allograft and patient survival; however, the influence of infection on the development of chronic allograft dysfunction has not been completely delineated. Some viral infections appear to affect allograft function by both inducing direct tissue damage and immunologically related injury, including acute rejection. In particular, this has been observed for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in all SOT recipients and for BK virus infection in kidney transplant recipients, for community-acquired respiratory viruses in lung transplant recipients, and for hepatitis C virus in liver transplant recipients. The impact of bacterial and fungal infections is less clear, but bacterial urinary tract infections and respiratory tract colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aspergillus spp appear to be correlated with higher rates of chronic allograft dysfunction in kidney and lung transplant recipients, respectively. Evidence supports the beneficial effects of the use of antiviral prophylaxis for CMV in improving allograft function and survival in SOT recipients. Nevertheless, there is still a need for prospective interventional trials assessing the potential effects of preventive and therapeutic strategies against bacterial and fungal infection for reducing or delaying the development of chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:26474168

  19. Risk factors of cardiac allograft vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Szczurek, Wioletta; Gąsior, Mariusz; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in prevention and treatment of heart transplant rejection, development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) remains the leading factor limiting long-term survival of the graft. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy etiopathogenesis is not fully understood, but a significant role is attributed to endothelial cell damage, caused by immunological and non-immunological mechanisms. Immunological factors include the differences between the recipient's and the donor's HLA systems, the presence of alloreactive antibodies and episodes of acute rejection. Among the non-immunological factors the most important are the age of the donor, ischemia-reperfusion injury and cytomegalovirus infection. The classical cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, obesity and hyperlipidemia) are also important. This study presents an up-to-date overview of current knowledge on the vasculopathy etiopathogenesis and the role played by endothelium and inflammatory processes in CAV, and it also investigates the factors which may serve as risk markers of cardiac allograft vasculopathy. PMID:26855649

  20. [Transfusion of autologous bone marrow for the prevention and treatment of postoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Malakhov, S F; Men'shikova, E A; Shelukhin, V A; Bagautdinov, Sh M

    1982-12-01

    The authors have shown hyporegeneratory character of anemia developing after operations on the lungs followed by massive blood loss which was adequately compensated by conserved homologous blood. The transfusion of the autologous bone marrow prepared before operation results in a pronounced stimulation of production of erythrocytes, contributing to the quickest recovery of the circulating erythron. PMID:6762753

  1. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6. The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2. The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  2. Prevention of benzene-induced genotoxicity in bone marrow and lung cells: superiority of polyphenolic acetates to polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Sushama, Anupam; Rohil, Vishwajeet; Manral, Sushma; Gangopadhyay, Sukanya; Prasad, Ashok K; Raj, Hanumantharao G; Parmar, Virender S

    2011-09-01

    Previous investigations carried out in our laboratory have highlighted that 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarin demonstrates a mechanism-based inhibition of cytochrome P450 (Cyt-P450) activities such as microsome-mediated aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) epoxidation, dealkylation of alkylated resorufin, and toxicokinetics of benzene. 7,8-Diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarin, quercetin pentaacetate, and ellagic acid peracetate were also found to be effective in giving the protection of AFB1-induced genotoxicity in rat's bone marrow and lung cells possibly due to acetylation of Cyt-P450 apoprotein mediated by acetoxy drug: protein transacetylase. Later, this transacetylase was identified as calreticulin, and the acetyltransferase function of calreticulin was appropriately termed calreticulin transacetylase. In this communication, we have focused on the superiority of several classes of polyphenolic acetates to polyphenols in the modification of Cyt-P450-linked mixed function oxidases (MFOs) such as 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (PROD). Special attention has also been focused on benzene-induced genotoxicity in bone marrow and lung cells. Results clearly indicated that polyphenolic acetates demonstrated time-dependent inhibition of Cyt-P450-linked MFOs, while parent polyphenols failed to demonstrate the same. Polyphenolic acetates were found to be more superior to polyphenols in preventing benzene-induced micronuclei formation. The pattern of inhibition of Cyt-P450-dependent MFOs and benzene-induced micronuclei formation by polyphenolic acetates was found in tune with their specificities to calreticulin transacetylase. These results further substantiated that inhibition of Cyt-P450-linked MFOs and benzene-induced genotoxicity in bone marrow and lung cells by polyphenolic acetates are mediated by the action of calreticulin transacetylase that catalyzes the acetylation of concerned proteins. PMID:21267547

  3. Targeting Sirtuin-1 prolongs murine renal allograft survival and function.

    PubMed

    Levine, Matthew H; Wang, Zhonglin; Xiao, Haiyan; Jiao, Jing; Wang, Liqing; Bhatti, Tricia R; Hancock, Wayne W; Beier, Ulf H

    2016-05-01

    Current immunosuppressive medications used after transplantation have significant toxicities. Foxp3(+) T-regulatory cells can prevent allograft rejection without compromising protective host immunity. Interestingly, inhibiting the class III histone/protein deacetylase Sirtuin-1 can augment Foxp3(+) T-regulatory suppressive function through increasing Foxp3 acetylation. Here we determined whether Sirtuin-1 targeting can stabilize biological allograft function. BALB/c kidney allografts were transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients with a CD4-conditional deletion of Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre)) or mice treated with a Sirtuin-1-specific inhibitor (EX-527), and the native kidneys removed. Blood chemistries and hematocrit were followed weekly. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients showed markedly longer survival and improved kidney function. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients exhibited donor-specific tolerance, accepted BALB/c, but rejected third-party C3H cardiac allografts. C57BL/6 recipients of BALB/c renal allografts that were treated with EX-527 showed improved survival and renal function at 1, but not 10 mg/kg/day. Pharmacologic inhibition of Sirtuin-1 also improved renal allograft survival and function with dosing effects having relevance to outcome. Thus, inhibiting Sirtuin-1 can be a useful asset in controlling T-cell-mediated rejection. However, effects on non-T cells that could adversely affect allograft survival and function merit consideration. PMID:27083279

  4. Significant prolongation of segmental pancreatic allograft survival in two species

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    A study was conducted to assess the suppression of segmental pancreatic allograft rejection by cyclosporine (CSA) alone in baboons and dogs, and subtotal marrow irradiation (TL1) alone and TL 1 in combination with CSA in baboons. Total pancreatectomy in the dog and primate provided a reliable diabetic model, induced an absolute deficiency of insulin and was uniformly lethal if not treated. Continuous administration of CSA in baboons resulted in modest allograft survival. As in baboons, dogs receiving CSA 25 mg/kg/d rendered moderate graft prolongation but a dose of 40 mg/kg/d resulted in significant graft survival (greater than 100 days) in 5 of 8 allograft recipients. Irradiation alone resulted in minimal baboon pancreatic allograft survival of 20 baboons receiving TL1 1,000 rad and CSA, 3 had graft survival greater than of 100 days. Of 15 baboons receiving TL1 800 rad and CSA, 6 had graft survival of greater than 100 days. In conclusion, CSA administration in dogs and TL1 in combination with CSA in baboons resulted in highly significant segmental pancreatic allograft survival.

  5. Co-transplantation of autologous MSCs delays islet allograft rejection and generates a local immunoprivileged site

    PubMed Central

    Ben Nasr, Moufida; Vergani, Andrea; Avruch, James; Liu, Liye; Kefaloyianni, Eirini; D’Addio, Francesca; Tezza, Sara; Corradi, Domenico; Bassi, Roberto; Valderrama-Vasquez, Alessandro; Usuelli, Vera; Kim, James; Azzi, Jamil; Essawy, Basset El; Markmann, James; Abdi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aims Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with immunomodulatory properties. We tested the ability of MSCs to delay islet allograft rejection. Methods Mesenchymal stem cells were generated in vitro from C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice bone marrow, and their immunomodulatory properties were tested in vitro. We then tested the effect of a local or systemic administration of heterologous and autologous MSCs on graft survival in a fully allogeneic model of islet transplantation (BALB/c islets into C57BL/6 mice). Results In vitro, autologous, but not heterologous, MSCs abrogated immune cell proliferation in response to alloantigens and skewed the immune response toward a Th2 profile. A single dose of autologous MSCs co-transplanted under the kidney capsule with allogeneic islets delayed islet rejection, reduced graft infiltration, and induced long-term graft function in 30 % of recipients. Based on ex vivo analysis of recipient splenocytes, the use of autologous MSCs did not appear to have any systemic effect on the immune response toward graft alloantigens. The systemic injection of autologous MSCs or the local injection of heterologous MSCs failed to delay islet graft rejection. Conclusion Autologous, but not heterologous, MSCs showed multiple immunoregulatory properties in vitro and delayed allograft rejection in vivo when co-transplanted with islets; however, they failed to prevent rejection when injected systemically. Autologous MSCs thus appear to produce a local immunoprivileged site, which promotes graft survival. PMID:25808641

  6. Interleukin-2 critically regulates bone marrow erythropoiesis and prevents anemia development.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Martin; Langenhorst, Daniela; Beilhack, Andreas; Serfling, Edgar; Patra, Amiya K

    2015-12-01

    Mice deficient in IL-2 signaling develop severe anemia indicating a defect in erythropoiesis. However, why deficiency in IL-2, an essential growth factor for lymphocytes, or in IL-2 signaling components should result in defective erythropoiesis is unclear. Here, we have analyzed the mechanism of IL-2 signaling deficiency induced anemia in mice and show that IL-2 plays an indispensable role in bone marrow (BM) erythropoiesis via maintenance of regulatory T (Treg) cells. In absence of IL-2 signaling, IFN-γ produced by the activated T cells suppressed klf1 expression, resulting in an early block in erythrocyte differentiation. Anemia, in IL-2 or IL-2 signaling deficient mice always developed prior to the manifestation of other autoimmune complications such as colitis, suggesting that anemia in these mice might be a contributing factor in inducing other pathological complications in later stages. Our study shows, how essential cytokines of lymphoid cells could exert critical influence on the development of erythrocytes and thus expanding our understanding of the complex regulation of hematopoiesis in the BM. Besides, our findings might facilitate the use of IL-2 and anti-IFN-γ as a clinical remedy against anemia that arise in cancer patients following radiotherapy or chemotherapy, a context which simulates the situation of IL-2 deficiency. PMID:26404745

  7. Prevention of lethal graft vs Host disease following bone marrow transplantation (pretreatment of the inoculum with purine metabolic enzyme inhibitors)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    A correlation between lymphocyte function and enzymes of the purine metabolic pathway has been shown. Abnormal levels of three of these enzymes - adenosine deaminase (ADA), 5'-nucleotidase (5'-NT), and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) - have been associated with defective lymphoid functions. Selective inhibition of one or more of these enzymes may result in elimination of specific lymphocyte populations from a bone marrow (BM) graft and thus prevent graft-vs-host disease (GVHD). To test this hypothesis, BM and spleen cells were pretreated with inhibitors of ADA or PNP before transplant to histoincompatible recipients. Germfree (GF) mice approximately 11 weeks of age were lethally X-irradiated with 1000 Rads. At 24 hours post irradiation the mice received 5 x 10/sup 6/ BM cells and 5 x 10/sup 6/ BM cells and 5 x 10/sup 6/ spleen cells i.v. from syngeneic donors or allogeneic donors. Prior to injection the mice were divided into 5 groups: (1) the inoculum was treated with a final concentration of 10 ..mu..M deoxycoformycin (dCF), and ADA inhibitor, and 100 ..mu..M deoxyadenosine (dAdo); (2) the inoculum was treated with a final concentration of 100 ..mu..M 8-aminoguanosine (8AGuo), an inhibitor of PNP, and 100 ..mu..M 2'-deoxyguanosine (2'dGuo); (3) allogenic controls; (4) syngeneic controls; and (5) radiation controls. In vitro experiments utilizing human peripheral blood and bone marrow demonstrated a severe immunosuppressive effect by the combination of 2'dCF and dAdo which was quick acting and not easily washed away. Treatment with 8A Guo + 2'dGuo also was immunosuppressive, but not as effective as the dCF and dAdo treatment. Both groups of drugs deserve further investigation for possible clinical application to BM transplantation.

  8. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells prevents memory impairment in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Iuchi, Katsuya; Lee, Hyunjin; Takami, Shinya; Akashiba, Hiroki; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Ueda, Masayuki; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Kimura, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2015-04-24

    Stem cell transplantation therapy is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of ischemic stroke, and several beneficial aspects have been reported. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), stem cell therapy is expected to provide an efficient therapeutic approach. Indeed, the intracerebral transplantation of stem cells reduced amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and rescued memory deficits in AD model mice. Here, we show that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMCs) improves cognitive function in two different AD mouse models, DAL and APP mice, and prevents neurodegeneration. GFP-positive BMMCs were isolated from tibiae and femurs of 4-week-old mice and then transplanted intravenously into DAL and APP mice. Transplantation of BMMCs suppressed neuronal loss and restored memory impairment of DAL mice to almost the same level as in wild-type mice. Transplantation of BMMCs to APP mice reduced Aβ deposition in the brain. APP mice treated with BMMCs performed significantly better on behavioral tests than vehicle-injected mice. Moreover, the effects were observed even with transplantation after the onset of cognitive impairment in DAL mice. Together, our results indicate that intravenous transplantation of BMMCs has preventive effects against the cognitive decline in AD model mice and suggest a potential therapeutic effect of BMMC transplantation therapy. PMID:25698614

  9. Extramedullary hematopoiesis in renal allograft

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guilan; Ali, Reza; Shuldberg, Mark M.; Bastani, Bahar; Brink, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), defined as the presence of hematopoietic elements outside of the medullary cavity of bone, has been reported in patients with various hematopoietic neoplasms including myelofibrosis. EMH commonly occurs in the liver and spleen (resulting in hepatosplenomegaly) and uncommonly involves the kidney. EMH involving the allograft kidney has not been reported in English literature. Herein, we report the first case of EMH in allograft kidney in a patient with myelofibrosis. The clinical and pathological findings are described. Through comparison of the medullary neoplastic infiltrate with the renal allograft infiltrate, we postulate the neoplastic nature of the infiltrate in the allograft kidney. PMID:26120442

  10. Allograft Pancreatectomy: Indications and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nagai, S; Powelson, J A; Taber, T E; Goble, M L; Mangus, R S; Fridell, J A

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated the indications, surgical techniques, and outcomes of allograft pancreatectomy based on a single center experience. Between 2003 and 2013, 47 patients developed pancreas allograft failure, excluding mortality with a functioning pancreas allograft. Early graft loss (within 14 days) occurred in 16, and late graft loss in 31. All patients with early graft loss eventually required allograft pancreatectomy. Nineteen of 31 patients (61%) with late graft loss underwent allograft pancreatectomy. The main indication for early allograft pancreatectomy included vascular thrombosis with or without severe pancreatitis, whereas one recipient required urgent allograft pancreatectomy for gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to an arterioenteric fistula. In cases of late allograft pancreatectomy, graft failure with clinical symptoms such as abdominal discomfort, pain, and nausea were the main indications (13/19 [68%]), simultaneous retransplantation without clinical symptoms in 3 (16%), and vascular catastrophes including pseudoaneurysm and enteric arterial fistula in 3 (16%). Postoperative morbidity included one case each of pulmonary embolism leading to mortality, formation of pseudoaneurysm requiring placement of covered stent, and postoperative bleeding requiring relaparotomy eventually leading to femoro-femoral bypass surgery 2 years after allograftectomy. Allograft pancreatectomy can be performed safely, does not preclude subsequent retransplantation, and may be lifesaving in certain instances. PMID:25912792

  11. Progress in the prevention of cytomegalovirus infection after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Devergie, A; Traineau, R; Esperou-Bourdeau, H; Ribaud, P; Socié, G; Richard, P; Selimi, F; Hirsch, I; Gluckman, E

    1994-01-01

    There has been substantial progress in preventing and treating CMV infection. Prophylaxis with CMV screened blood products, IVIG and antiviral drugs (high dose acyclovir and/or Ganciclovir) considerably reduce the incidence of CMV disease and nearly eliminate CMV pneumonia after allogeneic BMT. PMID:8177726

  12. Infusion of freshly isolated autologous bone marrow derived mononuclear cells prevents endotoxin-induced lung injury in an ex-vivo perfused swine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), affects up to 150,000 patients per year in the United States. We and other groups have demonstrated that bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells prevent ARDS induced by systemic and local administration of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) in mice. Methods A study was undertaken to determine the effects of the diverse populations of bone marrow derived cells on the pathophysiology of ARDS, using a unique ex-vivo swine preparation, in which only the ventilated lung and the liver are perfused with autologous blood. Six experimental groups were designated as: 1) endotoxin alone, 2) endotoxin + total fresh whole bone marrow nuclear cells (BMC), 3) endotoxin + non-hematopoietic bone marrow cells (CD45 neg), 4) endotoxin + hematopoietic bone marrow cells (CD45 positive), 5) endotoxin + buffy coat and 6) endotoxin + in vitro expanded swine CD45 negative adherent allogeneic bone marrow cells (cultured CD45neg). We measured at different levels the biological consequences of the infusion of the different subsets of cells. The measured parameters were: pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), gas exchange (PO2), lung edema (lung wet/dry weight), gene expression and serum concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. Results Infusion of freshly purified autologous total BMCs, as well as non-hematopoietic CD45(-) bone marrow cells significantly reduced endotoxin-induced pulmonary hypertension and hypoxemia and reduced the lung edema. Also, in the groups that received BMCs and cultured CD45neg we observed a decrease in the levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in plasma. Infusion of hematopoietic CD45(+) bone marrow cells or peripheral blood buffy coat cells did not protect against LPS-induced lung injury. Conclusions We conclude that infusion of freshly isolated autologous whole bone marrow cells and the subset of non-hematopoietic cells can suppress the acute humoral and physiologic

  13. Inhibition of the immune response to experimental fresh osteoarticular allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigo, J.J.; Schnaser, A.M.; Reynolds, H.M. Jr.; Biggart, J.M. 3d.; Leathers, M.W.; Chism, S.E.; Thorson, E.; Grotz, T.; Yang, Q.M. )

    1989-06-01

    The immune response to osteoarticular allografts is capable of destroying the cartilage--a tissue that has antigens on its cells identical to those on the bone and marrow cells. Osteoarticular allografts of the distal femur were performed in rats using various methods to attempt to temporarily inhibit the antibody response. The temporary systemic immunosuppressant regimens investigated were cyclophosphamide, azathioprine and prednisolone, cyclosporine A, and total lymphoid irradiation. The most successful appeared to be cyclosporine A, but significant side effects were observed. To specifically inhibit the immune response in the allograft antigens without systemically inhibiting the entire immune system, passive enhancement and preadministration of donor blood were tried. Neither was as effective as coating the donor bone with biodegradable cements, a method previously found to be successful. Cyclosporine A was investigated in dogs in a preliminary study of medial compartmental knee allografts and was found to be successful in inhibiting the antibody response and in producing a more successful graft; however, some significant side effects were similarly observed.

  14. New bone formation by murine osteoprogenitor cells cultured on corticocancellous allograft bone.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ehren R; Huang, Zhinong; Ma, Ting; Lindsey, Derek; Jacobs, Christopher; Smith, Robert L; Goodman, Stuart B

    2008-12-01

    The gold standard for bone grafting in orthopedics is autograft, however autograft has a limited supply and is associated with significant morbidity at the harvest site. One alternative, allograft bone, provides an osteoconductive scaffold, is in less limited supply, and it does not require a harvest from the patient. However, allograft lacks both osteogenic cells and osteoinductive proteins that make autograft bone so advantageous. This study provides a model to investigate strategies for augmentation of corticocancellous allograft bone discs with bone marrow-derived osteoprogenitor cells (OPCs) plus exogenous growth factors in vitro. In this model, allograft bone discs were created by cutting 1-mm thick slices from the distal femur and proximal tibia of euthanized mice. The allografts were sterilized and scanned by micro-computed tomography (microCT) to provide the pre-culture graft volume and trabecular characteristics. The discs were then seeded with OPCs harvested from murine bone marrow. The seeded grafts were placed in organ culture until harvest, after which they were re-scanned by microCT and the data compared to the corresponding pre-culture data. In addition, bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7, also know as osteogenic protein-1 or OP-1), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and OP-1 combined with bFGF were added on a daily basis to the cultures. After final microCT scanning, all grafts were sectioned and evaluated histologically after hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. microCT scans of cultured allografts with cells at 3, 5, and 9 weeks showed a time-dependent, statistically significant increase in bone volume. The trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.) of grafts, from both groups that were augmented with OP-1, showed a statistically significant increase in trabecular thickness of allografts with OPCs. These data suggest that bone marrow-derived OPCs adhere to, and produce, new bone on corticocancellous allograft in vitro. When exogenous OP-1 is added to

  15. Two Different Regulatory T Cell Populations That Promote Corneal Allograft Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cunnusamy, Khrishen; Paunicka, Kathryn; Reyes, Nancy; Yang, Wanhua; Chen, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To compare and contrast the T regulatory cells (Tregs) induced by anterior chamber (AC) injection of antigen with those induced by orthotopic corneal allografts. Methods. Anterior chamber–associated immune deviation (ACAID) Tregs were induced by injecting C57BL/6 spleen cells into the AC of BALB/c mice. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to C57BL/6 alloantigens were evaluated by a conventional ear swelling assay. Corneal allograft Tregs were induced by applying orthotopic C57BL/6 corneal allografts onto BALB/c hosts. The effects of anti-CD25, anti-CD8, anti-interferon-γ (IFN-γ), anti-IL-17A, or cyclophosphamide treatments on corneal allograft survival and ACAID were evaluated. Results. Administration of either anti-CD25 or anti-IFN-γ antibodies prevented the expression of ACAID and abolished the immune privilege of corneal allografts. By contrast, in vivo treatment with anti-CD8 antibody abrogated ACAID but had no effect on corneal allograft survival. Further discordance between ACAID and corneal allograft survival emerged in experiments in which the induction of allergic conjunctivitis or the administration of anti-IL-17A abolished the immune privilege of corneal allografts but had no effect on the induction or expression of ACAID. Conclusions. Although orthotopic corneal allografts are strategically located for the induction of ACAID by the sloughing of corneal cells into the AC, the results reported here indicate that the Tregs induced by orthotopic corneal allografts are remarkably different from the Tregs that are induced by AC injection of alloantigen. Although both of these Treg populations promote corneal allograft survival, they display distinctly different phenotypes. PMID:20702818

  16. Systemic zoledronate treatment both prevents resorption of allograft bone and increases the retention of new formed bone during revascularization and remodelling. A bone chamber study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Åstrand, Jörgen; Harding, Anna Kajsa; Aspenberg, Per; Tägil, Magnus

    2006-01-01

    Background In osteonecrosis the vascular supply of the bone is interrupted and the living cells die. The inorganic mineral network remains intact until ingrowing blood vessels invade the graft. Accompanying osteoclasts start to resorb the bone trabeculae and gradually replace the bone. If the osteonecrosis occurs in mechanically loaded parts, like in the subchondral bone of a loaded joint, the remodelling might lead to a weakening of the bone and, in consequence to a joint collapse. Systemic bisphosphonate treatment can reduce the resorption of necrotic bone. In the present study we investigate if zoledronate, the most potent of the commercially available bisphosphonates, can be used to reduce the amount or speed of bone graft remodeling. Methods Bone grafts were harvested and placed in a bone chamber inserted into the tibia of a rat. Host tissue could grow into the graft through openings in the chamber. Weekly injections with 1.05 μg zoledronate or saline were given subcutaneously until the rats were harvested after 6 weeks. The specimens were fixed, cut and stained with haematoxylin/eosin and used for histologic and histomorphometric analyses. Results By histology, the control specimens were almost totally resorbed in the remodeled area and the graft replaced by bone marrow. In the zoledronate treated specimens, both the old graft and new-formed bone remained and the graft trabeculas were lined with new bone. By histomorphometry, the total amount of bone (graft+ new bone) within the remodelled area was 35 % (SD 13) in the zoledronate treated grafts and 19 % (SD 12) in the controls (p = 0.001). Also the amount of new bone was increased in the treated specimens (22 %, SD 7) compared to the controls (14 %, SD 9, p = 0.032). Conclusion We show that zoledronate can be used to decrease the resorption of both old graft and new-formed bone during bone graft remodelling. This might be useful in bone grafting procedure but also in other orthopedic conditions, both where

  17. Erythropoietin, but not the correction of anemia alone, protects from chronic kidney allograft injury.

    PubMed

    Cassis, Paola; Gallon, Lorenzo; Benigni, Ariela; Mister, Marilena; Pezzotta, Anna; Solini, Samantha; Gagliardini, Elena; Cugini, Daniela; Abbate, Mauro; Aiello, Sistiana; Rocchetta, Federica; Scudeletti, Pierangela; Perico, Norberto; Noris, Marina; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    Anemia can contribute to chronic allograft injury by limiting oxygen delivery to tissues, particularly in the tubulointerstitium. To determine mechanisms by which erythropoietin (EPO) prevents chronic allograft injury we utilized a rat model of full MHC-mismatched kidney transplantation (Wistar Furth donor and Lewis recipients) with removal of the native kidneys. EPO treatment entirely corrected post-transplant anemia. Control rats developed progressive proteinuria and graft dysfunction, tubulointerstitial damage, inflammatory cell infiltration, and glomerulosclerosis, all prevented by EPO. Normalization of post-transplant hemoglobin levels by blood transfusions, however, had no impact on chronic allograft injury, indicating that EPO-mediated graft protection went beyond the correction of anemia. Compared to syngeneic grafts, control allografts had loss of peritubular capillaries, higher tubular apoptosis, tubular and glomerular oxidative injury, and reduced expression of podocyte nephrin; all prevented by EPO treatment. The effects of EPO were associated with preservation of intragraft expression of angiogenic factors, upregulation of the anti-apoptotic factor p-Akt in tubuli, and increased expression of Bcl-2. Inhibition of p-Akt by Wortmannin partially antagonized the effect of EPO on allograft injury and tubular apoptosis, and prevented EPO-induced Bcl-2 upregulation. Thus non-erythropoietic derivatives of EPO may be useful to prevent chronic renal allograft injury. PMID:22318420

  18. Failure of donor lymphocyte infusion to prevent graft rejection in dogs given DLA-identical marrow after 1 Gy of total body irradiation.

    PubMed

    Baron, Frédéric; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Zellmer, Eustacia; Sorror, Mohamed; Storer, Barry; Storb, Rainer

    2006-08-01

    We investigated in a preclinical canine model of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) whether preemptive donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) given 1 month after HCT could prevent late graft rejection that was the rule in historical dogs given suboptimal conditioning with 1 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI) before and immunosuppression with cyclosporine (CSP) and either mycophenolate mofetil (MMF; n = 6) or rapamycin (n = 5) after dog leukocyte antigen (DLA)-identical marrow transplantation. Nine dogs given DLA-identical marrow after 1 Gy of TBI followed by postgrafting MMF and CSP were studied. A single DLI was given 28-36 days after HCT, either with (n = 5) or without (n = 4) preceding treatment with the immunosuppressive drug pentostatin. Two of the 4 dogs given DLI only maintained stable mixed donor-host chimera beyond 30 weeks after HCT, whereas 2 rejected their grafts, on weeks 10 and 15 after HCT. One of the 5 dogs given pentostatin before DLI maintained a stable mixed donor-host chimera beyond 30 weeks, whereas 4 rejected their grafts, at weeks 8, 12, 12, and 16 after HCT. The 30-week probability of stable mixed chimerism was 33% among dogs given DLI, versus 0% among 11 historical dogs (P = .003). In conclusion, DLI was only moderately effective in preventing graft rejection in this model. Additional immunosuppression with pentostatin did not improve that outcome. The model might be useful in developing potential strategies aimed at preventing graft rejection in patients with low donor chimerism levels. PMID:16864051

  19. Leukemia prevention and long-term survival of AKR mice transplanted with MHC-matched or MHC-mismatched bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Longley, R.E.; Good, R.A.

    1986-09-01

    The current studies were designed to evaluate the effectiveness of marrow transplantation within and outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on the long-term survival and occurrence of spontaneous leukemia in AKR mice. AKR mice, which were lethally irradiated and received MHC-matched marrow from CBA/J mice (CBA----AKR), never developed leukemia and were alive and remained healthy for up to 280 days post-transplant. These long-term surviving chimeras possessed substantial immune vigor when both cell-mediated and humoral responses were tested. Lethally irradiated AKR mice, which had received MHC-mismatched marrow (anti-Thy-1.2 treated or nontreated) from C57BL/6J mice (B6----AKR), never developed leukemia and survived up to 170 days post-transplant. However, both groups of these chimeras began dying 180 to 270 days post-transplant due to a disease process which could not be readily identified. Histological analysis of B6----AKR chimeras revealed severe lymphoid cell depletion in thymus and spleen; however, none of these chimeras exhibited classical features of acute graft versus host disease. Concanavalin A mitogenesis, primary antibody responses to sheep red blood cells and the production of interleukin 2 (IL-2) were suppressed in B6----AKR chimeras. IL-2 treatment of B6----AKR chimeras was shown to partially correct these deficiencies without stimulating mixed lymphocyte responsiveness to donor or host lymphocytes. These studies indicate that the use of MHC-mismatched marrow for the prevention of spontaneous AKR leukemia may rely on augmentative IL-2 therapy for complete immune reconstitution of leukemia-free chimeras.

  20. Aortic valve allografts in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Borrie, John; Hill, G. L.

    1968-01-01

    Some of the mechnical and biological problems surrounding the use of fresh allograft inverted aortic valves as mitral valve substitutes are described. Certain aspects of the problem have been studied experimentally. In three sheep `fresh' aortic valve allografts were inserted, using cardiopulmonary bypass, into the main pulmonary artery, and were observed from 5 to 7 months after operation. The animals survived normally. Their normal pulmonary valves remained in situ. The technique is described. At subsequent necropsy, macroscopically the valves were found to be free from vegetation, and the cusps were pliable and apparently normal. Microscopically, the supporting allograft myocardium showed necrosis and early calcification. The valve cusp showed hyalinization of collagen, although beneath the endocardium this hyalinized collagen contained moderate numbers of fibroblasts with no evidence of proliferation. The endocardium and arterial intima of the allograft showed evidence of ingrowth from adjacent normal host endocardial tissues. The allograft itself was invested in a loose layer of fibro-fatty tissue, which, in view of the necrotic state of the graft myocardium, could well have been a reparative reaction rather than a homograft reaction. It is concluded that, although the cusps could function normally, the necrosis of the myocardium might in time lead to late failure of the graft. Further studies with the valve inserted at mitral level are indicated. Images PMID:5656757

  1. Osteochondral Allograft of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Bisicchia, Salvatore; Rosso, Federica; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are being recognized as an increasingly common injury. They are most commonly located postero-medially or antero-laterally, while centrally located lesions are uncommon. Large osteochondral lesions have significant biomechanical consequences and often require resurfacing with osteochondral autograft transfer, mosaicplasty, autologous chondrocyte implantation (or similar methods) or osteochondral allograft transplantation. Allograft procedures have become popular due to inherent advantages over other resurfacing techniques. Cartilage viability is one of the most important factors for successful clinical outcomes after transplantation of osteochondral allografts and is related to storage length and intra-operative factors. While there is abundant literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation in the knee, there are few papers about this procedure in the talus. Failure of non-operative management, initial debridement, curettage or microfractures are an indication for resurfacing. Patients should have a functional ankle motion, closed growth plates, absence of cartilage lesions on the tibial side. This paper reviews the published literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation of the talus focusing on indications, pre-operative planning, surgical approaches, postoperative management, results and complications of this procedure. PMID:25328456

  2. Long-term enzyme replacement therapy in beta-glucuronidase--deficient mice by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Yatziv, S.; Weiss, L.; Morecki, S.; Fuks, Z.; Slavin, S.

    1982-06-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy was successfully accomplished in beta-Glu-deficient C3H/HeJ mice after transplantation of BM cells obtained from normal BALB/c donors. Marrow recipients were prepared for transplantation by fractionated TLI. Enzyme activity increased from 20.5 +/- 7.0 nmol/mg of protein per hour to 180 +/- 30.2 in the liver (p less than 0.001) and from 8.2 +/- 2.0 to 17.5 +/- 5.0 nmol/ml/hr in the plasma (p less than 0.05) at 50 days after marrow infusion. Normal enzyme activity was maintained in treated mice for at least 100 days after marrow transplantation, as documented by repeated liver biopsies and examination of plasma samples. The marrow donors and the recipients were fully histoincompatible. Both immunologic rejection of the marrow allograft and GVHD were prevented by the prior conditioning of the recipients with TLI, resulting in bilateral transplantation tolerance of host vs. graft and graft vs. host. The data suggest that allogeneic BM transplantation may provide a possible therapeutic approach for certain enzyme deficiency syndromes.

  3. Biomechanical properties of bone allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Markham, T.C.

    1983-04-01

    The biomechanical properties of allograft bone can be altered by the methods chosen for its preservation and storage. These effects are minimal with deep-freezing or low-level radiation. Freeze-drying, however, markedly diminishes the torsional and bending strength of bone allografts but does not deleteriously affect the compressive or tensile strength. Irradiation of bone with more than 3.0 megarad or irradiation combined with freeze-drying appears to cause a significant reduction in breaking strength. These factors should be considered when choosing freeze-dried or irradiated allogeneic bone that will be subjected to significant loads following implantation.

  4. Minimizing the risk of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Wali, Ravinder K

    2009-04-27

    Chronic allograft nephropathy, now defined as interstital fibrosis and tubular atrophy not otherwise specified, is a near universal finding in transplant kidney biopsies by the end of the first decade posttransplantation. After excluding death with functioning graft, caused by cardiovascular disease or malignancy, chronic allograft nephropathy is the leading cause of graft failure. Original assumptions were that this was not a modifiable process but inexorable, likely due to past kidney injuries. However, newer understandings suggest that acute or subacute processes are involved, and with proper diagnosis, appropriate interventions can be instituted. Our method involved a review of the primary and secondary prevention trials in calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal. Some of the more important causes of progressive graft deterioration include subclinical cellular or humoral rejection, and chronic calcineurin inhibitor toxicity. Early graft biopsy, assessment of histology, and changes in immunosuppression may be some of the most important measures available to protect graft function. The avoidance of clinical inertia in pursuing subtle changes in graft function is critical. Modification in maintenance immunosuppression may benefit many patients with early evidence of graft deterioration. PMID:19384181

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in bone marrow-derived cells prevents acute cardiac inflammation and injury in response to angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Li, T-T; Jia, L-X; Zhang, W-M; Li, X-Y; Zhang, J; Li, Y-L; Li, H-H; Qi, Y-F; Du, J

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in hypertensive cardiac injury. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway is involved in the inflammatory response. However, the role of ER stress in elevated angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac injury remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress in Ang II-induced hypertensive cardiac injury. Transcriptome analysis and quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ang II infusion in mice increased ER stress-related genes expression in the heart. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency, a key mediator of ER stress, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, especially neutrophils, the production of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines in Ang II-infused mouse hearts. CHOP deficiency increased Ang II-induced cardiac fibrotic injury: (1) Masson trichrome staining showed increased fibrotic areas, (2) immunohistochemistry staining showed increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor β1 and (3) quantitative real-time PCR showed increased expression of collagen in CHOP-deficient mouse heart. Bone marrow transplantation experiments indicated that CHOP deficiency in bone marrow cells was responsible for Ang II-induced cardiac fibrotic injury. Moreover, TUNEL staining and flow cytometry revealed that CHOP deficiency decreased neutrophil apoptosis in response to Ang II. Taken together, our study demonstrated that hypertension induced ER stress after Ang II infusion. ER stress in bone marrow-derived cells protected acute cardiac inflammation and injury in response to Ang II. PMID:27277680

  6. Alternatively expressed genes identified in the CD4+ T cells of allograft rejection mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Chao; Song, Jing; Liang, Ting; Jin, Weirong; Kim, Yeong C; Wang, San Ming; Hou, Guihua

    2011-01-01

    Allograft rejection is a leading cause for the failure of allotransplantation. CD4(+) T cells play critical roles in this process. The identification of genes that alternatively expressed in CD4(+) T cells during allograft rejection will provide critical information for studying the mechanism of allograft rejection, finding specific gene markers for monitoring, predicting allograft rejection, and opening new ways to regulate and prevent allograft rejection. Here, we established allograft and isograft transplantation models by adoptively transferring wild-type BALB/c mouse CD4(+) T cells into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with a C57BL/6 or BALB/c mouse skin graft. Using the whole transcriptome sequencing-based serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) technology, we identified 97 increasingly and 88 decreasingly expressed genes that may play important roles in allograft rejection and tolerance. Functional classification of these genes shows that apoptosis, transcription regulation, cell growth and maintenance, and signal transduction are among the frequently changed functional groups. This study provides a genome-wide view for the candidate genes of CD4(+) T cells related to allotransplantation, and this report is a good resource for further microarray studies and for identifying the specific markers that are associated with clinical organ transplantations. PMID:21294963

  7. Emphysema in the renal allograft

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.L.; Sullivan, B.M.; Fluornoy, J.G.; Gerza, C.

    1985-04-01

    Two diabetic patients in whom emphysematous pyelonephritis developed after renal transplantation are described. Clinical recognition of this unusual and serious infection is masked by the effects of immunosuppression. Abdominal radiographic, ultrasound, and computed tomography findings are discussed. The clinical presentation includes urinary tract infection, sepsis, and acute tubular malfunction of the allograft in insulin-dependent diabetics.

  8. Allograft pancreas: pale acinar nodules.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Megan L; Drachenberg, Cinthia

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic pale-staining acinar nodules were characterized in native pancreas in the 1980s under a variety of names but have been infrequently reported since. We retrospectively studied the frequency and characteristics of pale acinar nodules in allograft pancreas biopsies, as compared to a sampling of native pancreas specimens at our center. Pale acinar nodules were present in 13% (9/69) of allograft biopsies from 22% (7/32) of transplant patients, and 23% (5/22) of native pancreas surgical specimens, although more nodules per pancreas area were present in allograft needle biopsies. Acinar nodules had size of 100 to 700 μm, were periodic acid-Schiff pale, were synaptophysin negative, stained more weakly with keratin CAM 5.2 compared to surrounding parenchyma, and had a low proliferative rate. Ultrastructural evaluation revealed paucity of zymogen granules with dilated cistern-like structures. In our experience, pale acinar nodules have similar features in allograft and native pancreas specimens, yet remain of uncertain etiology and significance. PMID:27063474

  9. Controlled Release of Growth Factors on Allograft Bone in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, WonHyoung; Ren, Peigen; Fasching, Rainer; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2008-01-01

    Allografts are important alternatives to autografts for treating defects after major bone loss. Bone growth factors have both local autocrine and paracrine effects and regulate the growth, proliferation, and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells. To study the effects of prolonged, continuous, local delivery of growth factors on bone growth, we developed a new microelectromechanical system (MEMS) drug delivery device. Bone marrow cells from mice were seeded on mouse allograft discs and cultured in osteogenic media with osteogenic protein 1 (OP-1) and/or basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) delivered from MEMS devices for 6 weeks. We monitored bone formation by changes of bone volume using micro-CT scanning and release of osteocalcin using ELISA. The data suggest the MEMS devices delivered constant concentrations of OP-1 and FGF-2 to the media. Bone marrow cells grew on the allografts and increased bone volume. Addition of OP-1 increased bone formation whereas FGF-2 decreased bone formation. Local delivery of growth factors over a prolonged period modulated the differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells on allograft bone. PMID:18509711

  10. Platelet deposition in rat heart allografts and the effect of a thromboxane receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Foegh, M.L.; Khirabadi, B.S.; Ramwell, P.W.

    1986-07-01

    The effect of a thromboxane antagonist, L640,035 on platelet deposition in heart allografts was studied. Twenty Lewis rats received heterotopic allografts from Lewis x Brown-Norway F1 hybrid. All recipients received azathioprine (5 mg/kg/day). The rats were divided into three groups. Groups II and III were also treated daily with either the vehicle for L640,035 or L640,035 respectively. Syngeneic indium-111-labeled platelet deposition was determined in the allograft and the native heart at 6, 9, and 13 days after transplantation; group III was studied on the sixth and ninth day only. A rapidly increasing platelet deposition was seen in allografts from rats given azathioprine; whereas the thromboxane antagonist prevented the increase in platelet deposition on the ninth day.

  11. Combined procedure of vascularized bone marrow transplantation and mesenchymal stem cells graft - an effective solution for rapid hematopoietic reconstitution and prevention of graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Coliţă, Andrei; Coliţă, Anca; Zamfirescu, Dragos; Lupu, Anca Roxana

    2012-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a a standard therapeutic option for several diseases. The success of the procedure depends on quality and quantity of transplanted cells and on stromal capacity to create an optimal microenvironment, that supports survival and development of the hematopoietic elements. Conditions associated with stromal dysfunction lead to slower/insufficient engraftment and/or immune reconstitution. A possible solution to this problem is to realize a combined graft of hematopoietic stem cells along with the medular stroma in the form of vascularized bone marrow transplant (VBMT). Another major drawback of HSCT is the risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD). Recently, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have demonstrated the capacity to down-regulate alloreactive T-cell and to enhance the engraftment. Cotransplantation of MSC could be a therapeutic option for a better engraftment and GVHD prevention. PMID:22677297

  12. Leiomyoma in a Renal Allograft.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan Jun; Siriwardana, Amila Rohan; Symons, James Lawrence Penn; O'Neill, Gordon Francis; Qiu, Min Ru; Furlong, Timothy John

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas are smooth muscle tumours that are rarely found in the kidney. There is one report of a leiomyoma in a kidney transplant in a paediatric recipient. Here, we report an adult renal transplant recipient who developed an Epstein-Barr virus-positive leiomyoma in his allograft 15 years after transplantation. The patient was converted to everolimus for posttransplant immunosuppression management and there was no sign of progression over a year. PMID:27195169

  13. Leiomyoma in a Renal Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan Jun; Siriwardana, Amila Rohan; Symons, James Lawrence Penn; O'Neill, Gordon Francis; Qiu, Min Ru; Furlong, Timothy John

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas are smooth muscle tumours that are rarely found in the kidney. There is one report of a leiomyoma in a kidney transplant in a paediatric recipient. Here, we report an adult renal transplant recipient who developed an Epstein-Barr virus-positive leiomyoma in his allograft 15 years after transplantation. The patient was converted to everolimus for posttransplant immunosuppression management and there was no sign of progression over a year. PMID:27195169

  14. The beginning of clinical tolerance in solid organ allografts.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Anthony P

    2004-06-01

    Development of effective multidrug immunosuppressive regimens and improvements in the management of chronically immunosuppressed patients have produced extraordinary patient and allograft survival in clinical organ transplantation. Unfortunately, significant problems of morbidity and mortality related to chronic immunosuppression remain. Thus, there is an enormous motivation and interest in inducing specific unresponsiveness (tolerance) to clinical solid organ allografts. Operational clinical tolerance may be defined as stable, normal graft function in the total absence of a requirement for maintenance immunosuppression. Alternatively, the concept of employing tolerogenic strategies to permit graft acceptance with dramatically reduced immunosuppression requirements is referred to as prope' or minimal immunosuppression tolerance. There have been isolated examples of clinical tolerance, usually in the context of spontaneous or induced donor chimerism, excellent HLA matching, and/or drug weaning or patient noncompliance. The various attempts that are currently being employed to induce some type of clinical tolerance are reviewed in this manuscript. Strategies in which all immunosuppression was to be withdrawn from the recipient (donor-specific unresponsiveness) are first discussed. These include strategies that utilize initial immunoablation with varying doses of irradiation and/or lymphocytic antibodies with or without donor-specific bone marrow infusion and short-term standard immunosuppressive therapy. Strategies to induce prope' or minimal immunosuppression tolerance that utilize induction lymphoablation with polyclonal or monoclonal antilymphocyte antibodies, with or without donor bone marrow infusion, followed by limited low-dose immunosuppressive therapy are also discussed. The ethical considerations in testing clinical tolerance strategies and protocols are discussed in detail. The limited number of clinical tolerance studies already available affirms that

  15. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 agonist SEW2871 prolongs heterotopic heart allograft survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qian; Yuan, Baohong; Liu, Tao; Lan, Fang; Luo, Xiaochun; Lu, Xiaoyan; Huang, Ping; Dai, Liangcheng; Jin, Xiaobao; Yin, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a biologically active metabolite of plasma-membrane sphingolipids that is essential for immune cell trafficking. Recent studies have revealed immunomodulatory functions of S1P and its receptors (S1PR1-S1PR5) in many inflammatory conditions, such as asthma and autoimmunity. Here, we explore the efficacy of SEW2871, a selective S1PR1 agonist, in the prevention of acute allograft rejection in a murine cardiac transplantation model. Treatment of recipient mice with SEW2871 significantly prolongs cardiac allograft survival as compared to those recipients treated with control vehicle. The enhanced graft survival is associated with reduced circulating lymphocytes and allograft inflammatory cell infiltration. The cytokine analysis showed decreased allograft expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-2 in the SEW2871-treated mice. Moreover, administration of SEW2871 increases the percentage of CD4(+) T regulatory cells and FoxP3 expression in spleen of allograft recipients. Therefore, SEW2871 plays a critical role in regulation of lymphocyte trafficking and development, which directly contributes to prolongation of the allograft survival. PMID:25776899

  16. Allografts in Soft Tissue Reconstructive Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Giedraitis, Andrius; Arnoczky, Steven P.; Bedi, Asheesh

    2014-01-01

    Context Allografts offer several important advantages over autografts in musculoskeletal reconstructive procedures, such as anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Despite growing widespread use of allograft tissue, serious concerns regarding safety and functionality remain. We discuss the latest knowledge of the potential benefits and risks of allograft use and offer a critical review of allograft tissue regulation, management, and sterilization to enable the surgeon to better inform athletes considering reconstructive surgery options. Evidence Acquisition A review of sources published in the past 10 years is the primary basis of this research. Study Design: Observational analysis (cohort study). Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results Comparable outcome data for autografts and allografts do not support universal standards for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and physician recommendation and bias appear to significantly influence patient preference and satisfaction. Sterilization by gamma and electron-beam irradiation diminishes the biomechanical integrity of allograft tissue, but radioprotective agents such as collagen cross-linking and free radical scavengers appear to have potential in mitigating the deleterious effects of irradiation and preserving tissue strength and stability. Conclusion Allografts offer greater graft availability and reduced morbidity in orthopaedic reconstructive procedures, but greater expansion of their use by surgeons is challenged by the need to maintain tissue sterility and biomechanical functionality. Advances in the radioprotection of irradiated tissue may lessen concerns regarding allograft safety and structural stability. PMID:24790696

  17. Suppression of allograft rejection in the sponge Suberites domuncula by FK506 and expression of genes encoding FK506-binding proteins in allografts.

    PubMed

    Müller, W E; Steffen, R; Lorenz, B; Batel, R; Kruse, M; Krasko, A; Müller, I M; Schröder, H C

    2001-07-01

    Porifera (sponges) are, evolutionarily, the oldest metazoan phylum. Recent molecular data suggest that these animals possess molecules similar to and homologous with those of the innate and adaptive immune systems of higher Metazoa. Applying the biological system of parabiosis and the technique of differential display of mRNA, two cDNAs encoding putative FK506-binding proteins were isolated. FK506 is successfully used in clinics as a drug to prevent allograft rejection and is toxic to Suberites domuncula cells in vitro at doses above 100ng ml(-1). Autograft fusion of transplants from S. domuncula was not affected by FK506. Allograft non-fusion was not affected by FK506 at toxic doses; however, at the non-toxic dose of 20ng ml(-1), the allografts fused with each other. It is shown that at the attachment zone in untreated and (particularly drastic) in FK506-treated allografts, expression of the genes encoding the FK506-binding proteins is upregulated. These data indicate that the drug FK506 suppresses allograft rejection in S. domuncula, most probably via interaction with expression of the gene coding for the FK506-binding proteins. PMID:11507104

  18. Allograft Replacement for Absent Native Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Salma; Wanivenhaus, Florian; Fox, Alice J.; Warren, Russell F.; Doyle, Maureen; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Structural instability due to poor soft tissue quality often requires augmentation. Allografts are important biological substitutes that are used for the symptomatic patient in the reconstruction of deficient ligaments, tendons, menisci, and osteochondral defects. Interest in the clinical application of allografts has arisen from the demand to obtain stable anatomy with restoration of function and protection against additional injury, particularly for high-demand patients who participate in sports. Traditionally, allografts were employed to reinforce weakened tissue. However, they can also be employed to substitute deficient or functionally absent tissue, particularly in the sports medicine setting. Objective: This article presents a series of 6 cases that utilized allografts to restore functionally deficient anatomic architecture, rather than just simply augmenting the degenerated or damaged native tissue. Detailed discussions are presented of the use of allografts as a successful treatment strategy to replace functionally weakened tissue, often after failed primary repairs. PMID:24427387

  19. Fresh osteochondral allografts in the knee: only a salvage procedure?

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Alberto; Scotti, Celeste; Lane, John G; Peretti, Giuseppe M

    2015-07-01

    The role of fresh allogeneic osteochondral allograft transplantation (OCA) in the cartilage repair algorithm has been long debated and this procedure is primarily considered as a salvage procedure, to be used when other, simple, techniques have failed. Gracitelli et al. in a retrospective comparison of patients who received OCA as primary treatment or as a salvage procedure, demonstrates that the outcome of this procedure is minimally influenced by a previous failed treatment and that OCA represents an effective solution for both primary and revision surgery of chondral and osteochondral lesions of the knee. In particular, optimal indications for OCA seem to be revision of previously failed bone marrow stimulation techniques with an impaired subchondral bone plate and primary treatment of large osteochondral defects. PMID:26261835

  20. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  1. Prevention of Lethal Murine Hypophosphatasia by Neonatal Ex Vivo Gene Therapy Using Lentivirally Transduced Bone Marrow Cells.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Osamu; Miyake, Koichi; Watanabe, Atsushi; Miyake, Noriko; Igarashi, Tsutomu; Kanokoda, Chizu; Nakamura-Takahashi, Aki; Kinoshita, Hideaki; Noguchi, Taku; Abe, Shinichi; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Okada, Takashi; Shimada, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inherited skeletal and dental disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP). The major symptoms of severe forms of the disease are bone defects, respiratory insufficiency, and epileptic seizures. In 2015, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using recombinant bone-targeted TNALP with deca-aspartate (D10) motif was approved to treat pediatric HPP patients in Japan, Canada, and Europe. However, the ERT requires repeated subcutaneous administration of the enzyme because of the short half-life in serum. In the present study, we evaluated the feasibility of neonatal ex vivo gene therapy in TNALP knockout (Akp2(-/-)) HPP mice using lentivirally transduced bone marrow cells (BMC) expressing bone-targeted TNALP in which a D10 sequence was linked to the C-terminus of soluble TNALP (TNALP-D10). The Akp2(-/-) mice usually die within 20 days because of growth failure, epileptic seizures, and hypomineralization. However, an intravenous transplantation of BMC expressing TNALP-D10 (ALP-BMC) into neonatal Akp2(-/-) mice prolonged survival of the mice with improved bone mineralization compared with untransduced BMC-transplanted Akp2(-/-) mice. The treated Akp2(-/-) mice were normal in appearance and experienced no seizures during the experimental period. The lentivirally transduced BMC were efficiently engrafted in the recipient mice and supplied TNALP-D10 continuously at a therapeutic level for at least 3 months. Moreover, TNALP-D10 overexpression did not affect multilineage reconstitution in the recipient mice. The plasma ALP activity was sustained at high levels in the treated mice, and tissue ALP activity was selectively detected on bone surfaces, not in the kidneys or other organs. No ectopic calcification was observed in the ALP-BMC-treated mice. These results indicate that lentivirally transduced BMC can serve as a reservoir for stem cell-based ERT to rescue the Akp2

  2. Induced regulatory T cells in allograft tolerance via transient mixed chimerism

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Kiyohiko; Aoyama, Akihiro; Oura, Tetsu; Yamada, Yohei; Tonsho, Makoto; Huh, Kyu Ha; Kawai, Kento; Schoenfeld, David; Allan, James S.; Madsen, Joren C.; Benichou, Gilles; Smith, Rex-Neal; Colvin, Robert B.; Sachs, David H.; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Successful induction of allograft tolerance has been achieved in nonhuman primates (NHPs) and humans via induction of transient hematopoietic chimerism. Since allograft tolerance was achieved in these recipients without durable chimerism, peripheral mechanisms are postulated to play a major role. Here, we report our studies of T cell immunity in NHP recipients that achieved long-term tolerance versus those that rejected the allograft (AR). All kidney, heart, and lung transplant recipients underwent simultaneous or delayed donor bone marrow transplantation (DBMT) following conditioning with a nonmyeloablative regimen. After DBMT, mixed lymphocyte culture with CFSE consistently revealed donor-specific loss of CD8+ T cell responses in tolerant (TOL) recipients, while marked CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to donor antigens was found to persist. Interestingly, a significant proportion of the proliferated CD4+ cells were FOXP3+ in TOL recipients, but not in AR or naive NHPs. In TOL recipients, CD4+FOXP3+ cell proliferation against donor antigens was greater than that observed against third-party antigens. Finally, the expanded Tregs appeared to be induced Tregs (iTregs) that were converted from non-Tregs. These data provide support for the hypothesis that specific induction of iTregs by donor antigens is key to long-term allograft tolerance induced by transient mixed chimerism. PMID:27446989

  3. Hair Follicle Dermal Sheath Derived Cells Improve Islet Allograft Survival without Systemic Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojie; Hao, Jianqiang; Leung, Gigi; Breitkopf, Trisia; Wang, Eddy; Kwong, Nicole; Akhoundsadegh, Noushin; Warnock, Garth L.; Shapiro, Jerry; McElwee, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs successfully prevent rejection of islet allografts in the treatment of type I diabetes. However, the drugs also suppress systemic immunity increasing the risk of opportunistic infection and cancer development in allograft recipients. In this study, we investigated a new treatment for autoimmune diabetes using naturally immune privileged, hair follicle derived, autologous cells to provide localized immune protection of islet allotransplants. Islets from Balb/c mouse donors were cotransplanted with syngeneic hair follicle dermal sheath cup cells (DSCC, group 1) or fibroblasts (FB, group 2) under the kidney capsule of immune-competent, streptozotocin induced, diabetic C57BL/6 recipients. Group 1 allografts survived significantly longer than group 2 (32.2 ± 12.2 versus 14.1 ± 3.3 days, P < 0.001) without administration of any systemic immunosuppressive agents. DSCC reduced T cell activation in the renal lymph node, prevented graft infiltrates, modulated inflammatory chemokine and cytokine profiles, and preserved better beta cell function in the islet allografts, but no systemic immunosuppression was observed. In summary, DSCC prolong islet allograft survival without systemic immunosuppression by local modulation of alloimmune responses, enhancing of beta cell survival, and promoting of graft revascularization. This novel finding demonstrates the capacity of easily accessible hair follicle cells to be used as local immunosuppression agents in islet transplantation. PMID:26000314

  4. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  5. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity, nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  6. Induction of allogeneic unresponsiveness by supralethal irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Rapaport, F.T.; Bachvaroff, R.J.; Akiyama, N.; Sato, T.

    1980-09-01

    Supralethally irradiated dogs were reconstituted wth their own stored bone marrow and were challenged at various time intervals with a kidney allograft. The data suggest that transplanted bone marrow cells may participate directly in the events leading to allogenic unresponsiveness. The time interval between marrow cell replacement and kidney allotransplantation required for optimal results suggest that at least one cycle of cell turnover by the replaced stem cells is needed in order to produce unresponsiveness. Host irradiation and reconstitution with stored autologous marrow may be useful in the treatment of certain forms of cancer.

  7. Meniscal allograft transplantation in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Liana M; Del Carlo, Ricardo J; Melo Filho, Edson V; Favarato, Lukiya S C; Duarte, Tatiana S; Pontes, Kelly C S; Cunha, Daise N Q

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the technique for meniscal allograft transplantation using allografts preserved in glycerin 98% in rabbits. Euthanasia was performed at 70 days to compare the transplanted (TM1 to TM16) versus the contralateral meniscus (OM1 to OM16). Sixteen menisci, 8 transplanted and 8 contralateral, were submitted to gross examination, histomorphometric analysis for identification and quantification of cellular type, and for quantification and distribution of collagen fibers. A revascularization study was conducted in all of the other samples. Lengths of the OM varied from 0.9 to 1.0 cm and two TM were smaller. All TM were completely attached to the synovial membrane, except for one case that presented partial fixation. Both, TM and OM had similar amounts of chondrocytes, fibroblasts and fibrocytes, and at the horns, chondrocytes were predominant. The collagen fibers in TM were well organized throughout the body, and disorganized at the horns. These fibers in OM were organized. The amounts of collagen type I and III, and the vascularization of the perimeniscal tissue and of the edge were similar in OM and TM. These results demonstrated graft integration and thus this transplantation technique and preservation method may be recommended. PMID:26648544

  8. Preserved saphenous vein allografts for vascular access.

    PubMed

    Piccone, V A; Sika, J; Ahmed, N; LeVeen, H H; DiScala, V

    1978-09-01

    Preserved venous allografts were used as an alternate access procedure in 70 patients receiving dialysis during a three year period. The clinical experience with allograft fistulas revealed an extremely high initial patency rate; absence of infection postoperatively and during three years of dialysis; suitability for dialysis a week after implantation, thus greatly obviating the need for Silastic shunts; a low long term thrombosis rate and the weakly antigenic allograft veins produced no accelerated rejection of subsequently transplanted kidneys. Surviving patients average 172 dialysis treatments per allograft. Allograft fistulas constituted 45 per cent of the last 100 vascular procedures, an indication of the extent of usage. Microscopic examination of grafts retrieved from patients who died during the late follow-up period demonstrated that structural components of the wall of the vein were still identifiable. Allograft venous fistulas offer dependable, safe vascular access, especially in the infection prone patient with diabetes who is receiving dialysis treatment. The clinical results of allograft fistulas suggests a major role for this technique in vascular access operations. PMID:684591

  9. Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Peptide Prevents Serum Deprivation-Induced Apoptosis in Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Osteoblastic Cells.

    PubMed

    Berlier, J L; Kharroubi, I; Zhang, J; Dalla Valle, A; Rigutto, S; Mathieu, M; Gangji, V; Rasschaert, J

    2015-12-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC) are able to differentiate into cells of connective tissue lineages, including bone and cartilage. They are therefore considered as a promising tool for the treatment of bone degenerative diseases. One of the major issues in regenerative cell therapy is the biosafety of fetal bovine serum used for cell culture. Therefore, the development of a culture medium devoid of serum but preserving hBMSC viability will be of clinical value. The glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) has an anti-apoptotic action in insulin-producing cells. Interestingly, GIP also exerts beneficial effects on bone turnover by acting on osteoblasts and osteoclasts. We therefore evaluated the ability of GIP to prevent cell death in osteoblastic cells cultured in serum-free conditions. In hBMSC and SaOS-2 cells, activation of the GIP receptor increased intracellular cAMP levels. Serum deprivation induced apoptosis in SaOS-2 and hBMSC that was reduced by 30 and 50 %, respectively, in the presence of GIP. The protective effect of GIP involves activation of the adenylate cyclase pathway and inhibition of caspases 3/7 activation. These findings demonstrate that GIP exerts a protective action against apoptosis in hBMSC and suggest a novel approach to preserve viability of hBMSC cultured in the absence of serum. PMID:26254594

  10. Future of allografts in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Harner, Christopher D; Lo, Marvin Y

    2009-04-01

    Allografts play a prominent role in sports medicine, and their usage has increased dramatically over the past few decades, but the role of allograft in the future of sports medicine largely depends on several factors: (1) the ability of the tissue banking industry to convince both surgeons and the general population that tissue procurement is safe and nearly disease-free, (2) the ability to sterilize tissue with minimal compromise to tissue integrity, (3) successful clinical outcomes with allograft, and (4) the advent of artificial scaffolds and ligaments that function as well. PMID:19306738

  11. Inability of donor total body irradiation to prolong survival of vascularized bone allografts: Experimental study in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez del Pino, J.; Benito, M.; Randolph, M.A.; Weiland, A.J. )

    1990-07-01

    At the present time, the toxic side effects of recipient immunosuppression cannot be justified for human non-vital organ transplantation. Total body irradiation has proven effective in ablating various bone-marrow-derived and endothelial immunocompetent cellular populations, which are responsible for immune rejection against donor tissues. Irradiation at a dose of 10 Gy was given to donor rats six days prior to heterotopic transplantation of vascularized bone allografts to host animals. Another group of recipient rats also received a short-term (sixth to fourteenth day after grafting), low dose of cyclosporine. Total body irradiation was able merely to delay rejection of grafts across a strong histocompatibility barrier for one to two weeks, when compared to nonirradiated allografts. The combination of donor irradiation plus cyclosporine did not delay the immune response, and the rejection score was similar to that observed for control allografts. Consequently, allograft viability was quickly impaired, leading to irreversible bone damage. This study suggest that 10 Gy of donor total body irradiation delivered six days prior to grafting cannot circumvent the immune rejection in a vascularized allograft of bone across a strong histocompatibility barrier.

  12. Predicting the development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Atsuko; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a lifesaving therapy for patients with end-stage cardiovascular disease. There has been remarkable progress in controlling acute rejection, and the early survival rate after the heart transplantation has significantly improved. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is one of the common causes of death and a major limiting factor for long-term graft survival years after heart transplantation. CAV is a progressive occlusion of arteries and veins of the transplanted heart. CAV is often clinically silent because of the denervation of the transplanted heart. CAV tends to be found at an advanced stage of disease, including myocardial infarction (MI), congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, and/or sudden cardiac death. Because of the serious sequelae of CAV, risk factors, prevention, and prediction of CAV have been investigated. Despite the effort by many researchers, the pathogenesis is not yet completely understood. There are a number of both immune and nonimmune factors in the donor and recipient that are related to the development of CAV. In addition, several biomarkers in blood and tissue are found to correlate with the presence of CAV, and that may be able to predict CAV. Here, we review the pathology, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and the potential for prediction of CAV. PMID:24972526

  13. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-04-28

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts. PMID:27158422

  14. Renal allograft rejection: sonography and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Cohen, W.N.

    1980-07-01

    A total of 30 renal allograft patients who had sonographic B scanning and radionuclide studies of the transplant was studied as to whether: (1) the allograft rejection was associated with any consistent and reliable sonographic features and (2) the sonograms complemented the radionuclide studies. Focal areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistent sonographic finding in chymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistens sonographic finding in allograft rejection. This was observed in most of the patients exhibiting moderate or severe rejection, but was frequently absent with mild rejection. Areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were not seen during episodes of acute tubular necrosis. Therefore, sonography showing zones of decreased parenchymal echogenicity was complementary to radionuclide studies in the diagnosis of allograft rejection versus acute tubular necrosis. Corticomedullary demarcation was difficult to interpret because of technical variables, and was inconsistently related to rejection in this series.

  15. Infectious Triggers of Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gregson, Aric L

    2016-07-01

    Survival after lung transplantation is limited in large part due to the high incidence of chronic rejection, known as chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). Pulmonary infections are a frequent complication in lung transplant recipients, due both to immunosuppressive medications and constant exposure of the lung allograft to the external environment via the airways. Infection is a recognized risk factor for the development of CLAD, and both acute infection and chronic lung allograft colonization with microorganisms increase the risk for CLAD. Acute infection by community acquired respiratory viruses, and the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are increasingly recognized as important risk factors for CLAD. Colonization by the fungus Aspergillus may also augment the risk of CLAD. Fostering this transition from healthy lung to CLAD in each of these infectious episodes is the persistence of an inflammatory lung allograft environment. PMID:27221821

  16. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-01-01

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts. PMID:27158422

  17. Graft rejection by cytolytic T cells. Specificity of the effector mechanism in the rejection of allogeneic marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, H.; Gress, R.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Cellular effector mechanisms of allograft rejection remain incompletely described. Characterizing the rejection of foreign-marrow allografts rather than solid-organ grafts has the advantage that the cellular composition of the marrow graft, as a single cell suspension, can be altered to include cellular components with differing antigen expression. Rejection of marrow grafts is sensitive to lethal doses of radiation in the mouse but resistant to sublethal levels of radiation. In an effort to identify cells mediating host resistance, lymphocytes were isolated and cloned from spleens of mice 7 days after sublethal TBI (650 cGy) and inoculation with allogeneic marrow. All clones isolated were cytolytic with specificity for MHC encoded gene products of the allogeneic marrow donor. When cloned cells were transferred in vivo into lethally irradiated (1025 cGy) recipients unable to reject allogeneic marrow, results utilizing splenic 125IUdR uptake indicated that these MHC-specific cytotoxic clones could suppress marrow proliferation. In order to characterize the effector mechanism and the ability of the clones to affect final engraftment, double donor chimeras were constructed so that 2 target cell populations differing at the MHC from each other and from the host were present in the same marrow allograft. Results directly demonstrated an ability of CTL of host MHC type to mediate graft rejection and characterized the effector mechanism as one with specificity for MHC gene products.

  18. Cyclosporine-impregnated allograft bone sterilized with low-temperature plasma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haibo; Pei, Guoxian; Zhao, Peiran; Liang, Shuangwu; Jin, Dan; Jiang, Shan

    2010-12-01

    Deep-freezing, freeze-drying and gamma (γ)-irradiation have deleterious effects on bone healing and mechanical properties of allograft bones. We tried preparing bone allografts using cyclosporine plus low-temperature-plasma sterilization. To explore the feasibility of this method of preparation, segmental defects in the right radii of rabbits were repaired with cyclosporine-impregnated allograft bones (CABs) sterilized with low-temperature-plasma (in the study group) and deep-frozen/freeze-dried irradiated allograft bones (D/FIABs) (in the control group). X-ray and quantitative histological analysis, peripheral blood T lymphocyte subset analysis and CD₂₅ molecule immunohistochemistry stain, the four-point bending test and safety evaluations were respectively conducted to compare bone-healing, immunosuppression, mechanical properties and safety between the two groups. X-ray scores were higher in the study group than those in the control (p = 0.032). There were significant differences in new bone areas at most repairs in both groups (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the percentages of CD₄(+) T, CD₈(+) T, ratios of CD₄(+) T:CD₈(+) T or serum concentrations of GPT/Cr in both groups (p > 0.05). At 16 weeks postoperatively, the density of CD₂₅ molecules in the control group was higher than that in the study group. The ultimate loading in the study group was significantly higher than that in the control (p = 0.048). Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) grew thickly around and on the surface of a cyclosporine-impregnated allograft. Livers and kidneys in the study and control groups remained histologically normal at 7 days postoperatively. These results indicate that the CAB might be a better material than the D/FIAB in terms of bone healing, preservation of mechanical properties and immunosuppression without severe side-effects. PMID:20665654

  19. Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Promote Allograft Tolerance Induction

    PubMed Central

    Anam, Khairul; Lazdun, Yelena; Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Elster, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Amputations and unsalvageable injuries with devastating tissue loss are common in the combat wounded. Reconstructive transplantation in the civilian setting using vascular composite allotransplants (VCAs) with multiple tissues (skin, muscle, nerve, bone) combined with long-term multidrug immunosuppression has been encouraging. However, skin rejection remains a critical complication. Adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) are easily obtained from normal individuals in high numbers, precluding ex vivo expansion. The reparative function and paracrine immunomodulatory capacity of ASCs has gained considerable attention. The present study investigated whether ASCs facilitate long-term skin allograft survival. ASCs were isolated from fresh human subcutaneous adipose lipoaspirate. Full-thickness skin grafts from BALB/c mice were transplanted onto the dorsal flanks of C57BL/6 mice treated with five doses of anti-CD4/CD8 monoclonal antibodies (10 mg/kg) on days 0, +2, +5, +7, and +14 relative to skin grafting. A single nonmyeloablative low dose of busulfan (5 mg/kg) was given on day +5. Seven days after skin transplantation, ASCs (3 × 106) were infused i.v. with or without donor bone marrow cells (BMCs; 5 × 105). ASC+BMC coinfusion with minimal conditioning led to stable lymphoid and myeloid macrochimerism, deletion of alloreactive T cells, expansion of regulatory T cells, and long-term allograft survival (>200 days). ASCs constitutively produced high levels of anti-inflammatory/immunoregulatory factors such as prostaglandin E2, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, APO-1/Fas (CD95), and programmed cell death-1 ligand-2. These findings serve as a foundation for developing a translational advanced VCA protocol, embodying both ASCs and low-dose donor BMCs, in nonhuman primates, with the goal of enhancing functional outcomes and eliminating the complications associated with long-term immunosuppression. PMID:25411475

  20. Molecular profile of osteoprogenitor cells seeded on allograft bone.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kierann E; Huang, Zhinong; Ma, Ting; Irani, Afraaz; Lane Smith, R; Goodman, Stuart B

    2011-10-01

    In order to optimize and modulate bone formation it is essential to understand the expression patterns of key bone-specific growth factors, as osteoprogenitor cells undergo the processes of proliferation, differentiation and maturation. This study reports the sequential expression of bone-related growth and transcription factors when bone marrow-derived osteoprogenitor cells from C57BL mice were cultured on allograft bone discs. Mineralization and osteocalcin protein levels were used to track osteogenic differentiation and maturation. Bone-related growth factors, such as Bmp-2, Bmp-7, Ctnnb-1, Fgf-2, Igf-1, Vegf-a and Tgf-β1, and transcription factors, such as Runx-2 and osteocalcin, were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Total density of mineralized bone was significantly increased 7.6 ± 0.7% in allografts cultured with cells, compared with a 0.5 ± 2.0% increase in the controls without cells (p < 0.01). Osteocalcin protein levels peaked at day 4. Protein expression showed peaks of BMP-2 and TGF-β1 on day 2, with VEGF peaking on day 8, and IGF-1 decreasing on day 2. mRNA for Pdgf-a peaked on day 2; Bmp-2 on days 4 and 16; Ctnnb-1 on days 8 and 20; Vegf-a, Fgf-2, Runx-2 and Igf-1 on day 12; Tgf-β1 on day 16; and Pdgf-b on day 20. Osteogenic growth factors correlated with Runx-2 and Ctnnb-1, whereas a predominant vascular growth factor, Vegf-a, did not follow this pattern. Specific bone-related genes and proteins were expressed in a time-dependent manner when osteoprogenitor cells were cultured on cortico-cancellous bone discs in vitro. PMID:21953868

  1. One-year results from cryopreserved mitral allograft transplantation into the tricuspid position in a sheep experimental model.

    PubMed

    Mokracek, A; Canadyova, J; Simunkova, Z; Fiala, R; Hmirak, M; Sulda, M; Burkert, J; Tintera, J; Kobylka, P; Spatenka, J

    2015-01-01

    Mitral allografts are still used only exceptionally in the mitral or tricuspid position. The main indication remains infectious endocarditis of atrioventricular valves for its flexibility and low risk of infection. The aim of our study was to evaluate 1-year results of mitral allografts transplantation into the tricuspid position in a sheep model. Mitral allografts were processed, cryopreserved, and transplanted into the tricuspid position anatomically (Group I - 11 animals) or antianatomically (Group II - 8 animals). All survivors (4 from Group I, and 3 from Group II) were checked at 3, 6, and 12 months by echocardiography with the exception of one survivor from Group II (which was examinated only visually). Examination throughout follow-up included for mitral allograft regurgitation and annuli dilatation. At postmortem, the papillary muscles were healed and firmly anchored to the right ventricular wall in all subjects. Transventricular fixation of the papillary muscles with buttressed sutures was proven to be a stable, reproducible, and safe method for anchoring mitral allograft leaflets. There were no significant differences between the two implantation methods. Annulus support of mitral allografts might be very useful in this type of operation and could prevent annular dilatation. PMID:26047374

  2. Early allograft dysfunction in liver transplantation with donation after cardiac death donors results in inferior survival.

    PubMed

    Lee, David D; Singh, Amandeep; Burns, Justin M; Perry, Dana K; Nguyen, Justin H; Taner, C Burcin

    2014-12-01

    Donation after cardiac death (DCD) liver allografts have been associated with increased morbidity from primary nonfunction, biliary complications, early allograft failure, cost, and mortality. Early allograft dysfunction (EAD) after liver transplantation has been found to be associated with inferior patient and graft survival. In a cohort of 205 consecutive liver-only transplant patients with allografts from DCD donors at a single center, the incidence of EAD was found to be 39.5%. The patient survival rates for those with no EAD and those with EAD at 1, 3, and 5 years were 97% and 89%, 79% and 79%, and 61% and 54%, respectively (P = 0.009). Allograft survival rates for recipients with no EAD and those with EAD at 1, 3, and 5 years were 90% and 75%, 72% and 64%, and 53% and 43%, respectively (P = 0.003). A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant association between the development of EAD and the cold ischemia time [odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-1.56, P = 0.037] and hepatocellular cancer as a secondary diagnosis in recipients (OR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.11-4.58, P = 0.025). There was no correlation between EAD and the development of ischemic cholangiopathy. In conclusion, EAD results in inferior patient and graft survival in recipients of DCD liver allografts. Understanding the events that cause EAD and developing preventive or early therapeutic approaches should be the focus of future investigations. PMID:25179581

  3. Radionuclide surveillance of the allografted pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.A.; Salimi, Z.; Carney, K.; Castaneda, M.; Garvin, P.J.

    1988-04-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphy to detect posttransplantation complications of the allografted pancreas, we retrospectively reviewed 209 scintigrams obtained with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid (/sup 99m/Tc-SC) and /sup 99m/Tc-glucoheptonate (/sup 99m/Tc-GH). The scintigraphic studies were performed in 37 recipients of simultaneous renal and pancreatic allografts harvested from the same donor. /sup 99m/Tc-SC was used as an indicator of thrombotic vasculitis; pancreatic perfusion and blood-pool parameters were monitored with /sup 99m/Tc-GH. In 11 of the 37 recipients, scintigraphic abnormalities suggested posttransplantation infarction. Recurrent episodes of acute rejection of the pancreatic allograft, which always coincided with acute rejection of the renal allograft, were monitored in 24 recipients. Rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis was suggested in 12 of the 24 recipients and persisted in 10 recipients for several weeks after improvement of renal allograft rejection. Pancreatic atrophy was suggested scintigraphically in 16 of the 24 recipients with recurrent episodes of rejection. Spontaneous pancreatic-duct obstruction and obstructive pancreatitis were associated with a scintigraphic pattern similar to that of rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis. We concluded that the specific radionuclides used in this series are useful for the surveillance and assessment of posttransplantation pancreatic infarction, acute rejection, pancreatitis, and atrophy

  4. Methanolic Extract of Curcuma caesia Roxb. Prevents the Toxicity Caused by Cyclophosphamide to Bone Marrow Cells, Liver and Kidney of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Heisanam Pushparani; Mazumder, Pranab Behari

    2016-01-01

    methanolic extract of C. caesia Roxb. Conclusion: The present study suggested that the methanolic extract of C. caesia Roxb has not shown any genotoxicity and reduces the genotoxicity caused by cyclophosphamide. It was also to have the protective effects against the liver and kidney. So it could be provided as one of the herbal supplementation in chemoprevention of CP to ameliorate the side effects of it. SUMMARY Cancer is characterized by uncontrolled growth of cells and much research has been done for the past several years from various disciplines for the treatment of cancer but till now no therapy has been discovered. Treatment of cancer with chemotherapeutic drugs has been suggested to prevent cancer cells however they are often limited with their toxicity to normal cells. Therefore it has been suggested that the supplementation of medicinal plants which are rich source of antioxidants can decrease the toxic effect caused by chemotherapeutic drugs. Curcuma caesia Roxb is a medicinal plant which has high antioxidant activity, as per present study, methanolic extract of Curcuma caesia Roxb prevents the toxicity caused by cyclophosphosphamide (chemotherapeutic drug) in bone marrow cells by reducing the micronuclei formation; it also prevents the hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity caused by cyclophosphamide, so it can be used as a supplement in cancer treatment with cyclophosphamide. PMID:26941535

  5. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may be taken from the pelvic or breast bone. Sometimes, other areas are used. Marrow is removed ...

  6. Autograft Substitutes: Conduits and Processed Nerve Allografts.

    PubMed

    Safa, Bauback; Buncke, Gregory

    2016-05-01

    Manufactured conduits and allografts are viable alternatives to direct suture repair and nerve autograft. Manufactured tubes should have gaps less than 10 mm, and ideally should be considered as an aid to the coaptation. Processed nerve allograft has utility as a substitute for either conduit or autograft in sensory nerve repairs. There is also a growing body of evidence supporting their utility in major peripheral nerve repairs, gap repairs up to 70 mm in length, as an alternative source of tissue to bolster the diameter of a cable graft, and for the management of neuromas in non-reconstructable injuries. PMID:27094886

  7. Meniscal allograft transplantation: rationale for treatment.

    PubMed

    Smith, N A; Costa, M L; Spalding, T

    2015-05-01

    The anatomy and microstructure of the menisci allow the effective distribution of load across the knee. Meniscectomy alters the biomechanical environment and is a potent risk factor for osteoarthritis. Despite a trend towards meniscus-preserving surgery, many tears are irreparable, and many repairs fail. Meniscal allograft transplantation has principally been carried out for pain in patients who have had a meniscectomy. Numerous case series have reported a significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes after surgery, but randomised controlled trials have not been undertaken. It is scientifically plausible that meniscal allograft transplantation is protective of cartilage, but this has not been established clinically to date. PMID:25922450

  8. Combination of conjugated linoleic acid with fish oil prevents age-associated bone marrow adiposity in C57Bl/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Halade, Ganesh V; Rahman, Md M; Williams, Paul J; Fernandes, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    The inverse relationship between fat in bone marrow and bone mass in the skeleton of aging subjects is well-known. However, there is no precise therapy for the treatment of bone marrow adiposity. We investigated the ability of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and fish oil (FO), alone or in combination, to modulate bone loss using 12 months old C57Bl/6J mice fed 10% corn oil (CO) diet as control or supplemented with 0.5% CLA or 5% FO or 0.5% CLA+5% FO for 6 months. We found, CLA fed mice exhibited reduced body weight, body fat mass (BFM), and enhanced hind leg lean mass (HLLM) and bone mineral density (BMD) in different regions measured by DXA; however, associated with fatty liver and increased insulin resistance; whereas, FO fed mice exhibited enhanced BMD, improved insulin sensitivity, with no changes in BFM and HLLM. Interestingly, CLA+FO fed mice exhibited reduced body weight, BFM, PPARγ and cathepsin K expression in bone marrow with enhanced BMD and HLLM. Moreover, CLA+FO supplementation reduced liver hypertrophy and improved insulin sensitivity with remarkable attenuation of bone marrow adiposity, inflammation and oxidative stress in aging mice. Therefore, CLA with FO combination might be a novel dietary supplement to reduce fat mass and improve BMD. PMID:20656466

  9. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  10. Allograft rejection in cattle with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Müller, K E; Rutten, V P; Becker, C K; Hoek, A; Bernadina, W E; Wentink, G H; Figdor, C G

    1995-09-01

    In the present investigation cell-mediated immunity in animals with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was studied by means of skin transplantation experiments. Autograft and allograft behaviour in animals with BLAD was compared with the behaviour of simultaneously transplanted autografts and allografts in healthy controls. Allograft survival time was prolonged in three BLAD cattle (28, 30, and 72 days) compared to six healthy controls (12-14 days). When transplantations were repeated on one animal with BLAD using skin grafts from the same donor, accelerated rejection was observed (allograft survival time decreased from 72 days at primary to 35 days at secondary and to 21 days at tertiary transplantation), suggesting the development of immunological memory. Graft-infiltrating lymphocytes that were obtained from allograft biopsies during the period of rejection, were shown to be from recipient origin (beta 2-integrin negative). Our findings demonstrate that, although prolonged allograft survival is observed in cattle with BLAD, skin allografts are ultimately rejected. PMID:8533316

  11. Bioengineering Thymus Organoids to Restore Thymic Function and Induce Donor-Specific Immune Tolerance to Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Tajima, Asako; Goh, Saik Kia; Geng, Xuehui; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; Bertera, Suzanne; Rudert, William A; Banerjee, Ipsita; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in organ transplantation is to establish immune tolerance of allografts. Although immunosuppressive drugs can prevent graft rejection to a certain degree, their efficacies are limited, transient, and associated with severe side effects. Induction of thymic central tolerance to allografts remains challenging, largely because of the difficulty of maintaining donor thymic epithelial cells in vitro to allow successful bioengineering. Here, the authors show that three-dimensional scaffolds generated from decellularized mouse thymus can support thymic epithelial cell survival in culture and maintain their unique molecular properties. When transplanted into athymic nude mice, the bioengineered thymus organoids effectively promoted homing of lymphocyte progenitors and supported thymopoiesis. Nude mice transplanted with thymus organoids promptly rejected skin allografts and were able to mount antigen-specific humoral responses against ovalbumin on immunization. Notably, tolerance to skin allografts was achieved by transplanting thymus organoids constructed with either thymic epithelial cells coexpressing both syngeneic and allogenic major histocompatibility complexes, or mixtures of donor and recipient thymic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of restoring thymic function with bioengineered thymus organoids and highlight the clinical implications of this thymus reconstruction technique in organ transplantation and regenerative medicine. PMID:25903472

  12. Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Enhances Lymphatic Endothelial VEGFR3 and Rejection in Cardiac Allografts.

    PubMed

    Dashkevich, A; Raissadati, A; Syrjälä, S O; Zarkada, G; Keränen, M A I; Tuuminen, R; Krebs, R; Anisimov, A; Jeltsch, M; Leppänen, V-M; Alitalo, K; Nykänen, A I; Lemström, K B

    2016-04-01

    Organ damage and innate immunity during heart transplantation may evoke adaptive immunity with serious consequences. Because lymphatic vessels bridge innate and adaptive immunity, they are critical in immune surveillance; however, their role in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in allotransplantation remains unknown. We investigated whether the lymphangiogenic VEGF-C/VEGFR3 pathway during cardiac allograft IRI regulates organ damage and subsequent interplay between innate and adaptive immunity. We found that cardiac allograft IRI, within hours, increased graft VEGF-C expression and lymphatic vessel activation in the form of increased lymphatic VEGFR3 and adhesion protein expression. Pharmacological VEGF-C/VEGFR3 stimulation resulted in early lymphatic activation and later increase in allograft inflammation. In contrast, pharmacological VEGF-C/VEGFR3 inhibition during cardiac allograft IRI decreased early lymphatic vessel activation with subsequent dampening of acute and chronic rejection. Genetic deletion of VEGFR3 specifically in the lymphatics of the transplanted heart recapitulated the survival effect achieved by pharmacological VEGF-C/VEGFR3 inhibition. Our results suggest that tissue damage rapidly changes lymphatic vessel phenotype, which, in turn, may shape the interplay of innate and adaptive immunity. Importantly, VEGF-C/VEGFR3 inhibition during solid organ transplant IRI could be used as lymphatic-targeted immunomodulatory therapy to prevent acute and chronic rejection. PMID:26689983

  13. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Trentacosta, Natasha; Graham, William C; Gersoff, Wayne K

    2016-06-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation has evolved over the years to provide a state-of-the-art technique for the sports medicine surgeon to utilize in preserving contact mechanics and function of the knee in irreparable meniscal pathology. However, this procedure continues to spark considerable debate on proper tissue processing techniques, acceptable indications, methods of implantation, and potential long-term outcomes. PMID:27135295

  14. Alternative agents versus prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in patients with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure: a network meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Desborough, Michael; Estcourt, Lise J; Chaimani, Anna; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Hadjinicolaou, Andreas V; Vyas, Paresh; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To compare the relative efficacy of different treatments for thrombocytopenia (artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen, rFVIIa, rFXIII, thrombopoietin mimetics, antifibrinolytic drugs or platelet transfusions) in patients with chronic bone marrow failure and to derive a hierarchy of potential alternate treatments to platelet transfusions. PMID:27069420

  15. Medication management of cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Ian B; Reed, Brent N; Moranville, Michael P

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a common complication following heart transplantation (HT), resulting in diminished graft survival. The preferred strategy for preventing CAV is optimal medical management; however, for patients who develop CAV, delaying disease progression through effective medication management is equally important. A review of the literature regarding medication management of CAV was conducted via a search of the MEDLINE database. Studies were included if they were published in English, conducted in humans ≥ 18 years of age or older, and used noninvestigational medications. Immunosuppressive medications such as the antiproliferative mycophenolate, the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus, and the proliferation signal inhibitors sirolimus and everolimus have been shown to prevent the development of CAV. Certain cardiovascular medications, such as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), gemfibrozil, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, have also demonstrated efficacy in preventing this disease process. Prevention of CAV has also been observed with prophylaxis against cytomegalovirus infection and antioxidant medications. Despite being commonly used in HT patients, neither antiplatelet agents nor glycemic control have proved effective at preventing CAV. Only sirolimus has been shown to arrest the progress of existing CAV. PMID:26011142

  16. Informed consent is not routinely documented for procedures using allografts.

    PubMed

    Porter, Scott E; Stull, Douglass; Kneisl, Jeffrey S; Frick, Steven L

    2004-06-01

    Patients who receive musculoskeletal allografts may have severe postoperative infections develop. Media reports have heightened public awareness of the risk of allograft use. Explaining these risks to patients preoperatively has become more important as attention to informed consent issues has increased. This study retrospectively investigated the patterns of informed consent for allograft bone used during elective orthopaedic procedures at a major teaching hospital. Forty-seven (32%) of 148 patients had preoperative discussions of allograft risks and benefits documented with a signed preoperative consent. In nearly 70% of the cases in which structural allograft was used, preoperative consent was documented. Only 8% of cases in which nonstructural, highly processed allograft was used had documented preoperative consent. Forty-eight (32%) of 148 patients were treated with allograft and autograft. Consent was obtained for the harvesting and use of autograft from 90% of these patients. In none of these patients was consent obtained for the allograft used. Although risks of disease transmission vary widely with the degree of allograft processing and the source of its procurement, informed consent for any allograft use should be a routine part of preoperative discussions of risks and benefits in elective orthopaedic surgeries. PMID:15232464

  17. Knee cartilage defect: marrow stimulating techniques.

    PubMed

    Mirza, M Zain; Swenson, Richard D; Lynch, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    Painful chondral defects of the knee are very difficult problems. The incidence of these lesions in the general population is not known since there is likely a high rate of asymptomatic lesions. The rate of lesions found during arthroscopic exam is highly variable, with reports ranging from 11 to 72 % Aroen (Aroen Am J Sports Med 32: 211-5, 2004); Curl(Arthroscopy13: 456-60, 1997); Figueroa(Arthroscopy 23(3):312-5, 2007;); Hjelle(Arthroscopy 18: 730-4, 2002). Examples of current attempts at cartilage restoration include marrow stimulating techniques, ostochondral autografts, osteochondral allografts, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Current research in marrow stimulating techniques has been focused on enhancing and guiding the biology of microfracture and other traditional techniques. Modern advances in stem cell biology and biotechnology have provided many avenues for exploration. The purpose of this work is to review current techniques in marrow stimulating techniques as it relates to chondral damage of the knee. PMID:26411978

  18. Joint degeneration following meniscal allograft transplantation in a canine model: mechanical properties and semiquantitative histology of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Dawn M; Jones, Relief; Setton, Lori A; Scully, Sean P; Vail, T Parker; Guilak, Farshid

    2002-03-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that meniscal allograft transplantation serves a "chondroprotective" role and prevents the histological and biomechanical changes of the articular cartilage following meniscectomy. Skeletally mature mongrel dogs underwent total medial meniscectomy and received either a fresh meniscal allograft ( n=10) or no further treatment ( n=10). Semiquantitative histology and biomechanical analysis of the femoral articular cartilage was used to assess cartilage pathology 12 weeks following surgery. Histological analysis showed significant changes in cartilage structure that did not differ between the meniscectomy and allograft transplantation groups. Similarly, the tensile modulus of the surface zone cartilage was significantly lower than that in unoperated controls following either meniscectomy or allograft transplantation. A significant correlation was observed between the biomechanical and histological changes, suggesting that degenerative changes in cartilage structure and mechanical function are interrelated. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that meniscal allograft transplantation provides chondroprotection of the femoral condyle and also suggest that it does not lead to increased degenerative changes. PMID:11914769

  19. Development of a Comprehensive Osteochondral Allograft MRI Scoring System (OCAMRISS) With Histopathologic, Micro–Computed Tomography, and Biomechanical Validation

    PubMed Central

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L.; Bae, Won C.; Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony C.; Cory, Esther; Amiel, David; Bugbee, William D.; Sah, Robert L.; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe and apply a semiquantitative MRI scoring system for multifeature analysis of cartilage defect repair in the knee by osteochondral allografts and to correlate this scoring system with histopathologic, micro–computed tomography (µCT), and biomechanical reference standards using a goat repair model. Design: Fourteen adult goats had 2 osteochondral allografts implanted into each knee: one in the medial femoral condyle and one in the lateral trochlea. At 12 months, goats were euthanized and MRI was performed. Two blinded radiologists independently rated 9 primary features for each graft, including cartilage signal, fill, edge integration, surface congruity, calcified cartilage integrity, subchondral bone plate congruity, subchondral bone marrow signal, osseous integration, and presence of cystic changes. Four ancillary features of the joint were also evaluated, including opposing cartilage, meniscal tears, synovitis, and fat-pad scarring. Comparison was made with histologic and µCT reference standards as well as biomechanical measures. Interobserver agreement and agreement with reference standards was assessed. Cohen’s κ, Spearman’s correlation, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used as appropriate. Results: There was substantial agreement (κ > 0.6, P < 0.001) for each MRI feature and with comparison against reference standards, except for cartilage edge integration (κ = 0.6). There was a strong positive correlation between MRI and reference standard scores (ρ = 0.86, P < 0.01). Osteochondral allograft MRI scoring system was sensitive to differences in outcomes between the types of allografts. Conclusions: We have described a comprehensive MRI scoring system for osteochondral allografts and have validated this scoring system with histopathologic and µCT reference standards as well as biomechanical indentation testing. PMID:24489999

  20. Factors Predicting Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Failure

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nicholas; Asplin, Laura; Thompson, Peter; Spalding, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) is performed to improve symptoms and function in patients with a meniscal-deficient compartment of the knee. Numerous studies have shown a consistent improvement in patient-reported outcomes, but high failure rates have been reported by some studies. The typical patients undergoing MAT often have multiple other pathologies that require treatment at the time of surgery. The factors that predict failure of a meniscal allograft within this complex patient group are not clearly defined. Purpose: To determine predictors of MAT failure in a large series to refine the indications for surgery and better inform future patients. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All patients undergoing MAT at a single institution between May 2005 and May 2014 with a minimum of 1-year follow-up were prospectively evaluated and included in this study. Failure was defined as removal of the allograft, revision transplantation, or conversion to a joint replacement. Patients were grouped according to the articular cartilage status at the time of the index surgery: group 1, intact or partial-thickness chondral loss; group 2, full-thickness chondral loss 1 condyle; and group 3, full-thickness chondral loss both condyles. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine significant predictors of failure, independently of other factors. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were produced for overall survival and significant predictors of failure in the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: There were 125 consecutive MATs performed, with 1 patient lost to follow-up. The median follow-up was 3 years (range, 1-10 years). The 5-year graft survival for the entire cohort was 82% (group 1, 97%; group 2, 82%; group 3, 62%). The probability of failure in group 1 was 85% lower (95% CI, 13%-97%) than in group 3 at any time. The probability of failure with lateral allografts was 76% lower (95% CI, 16%-89%) than medial allografts at

  1. Effects of supralethal total body irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution upon immunologic memory

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, N.; Bachvaroff, R.J.; Sato, T.; Rapaport, F.T.

    1981-03-01

    The transplantation of bone marrow from prospectively selected genotypically and pedigree DLA-identical donors into supralethally irradiated littermate and nonlittermate recipients within the Copperstown beagle colony has regularly resulted in the establishment of long-term chimerism, with no evidence of graft-versus-host disease in the recipients. It has been demonstrated that irradiated recipients exhibit significant decreases in their ability to muster primary immunological responses during the first months after reconstitution with bone marrow. Beyond the documented capacity of preirradiation blood transfusions to interfere with subsequent engraftment of allogeneic marrow, however, there have been no systematic studies of the possible effects of irradiation and bone marrow transplantation upon immunologic memory. The present study was designed in order to assess this question in greater detail, with particular regard to the effects of irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution upon host sensitization to skin allografts. The results indicate that, within the experimental limitations described, the state of sensitivity produced by first set skin allograft rejection is not affected significantly by supralethal total body irradiation and reconstitution of the recipient with allogeneic bone marrow.

  2. Comparison of frozen and freeze-dried particulate bone allografts.

    PubMed

    Malinin, Theodore; Temple, H Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Freeze-dried and frozen particulate bone allografts are used interchangeably on the assumption that the biologic behavior of these grafts is similar. Dissimilarities in biologic behavior and differences in the rate and extent of bone incorporation of freeze-dried and frozen particulate grafts were demonstrated in a comparative study using a non-human primate model. Freeze-dried particulate allografts induced new bone formation and healing of the osseous defects much faster than the frozen allografts. PMID:17658506

  3. [Extensor mechanism allograft reconstruction after total knee replacement].

    PubMed

    Bürde, C; Sweeney, Patrick

    2007-04-01

    We present three cases in which we used a complete extensor mechanism allograft for the reconstruction of an insufficient extensor mechanism after total knee arthroplasty (and failed reconstruction with local tissue in two of these cases). Early results are encouraging. Allograft reconstruction can be taken into consideration as an alternative to arthrodesis in those "worst-case scenarios". Late failure may occur in about 20%, probably due to a lack of revitalisation in the centre of the allograft. PMID:17262182

  4. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Prevention Basic Facts & Information Some factors that affect your ... control of the things that you can change. Preventive Recommendations for Adults Aged 65 and Older The ...

  5. Mechanisms of allograft rejection of corneal endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Tagawa, Y.; Silverstein, A.M.; Prendergast, R.A.

    1982-07-01

    The local intraocular graft-vs.-host (GVH) reaction, involving the destruction of the corneal endothelial cells of the rabbit host by sensitized donor lymphoid cells, has been used to study the mechanism of corneal allograft rejection. Pretreatment of donor cells with a specific mouse monoclonal hybridoma anti-T cell antibody and complement suppresses the destructive reaction, suggesting that a cellular-immune mechanism is primarily involved. Pretreatment of donor cells with mitomycin-C completely abolishes the local GVH reaction, indicating that the effector lymphocytes must undergo mitosis within the eye before they can engage in target cell destruction. Finally, studies of the local GVH reaction in irradiated leukopenic recipients or in preinflamed rabbit eyes suggest that host leukocytes may contribute nonspecifically to enhance the destructive process. These studies show that the local ocular GVH reaction may provide a useful model for the study of the mechanisms involved in the rejection of corneal allografts.

  6. Imaging of Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sopo; Ouyang, Tao; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow is the essential for function of hematopoiesis, which is vital for the normal functioning of the body. Bone marrow disorders or dysfunctions may be evaluated by blood workup, peripheral smears, marrow biopsy, plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT), MRI and nuclear medicine scan. It is important to distinguish normal spinal marrow from pathology to avoid missing a pathology or misinterpreting normal changes, either of which may result in further testing and increased health care costs. This article focuses on the diffuse bone marrow pathologies, because the majority of the bone marrow pathologies related to hematologic disorders are diffuse. PMID:27444005

  7. Prevention of myelosuppression and genotoxicity induced by cisplatin in murine bone marrow cells: effect of an organovanadium compound vanadium(III)-l-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Basu, Abhishek; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Bhattacharjee, Arin; Patra, Arup Ranjan; Bhattacharya, Sudin

    2015-07-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is one of the first-line anticancer drugs indicated for use against various form of human malignancies; but, the therapeutic outcome of CDDP chemotherapy is limited due to the development of myelosuppression and genotoxicity which may lead to secondary cancer. Induction of oxidative stress in normal host cells is thought to be responsible for these adverse effects. Therefore, in search of a potential chemoprotectant, an oraganovanadium compound, viz., vanadium(III)-l-cysteine (VC-III) was evaluated against CDDP-induced clastogenicity and cytotoxicity in bone marrow cells of Swiss albino mice. CDDP was administered intraperitoneally (5mg/kg body weight [b.w.]) and VC-III was given by oral gavage (1mg/kg b.w.) in concomitant and pretreatment schedule. The results showed that VC-III administration significantly (P < 0.001) enhanced cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis in the bone marrow niche indicating recovery of CDDP-induced myelosuppression. VC-III also significantly (P < 0.001) decreased the percentage of chromosomal aberrations, the frequency of micronuclei formation and the extent of DNA damage. The observed antigenotoxic and cytoprotective effect of VC-III was attributed to its attenuation of free radicals status and restoration of oxidised and reduced glutathione levels. These results suggest that VC-III is a potential candidate for future development as a chemoprotective agent against chemotherapy-associated primary and secondary complications. PMID:25778689

  8. p38α MAPK Regulates Lineage Commitment and OPG Synthesis of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Prevent Bone Loss under Physiological and Pathological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Qian; Jia, Hao; Biswas, Soma; Li, Ping; Qiu, Shoutao; Deng, Qi; Guo, Xizhi; Ma, Gang; Ling Chau, Jenny Fang; Wang, Yibin; Zhang, Zhen-Lin; Jiang, Xinquan; Liu, Huijuan; Li, Baojie

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) are capable of differentiating into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Skewed differentiation of BM-MSCs contributes to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Yet how BM-MSC lineage commitment is regulated remains unclear. We show that ablation of p38α in Prx1+ BM-MSCs produced osteoporotic phenotypes, growth plate defects, and increased bone marrow fat, secondary to biased BM-MSC differentiation from osteoblast/chondrocyte to adipocyte and increased osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. p38α regulates BM-MSC osteogenic commitment through TAK1-NF-κB signaling and osteoclastogenesis through osteoprotegerin (OPG) production by BM-MSCs. Estrogen activates p38α to maintain OPG expression in BM-MSCs to preserve the bone. Ablation of p38α in BM-MSCs positive for Dermo1, a later BM-MSC marker, only affected osteogenic differentiation. Thus, p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in Prx1+ BM-MSCs acts to preserve the bone by promoting osteogenic lineage commitment and sustaining OPG production. This study thus unravels previously unidentified roles for p38α MAPK in skeletal development and bone remodeling. PMID:26947973

  9. Zygomycosis in a renal allograft recipient

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayana, G.; Rajesh, R.; Kurian, G.; Unni, V. N.

    2009-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections can cause considerable morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Zygomycosis is a type of invasive fungal infection with a rapid course and grave prognosis. Renal transplant recipients with concomitant diabetes mellitus are most susceptible to this infection. We report here a case of disseminated zygomycosis (Rhizopus sp.) in a renal allograft recipient with posttransplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM). This is the first reported case of zygomycosis caused by Rhizopus species. PMID:20352010

  10. Procurement of hand and arm allografts.

    PubMed

    Cetrulo, Curtis L; Kovach, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    Upper extremity transplantation has been at the forefront of vascularized composite allotransplantation. There have been more hand and upper extremity transplants than any other kinds of vascularized composite allotransplantation. However, it is a new and evolving field. Reconstructive surgeons are relative newcomers to the field of transplantation, and the procurement of upper extremity allografts has many subtleties that will differ depending on the intended recipient. However, there are certain principles that can be adhered to that this review serves to elucidate. PMID:24310234

  11. Urinary Calprotectin and Posttransplant Renal Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bistrup, Claus; Marcussen, Niels; Pagonas, Nikolaos; Seibert, Felix S.; Arndt, Robert; Zidek, Walter; Westhoff, Timm H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Current methods do not predict the acute renal allograft injury immediately after kidney transplantation. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of urinary calprotectin for predicting immediate posttransplant allograft injury. Methods In a multicenter, prospective-cohort study of 144 incipient renal transplant recipients, we postoperatively measured urinary calprotectin using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after 4 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. Results We observed a significant inverse association of urinary calprotectin concentrations and eGFR 4 weeks after transplantation (Spearman r = −0.33; P<0.001). Compared to the lowest quartile, patients in the highest quartile of urinary calprotectin had an increased risk for an eGFR less than 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 four weeks after transplantation (relative risk, 4.3; P<0.001; sensitivity, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.98; specificity, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.66). Higher urinary calprotectin concentrations predicted impaired kidney function 4 weeks after transplantation, as well as 6 months and 12 months after transplantation. When data were analyzed using the urinary calprotectin/creatinine-ratio similar results were obtained. Urinary calprotectin was superior to current use of absolute change of plasma creatinine to predict allograft function 12 months after transplantation. Urinary calprotectin predicted an increased risk both in transplants from living and deceased donors. Multivariate linear regression showed that higher urinary calprotectin concentrations and older donor age predicted lower eGFR four weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after transplantation. Conclusions Urinary calprotectin is an early, noninvasive predictor of immediate renal allograft injury after kidney transplantation. PMID:25402277

  12. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cell transplant; Allogeneic-donation ... There are two types of bone marrow donation: Autologous bone marrow transplant is when people donate their own bone marrow. "Auto" means self. Allogenic bone marrow transplant is when another person ...

  13. Bone allograft and implant fixation tested under influence of bio-burden reduction, periosteal augmentation and topical antibiotics. Animal experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Barckman, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    femur (Study II and III) in dogs. The observation period was four weeks and the bone-implant specimens were evaluated by mechanical tests and histomorphometry. Study I compared the fixation of grafted implants where the morselized allograft bone was either rinsed in saline or not. Since the majority of immunogenic factors in allograft bone are present in the blood, the marrow and fat, the objective of this study was to investigate whether rinsing of the allograft bone would lower the immunogenic load and thereby improve osseointegration and bone graft incorporation. We found no statistically significant difference in the histomorphometric or the mechanical evaluations between the two groups. Study II investigated the addition of minced periosteal tissue to the allograft bone. The objective of this study was to investigate whether adding autologous tissue containing bone-forming cells could augment the bioactivity of allograft bone and thereby improve bone graft incorporation. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found no benefit of adding autologous periosteum to the allograft bone. No differences in mechanical fixation were observed, and the periosteum-treated implants had reduced new-bone ongrowth and increased amounts of fibrous tissue. Study III evaluated the impact of antibiotic impregnation of the allograft bone prior to impaction. Antibiotic-impregnated bone graft has been used in one-stage septic revisions and in cases where potential infection is suspected, but its potentially harmful effect on bone graft incorporation has not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Tobramycin impregnation of bone-grafted implants by mechanical testing and histomorphometric assessment. We hypothesized that Tobramycin impregnation would impair implant fixation. Under the conditions of the present study, Tobramycin impregnation of allograft bone did not appear to impair implant fixation or tissue in-growth. In conclusion, under the premises of the present

  14. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency as a rare cause of renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Kati; Hemmilä, Ulla; Salmela, Kaija; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Kouri, Timo; Mäkelä, Satu

    2014-04-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifesting as urolithiasis or crystalline nephropathy. It leads to the generation of large amounts of poorly soluble 2,8-dihydroxyadenine excreted in urine, yielding kidney injury and in some patients, kidney failure. Early recognition of the disease, institution of xanthine analog therapy to block the formation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, high fluid intake, and low purine diet prevent CKD. Because of symptom variability and lack of awareness, however, the diagnosis is sometimes extremely deferred. We describe a patient with adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency who was diagnosed during evaluation of a poorly functioning second kidney allograft. This report highlights the risk of renal allograft loss in patients with undiagnosed adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency and the need for improved early detection of this disease. PMID:24459232

  15. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells ...

  16. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a person's ...

  17. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003658.htm Bone marrow aspiration To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside bones that helps ...

  18. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    ... creates suction. A small sample of bone marrow fluid flows into the tube. The needle is removed. Pressure and then a bandage are applied to the skin. The bone marrow fluid is sent to a laboratory and examined under ...

  19. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells or ... marrow makes too many white blood cells Other diseases, such as lymphoma, can spread into the bone ...

  20. Cutting edge: blockade of the CD28/B7 costimulatory pathway inhibits intestinal allograft rejection mediated by CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Newell, K A; He, G; Guo, Z; Kim, O; Szot, G L; Rulifson, I; Zhou, P; Hart, J; Thistlethwaite, J R; Bluestone, J A

    1999-09-01

    The effect of blocking the CD28/B7 costimulatory pathway on intestinal allograft rejection was examined in mice. Murine CTLA4Ig failed to prevent the rejection of allografts transplanted into wild-type or CD4 knockout (KO) mice but did inhibit allograft rejection by CD8 KO recipients. This effect was associated with decreased intragraft mRNA for IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha and increased mRNA for IL-4 and IL-5. This altered pattern of cytokine production was not observed in allografts from murine CTLA4Ig-treated CD4 KO mice. These data demonstrate that blockade of the CD28/B7 pathway has different effects on intestinal allograft rejection mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and suggest that these T cell subsets have different costimulatory requirements in vivo. The results also suggest that the inhibition of CD4+ T cell-mediated allograft rejection by CTLA4Ig may be related to down-regulation of Th1 cytokines and/or up-regulation of Th2 cytokines. PMID:10452966

  1. Starvation marrow - gelatinous transformation of bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Osgood, Eric; Muddassir, Salman; Jaju, Minal; Moser, Robert; Farid, Farwa; Mewada, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT), also known as starvation marrow, represents a rare pathological entity of unclear etiology, in which bone marrow histopathology demonstrates hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and gelatinous infiltration. The finding of gelatinous marrow transformation lacks disease specificity; rather, it is an indicator of severe illness and a marker of poor nutritional status, found in patients with eating disorders, acute febrile illnesses, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, alcoholism, malignancies, and congestive heart failure. We present a middle-aged woman with a history of alcoholism, depression, and anorexia nervosa who presented with failure to thrive and macrocytic anemia, with bone marrow examination demonstrative of gelatinous transformation, all of which resolved with appropriate treatment. To our knowledge, there are very few cases of GMT which have been successfully treated; thus, our case highlights the importance of proper supportive management. PMID:25317270

  2. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may ... This captures a tiny sample, or core, of bone marrow within the needle. The sample and needle are ...

  3. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.C.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasng the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-h interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplotype-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  4. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasing the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-hr interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplo-type-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  5. Lyophilized allografts without pre-treatment with glutaraldehyde are more suitable than cryopreserved allografts for pulmonary artery reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Olmos-Zúãiga, J.R.; Jasso-Victoria, R.; Díaz-Martínez, N.E.; Gaxiola-Gaxiola, M.O.; Sotres-Vega, A.; Heras-Romero, Y.; Baltazares-Lipp, M.; Baltazares-Lipp, M.E.; Santillán-Doherty, P.; Hernández-Jiménez, C.

    2015-01-01

    Various methods are available for preservation of vascular grafts for pulmonary artery (PA) replacement. Lyophilization and cryopreservation reduce antigenicity and prevent thrombosis and calcification in vascular grafts, so both methods can be used to obtain vascular bioprostheses. We evaluated the hemodynamic, gasometric, imaging, and macroscopic and microscopic findings produced by PA reconstruction with lyophilized (LyoPA) grafts and cryopreserved (CryoPA) grafts in dogs. Eighteen healthy crossbred adult dogs of both sexes weighing between 18 and 20 kg were used and divided into three groups of six: group I, PA section and reanastomosis; group II, PA resection and reconstruction with LyoPA allograft; group III, PA resection and reconstruction with CryoPA allograft. Dogs were evaluated 4 weeks after surgery, and the status of the graft and vascular anastomosis were examined macroscopically and microscopically. No clinical, radiologic, or blood-gas abnormalities were observed during the study. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) in group III increased significantly at the end of the study compared with baseline (P=0.02) and final [P=0.007, two-way repeat-measures analysis of variance (RM ANOVA)] values. Pulmonary vascular resistance of groups II and III increased immediately after reperfusion and also at the end of the study compared to baseline. The increase shown by group III vs group I was significant only if compared with after surgery and study end (P=0.016 and P=0.005, respectively, two-way RM ANOVA). Microscopically, permeability was reduced by ≤75% in group III. In conclusion, substitution of PAs with LyoPA grafts is technically feasible and clinically promising. PMID:26648092

  6. Reduced-intensity stem cell allografting for PNH patients in the eculizumab era: The Mexican experience.

    PubMed

    Schcolnik-Cabrera, Alejandro; Labastida-Mercado, Nancy; Galindo-Becerra, Laura Samantha; Gomez-Almaguer, David; Herrera-Rojas, Miguel Angel; Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo Jose; Ruiz-Arguelles, Guillermo José

    2015-06-01

    Background Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) presents as two major entities: the classical form, predominantly haemolytic and a secondary type with marrow failure and resultant aplastic anaemia (AA-PNH). Currently, the treatment of choice of the haemolytic variant is eculizumab; however, the most frequent form of PNH in México is AA-PNH. Patients and methods Six consecutive AA-PNH patients with HLA-identical siblings were allografted in two institutions in México, employing a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen for stem cell transplantation (RIST) conducted on an outpatient basis. Results Median age of the patients was 37 years (range 25-48). The patients were given a median of 5.4 × 10(6)/kg allogeneic CD34(+) cells, using 1-3 apheresis procedures. Median time to achieve above 0.5 × 10(9)/l granulocytes was 21 days, whereas median time to achieve above 20 × 10(9)/l platelets was 17 days. Five patients are alive for 330-3150 days (median 1437) after the allograft. The 3150-day overall survival is 83.3%, whereas median survival has not been reached, being above 3150 days. Conclusion We have shown that hypoplastic PNH patients can be allografted safely using RIST and that the long-term results are adequate, the cost-benefit ratio of this treatment being reasonable. Additional studies are needed to confirm the usefulness of RIST in the treatment of AA-PNH. PMID:25148373

  7. Use of local allograft irradiation following renal transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, E.C.; Delmonico, F.L.; Nelson, P.W.; Shipley, W.U.; Cosimi, A.B.

    1984-07-01

    Over a 10 year period, 67 recipients of 71 renal allografts received graft irradiation following the diagnosis of rejection. The majority of kidneys were treated with a total dose of 600 rad, 150 rad per fraction, in 4 daily fractions. Fifty-three kidneys were irradiated following the failure of standard systemic immunosuppression and maximally tolerated antirejection measures to reverse an episode of acute rejection. Twenty-two (42%) of these allografts were noted to have stable (i.e. no deterioration) or improved function 1 month following the treatment with irradiation. Eleven (21%) of these allografts maintained function 1 year following transplantation. Biopsies were obtained of 41 allografts. Of the 24 renal allografts with predominantly cellular rejection, 10 (42%) had the process reversed or stabilized at 1 month following irradiation. Five (21%) of these allografts were functioning at 1 year following irradiation. Rejection was reversed or stabilized in 6 of 17 (35%) allografts at 1 month when the histologic features of renal biopsy suggested predominantly vascular rejection. Local graft irradiation has helped maintain a limited number of allografts in patients whose rejection has failed to respond to systemic immunosuppression. Irradiation may also benefit patients with ongoing rejection in whom further systemic immunosuppression is contra-indicated.

  8. Disruption of Murine Cardiac Allograft Acceptance by Latent Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Charles H.; Bickerstaff, Alice A.; Wang, Jiao-Jing; Zimmerman, Peter D.; Forster, Meghan R.; Nadasdy, Tibor; Colvin, Robert B.; Hadley, Gregg A.; Orosz, Charles G.

    2008-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation is a well described complication of solid organ transplantation. These studies were performed to 1.) determine if cardiac allograft transplantation of latently infected recipients results in reactivation of CMV, and 2.) determine what impact CMV might have on development of graft acceptance/tolerance. BALB/c cardiac allografts were transplanted into C57BL/6 mice with/without latent murine CMV (MCMV). Recipients were treated with gallium nitrate induction and monitored for graft survival, viral immunity, and donor reactive DTH responses. Latently infected allograft recipients had ∼80% graft loss by 100 days after transplant, compared with ∼8% graft loss in naïve recipients. PCR evaluation demonstrated that MCMV was transmitted to cardiac grafts in all latently infected recipients, and 4/8 allografts had active viral transcription compared to 0/6 isografts. Latently infected allograft recipients showed intragraft IFN-α expression consistent with MCMV reactivation, but MCMV did not appear to negatively influence regulatory gene expression. Infected allograft recipients had disruption of splenocyte DTH regulation, but recipient splenocytes remained unresponsive to donor antigen even after allograft losses. These data suggest that transplantation in an environment of latent CMV infection may reactivate virus, and that intragraft responses disrupt development of allograft acceptance. PMID:18976295

  9. Clinical, Histological, and Histomorphometric Evaluation of Demineralized Freeze-Dried Cortical Block Allografts for Alveolar Ridge Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Elcin; Gultekin, Alper; Karabuda, Cuneyt; Mortellaro, Carmen; Olgac, Vakur; Mijiritsky, Eitan

    2016-07-01

    Autogenous bone-block grafts are the "gold standard" for block bone grafting, but have several disadvantages. Allografts have the potential to overcome these disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and histomorphometric features of demineralized freeze-dried cortical block allografts (DCBA) used for ridge augmentation. Eleven patients who showed bone deficiencies of <5 mm in the horizontal plane were included in this study. The recipient sites were reconstructed with DCBA. The primary outcomes of interest were bone-width measurements, postoperative clinical evaluations, and histomorphometric analysis of the biopsy samples collected during the implant surgery. Clinical analysis showed that the mean gain in horizontal bone was 1.65 ± 0.14 mm, and that the mean percentage of graft resorption was 5.39 ± 2.18%. On postoperative day 7, edema, pain, and bruising were observed in 18.2%, 0%, and 9.1% of the patients, respectively. In the biopsy samples, the mean percentages of newly formed bone, residual block allograft, and marrow and connective tissue were 40.30 ± 24.59%, 40.39 ± 21.36%, and 19.30 ± 15.07%, respectively. All of the block grafts were successfully integrated into the recipient sites. DCBA may be a viable alternative for treating both deficient maxillary and mandibular alveolar ridges. PMID:27380561

  10. The Macrophage-depleting Agent Clodronate Promotes Durable Hematopoietic Chimerism and Donor-specific Skin Allograft Tolerance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhanzhuo; Xu, Xin; Feng, Xingmin; Murphy, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic chimerism is known to promote donor-specific organ allograft tolerance; however, clinical translation has been impeded by the requirement for toxic immunosuppression and large doses of donor bone marrow (BM) cells. Here, we investigated in mice whether durable chimerism might be enhanced by pre-treatment of the recipient with liposomal clodronate, a macrophage depleting agent, with the goal of vacating BM niches for preferential reoccupation by donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). We found that liposomal clodronate pretreatment of C57BL/6 mice permitted establishment of durable hematopoietic chimerism when the mice were given a low dose of donor BM cells and transient immunosuppression. Moreover, clodronate pre-treatment increased durable donor-specific BALB/c skin allograft tolerance. These results provide proof-of-principle that clodronate is effective at sparing the number of donor BM cells required to achieve durable hematopoietic chimerism and donor-specific skin allograft tolerance and justify further development of a tolerance protocol based on this principle. PMID:26917238

  11. Segmental pancreatic allograft survival in baboons treated with combined irradiation and cyclosporine: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Laker, L.; Els, D.; Weideman, A.; Wolfe-Coote, S.; van der Merwe, E.A.

    1985-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of cyclosporine (CS) alone, total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) alone, and CS in combination with total body irradiation (TBI) in suppressing segmental pancreatic allograft rejection in totally pancreatectomized outbred chacma baboons. The administration of CS 25 mg/kg/day and 50 mg/ kg/day resulted in mean graft survival of 21.5 days and 24.5 days, respectively. CS 85 mg/kg/day resulted in median graft survival of 9 days. There was a wide daily fluctuation of CS serum trough levels exhibited between primates receiving the same oral dose. TBI in excess of 300 rads resulted in irreversible bone marrow suppression. Modest results were achieved in recipients of TBI-76 rads (38 x 2 rads), with median graft survival of 21 days, results not different from recipients treated with CS. TLI recipients of 600 rads (150 x 4 rads) resulted in median pancreatic graft survival of 16 days. TBI together with oral CS administration exhibited no synergistic or additive effect and a single peroperative donor-specific blood transfusion did not enhance pancreatic allograft survival in this model. However, of 10 primates receiving TBI 100 rads (50 x 2 rads) and CS 25 mg/kg/day administered orally indefinitely, four remained normoglycemic for more than 60 days. TBI 100 rads (50 x 2 rads) together with oral and parenteral CS resulted in necrotizing enterocolitis in four of six recipients.

  12. Surgical techniques and radiological findings of meniscus allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoseok; Lee, Sang Yub; Na, Young Gon; Kim, Sung Kwan; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Lim, Jae Kwang; Lee, So Mi

    2016-08-01

    Meniscus allograft transplantation has been performed over the past 25 years to relieve knee pain and improve knee function in patients with an irreparable meniscus injury. The efficacy and safety of meniscus allograft transplantation have been established in numerous experimental and clinical researches. However, there is a lack of reviews to aid radiologists who are routinely interpreting images and evaluating the outcome of the procedures, and also meniscus allograft transplantation is not widely performed in most hospitals. This review focuses on the indications of the procedure, the different surgical techniques used for meniscus allograft transplantation according to the involvement of the lateral and medial meniscus, and the associated procedures. The postoperative radiological findings and surgical complications of the meniscus allograft transplantation are also described in detail. PMID:27423673

  13. A Systematic Review of Failed Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Autograft Compared With Allograft in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstein, David; Sheth, Ujash; Cabrera, Alison; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The advantages of allograft anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), which include shorter surgical time, less postoperative pain, and no donor site morbidity, may be offset by a higher risk of failure. Previous systematic reviews have inconsistently shown a difference in failure prevalence by graft type; however, such reviews have never been stratified for younger or more active patients. Objective: To determine whether there is a different ACLR failure prevalence of autograft compared with allograft in young, active patients. Data Sources: EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane trials registry. Study Selection: Comparative studies of allograft versus autograft primary ACL reconstruction in patients <25 years of age or of high-activity level (military, Marx activity score >12 points, collegiate or semiprofessional athletes). Study Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Data Extraction: Manual extraction of available data from eligible studies. Quantitative synthesis of failure prevalence and Lysholm score (outcomes in ≥3 studies) and I2 test for heterogeneity. Assessment of study quality using CLEAR NPT and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Results: Seven studies met inclusion criteria (1 level 1; 2 level 2, 4 level 3), including 788 patients treated with autograft tissue and 228 with various allografts. The mean age across studies was 21.7 years (64% male), and follow-up ranged between 24 and 51 months. The pooled failure prevalence was 9.6% (76/788) for autografts and 25.0% (57/228) for allografts (relative risk, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.24-0.53; P < 0.00001; I2 = 16%). The number needed to benefit to prevent 1 failure by using autograft was 7 patients (95% CI, 5-10). No difference between hamstrings autograft and patella tendon autograft was noted. Lysholm score was reported in 3 studies and did not differ between autograft and allograft. Conclusion: While systematic reviews comparing allograft and autograft ACLR have been equivocal

  14. The Safety and Efficacy of Cadaveric Allografts and Titanium Cage as a Fusion Substitutes in Pyogenic Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Woo; Ryu, Je-il

    2011-01-01

    Objective The safety and efficacy of various fusion substitutes in pyogenic osteomyelitis has not been investigated. We evaluated and compared the cadaveric allograft and titanium cages used to reconstruct, maintain alignment and achieve fusion in the management of pyogenic spinal infection. Methods There were 33 patients with pyogenic osteomyelitis underwent fusion in this study. Fifteen of the 33 patients were operated on by fusion with allografts (cadaveric patella bones) and 18 of those were operated with titanium mesh cages filled with autologous cancellous iliac bone. After the affected disc and vertebral body resection with pus drainage, cadaveric allograft or titanium cages were inserted into the resected space. Posterior transpedicular screw fixation and rod compression in resected space, where cadaveric allograft or titanium cages were inserted, was performed to prevent the malposition in all patients except in 1 case. Recurrent infection was identified by serial erythrocyte sedimentation rate and cross reactive protein follow-up. Osseous union and recurred infection available at a minimum of 2 years following operation was identified. The amount of kyphosis correction and the subsidence were measured radiographically. Results Spinal fusion was achieved in 29 of 33 patients. In the cadaveric allograft group, 93.3% of patient (14 of 15) showed the osseous union while 83.3% of patient (15 of 18) in the titanium cage group showed union. Subsidence was noted in 12 of the patients. Twelve patients (36.3%) showed unsettling amounts of subsidence postoperatively whereas 46.6% of patients in the cadaveric allograft group and 37.7% of patients in the titanium cage group showed similar subsidence, respectively. There were statistical difference in the fusion rate (p=0.397) and subsidence rate (p=0.276) between the two groups. There was significant statistical difference in the postoperative improvement of segmental kyphosis between the two groups (p=0.022), that is

  15. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox ... Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation Ban Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum Orf Virus ( ...

  16. A novel antagonist of CXCR4 prevents bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell-mediated osteosarcoma and hepatocellular carcinoma cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, Raffaela; Pelagalli, Alessandra; Nardelli, Anna; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Ieranò, Caterina; Cerchia, Laura; Lucarelli, Enrico; Scala, Stefania; Zannetti, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are recruited into the microenvironment of developing tumors, where they contribute to metastatic processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of BM-MSCs in promoting osteosarcoma and hepatocellular carcinoma cell progression in vitro and the possible mechanisms involved in these processes. U2OS and SNU-398 are osteosarcoma and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines, respectively, that can be induced to proliferate when cultured in the presence of BM-MSCs. To determine the effect of BM-MSCs on U2OS and SNU-398 cells, the AKT and ERK signaling pathways were investigated, and increases were observed in active P-Akt and P-Erk forms. Moreover, BM-MSCs caused an increase in tumor cell migration and invasion that was derived from the enhancement of CXCR4 levels. Thus, when tumor cells were treated with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, a reduction in their migration and invasion was observed. Furthermore, a new CXCR4 inhibitor, Peptide R, which was recently developed as an anticancer agent, was used to inhibit BM-MSC-mediated tumor invasion and to overcome AMD3100 toxicity. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibiting CXCR4 impairs the cross-talk between tumor cells and BM-MSCs, resulting in reduced metastatic potential in osteosarcoma and hepatocellular carcinoma cells. PMID:26517945

  17. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  18. Polyethylene Glycol-Fused Allografts Produce Rapid Behavioral Recovery After Ablation of Sciatic Nerve Segments

    PubMed Central

    Riley, D.C.; Bittner, G.D.; Mikesh, M.A.; Cardwell, N.L.; Pollins, A.C.; Ghergherehchi, C.L.; Sunkesula, S.R. Bhupanapadu; Ha, T.N.; Hall, B.T.D.; Poon, A.D.; Pyarali, M.; Boyer, R.B.; Mazal, A.T.; Munoz, N.; Trevino, R.C.; Schallert, T.; Thayer, W.P.

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of neuronal functions by outgrowths regenerating at ~1mm/d from the proximal stumps of severed peripheral nerves takes many weeks or months, if it occurs at all, especially after ablation of nerve segments. Distal segments of severed axons typically degenerate in 1–3 days. The purpose of this study was to show that Wallerian degeneration could be prevented or retarded and lost behavioral function restored following ablation of 0.5 – 1 cm segments of rat sciatic nerves in host animals. This is achieved using 0.8 – 1.1cm microsutured donor allografts treated with bioengineered solutions varying in ionic and polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentrations (modified PEG-fusion procedure), being careful not to stretch any portion of donor or host sciatic nerves. Our data show that PEG-fusion permanently restores axonal continuity within minutes as initially assessed by action potential conduction and intracellular diffusion of dye. Behavioral functions mediated by the sciatic nerve are largely restored within 2 – 4 wk as measured by the Sciatic Functional Index (SFI). Increased restoration of sciatic behavioral functions after ablating 0.5 – 1 cm segments is associated with greater numbers of viable myelinated axons within, and distal to, PEG-fused allografts. Many such viable myelinated axons are almost-certainly spared from Wallerian degeneration by PEG-fusion. PEG-fusion of donor allografts may produce a paradigm-shift in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:25425242

  19. Polyethylene glycol-fused allografts produce rapid behavioral recovery after ablation of sciatic nerve segments.

    PubMed

    Riley, D C; Bittner, G D; Mikesh, M; Cardwell, N L; Pollins, A C; Ghergherehchi, C L; Bhupanapadu Sunkesula, S R; Ha, T N; Hall, B T D; Poon, A D; Pyarali, M; Boyer, R B; Mazal, A T; Munoz, N; Trevino, R C; Schallert, T; Thayer, W P

    2015-04-01

    Restoration of neuronal functions by outgrowths regenerating at ∼1 mm/day from the proximal stumps of severed peripheral nerves takes many weeks or months, if it occurs at all, especially after ablation of nerve segments. Distal segments of severed axons typically degenerate in 1-3 days. This study shows that Wallerian degeneration can be prevented or retarded, and lost behavioral function can be restored, following ablation of 0.5-1-cm segments of rat sciatic nerves in host animals. This is achieved by using 0.8-1.1-cm microsutured donor allografts treated with bioengineered solutions varying in ionic and polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentrations (modified PEG-fusion procedure), being careful not to stretch any portion of donor or host sciatic nerves. The data show that PEG fusion permanently restores axonal continuity within minutes, as initially assessed by action potential conduction and intracellular diffusion of dye. Behavioral functions mediated by the sciatic nerve are largely restored within 2-4 weeks, as measured by the sciatic functional index. Increased restoration of sciatic behavioral functions after ablating 0.5-1-cm segments is associated with greater numbers of viable myelinated axons within and distal to PEG-fused allografts. Many such viable myelinated axons are almost certainly spared from Wallerian degeneration by PEG fusion. PEG fusion of donor allografts may produce a paradigm shift in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:25425242

  20. Graft vasculopathy in the skin of a human hand allograft: implications for diagnosis of rejection of vascularized composite allografts.

    PubMed

    Kanitakis, Jean; Karayannopoulou, Georgia; Lanzetta, Marco; Petruzzo, Palmina

    2014-11-01

    Whereas vascularized composite allografts often undergo acute rejections early in the postgraft period, rejection manifesting with severe vascular changes (graft vasculopathy) has only been observed on three occasions in humans. We report a hand-allografted patient who developed severe rejection following discontinuation of the immunosuppressive treatment. It manifested clinically with erythematous maculopapules on the skin and pathologically with graft vasculopathy that affected both large vessels and smaller cutaneous ones. The observation that graft vasculopathy can affect skin vessels shows that it is amenable to diagnosis with usual skin biopsy as recommended for the follow-up of these allografts. Graft vasculopathy developing in the setting of vascularized composite allografts likely represents chronic rejection due to under-immunosuppression and, if confirmed, should be included in a future update of the Banff classification of vascularized composite allograft rejection. PMID:25041139

  1. Nitric oxide formation in acutely rejecting cardiac allografts correlates with GTP cyclohydrolase I activity

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is a prominent component of the complex array of mediators in acute graft rejection. While NO production is determined by iNOS expression, BH4 (tetrahydrobiopterin), a cofactor of iNOS synthesized by GTP cyclohydrolase I, has been considered critical in sustaining NO production. In the present study, we examined time-dependent changes in iNOS and GTP cyclohydrolase I in rat cardiac allografts. The increase in iNOS protein and mRNA in allografts was similar at POD4 (post-operative day 4) and POD6. However, the peak increase in intragraft NO level at POD4 was not sustained at POD6. This disparity could not be explained by any decrease in iNOS enzyme activity measured ex vivo with optimal amounts of substrate and cofactors. Lower iNOS activity could be explained by changes in total biopterin levels in allografts at POD4 that was decreased to baseline at POD6. Changes in biopterin production correlated with lower GTP cyclohydrolase I protein levels but not by any change in GTP cyclohydrolase I mRNA. Functionally, allografts displayed bradycardia and distended diastolic and systolic dimensions at POD6 but not at POD4. Likewise, histological rejection scores were increased at POD4 but with a secondary increased stage at POD6. It is hypothesized that the dissimilar amounts of NO at early and later stages of rejection is due to uncoupling of iNOS arising from disproportionate synthesis of BH4. These findings provide insight into a potential pathway regulating NO bioactivity in graft rejection. Such knowledge may potentially assist in the design of newer strategies to prevent acute graft rejection. PMID:16000090

  2. Autograft Versus Nonirradiated Allograft Tissue for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mariscalco, Michael W.; Magnussen, Robert A.; Mehta, Divyesh; Hewett, Timothy E.; Flanigan, David C.; Kaeding, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Background An autograft has traditionally been the gold standard for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), but the use of allograft tissue has increased in recent years. While numerous studies have demonstrated that irradiated allografts are associated with increased failure rates, some report excellent results after ACLR with nonirradiated allografts. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine whether the use of nonirradiated allograft tissue is associated with poorer outcomes when compared with autografts. Hypothesis Patients undergoing ACLR with autografts versus nonirradiated allografts will demonstrate no significant differences in graft failure risk, laxity on postoperative physical examination, or differences in patient-oriented outcome scores. Study Design Systematic review. Methods A systematic review was performed to identify prospective or retrospective comparative studies (evidence level 1, 2, or 3) of autografts versus nonirradiated allografts for ACLR. Outcome data included graft failure based on clinical findings and instrumented laxity, postoperative laxity on physical examination, and patient-reported outcome scores. Studies were excluded if they did not specify whether the allograft had been irradiated. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed by 2 examiners. Results Nine studies comparing autografts and nonirradiated allografts were included. Six of the 9 studies compared bone– patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autografts with BPTB allografts. Two studies compared hamstring tendon autografts to hamstring tendon allografts, and 1 study compared hamstring tendon autografts to tibialis anterior allografts. The mean patient age in 7 of 9 studies ranged from 24.5 to 32 years, with 1 study including only patients older than 40 years and another not reporting patient age. The mean follow-up duration was 24 to 94 months. Six of 9 studies reported clinical graft failure rates, 8 of 9 reported postoperative instrumented

  3. ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft and irradiated fresh frozen allograft*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kang; Tian, Shao-qi; Zhang, Ji-hua; Xia, Chang-suo; Zhang, Cai-long; Yu, Teng-bo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with irradiated bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allograft compared with non-irradiated allograft and autograft. Methods: All BPTB allografts were obtained from a single tissue bank and the irradiated allografts were sterilized with 2.5 mrad of irradiation prior to distribution. A total of 68 patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were prospectively randomized consecutively into one of the two groups (autograft and irradiated allograft groups). The same surgical technique was used in all operations done by the same senior surgeon. Before surgery and at the average of 31 months of follow-up (ranging from 24 to 47 months), patients were evaluated by the same observer according to objective and subjective clinical evaluations. Results: Of these patients, 65 (autograft 33, irradiated allograft 32) were available for full evaluation. When the irradiated allograft group was compared to the autograft group at the 31-month follow-up by the Lachman test, the anterior drawer test (ADT), the pivot shift test, and KT-2000 arthrometer test, statistically significant differences were found. Most importantly, 87.8% of patients in the autograft group and just only 31.3% in the irradiated allograft group had a side-to-side difference of less than 3 mm according to KT-2000. The failure rate of the ACL reconstruction with irradiated allograft (34.4%) was higher than that with autograft (6.1%). The anterior and rotational stabilities decreased significantly in the irradiated allograft group. According to the overall International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), functional and subjective evaluations, and activity level testing, no statistically significant differences were found between the two groups. Besides, patients in the irradiated allograft group had a shorter operation time and a longer duration of postoperative fever. When the patients had a fever, the

  4. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells with CD47 high expression via the signal transducer and activators of transcription signaling pathway preventing myocardial fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Chen, Qing-Wei; Li, Xing-Sheng; Yuan, Zhong-Ming; Li, Gui-Qiong; Ke, Da-Zhi; Wang, Li; Wu, Zhi-Qing; Luo, Shi-Lan

    2015-01-01

    This study was initiated to investigate the efficacy of myocardial fibrosis intervention via signal transducer and activators of transcription (STAT) signaling using bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in which being over-expressed with the aid of bispecific antibody (BiAb) and ultrasound-mediated microbubbles (MB). BiAb was prepared and combined with isolated MSC with CD47 overexpression from male mice and trans-fused into female mice with isoproterenol-induced myocardial fibrosis via the tail vein, followed by MB. This study included five groups. Five weeks after treatment, expression levels of the sex-determining region of Y-chromosome (SRY), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in myocardium were detected by fluorescent quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The protein expression of signal transducer and activators of transcription (STAT) 1 and STAT 3 was detected by Western blot. Results: The highest homing number of MSC was in the CD47 + MSC + BiAb + MB group, second highest in the CD47 + MSC + BiAb group, and lowest in MSC alone. Compared with the Control group, CD47 + MSC + BiAb + MB, CD47 + MSC + BiAb, CD47 + MSC and MSC groups had decreased levels of MMP-9, TIMP-1, STAT 1 and collagen deposition, and increased levels of STAT 3. Up regulated STAT 3 and down regulated TIMP-1 were significantly different in CD47 + MSC + BiAb + MB compared with CD47 + MSC or CD47 + MSC + BiAb. Conclusion: CD47 can enhance the homing rate and repairing efficacy of MSC. MSC can improve MMP-TIMP expression in injured myocardium and interfere with myocardial fibrosis after homing, a mechanism that may be related to the STAT-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:26617765

  5. MicroRNA-155 may affect allograft survival by regulating the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Maomao; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Fang; Yin, Li; Yu, Bo; Wu, Jian

    2011-10-01

    Immune rejection of organ transplants has life-threatening implications. It is believed that allograft rejection is initiated by the activation of lymphocytes following recognition of donor antigens, leading to generation of effector T lymphocytes, alloantibody production, and graft infiltration by alloreactive cells. There is solid evidence that miRNAs are integral for maintaining immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. A deeper understanding of the regulation of the immune response by miRNAs could define new mechanisms for manipulating graft immunity and preventing rejection. The miRNA miR-155 is of particular interest due to its known roles in regulating the expression of genes relevant to allograft rejection and the induction of immune tolerance. Indeed, miR-155 has been shown to dramatically impact both innate and adaptive immune processes, including inflammation, antigen presentation, T-cell differentiation, cytokine production, and T regulatory cell (Treg) functions. The suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) is a critical regulator of immune cell function and an evolutionarily conserved target of miR-155 in breast cancer cells. We propose that suppression of miR-155 could enhance SOCS1 expression in immune cells and suppress allograft rejection. Further studies on the specific role of miR-155 in allograft rejection may lead to the identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21802214

  6. A retrospective study on annual evaluation of radiation processing for frozen bone allografts complying to quality system requirements.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Saravana; Mohd, Suhaili; Samsuddin, Sharifah Mazni; Min, N G Wuey; Yusof, Norimah; Mansor, Azura

    2015-12-01

    Bone allografts have been used widely to fill up essential void in orthopaedic surgeries. The benefit of using allografts to replace and reconstruct musculoskeletal injuries, fractures or disease has obtained overwhelming acceptance from orthopaedic surgeons worldwide. However, bacterial infection and disease transmission through bone allograft transplantation have always been a significant issue. Sterilization by radiation is an effective method to eliminate unwanted microorganisms thus assist in preventing life threatening allograft associated infections. Femoral heads procured from living donors and long bones (femur and tibia) procured from cadaveric donors were sterilized at 25 kGy in compliance with international standard ISO 11137. According to quality requirements, all records of bone banking were evaluated annually. This retrospective study was carried out on annual evaluation of radiation records from 1998 until 2012. The minimum doses absorbed by the bones were ranging from 25.3 to 38.2 kGy while the absorbed maximum doses were from 25.4 to 42.3 kGy. All the bones supplied by our UMMC Bone Bank were sterile at the required minimum dose of 25 kGy. Our analysis on dose variation showed that the dose uniformity ratios in 37 irradiated boxes of 31 radiation batches were in the range of 1.003-1.251, which indicated the doses were well distributed. PMID:25687771

  7. Iontophoresis as a means of delivering antibiotics into allograft bone.

    PubMed

    Day, R E; Megson, S; Wood, D

    2005-11-01

    Allograft bone is widely used in orthopaedic surgery, but peri-operative infection of the graft remains a common and disastrous complication. The efficacy of systemic prophylactic antibiotics is unproven, and since the graft is avascular it is likely that levels of antibiotic in the graft are low. Using an electrical potential to accelerate diffusion of antibiotics into allograft bone, high levels were achieved in specimens of both sheep and human allograft. In human bone these ranged from 187.1 mg/kg in endosteal (sd 15.7) to 124.6 (sd 46.2) in periosteal bone for gentamicin and 31.9 (sd 8.9) in endosteal and 2.9 (sd 1.1) in periosteal bone for flucloxacillin. The antibiotics remained active against bacteria in vitro after iontophoresis and continued to elute from the allograft for up to two weeks. Structural allograft can be supplemented directly with antibiotics using iontophoresis. The technique is simple and inexpensive and offers a potential means of reducing the rate of peri-operative infection in allograft surgery. Iontophoresis into allograft bone may also be applicable to other therapeutic compounds. PMID:16260682

  8. Acute and Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Ryan J; Weng, Francis L; Kandula, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    Allograft dysfunction after a kidney transplant is often clinically asymptomatic and is usually detected as an increase in serum creatinine level with corresponding decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The diagnostic evaluation may include blood tests, urinalysis, transplant ultrasonography, radionuclide imaging, and allograft biopsy. Whether it occurs early or later after transplant, allograft dysfunction requires prompt evaluation to determine its cause and subsequent management. Acute rejection, medication toxicity from calcineurin inhibitors, and BK virus nephropathy can occur early or later. Other later causes include transplant glomerulopathy, recurrent glomerulonephritis, and renal artery stenosis. PMID:27095641

  9. Alveolar Ridge Preservation Using Xenogeneic Collagen Matrix and Bone Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Parashis, Andreas O.; Kalaitzakis, Charalampos J.; Tatakis, Dimitris N.; Tosios, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) has been shown to prevent postextraction bone loss. The aim of this report is to highlight the clinical, radiographic, and histological outcomes following use of a bilayer xenogeneic collagen matrix (XCM) in combination with freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) for ARP. Nine patients were treated after extraction of 18 teeth. Following minimal flap elevation and atraumatic extraction, sockets were filled with FDBA. The XCM was adapted to cover the defect and 2-3 mm of adjacent bone and flaps were repositioned. Healing was uneventful in all cases, the XCM remained in place, and any matrix exposure was devoid of further complications. Exposed matrix portions were slowly vascularized and replaced by mature keratinized tissue within 2-3 months. Radiographic and clinical assessment indicated adequate volume of bone for implant placement, with all planned implants placed in acceptable positions. When fixed partial dentures were placed, restorations fulfilled aesthetic demands without requiring further augmentation procedures. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis from 9 sites (4 patients) indicated normal mucosa with complete incorporation of the matrix and absence of inflammatory response. The XCM + FDBA combination resulted in minimal complications and desirable soft and hard tissue therapeutic outcomes, suggesting the feasibility of this approach for ARP. PMID:25328523

  10. Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation in the Knee.

    PubMed

    Zouzias, Ioannis C; Bugbee, William D

    2016-06-01

    The technique of osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation has been used to treat a wide spectrum of cartilage deficiencies in the knee. Its use has been supported by basic science and clinical studies that show it is a safe and effective treatment option. What sets fresh OCA transplantation apart from other cartilage procedures in the knee, is the ability to treat large defects with mature hyaline cartilage. Studies looking at transplantation of fresh OCAs in the general population have shown reliable pain relief and return to activities of daily living. Reports of cartilage injuries in athletes have risen over the years and more research is needed in evaluating the successfulness of OCA transplantation in the athletic population. PMID:27135291

  11. Dysplasia Epiphysealis Hemimelica Treated with Osteochondral Allograft: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Chris A.; Wolf, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH), or Trevor's disease, is a developmental disorder of the pediatric skeleton characterized by asymmetric osteochondral overgrowth. Methods We present the case of a five year old boy with a two year history of right knee pain and evidence of DEH on imaging who underwent initial arthroscopic resection of his lesion with subsequent recurrence. The patient then underwent osteochondral allograft revision surgery and was asymptomatic at two year follow-up with a congruent joint surface. Results To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a DEH lesion treated with osteochondral allograft and also the youngest reported case of osteochondral allograft placement in the literature. Conclusions Osteochondral allograft may be a viable option in DEH and other deformities of the pediatric knee. Level of Evidence Level V PMID:26361443

  12. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains immature cells, called stem cells. The ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a ...

  13. Donor Heart Treatment With COMP-Ang1 Limits Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Rejection of Cardiac Allografts.

    PubMed

    Syrjälä, S O; Nykänen, A I; Tuuminen, R; Raissadati, A; Keränen, M A I; Arnaudova, R; Krebs, R; Koh, G Y; Alitalo, K; Lemström, K B

    2015-08-01

    The major cause of death during the first year after heart transplantation is primary graft dysfunction due to preservation and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Angiopoietin-1 is a Tie2 receptor-binding paracrine growth factor with anti-inflammatory properties and indispensable roles in vascular development and stability. We used a stable variant of angiopoietin-1 (COMP-Ang1) to test whether ex vivo intracoronary treatment with a single dose of COMP-Ang1 in donor Dark Agouti rat heart subjected to 4-h cold ischemia would prevent microvascular dysfunction and inflammatory responses in the fully allogeneic recipient Wistar Furth rat. COMP-Ang1 reduced endothelial cell-cell junction disruption of the donor heart in transmission electron microscopy during 4-h cold ischemia, improved myocardial reflow, and reduced microvascular leakage and cardiomyocyte injury of transplanted allografts during IRI. Concurrently, the treatment reduced expression of danger signals, dendritic cell maturation markers, endothelial cell adhesion molecule VCAM-1 and RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase activation and the influx of macrophages and neutrophils. Furthermore, COMP-Ang1 treatment provided sustained anti-inflammatory effects during acute rejection and prevented the development of cardiac fibrosis and allograft vasculopathy. These results suggest donor heart treatment with COMP-Ang1 having important clinical implications in the prevention of primary and subsequent long-term injury and dysfunction in cardiac allografts. PMID:25932532

  14. The clinical and radiological evaluation of the use of an allograft-prosthesis composite in the treatment of proximal femoral giant cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, R; Kiran Kumar, G N; K Digge, V; Kumar, V

    2014-08-01

    Giant cell tumour is the most common aggressive benign tumour of the musculoskeletal system and has a high rate of local recurrence. When it occurs in proximity to the hip, reconstruction of the joint is a challenge. Options for reconstruction after wide resection include the use of a megaprosthesis or an allograft-prosthesis composite. We performed a clinical and radiological study to evaluate the functional results of a proximal femoral allograft-prosthesis composite in the treatment of proximal femoral giant cell tumour after wide resection. This was an observational study, between 2006 and 2012, of 18 patients with a mean age of 32 years (28 to 42) and a mean follow-up of 54 months (18 to 79). We achieved excellent outcomes using Harris Hip Score in 13 patients and a good outcome in five. All allografts united. There were no complications such as infection, failure, fracture or resorption of the graft, or recurrent tumour. Resection and reconstruction of giant cell tumours with proximal femoral allograft-prosthesis composite is a better option than using a prosthesis considering preservation of bone stock and excellent restoration of function. A good result requires demanding bone banking techniques, effective measures to prevent infection and stability at the allograft-host junction. PMID:25086128

  15. Recurrent Hepatitis C in Liver Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, A. J.; Eghtesad, B.; Marcos, A.; Ruppert, K.; Nalesnik, M. A.; Randhawa, P.; Wu, T.; Krasinskas, A.; Fontes, P.; Cacciarelli, T.; Shakil, A. O.; Murase, N.; Fung, J. J.; Starzl, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale and Design The accuracy of a prospective histopathologic diagnosis of rejection and recurrent hepatitis C (HCV) was determined in 48 HCV RNA-positive liver allograft recipients enrolled in an “immunosuppression minimization protocol” between July 29, 2001 and January 24, 2003. Prospective entry of all pertinent treatment, laboratory, and histopathology results into an electronic database enabled a retrospective analysis of the accuracy of histopathologic diagnoses and the pathophysiologic relationship between recurrent HCV and rejection. Results Time to first onset of acute rejection (AR) (mean, 107 days; median, 83 days; range, 7–329 days) overlapped with the time to first onset of recurrent HCV (mean, 115 days; median, 123 days; range, 22–315 days), making distinction between the two difficult. AR and chronic rejection (CR) with and without co-existent HCV showed overlapping but significantly different liver injury test profiles. One major and two minor errors occurred (positive predictive values for AR = 91%; recurrent HCV = 100%); all involved an overdiagnosis of AR in the context of recurrent HCV. Retrospective analysis of the mistakes showed that major errors can be avoided altogether and the impact of unavoidable minor errors can be minimized by strict adherence to specific histopathologic criteria, close clinicopathologic correlation including examination of HCV RNA levels, and a conservative approach to the use of additional immunosuppression. In addition, histopathologic diagnoses of moderate and severe AR and CR were associated with relatively low HCV RNA levels, whereas relatively high HCV RNA levels were associated with a histopathologic diagnosis of hepatitis alone, particularly the cholestatic variant of HCV. Conclusions Liver allograft biopsy interpretation can rapidly and accurately distinguish between recurrent HCV and AR/CR. In addition, the histopathologic observations suggest that the immune mechanism responsible for HCV

  16. Donor MHC class II antigen is essential for induction of transplantation tolerance by bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Umemura, A; Monaco, A P; Maki, T

    2000-05-01

    Posttransplant infusion of donor bone marrow cells (BMC) induces tolerance to allografts in adult mice, dogs, nonhuman primates, and probably humans. Here we used a mouse skin allograft model and an allogeneic radiation chimera model to examine the role of MHC Ags in tolerance induction. Infusion of MHC class II Ag-deficient (CIID) BMC failed to prolong C57BL/6 (B6) skin grafts in ALS- and rapamycin-treated B10.A mice, whereas wild-type B6 or MHC class I Ag-deficient BMC induced prolongation. Removal of class II Ag-bearing cells from donor BMC markedly reduced the tolerogenic effect compared with untreated BMC, although graft survival was significantly longer in mice given depleted BMC than that in control mice given no BMC. Infusion of CIID BMC into irradiated syngeneic B6 or allogeneic B10.A mice produced normal lymphoid cell reconstitution including CD4+ T cells except for the absence of class II Ag-positive cells. However, irradiated B10.A mice reconstituted with CIID BMC rejected all B6 and a majority of CIID skin grafts despite continued maintenance of high degree chimerism. B10.A mice reconstituted with B6 BMC maintained chimerism and accepted both B6 and CIID skin grafts. Thus, expression of MHC class II Ag on BMC is essential for allograft tolerance induction and peripheral chimerism with cells deficient in class II Ag does not guarantee allograft acceptance. PMID:10779744

  17. A Case of Intraparenchymal Pseudoaneurysms in Kidney Allograft.

    PubMed

    Lorentz, Liam Antony; Hlabangana, Linda Tebogo; Davies, Malcom

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Percutaneous needle biopsy is routinely performed for renal allograft management. Vascular complications of the procedure include pseudoaneurysm and arterio-venous fistulae formation. Delayed diagnosis of these complications is due to their mostly asymptomatic and indolent nature. CASE REPORT We present a case of extensive intraparenchymal pseudoaneurysm formation within the inferior pole of the allograft, diagnosed two years following the most recent biopsy procedure. CONCLUSIONS Renal pseudoaneurysms may only be diagnosed years after their formation as they are typically asymptomatic. PMID:27510594

  18. Musculoskeletal allograft risks and recalls in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mroz, Thomas E; Joyce, Michael J; Steinmetz, Michael P; Lieberman, Isador H; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2008-10-01

    There have been several improvements to the US tissue banking industry over the past decade. Tissue banks had limited active government regulation until 1993, at which time the US Food and Drug Administration began regulatory oversight because of reports of disease transmission from allograft tissues. Reports in recent years of disease transmission associated with the use of allografts have further raised concerns about the safety of such implants. A retrospective review of allograft recall data was performed to analyze allograft recall by tissue type, reason, and year during the period from January 1994 to June 30, 2007. During the study period, more than 96.5% of all allograft tissues recalled were musculoskeletal. The reasons underlying recent musculoskeletal tissue recalls include insufficient or improper donor evaluation, contamination, recipient infection, and positive serologic tests. Infectious disease transmission following allograft implantation may occur if potential donors are not adequately evaluated or screened serologically during the prerecovery phase and if the implant is not sterilized before implantation. PMID:18832599

  19. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R. PMID:24414293

  20. Bone marrow culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2015 Updated by: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Also reviewed ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  1. Bone marrow fat.

    PubMed

    Hardouin, Pierre; Pansini, Vittorio; Cortet, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    Bone marrow fat (BMF) results from an accumulation of fat cells within the bone marrow. Fat is not a simple filling tissue but is now considered as an actor within bone microenvironment. BMF is not comparable to other fat depots, as in subcutaneous or visceral tissues. Recent studies on bone marrow adipocytes have shown that they do not appear only as storage cells, but also as cells secreting adipokines, like leptin and adiponectin. Moreover bone marrow adipocytes share the same precursor with osteoblasts, the mesenchymal stem cell. It is now well established that high BMF is associated with weak bone mass in osteoporosis, especially during aging and anorexia nervosa. But numerous questions remain discussed: what is the precise phenotype of bone marrow adipocytes? What is the real function of BMF, and how does bone marrow adipocyte act on its environment? Is the increase of BMF during osteoporosis responsible for bone loss? Is BMF involved in other diseases? How to measure BMF in humans? A better understanding of BMF could allow to obtain new diagnostic tools for osteoporosis management, and could open major therapeutic perspectives. PMID:24703396

  2. Comparative evaluation of pelvic allograft selection methods.

    PubMed

    Bousleiman, Habib; Paul, Laurent; Nolte, Lutz-Peter; Reyes, Mauricio

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a firsthand comparative evaluation of three different existing methods for selecting a suitable allograft from a bone storage bank. The three examined methods are manual selection, automatic volume-based registration, and automatic surface-based registration. Although the methods were originally published for different bones, they were adapted to be systematically applied on the same data set of hemi-pelvises. A thorough experiment was designed and applied in order to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The methods were applied on the whole pelvis and on smaller fragments, thus producing a realistic set of clinical scenarios. Clinically relevant criteria are used for the assessment such as surface distances and the quality of the junctions between the donor and the receptor. The obtained results showed that both automatic methods outperform the manual counterpart. Additional advantages of the surface-based method are in the lower computational time requirements and the greater contact surfaces where the donor meets the recipient. PMID:23299829

  3. Autophagy in allografts rejection: A new direction?

    PubMed

    Sun, Hukui; Cheng, Dayan; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Huaiquan; Liang, Ting; Hou, Guihua

    2016-03-18

    Despite the introduction of new and effective immunosuppressive drugs, acute cellular graft rejection is still a major risk for graft survival. Modulating the dosage of immunosuppressive drugs is not a good choice for all patients, new rejection mechanisms discovery are crucial to limit the inflammatory process and preserve the function of the transplant. Autophagy, a fundamental cellular process, can be detected in all subsets of lymphocytes and freshly isolated naive T lymphocytes. It is required for the homeostasis and function of T lymphocytes, which lead to cell survival or cell death depending on the context. T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and costimulator signals induce strong autophagy, and autophagy deficient T cells leads to rampant apoptosis upon TCR stimulation. Autophagy has been proved to be activated during ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and associated with grafts dysfunction. Furthermore, Autophagy has also emerged as a key mechanism in orchestrating innate and adaptive immune response to self-antigens, which relates with negative selection and Foxp3(+) Treg induction. Although, the role of autophagy in allograft rejection is unknown, current data suggest that autophagy indeed sweeps across both in the graft organs and recipients lymphocytes after transplantation. This review presents the rationale for the hypothesis that targeting the autophagy pathway could be beneficial in promoting graft survival after transplantation. PMID:26876576

  4. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  5. Biodistribution of an anti-interleukin 2 receptor monoclonal antibody in rat recipients of a heart allograft, and its use as a rejection marker in gamma scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Thedrez, P.; Paineau, J.; Jacques, Y.; Chatal, J.F.; Pelegrin, A.; Bouchaud, C.; Soulillou, J.P. )

    1989-09-01

    Anti-interleukin-2 receptor monoclonal antibodies have been shown to prevent allograft rejection. This paper reports on the biodistribution of a mouse MoAb directed at the 55 Kd alpha chain of rat interleukin-2 receptor (IL2-R) during allograft rejection. Only a low percentage (approximately 1%) of intact 125I-labeled MoAb was detected in the rejected graft, and irrelevant control IgG1 was found at a similar level. This suggests that most of the injected intact MoAb bound to graft tissue via its monomorphic Fc segment. In contrast, OX39 F(ab')2 fragments showed a preferential localization in the rejected allograft and did not bind to the LEW-to-LEW syngeneic heart graft. Irrelevant F(ab')2 did not concentrate in the allogeneic graft. Accordingly, F(ab')2 fragments from OX39 or irrelevant MoAb were used for gamma-scintigraphy on allograft recipients together with biodistribution studies. Results show that scintigraphy was able to detect allograft accumulation of 131I OX39 F(ab')2, whereas no imaging was obtained when OX39 F(ab')2 was used in the syngeneic combination or when irrelevant 131-IgG1 F(ab')2 was given to allograft recipients. This method, applied to the clinical situation, could be of interest for detection of early graft rejection episodes by immunoscintigraphy using reagents specific for activation determinants on lymphocyte membranes, such as anti-interleukin-2 receptor MoAb.

  6. Allografts in the treatment of athletic injuries of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jason Y; Miller, Suzanne L

    2007-09-01

    As allogeneic musculoskeletal tissue is readily available, has minimal limitation in size or shape, and carries no donor site morbidity, it has become attractive for use in reconstructive shoulder surgery. Allograft is a viable option for treating osseous defects associated with glenohumeral instability and has been shown to achieve a stable shoulder with good clinical outcomes. Although there are mixed results on the use of allograft as rotator cuff augments or substitutes, new commercially processed materials such as GraftJacket are being tested to address the high failure rates associated with massive rotator cuff repair. Interposition arthroplasty as a treatment for glenohumeral arthritis in the young and active patient is a novel concept in which the arthritic glenoid is biologically resurfaced. Satisfactory results have been described using lateral meniscus and Achilles tendon allograft. Despite the promising reports on the use of allograft in reconstructive shoulder surgery, most of the published literature exists as retrospective, case reports. Additional large, controlled research is needed to prove the efficacy and safety of allograft tissue in the treatment of athletic injuries of the shoulder. PMID:17700375

  7. Monitoring of corneal allograft rejection using laser flare meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnowski, Tomasz; Haszcz, Dariusz; Rakowska, Ewa; Zagorski, Zbigniew

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify noninvasively, with the use of laser-flare meter the alterations of the blood-aqueous barrier following penetrating keratoplasty. This could diagnose objectively disruption of this barrier in eyes with early allograft rejection, possible even before manifestation of the clinical signs and would help to monitor the efficacy of the treatment. We used the laser flare-meter (Kowa FM-500) to investigate alteration of the blood-aqueous barrier following uncomplicated penetrating keratoplasty (PK) and in corneal allograft rejection. Examination was performed in 50 eyes of 48 patients after uncomplicated PK (7 days to 12 months after PK), in 20 normal control eyes and in 8 patients with acute allograft rejection. Flare values after uncomplicated keratoplasty slowly decreased in time reaching nearly control values 6 - 12 months postoperatively. They were considerably higher for acute allograft rejection compared to eyes following uncomplicated PK and normal control group. Actually, they tended to diminish gradually after systemic and topical administration of steroids and/or immunosuppressants. Application of laser tyndalometry has been proven to be highly useful in the follow up of patients after perforating keratoplasty-especially high risk grafts, it helps to detect objectively early allograft rejection and is beneficial in monitoring the effectiveness of the treatment.

  8. Osteochondral and Meniscal Allograft Transplantation in the Football (Soccer) Player

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Riley J.; Gersoff, Wayne K.; Bugbee, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Knee injuries are common in football, frequently involving damage to the meniscus and articular cartilage. These injuries can cause significant disability, result in loss of playing time, and predispose players to osteoarthritis. Osteochondral allografting is an increasingly popular treatment option for osteoarticular lesions in athletes. Osteochondral allografts provide mature, orthotopic hyaline cartilage on an osseous scaffold that serves as an attachment vehicle, which is rapidly replaced via creeping substitution, leading to reliable graft integration that allows for simplified rehabilitation and accelerated return to sport. The indications for meniscal replacement in football players are currently still evolving. Meniscus allografts offer potential functional, analgesic, and chondroprotective benefits in the meniscectomized knee. In the player at the end of his or her professional/competitive career, meniscal allografts can play a role in averting progression of chondropenia and facilitating knee function and an active lifestyle. This article is intended to present a concise overview of the limited published results for osteochondral and meniscal allografting in the athletic population and to provide a practical treatment algorithm that is of relevance to the clinician as well as the patient/football player, based on current consensus of opinion. PMID:26069605

  9. Imaging mouse lung allograft rejection with 1H MRI

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jinbang; Huang, Howard J.; Wang, Xingan; Wang, Wei; Ellison, Henry; Thomen, Robert P.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Woods, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate that longitudinal, non-invasive monitoring via MRI can characterize acute cellular rejection (ACR) in mouse orthotopic lung allografts. Methods Nineteen Balb/c donor to C57BL/6 recipient orthotopic left lung transplants were performed, further divided into control-Ig vs anti-CD4/anti-CD8 treated groups. A two-dimensional multi-slice gradient-echo pulse sequence synchronized with ventilation was used on a small-animal MR scanner to acquire proton images of lung at post-operative days 3, 7 and 14, just before sacrifice. Lung volume and parenchymal signal were measured, and lung compliance was calculated as volume change per pressure difference between high and low pressures. Results Normalized parenchymal signal in the control-Ig allograft increased over time, with statistical significance between day 14 and day 3 post transplantation (0.046→0.789, P < 0.05), despite large inter-mouse variations; this was consistent with histopathologic evidence of rejection. Compliance of the control-Ig allograft decreased significantly over time (0.013→0.003, P < 0.05), but remained constant in mice treated with anti-CD4/anti-CD8 antibodies. Conclusion Lung allograft rejection in individual mice can be monitored by lung parenchymal signal changes and by lung compliance through MRI. Longitudinal imaging can help us better understand the time course of individual lung allograft rejection and response to treatment. PMID:24954886

  10. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  11. Modern approaches to HLA-haploidentical blood or marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kanakry, Christopher G.; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Luznik, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic blood or bone-marrow transplantation (alloBMT) is a potentially curative treatment for a variety of haematological malignancies and nonmalignant diseases. Historically, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched siblings have been the preferred source of donor cells owing to superior outcomes compared with alloBMT using other donors. Although only approximately one-third of patients have an HLA-matched sibling, nearly all patients have HLA-haploidentical related donors. Early studies using HLA-haploidentical alloBMT resulted in unacceptably high rates of graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), leading to high nonrelapse mortality and consequently poor survival. Several novel approaches to HLA-haploidentical alloBMT have yielded encouraging results with high rates of successful engraftment, effective GVHD control and favourable outcomes. In fact, outcomes of several retrospective comparative studies seem similar to those seen using other allograft sources, including those of HLA-matched-sibling alloBMT. In this Review, we provide an overview of the three most-developed approaches to HLA-haploidentical alloBMT: T-cell depletion with ‘megadose’ CD34+ cells; granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-primed allografts combined with intensive pharmacological immunosuppression, including antithymocyte globulin; and high-dose, post-transplantation cyclophosphamide. We review the preclinical and biological data supporting each approach, results from major clinical studies, and completed or ongoing clinical studies comparing these approaches with other alloBMT platforms. PMID:26305035

  12. Recipient-derived EDA fibronectin promotes cardiac allograft fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Booth, Adam J; Wood, Sherri C; Cornett, Ashley M; Dreffs, Alyssa A; Lu, Guanyi; Muro, Andrés F; White, Eric S; Bishop, D Keith

    2012-03-01

    Advances in donor matching and immunosuppressive therapies have decreased the prevalence of acute rejection of cardiac grafts; however, chronic rejection remains a significant obstacle for long-term allograft survival. While initiating elements of anti-allograft immune responses have been identified, the linkage between these factors and the ultimate development of cardiac fibrosis is not well understood. Tissue fibrosis resembles an exaggerated wound healing response, in which extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules are central. One such ECM molecule is an alternatively spliced isoform of the ubiquitous glycoprotein fibronectin (FN), termed extra domain A-containing cellular fibronectin (EDA cFN). EDA cFN is instrumental in fibrogenesis; thus, we hypothesized that it might also regulate fibrotic remodelling associated with chronic rejection. We compared the development of acute and chronic cardiac allograft rejection in EDA cFN-deficient (EDA(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) mice. While EDA(-/-) mice developed acute cardiac rejection in a manner indistinguishable from WT controls, cardiac allografts in EDA(-/-) mice were protected from fibrosis associated with chronic rejection. Decreased fibrosis was not associated with differences in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy or intra-graft expression of pro-fibrotic mediators. Further, we examined expression of EDA cFN and total FN by whole splenocytes under conditions promoting various T-helper lineages. Conditions supporting regulatory T-cell (Treg) development were characterized by greatest production of total FN and EDA cFN, though EDA cFN to total FN ratios were highest in Th1 cultures. These findings indicate that recipient-derived EDA cFN is dispensable for acute allograft rejection responses but that it promotes the development of fibrosis associated with chronic rejection. Further, conditions favouring the development of regulatory T cells, widely considered graft-protective, may drive production of ECM molecules which enhance

  13. Bone marrow aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Bain, B

    2001-01-01

    Bone marrow aspiration biopsies are carried out principally to permit cytological assessment but also for immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, molecular genetic, and other specialised investigations. Often, a trephine biopsy is carried out as part of the same procedure. Bone marrow aspirations should be carried out by trained individuals who are aware of the indications, contraindications, and hazards of the procedure. They should follow a standard operating procedure. The operator should have made an adequate assessment of clinical and haematological features to ensure both that appropriate indications exist and that all relevant tests are performed. For the patient's comfort and safety, the posterior iliac crest is generally the preferred site of aspiration. Films of aspirated marrow and, when appropriate, films of crushed particles should be made and labelled. Once thoroughly dry, films should be fixed and stained. As a minimum, a Romanowsky stain and a Perls' stain are required. A cover slip should be applied. The bone marrow films should be assessed and reported in a systematic manner so that nothing of importance is overlooked, using a low power, then intermediate, then high power objective. A differential count should be performed. An interpretation of the findings, in the light of the clinical and haematological features, should be given. The report should be signed or computer authorised, using a secure password, and issued in a timely manner. Key Words: bone marrow aspirate • haematological diagnosis PMID:11533068

  14. Effect of Storage Temperature on Allograft Bone

    PubMed Central

    Fölsch, Christian; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bilderbeek, Uwe; Timmesfeld, Nina; von Garrel, Thomas; Peter Matter, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Background The recommendations for storage temperature of allogeneic bone are varying between −20 °C and −70 °C and down to −80 °C. The necessary temperature of storage is not exactly defined by scientific data, and the effect of different storage temperatures onto the biomechanical and the biological behavior is discussed controversially. Methods The historical development of storage temperature of bone banks is described. A survey on literature concerning the biomechanical and biological properties of allograft bone depending on the procurement and storage temperature is given as well as on national and international regulations on storage conditions of bone banks (European Council, American Association of Tissue Banks (AATB), European Association of Tissue Banks (EATB)). Results Short-term storage up to 6 months is recommended with −20 °C and −40 °C for a longer period (AATB), and EATB recommends storage at −40 °C and even −80 °C while the regulations of the German German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) from 2001 recommend storage at −70 °C. Duration of storage at −20 °C can be maintained at least for 2 years. The potential risk of proteolysis with higher storage temperatures remains, but a definite impairment of bone ingrowth due to a storage at −20 °C was not shown in clinical use, and no adverse biomechanical effects of storage at −20 °C could be proven. Conclusion Biomechanical studies showed no clinically relevant impairment of biomechanical properties of cancellous bone due to different storage temperatures. Sterilization procedures bear the advantage of inactivating enzymatic activity though reducing the risk of proteolysis. In those cases a storage temperature of −20 °C can be recommended for at least a period of 2 years, and the risk of undesired effects seems to be low for native unprocessed bone. PMID:22896765

  15. Porous allograft bone scaffolds: doping with strontium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yantao; Guo, Dagang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Chunli; Zhou, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Strontium (Sr) can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS) were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF) assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca)] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28 ± 0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60 ± 0.20 µm/day; p<0.05). Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes. PMID:23922703

  16. Porous Allograft Bone Scaffolds: Doping with Strontium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yantao; Guo, Dagang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Chunli; Zhou, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Strontium (Sr) can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS) were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF) assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca)] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28±0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60±0.20 µm/day; p<0.05). Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes. PMID:23922703

  17. Lateral Meniscal Allograft Transplantation: The Bone Trough Technique.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Olivetto, Javier; Dean, Chase S; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-04-01

    The lateral meniscus plays a critical role in the stability and health of the knee. Treating patients who have undergone a total lateral meniscectomy or functional equivalent is challenging, especially young and active patients. Current literature regarding meniscal tears supports that repair should be the first surgical option. Moreover, it is recommended to preserve as much meniscal tissue as possible. In cases in which a total or functional meniscectomy is a pre-existing condition, a lateral meniscal allograft transplantation is a possible option. The purpose of this surgical technique description was to detail the method of lateral meniscal allograft transplantation using a bone trough. PMID:27462536

  18. A Case of Intraparenchymal Pseudoaneurysms in Kidney Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Lorentz, Liam Antony; Hlabangana, Linda Tebogo; Davies, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 31 Final Diagnosis: Intraparenchymal pseudo-aneurysms in kidney transplant Symptoms: Asymptomatic Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Percutaneous renal biopsy Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Percutaneous needle biopsy is routinely performed for renal allograft management. Vascular complications of the procedure include pseudoaneurysm and arterio-venous fistulae formation. Delayed diagnosis of these complications is due to their mostly asymptomatic and indolent nature. Case Report: We present a case of extensive intraparenchymal pseudoaneurysm formation within the inferior pole of the allograft, diagnosed two years following the most recent biopsy procedure. Conclusions: Renal pseudoaneurysms may only be diagnosed years after their formation as they are typically asymptomatic. PMID:27510594

  19. Investigation of bone allografts representing different steps of the bone bank procedure using the CAM-model.

    PubMed

    Holzmann, Philipp; Niculescu-Morzsa, Eugenia; Zwickl, Hannes; Halbwirth, Florian; Pichler, Monika; Matzner, Michael; Gottsauner-Wolf, Florian; Nehrer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Bone grafting is commonly used to treat large bone defects. Since autografts are limited and frequently associated with postoperative donor morbidity, allografts from bone banks are often used. However, vascularisation of the allograft is often impaired, resulting in inadequate bone healing and functional graft failure. In bone bank processing, tissue is stored at -80 degree Celsius and subsequently subjected to a harsh multi-step cleaning and sterilisation procedure to prevent immune rejection or transmission of diseases. To determine which step of this procedure diminishes the ability of allografts to induce or promote vascularisation, we used the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model to monitor the vascular reaction to sample bone chips representing the respective procedural steps. The CAM model monitors the angiogenic potency of xenogeneic and, hence, potentially immunogeneic materials (e.g. cells, tissues, tissue-engineered matrices). Due to the chicken embryo's lack of a fully functional immune system, it provides test conditions that are analogous to immunologically incompetent mice and is a well-suited alternative to their use. Bone chips were placed onto the CAM, and vascular reactions were quantified by image analysis after 48 h incubation. The vascular reaction was most pronounced to fresh, untreated bone chips that had been kept at +2 degree Celsius prior to the experiment. Surprisingly, storage of bone samples at -80 degree Celsius was sufficient to drastically reduce the vascular reaction. Consistent with this, samples representing different stages of the subsequent procedure showed similarly low vascular indices. PMID:20686742

  20. Microvascular destruction identifies murine allografts that cannot be rescued from airway fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Ashok N.; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Thurman, Joshua M.; Miller, Edmund J.; Henson, Peter M.; Zamora, Martin R.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Nicolls, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    Small airway fibrosis (bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome) is the primary obstacle to long-term survival following lung transplantation. Here, we show the importance of functional microvasculature in the prevention of epithelial loss and fibrosis due to rejection and for the first time, relate allograft microvascular injury and loss of tissue perfusion to immunotherapy-resistant rejection. To explore the role of alloimmune rejection and airway ischemia in the development of fibroproliferation, we used a murine orthotopic tracheal transplant model. We determined that transplants were reperfused by connection of recipient vessels to donor vessels at the surgical anastomosis site. Microcirculation through the newly formed vascular anastomoses appeared partially dependent on VEGFR2 and CXCR2 pathways. In the absence of immunosuppression, the microvasculature in rejecting allografts exhibited vascular complement deposition, diminished endothelial CD31 expression, and absent perfusion prior to the onset of fibroproliferation. Rejecting grafts with extensive endothelial cell injury were refractory to immunotherapy. After early microvascular loss, neovascularization was eventually observed in the membranous trachea, indicating a reestablishment of graft perfusion in established fibrosis. One implication of this study is that bronchial artery revascularization at the time of lung transplantation may decrease the risk of subsequent airway fibrosis. PMID:18060031

  1. Premalignant and Malignant Skin Lesions in Two Recipients of Vascularized Composite Tissue Allografts (Face, Hands)

    PubMed Central

    Kanitakis, Jean; Petruzzo, Palmina; Gazarian, Aram; Testelin, Sylvie; Devauchelle, Bernard; Badet, Lionel; Dubernard, Jean-Michel; Morelon, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ transplants (RSOT) have a highly increased risk for developing cutaneous premalignant and malignant lesions, favored by the lifelong immunosuppression. Vascularized composite tissue allografts (VCA) have been introduced recently, and relevant data are sparse. Two patients with skin cancers (one with basal cell carcinoma and one with squamous cell carcinomas) have been so far reported in this patient group. Since 2000 we have been following 9 recipients of VCA (3 face, 6 bilateral hands) for the development of rejection and complications of the immunosuppressive treatment. Among the 9 patients, one face-grafted recipient was diagnosed with nodular-pigmented basal cell carcinoma of her own facial skin 6 years after graft, and one patient with double hand allografts developed disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis, a potentially premalignant dermatosis, on her skin of the arm and legs. Similar to RSOT, recipients of VCA are prone to develop cutaneous premalignant and malignant lesions. Prevention should be applied through sun-protective measures, regular skin examination, and early treatment of premalignant lesions. PMID:26550517

  2. Premalignant and Malignant Skin Lesions in Two Recipients of Vascularized Composite Tissue Allografts (Face, Hands).

    PubMed

    Kanitakis, Jean; Petruzzo, Palmina; Gazarian, Aram; Testelin, Sylvie; Devauchelle, Bernard; Badet, Lionel; Dubernard, Jean-Michel; Morelon, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ transplants (RSOT) have a highly increased risk for developing cutaneous premalignant and malignant lesions, favored by the lifelong immunosuppression. Vascularized composite tissue allografts (VCA) have been introduced recently, and relevant data are sparse. Two patients with skin cancers (one with basal cell carcinoma and one with squamous cell carcinomas) have been so far reported in this patient group. Since 2000 we have been following 9 recipients of VCA (3 face, 6 bilateral hands) for the development of rejection and complications of the immunosuppressive treatment. Among the 9 patients, one face-grafted recipient was diagnosed with nodular-pigmented basal cell carcinoma of her own facial skin 6 years after graft, and one patient with double hand allografts developed disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis, a potentially premalignant dermatosis, on her skin of the arm and legs. Similar to RSOT, recipients of VCA are prone to develop cutaneous premalignant and malignant lesions. Prevention should be applied through sun-protective measures, regular skin examination, and early treatment of premalignant lesions. PMID:26550517

  3. Comparison between Constrained and Semiconstrained Knee Allograft-Prosthesis Composite Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Farfalli, German L.; Aponte-Tinao, Luis A.; Ayerza, Miguel A.; Muscolo, D. Luis; Boland, Patrick J.; Morris, Carol D.; Athanasian, Edward A.; Healey, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Allograft-prosthesis composite (APC) can restore capsular and ligamentous tissues of the knee sacrificed in a tumor extirpation. We asked if performing APC would restore knee stability and allow the use of nonconstrained arthroplasty while preventing aseptic loosening. We retrospectively compared 50 knee APCs performed with non-constrained revision knee prosthesis (Group 1) with 36 matched APCs performed with a constrained prosthesis (Group 2). In Group 1, the survival rate was 69% at five and 62% at ten years. Sixteen reconstructions were removed due to complications: eight deep infections, three fractures, two instabilities, one aseptic loosening, one local recurrence, and one nonunion. In Group 2, the survival rate was 80% at five and 53% at ten years. Nine reconstructions were removed: 3 due to deep infections, 3 to fractures, and 3 to aseptic loosening. In both groups, we observed more allograft fractures when the prosthetic stem does not bypass the host-donor osteotomy (P > 0.05). Both groups had mainly good or excellent MSTS functional results. Survival rate and functional scores and aseptic loosening were similar in both groups. A rotating-hinge APC is recommended when host-donor soft tissue reconstruction fails to restore knee instability. The use of a short prosthetic stem has a statistical relationship with APC fractures. PMID:23476114

  4. A Novel Therapy to Attenuate Acute Kidney Injury and Ischemic Allograft Damage after Allogenic Kidney Transplantation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gueler, Faikah; Shushakova, Nelli; Mengel, Michael; Hueper, Katja; Chen, Rongjun; Liu, Xiaokun; Park, Joon-Keun; Haller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia followed by reperfusion contributes to the initial damage to allografts after kidney transplantation (ktx). In this study we tested the hypothesis that a tetrapeptide EA-230 (AQGV), might improve survival and attenuate loss of kidney function in a mouse model of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) and ischemia-induced delayed graft function after allogenic kidney transplantation. IRI was induced in male C57Bl/6N mice by transient bilateral renal pedicle clamping for 35 min. Treatment with EA-230 (20–50mg/kg twice daily i.p. for four consecutive days) was initiated 24 hours after IRI when acute kidney injury (AKI) was already established. The treatment resulted in markedly improved survival in a dose dependent manner. Acute tubular injury two days after IRI was diminished and tubular epithelial cell proliferation was significantly enhanced by EA-230 treatment. Furthermore, CTGF up-regulation, a marker of post-ischemic fibrosis, at four weeks after IRI was significantly less in EA-230 treated renal tissue. To learn more about these effects, we measured renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at 28 hours after IRI. EA-230 improved both GFR and RBF significantly. Next, EA-230 treatment was tested in a model of ischemia-induced delayed graft function after allogenic kidney transplantation. The recipients were treated with EA-230 (50 mg/kg) twice daily i.p. which improved renal function and allograft survival by attenuating ischemic allograft damage. In conclusion, EA-230 is a novel and promising therapeutic agent for treating acute kidney injury and preventing IRI-induced post-transplant ischemic allograft injury. Its beneficial effect is associated with improved renal perfusion after IRI and enhanced regeneration of tubular epithelial cells. PMID:25617900

  5. [Allogenic bone marrow transplantation complications. Part II].

    PubMed

    Saloua, L; Tarek, B O; Abderrahman, A; Abdeladhim, B A

    2000-03-01

    Bone marrow transplantation increase the chances of cure of many hematology and also neoplasms cancers. The procedure is however a cause of expected mortality and morbidity. The complications are represented by mucocutaneous, toxicity graft versus host disease, veno-occlusive disease and most importantly injections consequences all this complications needs to be prevented and treated considering the risk associated to the moderling immunosuppression. PMID:11026816

  6. Reconstruction of an atrophied posterior mandible with the inlay technique and allograft block versus allograft particulate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Checchi, Vittorio; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Breschi, Lorenzo; Felice, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the bilateral reconstruction of a severely atrophic posterior mandible in a 30-year-old woman using allograft block versus particulate grafting in the inlay technique. Three months later, four dental implants were placed and bone core biopsy specimens were taken for histologic evaluation. During implant placement, the grafted sites were stable with good clinical osseointegration. The histologic analysis showed the presence of compact bone revealing areas of demarcation between grafted bone, newly formed bone, and bone-regenerated areas. Allografts might serve as an alternative to autogenous and heterologous grafting in posterior mandible augmentation using the inlay technique. PMID:25738350

  7. Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bone marrow and capability for blood cell production, including red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells ( ... can affect the bone marrow and blood cell production. A specialist who has expertise in the diagnosis ...

  8. Bone-marrow transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100112.htm Bone-marrow transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Bone-marrow is a soft, fatty tissue found inside of ...

  9. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > For Teens > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Risks If You Have Questions What It Is Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies are performed to examine bone ...

  10. Functional Immune Anatomy of the Liver-As an Allograft.

    PubMed

    Demetris, A J; Bellamy, C O C; Gandhi, C R; Prost, S; Nakanuma, Y; Stolz, D B

    2016-06-01

    The liver is an immunoregulatory organ in which a tolerogenic microenvironment mitigates the relative "strength" of local immune responses. Paradoxically, necro-inflammatory diseases create the need for most liver transplants. Treatment of hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and acute T cell-mediated rejection have redirected focus on long-term allograft structural integrity. Understanding of insults should enable decades of morbidity-free survival after liver replacement because of these tolerogenic properties. Studies of long-term survivors show low-grade chronic inflammatory, fibrotic, and microvascular lesions, likely related to some combination of environment insults (i.e. abnormal physiology), donor-specific antibodies, and T cell-mediated immunity. The resultant conundrum is familiar in transplantation: adequate immunosuppression produces chronic toxicities, while lightened immunosuppression leads to sensitization, immunological injury, and structural deterioration. The "balance" is more favorable for liver than other solid organ allografts. This occurs because of unique hepatic immune physiology and provides unintended benefits for allografts by modulating various afferent and efferent limbs of allogenic immune responses. This review is intended to provide a better understanding of liver immune microanatomy and physiology and thereby (a) the potential structural consequences of low-level, including allo-antibody-mediated injury; and (b) how liver allografts modulate immune reactions. Special attention is given to the microvasculature and hepatic mononuclear phagocytic system. PMID:26848550

  11. Arthroscopic Allograft Cartilage Transfer for Osteochondral Defects of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyong S.; Ryan, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of osteochondral defects is well established but has had mixed results in larger lesions and revision operations. Particulated allograft cartilage transfer may provide an arthroscopic option for lesions that would otherwise have been treated through open approaches or osteotomies. The procedure is performed under noninvasive distraction with standard arthroscopic portals. PMID:26052496

  12. Therapeutic lymphangiogenesis ameliorates established acute lung allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Monzon-Medina, Maria E; Padera, Robert F; Wang, Hao; George, Gautam; Toprak, Demet; Abdelnour, Elie; D'Agostino, Emmanuel; Goldberg, Hilary J; Perrella, Mark A; Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Rosas, Ivan O; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2015-11-01

    Lung transplantation is the only viable option for patients suffering from otherwise incurable end-stage pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Despite aggressive immunosuppression, acute rejection of the lung allograft occurs in over half of transplant recipients, and the factors that promote lung acceptance are poorly understood. The contribution of lymphatic vessels to transplant pathophysiology remains controversial, and data that directly address the exact roles of lymphatic vessels in lung allograft function and survival are limited. Here, we have shown that there is a marked decline in the density of lymphatic vessels, accompanied by accumulation of low-MW hyaluronan (HA) in mouse orthotopic allografts undergoing rejection. We found that stimulation of lymphangiogenesis with VEGF-C156S, a mutant form of VEGF-C with selective VEGFR-3 binding, alleviates an established rejection response and improves clearance of HA from the lung allograft. Longitudinal analysis of transbronchial biopsies from human lung transplant recipients demonstrated an association between resolution of acute lung rejection and decreased HA in the graft tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that lymphatic vessel formation after lung transplantation mediates HA drainage and suggest that treatments to stimulate lymphangiogenesis have promise for improving graft outcomes. PMID:26485284

  13. Therapeutic lymphangiogenesis ameliorates established acute lung allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Monzon-Medina, Maria E.; Padera, Robert F.; Wang, Hao; George, Gautam; Toprak, Demet; Abdelnour, Elie; D’Agostino, Emmanuel; Goldberg, Hilary J.; Perrella, Mark A.; Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Rosas, Ivan O.; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation is the only viable option for patients suffering from otherwise incurable end-stage pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Despite aggressive immunosuppression, acute rejection of the lung allograft occurs in over half of transplant recipients, and the factors that promote lung acceptance are poorly understood. The contribution of lymphatic vessels to transplant pathophysiology remains controversial, and data that directly address the exact roles of lymphatic vessels in lung allograft function and survival are limited. Here, we have shown that there is a marked decline in the density of lymphatic vessels, accompanied by accumulation of low-MW hyaluronan (HA) in mouse orthotopic allografts undergoing rejection. We found that stimulation of lymphangiogenesis with VEGF-C156S, a mutant form of VEGF-C with selective VEGFR-3 binding, alleviates an established rejection response and improves clearance of HA from the lung allograft. Longitudinal analysis of transbronchial biopsies from human lung transplant recipients demonstrated an association between resolution of acute lung rejection and decreased HA in the graft tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that lymphatic vessel formation after lung transplantation mediates HA drainage and suggest that treatments to stimulate lymphangiogenesis have promise for improving graft outcomes. PMID:26485284

  14. Clinical application of intrauterine bone marrow transplantation for treatment of genetic diseases--feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Slavin, S; Naparstek, E; Ziegler, M; Lewin, A

    1992-01-01

    Intrauterine bone marrow transplantation (BMT) may represent a new approach for correction of a large variety of genetic disorders in utero. The procedure may become feasible for more genetic disorders in the future, since a large majority of potentially correctible diseases can be diagnosed at an early stage of gestation in utero using molecular probes that permit analysis of small biologic samples and even few cells that may be obtained by chorionic villi biopsy and/or amniocentesis. Haploidentical paternal marrow (2 cases) and sibling bone marrow cells from a disease-free family members, were infused into the fetus. GVHD was avoided following in vitro T-lymphocyte depletion using monoclonal antilymphocyte (CDW52) antibodies (Campath-1) without affecting stem cell viability, similarly to the procedures in routine use in clinical BMT programs in man. Three women underwent intrauterine BMT at 34, 23 and 25 weeks of gestation for metachromatic leucodystrophy (Arylsulfatase A deficiency, 2 cases) and beta thalassemia major (1 case), respectively. A total of 33 x 10(8), 30 x 10(8) and 30 x 10(8) bone marrow cells were infused intraperitoneally (1 case), intraportally plus intraperitoneally (2 cases) with no fetal distress. Although the procedure was uneventful and no clinical evidence of GVHD was observed following delivery, correction of the basic disorders was not accomplished because of anticipated rejection of marrow allografts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1504665

  15. Resident Tissue-Specific Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Contribute to Fibrogenesis in Human Lung Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Natalie; Badri, Linda; Wettlaufer, Scott; Flint, Andrew; Sajjan, Uma; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Lama, Vibha N.

    2011-01-01

    Fibrotic obliteration of the small airways leading to progressive airflow obstruction, termed bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), is the major cause of poor outcomes after lung transplantation. We recently demonstrated that a donor-derived population of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of human lung transplant recipients. Herein, we study the organ specificity of these cells and investigate the role of local mesenchymal progenitors in fibrogenesis after lung transplantation. We demonstrate that human lung allograft–derived MSCs uniquely express embryonic lung mesenchyme–associated transcription factors with a 35,000-fold higher expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor forkhead box (FOXF1) noted in lung compared with bone marrow MSCs. Fibrotic differentiation of MSCs isolated from normal lung allografts was noted in the presence of profibrotic mediators associated with BOS, including transforming growth factor-β and IL-13. MSCs isolated from patients with BOS demonstrated increased expression of α-SMA and collagen I when compared with non-BOS controls, consistent with a stable in vivo fibrotic phenotype. FOXF1 mRNA expression in the BAL cell pellet correlated with the number of MSCs in the BAL fluid, and myofibroblasts present in the fibrotic lesions expressed FOXF1 by in situ hybridization. These data suggest a key role for local tissue-specific, organ-resident, mesenchymal precursors in the fibrogenic processes in human adult lungs. PMID:21641374

  16. Both rejection and tolerance of allografts can occur in the absence of secondary lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Kant, Cavit D; Akiyama, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Katsunori; Shea, Susan; Yamada, Yohei; Connolly, Sarah E; Marino, Jose; Tocco, Georges; Benichou, Gilles

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we showed that aly/aly mice, which are devoid of lymph nodes and Peyer's patches, acutely rejected fully allogeneic skin and heart grafts. They mounted potent inflammatory direct alloresponses but failed to develop indirect alloreactivity after transplantation. Remarkably, skin allografts also were rejected acutely by splenectomized aly/aly (aly/aly-spl(-)) mice devoid of all secondary lymphoid organs. In these recipients, the rejection was mediated by alloreactive CD8(+) T cells presumably primed in the bone marrow. In contrast, cardiac transplants were not rejected by aly/aly-spl(-) mice. Actually, aly/aly-spl(-) mice that spontaneously accepted a heart allotransplant and displayed donor-specific tolerance also accepted skin grafts from the same, but not a third-party, donor via a mechanism involving CD4(+) regulatory T cells producing IL-10 cytokine. Therefore, direct priming of alloreactive T cells, as well as rejection and regulatory tolerance of allogeneic transplants, can occur in recipient mice lacking secondary lymphoid organs. PMID:25535285

  17. mTOR masters monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice with allografts or tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tingting; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Hao; Li, yang; Shao, Lijuan; Wang, Ruoyu; Lu, Jun; Yang, Zhongzhou; Wang, Junjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    CD11b+ Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in controlling the processes of tumors, infections, autoimmunity and graft rejection. Immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RPM), targeting on the key cellular metabolism molecule mTOR, is currently used in clinics to treat patients with allo-grafts, autoimmune diseases and tumors. However, the effect of RPM on MDSCs has not been studied. RPM significantly decreases the cell number and the immunosuppressive ability on T cells of CD11b+ Ly6Chigh monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs) in both allo-grafts-transplanted and tumor-bearing mice respectively. Mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of mTOR have poor M-MDSCs after grafting with allo-skin tissue or a tumor. Grafting of allo-skin or tumors significantly activates glycolysis pathways in myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow, which is inhibited by RPM or mTOR deletion. 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of the glycolytic pathway, inhibits M-MDSC differentiation from precursors, while enhancing glycolysis by metformin significantly rescues the RPM-caused deficiency of M-MDSCs. Therefore, we offer evidence supporting that mTOR is an intrinsic factor essential for the differentiation and immunosuppressive function of M-MDSCs and that these metabolism-relevant medicines may impact MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression or immune tolerance induction, which is of considerable clinical importance in treating graft rejection, autoimmune diseases and cancers. PMID:26833095

  18. CIRCUMFERENTIAL PROXIMAL FEMORAL ALLOGRAFTS IN TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY REVISION SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Bruno Dutra; Roos, Milton Valdomiro; Júnior, Antero Camisa; Lampert, Henrique Bonotto; da Silva, Matheus Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from patients who underwent femoral reconstruction secondary to loosening of total hip arthroplasty, using circumferential proximal femoral allografts and cemented implants. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 32 patients (33 hips) who underwent femoral reconstruction secondary to loosening of total hip arthroplasty, using circumferential proximal femoral allografts and cemented implants. Among these patients, 28 (29 hips) fulfilled all the requirements for this study. The mean follow-up was five years and two months. The clinical evaluation was done in accordance with the Harris Hip Score. Radiographically, the patients were assessed regarding reabsorption and consolidation of the allograft, migration of the greater trochanter, stability of the femoral component and heterotypic calcification. Results: The average preoperative Harris Hip Score was 32 points. At the last postoperative follow-up, the average score was 82 points. Allograft resorption of some degree was seen in nine hips (31%). Regarding consolidation, 24 cases (82.8%) showed full consolidation, three (10.3%) showed partial consolidation and two (6.9%) showed pseudarthrosis. All femoral components were stable. According to the criteria established, 27 cases (93.1%) were considered to be successful reconstructions after a mean follow-up of five years and two months. Conclusion: From the results obtained, it was concluded that use of circumferential proximal femoral allografts in selected cases of femoral reconstruction secondary to loosening of arthroplasty presented a high survival rate from the reconstruction over an average follow-up of five years and two months. PMID:27047896

  19. Skin allograft and vascularized composite allograft: potential for long-term efficacy in the context of lymphatic modulation.

    PubMed

    Rinkinen, Jacob; Selley, Ryan; Agarwal, Shailesh; Loder, Shawn; Levi, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Tissue transplantation restores form and function in burn patients. The treatment of burn injuries is influenced by severity, location, and the percentage of total body surface area. There have been a number of different techniques developed to temporize and repair the destroyed tissue. However, in patients with large wound burden, sufficient donor site tissue may not be available for autograft harvesting. Such extensive burns necessitate other temporary and permanent options for wound coverage such as skin or vascularized composite allografts (VCA). Rejection of these tissues presents an ongoing problem which is currently managed using a host of systemic immunosuppressive medications. This article discusses the mechanism behind the innate and adaptive immune systems rejection of the allografts. By understanding these pathways, various techniques using immunomodulatory protocols have led to increased allograft survival. However, our primary interest lies in the initial recognition of the graft. We tailor this article to have a specific emphasis on lymphatic modulation as a potential adjunctive therapy. Reviews of the studies evaluating the effect of lymph node modulation on graft survival are described with future implications to allograft transplant research. PMID:25051523

  20. Radioprotection provides functional mechanics but delays healing of irradiated tendon allografts after ACL reconstruction in sheep.

    PubMed

    Seto, Aaron U; Culp, Brian M; Gatt, Charles J; Dunn, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Successful protection of tissue properties against ionizing radiation effects could allow its use for terminal sterilization of musculoskeletal allografts. In this study we functionally evaluate Achilles tendon allografts processed with a previously developed radioprotective treatment based on (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide) crosslinking and free radical scavenging using ascorbate and riboflavin, for ovine anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction was performed using double looped allografts, while comparing radioprotected irradiated and fresh frozen allografts after 12 and 24 weeks post-implantation, and to control irradiated grafts after 12 weeks. Radioprotection was successful at preserving early subfailure mechanical properties comparable to fresh frozen allografts. Twelve week graft stiffness and anterior-tibial (A-T) translation for radioprotected and fresh frozen allografts were comparable at 30 % of native stiffness, and 4.6 and 5 times native A-T translation, respectively. Fresh frozen allograft possessed the greatest 24 week peak load at 840 N and stiffness at 177 N/mm. Histological evidence suggested a delay in tendon to bone healing for radioprotected allografts, which was reflected in mechanical properties. There was no evidence that radioprotective treatment inhibited intra-articular graft healing. This specific radioprotective method cannot be recommended for ACL reconstruction allografts, and data suggest that future efforts to improve allograft sterilization procedures should focus on modifying or eliminating the pre-crosslinking procedure. PMID:23842952

  1. Inaccuracy in selection of massive bone allograft using template comparison method.

    PubMed

    Paul, Laurent; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Cartiaux, Olivier; Cornu, Olivier; Delloye, Christian; Banse, Xavier

    2008-06-01

    The use of massive bone allografts is increasing year by year and selection method remains unchanged. Superposition of patient's radiograph over allograft image and comparison of distances is the gold standard. Experiment was led to test selection procedure of a major european tissue bank. Four observers were asked to select an allograft for 10 fictive recipients. Nine allografts were provided. To simulate a perfect allograft, recipient himself was inserted in the pool of allografts (trap graft). The 10 potential bone transplants were classified in four categories (from adequate to unacceptable). In addition, observers were asked to choose the three best grafts for a given recipient. Quadratic kappa measuring agreement on classification between two observers ranged between 0.74 (substantial) and 0.47 (moderate). Trap graft was quoted by observers as adequate four times (10%) and was cited eight times (20%) among the three best matching allografts. None of the observers discovered that recipient was among allograft panel. This study demonstrates that current selection method is inaccurate for hemipelvic allograft selection. New methods should be developed and tested to assist tissue banks in bone allograft selection. PMID:18253861

  2. Follicular Helper T (Tfh) Cells in Autoimmune Diseases and Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yun-Hui; Choi, Youn Soo

    2016-08-01

    Production of high affinity antibodies for antigens is a critical component for the immune system to fight off infectious pathogens. However, it could be detrimental to our body when the antigens that B cells recognize are of self-origin. Follicular helper T, or Tfh, cells are required for the generation of germinal center reactions, where high affinity antibody-producing B cells and memory B cells predominantly develop. As such, Tfh cells are considered as targets to prevent B cells from producing high affinity antibodies against self-antigens, when high affinity autoantibodies are responsible for immunopathologies in autoimmune disorders. This review article provides an overview of current understanding of Tfh cells and discusses it in the context of animal models of autoimmune diseases and allograft rejections for generation of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:27574501

  3. Follicular Helper T (Tfh) Cells in Autoimmune Diseases and Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yun-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Production of high affinity antibodies for antigens is a critical component for the immune system to fight off infectious pathogens. However, it could be detrimental to our body when the antigens that B cells recognize are of self-origin. Follicular helper T, or Tfh, cells are required for the generation of germinal center reactions, where high affinity antibody-producing B cells and memory B cells predominantly develop. As such, Tfh cells are considered as targets to prevent B cells from producing high affinity antibodies against self-antigens, when high affinity autoantibodies are responsible for immunopathologies in autoimmune disorders. This review article provides an overview of current understanding of Tfh cells and discusses it in the context of animal models of autoimmune diseases and allograft rejections for generation of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:27574501

  4. Induction of tolerance to small bowel allografts in high-responder rats by combining anti-CD4 with CTLA4Ig.

    PubMed

    Yin, D P; Sankary, H N; Williams, J; Krieger, N; Fathman, C G

    1996-12-15

    This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of combined perioperative anti-CD4 and human (h)CTLA4Ig therapy in preventing allorejection of small bowel transplantation in high-responder Lewis rat recipients of ACI grafts. Anti-CD4 (5 mg/kg x 4 days) or hCTLA4Ig (0.5 mg/rat x 2 days) therapy alone delayed, but did not prevent, allograft rejection after small bowel transplantation of ACI into Lewis rats. All grafts were rejected in 18 and 10 days, respectively. However, a regimen of anti-CD4 (5 mg/kg x 4 days) combined with hCTLA4Ig (0.5 mg/rat x 2 days) allowed indefinite survival of ACI small bowel allografts. Second donor-matched heart grafts were permanently accepted, whereas third-party (Sprague-Dawley) heart allografts were rejected by the tolerant recipients. These data suggest that these two reagents produced a synergistic effect in preventing allorejection of small bowel transplantation. PMID:8970603

  5. Induction of specific unresponsiveness to heart allografts in mongrel dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation and antithymocyte globulin

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.; Modry, D.L.; Hoppe, R.T.; Pennock, J.L.; Bieber, C.P.; Holm, B.I.; Jamieson, S.W.; Stinson, E.B.; Schroder, J.; Suomalainen, H.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1984-02-01

    The survival of heterotopic heart allografts was determined in mongrel dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) alone or in combination with other immunosuppressive agents. TLI alone (total dose, 1800 rad) minimally prolonged graft survival as compared with untreated controls. However, marked synergy was observed when TLI was combined with a 10-day post-transplant course of rabbit anti-dog thymocyte globulin (ATG). Approximately 40% of recipients given TLI and ATG showed specific unresponsiveness, as judged by the lack of rejection on serial biopsies for more than 1 year and the prompt rejection of third party hearts. The addition of post-transplant azathioprine (90 to 180 days) to the TLI and ATG regimen increased the mortality of recipients and reduced the fraction of dogs showing specific unresponsiveness. Infusion of donor bone marrow cells at the time of heart transplantation failed to induced specific unresponsiveness in recipients given TLI alone or TLI in combination with post-transplant methotrexate, cyclosporine A, or ATG. The results indicate that the combination of TLI and a brief course of ATG without marrow transplantation was the most effective regimen for the induction of specific unresponsiveness in mongrel dogs.

  6. Recipient–derived EDA fibronectin promotes cardiac allograft fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Adam J; Wood, Sherri C; Cornett, Ashley M; Dreffs, Alyssa A; Lu, Guanyi; Muro, Andrés F; White, Eric S; Bishop, D Keith

    2014-01-01

    Advances in donor matching and immunosuppressive therapies have decreased the prevalence of acute rejection of cardiac grafts; however, chronic rejection remains a significant obstacle for long-term allograft survival. While initiating elements of anti-allograft immune responses have been identified, the linkage between these factors and the ultimate development of cardiac fibrosis is not well understood. Tissue fibrosis resembles an exaggerated wound healing response, in which extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules are central. One such ECM molecule is an alternatively spliced isoform of the ubiquitous glycoprotein fibronectin (FN), termed extra domain A-containing cellular fibronectin (EDA cFN). EDA cFN is instrumental in fibrogenesis; thus, we hypothesized that it might also regulate fibrotic remodelling associated with chronic rejection. We compared the development of acute and chronic cardiac allograft rejection in EDA cFN-deficient (EDA−/−) and wild-type (WT) mice. While EDA−/− mice developed acute cardiac rejection in a manner indistinguishable from WT controls, cardiac allografts in EDA−/− mice were protected from fibrosis associated with chronic rejection. Decreased fibrosis was not associated with differences in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy or intra-graft expression of pro-fibrotic mediators. Further, we examined expression of EDA cFN and total FN by whole splenocytes under conditions promoting various T-helper lineages. Conditions supporting regulatory T-cell (Treg) development were characterized by greatest production of total FN and EDA cFN, though EDA cFN to total FN ratios were highest in Th1 cultures. These findings indicate that recipient-derived EDA cFN is dispensable for acute allograft rejection responses but that it promotes the development of fibrosis associated with chronic rejection. Further, conditions favouring the development of regulatory T cells, widely considered graft-protective, may drive production of ECM molecules which

  7. Lipidomics comparing DCD and DBD liver allografts uncovers lysophospholipids elevated in recipients undergoing early allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Casas-Ferreira, Ana M; Ma, Yun; Sen, Arundhuti; Kim, Min; Proitsi, Petroula; Shkodra, Maltina; Tena, Maria; Srinivasan, Parthi; Heaton, Nigel; Jassem, Wayel; Legido-Quigley, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Finding specific biomarkers of liver damage in clinical evaluations could increase the pool of available organs for transplantation. Lipids are key regulators in cell necrosis and hence this study hypothesised that lipid levels could be altered in organs suffering severe ischemia. Matched pre- and post-transplant biopsies from donation after circulatory death (DCD, n = 36, mean warm ischemia time = 2 min) and donation after brain death (DBD, n = 76, warm ischemia time = none) were collected. Lipidomic discovery and multivariate analysis (MVA) were applied. Afterwards, univariate analysis and clinical associations were conducted for selected lipids differentiating between these two groups. MVA grouped DCD vs. DBD (p = 6.20 × 10(-12)) and 12 phospholipids were selected for intact lipid measurements. Two lysophosphatidylcholines, LysoPC (16:0) and LysoPC (18:0), showed higher levels in DCD at pre-transplantation (q < 0.01). Lysophosphatidylcholines were associated with aspartate aminotransferase (AST) 14-day post-transplantation (q < 0.05) and were more abundant in recipients undergoing early allograft dysfunction (EAD) (p < 0.05). A receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve combining both lipid levels predicted EAD with 82% accuracy. These findings suggest that LysoPC (16:0) and LysoPC (18:0) might have a role in signalling liver tissue damage due to warm ischemia before transplantation. PMID:26635289

  8. Bone marrow trephine biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Bain, B

    2001-01-01

    Trephine biopsies of the bone marrow should be carried out, when clinically indicated, by trained individuals following a standard operating procedure. A bone marrow aspiration should be performed as part of the same procedure. For patient safety and convenience, biopsies are usually performed on the posterior iliac crest. The biopsy specimen should measure at least 1.6 cm and, if it does not, consideration should be given to repeating the procedure, possibly on the contralateral iliac crest. If bone marrow aspiration is found to be impossible, imprints from the biopsy specimen should be obtained. Otherwise, the specimen is placed immediately into fixative and after fixation is embedded in a resin or, more usually, decalcified and embedded in paraffin wax. Thin sections are cut and are stained, as a minimum, with haematoxylin and eosin and with a reticulin stain. A Giemsa stain is also desirable. A Perls' stain does not often give useful information and is not essential in every patient. The need for other histochemical or immunohistochemical stains is determined by the clinical circumstances and the preliminary findings. Trephine biopsy sections should be examined and reported in a systematic manner, assessment being made of the bones, the vessels and stroma, and the haemopoietic and any lymphoid or other tissue. Assessment should begin with a very low power objective, the entire section being examined. Further examination is then done with an intermediate and high power objective. Ideally, reporting of trephine biopsy sections should be done by an individual who is competent in both histopathology and haematology, and who is able to make an appropriate assessment of both the bone marrow aspirate and the trephine biopsy sections. When this is not possible, there should be close consultation between a haematologist and a histopathologist. The report should both describe the histological findings and give an interpretation of their importance. A signed or computer

  9. Selection of massive bone allografts using shape-matching 3-dimensional registration

    PubMed Central

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Cartiaux, Olivier; Cornu, Olivier; Delloye, Christian; Banse, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Massive bone allografts are used when surgery causes large segmental defects. Shape-matching is the primary criterion for selection of an allograft. The current selection method, based on 2-dimensional template comparison, is inefficient for 3-dimensional complex bones. We have analyzed a 3-dimensional (3-D) registration method to match the anatomy of the allograft with that of the recipient. Methods 3-D CT-based registration was performed to match the shapes of both bones. We used the registration to align the allograft volume onto the recipient's bone. Hemipelvic allograft selection was tested in 10 virtual recipients with a panel of 10 potential allografts, including one from the recipient himself (trap graft). 4 observers were asked to visually inspect the superposition of allograft over the recipient, to classify the allografts into 4 categories according to the matching of anatomic zones, and to select the 3 best matching allografts. The results obtained using the registration method were compared with those from a previous study on the template method. Results Using the registration method, the observers systematically detected the trap graft. Selections of the 3 best matching allografts performed using registration and template methods were different. Selection of the 3 best matching allografts was improved by the registration method. Finally, reproducibility of the selection was improved when using the registration method. Interpretation 3-D CT registration provides more useful information than the template method but the final decision lies with the surgeon, who should select the optimal allograft according to his or her own preferences and the needs of the recipient. PMID:20175643

  10. Medial Meniscal Allograft Transplantation: The Bone Plug Technique.

    PubMed

    Dean, Chase S; Olivetto, Javier; Chahla, Jorge; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-04-01

    The medial meniscus is crucial for knee homeostasis. Treating patients who have undergone a subtotal or total meniscectomy, or equivalent irreparable tear pattern, can be extremely challenging, especially in young, active patients. The importance of meniscal preservation has been reported by several authors. Meniscal repair is now widely accepted as the first surgical option for treating medial meniscal tears. Moreover, current guidelines recommend preserving as much meniscal tissue as possible. Treating a symptomatic medial meniscectomized knee is challenging because of limited surgical options. In this context, medial meniscal allograft transplantation arises as the preferred procedure. The purpose of this article was to detail the arthroscopic medial meniscal allograft transplantation technique with the use of 2 bone plugs. PMID:27330948

  11. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  12. Chest wall reconstruction using iliac bone allografts and muscle flaps.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tutor, Emilio; Yeste, Luis; Murillo, Julio; Aubá, Cristina; Sanjulian, Mikel; Torre, Wenceslao

    2004-01-01

    Technically we can divide full-thickness thoracic reconstruction into 2 parts: providing a rigid support and ensuring well-vascularized coverage. Since 1986, the authors' center has had ample experience with bone banks and the use of cryopreserved bone grafts, which led them to consider the possibility of using these grafts for full-thickness chest wall reconstruction. They describe 3 patients in whom resection of the tumor and reconstruction of the thorax were carried out using iliac bone allografts covered with muscle flaps (1 pectoralis major and 2 rectus abdominis). None of the patients experienced breathing difficulties, pain, or instability after 14 months, 18 months, and 11 years of follow-up. The result of the reconstruction was excellent in all 3 patients in terms of function and aesthetics. The advantage of allografts compared with synthetic materials is their potential integration; they can become part of the host patient's living tissue. PMID:14676700

  13. Total lymphoid irradiation for treatment of intractable cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, S.A.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Stinson, E.B. )

    1991-03-01

    The ability of postoperative total lymphoid irradiation to reverse otherwise intractable cardiac allograft rejection was examined in a group of 10 patients in whom conventional rejection therapy (including pulsed steroids and monoclonal or polyclonal anti-T-cell antibody therapy) had failed to provide sustained freedom from rejection. Follow-up periods range from 73 to 1119 days since the start of total lymphoid irradiation. No patient died or sustained serious morbidity because of the irradiation. Three patients have had no further rejection (follow-up periods, 105 to 365 days). Two patients died--one in cardiogenic shock during the course of total lymphoid irradiation, the other with recurrent rejection caused by noncompliance with his medical regimen. Total lymphoid irradiation appears to be a safe and a moderately effective immunosuppressive modality for 'salvage' therapy of cardiac allograft rejection unresponsive to conventional therapy.

  14. Emerging role of B cells in chronic allograft dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Robert B.; Hirohashi, Tsutomu; Farris, Alton B.; Minnei, Francesca; Collins, A. Bernard; Smith, R. Neal

    2015-01-01

    B cells have many possible mechanisms by which they can affect allograft survival, including antigen presentation, cytokine production, immune regulation, and differentiation into alloantibody-producing plasma cells. This report reviews the last mechanism, which the authors regard as most critical for the long-term survival of allografts, namely, the promotion of chronic rejection by alloantibodies. Chronic humoral rejection characteristically arises late after transplantation and causes transplant glomerulopathy, multilamination of peritubular capillary basement membranes, and C4d deposition in PTCs and glomeruli. Circulating antidonor human leukocyte antigen class II antibodies are commonly detected and may precede the development of graft injury. Prognosis is poor, especially when recognized after graft dysfunction has developed. Improved detection and treatment are critically needed for this common cause of late graft loss. PMID:21116310

  15. Massive allograft replacement of hemiarticular traumatic defects of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Breen, T; Gelberman, R H; Leffert, R; Botte, M

    1988-11-01

    Four elbow osteoarticular allografts were done for four patients as salvage procedures for unreconstructable elbow fracture malunions. With a mean follow-up of 60 months (range, 12 to 72 months) all elbows were stable, free of pain, and had mean motion of 130 degrees active flexion and 27 degrees of flexion deformity, 67 degrees pronation and 62 degrees supination (preoperative mean: 104 degrees flexion, 42 degrees flexion contracture, 20 degrees pronation, and 34 degrees supination). Complications occurred in two elbows. One had a deep infection necessitating graft removal and subsequent regrafting. The second had an olecranon osteotomy nonunion. Elbow allografting is recommended as a salvage procedure for massive posttraumatic articular defects, bone loss, or malunion when neither arthrodesis nor conventional arthroplasty is indicated. PMID:3066816

  16. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin in renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rabadi, Laith; Francis, Jean M.; Henderson, Joel; Ghai, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Glomerulopathy due to dysproteinemia can have a wide spectrum of pathologic and clinical features based on specific characteristics of the abnormal protein and the response induced within the parenchymal tissue. Monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) deposition can manifest as a different glomerular disease. Proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) is a unique entity mimicking immune complex GN that does not conform to any of those subtypes. IgG monoclonal granular deposition in the glomeruli with a pattern similar to immune complex disease suggested by C3 and C1q deposition should prompt consideration of PGNMID. Literature is scarce in terms of recurrence of disease in renal allografts. In this article we present the clinical–pathologic features of three cases of PGNMID in the renal allograft showing the variable course and manifestation of the disease. PMID:26613031

  17. Histological Study of Fresh Versus Frozen Semitendinous Muscle Tendon Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Santos, Luiz Augusto Ubirajara; Croci, Alberto Tesconi; Pereira, João Alberto Ramos Maradei; França Bisneto, Edgard N.; Giovani, Arlete Mazzini Miranda; Oliveira, Claudia Regina G. C. M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to histologically analyze allografts from cadaveric semitendinous muscle after cryopreservation at −80°C in comparison to a control group kept at only −4°C to test the hypothesis that the histological characteristics of the tissue are maintained when the tendons are kept at lower temperatures. METHODS: In a tissue bank, 10 semitendinous tendons from 10 cadavers were frozen at −80ºC as a storage method for tissue preservation. They were kept frozen for 40 days, and then a histological study was carried out. Another 10 tendon samples were analyzed while still “fresh”. RESULTS: There was no histological difference between the fresh and frozen samples in relation to seven variables. CONCLUSIONS: Semitendinous muscle tendon allografts can be submitted to cryopreservation at −80ºC without suffering histological modifications. PMID:20360921

  18. Arthroscopic Labral Reconstruction of the Hip Using Semitendinosus Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, John M.; Cregar, William M.; Martin, Timothy J.; Vemula, S. Pavan; Gupta, Asheesh; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    The labrum of the hip is recognized as being important to the stability of the hip and a major cause of hip pain. Damage to the labrum may result in increased joint stress and articular damage. Labral damage is often treated through various methods, among them simple stitch repair, base refixation, and debridement. Labral reconstruction becomes necessary when the labrum is too damaged to salvage, which renders labral repair improbable and labral debridement ineffective. In contrast to other methods that have been described for this treatment, our technique uses a semitendinosus allograft as a graft source, allowing for arthroscopic hip labral reconstruction. This technique has many advantages and is easily reproducible. It has shown promising results in patients with labral damage. The purpose of this article is to detail the step-by-step surgical technique of labral reconstruction using a semitendinosus allograft, in addition to the indications, pearls, and pitfalls of the technique. PMID:26759770

  19. Regulatory oversight in the United States of vascularized composite allografts.

    PubMed

    Glazier, Alexandra K

    2016-06-01

    Vascularized composite allograft (VCA) transplantation is a medically acceptable treatment for the reconstruction of major tissue loss. The advent of VCA transplantation has spurred regulatory and policy development in the United States to address the multiple clinical, ethical and legal issues that must be considered for the practice of VCA donation and transplantation to develop within the existing framework of public trust and transparency vital to the success of donation and transplantation. PMID:26284312

  20. Fresh-frozen Complete Extensor Mechanism Allograft versus Autograft Reconstruction in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanyin; Zhang, Hongtao; Ma, Qiong; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Yinglong; Fan, Qingyu; Ma, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Different clinical results have been reported in the repair of extensor mechanism disruption using fresh-frozen complete extensor mechanism (CEM) allograft, creating a need for a better understanding of fresh-frozen CME allograft reconstruction. Here, we perform histological and biomechanical analyses of fresh-frozen CEM allograft or autograft reconstruction in an in vivo rabbit model. Our histological results show complete incorporation of the quadriceps tendon into the host tissues, patellar survival and total integration of the allograft tibia, with relatively fewer osteocytes, into the host tibia. Vascularity and cellularity are reduced and delayed in the allograft but exhibit similar distributions to those in the autograft. The infrapatellar fat pad provides the main blood supply, and the lowest cellularity is observed in the patellar tendon close to the tibia in both the allograft and autograft. The biomechanical properties of the junction of quadriceps tendon and host tissues and those of the allograft patellar tendon are completely and considerably restored, respectively. Therefore, fresh-frozen CEM allograft reconstruction is viable, but the distal patellar tendon and the tibial block may be the weak links of the reconstruction. These findings provide new insight into the use of allograft in repairing disruption of the extensor mechanism. PMID:26911538

  1. Healing properties of allograft from alendronate-treated animal in lumbar spine interbody cage fusion.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingyun; Li, Haisheng; Zou, Xuenong; Bünger, Mathias; Egund, Niels; Lind, Martin; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Bünger, Cody

    2005-04-01

    This study investigated the healing potential of allograft from bisphosphonate-treated animals in anterior lumbar spine interbody fusion. Three levels of anterior lumbar interbody fusion with Brantigan cages were performed in two groups of five landrace pigs. Empty Brantigan cages or cages filled with either autograft or allograft were located randomly at different levels. The allograft materials for the treatment group were taken from the pigs that had been fed with alendronate, 10 mg daily for 3 months. The histological fusion rate was 2/5 in alendronate-treated allograft and 3/5 in non-treated allograft. The mean bone volume was 39% and 37.2% in alendronate-treated or non-treated allograft (NS), respectively. No statistical difference was found between the same grafted cage comparing two groups. The histological fusion rate was 7/10 in all autograft cage levels and 5/10 in combined allograft cage levels. No fusion was found at all in empty cage levels. With the numbers available, no statistically significant difference was found in histological fusion between autograft and allograft applications. There was a significant difference of mean bone volume between autograft (49.2%) and empty cage (27.5%) (P<0.01). In conclusion, this study did not demonstrate different healing properties of alendronate-treated and non-treated allograft for anterior lumbar interbody fusion in pigs. PMID:15248057

  2. Prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts in the primate with total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Els, D.; Du Toit, L.B.; Weideman, A.; Davids, H.; van der Merwe, E.

    1987-09-01

    The prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts (PDA) by total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and in combination with cyclosporine (CsA) was assessed in a well established total pancreatectomy, diabetic, primate transplantation model. Pancreatic transplantation was performed in 119 pancreatectomized baboons (Papio ursinus). Of a total of 109 allografts performed, 71 were segmental allografts (open duct drainage) and 38 PDA. Of 119 graft recipients, 10 received segmental pancreatic autografts. TLI and CsA administered separately to segmental allograft recipients resulted in modest allograft survival and indefinite graft survival was not observed. 8 of 17 (47%) segmental allograft recipients that received TLI and CsA had graft survival beyond 100 days, indicating highly significant pancreatic allograft survival. All long-term segmental allograft recipients were rendered normoglycemic (plasma glucose less than 8 mmol/L) by this immunosuppressive regimen. In contrast, poor results were observed in PDA recipients treated with TLI and CsA. Mean survival in 18 treated PDA recipients was 23.8 days, 8 survived longer than 20 days (44.4%), and 1 greater than 100 days (5.5%). Despite treatment, early rejection of the duodenum in PDA recipients frequently resulted in necrosis and perforation and contributed to a high morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that, in contrast to the significant prolongation of segmental allografts by TLI and CsA, poor immunosuppression was achieved by this regimen in PDA recipients and was associated with a high morbidity and mortality caused by early rejection of the duodenum.

  3. Quantitative podocyte parameters predict human native kidney and allograft half-lives

    PubMed Central

    Cibrik, Diane; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Min; Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Samaniego, Milagros; Bitzer, Markus; Wiggins, Jocelyn E.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Li, Yi; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Kidney function decreases with age. A potential mechanistic explanation for kidney and allograft half-life has evolved through the realization that linear reduction in glomerular podocyte density could drive progressive glomerulosclerosis to impact both native kidney and allograft half-lives. METHODS Predictions from podometrics (quantitation of podocyte parameters) were tested using independent pathologic, functional, and outcome data for native kidneys and allografts derived from published reports and large registries. RESULTS With age, native kidneys exponentially develop glomerulosclerosis, reduced renal function, and end-stage kidney disease, projecting a finite average kidney life span. The slope of allograft failure rate versus age parallels that of reduction in podocyte density versus age. Quantitative modeling projects allograft half-life at any donor age, and rate of podocyte detachment parallels the observed allograft loss rate. CONCLUSION Native kidneys are designed to have a limited average life span of about 100–140 years. Allografts undergo an accelerated aging-like process that accounts for their unexpectedly short half-life (about 15 years), the observation that older donor age is associated with shorter allograft half-life, and the fact that long-term allograft survival has not substantially improved. Podometrics provides potential readouts for these processes, thereby offering new approaches for monitoring and intervention. FUNDING National Institutes of Health. PMID:27280173

  4. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  5. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  6. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  7. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  8. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  9. Immunomodulation of vascular endothelium: Effects of ultraviolet B irradiation on vein allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, M.L.; Hardy, M.A.; Gordon, R.E.; Reemtsma, K.; Benvenisty, A.I. )

    1990-01-01

    Prosthetic grafts of vein allografts are inadequate as small-diameter vessel substitutes. We have applied ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation to modulate the immunogenicity of vein allografts to avoid immunologic injury. The veins of male ACI rats were irradiated with UVB (60 mJ/cm2) in situ and transplanted to male ACI rats (autografts) and female Lewis rats (allografts). Nonirradiated veins served as controls. At 4, 7, 14, and 28 days, all grafts were patent and were studied for morphologic changes by scanning electron microscopy and for immunogold labeling of major histocompatibility complex class II antigen expression. In autografts, scanning electron microscopy demonstrated minimal endothelial loss after grafting, regardless of UVB irradiation. Untreated allografts showed severe endothelial injury 4, 7, and 14 days after transplantation. UVB irradiation of veins protected allografts from injury to the endothelium and basement membrane. Major histocompatibility complex class II-positive endothelial cells were not seen in autografts but were seen in 40% of cells 4 days after transplantation in untreated allografts. UVB-treated allografts showed MHC class II antigen expression labeling of 20% of the endothelial cells. Barr body analysis demonstrated the donor origin of these endothelial cells. UVB irradiation of rat vein allografts prolongs endothelial survival while decreasing endothelial surface expression of class II antigens. These data suggest that modification of vein immunogenicity with UVB irradiation may permit functional survival of small-vessel allografts without chronic immunosuppression.

  10. Polyglutamate directed coupling of bioactive peptides for the delivery of osteoinductive signals on allograft bone

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Bonnie K.; Bonvallet, Paul P.; Reddy, Michael S.; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Bellis, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Allograft bone is commonly used as an alternative to autograft, however allograft lacks many osteoinductive factors present in autologous bone due to processing. In this study, we investigated a method to reconstitute allograft with osteoregenerative factors. Specifically, an osteoinductive peptide from collagen I, DGEA, was engineered to express a heptaglutamate (E7) domain, which binds the hydroxyapatite within bone mineral. Addition of E7 to DGEA resulted in 9× greater peptide loading on allograft, and significantly greater retention after a 5-day interval with extensive washing. When factoring together greater initial loading and retention, the E7 domain directed a 45-fold enhancement of peptide density on the allograft surface. Peptide-coated allograft was also implanted subcutaneously into rats and it was found that E7DGEA was retained in vivo for at least 3 months. Interestingly, E7DGEA peptides injected intravenously accumulated within bone tissue, implicating a potential role for E7 domains in drug delivery to bone. Finally, we determined that, as with DGEA, the E7 modification enhanced coupling of a bioactive BMP2-derived peptide on allograft. These results suggest that E7 domains are useful for coupling many types of bone-regenerative molecules to the surface of allograft to reintroduce osteoinductive signals and potentially advance allograft treatments. PMID:23182349

  11. Significance of urinary proteome pattern in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Suhail, Sufi M

    2014-01-01

    Urinary proteomics is developing as a platform of urinary biomarkers of immense potential in recent years. The definition of urinary proteome in the context of renal allograft and characterization of different proteome patterns in various graft dysfunctions have led to the development of a distinct science of this noninvasive tool. Substantial numbers of studies have shown that different renal allograft disease states, both acute and chronic, could portray unique urinary proteome pattern enabling early diagnosis of graft dysfunction and proper manipulation of immunosuppressive strategy that could impact graft prognosis. The methodology of the urinary proteome is nonetheless not more complex than that of other sophisticated assays of conventional urinary protein analysis. Moreover, the need for a centralized database is also felt by the researchers as more and more studies have been presenting their results from different corners and as systems of organizing these newly emerging data being developed at international and national levels. In this context concept of urinary proteomics in renal allograft recipients would be of significant importance in clinical transplantation. PMID:24757556

  12. Clinical Course and Outcomes of Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zakharov, Vadym; Ksenofontova, Anna; Onishchenko, Eugene; Golubova, Tatyana; Kichatyi, Sergey; Zakharova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study is provided to increase the efficiency of the treatment of kidney transplant recipients by predicting the development of the late allotransplant dysfunction. Methods. 330 patients who have lived for more than one year with functioning kidney allograft were evaluated. To predict the subsequent duration of the well-functioning of allotransplant the prognostic significance of 15 baseline clinical and sociodemographic characteristics on the results of the survey one year after transplantation was investigated. The result was considered to be positive in constructing the regression prognostication model if recipient lived more than 3 years from the time of transplantation. Results. It was established that more late start of renal allograft dysfunction after transplantation correlates with the more time it takes till complete loss of allograft function. Creatinine and hemoglobin blood concentration and the level of proteinuria one year after transplantation within created mathematical model allow predicting the loss of kidney transplant function three years after the transplantation. Patients with kidney transplant dysfunction are advised to renew the program hemodialysis upon reaching plasma creatinine concentration 0.5–0.7 mmol/L. Conclusion. Values of creatinine, hemoglobin, and proteinuria one year after transplantation can be used for subsequent prognostication of kidney transplant function. PMID:27478631

  13. Significance of Urinary Proteome Pattern in Renal Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Suhail, Sufi M.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary proteomics is developing as a platform of urinary biomarkers of immense potential in recent years. The definition of urinary proteome in the context of renal allograft and characterization of different proteome patterns in various graft dysfunctions have led to the development of a distinct science of this noninvasive tool. Substantial numbers of studies have shown that different renal allograft disease states, both acute and chronic, could portray unique urinary proteome pattern enabling early diagnosis of graft dysfunction and proper manipulation of immunosuppressive strategy that could impact graft prognosis. The methodology of the urinary proteome is nonetheless not more complex than that of other sophisticated assays of conventional urinary protein analysis. Moreover, the need for a centralized database is also felt by the researchers as more and more studies have been presenting their results from different corners and as systems of organizing these newly emerging data being developed at international and national levels. In this context concept of urinary proteomics in renal allograft recipients would be of significant importance in clinical transplantation. PMID:24757556

  14. Anti-HLA sensitization after kidney allograft nephrectomy: changes one year post-surgery and beneficial effect of intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Matignon, Marie; Leibler, Claire; Moranne, Olivier; Salomon, Laurent; Charron, Dominique; Lang, Philippe; Jacquelinet, Christian; Suberbielle, Caroline; Grimbert, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of anti-HLA sensitization at the time of and following allograft nephrectomy may help clinicians to define better both the indications for nephrectomy and preventive therapeutic strategies. We carried out a retrospective analysis of anti-HLA antibodies in 63 clinically indicated nephrectomies (baseline and three and 12 months after) according to the time elapsed since transplantation (six months) and clinical background. An intervention study included 10 patients without donor-specific antibodies (DSA) at the time of nephrectomy treated with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) (1.5 g/kg). Early nephrectomies were performed in 15 patients (24%). Among the late nephrectomies, 14 patients (22%) were asymptomatic and 34 (54%) had graft intolerance syndrome (GIS). At baseline, anti-HLA sensitization was significantly lower in the early and late asymptomatic groups than in the GIS group, but increased considerably within the three months following surgery. In the group of 10 patients treated with IVIG, only the number of class I non-DSA increased in the three months after surgery, whereas in the control group (N = 13), all anti-HLA variables increased significantly. All patients undergoing a clinically indicated allograft nephrectomy become highly sensitized within the 12 months after surgery. In patients without DSA before nephrectomy, high doses of IVIG may prevent anti-HLA sensitization. PMID:27140447

  15. Use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography to Evaluate Chronic Allograft Nephropathy in Rats and Correlations between Time-Intensity Curve Parameters and Allograft Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Yu, Zexing; Xu, Yue; Zeng, Song; Zhang, Zijian; Xue, Wenrui; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2016-07-01

    This study quantitatively analyzed changes in the hemodynamic characteristics of renal allografts at different stages in a rat chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) model as well as the relationship between hemodynamic parameters and renal allograft fibrosis using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS). The experimental group used a CAN rat model (n = 30), and the control group used an orthotopic syngeneic renal transplant model (n = 30). After surgery, creatinine clearance rates were regularly monitored every 2 wk. The checking times were set at 4, 12 and 24 wk after surgery, which represent early, middle and late stage of CAN, respectively. At different stages of CAN, eight rats from each group were randomly selected for CEUS examination. Time-intensity curve (TIC) parameters, including rise time, peak intensity, mean transit time, area under the curve, wash-in slope, time-to-peak and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression; Vimentin expression; and chronic allograft damage index scores were evaluated by linear correlation analysis. Before the creatinine clearance rate showed significant abnormalities, the renal allografts in the experimental group had already presented pathologic changes associated with CAN. In the early stage after surgery, compared to the TIC curve of the control group, the experimental group showed increased rise time, mean transit time, area under the curve and time-to-peak, and decreased wash-in slope (p < 0.05). Chronic allograft damage index scores and the expression levels of α-SMA and Vimentin proteins in renal allografts were correlated with TIC parameters (p < 0.05). Compared to creatinine clearance rate, CEUS can detect CAN at earlier stages. The correlations between TIC-related parameters and the expression levels of α-SMA and Vimentin in renal allografts indicate that CEUS is a feasible way to assess the degree of renal allograft fibrosis quantitatively. PMID:27056611

  16. Starvation marrow – gelatinous transformation of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Osgood, Eric; Muddassir, Salman; Jaju, Minal; Moser, Robert; Farid, Farwa; Mewada, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT), also known as starvation marrow, represents a rare pathological entity of unclear etiology, in which bone marrow histopathology demonstrates hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and gelatinous infiltration. The finding of gelatinous marrow transformation lacks disease specificity; rather, it is an indicator of severe illness and a marker of poor nutritional status, found in patients with eating disorders, acute febrile illnesses, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, alcoholism, malignancies, and congestive heart failure. We present a middle-aged woman with a history of alcoholism, depression, and anorexia nervosa who presented with failure to thrive and macrocytic anemia, with bone marrow examination demonstrative of gelatinous transformation, all of which resolved with appropriate treatment. To our knowledge, there are very few cases of GMT which have been successfully treated; thus, our case highlights the importance of proper supportive management. PMID:25317270

  17. What Is a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... procedure allows the recipient to get new stem cells that work properly. Stem cells are found in bone marrow, ... the body doesn't make enough red blood cells or they don't work properly. Certain immune-deficiency diseases that prevent the ...

  18. Bone Marrow Derived Eosinophil Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas X.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional effector cells implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases including asthma, eosinophil gastrointestinal disorders and helminth infection. Mouse bone marrow derived progenitor cells can be differentiated into eosinophils following IL-5 exposure. These bone marrow derived eosinophils are fully differentiated at the end of a 14 day culture based on morphology and expression of molecular markers.

  19. CT Lesion Model-Based Structural Allografts: Custom Fabrication and Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Jan Claas; Hesselbarth, Uwe; Seifert, Philipp; Nowack, Dimitri; von Versen, Rüdiger; Smith, Mark David; Seifert, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Patients requiring knee and hip revision arthroplasty often present with difficult anatomical situations that limit options for surgery. Customised mega-implants may be one of few remaining treatment options. However, extensive damage to residual bone stock may also be present, and in such cases even customised prosthetics may be difficult to implant. Small quantities of lost bone can be replaced with standard allografts or autologous bone. Larger defects may require structural macro-allografts, sometimes in combination with implants (allograft-prosthesis composites). Methods Herein, we describe a process for manufacturing lesion-specific large structural allografts according to a 3D, full-scale, lithographically generated defect model. These macro-allografts deliver the volume and the mechanical stability necessary for certain complex revisions. They are patient-and implant-matched, negate some requirements for additional implants and biomaterials and save time in the operating theatre by eliminating the requirement for intra-operative sizing and shaping of standard allografts. Conclusion While a robust data set from long-term follow-up of patients receiving customised macro-allografts is not yet available, initial clinical experience and results suggest that lesion-matched macro-allografts can be an important component of revision joint surgery. PMID:23800856

  20. Storage conditions do not have detrimental effect on allograft collagen or scaffold performance.

    PubMed

    Abreu, E L; Palmer, M P; Murray, M M

    2009-11-01

    Musculoskeletal allografts are a valuable alternative to autograft tissue in orthopaedic surgeries. However, the effects of the allografts' storage history on the collagen and subsequent allograft scaffold properties are unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that freezing and refrigeration of allografts for 1 week would alter the biologic performance and mechanical properties of the allograft collagen. Allograft collagen was characterized by SDS-PAGE migration pattern, amino acid profile and measured denaturation. Scaffolds made from allograft collagen were evaluated for fibroblast proliferation, platelet activation and scaffold retraction. Collagen gelation kinetics (elastic and inelastic moduli and the viscous-elastic transition point) were also evaluated. Fibroblast proliferation, platelet activation and scaffold retraction results showed only minor, though statistically significant, differences between the storage groups. In addition, there were no significant differences in rheological properties or collagen biochemistry. In conclusion, this study suggests that freezing or refrigeration for 1 week does not appear to have any detrimental effect on the mechanical properties and biologic performance of the collagen within allografts. PMID:19507051

  1. Evaluation of Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion in Sheep Using Mineral Scaffolds Seeded with Cultured Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca-López, María D.; Andrades, José A.; Gómez, Santiago; Zamora-Navas, Plácido; Guerado, Enrique; Rubio, Nuria; Blanco, Jerónimo; Becerra, José

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the efficacy of hybrid constructs in comparison to bone grafts (autograft and allograft) for posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in sheep, instrumented with transpedicular screws and bars. Hybrid constructs using cultured bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown promising results in several bone healing models. In particular, hybrid constructs made by calcium phosphate-enriched cells have had similar fusion rates to bone autografts in posterolateral lumbar fusion in sheep. In our study, four experimental spinal fusions in two animal groups were compared in sheep: autograft and allograft (reference group), hydroxyapatite scaffold, and hydroxyapatite scaffold seeded with cultured and osteoinduced bone marrow MSCs (hybrid construct). During the last three days of culture, dexamethasone (dex) and beta-glycerophosphate (β-GP) were added to potentiate osteoinduction. The two experimental situations of each group were tested in the same spinal segment (L4–L5). Spinal fusion and bone formation were studied by clinical observation, X-ray, computed tomography (CT), histology, and histomorphometry. Lumbar fusion rates assessed by CT scan and histology were higher for autograft and allograft (70%) than for mineral scaffold alone (22%) and hybrid constructs (35%). The quantity of new bone formation was also higher for the reference group, quite similar in both (autograft and allograft). Although the hybrid scaffold group had a better fusion rate than the non-hybrid scaffold group, the histological analysis revealed no significant differences between them in terms of quantity of bone formation. The histology results suggested that mineral scaffolds were partly resorbed in an early phase, and included in callus tissues. Far from the callus area the hydroxyapatite alone did not generate bone around it, but the hybrid scaffold did. In nude mice, labeled cells were induced to differentiate in vivo and monitored by

  2. Meniscal replacement using a cryopreserved allograft. An experimental study in the dog.

    PubMed

    Arnoczky, S P; Warren, R F; McDevitt, C A

    1990-03-01

    The medial menisci of 14 adult dogs were replaced using a cryopreserved meniscal allograft. The morphology and metabolic activity of the transplanted allografts were then evaluated using routine histology, a vascular-injection (Spalteholz) technique, and autoroentgenography (Na2(35)SO4 incorporation) at various intervals, from two weeks to six months postoperatively. After transplantation, the allografts retained their normal gross appearance and healed to the capsular tissues of the host by fibrovascular scar tissue. Histologically, the grafts demonstrated a decrease in the number of metabolically active cells after transplantation but had a normal cellular distribution and Na2(35)SO4 uptake by three months. The allografts appeared to function normally after transplantation. Although some degenerative changes were noted in the tibial articular cartilage not covered by the meniscus, the cartilage beneath the allograft appeared normal. PMID:2302876

  3. Endocrine function after immunosuppression of pancreatic allograft by ionizing irradiation in the primate

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Laker, L.; Els, D.; Weideman, A.; Wolfe-Coote, S.; Du Toit, L.B.

    1986-05-01

    The object of this preliminary study was to evaluate the endocrine function after heterotopic intraperitoneal segmental pancreatic allotransplantation with unligated duct in irradiated, totally pancreatectomized primates. All allograft recipients received, pre- and peroperative donor-specific blood transfusions and peroperative external irradiation from a linear accelerator; 200 rads was administered weekly and increased to a total dose of 1,500 rads. Pancreatic transplantation was performed between 2 and 6 weeks after completion of irradiation and preoperative blood transfusions. As previously reported, only minimal pancreatic allograft survival was achieved following preoperative irradiation. One recipient remained normoglycaemic for greater than 100 days after transplantation, the longest surviving pancreatic allograft recipient reported from this laboratory. Intravenous glucose tolerance test results in this recipient revealed normoglycaemia, reduced K-value, hypoinsulinaemia, normal glucagon response, reduced C-peptide values, and moderate glucose intolerance. Aortography and electron-microscopic examination of allograft biopsy tissue confirmed the presence of a functioning allograft.

  4. Double-chamber rotating bioreactor for dynamic perfusion cell seeding of large-segment tracheal allografts: comparison to conventional static methods.

    PubMed

    Haykal, Siba; Salna, Michael; Zhou, Yingzhe; Marcus, Paula; Fatehi, Mostafa; Frost, Geoff; Machuca, Tiago; Hofer, Stefan O P; Waddell, Thomas K

    2014-08-01

    Tracheal transplantation with a long-segment recellularized tracheal allograft has previously been performed without the need for immunosuppressive therapy. Recipients' mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and tracheal epithelial cells (TEC) were harvested, cultured, expanded, and seeded on a donor trachea within a bioreactor. Prior techniques used for cellular seeding have involved only static-seeding methods. Here, we describe a novel bioreactor for recellularization of long-segment tracheae. Tracheae were recellularized with epithelial cells on the luminal surface and bone marrow-derived MSC on the external surface. We used dynamic perfusion seeding for both cell types and demonstrate an increase in both cellular counts and homogeneity scores compared with traditional methods. Despite these improvements, orthotopic transplantation of these scaffolds revealed no labeled cells at postoperative day 3 and lack of re-epithelialization within the first 2 weeks. The animals in this study had postoperative respiratory distress and tracheal collapse that was incompatible with life. PMID:24392662

  5. Double-Chamber Rotating Bioreactor for Dynamic Perfusion Cell Seeding of Large-Segment Tracheal Allografts: Comparison to Conventional Static Methods

    PubMed Central

    Haykal, Siba; Salna, Michael; Zhou, Yingzhe; Marcus, Paula; Fatehi, Mostafa; Frost, Geoff; Machuca, Tiago; Hofer, Stefan O.P.

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal transplantation with a long-segment recellularized tracheal allograft has previously been performed without the need for immunosuppressive therapy. Recipients' mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and tracheal epithelial cells (TEC) were harvested, cultured, expanded, and seeded on a donor trachea within a bioreactor. Prior techniques used for cellular seeding have involved only static-seeding methods. Here, we describe a novel bioreactor for recellularization of long-segment tracheae. Tracheae were recellularized with epithelial cells on the luminal surface and bone marrow-derived MSC on the external surface. We used dynamic perfusion seeding for both cell types and demonstrate an increase in both cellular counts and homogeneity scores compared with traditional methods. Despite these improvements, orthotopic transplantation of these scaffolds revealed no labeled cells at postoperative day 3 and lack of re-epithelialization within the first 2 weeks. The animals in this study had postoperative respiratory distress and tracheal collapse that was incompatible with life. PMID:24392662

  6. Triple drug immunosuppression significantly reduces immune activation and allograft arteriosclerosis in cytomegalovirus-infected rat aortic allografts and induces early latency of viral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lemström, K. B.; Bruning, J. H.; Bruggeman, C. A.; Lautenschlager, I. T.; Häyry, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of triple drug immunosuppression (cyclosporine A 10 mg/kg/day+methylprednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/day+azathioprine 2 mg/kg/day) on rat cytomegalovirus (RCMV)-enhanced allograft arteriosclerosis was investigated applying WF (AG-B2, RT1v) recipients of DA (AG-B4, RT1a) aortic allografts. The recipients were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(5) plaque-forming units of RCMV 1 day after transplantation or left noninfected. The grafts were removed on 7 and 14 days, and at 1, 3, and 6 months after transplantation. The presence of viral infection was demonstrated by plaque assays, cell proliferation by [3H]thymidine autoradiography, and vascular wall alterations by quantitative histology and immunohistochemistry. Triple drug immunosuppression reduced the presence of infectious virus in plaque assays and induced early latency of viral infection. It significantly reduced the peak adventitial inflammatory response (P < 0.05) and reduced and delayed intimal nuclear intensity and intimal thickening (P < 0.05) in RCMV-infected allografts. The proliferative response of smooth muscle cells was reduced by triple drug immunosuppression to 50% of that observed in nonimmunosuppressed RCMV-infected allografts, but still the proliferative peak response was seen at 1 month. Only low level immune activation, ie, the expression of interleukin-2 receptor (P < 0.05) and MHC class II, was observed under triple drug immunosuppression in the adventitia of RCMV-infected allografts, whereas there was no substantial change in the phenotypic distribution of inflammatory cells. In conclusion, although RCMV infection significantly enhances allograft arteriosclerosis also in immunosuppressed allografts, triple drug immunosuppression has no additional detrimental effect but rather a protective one on vascular wall histology. These results further suggest that RCMV-enhanced allograft arteriosclerosis may be an immunopathological condition linked to the host immune response toward the graft and

  7. Results of 32 Allograft-prosthesis Composite Reconstructions of the Proximal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Larousserie, Frédérique; Thévenin, Fabrice; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Anract, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The use of allograft-prosthesis composites for reconstruction after bone tumor resection at the proximal femur has generated considerable interest since the mid1980s on the basis that their use would improve function and survival, and restore bone stock. Although functional improvement has been documented, it is unknown whether these composites survive long periods and whether they restore bone stock. We therefore determined long-term allograft-prosthesis composite survival, identified major complications that led to revision, and determined whether allograft bone stock could be spared at the time of revision. We also compared the radiographic appearance of allografts sterilized by gamma radiation and fresh-frozen allografts. We retrospectively reviewed 32 patients with bone malignancy in the proximal femur who underwent reconstruction with a cemented allograft-prosthesis composite. The allograft-prosthesis composite was a primary reconstruction for 23 patients and a revision procedure for nine. The minimum followup was 2 months (median, 68 months; range, 2–232 months). The cumulative incidence of revision for any reason was 14% at 5 years (95% confidence interval, 1%–28%) and 19% at 10 years (95% confidence interval, 3%–34%). Nine patients (28%) had revision of the reconstruction during followup; four of these patients had revision surgery for infection. Allografts sterilized by gamma radiation showed worse resorption than fresh-frozen allografts. Based on reported results, allograft-composite prostheses do not appear to improve survival compared with megaprostheses. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19851817

  8. Injury-induced allograft rejection: A rendezvous with evolution.

    PubMed

    Land, Walter G

    2013-01-01

    Modern immunology, in many ways, is based on three major paradigms: the clonal selection theory, the pattern recognition theory, and the danger/injury theory. The last theory holds that any cell stress and tissue injury, including allograft injury, via induction of damage-associated molecular patterns, induces immunity, including alloimmunity, leading to allograft rejection. On the other hand, the concept precludes that non-self per se induces immunity as proposed by the two former theories. Recently, the danger/injury model has gained considerable acceptance by immunologists, in particular as promoted by new insights into the function of the mammalian gut microbiota, representing a huge assemblage of non-self. Harboring microbiota by hosts is characterized by the fact that harmless noninjurious commensal microbes are protected by innate immunity-based tolerance, whereas intestinal injury-causing pathogenic microbes are immunologically attacked. Plausibility and validity of the danger/injury concept is stringently supported by observations of similar phenomena across the tree of life: the ability of the immune system to discriminate between harmful life-threatening non-self to induce immunity and harmless beneficial non-self to induce tolerance has apparently emerged during evolution. Immune defense responses to injuring/injured non-self (e.g., as reflected by plant resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses on one hand, and allograft rejection on the other hand) as well as immunity-controlled protection of beneficial non-self (e.g., as reflected by microbiota and the fetus of placental mammals) are processes in the interest of evolution and, thus, evolved under pressure across the phylogenetic tree. PMID:25095509

  9. Urine Metabolite Profiles Predictive of Human Kidney Allograft Status.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Schwartz, Joseph E; Sharma, Vijay K; Chen, Qiuying; Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana M; Ding, Ruchuang; Ikle, David N; Bridges, Nancy D; Williams, Nikki M; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Karoly, Edward D; Mohney, Robert P; Abecassis, Michael; Friedewald, John; Knechtle, Stuart J; Becker, Yolanda T; Samstein, Benjamin; Shaked, Abraham; Gross, Steven S; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2016-02-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis and prognostication of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft may help realize the full benefits of kidney transplantation. To investigate whether urine metabolites predict kidney allograft status, we determined levels of 749 metabolites in 1516 urine samples from 241 kidney graft recipients enrolled in the prospective multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation-04 study. A metabolite signature of the ratio of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine in biopsy specimen-matched urine supernatants best discriminated acute cellular rejection biopsy specimens from specimens without rejection. For clinical application, we developed a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based assay that enabled absolute and rapid quantification of the 3-sialyllactose-to-xanthosine ratio in urine samples. A composite signature of ratios of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine and quinolinate to X-16397 and our previously reported urinary cell mRNA signature of 18S ribosomal RNA, CD3ε mRNA, and interferon-inducible protein-10 mRNA outperformed the metabolite signatures and the mRNA signature. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the composite metabolite-mRNA signature was 0.93, and the signature was diagnostic of acute cellular rejection with a specificity of 84% and a sensitivity of 90%. The composite signature, developed using solely biopsy specimen-matched urine samples, predicted future acute cellular rejection when applied to pristine samples taken days to weeks before biopsy. We conclude that metabolite profiling of urine offers a noninvasive means of diagnosing and prognosticating acute cellular rejection in the human kidney allograft, and that the combined metabolite and mRNA signature is diagnostic and prognostic of acute cellular rejection with very high accuracy. PMID:26047788

  10. Evidence for Kidney Rejection after Combined Bone Marrow and Renal Transplantation Despite Ongoing Whole-blood Chimerism in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Swetha K; Page, Andrew; Farris, Alton B.; Singh, Karnail; Leopardi, Frank; Hamby, Kelly; Sen, Sharon; Polnett, Aneesah; Deane, Taylor; Song, Mingqing; Stempora, Linda; Strobert, Elizabeth; Kirk, Allan D.; Larsen, Christian P.; Kean, Leslie S.

    2012-01-01

    Although there is evidence linking hematopoietic chimerism-induction and solid organ transplant tolerance, the mechanistic requirements for chimerism-induced tolerance are not clearly elucidated. To address this, we used an MHC-defined primate model to determine the impact of impermanent, T cell-poor, mixed-chimerism on renal allograft survival. We compared two cohorts: one receiving a bone marrow + renal transplant (“BMT/renal”) and one receiving only a renal transplant. Both cohorts received maintenance immunosuppression with CD28/CD40-directed costimulation blockade and sirolimus. As previously demonstrated, this transplant strategy consistently induced compartmentalized donor chimerism, (significant whole-blood chimerism, lacking T cell chimerism). This chimerism was not sufficient to prolong renal allograft acceptance: the BMT/renal mean survival time (MST, 76 days) was not significantly different than the renal transplant alone MST (85 days, p= 0. 46), with histopathology documenting T-cell mediated rejection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed significant enrichment for CD28-/CD95+ CD4+ and CD8+ Tem cells in the rejected kidney, suggesting a link between CD28-negative Tem and costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. These results suggest that in some settings, transient T cell-poor chimerism is not sufficient to induce tolerance to a concurrently placed renal allograft and that the presence of this chimerism per se is not an independent biomarker to identify tolerance. PMID:22642491

  11. Until they have faces: the ethics of facial allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Agich, G J; Siemionow, M

    2005-12-01

    The ethical discussion of facial allograft transplantation (FAT) for severe facial deformity, popularly known as facial transplantation, has been one sided and sensationalistic. It is based on film and fiction rather than science and clinical experience. Based on our experience in developing the first IRB approved protocol for FAT, we critically discuss the problems with this discussion, which overlooks the plight of individuals with severe facial deformities. We discuss why FAT for facial deformity is ethically and surgically justified despite its negative portrayal in the media. PMID:16319234

  12. Renal allograft transplant recipient with ruptured hydatid native kidney.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Wani, Imtiyaz; Khan, Imran; Wani, Muzaffar

    2014-07-01

    Echinococcosis of the kidneys in a renal transplant recipient is extremely rare and its occurrence being related to immunosuppression is a possibility which needs further characterisation. Ruptured renal hydatid in a renal transplant recipient is not reported so far to our best knowledge. We present a 42-year-old renal allograft receipient who presented one year after transplant with left flank pain, palpable left lumbar mass and gross hydatiduria. Investigations revealed a ruptured native hydatid kidney. Patient was managed with a combination of chemotherapy and left native nephrectomy and discharged in a satisfactory condition. PMID:25125908

  13. Combined Anti-CD154/CTLA4Ig Costimulation Blockade-Based Therapy Induces Donor-Specific Tolerance to Vascularized Osteomyocutaneous Allografts.

    PubMed

    Lin, C H; Wang, Y L; Anggelia, M R; Chuang, W Y; Cheng, H Y; Mao, Q; Zelken, J A; Lin, C H; Zheng, X X; Lee, W P A; Brandacher, G

    2016-07-01

    Tolerance induction by means of costimulation blockade has been successfully applied in solid organ transplantation; however, its efficacy in vascularized composite allotransplantation, containing a vascularized bone marrow component and thus a constant source of donor-derived stem cells, remains poorly explored. In this study, osteomyocutaneous allografts (alloOMCs) from Balb/c (H2(d) ) mice were transplanted into C57BL/6 (H2(b) ) recipients. Immunosuppression consisted of 1 mg anti-CD154 on day 0, 0.5 mg CTLA4Ig on day 2 and rapamycin (RPM; 3 mg/kg per day from days 0-7, then every other day for 3 weeks). Long-term allograft survival, donor-specific tolerance and donor-recipient cell trafficking were evaluated. Treatment with costimulation blockade plus RPM resulted in long-term graft survival (>120 days) of alloOMC in 12 of 15 recipients compared with untreated controls (median survival time [MST] ≈10.2 ± 0.8 days), RPM alone (MST ≈33 ± 5.5 days) and costimulation blockade alone (MST ≈45.8 ± 7.1 days). Donor-specific hyporesponsiveness in recipients with viable grafts was demonstrated in vitro. Evidence of donor-specific tolerance was further assessed in vivo by secondary donor-specific skin graft survival and third-party graft rejection. A significant increase of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells was evident in tolerant animals. Donor cells populated peripheral blood, thymus, and both donor and recipient bone marrow. Consequently, combined anti-CD154/CTLA4Ig costimulation blockade-based therapy induces donor-specific tolerance in a stringent murine alloOMC transplant model. PMID:26914847

  14. Hepatitis B transmission by cell and tissue allografts: How safe is safe enough?

    PubMed Central

    Solves, Pilar; Mirabet, Vicente; Alvarez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    More than 2 million human tissue transplants (bone, tendon, cartilage, skin, cornea, amniotic membrane, stem cells, heart valve, blood vessel, etc.), are performed worldwide every year. Cells and tissues are shared between countries which have different regulations and laboratory equipment and represent a risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission that has become a global safety concern. While the risk of transfusion-transmitted HBV infection from blood donations has been estimated, the rate of HBV transmission from donors to recipients of allografts is unknown and varies between different tissues. There are various important ways of reducing the transmission risk, but donor screening and donor testing are still the main factors for preventing HBV transmission. HBV detection is included in the routine screening tests for cell and tissue donors. The standard test for preventing transplant-transmitted hepatitis B is the hepatitis B surface antigen. The implementation of methods involving nucleic acid amplification and the new generation of reactives to detect viral antibodies or antigens with an immunoassay, has increased the sensitivity and the specificity of the screening tests. The objective of our research was to review the literature and critically analyse the different steps for avoiding HBV transmission in cell and tissue donors, focusing on the screening tests performed. PMID:24966613

  15. Statin therapy in cardiac allograft vasculopathy progression in heart transplant patients: Does potency matter?

    PubMed

    Sieg, Adam; Weeks, Phillip; Krustchinsky, Lori; Rajapreyar, Indranee

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a unique multi-factorial pathologic process encountered following heart transplantation. Several risk factors have been identified including a combination of immunologic and non-immunologic processes. Significant research has been conducted to elucidate the driving forces of CAV as well as improved identification, prevention and treatment strategies. Statin therapy following transplant remains the standard of care to help prevent the progression of CAV. The benefits of statin therapy following transplantation correspond to cholesterol control, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory mechanisms as well as potentially unknown mechanisms. Despite known drug interactions with calcineurin inhibitors, the use of statins is highly recommended in the current International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation guidelines. Limited research has been conducted on the impact of higher intensity statin therapy following heart transplant and the relative risks and benefits are unknown. This review focuses on risk factors and pathophysiology of CAV, the role of statin therapy in heart transplantation, and the potential added benefit of more intense statin therapy to limit the progression of this graft-limiting complication. PMID:27079752

  16. L-leucyl-l-leucine methyl ester treatment of canine marrow and peripheral blood cells: Inhibition of proliferative responses with maintenance of the capacity for autologous marrow engraftment

    SciTech Connect

    Raff, R.F.; Severns, E.; Storb, R.; Martin, P.; Graham, T.

    1988-11-01

    The success of allogeneic marrow transplantation as treatment for malignant and nonmalignant hematopoietic diseases has been restricted by the serious complications of graft-versus-host disease. Experiments in a variety of mammalian marrow transplant models have shown that removal of mature T cells from donor marrow permits engraftment without the development of GVHD. Incubation of canine marrow and peripheral blood mononuclear cells with L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester resulted in the inhibition of mitogen-and alloantigen induced blastogenesis, the elimination of allosensitized Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte and Natural Killer activity, and prevented the development of CTL from pCTL. The effects of these incubations were similar to those described in mice and humans. Additionally, in vitro CFU-GM growth from treated canine marrow was reduced, but could be regained when the Leu-Leu-OMe-treated marrow was cocultured with either untreated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells or monocyte-enriched PBMC but not with untreated monocyte-depleted PBMC. Six of seven dogs conditioned with 920 cGy total-body irradiation engrafted successfully after receiving autologous marrow that was incubated with Leu-Leu-OMe prior to infusion. These cumulative results indicate that incubation with Leu-Leu-OMe is a feasible method to deplete canine marrows of alloreactive and cytotoxic T cells prior to transplantation.

  17. Modeling Selective Elimination of Quiescent Cancer Cells from Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Cavnar, Stephen P.; Rickelmann, Andrew D.; Meguiar, Kaille F.; Xiao, Annie; Dosch, Joseph; Leung, Brendan M.; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Chitta, Shashank; Luker, Kathryn E.; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with many types of malignancy commonly harbor quiescent disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow. These cells frequently resist chemotherapy and may persist for years before proliferating as recurrent metastases. To test for compounds that eliminate quiescent cancer cells, we established a new 384-well 3D spheroid model in which small numbers of cancer cells reversibly arrest in G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle when cultured with bone marrow stromal cells. Using dual-color bioluminescence imaging to selectively quantify viability of cancer and stromal cells in the same spheroid, we identified single compounds and combination treatments that preferentially eliminated quiescent breast cancer cells but not stromal cells. A treatment combination effective against malignant cells in spheroids also eliminated breast cancer cells from bone marrow in a mouse xenograft model. This research establishes a novel screening platform for therapies that selectively target quiescent tumor cells, facilitating identification of new drugs to prevent recurrent cancer. PMID:26408255

  18. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents ... bone marrow sample for procedures (such as a stem cell transplant ) or other testing (such as chromosomal ...

  19. Hearing Benefit in Allograft Tympanoplasty Using Tutoplast Processed Malleus

    PubMed Central

    Issing, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Tutoplast processed human cadaveric ossicular allografts are a safe alternative for ossicular reconstruction where there is insufficient material suitable for autograft ossiculoplasty. We present a series of 7 consecutive cases showing excellent air-bone gap closure following canal-wall-down mastoidectomy for cholesteatoma and reconstruction of the middle ear using Tutoplast processed malleus. Patients and Methods. Tympanoplasty with Tutoplast processed malleus was performed in seven patients to reconstruct the middle ear following canal-wall-down mastoidectomy in a tertiary ENT centre. Main Outcome Measures. Hearing improvement and recurrence-free period were assessed. Pre-and postoperative audiograms were performed. Results. The average pre operative hearing loss was 50 ± 13 dB, with an air-bone gap of 33 ± 7 dB. Post operative audiograms at 25 months demonstrated hearing thresholds of 29 ± 10 dB, with an air-bone gap of 14 ± 6 dB. No prosthesis extrusion was observed, which compares favourably to other commercially available prostheses. Conclusions. Tutoplast processed allografts restore conductive hearing loss in patients undergoing mastoidectomy and provide an excellent alternative when there is insufficient material suitable for autograft ossiculoplasty. PMID:24688548

  20. The composition of the microbiota modulates allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yuk Man; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Ying; Stefka, Andrew T; Molinero, Luciana L; Theriault, Betty; Aquino-Michaels, Keston; Sivan, Ayelet S; Nagler, Cathryn R; Gajewski, Thomas F; Chong, Anita S; Bartman, Caroline; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Transplantation is the only cure for end-stage organ failure, but without immunosuppression, T cells rapidly reject allografts. While genetic disparities between donor and recipient are major determinants of the kinetics of transplant rejection, little is known about the contribution of environmental factors. Because colonized organs have worse transplant outcome than sterile organs, we tested the influence of host and donor microbiota on skin transplant rejection. Compared with untreated conventional mice, pretreatment of donors and recipients with broad-spectrum antibiotics (Abx) or use of germ-free (GF) donors and recipients resulted in prolonged survival of minor antigen-mismatched skin grafts. Increased graft survival correlated with reduced type I IFN signaling in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and decreased priming of alloreactive T cells. Colonization of GF mice with fecal material from untreated conventional mice, but not from Abx-pretreated mice, enhanced the ability of APCs to prime alloreactive T cells and accelerated graft rejection, suggesting that alloimmunity is modulated by the composition of microbiota rather than the quantity of bacteria. Abx pretreatment of conventional mice also delayed rejection of major antigen-mismatched skin and MHC class II-mismatched cardiac allografts. This study demonstrates that Abx pretreatment prolongs graft survival, suggesting that targeting microbial constituents is a potential therapeutic strategy for enhancing graft acceptance. PMID:27322054

  1. Meniscal allograft sterilisation: effect on biomechanical and histological properties.

    PubMed

    Bui, David; Lovric, Vedran; Oliver, Rema; Bertollo, Nicky; Broe, David; Walsh, William R

    2015-09-01

    Sterilisation of allografts are a crucial step in ensuring safety and viability. Current sterilisation standards such as 25 kGy gamma irradiation (γ) can have adverse effects on the ultrastructure and biomechanical properties of allograft tissue. Supercritical CO2 (SCCO2) technology, represents an improved sterilisation process that potentially preserves tissue properties. This study aimed to test the effect of SCCO2 sterilisation on the biomechanical and histological properties of the meniscus and compare this to the current standard of γ. Thirty-two 18-month old ovine menisci were randomly assigned into three groups for sterilisation (SCCO2, γ and control). After treatment, biomechanical indentation testing (stiffness and stress relaxation) or histological analysis [percentage of void, cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) per slide] was undertaken. Both SCCO2 and gamma groups displayed an increase in stiffness and stress relaxation as compared to control, however, this difference was lesser in samples treated with SCCO2. No significant histological quantitative differences were detected between SCCO2 and control specimens. Gamma-treated samples demonstrated a significant increase in void and decrease in ECM. Interestingly, both treatment groups demonstrated a decreasing mean void and increasing ECM percentage when analysed from outer to inner zones. No significant differences were detected in all-endpoints when analysed by section. SCCO2 sterilisation represents a potential feasible alternative to existing sterilization techniques such as γ. PMID:25589449

  2. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation A Comprehensive Historical and Current Review.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Michael G; Ryan, Michael K; Strauss, Eric J

    2015-06-01

    Throughout the history of orthopaedics, our understanding of the function and necessity of the meniscus has significantly evolved, and with it, our techniques of treating, repairing, preserving, and replacing it have progressed in parallel. Currently, it is known that a meniscus deficiency is a predisposing factor to the development of degenerative changes of the knee. Thus, it is incumbent upon the surgeon to preserve the meniscus to the extent that biology will allow. Unfortunately, circumstances arise when the meniscus cannot be preserved, and young patients afflicted by irreparable meniscus deficiency may be potential candidates for a meniscus transplant. Though its indications are limited and its execution technically complex, meniscal allograft transplant has been shown to provide good subjective outcomes and is a potentially joint preserving surgery. This paper provides a comprehensive and historical review of the meniscus, a brief review of meniscus anatomy and biomechanics, and commentary on the role of meniscal allograft transplant for the treatment of meniscal deficiency, including patient selection, graft selection and sizing, surgical technique, and outcomes. PMID:26517162

  3. Dynamics of allograft fibrosis in pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Venturi, C; Sempoux, C; Quinones, J A; Bourdeaux, C; Hoyos, S P; Sokal, E; Reding, R

    2014-07-01

    Progressive liver allograft fibrosis (LAF) is well known to occur long term, as shown by its high prevalence in late posttransplant liver biopsies (LBs). To evaluate the influence of clinical variables and immunosuppression on LAF progression, LAF dynamic was assessed in 54 pediatric liver transplantation (LT) recipients at 6 months, 3 and 7 years post-LT, reviewing clinical, biochemical data and protocol LBs using METAVIR and the liver allograft fibrosis score, previously designed and validated specifically for LAF assessment. Scoring evaluations were correlated with fibrosis quantification by morphometric analysis. Progressive LAF was found in 74% of long-term patients, 70% of whom had unaltered liver enzymes. Deceased grafts showed more fibrosis than living-related grafts (p = 0.0001). Portal fibrosis was observed in correlation with prolonged ischemia time, deceased grafts and lymphoproliferative disease (p = 0.001, 0.006 and 0.012, respectively). Sinusoidal fibrosis was correlated with biliary complications (p = 0.01). Centrilobular fibrosis was associated with vascular complications (p = 0.044), positive autoantibodies (p = 0.017) and high gamma-globulins levels (p = 0.028). Steroid therapy was not associated with reduced fibrosis (p = 0.83). LAF could be viewed as a dynamic process with mostly progression along the time. Peri- and post-LT-associated factors may condition fibrosis development in a specific area of the liver parenchyma. PMID:24934832

  4. Mast Cells Condition Dendritic Cells to Mediate Allograft Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Victor C.; Pino-Lagos, Karina; Nowak, Elizabeth C.; Bennett, Kathy A.; Oliva, Carla; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Peripheral tolerance orchestrated by regulatory T cells, dendritic cells (DCs), and mast cells (MCs) has been studied in several models including skin allograft tolerance. We now define a role for MCs in controlling DC behavior (“conditioning”) to facilitate tolerance. Under tolerant conditions, we show that MCs mediated a marked increase in tumor necrosis factor (TNFα)-dependent accumulation of graft-derived DCs in the dLN compared to nontolerant conditions. This increase of DCs in the dLN is due to the local production of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by MCs that induces a survival advantage of graft-derived DCs. DCs that migrated to the dLN from the tolerant allograft were tolerogenic; i.e., they dominantly suppress T cell responses and control regional immunity. This study underscores the importance of MCs in conditioning DCs to mediate peripheral tolerance and shows a functional impact of peripherally produced TNFα and GM-CSF on the migration and function of tolerogenic DCs. PMID:22035846

  5. De novo C3 glomerulonephritis in a renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Ji Hae; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Yu Seun; Cheong, Hae-Il; Lim, Beom Jin; Kim, Beom Seok; Jeong, Hyeon Joo

    2016-01-01

    C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) is a recently described, rare glomerular disease characterized by predominant or sole glomerular C3 deposits. Morphologic features of C3GN are similar to those of dense deposit disease (DDD); however, ribbon-like intramembranous electron-dense deposits are absent in the former. We report a case of de novo C3GN in a renal allograft with morphologic transformation to DDD. A 6-year-old boy presented with congenital left renal agenesis and right ureteropelvic junction obstruction. The patient underwent pyeloplasty but experienced recurrent urinary tract infections. At the age of 22 years, he received a renal allograft from a living related donor. C3GN was diagnosed after 1 year of transplantation; initial histology showed minimal mesangiopathy and this progressed to mesangial proliferation and membranoproliferative features over the next 7 years. Serum creatinine levels were stabilized with anti-rejection treatments for combating repeated episodes of acute rejection; however, glomerular and tubular band-like electron-dense deposits became evident. PMID:26986539

  6. Survival and Reoperation Rate Following Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Levy, David; Scalise, Pamela Nina; Smith, Margaret Elizabeth; Cole, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to quantify survival for osteochondral allograft transplantation (OAT) and report findings at reoperation. Methods: A retrospective review of a prospectively collected database of patients who underwent OAT by a single surgeon with a minimum follow-up duration of 2-years was conducted. The reoperation rate, timing of reoperation, procedure performed at reoperation, and findings at surgery were reviewed. Failure was defined by revision OAT, conversion to knee arthroplasty, or gross appearance of graft failure at 2ndlook arthroscopy. Descriptive statistics, log-rank testing, cross-tabulation, and chi-square testing were performed, with P<0.05 set as significant. Results: 100 patients (average age 32.7±10.2 years; 53 males, 47 females) who underwent OAT at an average follow-up of 4.9±2.5 years (range, 2.0 to 11.3) were included. Ninety-five patients (95%) underwent an average of 2.7±1.7 prior surgical procedures on the ipsilateral knee prior to OAT. The average defect size was 452.7±181.6 mm2 and was located on the medial femoral condyle in 63 patients (63%). Fifty-one percent of OATs were isolated, while 49% were performed with concomitant procedures including meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT) in 27 (27%). Fifty-three patients (53%) returned to the operating room at an average 2.8±2.7 years, with 26% of these patients (14/53) undergoing additional reoperations (range, 1-3 additional reoperations). Arthroscopic debridement was performed in 91% of the initial reoperations (48/53); 55% of reoperations (29/53) were performed within 2 years of the index OAT. Twenty patients (20%) were considered failures at an average 4.0±2.7 years following index OAT either due to revision OAT (N=6), conversion to arthroplasty (N=10), or appearance of poorly incorporated allograft at arthroscopy (N=4). Patients requiring multiple reoperations had an odds ratio of 7.25 (95% CI, 1.85 to 28.37) of OAT failure (P=0.004), while patients

  7. An immunomodulatory role for follistatin-like 1 in heart allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Le Luduec, J B; Condamine, T; Louvet, C; Thebault, P; Heslan, J-M; Heslan, M; Chiffoleau, E; Cuturi, M-C

    2008-11-01

    Donor-specific tolerance to heart allografts in the rat can be achieved by donor-specific blood transfusions (DST) before transplantation. We have previously reported that this tolerance is associated with strong leukocyte infiltration, and that host CD8(+) T cells and TGFbeta are required. In order to identify new molecules involved in the induction phase of tolerance, we compared tolerated and rejected heart allografts (suppressive subtractive hybridization) 5 days after transplantation. We identified overexpression of Follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) transcript in tolerated allografts compared to rejected allografts or syngeneic grafts. We show that FSTL1 is overexpressed during both the induction and maintenance phase of tolerance, and appears to be specific to the tolerance model induced by DST. Analysis of graft-infiltrating cells revealed predominant expression of FSTL1 in CD8(+) T cells from tolerated grafts, and depletion of these cells prior to transplantation abrogated FSTL1 expression and heart allograft survival. Moreover, overexpression of FSTL1 by adenovirus gene transfer in vivo significantly prolonged allograft survival in association with inhibition of the proinflammatory cytokines, IL6, IL17 A and IFNgamma. Taken together, these results suggest that FSTL1 could be an active component of the mechanisms mediating heart allograft tolerance. PMID:18925901

  8. A retrospective clinical study of Xinjiang Uygur patients with corneal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Maimaitiming, Reziwan; Yang, Xin; Wupuer, Kelala; Ye, Nan; Kong, Na; Gu, Baoyu; Fan, Yuanyuan; Shao, Lan; Pan, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: To explore the causes of corneal allograft rejection in Xinjiang Uygur patients and the factors that affect rejection through a retrospective clinical analysis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 126 Uygur cases from January 2010 to November 2014 in which corneal transplantation had been performed at the Xinjiang Urumqi ENT hospital. Of the treated patients, 85 eyes belonged to male patients and 41 eyes belonged to female patients. Patients were aged 10-77 years (mean age 46.14 ± 8.20 years). Surgical methods included penetrating keratoplasty (75 eyes) and lamellar keratoplasty (38 eyes). Follow-up time ranged from 0.5 to 3 years and a total of seven pre-operative keratopathies were observed: walleye, corneal ulcer, bullous keratopathy, corneal degeneration. Eye changes included 72 cases of limbal vascularization and 15 cases of high intraocular pressure. Allograft rejection was observed in 25 eyes. Results: The pre-operative keratopathies associated with the highest incidences of allograft rejection were: viral corneal ulcer, bullous keratopathy, adhesive walleye, and fungal corneal ulcers. The rate of allograft rejection using avascular corneal tissue was 10%, while the rate was 36% with severly-vascularized cornea. The earliest time of rejection was 20 days after surgery, while the latest was 16.4 months after surgery. Heavy corneal vascularization is associated with more rapid post-operative rejection. The rate of allograft rejection was higher after combined surgery when compared to penetrating keratoplasty or lamellar keratoplasty alone, while the rate was higher with penetrating keratoplasty than with lamellar keratoplasty. With increasing graft diameter, there was an increase in post-operative allograft rejection. Allograft rejection was significantly increased when graft diameter was above 7.75 mm. Conclusion: The major cause of corneal allograft rejection is viral corneal ulcers. High corneal vascularization, combined surgical methods

  9. Association of corticosteroids and factor V, prothrombin, and MTHFR gene mutations with avascular osteonecrosis in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Celik, A; Tekis, D; Saglam, F; Tunali, S; Kabakci, N; Ozaksoy, D; Manisali, M; Ozcan, M A; Meral, M; Gülay, H; Camsari, T

    2006-03-01

    The mechanism of posttransplantation avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) is controversial. Besides an increased bone marrow pressure due to reduced blood supply, enhanced coagulation has been considered. We investigated the associations of factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T mutations as well as cumulative corticosteroid doses with AVN in renal allograft recipients. The records of 39 volunteer patients and 11 patients in whom osteonecrosis was previously identified were reviewed for cumulative corticosteroid dosages during the first year. All patients were screened for factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T mutations by direct sequencing of genomic DNA. The cumulative corticosteroid dosages at 3, 6, and 12 months in the osteonecrotic group (5033.5 +/- 1565.3, 7164.9 +/- 2063.1, 8835.1 +/- 2216.8 mg) were significantly higher than in the control group (3629 +/- 1504.1, 4784.5 +/- 1568.7, 6322.4 +/- 1686.6 mg; P = .013, P = .001, P = .001, respectively). No significant difference in factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T mutations was observed between the osteonecrotic and control groups (P > .05). In conclusion, an association between the first year (3, 6, and 12 month) cumulative corticosteroid dosages and AVN was demonstrated in renal transplant recipients. However, no correlation was determined between factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T mutations and osteonecrosis. PMID:16549163

  10. Chondroblastoma of the Knee Treated with Resection and Osteochondral Allograft Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Broehm, Cory; Treme, Gehron

    2014-01-01

    Case. This case report describes the operative management of 16-year-old male with a symptomatic chondroblastoma of the distal femur with breach of the chondral surface. Following appropriate imaging and core needle biopsy, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The patient then underwent intralesional curettage and osteochondral allograft reconstruction of the defect. At one-year follow-up the patient was pain-free and has obtained excellent range of motion. There is radiographic evidence of allograft incorporation and no evidence of local recurrence. Conclusion. Osteochondral allograft reconstruction is an effective option following marginal resection and curettage of chondroblastoma involving the chondral surface of the distal femur. PMID:25548701

  11. Early right coronary vasospasm presenting with malignant arrhythmias in a heart transplantation recipient without allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Pistono, M; Brentana, L; Gnemmi, M; Imparato, A; Temporelli, P L; Zingarelli, E; Patané, F; Giannuzzi, P

    2009-01-24

    In heart transplant recipients, the aetiology of coronary vasospasm is largely unknown but it has been reported to be related to coronary vasculopathy or allograft rejection. We report a case of acute, reversible coronary vasospasm which caused malignant arrhythmias in a cardiac transplant recipient one month after transplantation without evidence of coronary vasculopathy or allograft rejection. The patient had a normal post-operative course with no other complications; this case supports the hypothesis that coronary vasospasm is not necessarily related to epicardial coronary artery disease or allograft rejection, but rather may be due to an abnormal reversible vasoreactivity. PMID:17950482

  12. Biomechanical Evaluation of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Quadriceps Versus Achilles Tendon Bone Block Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Brian; Haro, Marc S.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Collins, Michael J.; Arns, Thomas A.; Trella, Katie J.; Shewman, Elizabeth F.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term studies of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction suggest that normal stability is not restored in the majority of patients. The Achilles tendon allograft is frequently utilized, although recently, the quadriceps tendon has been introduced as an alternative option due to its size and high patellar bone density. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical strength of PCL reconstructions using a quadriceps versus an Achilles allograft. The hypothesis was that quadriceps bone block allograft has comparable mechanical properties to those of Achilles bone block allograft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) intact PCL, (2) PCL reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft, or (3) PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon allograft. After reconstruction, all supporting capsular and ligamentous tissues were removed. Posterior tibial translation was measured at neutral and 20° external rotation. Each specimen underwent a preload, 2 cyclic loading protocols of 500 cycles, then load to failure. Results: Construct creep deformation was significantly lower in the intact group compared with both Achilles and quadriceps allograft (P = .008). The intact specimens reached the greatest ultimate load compared with both reconstructions (1974 ± 752 N, P = .0001). The difference in ultimate load for quadriceps versus Achilles allograft was significant (P = .048), with the quadriceps group having greater maximum force during failure testing. No significant differences were noted between quadriceps versus Achilles allograft for differences in crosshead excursion during cyclic testing (peak-valley [P-V] extension stretch), creep deformation, or stiffness. Construct stiffness measured during the failure test was greatest in the intact group (117 ± 9 N/mm, P = .0001) compared with the Achilles (43 ± 11 N/mm) and quadriceps (43

  13. Quality control in tissue banking--ensuring the safety of allograft tissues.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Linda K; Mansavage, Vicki L

    2006-09-01

    DESPITE FEDERAL REGULATIONS for tissue-banking practices, inadequate quality control led to the largest allograft tissue recall in history in October 2005. THE RECALL INCLUDED all allograft tissues obtained from 761 donors and distributed by five tissue banks. Many of these tissues already had been implanted and were unrecoverable. THIS ARTICLE DESCRIBES the many tissue-banking industry variables, including donor selection and testing and tissue recovery, processing, and preservation. QUESTIONS THAT HEALTH CARE providers can ask to determine which tissue banks' quality control measures best ensure the safety of the allografts they provide also are included. PMID:17004664

  14. In situ expression of cytokines in human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Van Hoffen, E.; Van Wichen, D.; Stuij, I.; De Jonge, N.; Klöpping, C.; Lahpor, J.; Van Den Tweel, J.; Gmelig-Meyling, F.; De Weger, R.

    1996-01-01

    Although allograft rejection, the major complication of human organ transplantation, has been extensively studied, little is known about the exact cellular localization of the cytokine expression inside the graft during rejection. Therefore, we used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to study local cytokine mRNA and protein expression in human heart allografts, in relation to the phenotypical characteristics of the cellular infiltrate. Clear expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-9, and IL-10 and weak expression for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was detected in biopsies exhibiting high rejection grades (grade 3A/B). Also at lower grades of rejection, mRNA for IL-6 and IL-9 was present. Some mRNA for IL-1 beta, TNF-beta, and interferon (IFN)-gamma was detected in only a few biopsies. Using immunohistochemistry, IL-2, IL-3, and IL-10 protein was detected in biopsies with high rejection grades, whereas few cells expressed IL-6, IL-8, and IFN-gamma. In biopsies with lower grades of rejection, a weaker expression of these cytokines was observed. IL-4 was hardly detected in any of the biopsies. The level of IL-12 expression was equal in all biopsies. Although mRNA expression of several cytokines was expressed at a low level compared with the protein level of those cytokines, there was a good correlation between localization of cytokine mRNA and protein. Expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma was mainly detected in lymphocytes. IL-3, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 were not detected or not only detected in lymphocytes but also in other stromal elements (eg, macrophages). Macrophage production of IL-3 and IL-12 was confirmed by immunofluorescent double labeling with CD68. We conclude that cardiac allograft rejection is not simply regulated by T helper cell cytokine production, but other intragraft elements contribute considerably to this process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8952534

  15. Listeriosis in bone marrow transplant recipients: incidence, clinical features, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chang, J; Powles, R; Mehta, J; Paton, N; Treleaven, J; Jameson, B

    1995-11-01

    Cultures of blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid from four of 1,013 bone marrow transplant recipients treated at our center between January 1972 and April 1994 were positive for Listeria monocytogenes. The overall occurrence of listeriosis was 0.39 case per 100 transplantations. Allograft recipients had received prior treatment with parenteral methylprednisolone, thus supporting an association between listeriosis and corticosteroids. Treatment with parenteral ampicillin (200 mg/[kg.d]) and gentamicin is recommended for a minimum of 3 weeks before oral therapy. Two patients with penicillin allergies in this study failed to respond to chloramphenicol-based therapeutic regimens. Recurrent meningitis occurred in two patients, and the therapeutic use of intrathecal gentamicin/vancomycin did not confer a survival advantage (i.e., the patients did not survive). PMID:8589157

  16. Meniscal allograft transplant in a 16-year-old male soccer player: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Menta, Roger; Howitt, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) is a relatively new procedure that has gained popularity in the last couple of decades as a possible alternative to a meniscectomy to provide significant pain relief, improve function, and prevent the early onset of degenerative joint disease (DJD). As of present, evidence is limited and conflicting on the success of such procedures. In this case, a 16-year old male athlete underwent numerous surgical procedures to correct a left anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture with associated medial and lateral meniscal damage that occurred as a result of a non-contact mechanism of injury. Following multiple procedures, including repair of both menisci and follow-up partial meniscectomy of the lateral meniscus, the patient continued to experience symptoms on the left lateral knee, making him a candidate for MAT. This case is used to highlight what a MAT is, what makes someone a candidate for this type of procedure, the current evidence surrounding the success of this intervention, and some rehabilitation considerations following surgery. The role of chiropractors and primary clinicians is to ensure that young athletes undergo early intervention to offset any degenerative changes that would be associated with sustained meniscal lesions. PMID:25550669

  17. Meniscal allograft transplant in a 16-year-old male soccer player: A case report.

    PubMed

    Menta, Roger; Howitt, Scott

    2014-12-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) is a relatively new procedure that has gained popularity in the last couple of decades as a possible alternative to a meniscectomy to provide significant pain relief, improve function, and prevent the early onset of degenerative joint disease (DJD). As of present, evidence is limited and conflicting on the success of such procedures. In this case, a 16-year old male athlete underwent numerous surgical procedures to correct a left anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture with associated medial and lateral meniscal damage that occurred as a result of a non-contact mechanism of injury. Following multiple procedures, including repair of both menisci and follow-up partial meniscectomy of the lateral meniscus, the patient continued to experience symptoms on the left lateral knee, making him a candidate for MAT. This case is used to highlight what a MAT is, what makes someone a candidate for this type of procedure, the current evidence surrounding the success of this intervention, and some rehabilitation considerations following surgery. The role of chiropractors and primary clinicians is to ensure that young athletes undergo early intervention to offset any degenerative changes that would be associated with sustained meniscal lesions. PMID:25550669

  18. Cemented allograft-prosthesis composite reconstruction for the proximal femur tumor

    PubMed Central

    Min, Li; Tang, Fan; Duan, Hong; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Wen-li; Shi, Rui; Tu, Chong-qi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cemented allograft-prosthesis composite (APC) reconstruction is one option following resection of the proximal femur tumor. However, rare studies have focused on the indications and complications. The goal of the present study was to (1) ascertain the indications for cemented APC arthroplasty in the proximal femur; (2) identify the detailed perioperative management; and (3) illustrate our experiences to avoid the complications of cemented APC. Materials and methods A total 28 patients who underwent cemented APC reconstruction of the proximal femur after tumor resection were retrospectively evaluated at a median follow-up of 56 months. Clinical records and radiographs were reviewed to evaluate patients’ outcome. Results In our series, excluding three cases of death that had a short follow-up period, union occurred in 22 (88.0%) patients (range 9–18 months). Nonunion of the greater trochanter was seen in six of the 12 patients (50.0%). Eight (32.0%) hips had resorption. There were two (8.0%) hips that were observed to have asymptomatic wear of the acetabulum. The average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score was 26.5 points. The average Harris Hip Score (HHS) score was 80.6 points. There were no cases of recurrence, but metastasis was found in two hips. Conclusions Mastering indications, perioperative management, and complication prevention are all very important in the APC reconstruction after resection of the proximal femur. PMID:26345329

  19. Mechanics of intact bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lauren E; Birch, Nathan P; Schiffman, Jessica D; Crosby, Alfred J; Peyton, Shelly R

    2015-10-01

    The current knowledge of bone marrow mechanics is limited to its viscous properties, neglecting the elastic contribution of the extracellular matrix. To get a more complete view of the mechanics of marrow, we characterized intact yellow porcine bone marrow using three different, but complementary techniques: rheology, indentation, and cavitation. Our analysis shows that bone marrow is elastic, and has a large amount of intra- and inter-sample heterogeneity, with an effective Young׳s modulus ranging from 0.25 to 24.7 kPa at physiological temperature. Each testing method was consistent across matched tissue samples, and each provided unique benefits depending on user needs. We recommend bulk rheology to capture the effects of temperature on tissue elasticity and moduli, indentation for quantifying local tissue heterogeneity, and cavitation rheology for mitigating destructive sample preparation. We anticipate the knowledge of bone marrow elastic properties for building in vitro models will elucidate mechanisms involved in disease progression and regenerative medicine. PMID:26189198

  20. Rational clinical trial design for antibody mediated renal allograft injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandal, Shaifali; Zand, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody mediated renal allograft rejection is a significant cause of acute and chronic graft loss. Recent work has revealed that AMR is a complex processes, involving B and plasma cells, donor-specific antibodies, complement, vascular endothelial cells, NK cells, Fc receptors, cytokines and chemokines. These insights have led to the development of numerous new therapies, and adaptation of others originally developed for treatment of hemetologic malignancies, autoimmune and complement mediated conditions. Here we review emerging insights into the pathophysiology of AMR as well as current and emerging therapies for both acute and chronic AMR. Finally, we discuss rational clinical trial design in light of antibody and B cell immunobiology, as well as appropriate efficacy metrics to identify robust protocols and therapeutic agents. PMID:25553476

  1. Rational clinical trial design for antibody mediated renal allograft injury.

    PubMed

    Sandal, Shaifali; Zand, Martin S

    2015-01-01

    Antibody mediated renal allograft rejection is a significant cause of acute and chronic graft loss. Recent work has revealed that AMR is a complex processes, involving B and plasma cells, donor-specific antibodies, complement, vascular endothelial cells, NK cells, Fc receptors, cytokines and chemokines. These insights have led to the development of numerous new therapies, and adaptation of others originally developed for treatment of hemetologic malignancies, autoimmune and complement mediated conditions. Here we review emerging insights into the pathophysiology of AMR as well as current and emerging therapies for both acute and chronic AMR. Finally, we discuss rational clinical trial design in light of antibody and B cell immunobiology, as well as appropriate efficacy metrics to identify robust protocols and therapeutic agents. PMID:25553476

  2. Scedosporium apiospermum causing brain abscess in a renal allograft recipient.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; Singh, Divya

    2015-11-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum is the asexual form of a rare fungus Pseudallescheria boydii that is usually present in the soil, sewage and dirty water. In immunocompromised patients, it is a rare infection involving multiple organs. We present a case of renal allograft recipient who developed fever two weeks post renal transplant. He was initially found to have dengue fever. After five days, he became drowsy and developed right-sided hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed multiple irregular masses with associated edema consistent with fungal brain abscesses. Left parietal abscess was drained and he was started on voriconazole. His cyclosporine was stopped. Drained pus revealed fungal hyphae on potassium hydroxide stain and Scedosporium apiospermum on culture. Unfortunately, the patient died after five days. Scedosporium infections should be kept as a possibility in transplant recipients with disseminated infections, especially with a brain abscess. Despite antifungal therapy and surgical drainage, mortality rates are high. PMID:26586067

  3. Neopterin and interferon gamma serum levels in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Khoss, A E; Balzar, E; Steger, H; Howanietz, H; Wladika, W; Hamilton, G; Woloszczuk, W

    In the follow-up of children receiving renal allografts the early differential diagnosis of infections and rejection episodes is the main problem. Serum levels of neopterin (N), a pteridine released from stimulated macrophages, was determined by radioimmunoassay. Also interferon-gamma (IF) serum levels, a marker of T lymphocyte activity, were determined with an immunoradiometric assay in 19 kidney-transplanted children. Both, infections and rejection episodes, are accompanied by distinct increases in N. The IF are elevated 1-3 days earlier than N, the median values during infections being significantly (p less than or equal to 0.001) higher than those during rejection crises. The routine measurement of N and IF allow the simple, quick and reliable monitoring of the immune status, which seems to be of a high relevance for the daily monitoring of transplant recipients. PMID:3150820

  4. Equivalence of topical clobetasone and dexamethasone in experimental corneal allograft rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmus, K R; Hunter, P A; Rice, N S

    1981-01-01

    We produced experimental immune reactions by exchanging peripheral corneal transplants between rabbits. Clobetasone butyrate 0.1% and dexamethasone phosphate 0.1% eye drops were equally effective in delaying corneal allograft rejection. Images PMID:7032579

  5. Transcript Signatures of Lymphocytic Bronchitis in Lung Allograft Biopsy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Dolganov, Gregory; Jones, Kirk D.; Donnelly, Samantha; Weaver, Timothy; Caughey, George H.

    2008-01-01

    Background Rejection and obliterative bronchiolitis are barriers to sustained graft function in recipients of transplanted lungs. Early detection is hindered by inadequate tests and an incomplete understanding of the molecular events preceding or accompanying graft deterioration. Methods Hypothesizing that genes involved in immune responses and tissue remodeling produce biomarkers of rejection, we measured the expression of 192 selected genes in 72 sets of biopsy specimens from human lung allografts. Gene transcripts were quantified using a 2-step, multiplex, real-time polymerase chain reaction approach in endobronchial and transbronchial biopsy specimens from transplant recipients without acute infections undergoing routine surveillance bronchoscopy. Results Comparisons of histopathology in parallel biopsy specimens identified 6 genes correlating with rejection as manifested by lymphocytic bronchitis, a suspected harbinger of obliterative bronchiolitis. For example, β2-defensin and collagenase transcripts in inflamed bronchi increased 37-fold and 163-fold, respectively. By contrast, these transcripts did not correlate with acute rejection in transbronchial specimens. Further, no correspondence was noted between histopathologic bronchitis and parenchymal rejection when endobronchial and transbronchial samples were obtained from the same patient. Conclusions Our highly sensitive method permits quantitation of many gene transcripts simultaneously in small, bronchoscopically acquired biopsy specimens of allografts. Transcript signatures obtained by this approach suggest that airway and alveolar responses to rejection differ and that endobronchial biopsy specimens assess lymphocytic bronchitis and chronic rejection but are not proxies for transbronchial biopsy specimens. Further, they reveal changes in airway expression of the specific genes involved in host defense and remodeling and suggest that the measurement of transcripts correlating with lymphocytic bronchitis

  6. Acute allograft rejection and immunosuppression: influence on endogenous melatonin secretion.

    PubMed

    Cardell, Markus; Jung, Florian Johannes; Zhai, Wei; Hillinger, Sven; Welp, Andre; Manz, Bernhard; Weder, Walter; Korom, Stephan

    2008-04-01

    Melatonin displays a dose-dependent immunoregulatory effect in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous high-dose melatonin therapy exerted an immunosuppressive effect, abrogating acute rejection (AR), significantly prolonging transplant survival. Endogenous melatonin secretion, in response to heterotopic rat cardiac allograft transplantation (Tx), was investigated during the AR response and under standardized immunosuppressive maintenance therapy with cyclosporin A (CsA) and rapamycin (RPM). Recipients of syngeneic transplants, and recipients of allogeneic grafts, either untreated or receiving immunosuppressive therapy constituted the experimental groups. Endogenous circadian melatonin levels were measured at 07:00, 19:00, and 24:00 hr, using a novel radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure, under standardized 12-hr-light/dark-conditions (light off: 19:00 hr; light on: 07:00 hr), before and after Tx. Neither the operative trauma, nor the challenge with a perfused allograft or the AR response influenced endogenous melatonin peak secretion. Immunosuppressive therapy with CsA led to a significant increase in peak secretion, measured for days 7 (212 +/- 40.7 pg/mL; P < 0.05), 14 (255 +/- 13.9 pg/mL; P < 0.001), and 21 (219 +/- 34 pg/mL; P < 0.01) after Tx, as compared with naïve animals (155 +/- 25.8 pg/mL). In contrast, treatment with RPM significantly decreased the melatonin peak post-Tx up to day 7 (87 +/- 25.2 pg/mL; P < 0.001), compared with naïve animals (155 +/- 25.8 pg/mL). These findings imply a robust nature of the endogenous circadian melatonin secretion kinetics, even against the background of profound allogeneic stimuli. Immunosuppressive maintenance therapy with CsA and RPM modulated early melatonin secretion, indicating a specific secondary action of these drugs. Further studies are necessary to disclose the long-term effect of immunosuppressive therapy on circadian melatonin secretion in transplant recipients. PMID:18339121

  7. Mechanical behaviour of Bioactive Glass granules and morselized cancellous bone allograft in load bearing defects.

    PubMed

    Hulsen, D J W; Geurts, J; van Gestel, N A P; van Rietbergen, B; Arts, J J

    2016-05-01

    Bioactive Glass (BAG) granules are osteoconductive and possess unique antibacterial properties for a synthetic biomaterial. To assess the applicability of BAG granules in load-bearing defects, the aim was to compare mechanical behaviour of graft layers consisting of BAG granules and morselized cancellous bone allograft in different volume mixtures under clinically relevant conditions. The graft layers were mechanically tested, using two mechanical testing modalities with simulated physiological loading conditions: highly controllable confined compression tests (CCT) and more clinically realistic in situ compression tests (ISCT) in cadaveric porcine bone defects. Graft layer impaction strain, residual strain, aggregate modulus, and creep strain were determined in CCT. Graft layer porosity was determined using micro computed tomography. The ISCT was used to determine graft layer subsidence in bone environment. ANOVA showed significant differences (p<0.001) between different graft layer compositions. True strains absolutely decreased for increasing BAG content: impaction strain -0.92 (allograft) to -0.39 (BAG), residual strain -0.12 to -0.01, and creep strain -0.09 to 0.00 respectively. Aggregate modulus increased with increasing BAG content from 116 to 653MPa. Porosity ranged from 66% (pure allograft) to 15% (pure BAG). Subsidence was highest for allograft, and remarkably low for a 1:1 BAG-allograft volume mixture. Both BAG granules and allograft morsels as stand-alone materials exhibit suboptimal mechanical behaviour for load-bearing purpose. BAG granules are difficult to handle and less porous, whereas allograft subsides and creeps. A 1:1 volume mixture of BAG and allograft is therefore proposed as the best graft material in load-bearing defects. PMID:26972764

  8. [Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes].

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yusuke

    2016-02-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes comprise a series of disorders caused by various gene mutations. Genetic tests were formerly difficult to perform because of the large size and number of causative genes. However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing has enabled simultaneous testing of all causative genes to be performed at an acceptable cost. We collaboratively conducted a series of whole-exome sequencing studies of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes and discovered RPS27/RPL27 and FANCT as causative genes of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Fanconi anemia, respectively. Furthermore, we established a target gene sequencing system to cover 189 genes associated with pediatric blood diseases to assist genetic diagnoses in clinical practice. In this review, discovery of new causative genes and possible roles of next-generation sequencing in the genetic diagnosis of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are discussed. PMID:26935625

  9. Peripheral blood stem cell versus bone marrow transplantation: A perspective from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Michael; Savani, Bipin N; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic cells has increased and is now the predominant graft source for related or unrelated adult allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. At the same time, increasing numbers of patients are receiving reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) prior to hematopoietic stem cell infusion. In prior work using smaller patient numbers and limited data, RIC peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation was shown to be noninferior to RIC bone marrow (BM) transplantation for acute leukemia. A recent, large registry analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation showed that peripheral blood grafts result in superior outcomes compared with BM after RIC regimens for acute leukemia. The T-cell-replete PBSC allografts are associated with significant graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) benefits that are important drivers of improved leukemia-free survival and overall survival. However, an increased risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after peripheral blood grafts is concerning and long-term follow-up comparing peripheral versus BM grafts after RIC regimens is needed. Further assessment of the long-standing risks should be undertaken in an effort to better understand whether the risk of cGVHD among peripheral blood graft recipients translates into continued GVL effects and long-term remissions and cures or if it results in late morbidity and mortality. PMID:27106798

  10. Imaging of cardiac allograft rejection in dogs using indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Addonizio, L.J.; Michler, R.E.; Marboe, C.; Esser, P.E.; Johnson, L.L.; Seldin, D.W.; Gersony, W.M.; Alderson, P.O.; Rose, E.A.; Cannon, P.J.

    1987-03-01

    The acute rejection of cardiac allografts is currently diagnosed by the presence of myocyte necrosis on endomyocardial biopsy. We evaluated the efficacy of noninvasive scintigraphic imaging with indium-111-labeled anticardiac myosin Fab fragments (indium-111 antimyosin) to detect and quantify cardiac allograft rejection. Six dogs that had intrathoracic heterotopic cardiac allograft transplantation were injected with indium-111 antimyosin and planar and single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images were obtained in various stages of acute and subacute rejection. Four dogs had an allograft older than 8 months and had been on long-term immunosuppressive therapy; two dogs had an allograft less than 2 weeks old and were not on immunosuppressive therapy. Count ratios comparing heterotopic with native hearts were calculated from both SPECT images and in vitro scans of excised and sectioned hearts and were compared with the degree of rejection scored by an independent histopathologic review. Indium-111 antimyosin uptake was not visible in planar or SPECT images of native hearts. Faint diffuse uptake was apparent in cardiac allografts during long-term immunosuppression and intense radioactivity was present in hearts with electrocardiographic evidence of rejection. The heterotopic to native heart count ratios in SPECT images correlated significantly with the count ratios in the excised hearts (r = 0.93) and with the histopathologic rejection score (r = 0.97). The distribution of indium-111 antimyosin activity in right and left ventricles corresponded to areas of histopathologic abnormalities.

  11. Systemic overexpression of matricellular protein CCN1 exacerbates obliterative bronchiolitis in mouse tracheal allografts.

    PubMed

    Raissadati, Alireza; Nykänen, Antti I; Tuuminen, Raimo; Syrjälä, Simo O; Krebs, Rainer; Arnaudova, Ralica; Rouvinen, Eeva; Wang, Xiaomin; Poller, Wolfgang; Lemström, Karl B

    2015-12-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) involves airway epithelial detachment, fibroproliferation, and inflammation, resulting in chronic rejection and transplant failure. Cysteine-rich 61 (CCN1) is an integrin receptor antagonist with a context-dependent role in inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes. We used a mouse tracheal OB model to investigate the role of CCN1 in the development of lung allograft OB. C57Bl/6 mice received a systemic injection of CCN1-expressing adenoviral vectors 2 days prior to subcutaneous implantation of tracheal allografts from major MHC-mismatched BALB/c mice. We treated another group of tracheal allograft recipients with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide to dissect the role of αvβ3-integrin signaling in mediating CCN1 effects in tracheal allografts. Allografts were removed 4 weeks after transplantation and analyzed for luminal occlusion, inflammation, and vasculogenesis. CCN1 overexpression induced luminal occlusion (P < 0.05), fibroproliferation, and smooth muscle cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Selective activation of αvβ3-integrin receptor failed to mimic the actions of CCN1, and blocking failed to inhibit the effects of CCN1 in tracheal allografts. In conclusion, CCN1 exacerbates tracheal OB by enhancing fibroproliferation via an αvβ3-integrin-independent pathway. Further experiments are required to uncover its potentially harmful role in the development of OB after lung transplantation. PMID:26174800

  12. The appropriateness of swab cultures for the release of human allograft tissue.

    PubMed

    Ronholdt, Chad J; Bogdansky, Simon

    2005-08-01

    Surgeries utilizing human allograft tissues have increased dramatically in recent years. With this increase has come a greater reliance on the use of swab culturing to assess allograft tissues for microbial contamination prior to distribution. In contrast to the typical industrial microbiological uses for swabs, the tissue banking industry has relied on swab cultures as a sterility release method for allograft tissues. It has been reported in the literature that swabs have limitations, both in sensitivity and reproducibility, so their suitability as a final sterility release method was evaluated in this study. Two different swab-culturing systems were evaluated (COPAN, EZ Culturette) using human allograft tissues spiked with low levels of multiple bacterial and fungal microorganisms. The average microbial recoveries for all challenge microorganisms for each tissue type and each swab system were calculated. Percent recoveries for each challenge microorganism were also calculated and reported. The results indicated that both swab systems exhibited low and highly variable recoveries from the seeded allograft tissues. Further analysis indicated there was no statistical difference ( proportional, variant=0.05) between the two swab systems. It is the recommendation of the authors that swab culturing not be used to assess relatively low levels of microbial contamination on allografts. Instead, alternative validated microbial detection methods with improved sensitivity and reproducibility should be employed and validated for this critical task. PMID:15973533

  13. Swab or biopsy samples for bioburden testing of allograft musculoskeletal tissue?

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2014-12-01

    Swab and biopsy samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue are most commonly collected by tissue banks for bacterial and fungal bioburden testing. An in vitro study was performed using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards standard 'Quality control of microbiological transport systems' (2003) to validate and evaluate the recovery of six challenge organisms from swab and biopsy samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue. On average, 8.4 to >100 and 7.2 to >100 % of the inoculum was recovered from swab and biopsy samples respectively. A retrospective review of donor episodes was also performed, consisting of paired swab and biopsy samples received in this laboratory during the period 2001-2012. Samples of allograft femoral heads were collected from living donors during hip operations. From the 3,859 donor episodes received, 21 paired swab and biopsy samples each recovered an isolate, 247 swab samples only and 79 biopsy samples only were culture positive. Low numbers of challenge organisms were recovered from inoculated swab and biopsy samples in the in vitro study and validated their use for bioburden testing of allograft musculoskeletal tissue. Skin commensals were the most common group of organisms isolated during a 12-year retrospective review of paired swab and biopsy samples from living donor allograft femoral heads. Paired swab and biopsy samples are a suitable representative sample of allograft musculoskeletal tissue for bioburden testing. PMID:24599706

  14. Interplay between Immune responses to HLA and Non-HLA self-antigens in allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Angaswamy, Nataraju; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Sarma, Nayan J; Subramanian, Vijay; Klein, Christina; Wellen, Jason; Shenoy, Surendra; Chapman, William C; Mohanakumar, T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies strongly suggest an increasing role for immune responses against self-antigens (Ags) which are not encoded by the major histocompatibility complex in the immunopathogenesis of allograft rejection. Although, improved surgical techniques coupled with improved methods to detect and avoid sensitization against donor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) have improved the immediate and short term function of transplanted organs. However, acute and chronic rejection still remains a vexing problem for the long term function of the transplanted organ. Immediately following organ transplantation, several factors both immune and non immune mechanisms lead to the development of local inflammatory milieu which sets the stage for allograft rejection. Traditionally, development of antibodies (Abs) against mismatched donor HLA have been implicated in the development of Ab mediated rejection. However, recent studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that development of humoral and cellular immune responses against non-HLA self-Ags may contribute in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection. There are reports demonstrating that immune responses to self-Ags especially Abs to the self-Ags as well as cellular immune responses especially through IL17 has significant pro-fibrotic properties leading to chronic allograft failure. This review summarizes recent studies demonstrating the role for immune responses to self-Ags in allograft immunity leading to rejection as well as present recent evidence suggesting there is interplay between allo- and autoimmunity leading to allograft dysfunction. PMID:23876679

  15. Should the freehand allograft be abandoned as a reliable alternative for aortic valve replacement?

    PubMed

    Jones, E L; Shah, V B; Shanewise, J S; Martin, T D; Martin, R P; Coto, J A; Broniec, R; Shen, Y

    1995-06-01

    Cryopreserved aortic allografts were used for aortic valve replacement in 80 patients between 1986 and 1994 (infracoronary in 46 and complete root replacement in 34). Hospital mortality was 6.3% (5/80) with all deaths occurring in the infracoronary group. Three of five deaths were in patients with endocarditis and valve ring abscess. Left ventricular-aortic mean pressure gradients across the allograft valves were significantly lower for root replacement patients (mean, 9.0 +/- 6.9 mm Hg versus 18.1 +/- 8.7 mm Hg for infracoronary patients) (p = 0.0001). No patient having root allograft replacement had early echocardiographic aortic insufficiency greater than grade 1 versus 28% of those having infracoronary implantations. Late aortic insufficiency of grade 2 or greater was seen in 46% of patients having infracoronary implantation versus 17% of patients having root implantation. Nine patients had explantation of an aortic allograft (eight infracoronary and one root). Reasons for explantation were as follows: endocarditis (three infracoronary, one root), technical (three infracoronary), undiagnosed idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (1 patient), and prolapsing infracoronary leaflet (1 patient). Actuarial freedom from grade 3 and 4 aortic insufficiency or explantation was 77% at 7 years for infracoronary implantations. We conclude that the infracoronary aortic allograft has an unacceptable frequency of late insufficiency and its use in this position should be abandoned. The substantial incidence of late endocarditis in the infracoronary (free-hand) aortic allograft was surprising.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7771817

  16. Clinical Outcomes of Cryopreserved Arterial Allograft Used as a Vascular Conduit for Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yangsoon; Han, Youngjin; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kwon, Tae-Won; Han, Duck Jong; Cho, Yong-Pil; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    This single center cohort study aimed to test the hypothesis that use of a cryopreserved arterial allograft could avoid the maturation or healing process of a new vascular access and to evaluate the patency of this technique compared with that of vascular access using a prosthetic graft. Between April 2012 and March 2013, 20 patients underwent an upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft for failed or failing vascular accesses and 53 using a prosthetic graft were included in this study. The mean duration of catheter dependence, calculated as the time interval from upper arm access placement to removal of the tunneled central catheter after successful cannulation of the access, was significantly longer for accesses using a prosthetic graft than a cryopreserved arterial allograft (34.4 ± 11.39 days vs. 4.9 ± 8.5 days, P < 0.001). In the allograft group, use of vascular access started within 7 days in 16 patients (80%), as soon as from the day of surgery in 10 patients. Primary (unassisted; P = 0.314) and cumulative (assisted; P = 0.673) access survivals were similar in the two groups. There were no postoperative complications related to the use of a cryopreserved iliac arterial allograft except for one patient who experienced wound hematoma. In conclusion, upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft may permit immediate hemodialysis without the maturation or healing process, resulting in access survival comparable to that of an access using a prosthetic graft. PMID:27478338

  17. Clinical Outcomes of Cryopreserved Arterial Allograft Used as a Vascular Conduit for Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yangsoon; Han, Youngjin; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kwon, Tae-Won; Han, Duck Jong; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    This single center cohort study aimed to test the hypothesis that use of a cryopreserved arterial allograft could avoid the maturation or healing process of a new vascular access and to evaluate the patency of this technique compared with that of vascular access using a prosthetic graft. Between April 2012 and March 2013, 20 patients underwent an upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft for failed or failing vascular accesses and 53 using a prosthetic graft were included in this study. The mean duration of catheter dependence, calculated as the time interval from upper arm access placement to removal of the tunneled central catheter after successful cannulation of the access, was significantly longer for accesses using a prosthetic graft than a cryopreserved arterial allograft (34.4 ± 11.39 days vs. 4.9 ± 8.5 days, P < 0.001). In the allograft group, use of vascular access started within 7 days in 16 patients (80%), as soon as from the day of surgery in 10 patients. Primary (unassisted; P = 0.314) and cumulative (assisted; P = 0.673) access survivals were similar in the two groups. There were no postoperative complications related to the use of a cryopreserved iliac arterial allograft except for one patient who experienced wound hematoma. In conclusion, upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft may permit immediate hemodialysis without the maturation or healing process, resulting in access survival comparable to that of an access using a prosthetic graft. PMID:27478338

  18. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires, Mario Cezar; Kakizaki, Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27438213

  19. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia*

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires, Mario Cezar; Kakizaki, Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27438213

  20. Case report: parenchymal pseudoaneurysm of a renal allograft after core needle biopsy: a rare cause of allograft injury.

    PubMed

    Selim, M; Goldstein, M J

    2011-09-01

    There are multiple causes of worsening graft function after initial good function in cadaveric kidney transplant. In this report, we discuss a rare one: a traumatic pseudoaneurysm caused by a 14-gauge core needle biopsy in a 55-year-old woman. She had immediate graft function followed by rapid decline in the first postoperative week. Imaging studies showed an intraparenchymal 2-cm pulsatile mass with turbulent blood flow in the upper pole at the corticomedullary junction. Angiography the following morning confirmed the diagnosis of pseudoaneurysm. It was coiled successfully, with restoration of graft function. Although development of a pseudoaneurysm is a rare event, transplant centers must be cognizant of allograft injuries like this one. PMID:21911162

  1. Widespread marrow necrosis during pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Knickerbocker, W.J.; Quenville, N.F.

    1982-11-01

    Recently, a 22-year-old Caucasian female was referred to our Hospital two days post-partum. She had been feeling unwell during the last few days of her pregnancy and complained of multiple aches and pains, worst in the abdomen and lower back. Her admission platelet count was severely depressed and a bone biopsy showed extensive marrow necrosis with viable bony trabeculae. There was no evidence of vasculitis, vascular thrombosis, or malignancy. Widespread marrow necrosis in pregnancy followed by recovery, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported.

  2. Bone-marrow transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Bone-marrow transplants are performed for: deficiencies in red blood cells (aplastic anemia) and white blood cells (leukemia or ... Bone-marrow transplants prolong the life of patients who might otherwise die. As with all major organ transplants, however, ...

  3. Bone Marrow Transplants: "Another Possibility at Life"

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Bone Marrow Transplants “Another Possibility at Life” Past Issues / Summer ... year, and, for 16,000 of them, a bone marrow transplant is the best treatment option, notes Susan ...

  4. Planning for a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Planning for a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) If you're going to have ... to a friend or family member undergoing a bone marrow or cord blood transplant. Help Your Loved One ...

  5. Transplant Outcomes (Bone Marrow and Cord Blood)

    MedlinePlus

    ... reports show patient survival and transplant data of bone marrow and umbilical cord blood transplants in the transplant ... Data by Center Report —View the number of bone marrow and cord blood transplants performed at a specific ...

  6. Marrow Fat and Bone—New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Horowitz, Mark C.; MacDougald, Ormond A.; Scheller, Erica L.; Rodeheffer, Matthew S.; Rosen, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: There is growing interest in the relationship between bone mineral density, bone strength, and fat depots. Marrow adipose tissue, a well-established component of the marrow environment, is metabolically distinct from peripheral fat depots, but its functional significance is unknown. Objective: In this review, we discuss animal and human data linking the marrow adipose tissue depot to parameters of bone density and integrity as well as the potential significance of marrow adipose tissue in metabolic diseases associated with bone loss, including type 1 diabetes mellitus and anorexia nervosa. Potential hormonal determinants of marrow adipose tissue are also discussed. Conclusions: We conclude that whereas most animal and human data demonstrate an inverse association between marrow adipose tissue and measures of bone density and strength, understanding the functional significance of marrow adipose tissue and its hormonal determinants will be critical to better understanding its role in skeletal integrity and the role of marrow adipose tissue in the pathophysiology of bone loss. PMID:23393168

  7. Increased Risk of Revision after ACL Reconstruction with Soft Tissue Allograft Compared to Autograft

    PubMed Central

    Maletis, Gregory; Chen, Jason; Inacio, Maria Carolina Secorun; Love, Rebecca; Funahashi, Tadashi Ted

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The use of allograft tissue for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) remains controversial. Numerous meta-analysis and systematic reviews of small clinical studies have not found differences between autograft and allograft outcomes but large registry studies have shown an increased risk of revision with allografts. The purpose of this study was to compare the risk of aseptic revision between bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autografts, hamstring tendon autografts and soft tissue allografts. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data was conducted using an US ACLR Registry. A cohort of primary unilateral ACLR cases reconstructed with BPTB autografts, hamstring autografts and soft tissue allografts (from any site) was identified. Aseptic revision was the end point of the study. Type of graft and allograft processing methods (non-processed, <1.8Mrads with and without chemical processing (Allowash or AlloTrue methods), >1.8 Mrads irradiation with and without chemical processing, and chemical processing alone (BioCleanse)) were the exposures of interest evaluated. Time from surgery was evaluated as an effect modifier. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, and race. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard models were employed. Hazard ratios (HR), 95% confidence intervals (CI) are provided. Results: The cohort had 14015 cases, 8924 (63.7%) were male, 6397 (45.6%) were White, 4557 (32.5%) cases used BPTB autograft, 3751 (26.8%) cases used soft tissue allograft and 5707 (40.7%) cases used hamstring autograft. The median age was 34.6 years-old (IQR 24.1-43.2) for allograft cases and 24.3 years-old (IQR 17.7-33.8) for hamstring autograft cases, and 22.0 years-old (IQR 17.6-30.0) for BPTB autograft cases. Compared to hamstring tendon autografts, an increased risk of revision was found in allografts processed with >1.8Mrads without chemical processing after 2.5 years (HR: 3.88 95%CI 1.48-10.12), and >1.8Mrads with

  8. Daintain/AIF-1 (Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1) accelerates type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yan-Ying; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Zheng-Wang

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 is over-expressed in the blood of NOD mice suffering from insulitis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 stimulates white blood cell proliferation in NOD mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 increases blood glucose levels and triggers type 1 diabetes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 accelerates insulitis, while its antibody prevents insulitis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 enhances the levels of nitric oxide in the pancreases of NOD mice. -- Abstract: A large body of experimental evidence suggests that cytokines trigger pancreatic {beta}-cell death in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Daintain/AIF-1 (Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1), a specific marker for activated macrophages, is accumulated in the pancreatic islets of pre-diabetic BB rats. In the present study, we demonstrate that daintain/AIF-1 is released into blood and the levels of daintain/AIF-1 in the blood of type 1 diabetes-prone non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice suffering from insulitis are significantly higher than that in healthy NOD mice. When injected intravenously into NOD mice, daintain/AIF-1 stimulates white blood cell proliferation, increases the concentrations of blood glucose, impairs insulin expression, up-regulates nitric oxide (NO) production in pancreases and accelerates diabetes in NOD mice, while the antibody against daintain/AIF-1 delays or prevents insulitis in NOD mice. These results imply daintain/AIF-1 triggers type 1 diabetes probably via arousing immune cells activation and induction of NO production in pancreas of NOD mice.

  9. Inhibition of Chemokine-Glycosaminoglycan Interactions in Donor Tissue Reduces Mouse Allograft Vasculopathy and Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Erbin; Liu, Li-Ying; Wang, Hao; McIvor, Dana; Sun, Yun ming; Macaulay, Colin; King, Elaine; Munuswamy-Ramanujam, Ganesh; Bartee, Mee Yong; Williams, Jennifer; Davids, Jennifer; Charo, Israel; McFadden, Grant; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Lucas, Alexandra R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is classically described as initiating inflammatory cell migration and creating tissue chemokine gradients that direct local leukocyte chemotaxis into damaged or transplanted tissues. While chemokine-receptor binding has been extensively studied during allograft transplantation, effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) interactions with chemokines on transplant longevity are less well known. Here we examine the impact of interrupting chemokine-GAG interactions and chemokine-receptor interactions, both locally and systemically, on vascular disease in allografts. Methodology/Principal Findings Analysis of GAG or CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) deficiency were coupled with the infusion of viral chemokine modulating proteins (CMPs) in mouse aortic allograft transplants (n = 239 mice). Inflammatory cell invasion and neointimal hyperplasia were significantly reduced in N-deacetylase-N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1f/fTekCre+) heparan sulfate (GAG)-deficient (Ndst1−/−, p<0.044) and CCR2-deficient (Ccr2−/−, p<0.04) donor transplants. Donor tissue GAG or CCR2 deficiency markedly reduced inflammation and vasculopathy, whereas recipient deficiencies did not. Treatment with three CMPs was also investigated; Poxviral M-T1 blocks CC chemokine receptor binding, M-T7 blocks C, CC, and CXC GAG binding, and herpesviral M3 binds receptor and GAG binding for all classes. M-T7 reduced intimal hyperplasia in wild type (WT) (Ccr2+/+, p≤0.003 and Ccr2−/−, p≤0.027) aortic allografts, but not in Ndst1−/− aortic allografts (p = 0.933). M-T1 and M3 inhibited WT (Ccr2+/+ and Ndst1+/+, p≤0.006) allograft vasculopathy, but did not block vasculopathy in Ccr2−/− (p = 0.61). M-T7 treatment alone, even without immunosuppressive drugs, also significantly prolonged survival of renal allograft transplants (p≤0.001). Conclusions/Significance Interruption of chemokine-GAG interactions, even in the absence of

  10. The protective effect of meniscus allograft transplantation on articular cartilage: a systematic review of animal studies.

    PubMed

    Rongen, J J; Hannink, G; van Tienen, T G; van Luijk, J; Hooijmans, C R

    2015-08-01

    Despite widespread reporting on clinical results, the effect of meniscus allograft transplantation on the development of osteoarthritis is still unclear. The aim of this study was to systematically review all studies on the effect of meniscus allograft transplantation on articular cartilage in animals. Pubmed and Embase were searched for original articles concerning the effect of meniscus allograft transplantation on articular cartilage compared with both its positive (meniscectomy) and negative (either sham or non-operated) control in healthy animals. Outcome measures related to assessment of damage to articular cartilage were divided in five principal outcome categories. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were calculated and pooled to obtain an overall SMD and 95% confidence interval. 17 articles were identified, representing 14 original animal cohorts with an average timing of data collection of 24 weeks [range 4 weeks; 30 months]. Compared to a negative control, meniscus allograft transplantation caused gross macroscopic (1.45 [0.95; 1.95]), histological (3.43 [2.25; 4.61]) damage to articular cartilage, and osteoarthritic changes on radiographs (3.12 [1.42; 4.82]). Moreover, results on histomorphometrics and cartilage biomechanics are supportive of this detrimental effect on cartilage. On the other hand, meniscus allograft transplantation caused significantly less gross macroscopic (-1.19 [-1.84; -0.54]) and histological (-1.70 [-2.67; -0.74]) damage to articular cartilage when compared to meniscectomy. However, there was no difference in osteoarthritic changes on plain radiographs (0.04 [-0.48; 0.57]), and results on histomorphometrics and biomechanics did neither show a difference in effect between meniscus allograft transplantation and meniscectomy. In conclusion, although meniscus allograft transplantation does not protect articular cartilage from damage, it reduces the extent of it when compared with meniscectomy. PMID:25960117

  11. An audit of consent for allograft use in elective orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mullan, C J; Pagoti, R; Davison, H; McAlinden, M G

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Patients receiving musculoskeletal allografts may be at risk of postoperative infection. The General Medical Council guidelines on consent highlight the importance of providing patients with the information they want or need on any proposed investigation or treatment, including any potential adverse outcomes. With the increased cost of defending medicolegal claims, it is paramount that adequate, clear informed patient consent be documented. Methods We retrospectively examined the patterns of informed consent for allograft bone use during elective orthopaedic procedures in a large unit with an onsite bone bank. The initial audit included patients operated over the course of 1 year. Following a feedback session, a re-audit was performed to identify improvements in practice. Results The case mix of both studies was very similar. Revision hip arthroplasty surgery constituted the major subgroup requiring allograft (48%), followed by foot and ankle surgery (16.3%) and revision knee arthroplasty surgery (11.4%) .On the initial audit, 17/45 cases (38%) had either adequate preoperative documentation of the outpatient discussion or an appropriately completed consent form on the planned use of allograft. On the re-audit, 44/78 cases (56%) had adequate pre-operative documentation. There was little correlation between how frequently a surgeon used allograft and the adequacy of consent (Correlation coefficient -0.12). Conclusions Although the risk of disease transmission with allograft may be variable, informed consent for allograft should be a routine part of preoperative discussions in elective orthopaedic surgery. Regular audit and feedback sessions may further improve consent documentation, alongside the targeting of high volume/low compliance surgeons. PMID:26924483

  12. Infrequency of cytomegalovirus genome in coronary arteriopathy of human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Kandolf, R.; Kendall, T. J.; Thieszen, S. L.; Wilson, J. E.; Radio, S. J.; Costanzo, M. R.; Winters, G. L.; Miller, L. L.; McManus, B. M.

    1995-01-01

    In heart transplantation, long-term engraftment success is severely limited by the rapid development of obliterative disease of the coronary arteries. Data from various groups have been suggestive of a pathogenetic role of herpesviruses, particularly human cytomegalovirus, in accelerated allograft coronary artery disease; however, results are not yet conclusive. This study examines the hypothesis that human cytomegalovirus infection of allograft tissues is related pathogenetically and directly to accelerated coronary artery disease. Using in situ DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction, we examined particular coronary artery segments from 41 human heart allografts (ranging from 4 days to greater than 4 years after transplantation; mean, 457 days) and 22 donor age- and gender-comparable, coronary site-matched trauma victims for presence of human cytomegalovirus DNA. Human cytomegalovirus genome was detected in 8 of 41 (19.5%) allografts and in 1 of 22 (4.5%) control hearts. This difference in positivity was not statistically significant (P = 0.10). In the human cytomegalovirus-positive hearts, viral genome was localized to perivascular myocardium or coronary artery media or adventitia. Human cytomegalovirus genome was not detected in arterial intima of any allograft or control heart, although human cytomegalovirus genome was readily identified within intima of small pulmonary arteries from lung tissue with human cytomegalovirus pneumonitis. By statistical analyses, the presence of human cytomegalovirus genome was not associated with the nature or digitized extent of transplant arteriopathy, evidence of rejection, allograft recipient or donor serological data suggestive of human cytomegalovirus infection, duration of allograft implantation, or causes of death or retransplantation. Thus, our data indicate a low frequency of detectable human cytomegalovirus genome in accelerated coronary artery disease and do not support a direct role for human cytomegalovirus

  13. Cytomegalovirus infection enhances smooth muscle cell proliferation and intimal thickening of rat aortic allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Lemström, K B; Bruning, J H; Bruggeman, C A; Lautenschlager, I T; Häyry, P J

    1993-01-01

    Inbred DA (AG-B4, RT1a) and WF (AG-B2, RT1v) rats were used as donors and recipients of aortic allografts. The recipient rats were inoculated i.p. either on day 1 (early infection) or on day 60 (late infection) with 10(5) plaque-forming units of rat cytomegalovirus (RCMV). The control rats were left noninfected. The presence of viral infection was demonstrated by plaque assays from biopsies of the salivary glands, liver, and spleen at sacrifice. The rats received 300 microCi[3H]thymidine by i.v. injection 3 h before sacrifice, and the grafts were removed at various time points for histology, immunohistochemistry, and autoradiography. RCMV infection significantly enhanced the generation of allograft arteriosclerosis. Infection at the time of transplantation had two important effects. First, the infection was associated with an early, prominent inflammatory episode and proliferation of inflammatory cells in the allograft adventitia. Second, the viral infection doubled the proliferation rate of smooth muscle cells and the arteriosclerotic alterations in the intima. In late infection the impact of RCMV infection on the allograft histology was nearly nonexistent. RCMV infection showed no effect in syngeneic grafts. These results suggest that early infection is more important to the generation of accelerated allograft arteriosclerosis than late infection, and that an acute alloimmune response must be associated with virus infection, to induce accelerated allograft arteriosclerosis. RCMV-infected aortic allografts, as described here, provide the first experimental model to investigate the interaction between the virus and the vascular wall of the transplant. Images PMID:8394384

  14. Osteoinductive effect of bone bank allografts on human osteoblasts in culture.

    PubMed

    de la Piedra, Concepción; Vicario, Carlos; de Acuña, Lucrecia Rodríguez; García-Moreno, Carmen; Traba, Maria Luisa; Arlandis, Santiago; Marco, Fernando; López-Durán, Luis

    2008-02-01

    Incorporation of a human bone allograft requires osteoclast activity and growth of recipient osteoblasts. The aim of this work was to study the effects produced by autoclavated and -80 degrees C frozen bone allografts on osteoblast proliferation and synthesis of interleukin 6 (IL6), activator of bone resorption, aminoterminal propeptide of procollagen I (PINP), marker of bone matrix formation, and osteoprotegerin (OPG), inhibitor of osteoclast activity and differentiation. Allografts were obtained from human femoral heads. Human osteoblasts were cultured in the presence (problem group) or in the absence (control group) of allografts during 15 days. Allografts produced a decrease in osteoblast proliferation in the first week of the experiment, and an increase in IL6 mRNA, both at 3 h and 2 days, and an increase in the IL6 released to the culture medium the second day of the experiment. We found a decrease in OPG released to the culture on the 2nd and fourth days. These results suggest an increase in bone resorption and a decrease in bone formation in the first week of the experiment. In the second week, allografts produced an increase in osteoblast proliferation and PINP release to the culture medium, indicating an increase in bone formation; an increase in OPG released to the culture medium, which would indicate a decrease in bone resorption; and a decrease in IL6, indicating a decrease in bone resorption stimulation. These results demonstrate that autoclavated and -80 degrees C frozen bone allografts produce in bone environment changes that regulate their own incorporation to the recipient bone. PMID:17853479

  15. Identification of differentially expressed genes in rat aortic allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J.; Myllärniemi, M.; Akyürek, L. M.; Häyry, P.; Marsden, P. A.; Paul, L. C.

    1996-01-01

    Graft vasculopathy is an important complication of long-surviving organ transplants, but its pathogenesis has remained elusive. We investigated rat aortic transplants with vasculopathy, aortic transplants without vasculopathy, and normal aortas for differentially expressed mRNA transcripts to gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms involved. Aortic transplants were performed in allogeneic or syngeneic recipients followed by removal after 1 or 5 months, RNA isolation, and differential display to identify mRNA transcripts the expression of which was modulated in conjunction with the transplant procedure and the development of vasculopathy. Using 80 random primers, 57 differentially displayed polymerase chain reaction products were identified, 18 of which were found in allografts but not in syngeneic grafts or normal vessels, whereas 15 were expressed in normal vessels and syngeneic grafts but not in allografts. Of the differentially displayed amplicons, 13 were successfully reamplified and used as probes for Northern analysis; differential expression was confirmed in 6 instances. DNA sequence analysis of these PCR products revealed identity with the immunoglobulin J chain in 2 instances, the ferritin heavy chain, a sequence related but not identical with Ras, and an established sequence tag recently isolated from a human fetal heart library; 1 sequence was not related to any known gene. To assess whether differential mRNA expression of the J-chain gene, a gene expressed in cells of B lymphocyte lineage, was associated with infiltration of the graft by B lymphocytes, tissue sections were stained with an antibody against the B cell marker CD45RA. Although the number of CD45RA-positive cells was low, there was a significant increase in the number of CD45RA-positive cells in the adventitia and intima of grafts with vasculopathy. Furthermore, immunostaining with anti-ferritin antiserum confirmed the presence of ferritin-positive cells within the inner layer of

  16. Cryopreserved cancellous bone allograft in periodontal intraosseous defects.

    PubMed

    Borghetti, A; Novakovitch, G; Louise, F; Simeone, D; Fourel, J

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of cryopreserved cancellous bone allograft (CCBA) in the treatment of intraosseous periodontal defects compared to surgical debridement alone (DEBR). Cancellous bone was procured from femur heads that had been extracted for hip prosthesis procedures and cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen (-196 degrees C) in a tissue bank. Ten patients without systemic disorders and advanced periodontal disease (at least 2 intraosseous defects) participated in this investigation. Measurements from the cemento-enamel junction were made after initial therapy for clinical attachment level; also gingival recession, probing pocket depth, plaque index, and gingival index and, at the time of surgery, alveolar crest height and osseous defect depth were measured. All measurements were repeated at 1 year-reentry. Sixteen defects were debrided and grafted (test sites) and 13 defects were debrided only (control sites). Soft tissue measurements showed no statistical differences between the 2 groups. Defect fill was significantly greater with CCBA (1.75 mm) than with DEBR (0.56 mm). Defect depth reduction was 2.06 mm for CCBA and 0.78 mm for DEBR. These values correspond to a percent-defect resolution of 60% for CCBA and 29% for DEBR. Hard tissue measurements showed significant differences between the 2 groups. CCBA seems to be effective in the short-term treatment of intraosseous periodontal defects. PMID:8433252

  17. Glutaraldehyde-cross-linked meniscal allografts: mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Wisnewski, P J; Powers, D L; Kennedy, J M

    1988-01-01

    Removal of a severely damaged medial meniscus has been shown to lead to degradation of the articular cartilage and formation of degenerative arthritis. To counter this degenerative effect, meniscal prostheses, including glutaraldehyde-cross-linked allografts, have been evaluated in dogs. The purpose of this research was to quantify the mechanical properties of both fresh and glutaraldehyde-cross-linked canine medial menisci. Mechanical properties quantified were tensile strength, tensile modulus, and compressive stiffness. In addition, water content of compressive test samples was measured. Analysis of variance showed significantly lower tensile strength and tensile modulus and significantly higher compressive stiffness for the glutaraldehyde-cross-linked menisci, as compared to fresh specimens. Measurement of the weight percentage of water in fresh and cross-linked samples revealed no significant differences in water content. When implanted into a joint, the increased compressive stiffness could increase the peripheral tensile load. Due to the decreased tensile strength in this region, the prosthetic meniscus could be susceptible to peripheral tears. PMID:3155295

  18. Meniscal allograft transplantation: preoperative assessment, surgical considerations, and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Randy; Yanke, Adam B; Frank, Rachel M; Butty, Davietta C; Cole, Brian J

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to characterize the preoperative assessment of meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) candidates, to detail MAT surgical techniques, and to evaluate current clinical outcome data on MAT. The MAT candidate is typically less than 50 years old and has a history of knee injury, previous meniscus surgery, and persistent pain. Physical exam generally reveals knee pain with joint line tenderness with normal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrating the postmeniscectomized state. There are several common surgical techniques used for transplantation, with fixation achieved through sutures, bony fixation, or a combination of the two. Concomitant procedures such as anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, osteotomy, and other cartilage procedures are commonly performed. The available short- and long-term studies of clinical outcomes of MAT are variable and difficult to effectively compare due to heterogeneity of the study population and available treatment techniques. In addition, there are no published randomized controlled trials. However, recent reviews and cohort studies of clinical outcomes following MAT have shown that whether performed in isolation or performed with concomitant articular cartilage, realignment, or soft tissue reconstruction procedures MAT outcomes have been acceptable with the majority of studies reporting improved clinical outcomes regardless of the scoring system employed. MAT has proven to be a safe and effective technique in reducing knee pain and improving function in the symptomatic meniscal deficient knee. Evaluation of long-term clinical outcomes is necessary as is evaluation of meniscal replacement alternatives. PMID:24951950

  19. Enhancing Osteochondral Allograft Viability: Effects of Storage Media Composition

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Margie S.; Yuen, Audrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Osteochondral allograft transplantation is a well-accepted treatment for articular cartilage damage. However, chondrocyte viability declines during graft storage, which may compromise graft performance. We first tested the hypothesis that the composition of commonly used storage media affects the viability of articular chondrocytes over time; we then tested the hypothesis that the addition of insulin growth factor-1 or the apoptosis inhibitor ZVAD-fmk could enhance the storage properties of serum-free media. Bovine osteochondral grafts were stored at 4°C in lactated Ringer’s, Dulbecco’s modified eagle’s media (DMEM), DMEM supplemented with either insulin growth factor-1 or ZVAD-fmk, and a commercial storage media. Chondrocyte viability in lactated Ringer’s declined rapidly to 20.4% at 2 weeks. Viability in DMEM declined more slowly to 54.8% at 2 weeks and 31.2% at 3 weeks. Viability in commercial storage media was 83.6% at 3 weeks and 44.8% at 4 weeks. Viability was increased in DMEM + insulin growth factor-1 (56.4%) and DMEM + ZVAD (52.4%) at 3 weeks compared with DMEM alone. These results confirm the hypotheses that media composition greatly influences chondrocyte viability during cold storage and that insulin growth factor-1 and ZVAD improve the storage properties of DMEM. PMID:18506560

  20. Enhancing osteochondral allograft viability: effects of storage media composition.

    PubMed

    Teng, Margie S; Yuen, Audrey S; Kim, Hubert T

    2008-08-01

    Osteochondral allograft transplantation is a well-accepted treatment for articular cartilage damage. However, chondrocyte viability declines during graft storage, which may compromise graft performance. We first tested the hypothesis that the composition of commonly used storage media affects the viability of articular chondrocytes over time; we then tested the hypothesis that the addition of insulin growth factor-1 or the apoptosis inhibitor ZVAD-fmk could enhance the storage properties of serum-free media. Bovine osteochondral grafts were stored at 4 degrees C in lactated Ringer's, Dulbecco's modified eagle's media (DMEM), DMEM supplemented with either insulin growth factor-1 or ZVAD-fmk, and a commercial storage media. Chondrocyte viability in lactated Ringer's declined rapidly to 20.4% at 2 weeks. Viability in DMEM declined more slowly to 54.8% at 2 weeks and 31.2% at 3 weeks. Viability in commercial storage media was 83.6% at 3 weeks and 44.8% at 4 weeks. Viability was increased in DMEM + insulin growth factor-1 (56.4%) and DMEM + ZVAD (52.4%) at 3 weeks compared with DMEM alone. These results confirm the hypotheses that media composition greatly influences chondrocyte viability during cold storage and that insulin growth factor-1 and ZVAD improve the storage properties of DMEM. PMID:18506560

  1. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Furthermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfusion of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion or irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  2. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  3. Adverse Effects of Systemic Immunosuppression in Keratolimbal Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Krakauer, M.; Welder, J. D.; Pandya, H. K.; Nassiri, N.; Djalilian, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Keratolimbal allograft (KLAL) is a treatment for limbal stem cell deficiency. One disadvantage is systemic immunosuppression to avoid rejection. Our purpose was to examine the adverse effects of systemic immunosuppression in KLAL. Methods. A retrospective case review of 16 patients with KLAL who received systemic immunosuppression consisting of a corticosteroid, an antimetabolite, and/or a calcineurin inhibitor was performed. Patients were monitored for signs, symptoms, or laboratory evidence of toxicity. Results. Eleven of 16 patients (68%) experienced an adverse effect. The average age of those with adverse effects was 43.5 years and without was 31.4 years. Ten of 11 patients (91%) had resolution during mean followup of 16.4 months. No serious adverse effects occurred. The most common included anemia, hyperglycemia, elevated creatinine, and elevated liver function tests. Prednisone and tacrolimus were responsible for the most adverse effects. Patients with comorbidities were more likely to experience an adverse effect (82% versus 20%, P = 0.036). Conclusions. KLAL requires prolonged systemic immunosuppression. Our data demonstrated that systemic immunosuppression did not result in serious adverse effects in our population and is relatively safe with monitoring for toxicity. In addition, we demonstrated that adverse effects are more likely in older patients with comorbidities. PMID:22523651

  4. [Method for concentrating marrow stem cells using the IBM 2991 washer. Necessary preparation before in vitro treatment of bone marrow by pharmacologic or immunologic means].

    PubMed

    Hervé, P; Coffe, C; Peters, A

    1983-04-01

    The technique using the IBM 2991 blood cell processor is an effective technique for the concentration of mononuclear cells from large volumes of bone marrow. The marrow cells are layered on to Ficoll Metrizoate using the IBM processing set. The mononuclear cells and CFU-GM recoveries are in close relationship with the hematocrit of the cell suspension processed. Twenty two bone marrows have been collected and purified according to this protocol. The mononuclear cell recovery is an average of 78,3% (range: 44-92%) and the CFU-GM recovery is in average of 67,5% (range: 40-89%). At the end of the procedure the cell viability is satisfying (97,1% +/- 1,7 are trypan blue negatives). When it is necessary to remove from the bone marrow collected either malignant cells prior autologous bone marrow graft or T lymphocytes in an attempt to prevent GVHD in allogeneic BMT, the purity of marrow cell suspension become a fundamental parameter. PMID:6348924

  5. Exercise Regulation of Marrow Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Pagnotti, Gabriel M.; Styner, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Despite association with low bone density and skeletal fractures, marrow adipose tissue (MAT) remains poorly understood. The marrow adipocyte originates from the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) pool that also gives rise to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and myocytes, among other cell types. To date, the presence of MAT has been attributed to preferential biasing of MSC into the adipocyte rather than osteoblast lineage, thus negatively impacting bone formation. Here, we focus on understanding the physiology of MAT in the setting of exercise, dietary interventions, and pharmacologic agents that alter fat metabolism. The beneficial effect of exercise on musculoskeletal strength is known: exercise induces bone formation, encourages growth of skeletally supportive tissues, inhibits bone resorption, and alters skeletal architecture through direct and indirect effects on a multiplicity of cells involved in skeletal adaptation. MAT is less well studied due to the lack of reproducible quantification techniques. In recent work, osmium-based 3D quantification shows a robust response of MAT to both dietary and exercise intervention in that MAT is elevated in response to high-fat diet and can be suppressed following daily exercise. Exercise-induced bone formation correlates with suppression of MAT, such that exercise effects might be due to either calorie expenditure from this depot or from mechanical biasing of MSC lineage away from fat and toward bone, or a combination thereof. Following treatment with the anti-diabetes drug rosiglitazone – a PPARγ-agonist known to increase MAT and fracture risk – mice demonstrate a fivefold higher femur MAT volume compared to the controls. In addition to preventing MAT accumulation in control mice, exercise intervention significantly lowers MAT accumulation in rosiglitazone-treated mice. Importantly, exercise induction of trabecular bone volume is unhindered by rosiglitazone. Thus, despite rosiglitazone augmentation of MAT, exercise

  6. Exercise Regulation of Marrow Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Pagnotti, Gabriel M; Styner, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Despite association with low bone density and skeletal fractures, marrow adipose tissue (MAT) remains poorly understood. The marrow adipocyte originates from the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) pool that also gives rise to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and myocytes, among other cell types. To date, the presence of MAT has been attributed to preferential biasing of MSC into the adipocyte rather than osteoblast lineage, thus negatively impacting bone formation. Here, we focus on understanding the physiology of MAT in the setting of exercise, dietary interventions, and pharmacologic agents that alter fat metabolism. The beneficial effect of exercise on musculoskeletal strength is known: exercise induces bone formation, encourages growth of skeletally supportive tissues, inhibits bone resorption, and alters skeletal architecture through direct and indirect effects on a multiplicity of cells involved in skeletal adaptation. MAT is less well studied due to the lack of reproducible quantification techniques. In recent work, osmium-based 3D quantification shows a robust response of MAT to both dietary and exercise intervention in that MAT is elevated in response to high-fat diet and can be suppressed following daily exercise. Exercise-induced bone formation correlates with suppression of MAT, such that exercise effects might be due to either calorie expenditure from this depot or from mechanical biasing of MSC lineage away from fat and toward bone, or a combination thereof. Following treatment with the anti-diabetes drug rosiglitazone - a PPARγ-agonist known to increase MAT and fracture risk - mice demonstrate a fivefold higher femur MAT volume compared to the controls. In addition to preventing MAT accumulation in control mice, exercise intervention significantly lowers MAT accumulation in rosiglitazone-treated mice. Importantly, exercise induction of trabecular bone volume is unhindered by rosiglitazone. Thus, despite rosiglitazone augmentation of MAT, exercise significantly

  7. A prospective, randomised comparative study of weekly versus biweekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft in the management of diabetic foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Zelen, Charles M; Serena, Thomas E; Snyder, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if weekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft reduce time to heal more effectively than biweekly application for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. This was an institutional review board-approved, registered, prospective, randomised, comparative, non-blinded, single-centre clinical trial. Patients with non-infected ulcers of ≥ 4 weeks duration were included for the study. They were randomised to receive weekly or biweekly application of allograft in addition to a non-adherent, moist dressing with compressive wrapping. All wounds were offloaded. The primary study outcome was mean time to healing. Overall, during the 12-week study period, 92·5% (37/40) ulcers completely healed. Mean time to complete healing was 4·1 ± 2·9 versus 2·4 ± 1·8 weeks (P = 0·039) in the biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively. Complete healing occurred in 50% versus 90% by 4 weeks in the biweekly and weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·014). Number of grafts applied to healed wounds was similar at 2·4 ± 1·5 and 2·3 ± 1·8 for biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·841). These results validate previous studies showing that the allograft is an effective treatment for diabetic ulcers and show that wounds treated with weekly application heal more rapidly than with biweekly application. More rapid healing may decrease clinical operational costs and prevent long-term medical complications. PMID:24618401

  8. A prospective, randomised comparative study of weekly versus biweekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft in the management of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Zelen, Charles M; Serena, Thomas E; Snyder, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if weekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft reduce time to heal more effectively than biweekly application for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. This was an institutional review board-approved, registered, prospective, randomised, comparative, non-blinded, single-centre clinical trial. Patients with non-infected ulcers of ≥ 4 weeks duration were included for the study. They were randomised to receive weekly or biweekly application of allograft in addition to a non-adherent, moist dressing with compressive wrapping. All wounds were offloaded. The primary study outcome was mean time to healing. Overall, during the 12-week study period, 92·5% (37/40) ulcers completely healed. Mean time to complete healing was 4·1 ± 2·9 versus 2·4 ± 1·8 weeks (P = 0·039) in the biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively. Complete healing occurred in 50% versus 90% by 4 weeks in the biweekly and weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·014). Number of grafts applied to healed wounds was similar at 2·4 ± 1·5 and 2·3 ± 1·8 for biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·841). These results validate previous studies showing that the allograft is an effective treatment for diabetic ulcers and show that wounds treated with weekly application heal more rapidly than with biweekly application. More rapid healing may decrease clinical operational costs and prevent long-term medical complications. PMID:24618401

  9. Effect of tissue culture storage on the in vivo survival of canine osteochondral allografts.

    PubMed

    Oates, K M; Chen, A C; Young, E P; Kwan, M K; Amiel, D; Convery, F R

    1995-07-01

    In vitro studies in our laboratory have shown that the biomechanical and biochemical characteristics of osteochondral grafts can be preserved for as long as 28 days under tissue culture conditions. This study represents an attempt to extend these results to an in vivo model. In adult mongrel dogs, either an autograft, a fresh allograft, or a stored allograft was placed in a standardized defect on the weight-bearing surface of the medial femoral condyle. The stored grafts were kept at 4 degrees C in tissue culture medium for 14 days prior to implantation. The animals were killed at 12 weeks. Cartilage from the contralateral knee served as a control. The modulus and permeability of the cartilage were assessed with confined compression creep tests. The collagen and glycosaminoglycan contents were measured, and the cartilage was analyzed histologically with hematoxylin and eosin and safranin O stains. Grossly, the cartilage appeared viable at harvest. The histologic results were similar in the treatment groups, with the same spectrum of mild degenerative changes being noted in each group. The glycosaminoglycan content was significantly less in the autograft group than in its control group and than in the fresh allograft group. The glycosaminoglycan content did not differ significantly between fresh and stored allografts. The collagen content, modulus, and permeability did not differ either between experimental and control groups or between graft types. Our results support the conclusion that osteochondral allografts can be stored for as many as 14 days without significantly affecting the results of the procedure. PMID:7674072

  10. Functional Outcomes of Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with Tibialis Anterior Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Başar, Selda; Büyükafşar, Enes; Hazar, Zeynep; Ataoğlu, Baybars; Kanatlı, Ulunay

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Allografts have potential advantages in primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), including the absence of donor site morbidity, shorter operative times, improved cosmesis, and easier rehabilitation. There is limited and conflicting outcome data for ACLR with tibialis anterior allograft. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of ACLR with tibialis anterior allograft. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated patients underwent ACLR using with tibialis anterior allograft between 2005 and 2013. Totally 12 patients who were performed suspensory fixation technique were included in this study (range: 25-43 years). Exclusion criteria included double bundle, bone tendon bone technique and revision surgery. Clinical outcomes were measured by subject part of International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scores. Results: A significant increase was reported in all the clinical scores. In particular, the IKDC-subjective score increased from a basal value of 45.5±12.7 to 84.3±5.50 at the 12 months' evaluation (p<0.05). The Lysholm score revealed a significant improvement from 49.7±14.2 to 83.5±20.5 at the 12 months' evaluation (p<0.05). Conclusion: ACLR with tibialis anterior allograft is an effective treatment for correcting loss of function and increasing quality of life.

  11. Local allograft irradiation as an adjunct for treating severe resistant rejection after liver transplantation in adults.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Sharma, Amit; Kaspar, Matthew; Behnke, Martha; Song, Shiyu; Stravitz, R Todd; Cotterell, Adrian; Posner, Marc; Fisher, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Acute rejection after liver transplantation occurs in one-third of all recipients and can be managed with conventional rejection therapy in the majority of cases. In rare instances, patients with severe acute rejection may be refractory to or have contraindications for conventional therapies. This case series evaluates the role of local allograft irradiation (LAI) as an adjunct for patients with rejection that is refractory to or contraindicated for conventional therapies. Additionally, the literature on the use of radiation therapy for reversing rejection in solid organ transplantation is reviewed. Five patients underwent 9 LAI treatments: 2 had refractory rejection, and 1 each had a malignancy, a concurrent life-threatening infection, and serum sickness with antibody therapy. Conventional rejection therapies included steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and antithymocyte globulin. LAI consisted of 3 cycles of 1.5 Gy directed toward the liver allograft. Two of the 5 patients remained alive with excellent graft function. Six of the 9 treatments were successful in rescuing the liver allograft (reversing the rejection episode). Treatment success was associated with lower pretreatment serum bilirubin levels and higher pretreatment alanine aminotransferase levels. Compared with patients with immunosuppression-responsive severe acute rejection, those requiring LAI trended toward a later onset of first rejection. In conclusion, local irradiation of liver allografts can be a useful adjunct in patients for whom conventional options have been exhausted or cannot be used. The ability of LAI to reverse allograft dysfunction and promote patient survival appears to be greatest before the onset of severe cholestatic injury. PMID:25287272

  12. Cyclosporin A and tissue antigen matching in bone transplantation. Fibular allografts studied in the dog.

    PubMed

    Welter, J F; Shaffer, J W; Stevenson, S; Davy, D T; Field, G A; Klein, L; Li, X Q; Zika, J M; Goldberg, V M

    1990-12-01

    We studied the mechanical, metabolic, and histologic properties of short-term nonvascularized cortical bone grafts in a canine fibular graft model. Sham operated nonvascularized autotransplanted and allotransplanted bones were compared. The allografts were performed between dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class I and II matched; DLA class I and II mismatched; and cyclosporin A (CsA) treated, DLA class I and II mismatched animals. Cyclosporin was given for 1 month, and all the animals were followed for 3 months after surgery. Mechanical properties were investigated using standard torsional tests, metabolic kinetics were assessed using isotopic prelabeling techniques, and histomorphometric analysis of cross-sectional area properties and sequential fluorochrome labels were performed. Autografts were mechanically stronger and stiffer than all the types of allograft. CsA-treated, DLA-mismatched allografts performed better than matched allografts. These in turn were stronger than non-CsA-treated, mismatched allografts, which underwent nearly complete resorption. These relationships were preserved in the metabolic and histologic analyses. In this short-term animal study, although DLA matching resulted in a slight improvement in graft outcome, mismatched grafts in dogs receiving a short course of cyclosporin A fared even better. PMID:2281759

  13. Successful treatment of renal allograft and bladder malakoplakia with minimization of immunosuppression and prolonged antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Graves, Angela L; Texler, Michael; Manning, Laurens; Kulkarni, Hemant

    2014-04-01

    Malakoplakia is an unusual granulomatous inflammatory disorder associated with diminished bactericidal action of leucocytes that occurs in immunosuppressed hosts. Cases of renal allograft malakoplakia are generally associated with a poor graft and patient survival. We present the case of a 56-year-old female with allograft and bladder malakoplakia occurring two years after renal transplantation complicated by an early antibody mediated rejection. Following a number of symptomatic urinary tract infections caused by resistant Gram-negative bacilli, a diagnosis of malakoplakia was made by biopsy of a new mass lesion of the renal allograft. Cystoscopy also revealed malakoplakia of the bladder wall. Immunosuppressant regimen was modified. Mycophenolate mofetil was ceased, prednisolone reduced to 5 mg/day and tacrolimus concentrations were carefully monitored to maintain trough serum concentrations of 2-4 μg/L. Concurrently, she received a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics followed by 13 months of dual oral antibiotic therapy with fosfomycin and faropenem. This joint approach resulted in almost complete resolution of allograft malakoplakia lesions and sustained regression of bladder lesions on cystoscopy with histological resolution in bladder lesions. Her renal function has remained stable throughout the illness. If treated with sustained antimicrobial therapy and reduction of immunosuppression, cases of allograft malakoplakia may not necessarily be associated with poor graft survival. PMID:24460630

  14. Elderly recipients of hepatitis C positive renal allografts can quickly develop liver disease.

    PubMed

    Flohr, Tanya R; Bonatti, Hugo; Hranjec, Tjasa; Keith, Doug S; Lobo, Peter I; Kumer, Sean C; Schmitt, Timothy M; Sawyer, Robert G; Pruett, Timothy L; Roberts, John P; Brayman, Kenneth L

    2012-08-01

    Our institution explored using allografts from donors with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) for elderly renal transplantation (RT). Thirteen HCV- elderly recipients were transplanted with HCV+ allografts (eD+/R-) between January 2003 and April 2009. Ninety HCV- elderly recipients of HCV- allografts (eD-/R-), eight HCV+ recipients of HCV+ allografts (D+/R+) and thirteen HCV+ recipients of HCV- allografts (D-/R+) were also transplanted. Median follow-up was 1.5 (range 0.8-5) years. Seven eD+/R- developed a positive HCV viral load and six had elevated liver transaminases with evidence of hepatitis on biopsy. Overall, eD+/R- survival was 46% while the eD-/R- survival was 85% (P = 0.003). Seven eD+/R- died during follow-up. Causes included multi-organ failure and sepsis (n = 4), cancer (n = 1), failure-to-thrive (n = 1) and surgical complications (n = 1). One eD+/R- died from causes directly related to HCV infection. In conclusion, multiple eD+/R- quickly developed HCV-related liver disease and infections were a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality. PMID:22316669

  15. Regenerative Effects of Three Types of Allografts on Rabbit Calvarium: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Rokn, Amir Reza; Shakeri, Abbas Seyed; Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo; Alaeddini, Mojgan; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Manasheof, Rebecca; Barikani, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to histologically compare the regenerative properties of two allografts manufactured by two Iranian companies. Materials and Methods: In this study, four 8-mm defects were produced in the calvaria of 12 rabbits. In three defects, three types of allografts namely ITB, CenoBone and Grafton were placed and one defect served as control. Samples were prepared and histomorphometric evaluations were carried out after healing periods of four weeks (interval 1) and eight weeks (interval 2). Qualitative and quantities variables were compared and analyzed with SPSS software. Results: Mild inflammation was observed in 45% and 12.5% of the samples in the first and second intervals, respectively. Foreign body reaction was observed in only 5% of the samples. The quality of regenerated bone was immature, mixed and lamellar in 54.5%, 15.9% and 4.5% of the samples, respectively. The rate of allograft resorption was the highest and lowest in the CenoBone and Grafton samples, respectively. The mean amount of regenerated bone was higher in areas containing Grafton; however, the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Despite the differences in the numerical values of bone regeneration, there were no statistically significant differences in bone generation among the material groups, and allografts manufactured in Iran can be suitable alternatives to Grafton with the same good properties. Further studies are necessary to clarify the efficacy of these allografts. PMID:27507993

  16. Freeze-Dried Tendon Allografts as Tissue Engineering Scaffolds for Gdf5 Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Patrick; Dadali, Tulin; Jacobson, Justin; Hasslund, Sys; Ulrich-Vinther, Michael; Søballe, Kjeld; Nishio, Yasuhiko; Drissi, M Hicham; Langstein, Howard N; Mitten, David J; O’Keefe, Regis J; Schwarz, Edward M; Awad, Hani A

    2009-01-01

    Tendon reconstruction using grafts often results in adhesions that limit joint flexion. These adhesions are precipitated by inflammation, fibrosis, and paucity of tendon differentiation signals during healing. To study this problem, we developed a mouse model in which the FDL tendon is reconstructed using a live autograft or a freeze-dried allograft and identified Gdf5 as a therapeutic target. Here we investigate the potential of rAAV-Gdf5 coated freeze-dried tendon allografts as “therapeutically-endowed” tissue engineering scaffolds to reduce adhesions. In reporter gene studies we demonstrate that rAAV-coated tendon allografts mediate efficient transduction of adjacent soft tissues, with expression peaking at 7-days. We also demonstrate that rAAV-Gdf5 vector significantly accelerates wound healing in an in vitro fibroblast scratch model, and when loaded onto freeze-dried FDL tendon allografts significantly improves the metatarsophalangeal joint flexion compared to rAAV-lacZ controls. Collectively, our data demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of therapeutic tendon allograft processing as a novel paradigm in tissue engineering to address difficult clinical problems such as tendon adhesions. PMID:18180771

  17. Elderly Recipients of Hepatitis C Positive Renal Allografts Can Quickly Develop Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Flohr, Tanya R.; Bonatti, Hugo; Hranjec, Tjasa; Keith, Doug S.; Lobo, Peter I.; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Sawyer, Robert G.; Pruett, Timothy L.; Roberts, John P.; Brayman, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Our institution explored using allografts from donors with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) for elderly renal transplantation (RT). Thirteen HCV− elderly recipients were transplanted with HCV+ allografts (eD+/R−) between January 2003 and April 2009. Ninety HCV− elderly recipients of HCV− allografts (eD−/R−), eight HCV+ recipients of HCV+ allografts (D+/R+) and thirteen HCV+ recipients of HCV− allografts (D−/R+) were also transplanted. Median follow-up was 1.5 (range 0.8–5) years. Seven eD+/R− developed a positive HCV viral load and six had elevated liver transaminases with evidence of hepatitis on biopsy. Overall, eD+/R− survival was 46% while the eD−/R− survival was 85% (P = 0.003). Seven eD+/R− died during follow-up. Causes included multi-organ failure and sepsis (n = 4), cancer (n = 1), failure-to-thrive (n = 1) and surgical complications (n = 1). One eD+/R− died from causes directly related to HCV infection. In conclusion, multiple eD+/R− quickly developed HCV-related liver disease and infections were a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality. PMID:22316669

  18. Effect of two cleaning processes for bone allografts on gentamicin impregnation and in vitro antibiotic release.

    PubMed

    Coraça-Huber, D C; Hausdorfer, J; Fille, M; Steidl, M; Nogler, M

    2013-06-01

    Bone allografts are a useful and sometimes indispensable tool for the surgeon to repair bone defects. Microbial contamination is a major reason for discarding allografts from bone banks. To improve the number of safe allografts, we suggest chemical cleaning of the grafts followed by antibiotic impregnation. Comparison of two chemical cleaning processes for bone allografts aiming for antibiotic impregnation and consequently delivery rates in vitro. Bone chips of 5-10 mm were prepared from human femoral heads. Two cleaning methods (cleaning A and cleaning B) based on solutions containing hydrogen peroxide, paracetic acid, ethanol and biological detergent were carried out and compared. After the cleaning processes, the bone chips were impregnated with gentamicin. Bacillus subtilis bioassay was used to determine the gentamicin release after intervals of 1-7 days. Differences were compared with non-parametric Mann-Whitney U tests. The zones of inhibition obtained from the bone grafts cleaned with both cleaning processes were similar between the groups. The concentration of the released antibiotic was decreasing gradually over time, following a similar pattern for both groups. The cleaning procedure A as well as the cleaning procedure B for bone allografts allowed the impregnation with gentamicin powder in the same concentrations in both groups. The delivery of gentamicin was similar for both groups. Both cleaning procedures were easy to be carried out, making them suitable for routine use at the bone banks. PMID:22581168

  19. Glycerol treatment as recovery procedure for cryopreserved human skin allografts positive for bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Verween, Gunther; De Vos, Daniel; Pascual, Bruno; De Corte, Peter; Richters, Cornelia; De Coninck, Arlette; Roseeuw, Diane; Ectors, Nadine; Rose, Thomas; Jennes, Serge; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2012-03-01

    Human donor skin allografts are suitable and much used temporary biological (burn) wound dressings. They prepare the excised wound bed for final autografting and form an excellent substrate for revascularisation and for the formation of granulation tissue. Two preservation methods, glycerol preservation and cryopreservation, are commonly used by tissue banks for the long-term storage of skin grafts. The burn surgeons of the Queen Astrid Military Hospital preferentially use partly viable cryopreserved skin allografts. After mandatory 14-day bacterial and mycological culture, however, approximately 15% of the cryopreserved skin allografts cannot be released from quarantine because of positive culture. To maximize the use of our scarce and precious donor skin, we developed a glycerolisation-based recovery method for these culture positive cryopreserved allografts. The inactivation and preservation method, described in this paper, allowed for an efficient inactivation of the colonising bacteria and fungi, with the exception of spore-formers, and did not influence the structural and functional aspects of the skin allografts. PMID:21360142

  20. Cartilage restoration of the hip using fresh osteochondral allograft: resurfacing the potholes.

    PubMed

    Khanna, V; Tushinski, D M; Drexler, M; Backstein, D B; Gross, A E; Safir, O A; Kuzyk, P R

    2014-11-01

    Cartilage defects of the hip cause significant pain and may lead to arthritic changes that necessitate hip replacement. We propose the use of fresh osteochondral allografts as an option for the treatment of such defects in young patients. Here we present the results of fresh osteochondral allografts for cartilage defects in 17 patients in a prospective study. The underlying diagnoses for the cartilage defects were osteochondritis dissecans in eight and avascular necrosis in six. Two had Legg-Calve-Perthes and one a femoral head fracture. Pre-operatively, an MRI was used to determine the size of the cartilage defect and the femoral head diameter. All patients underwent surgical hip dislocation with a trochanteric slide osteotomy for placement of the allograft. The mean age at surgery was 25.9 years (17 to 44) and mean follow-up was 41.6 months (3 to 74). The mean Harris hip score was significantly better after surgery (p<0.01) and 13 patients had fair to good outcomes. One patient required a repeat allograft, one patient underwent hip replacement and two patients are awaiting hip replacement. Fresh osteochondral allograft is a reasonable treatment option for hip cartilage defects in young patients. PMID:25381401

  1. Primary bone marrow oedema syndromes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    MRI scanning in patients with rheumatological conditions often shows bone marrow oedema, which can be secondary to inflammatory, degenerative, infective or malignant conditions but can also be primary. The latter condition is of uncertain aetiology and it is also uncertain whether it represents a stage in the progression to osteonecrosis in some patients. Patients with primary bone marrow oedema usually have lower limb pain, commonly the hip, knee, ankle or feet. The diagnosis is one of exclusion with the presence of typical MRI findings. Treatment is usually conservative and includes analgesics and staying off the affected limb. The natural history is that of gradual resolution of symptoms over a number of months. Evidence for medical treatment is limited, but open-label studies suggest bisphosphonates may help in the resolution of pain and improve radiological findings. Surgical decompression is usually used as a last resort. PMID:24080251

  2. Gillick, bone marrow and teenagers.

    PubMed

    Cherkassky, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    The Human Tissue Authority can authorise a bone marrow harvest on a child of any age if a person with parental responsibility consents to the procedure. Older children have the legal capacity to consent to medical procedures under Gillick, but it is unclear if Gillick can be applied to non-therapeutic medical procedures. The relevant donation guidelines state that the High Court shall be consulted in the event of a disagreement, but what is in the best interests of the teenage donor under s.1 of the Children Act 1989? There are no legal authorities on child bone marrow harvests in the United Kingdom. This article considers the best interests of the older saviour sibling and questions whether, for the purposes of welfare, the speculative benefits could outweigh the physical burdens. PMID:25911618

  3. Combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil causes trabecular bone loss, bone marrow cell depletion and marrow adiposity in female rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chiaming; Georgiou, Kristen R; McKinnon, Ross A; Keefe, Dorothy M K; Howe, Peter R C; Xian, Cory J

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of anthracyclines to adjuvant chemotherapy has increased survival rates among breast cancer patients. Cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil (CEF) combination therapy is now one of the preferred regimens for treating node-positive breast cancer due to better survival with less toxicity involved. Despite the increasing use of CEF, its potential in causing adverse skeletal effects remains unclear. Using a mature female rat model mimicking the clinical setting, this study examined the effects of CEF treatment on bone and bone marrow in long bones. Following six cycles of CEF treatment (weekly intravenous injections of cyclophosphamide at 10 mg/kg, epirubicin at 2.5 mg/kg and 5-flurouracil at 10 mg/kg), a significant reduction in trabecular bone volume was observed at the metaphysis, which was associated with a reduced serum level of bone formation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP), increased trends of osteoclast density and osteoclast area at the metaphysis, as well as an increased size of osteoclasts being formed from the bone marrow cells ex vivo. Moreover, a severe reduction of bone marrow cellularity was observed following CEF treatment, which was accompanied by an increase in marrow adipose tissue volume. This increase in marrow adiposity was associated with an expansion in adipocyte size but not in marrow adipocyte density. Overall, this study indicates that six cycles of CEF chemotherapy may induce some bone loss and severe bone marrow damage. Mechanisms for CEF-induced bone/bone marrow pathologies and potential preventive strategies warrant further investigation. PMID:26056019

  4. Sensitized recipients exhibit accelerated but not hyperacute rejection of vascularized composite tissue allografts1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shengli; Xu, Hong; Chen, Bo; Wen, Yujie; Ikusika, Olayemi M; Ocker, Ashley; Zhao, Hong; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, the donor-recipient matching process for vascularized composite tissue allotransplantation (VCTA) closely follows the standard practices for solid organ transplantation. Sensitization is considered a contraindication to VCTA. However, the role of sensitization in VCTA rejection is largely unstudied. Methods Major histocompatibility-mismatched ACI (RT1a) donors and WF (RT1u) recipients were used to determine if sensitization would lead to hyperacute rejection in VCTA as in other organs, such as kidneys. WF rats were presensitized to ACI antigens by skin transplantation and received heterotopic osteomyocutaneous VCTA flaps. Kidney transplants served as controls. Results Production of anti-donor antibody was detected in WF recipients after rejection of the ACI skin grafts. Sensitized WF rats rejected VCTA grafts from ACI rats significantly faster (P < 0.05) than unsensitized recipients, but not hyperacutely. Rejection in the sensitized recipients was not prevented by immunosuppression with FK506 and mycophenolate mofetil. In contrast, kidney allografts from ACI rats were hyperacutely rejected within 30 minutes by sensitized recipients. To confirm the role of antibody-mediated rejection in the sensitized recipients, serum from presensitized rats was adoptively transferred into naïve WF rats. Hyperacute rejection occurred only in transplanted kidneys but not VCTA. Histological examination of tissues from acceleratedly rejected VCTA showed dense lymphocytic infiltrates, and no antibody deposition. Conclusions VCTA are rejected in an accelerated fashion but not hyperacutely in the presence of allosensitization and preformed anti-donor antibody. The rejection of VCTA in sensitized recipients is mainly cell-mediated and differs mechanistically from that for renal transplants. PMID:21822173

  5. Improved Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Using Acellular Nerve Allografts Loaded with Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Canbin; Huang, Xijun; He, Caifeng; Jiang, Li; Quan, Daping

    2014-01-01

    Acellular nerve allografts (ANAs) behave in a similar manner to autografts in supporting axonal regeneration in the repair of short peripheral nerve defects but fail in larger defects. The objective of this article is to evaluate the effect of ANA supplemented with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to improve nerve regeneration after surgical repair and to discuss the mechanisms that underlie this approach. Autologous PRP was obtained from rats by double-step centrifugation and was characterized by determining platelet numbers and the release of growth factors. Forty-eight Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (12/group), identified as autograft, ANA, ANA loaded with PRP (ANA+PRP), and ANA loaded with platelet-poor plasma (PPP, ANA+PPP). All grafts were implanted to bridge long-gap (15 mm) sciatic nerve defects. We found that PRP with a high platelet concentration exhibited a sustained release of growth factors. Twelve weeks after surgery, the autograft group displayed the highest level of reinnervation, followed by the ANA+PRP group. The ANA+PRP group showed a better electrophysiology response for amplitude and conduction velocity than the ANA and ANA+PPP groups. Based on histological evaluation, the ANA+PRP and autograft groups had higher numbers of regenerating nerve fibers. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that PRP boosted expression of neurotrophins in the regenerated nerves. Moreover, the ANA+PRP and autograft groups showed excellent physiological outcomes in terms of the prevention of muscle atrophy. In conclusion, ANAs loaded with PRP as tissue-engineered scaffolds can enhance nerve regeneration and functional recovery after the repair of large nerve gaps nearly as well as autografts. PMID:24901030

  6. Allograft Inflammatory Factor 1 Functions as a Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine in the Oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Liu, Xiao; Wu, Xinzhong

    2014-01-01

    The oyster Crassostrea ariakensis is an economically important bivalve species in China, unfortunately it has suffered severe mortalities in recent years caused by rickettsia-like organism (RLO) infection. Prevention and control of this disease is a priority for the development of oyster aquaculture. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) was identified as a modulator of the immune response during macrophage activation and a key gene in host immune defense reaction and inflammatory response. Therefore we investigated the functions of C. ariakensis AIF-1 (Ca-AIF1) and its antibody (anti-CaAIF1) in oyster RLO/LPS-induced disease and inflammation. Ca-AIF1 encodes a 149 amino acid protein containing two typical Ca2+ binding EF-hand motifs and shares a 48–95% amino acid sequence identity with other animal AIF-1s. Tissue-specific expression analysis indicates that Ca-AIF1 is highly expressed in hemocytes. Significant and continuous up-regulation of Ca-AIF1 is detected when hemocytes are stimulated with RLO/LPS (RLO or LPS). Treatment with recombinant Ca-AIF1 protein significantly up-regulates the expression levels of LITAF, MyD88 and TGFβ. When anti-CaAIF1 antibody is added to RLO/LPS-challenged hemocyte monolayers, a significant reduction of RLO/LPS-induced LITAF is observed at 1.5–12 h after treatment, suggesting that interference with Ca-AIF1 can suppress the inflammatory response. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis indicated that anti-CaAIF1 administration reduces RLO/LPS-induced apoptosis and necrosis rates of hemocytes. Collectively these findings suggest that Ca-AIF1 functions as a pro-inflammatory cytokine in the oyster immune response and is a potential target for controlling RLO infection and LPS-induced inflammation. PMID:24759987

  7. Marrow fat composition in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Bredella, Miriam A.; Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Daley, Scott M.; Miller, Karen K.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Klibanski, Anne; Torriani, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Women with anorexia nervosa (AN) have increased marrow fat despite severe depletion of body fat. Recent studies have suggested that marrow fat composition may serve as a biomarker for bone quality. The purpose of our study was to investigate marrow fat composition of the femur using proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MRS), and the relationship between measures of marrow fat composition and BMD and body composition in women with AN and normal-weight controls. Materials and Methods 14 women with AN (29.5±1.9 years) and 12 age-matched normal-weight controls underwent 1H-MRS to determine total marrow fat content and marrow fat composition of the femoral diaphysis and soleus intramyocellular lipids und unsaturated muscle lipids. MRI was performed to quantify abdominal fat, thigh fat and muscle. Lumbar spine BMD, fat and lean mass were assessed by DXA. Results Subjects with AN had higher marrow fat content (p<0.05), but similar marrow fat composition (p >0.05) compared to normal-weight controls. There was an inverse association between marrow methylene protons, an estimate of fatty acid (FA) saturated bonds, and lumbar spine BMD (r= -0.52, p=0.008) independent of %ideal body weight (%IBW). Olefinic protons at 5.3 ppm, an estimate of FA unsaturated bonds, were inversely associated with body fat depots, independent of %IBW, and positively associated with soleus unsaturation (p≤0.05). Conclusion Women with AN have higher total femoral marrow fat but similar composition compared to normal-weight controls. The degree of marrow FA saturation correlates inversely with BMD, suggesting that saturated lipids may have negative effects on BMD. The degree of marrow FA unsaturation correlates positively with soleus unsaturation, suggesting that marrow fat composition may be influenced by the same factors as ectopic lipid composition in muscle. PMID:24953711

  8. Booster irradiation to the spleen following total body irradiation. A new immunosuppressive approach for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidot, T.; Singer, T.S.; Salomon, O.; Terenzi, A.; Schwartz, E.; Reisner, Y.

    1988-10-15

    Graft rejection presents a major obstacle for transplantation of T cell-depleted bone marrow in HLA-mismatched patients. In a primate model, after conditioning exactly as for leukemia patients, it was shown that over 99% of the residual host clonable T cells are concentrated in the spleen on day 5 after completion of cytoreduction. We have now corroborated these findings in a mouse model. After 9-Gy total body irradiation (TBI), the total number of Thy-1.2+ cells in the spleen reaches a peak between days 3 and 4 after TBI. The T cell population is composed of both L3T4 (helper) and Lyt-2 (suppressor) T cells, the former being the major subpopulation. Specific booster irradiation to the spleen (5 Gy twice) on days 2 and 4 after TBI greatly enhances production of donor-type chimera after transplantation of T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow. Similar enhancement can be achieved by splenectomy on day 3 or 4 after TBI but not if splenectomy is performed 1 day before TBI or 1 day after TBI, strengthening the hypothesis that, after lethal TBI in mice, the remaining host T cells migrate from the periphery to the spleen. These results suggest that a delayed booster irradiation to the spleen may be beneficial as an additional immunosuppressive agent in the conditioning of leukemia patients, in order to reduce the incidence of bone marrow allograft rejection.

  9. Development and characterization of a lung-protective method of bone marrow transplantation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Janssen, William J; Muldrow, Alaina; Kearns, Mark T; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M

    2010-05-31

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is a common method used to study the contribution of myeloid and lymphoid cell populations in murine models of disease. The method requires lethal doses of radiation to ablate the bone marrow. Unintended consequences of radiation include organ injury and inflammatory cell activation. The goal of our study was to determine the degree to which bone marrow transplantation alters lungs and to develop a system to protect the lungs during radiation. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to total body irradiation with 900cGy and then transplanted with bone marrow from green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing mice. Resultant chimeras exhibited a significant decline in alveolar macrophage numbers within 72h, modest influx of neutrophils in the lungs at 14days, and repopulation of the lungs by alveolar macrophages of bone marrow origin by 28days. Neutrophil influx and alveolar macrophage turnover were prevented when 1cm thick lead shields were used to protect the lungs during radiation, such that 8weeks after transplantation less than 30% of alveolar macrophages were of donor origin. Lung-shielded mice achieved a high level of bone marrow engraftment with greater than 95% of circulating leukocytes expressing GFP. In addition, their response to intratracheal lipopolysaccharide was similar to non-transplanted mice. We describe a model whereby lead shields protect resident cell populations in the lungs from radiation during bone marrow transplantation but permit full bone marrow engraftment. This system may be applicable to other organ systems in which protection from radiation during bone marrow transplantation is desired. PMID:20347833

  10. Immunomodulatory Effects of Different Cellular Therapies of Bone Marrow Origin on Chimerism Induction and Maintenance Across MHC Barriers in a Face Allotransplantation Model.

    PubMed

    Hivelin, Mikael; Klimczak, Aleksandra; Cwykiel, Joanna; Sonmez, Erhan; Nasir, Serdar; Gatherwright, James; Siemionow, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Many more patients would benefit from vascularized composite allotransplantation if less toxic and safer immunosuppressive protocols will become available. Tolerance induction protocols with donor cells co-transplantation are one of the promising pathways to reduce maintenance immunosupressive regimens. We investigated the role of donor bone marrow cells (BMC), mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and in vivo created chimeric cells (CC) used as supportive therapies in a fully MHC-mismatched rat face transplantation model. Twenty-four fully MHC-mismatched hemiface transplantations were performed between ACI (RT1(a)) donors and Lewis (RT1(l)) recipients under combined seven-day immunosuppressive regimen of anti-αβ-T-cell receptor (TCR) monoclonal antibody and cyclosporin A. We studied four experimental groups-group 1: no cellular therapy; group 2: supportive therapy with BMC; group 3: supportive therapy with MSC; group 4: supportive therapy with CC generated in a primary chimera. We evaluated clinical and histological rejection grades, transplanted cells migration, donor-specific chimerism in the peripheral blood and bone marrow compartments, and CD4(+)/CD25(+) T-cell levels. Face allograft rejection was observed at 26.8 ± 0.6 days post-transplant (PT) in the absence of cellular therapy, at 34.5 ± 1.1 days for group 2, 29.3 ± 0.8 days for group 3, and 30.3 ± 1.38 PT for group 4. The longest survival was observed in allografts supported by co-transplantation of BMC. All support in cellular therapies delayed face allograft rejection by chimerism induction and/or immunomodulatory properties of co-transplanted cells. Survival time was comparable between groups, however, further studies, with different cell dosages, delivery routes and delivery times are required. PMID:26708158

  11. International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation working formulation of a standardized nomenclature for cardiac allograft vasculopathy-2010.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Dipchand, Anne; Ensminger, Stephan M; Hiemann, Nicola E; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Madsen, Joren; Parameshwar, Jayan; Starling, Randall C; Uber, Patricia A

    2010-07-01

    The development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy remains the Achilles heel of cardiac transplantation. Unfortunately, the definitions of cardiac allograft vasculopathy are diverse, and there are no uniform international standards for the nomenclature of this entity. This consensus document, commissioned by the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation Board, is based on best evidence and clinical consensus derived from critical analysis of available information pertaining to angiography, intravascular ultrasound imaging, microvascular function, cardiac allograft histology, circulating immune markers, non-invasive imaging tests, and gene-based and protein-based biomarkers. This document represents a working formulation for an international nomenclature of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, similar to the development of the system for adjudication of cardiac allograft rejection by histology. PMID:20620917

  12. SPECT- and PET-Based Approaches for Noninvasive Diagnosis of Acute Renal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Pawelski, Helga; Schnöckel, Uta; Kentrup, Dominik; Grabner, Alexander; Schäfers, Michael; Reuter, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography are promising tools for noninvasive diagnosis of acute allograft rejection (AR). Given the importance of renal transplantation and the limitation of available donors, detailed analysis of factors that affect transplant survival is important. Episodes of acute allograft rejection are a negative prognostic factor for long-term graft survival. Invasive core needle biopsies are still the “goldstandard” in rejection diagnostics. Nevertheless, they are cumbersome to the patient and carry the risk of significant graft injury. Notably, they cannot be performed on patients taking anticoagulant drugs. Therefore, a noninvasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review SPECT- and PET-based approaches for noninvasive molecular imaging-based diagnostics of acute transplant rejection. PMID:24804257

  13. The mechanical stability of allografts after a cleaning process: comparison of two preparation modes.

    PubMed

    Putzer, David; Huber, Debora Coraca; Wurm, Alexander; Schmoelz, Werner; Nogler, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In revision hip arthroplasty, bone loss can be compensated by impacting allograft material. Cleaning processes reduce the risk of bacterial and viral contamination. Cleaned allograft material was compared to native untreated allografts by using a uniaxial compression test. 30 measurements were performed for each group before and after compaction. Grain size distribution and weight loss were determined. A reduction in the amount of large bone fragments and a higher compaction rate were observed in the cleaned bone grafts. The cleaned bone chips presented with a better mechanical resistance to a compression force and a reduced flowability. The benefit of a cleaner and a mechanical stable graft material comes with the drawback that higher initial amounts of graft material are needed. PMID:24793889

  14. Allograft tolerance induced by donor apoptotic lymphocytes requires phagocytosis in the recipient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, E.; Gao, Y.; Chen, J.; Roberts, A. I.; Wang, X.; Chen, Z.; Shi, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Cell death through apoptosis plays a critical role in regulating cellular homeostasis. Whether the disposal of apoptotic cells through phagocytosis can actively induce immune tolerance in vivo, however, remains controversial. Here, we report in a rat model that without using immunosuppressants, transfusion of apoptotic splenocytes from the donor strain prior to transplant dramatically prolonged survival of heart allografts. Histological analysis verified that rejection signs were significantly ameliorated. Splenocytes from rats transfused with donor apoptotic cells showed a dramatically decreased response to donor lymphocyte stimulation. Most importantly, blockade of phagocytosis in vivo, either with gadolinium chloride to disrupt phagocyte function or with annexin V to block binding of exposed phosphotidylserine to its receptor on phagocytes, abolished the beneficial effect of transfused apoptotic cells on heart allograft survival. Our results demonstrate that donor apoptotic cells promote specific allograft acceptance and that phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in vivo plays a crucial role in maintaining immune tolerance.

  15. Allograft tolerance induced by donor apoptotic lymphocytes requires phagocytosis in the recipient.

    PubMed

    Sun, E; Gao, Y; Chen, J; Roberts, A I; Wang, X; Chen, Z; Shi, Y

    2004-12-01

    Cell death through apoptosis plays a critical role in regulating cellular homeostasis. Whether the disposal of apoptotic cells through phagocytosis can actively induce immune tolerance in vivo, however, remains controversial. Here, we report in a rat model that without using immunosuppressants, transfusion of apoptotic splenocytes from the donor strain prior to transplant dramatically prolonged survival of heart allografts. Histological analysis verified that rejection signs were significantly ameliorated. Splenocytes from rats transfused with donor apoptotic cells showed a dramatically decreased response to donor lymphocyte stimulation. Most importantly, blockade of phagocytosis in vivo, either with gadolinium chloride to disrupt phagocyte function or with annexin V to block binding of exposed phosphotidylserine to its receptor on phagocytes, abolished the beneficial effect of transfused apoptotic cells on heart allograft survival. Our results demonstrate that donor apoptotic cells promote specific allograft acceptance and that phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in vivo plays a crucial role in maintaining immune tolerance. PMID:15375386

  16. Ligament reconstruction with tendon interposition using an acellular dermal allograft for thumb carpometacarpal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Zanaros, George; Sotereanos, Dean G

    2009-03-01

    Ligament reconstruction tendon interposition arthroplasty is currently the preferred technique for carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb by most surgeons. Despite its efficacy, morbidity has been associated with the harvest of the flexor carpi radialis tendon. Using an allograft as material for arthroplasty, donor site morbidity is avoided. In this report, we present our surgical technique to perform ligament reconstruction tendon interposition arthroplasty using an acellular dermal matrix allograft (GraftJacket) in patients with Eaton stages II, III, and IV symptomatic first carpometacarpal arthritis.One hundred thumbs with trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis underwent surgical treatment using GraftJacket allograft instead of the flexor carpi radialis tendon autograft. Each patient was followed for a minimum of 12 months. The surgical procedure included trapezial excision and identification of the flexor carpi radialis. The allograft was cut to create a 15-cm strip. The ligament reconstruction was performed by passing the strip around the flexor carpi radialis tendon and suturing it to the base of the thumb metacarpal base through an intramedullary drill hole. The remaining portion of the allograft was fashioned as an interposition mass (anchovy) and interposed between the scaphoid and the base of the first metacarpal.All but 1 patient experienced significant improvement in his or her pain scale rating and grip and pinch strengths. Outcomes from this study compare very favorably with those of other series. No patients experienced a foreign body reaction or infection in this series. We believe that the use of an acellular dermal allograft for both ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition provides a safe and an effective alternative technique for the treatment of advanced first carpometacarpal arthritis. PMID:19276927

  17. Comparison of Clinical Outcome of Autograft and Allograft Reconstruction for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yu-Hua; Sun, Peng-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hamstring (HS) autograft and bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft are the most common choice for reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). There was a little report about the clinical outcome and difference of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using allograft and autograft. This study aimed to compare the clinical outcome of autograft and allograft reconstruction for ACL tears. Methods: A total of 106 patients who underwent surgery because of ACL tear were included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups, including 53 patients in each group. The patients in group I underwent standard ACL reconstruction with HS tendon autografts, while others in group II underwent reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft. All the patients were followed up and analyzed; the mean follow-up was 81 months (range: 28–86 months). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, and patient satisfaction questionnaires. The complication rates of both groups were compared. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening were assessed using lateral and anteroposterior radiographs. Results: At the end of follow-up, no significant differences were found between the groups in terms of IKDC, Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, patient satisfaction questionnaires, and incidences of arthrofibrosis. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening was less in the HS tendon autografts. This difference was more significant on the tibial side. Conclusions: In the repair of ACL tears, allograft reconstruction is as effective as the autograft reconstruction, but the allograft can lead to more tunnel widening evidently in the tibial tunnel, particularly. PMID:26612290

  18. Penetrating Blast Injury to the Knee of a United States Soldier Treated with Allograft Mosaicplasty

    PubMed Central

    Eichinger, Maj. Josef K.; Bluman, Eric M.; Arrington, Col. Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This is the first report of successful allograft mosaicplasty treatment of a large osteochondral lesion of the knee caused by a blast fragment sustained during combat operations. The patient was able to return to active duty following rehabilitation. Methods: An active-duty infantryman sustained an osteochondral lesion of the medial femoral condyle caused by a metallic fragment of an explosively formed projectile. Initial treatment consisted of removal of the foreign body and primary closure. The patient continued to experience pain, mechanical symptoms, and repeated effusions after initial nonoperative treatment. Allograft mosaicplasty of the lesion utilizing two 18-mm-diameter fresh allograft osteochondral plugs was performed at 6 months post-injury. Results: At 2-year follow-up, the patient remains on active duty with marked improvement in symptoms. Two years postoperatively, his outcome scores are 72 of 100 on the Western Ontario and McMaster University osteoarthritis scoring index (WOMAC) and 60 of 100 on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). His follow-up x-rays and MRI demonstrate intact articular cartilage and subchondral bone incorporation. Conclusion: Penetrating injuries to joints are commonplace in the battlefield environment. Combat injuries to the knee are frequently associated with articular cartilage injury. While numerous cartilage restoration techniques have been used with success for the treatment of osteochondral injuries to the femoral condyles, no published reports describe the use of allograft mosaicplasty in this location for open, penetrating injuries with focal cartilage loss. This is the first documented use of allograft mosaicplasty for a traumatic osteochondral defect of the medial femoral condyle caused by a metallic projectile. The patient was able to return to active duty following rehabilitation. We demonstrate a high level of functioning is possible following allograft mosaicplasty of a large

  19. Novel action of 3,4-DAA ameliorating acute liver allograft injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing-Feng; Ding, Ji-Guang; Sheng, Ji-Fang; Zhu, Man-Hua; Li, Jun-Jie; Sheng, Zi-Ke; Tang, Xiao-Feng

    2011-12-01

    The anti-allergic drug, N-(3,4-dimethoxycinnamonyl) anthranilic acid (3,4-DAA), is a synthetic anthranilic acid derivative that has been used therapeutically in Japan for many years. In this study, to investigate the effects of 3,4-DAA in allograft immunorejection model, liver orthotopic transplants were performed using inbred male Dark Agouti donors and Lewis rat recipients (allografts). The levels of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenases (IDO) enzymic activities in five groups, allografts (control), dimethyl sulphoxide-treated group (vehicle control), 200 mg·kg(-1) ·day(-1) of 3,4-DAA-treated group and 200 mg·kg(-1) ·day(-1) of 3,4-DAA + 5 mg·ml(-1) of 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (1-MT)-treated group were confirmed by determination of L-kynurenine (L-Kyn) concentrations. The serum alanine aminotransferase levels in 3,4-DAA-treated rats significantly decreased compared with those in mock and control group, whereas treatment of 1-MT in allografts led to the opposite effect. Administration of 3,4-DAA reduced histological severity of allograft immunorejection, decreased serum levels of cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and raised serum levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10), suggesting that 3,4-DAA has both anti-inflammatory and anti-immunorejection properties through IDO in immune regulation and may therefore be useful in filling an unmet need, in the treatment of allograft immunorejection. PMID:21932299

  20. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin G deposits complicated by immunoglobulin A nephropathy in the renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Anri; Kawanishi, Kunio; Horita, Shigeru; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Ochi, Ayami; Komoda, Mizuki; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Unagami, Kohei; Okumi, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) A nephropathy (IgAN) is a known autoimmune disease due to abnormal glycosylation of IgA1, and occasionally, IgG co-deposition occurs. The prognosis of IgG co-deposition with IgAN is adverse, as shown in the previous studies. However, in the clinical setting, monoclonality of IgG co-deposition with IgAN has not been observed. We describe a case of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) combined with IgAN in a renal allograft. A-21-year-old man developed end-stage renal failure with unknown aetiology and underwent living-donor kidney transplantation from his mother 2 years after being diagnosed. One year after kidney transplantation, proteinuria 2+ and haematuria 2+ were detected; allograft biopsy revealed mesangial IgA and C3 deposits, indicating a diagnosis of IgAN. After tonsillectomy and steroid pulse therapy, proteinuria and haematuria resolved. However, 4 years after transplantation, pedal oedema, proteinuria (6.89 g/day) and allograft dysfunction (serum creatinine (sCr) 203.3 µmol/L) appeared. A second allograft biopsy showed mesangial expansion and focal segmental proliferative endocapillary lesions with IgA1λ and monoclonal IgG1κ depositions. Electron microscopic analysis revealed a massive amount of deposits, located in the mesangial and subendothelial lesions. A diagnosis of PGNMID complicated with IgAN was made, and rituximab and plasmapheresis were added to steroid pulse therapy. With this treatment, proteinuria was alleviated to 0.5 g/day, and the allograft dysfunction recovered to sCr 132.6 µmol/L. This case suggests a necessity for investigation of PGNMID and IgA nephropathy in renal allografts to detect monoclonal Ig deposition disease. PMID:26971743

  1. Use of indium-111-labeled cells in measurement of cellular dynamics of experimental cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.; Wang, T.; Fawwaz, R.; Satake, K.; Nowygrod, R.; Reemtsma, K.; Hardy, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    This study evaluates the kinetics and utility of infused indium-111-labeled cells in detecting rejection in ACI to Lewis rat heart allografts. Syngeneic leukocytes, lymph node lymphocytes, and platelets were isolated and labeled with indium-111 (/sup 111/In) oxine, respectively, and were infused i.v. into Lewis rats carrying beating ACI or syngeneic hearts from post-transplant days 0 to 6. Recipients were imaged serially at 24 hr after infusion of labeled cells followed by excision of both native and transplanted hearts for direct isotope count. Labeled leukocytes accumulative progressively in the allograft with the scan becoming positive by post-transplant day 4. The ratio of allograft to native heart isotope counts rose from 1.25 on day 1 to 10.07 (P less than 0.0001) on day 7. The Lewis recipients infused with labeled lymphocytes showed a positive scan on days 6 and 7 whereas the allograft to native heart isotope count ratio rose from 0.97 on day 1 to 5.33 (P less than 0.001) on day 7. Recipients infused with /sup 111/In-labeled platelets showed a positive scan on days 5 to 7 and the allograft to native heart isotope count ratio rose sharply from 2.56 on day 4 to 16.98 (P less than 0.005) on day 7. Syngeneic heart grafts failed to demonstrate significant accumulation of any of the labeled cell population. These studies confirm the importance of nonlymphocytic cells in cellular rejection, evaluate the kinetics of graft invasion by the various cell types, and suggest that the techniques used afford a method for a safe and an early detection of allograft rejection.

  2. Donor Graft Steatosis Influences Immunity to Hepatitis C Virus and Allograft Outcome After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Vijay; Seetharam, Anil B; Vachharajani, Neeta; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Angaswamy, Nataraju; Ramachandran, Sabarinathan; Crippin, Jeffrey S; Shenoy, Surendra; Chapman, William C; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Anderson, Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C (HCV) recurrence following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is universal, often with accelerated allograft fibrosis. Donor liver steatosis is frequently encountered and often associated with poor early post-operative outcome. The study’s aim was to test the hypothesis that allograft steatosis alters immune responses to HCV and self-antigens promoting allograft fibrosis. Methods Forty-eight HCV OLT recipients (OLTr) were enrolled and classified based on amount of allograft macrovesicular steatosis at time of OLT. Group 1-No Steatosis (0–5% steatosis, n=21), Group 2 – Mild (5–35% - n=16), Group 3 – moderate (>35%, n=11). Cells secreting IL-17, IL-10, IFN-γ in response to HCV antigens were enumerated by ELISpot. Serum cytokines were measured by Luminex, antibodies (Abs) to Collagen (Col) I, II, III, IV, V by ELISA. Results OLTr of moderate steatotic grafts had the highest incidence of advanced fibrosis in protocol one-year post-OLT biopsy (10.8% vs. 15.8% vs. 36.6%, r = 0.157, p<0.05). OLTr from Groups 2 and 3 had increased HCV specific IL-17 (p<0.05) and IL-10 (p<0.05) with reduced IFN-γ (p<0.05) secreting cells when compared to group 1. This was associated with increase in serum IL-17, IL-10, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-5 and decreased IFN-γ. In addition, there was development of Abs to Col I, II, III and V in OLTr with increased steatosis (p<0.05). Conclusion The results demonstrate that allograft steatosis influences post-OLT HCV specific immune responses leading to a IL-17 T-helper response and activation of humoral immune responses to liver associated self antigens which may contribute to allograft fibrosis and poor outcome. PMID:22011763

  3. Autograft versus sterilized allograft for lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies: Comparison of 50 patients.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sebastian A; Barg, Alexej; Vavken, Patrick; Valderrabano, Victor; Müller, Andreas M

    2016-07-01

    Sterilized allografts may be less resistant to collapse and prone to nonunion leading to loss of correction in open wedge osteotomies. These adverse events usually occur at early time points (i.e., < 9 months postoperatively). The goal of this study was to compare sterilized allografts to autologous grafts in respect to secondary loss of hindfoot alignment and graft incorporation after lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies.Fifty patients (22 F/ 28 M, age: 16-69 years) who had undergone 50 lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies for adult flatfoot deformity were included in this retrospective study. Cortical sterilized allografts were used in 25 patients, autologous grafts in the remaining 25. Patients' preoperative, 6 and 12 weeks, and 6 to 9 months follow-up weight-bearing radiographs of the affected foot were analyzed by 2 blinded radiologists: on each radiograph, graft incorporation, the talo-first metatarsal angle (TFMA), the talo-navicular coverage angle (TNCA), and the calcaneal pitch angle (CPA) were assessed. Loss of hindfoot alignment was defined as an increase of the TFMA or the TNCA or a decrease of the CPA, each by 5°.Inter- and intraclass correlation coefficients for TFMA, TNCA, and CPA measurements ranged from 0.93 to 0.99. At all follow-up visits, the ratio of patients with loss of hindfoot alignment and graft incorporation was not significantly different between the allograft and autograft group. However, loss of correction was associated with failure of graft incorporation.Compared with autografts, sterilized allografts do not increase the risk for loss of hindfoot alignment in lateral column lengthening of the calcaneus. With respect to mechanical resistance, allografts thus mean an equal and valid alternative without risk of donor site morbidities. PMID:27472719

  4. Anti‑migratory effect of rapamycin impairs allograft imaging by 18F‑fluorodeoxyglucose‑labeled splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hukui; Cheng, Dayan; Ma, Yuanyuan; Liu, Hong; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Cong; Wang, Kai; Hou, Guihua; Wang, Huaiquan

    2016-09-01

    Tracking lymphocyte migration is an emerging strategy for non‑invasive nuclear imaging of allografts; however, its clinical application remains to be fully demonstrated. In the present study, the feasibility of using rapamycin‑treated 18F‑fluorodeoxyglucose (18F‑FDG)‑labeled splenocytes for the in vivo imaging of allografts was evaluated. C57BL/6 skin was heterotopically transplanted onto non‑obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient recipient mice. BALB/c 18F‑FDG‑labeled splenocytes with or without rapamycin pretreatment (designated as FR and FC cells, respectively) were transferred into recipient mice 30 days later. Imaging of radiolabeled cells in the skin grafts was conducted through in vivo dynamic whole‑body phosphor‑autoradiography and histological analysis. Notably, rapamycin impaired the migration of 18F‑FDG‑labeled splenocytes to the graft. At all time points, the radioactivity of allografts (digital light units/mm2) was significantly lower in the group that received FR cells, compared with the group that received FC cells (P<0.01). Furthermore, the peak allograft to native skin ratio was 1.29±0.02 at 60 min for the FR group and 3.29±0.17 at 30 min for the FC group (P<0.001). In addition, the in vivo radioactivity of the allografts was observed to be correlated with the transferred cells, which were observed histologically (r2=0.887; P<0.0001). Although 18F‑FDG‑labeled splenocytes migrated to the allograft, imaging of these cells may not be possible in the presence of rapamycin. PMID:27432554

  5. Impaired elastin deposition in Fstl1-/- lung allograft under the renal capsule.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yan; Li, Lian; Dong, Yingying; Liu, Xue; Li, Xiao-He; Ning, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Lung alveolar development in late gestation is a process important to postnatal survival. Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1) is a matricellular protein of the Bmp antagonist class, which is involved in the differentiation/maturation of alveolar epithelial cells during saccular stage of lung development. This study investigates the role of Fstl1 on elastin deposition in mesenchyme and subsequent secondary septation in the late gestation stage of terminal saccular formation. To this aim, we modified the renal capsule allograft model for lung organ culture by grafting diced E15.5 distal lung underneath the renal capsule of syngeneic host and cultured up to 7 days. The saccular development of the diced lung allografts, as indicated by the morphology, epithelial and vascular developments, occurred in a manner similar to that in utero. Fstl1 deficiency caused atelectatic phenotype companied by impaired epithelial differentiation in D3 Fstl1(-/-) lung allografts, which is similar to that of E18.5 Fstl1(-/-) lungs, supporting the role of Fstl1 during saccular stage. Inhibition of Bmp signaling by intraperitoneal injection of dorsomorphin in the host mice rescued the pulmonary atelectasis of D3 Fstl1(-/-) allografts. Furthermore, a marked reduction in elastin expression and deposition was observed in walls of air sacs of E18.5 Fstl1(-/-) lungs and at the tips of the developing alveolar septae of D7 Fstl1(-/-) allografts. Thus, in addition to its role on alveolar epithelium, Fstl1 is crucial for elastin expression and deposition in mesenchyme during lung alveologenesis. Our data demonstrates that the modified renal capsule allograft model for lung organ culture is a robust and efficient technique to increase our understanding of saccular stage of lung development. PMID:24282586

  6. Sterilisation of canine anterior cruciate allografts by gamma irradiation in argon. Mechanical and neurohistological properties retained one year after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, M J; Clahsen, H; Bürrig, K F; Schulitz, K P

    1995-03-01

    Bone-ACL-bone allograft transplantation is a potential solution to the problem of reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), but sterilisation by gamma irradiation or ethylene oxide causes degradation of the graft. We have studied the biomechanical and histological properties of deep-frozen canine bone-ACL-bone allografts sterilised by gamma irradiation (2.5 Mrad) under argon gas protection. Particular attention was paid to their collagen structure and neuroanatomy compared with those of non-irradiated allografts. We used 60 skeletally mature foxhounds. In 30 animals one ACL was replaced by an irradiated allograft and in the other 30 a non-irradiated graft was used. In both groups the graft was augmented by a Kennedy Ligament Augmentation Device. Examination of the allografts at 3, 6 and 12 months after implantation included mechanical testing, histology, collagen morphometry, neuroanatomical morphology (silver and gold chloride stain) and studies of the microvasculature (modified Spalteholz technique). At 12 months the irradiated ACL allografts failed at a mean maximum load of 718.3 N, 63.8% of the strength of the normal canine ACL. The non-irradiated allografts failed at 780.1 N, 69.1% of normal. All the allografts showed a well-orientated collagen structure one year after transplantation and there was no difference between the irradiated grafts and the others. The silver staining technique demonstrated Golgi tendon organs and free nerve endings within both groups of allografts. As in the normal ACL these structures were most commonly found near the surface of the graft and at its bony attachments. At 12 months the irradiated allografts showed slight hypervascularity compared with the non-irradiated grafts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7706332

  7. Comparison of medial versus lateral meniscus allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo; Liang, Jie; Ru, Neng; Li, Yu-Peng; Shang, Zheng-Hui; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To perform a literature review and meta-analysis evaluating the effectiveness of medial and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT). Methods: The literature review and meta-analysis were conducted between August and October 2015 in the People’s Hospital of China Three Gorges University, Yi Chang, China. A systematic search was performed in the Medline and EMBASE databases, and the Cochrane Library for relevant literature published through October 2015. The outcomes of the included studies were analyzed in terms of the Lysholm Score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Score, Knee Injury And Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Tegner Activity Score, MRI results, and failure rates. An adapted version of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used for the methodological quality assessment in the meta-analyses. Results: The literature review identified 12 observational studies, including 7 retrospective studies, 4 prospective studies, and the nature of one study was not reported. Significant differences in the outcomes of the lateral MAT group and the medial MAT group were observed in the IKDC scores, KOOS pain values, KOOS activities of daily living (ADL) values, and the absolute and relative extrusions observed on MRI, which suggested that the lateral MAT patients experienced superior clinical benefits compared with the medial MAT patients. However, significant differences between the lateral MAT group and the medial MAT group were not observed with regards to the Lysholm Scores, KOOS symptom values, KOOS sports and recreations values, KOOS quality of life (QOL) values, Tegner Activity Scores, VAS for pain values, and failure rates. Conclusion: The analysis results indicated that lateral MAT provides superior clinical outcomes compared with medial MAT according to the KOOS and IKDC scores. In addition, greater graft extrusion was observed in the medial group on MRI. Although significant differences were not

  8. Detection and measurement of tubulitis in renal allograft rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, John B.; Chen, Qi; Jin, Jesse S.; Wang, Yung; Yong, James L. C.

    1997-04-01

    Tubulitis is one of the most reliable signs of acute renal allograft rejection. It occurs when mononuclear cells are localized between the lining tubular epithelial cells with or without disruption of the tubular basement membrane. It has been found that tubulitis takes place predominantly in the regions of the distal convoluted tubules and the cortical collecting system. The image processing tasks are to find the tubule boundaries and to find the relative location of the lymphocytes and epithelial cells and tubule boundaries. The requirement for accuracy applies to determining the relative locations of the lymphocytes and the tubule boundaries. This paper will show how the different sizes and grey values of the lymphocytes and epithelial cells simplify their identification and location. Difficulties in finding the tubule boundaries image processing will be illustrated. It will be shown how proximate location of epithelial cells and the tubule boundary leads to distortion in determination of the calculated boundary. However, in tubulitis the lymphocytes and the tubule boundaries are proximate.In these cases the tubule boundary is adequately resolved and the image processing is satisfactory to determining relativity in location. An adaptive non-linear anisotropic diffusion process is presented for image filtering and segmentation. Multi-layer analysis is used to extract lymphocytes and tubulitis from images. This paper will discuss grading of tissue using the Banff system. The ability to use computer to use computer processing will be argued as obviating problems of reproducability of values for this classification. This paper will also feature discussion of alternative approaches to image processing and provide an assessment of their capability for improving the identification of the tubule boundaries.

  9. High-risk corneal allografts: A therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian; Rajendran, Vijayalakshmi; Griffith, May; Forrester, John V; Kuffová, Lucia

    2016-03-24

    Corneal transplantation is the most common surgical procedure amongst solid organ transplants with a high survival rate of 86% at 1-year post-grafting. This high success rate has been attributed to the immune privilege of the eye. However, mechanisms originally thought to promote immune privilege, such as the lack of antigen presenting cells and vessels in the cornea, are challenged by recent studies. Nevertheless, the immunological and physiological features of the cornea promoting a relatively weak alloimmune response is likely responsible for the high survival rate in "low-risk" settings. Furthermore, although corneal graft survival in "low-risk" recipients is favourable, the prognosis in "high-risk" recipients for corneal graft is poor. In "high-risk" grafts, the process of indirect allorecognition is accelerated by the enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses due to pre-existing inflammation and neovascularization of the host bed. This leads to the irreversible rejection of the allograft and ultimately graft failure. Many therapeutic measures are being tested in pre-clinical and clinical studies to counter the immunological challenge of "high-risk" recipients. Despite the prevailing dogma, recent data suggest that tissue matching together with use of systemic immunosuppression may increase the likelihood of graft acceptance in "high-risk" recipients. However, immunosuppressive drugs are accompanied with intolerance/side effects and toxicity, and therefore, novel cell-based therapies are in development which target host immune cells and restore immune homeostasis without significant side effect of treatment. In addition, developments in regenerative medicine may be able to solve both important short comings of allotransplantation: (1) graft rejection and ultimate graft failure; and (2) the lack of suitable donor corneas. The advances in technology and research indicate that wider therapeutic choices for patients may be available to address the worldwide

  10. Immunology of Corneal Allografts: Insights from Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2015-01-01

    Corneal transplantation stands alone as the most common and successful form of solid organ transplantation. Even though HLA matching and systemic antirejection drugs are not routinely used, 90% of the first time corneal allografts will succeed. By contrast, all other major categories of organ transplantation require HLA matching and the use of systemically administered immunosuppressive drugs. This remarkable success of corneal transplants under these conditions is an example of “immune privilege” and is the primary reason for the extraordinary success of corneal transplantation. A number of dogmas have emerged over the past century to explain immune privilege and the immunobiology of corneal transplantation. Many of these dogmas have been based largely on inferences from clinical observations on keratoplasty patients. The past 30 years have witnessed a wealth of rodent studies on corneal transplantation that have tested hypotheses and dogmas that originated from clinical observations on penetrating keratoplasty patients. Rodent models allow the application of highly sophisticated genetic and immunological tools for testing these hypotheses in a controlled environment and with experiments designed prospectively. These studies have validated some of the widely held assumptions based on clinical observations and in other cases, previous dogmas have been replaced with new insights that could only come from prospective studies performed under highly controlled conditions. This review highlights some of the key dogmas and these widely held assumptions that have been scrutinized through the use of rodent models of penetrating keratoplasty. This review also makes note of new immunological principles of corneal immunology that have emerged from rodent studies on corneal transplantation that most likely would not have been revealed in studies on corneal transplantation patients. PMID:26301126

  11. High-risk corneal allografts: A therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tian; Rajendran, Vijayalakshmi; Griffith, May; Forrester, John V; Kuffová, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most common surgical procedure amongst solid organ transplants with a high survival rate of 86% at 1-year post-grafting. This high success rate has been attributed to the immune privilege of the eye. However, mechanisms originally thought to promote immune privilege, such as the lack of antigen presenting cells and vessels in the cornea, are challenged by recent studies. Nevertheless, the immunological and physiological features of the cornea promoting a relatively weak alloimmune response is likely responsible for the high survival rate in “low-risk” settings. Furthermore, although corneal graft survival in “low-risk” recipients is favourable, the prognosis in “high-risk” recipients for corneal graft is poor. In “high-risk” grafts, the process of indirect allorecognition is accelerated by the enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses due to pre-existing inflammation and neovascularization of the host bed. This leads to the irreversible rejection of the allograft and ultimately graft failure. Many therapeutic measures are being tested in pre-clinical and clinical studies to counter the immunological challenge of “high-risk” recipients. Despite the prevailing dogma, recent data suggest that tissue matching together with use of systemic immunosuppression may increase the likelihood of graft acceptance in “high-risk” recipients. However, immunosuppressive drugs are accompanied with intolerance/side effects and toxicity, and therefore, novel cell-based therapies are in development which target host immune cells and restore immune homeostasis without significant side effect of treatment. In addition, developments in regenerative medicine may be able to solve both important short comings of allotransplantation: (1) graft rejection and ultimate graft failure; and (2) the lack of suitable donor corneas. The advances in technology and research indicate that wider therapeutic choices for patients may be available to

  12. Clinical Allograft of a Calcaneal Tendon in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Lemoy, Marie-Josee; Summers, Laura; Colagross-Schouten, Angela

    2014-01-01

    A 5.5-y-old male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) housed in an outdoor field cage presented for severe trauma involving the left calcaneal tendon. Part of the management of this wound included an allograft of the calcaneal tendon from an animal that was euthanized for medical reasons. This case report describes the successful medical and surgical management of a macaque with a significant void of the calcaneal tendon. To our knowledge, this report is the first description of a successful tendon allograft in a rhesus macaque for clinical purposes. PMID:25255076

  13. Preclinical Evaluation of Zoledronate to Maintain Bone Allograft and Improve Implant Fixation in Revision Joint Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Mette; Barckman, Jeppe; Bechtold, Joan E.; Søballe, Kjeld; Baas, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Revision arthroplasty surgery is often complicated by loss of bone stock that can be managed by the use of bone allograft. The allograft provides immediate stability for the revision implant but may be resorbed, impairing subsequent implant stability. Bisphosphonates can delay allograft resorption. We hypothesized that zoledronate-impregnated allograft impacted around revision implants would improve implant fixation as characterized by mechanical push-out testing and histomorphometry. Methods: Twenty-four axially pistoning micromotion devices were inserted bilaterally into the knees of twelve dogs according to our revision protocol. This produced a standardized revision cavity with a loose implant, fibrous tissue, and a sclerotic bone rim. Revision surgery was performed eight weeks later; after stable titanium revision components were implanted, saline solution-soaked allograft was impacted around the component on the control side and allograft soaked in 0.005 mg/mL zoledronate was impacted on the intervention side. The results were evaluated after four weeks. Results: The zoledronate treatment resulted in a 30% increase in ultimate shear strength (p = 0.023), a 54% increase in apparent shear stiffness (p = 0.002), and a 12% increase in total energy absorption (p = 0.444). The quantity of allograft in the gap was three times greater in the zoledronate group compared with the control group (p < 0.001). The volume fraction of new bone in the zoledronate group (25%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 22% to 28%) was similar to that in the control group (23%; 95% CI, 19% to 26%) (p = 0.311). Conclusions: The data obtained in this canine model suggest that pretreating allograft with zoledronate may be beneficial for early stability of grafted revision arthroplasty implants, without any adverse effect on bone formation. Clinical studies are warranted. Clinical Relevance: The zoledronate treatment is simple to apply in the clinical setting. The treatment could

  14. Arthroscopic Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Soft-Tissue Fixation Through Bone Tunnels

    PubMed Central

    Spalding, Tim; Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nick A.; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation improves clinical outcomes for patients with symptomatic meniscus-deficient knees. We describe an established arthroscopic technique for meniscal allograft transplantation without the need for bone fixation of the meniscal horns. After preparation of the meniscal bed, the meniscus is parachuted into the knee through a silicone cannula and the meniscal horns are fixed with sutures through bone tunnels. The body of the meniscus is then fixed with a combination of all-inside and inside-out sutures. This technique is reliable and reproducible and has clinical outcomes comparable with those of bone plug fixation techniques. PMID:26900554

  15. Arthroscopic Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Soft-Tissue Fixation Through Bone Tunnels.

    PubMed

    Spalding, Tim; Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nick A; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation improves clinical outcomes for patients with symptomatic meniscus-deficient knees. We describe an established arthroscopic technique for meniscal allograft transplantation without the need for bone fixation of the meniscal horns. After preparation of the meniscal bed, the meniscus is parachuted into the knee through a silicone cannula and the meniscal horns are fixed with sutures through bone tunnels. The body of the meniscus is then fixed with a combination of all-inside and inside-out sutures. This technique is reliable and reproducible and has clinical outcomes comparable with those of bone plug fixation techniques. PMID:26900554

  16. The influence of vascularization of transplanted processed allograft nerve on return of motor function in rats.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Guilherme; Lee, Joo-Yup; Kremer, Thomas; Friedrich, Patricia; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-02-01

    Processed nerve allografts have become an alternative to repair segmental nerve defects, with results comparable with autografts regarding sensory recovery; however, they have failed to reproduce comparable motor recovery. The purpose of this study was to determine how revascularizaton of processed nerve allograft would affect motor recovery. Eighty-eight rats were divided in four groups of 22 animals each. A unilateral 10-mm sciatic nerve defect was repaired with allograft (group I), allograft wrapped with silicone conduit (group II), allograft augmented with vascular endothelial growth factor (group III), or autograft (group IV). Eight animals from each group were sacrificed at 3 days, and the remaining animals at 16 weeks. Revascularization was evaluated by measuring the graft capillary density at 3 days and 16 weeks. Measurements of ankle contracture, compound muscle action potential, tibialis anterior muscle weight and force, and nerve histomorphometry were performed at 16 weeks. All results were normalized to the contralateral side. The results of capillary density at 3 days were 0.99% ± 1.3% for group I, 0.33% ± 0.6% for group II, 0.05% ± 0.1% for group III, and 75.6% ± 45.7% for group IV. At 16 weeks, the results were 69.9% ± 22.4% for group I, 37.0% ± 16.6% for group II, 84.6% ± 46.6% for group III, and 108.3% ± 46.8% for group IV. The results of muscle force were 47.5% ± 14.4% for group I, 21.7% ± 13.5% for group II, 47.1% ± 7.9% for group III, and 54.4% ± 10.6% for group IV. The use of vascular endothelial growth factor in the fashion used in this study improved neither the nerve allograft short-term revascularization nor the functional motor recovery after 16 weeks. Blocking allograft vascularization from surrounding tissues was detrimental for motor recovery. The processed nerve allografts used in this study showed similar functional motor recovery compared with that of the autograft. PMID

  17. Renal Cell Carcinoma Arising From Renal Allograft Detected by 18F-FDG PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuehong; Wang, Tie

    2016-05-01

    Renal cell carcinoma arising from renal allograft is a rare condition. A 56-year-old man with a history of 3 renal transplantation due to renal failure presented poor appetite and weight loss for 3 months. Possibility of tumor of unknown origin was suspected. For this reason, an FDG PET/CT was performed, and the images showed a hypermetabolic focus in the lower pole of the left renal transplant, suggestive of a malignant lesion. Subsequent pathological examination following allograft nephrectomy confirmed grade 4 renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26825198

  18. Outcome of Kidney Allografts in Recipients With a Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Özdemir-van Brunschot, Denise M D; de Sévaux, Ruud G L; van Hamersvelt, Henk W; Warlé, Michiel C

    2016-09-01

    Two patients, who were on hemodialysis over a femoral arteriovenous fistula, were transplanted in our center. Despite adequate blood pressure, perfusion of the renal allograft remained poor after completion of the vascular anastomoses. Ligation of the femoral arteriovenous fistula (1.6 L/min) led to adequate perfusion. Initial graft function was good. Although it remains unclear whether ischemia of a renal allograft is caused by venous hypertension or vascular steal due to a femoral arteriovenous fistula, it might be necessary to ligate a femoral arteriovenous fistula to obtain adequate graft perfusion. PMID:27313989

  19. Autologous versus unrelated donor allogeneic marrow transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Weisdorf, D J; Billett, A L; Hannan, P; Ritz, J; Sallan, S E; Steinbuch, M; Ramsay, N K

    1997-10-15

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can cure patients with high-risk or recurrent acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Those lacking a related donor can receive either autologous or histocompatible unrelated donor (URD) marrow. Autotransplantation may result in higher risk of relapse, whereas URD allografts, although associated with serious posttransplant toxicities, may reduce relapse risk. Six years (1987 to 1993) of consecutive autologous BMT (University of Minnesota, Dana Farber Cancer Institute; n = 214) were compared with URD transplants (National Marrow Donor Program; n = 337). Most transplants (70% autologous, 48% URD) were in early remission (first or second complete remission [CR1 or CR2]); 376 patients (75% autologous, 64% URD) were less than 18 years old. Autologous BMT led to significantly lower transplant-related mortality (TRM; relative risk [RR] 0.35; P = .001). URD transplantation offered greater protection against relapse (autologous RR 3.1; P = .001). Patients greater than 18 years old, women, and BMT recipients beyond CR2 had higher TRM, whereas adults, BMT recipients in CR2+, or BMT recipients during 1991 through 1993 had significantly more relapse. After 25 months median follow-up, 100 URD and 56 autologous recipients survive leukemia free. URD BMT in CR2 resulted in superior disease-free survival (DFS), especially for adult patients. Multivariate analysis showed superior DFS for children, men, and BMT during CR1 or 2. Autologous and URD BMT can extend survival for a minority of patients unlikely to be cured by chemotherapy, and the results with either technique are comparable. Greater toxicity and TRM after URD BMT are counterbalanced by better protection against relapse. Prospective studies addressing additional clinical variables are needed to guide clinical decision making about transplant choices for patients with ALL. PMID:9376576

  20. Successful matched sibling donor marrow transplantation following reduced intensity conditioning in children with hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    King, Allison A; Kamani, Naynesh; Bunin, Nancy; Sahdev, Indira; Brochstein, Joel; Hayashi, Robert J; Grimley, Michael; Abraham, Allistair; Dioguardi, Jacqueline; Chan, Ka Wah; Douglas, Dorothea; Adams, Roberta; Andreansky, Martin; Anderson, Eric; Gilman, Andrew; Chaudhury, Sonali; Yu, Lolie; Dalal, Jignesh; Hale, Gregory; Cuvelier, Geoff; Jain, Akshat; Krajewski, Jennifer; Gillio, Alfred; Kasow, Kimberly A; Delgado, David; Hanson, Eric; Murray, Lisa; Shenoy, Shalini

    2015-12-01

    Fifty-two children with symptomatic sickle cell disease sickle cell disease (SCD) (N = 43) or transfusion-dependent thalassemia (N = 9) received matched sibling donor marrow (46), marrow and cord product (5), or cord blood (1) allografts following reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) with alemtuzumab, fludarabine, and melphalan between March 2003 and May 2014*. The Kaplan-Meier probabilities of overall and event-free survival at a median of 3.42 (range, 0.75-11.83) years were 94.2% and 92.3% for the group, 93% and 90.7% for SCD, and 100% and 100% for thalassemia, respectively. Treatment-related mortality (all related to graft versus host disease, GVHD) was noted in three (5.7%) recipients, all 17-18 years of age. Acute and chronic GVHD was noted in 23% and 13%, respectively, with 81% of recipients off immunosuppression by 1 year. Graft rejection was limited to the single umbilical cord blood recipient who had prompt autologous hematopoietic recovery. Fourteen (27%) had mixed chimerism at 1 year and beyond; all had discontinued immunosuppression between 4 and 12 months from transplant with no subsequent consequence on GVHD or rejection. Infectious complications included predominantly bacteremia (48% were staphylococcus) and CMV reactivation (43%) necessitating preemptive therapy. Lymphocyte recovery beyond 6 months was associated with subsidence of infectious complications. All patients who engrafted were transfusion independent; no strokes or pulmonary complications of SCD were noted, and pain symptoms subsided within 6 months posttransplant. These findings support using RIC for patients with hemoglobinopathy undergoing matched sibling marrow transplantation (*www.Clinical Trials.gov: NCT00920972, NCT01050855, NCT02435901). PMID:26348869

  1. Mitomycin C-treated antigen-presenting cells as a tool for control of allograft rejection and autoimmunity: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Terness, Peter; Kleist, Christian; Simon, Helmut; Sandra-Petrescu, Flavius; Ehser, Sandra; Chuang, Jing-Jing; Mohr, Elisabeth; Jiga, Lucian; Greil, Johann; Opelz, Gerhard

    2009-07-01

    Cells have been previously used in experimental models for tolerance induction in organ transplantation and autoimmune diseases. One problem with the therapeutic use of cells is standardization of their preparation. We discuss an immunosuppressive strategy relying on cells irreversibly transformed by a chemotherapeutic drug. Dendritic cells (DCs) of transplant donors pretreated with mitomycin C (MMC) strongly prolonged rat heart allograft survival when injected into recipients before transplantation. Likewise, MMC-DCs loaded with myelin basic protein suppressed autoreactive T cells of MS patients in vitro and prevented experimental autoimmune encephalitis in mice. Comprehensive gene microarray analysis identified genes that possibly make up the suppressive phenotype, comprising glucocorticoid leucine zipper, immunoglobulin-like transcript 3, CD80, CD83, CD86, and apoptotic genes. Based on these findings, a hypothetical model of tolerance induction by MMC-treated DCs is delineated. Finally, we describe the first clinical application of MMC-treated monocyte-enriched donor cells in an attempt to control the rejection of a haploidentical stem cell transplant in a sensitized recipient and discuss the pros and cons of using MMC-treated antigen-presenting cells for tolerance induction. Although many questions remain, MMC-treated cells are a promising clinical tool for controlling allograft rejection and deleterious immune responses in autoimmune diseases. PMID:19393276

  2. NAD+ regulates Treg cell fate and promotes allograft survival via a systemic IL-10 production that is CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T cells independent

    PubMed Central

    Elkhal, Abdallah; Rodriguez Cetina Biefer, Hector; Heinbokel, Timm; Uehara, Hirofumi; Quante, Markus; Seyda, Midas; Schuitenmaker, Jeroen M.; Krenzien, Felix; Camacho, Virginia; de la Fuente, Miguel A.; Ghiran, Ionita; Tullius, Stefan G.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs have been shown to play a central role in immune homeostasis while preventing from fatal inflammatory responses, while Th17 cells have traditionally been recognized as pro-inflammatory mediators implicated in a myriad of diseases. Studies have shown the potential of Tregs to convert into Th17 cells, and Th17 cells into Tregs. Increasing evidence have pointed out CD25 as a key molecule during this transdifferentiation process, however molecules that allow such development remain unknown. Here, we investigated the impact of NAD+ on the fate of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs in-depth, dissected their transcriptional signature profile and explored mechanisms underlying their conversion into IL-17A producing cells. Our results demonstrate that NAD+ promotes Treg conversion into Th17 cells in vitro and in vivo via CD25 cell surface marker. Despite the reduced number of Tregs, known to promote homeostasis, and an increased number of pro-inflammatory Th17 cells, NAD+ was able to promote an impressive allograft survival through a robust systemic IL-10 production that was CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ independent. Collectively, our study unravels a novel immunoregulatory mechanism of NAD+ that regulates Tregs fate while promoting allograft survival that may have clinical applications in alloimmunity and in a wide spectrum of inflammatory conditions. PMID:26928119

  3. mir-155 regulates cardiac allograft rejection by targing the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (DOCS1) in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Qiwei; Guo, Meng; Zhang, Mingjian; Guo, Wenyuan; Wang, Liming; Hu, Liping; Hu, Chaozhou; Shi, Yongzhao; Liu, Yushan; Wang, Quanxing

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we observed that mir-155 is induced during dendritic cell (DC) differentiation. We now demon-strated convincing evidence indicating that mir-155 promotes DC maturation and regulates its capacity for antigen presentation and induction of alloreactive T cell activation. Interestingly, the induction of miR-155 expression in DCs is dependent on the TLR4/Myd88/NF-κB signaling. Our mechanistic studies further revealed that SOCS1 is a direct target for mir-155, and by binding to its 3’UTR, mir-155 is likely to affect SOCS1 translation. Suppression of mir-155 expression in DCs significantly attenuated LPS-induced DC maturation along with reduced capability to stimulate allogeneic T cell proliferation. As a result, administration of antagomiR-155 provided protection for cardiac allografts from rejection. Together, our data support that suppression of miR-155 in DCs could be a viable therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of allograft rejection in clinical setting of transplantation. PMID:25550988

  4. Vascularized composite allotransplantation: current standards and novel approaches to prevent acute rejection and chronic allograft deterioration.

    PubMed

    Kueckelhaus, Maximilian; Fischer, Sebastian; Seyda, Midas; Bueno, Ericka M; Aycart, Mario A; Alhefzi, Muayyad; ElKhal, Abdallah; Pomahac, Bohdan; Tullius, Stefan G

    2016-06-01

    The advent of more potent immunosuppressants led to the first successful human upper extremity transplantation in 1998. At this time, >100 upper extremity transplants, 30 face transplants, and a variety of other vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) procedures have been performed around the world. VCA recipients present unique challenges for transplantation. The incidence of acute rejection exceeds 80% in hand and face transplantation and is well documented, whereas reports about antibody-mediated rejection and chronic rejection remain scarce. Immunosuppression protocols commonly used at US centers are derived from solid organ transplantation protocols. Novel approaches to minimize rejections in VCA may include improved HLA matching and considerations toward cytomegalovirus infection status. New graft preservation techniques may decrease immunogenicity prior to transplant. Novel monitoring methods such as valid biomarkers, ultrasound biomicroscopy, and sentinel flaps may enable earlier diagnosis of rejection. Cell-based therapies are being explored to achieve immunosuppressive regimen minimization or even tolerance induction. The efficacy of local immunosuppression in clinical VCA remains controversial. In conclusion, although immunosuppressive strategies adapted from SOT have demonstrated good midterm results, focusing on the unique features of VCA grafts may enable additional, more specific treatment strategies in the future and improved long-term graft outcomes. PMID:26265179

  5. Bone marrow transplantation in Basel: single center experience from 1973 to 1989.

    PubMed

    Speck, B; Nissen, C; Tichelli, A; Roth, J; Dazzi, H; Stebler, C H; Wernli, M; Signer, E; Gratwohl, A

    1989-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation with a small to medium-sized single hospital team is feasible. It leads to results similar to those observed at large centers and with the same major risk factors: age, stage of the disease at the time of transplant, degree of histocompatibility, graft-versus-host disease prevention method, and selection. A single small to medium-sized center cannot conduct prospective randomized studies but it can pioneer new concepts. Bone marrow transplantation today offers a good choice for patients suffering from otherwise lethal bone marrow diseases. These include severe aplastic anemia, acute leukemias, chronic myeloid and chronic lymphoid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and congenital disorders. Changes in outcome are due to innovative steps, such as the introduction of CsA for GvHD prevention. In addition they are certainly influenced by unrecognized changes in the patient selection process. PMID:2487556

  6. Investigation of the effects of aging on homologous recombination in long-term bone marrow cultures.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Michael W; Rugo, Rebecca; Cao, Shaonan; Wang, Hong; Franicola, Darcy; Goff, Julie P; Shen, Hongmei; Zhang, Xichen; Wiktor-Brown, Dominika; Engelward, Bevin P; Greenberger, Joel S

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent yellow direct repeat (FYDR) mice carry a transgenic reporter for homologous recombination (HR) and have been used to reveal an age-dependent increase in HR in the pancreas. An established in vitro model system for accelerated aging of the marrow is the mouse long-term bone marrow culture (LTBMC) system. To determine whether the FYDR system, in which an HR event can lead to a fluorescent cell, can be used to study the effects of aging in LTBMCs, clonally expanded hematopoietic and marrow stromal cells in FYDR, positive control FYDR-Recombined (FYDR-Rec), and negative control wild-type C57BL/6NHsd (WT) LTBMCs were analysed. All groups of cultures demonstrated equivalent parameters of continuous hematopoiesis including generation of multilineage colony forming CFU-GM progenitor cells for over 22 weeks and age associated senescence of hematopoiesis. Results indicate that low expression of the FYDR transgene in bone marrow cells in vivo and in vitro prevents the use of the FYDR mice to study rare combination events in bone marrow. Using an alternative approach for detecting HR, namely the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assay, a statistically significant increase in the number of SCEs per chromosome was observed in adherent cells subcultured from 20-week-compared to 4-week-old LTBMCs. These data suggest that adherent marrow stromal cells from LTBMCs become increasingly susceptible to HR events during aging. PMID:19779099

  7. Gender difference in the neuroprotective effect of rat bone marrow mesenchymal cells against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Yu, Jian-xiong

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can reduce retinal ganglion cell death and effectively prevent vision loss. Previously, we found that during differentiation, female rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells acquire a higher neurogenic potential compared with male rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests that female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have a stronger neuroprotective effect than male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we first isolated and cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from female and male rats by density gradient centrifugation. Retinal tissue from newborn rats was prepared by enzymatic digestion to obtain primary retinal ganglion cells. Using the transwell system, retinal ganglion cells were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay. We found a marked increase in apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells after 24 hours of hypoxia compared with normoxia. Moreover, apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells significantly decreased with both female and male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell co-culture under hypoxia compared with culture alone, with more significant effects from female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results indicate that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells exert a neuroprotective effect against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and also that female cells have greater neuroprotective ability compared with male cells. PMID:27335573

  8. Gender difference in the neuroprotective effect of rat bone marrow mesenchymal cells against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Yu, Jian-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can reduce retinal ganglion cell death and effectively prevent vision loss. Previously, we found that during differentiation, female rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells acquire a higher neurogenic potential compared with male rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests that female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have a stronger neuroprotective effect than male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we first isolated and cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from female and male rats by density gradient centrifugation. Retinal tissue from newborn rats was prepared by enzymatic digestion to obtain primary retinal ganglion cells. Using the transwell system, retinal ganglion cells were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay. We found a marked increase in apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells after 24 hours of hypoxia compared with normoxia. Moreover, apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells significantly decreased with both female and male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell co-culture under hypoxia compared with culture alone, with more significant effects from female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results indicate that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells exert a neuroprotective effect against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and also that female cells have greater neuroprotective ability compared with male cells. PMID:27335573

  9. Bone marrow and splenic histology in hairy cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Wotherspoon, Andrew; Attygalle, Ayoma; Mendes, Larissa Sena Teixeira

    2015-12-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia is a rare chronic neoplastic B-cell lymphoproliferation that characteristically involves blood, bone marrow and spleen with liver, lymph node and skin less commonly involved. Histologically, the cells have a characteristic appearance with pale/clear cytoplasm and round or reniform nuclei. In the spleen, the infiltrate involves the red pulp and is frequently associated with areas of haemorrhage (blood lakes). The cells stain for B-cell related antigens as well as with antibodies against tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, DBA44 (CD72), CD11c, CD25, CD103, CD123, cyclin D1 and annexin A1. Mutation of BRAF -V600E is present and antibody to the mutant protein can be used as a specific marker. Bone marrow biopsy is essential in the initial assessment of disease as the bone marrow may be inaspirable or unrepresentative of degree of marrow infiltration as a result of the tumour associated fibrosis preventing aspiration of the tumour cell component. Bone marrow biopsy is important in the assessment of therapy response but in this context staining for CD11c and Annexin A1 is not helpful as they are also markers of myeloid lineage and identification of low level infiltration may be obscured. In this context staining for CD20 may be used in conjunction with morphological assessment and staining of serial sections for cyclin D1 and DBA44 to identify subtle residual infiltration. Staining for CD79a and CD19 is not recommended as these antibodies will identify plasma cells and can lead to over-estimation of disease. Staining for CD20 should not be used in patients following with anti-CD20 based treatments. Down regulation of cyclin D1 and CD25 has been reported in patients following BRAF inhibitor therapy and assessment of these antigens should not be used in this context. Histologically, hairy cell leukaemia needs to be distinguished from other B-cell lymphoproliferations associated with splenomegaly including splenic marginal zone lymphoma, splenic

  10. Effects of Adoptive Transfer of Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells on Allograft Survival in Organ Transplantation Models: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Juan; Guo, Yingjia; Li, Shengfu; Long, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To dissect the efficacy of Tol-DC therapy with or without IS in multiple animal models of transplantation. Methods and Results. PubMed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for reviews published up to April 2015. Six systematic reviews and a total of 61 articles were finally included. Data were grouped by organ transplantation models and applied to meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis shows that Tol-DC therapy successfully prolonged allograft survival to varying extents in all except the islet transplantation models and with IS drugs further prolonged the survival of heart, skin, and islet allografts in mice, but not of heart allografts in rats. Compared with IS drugs alone, Tol-DC therapy with IS extended islet allograft survival in rats but failed to influence the survival of skin, small intestine, and heart allografts in rats or of heart and skin allografts in mice. Conclusion. Tol-DC therapy significantly prolonged multiple allograft survival and further prolonged survival with IS. However, standardized protocols for modification of Tol-DC should be established before its application in clinic. PMID:27547767

  11. The treatment of peripheral nerve injuries using irradiated allografts and temporary host immunosuppression (in a rat model)

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, K.J.; Trumble, T.E. )

    1990-10-01

    Irradiation of allografts prior to transplantation and host immunosuppression with cyclosporin-A were studied separately and in combination as means of lessening the rejection of transplanted peripheral nerve tissue. Lewis and Brown Norway rats were used in the animal model, as they differ at both major and minor histocompatibility loci. Sciatic nerve grafts (2.5 cm) were used and the animals were followed for 16 weeks after nerve grafting. The outcome was studied by functional measurements (sensory testing, gait analysis, joint flexion contracture, and muscle weight), as well as by measurements of biochemical and histologic parameters (hydroxyproline concentration and axon counts, respectively). Sensory testing was not reliable because of crossover innervation by the saphenous nerve. Evaluation by standard gait-testing techniques was found to be unsatisfactory. However, the allografted animals receiving cyclosporin-A had significantly smaller flexion contractures, compared to the allografted animals without immunosuppression (17 degrees +/- 12 degrees vs. 44 degrees +/- 13 degrees and 51 degrees +/- 13 degrees, p less than 0.005). Allografted animals receiving short-term cyclosporin-A had contractures that were not significantly different from those seen in isografted control animals (17 degrees +/- 12 degrees vs. 22 degrees +/- 15 degrees, NS). Muscle hydroxyproline concentration analysis revealed a lower hydroxyproline concentration among the allografted groups that received irradiated allografts, compared to groups receiving nonirradiated allogeneic grafts. The studies of muscle hydroxyproline concentration and muscle weight both showed substantial reinnervation, even in allografted animals without pretreatment of the grafts or immunosuppression of the recipient animal.

  12. Non-immunologic predictors of chronic renal allograft failure: data from the United Network of Organ Sharing.

    PubMed

    Chertow, G M; Brenner, B M; Mackenzie, H S; Milford, E L

    1995-12-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience suggest that non-immunologic factors are important predictors of long-term renal allograft survival. It has been suggested that chronic allograft failure may in some cases by mediated by non-immunologic factors implicated in the pathobiology of other forms of progressive renal disease. Donor age, sex, and race may influence the "dose" of nephrons delivered in cadaveric renal transplantation. The United Network of Organ Sharing 1994 Public Use Data Tape was used to evaluate these and other risk factors in more than 31,000 recipients of cadaver allografts followed between 1987 and 1992. Female sex and African American race of the donor were important predictors of allograft failure. There was a markedly increased risk of allograft failure at both extremes of donor age. Recipients of large body size had accelerated graft loss. Stratified analyses suggested an interaction between donor and recipient race; nevertheless, all non-immunologic factors examined expressed independent associations with allograft survival. In sum, antigen-independent factors appear to be important determinants of allograft performance. Additional multivariable analyses are required to assess the relative importance of these factors compared with other known immunologic factors, such as HLA antigen mismatch. These findings may have important biomedical and health care policy implications. PMID:8587283

  13. What Happens During a Bone Marrow Transplant? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... procedure allows the recipient to get new stem cells that work properly. Stem cells are found in bone marrow, ... The body doesn’t make enough red blood cells, or they don’t work properly. Certain immune-deficiency diseases that prevent the ...

  14. Monocyte procoagulant activity and plasminogen activator. Role in human renal allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.H.; Cardella, C.J.; Schulman, J.; Levy, G.A.

    1985-10-01

    Currently the mechanism of renal allograft rejection is not well understood. This study was designed to determine whether induction of monocyte procoagulant activity (MCPA) is important in the pathogenesis of renal allograft rejection. The MPCA assay was performed utilizing a one stage clotting assay both in normal and in factor-VII-deficient plasma. There was no increase in spontaneous MPCA in 20 patients with endstage renal failure and in 10 patients following abdominal or orthopedic operation, as compared with 20 normal controls. MPCA was assessed daily in 18 patients who had received renal allografts. Rejection episodes (RE) were predicted on the basis of persistent elevation in MPCA as compared with pretransplant levels. Rejection was diagnosed clinically and treated on the basis of standard criteria. Treated RE were compared with those predicted by elevated MPCA, and 3 patients were assessed as having no RE by MPCA and by standard criteria. In 8 RE, MPCA correlated temporally with RE (same day) when compared with standard criteria. In 12 RE, MPCA was predictive of rejection preceding standard criteria by at least 24 hr. There were 7 false-positive predictions on the basis of MPCA; however, there was only 1 false negative. MPCA was shown to be a prothrombinase by its dependence only on prothrombin and fibrinogen for full activity. MPCA may be important in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection, and additionally it may be a useful adjunct in the clinical management of this disease.

  15. Commercial kidney transplantation is an important risk factor in long-term kidney allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G V Ramesh; Ananth, Sailesh; Palepu, Sneha; Huang, Michael; Nash, Michelle M; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2016-05-01

    Transplant tourism, a form of transplant commercialization, has resulted in serious short-term adverse outcomes that explain reduced short-term kidney allograft survival. However, the nature of longer-term outcomes in commercial kidney transplant recipients is less clear. To study this further, we identified 69 Canadian commercial transplant recipients of 72 kidney allografts transplanted during 1998 to 2013 who reported to our transplant center for follow-up care. Their outcomes to 8 years post-transplant were compared with 702 domestic living donor and 827 deceased donor transplant recipients during this period using Kaplan-Meier survival plots and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Among many complications, notable specific events included hepatitis B or C seroconversion (7 patients), active hepatitis and/or fulminant hepatic failure (4 patients), pulmonary tuberculosis (2 patients), and a type A dissecting aortic aneurysm. Commercial transplantation was independently associated with significantly reduced death-censored kidney allograft survival (hazard ratio 3.69, 95% confidence interval 1.88-7.25) along with significantly delayed graft function and eGFR 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) or less at 3 months post-transplant. Thus, commercial transplantation represents an important risk factor for long-term kidney allograft loss. Concerted arguments and efforts using adverse recipient outcomes among the main premises are still required in order to eradicate transplant commercialization. PMID:27083285

  16. Monocytic Tissue Transglutaminase in a Rat Model for Reversible Acute Rejection and Chronic Renal Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewicz, Anna; Atanasova, Srebrena; Padberg, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Acute rejection is a major risk factor for chronic allograft injury (CAI). Blood leukocytes interacting with allograft endothelial cells during acute rejection were suggested to contribute to the still enigmatic pathogenesis of CAI. We hypothesize that tissue transglutaminase (Tgm2), a multifunctional protein and established marker of M2 macrophages, is involved in acute and chronic graft rejection. We focus on leukocytes accumulating in blood vessels of rat renal allografts (Fischer-344 to Lewis), an established model for reversible acute rejection and CAI. Monocytes in graft blood vessels overexpress Tgm2 when acute rejection peaks on day 9 after transplantation. Concomitantly, caspase-3 is activated, suggesting that Tgm2 expression is linked to apoptosis. After resolution of acute rejection on day 42, leukocytic Tgm2 levels are lower and activated caspase-3 does not differ among isografts and allografts. Cystamine was applied for 4 weeks after transplantation to inhibit extracellular transglutaminase activity, which did, however, not reduce CAI in the long run. In conclusion, this is the first report on Tgm2 expression by monocytes in vivo. Tgm2 may be involved in leukocytic apoptosis and thus in reversion of acute rejection. However, our data do not support a role of extracellular transglutaminase activity as a factor triggering CAI during self-limiting acute rejection. PMID:26063971

  17. Urothelial carcinoma of the allograft kidney developed in a renal transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Gökçe, Mehmet İlker; Kocaay, Akın Fırat; Aktürk, Serkan; Tüzüner, Acar

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the best option in the treatment of end-stage renal disease However these patients are under the risk of developing malignancies particularly due to effects of immune supression. These malignancies tend to be more agressive compared to the general population. Here, we present a case of urothelial carcinoma develoing in the ureter of allograft kidney.

  18. Knee salvage procedures: The indications, techniques and outcomes of large osteochondral allografts

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Karen; Jeys, Lee; Snow, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The overall incidence of osteochondral defect in the general population is estimated to be 15 to 30 per 100000 people. These lesions can become symptomatic causing pain, swelling and decreased function of the knee, and may eventually progress to osteoarthritis. In the young and active population, partial or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is rarely the treatment of choice due to risk of early failure. Osteochondral allograft transplantation has been demonstrated to be a safe and effective treatment of large osteochondral and chondral defects of the knee in appropriately selected patients. The treatment reduces pain, improves function and is a viable limb salvage procedure for patients, especially young and active patients for whom TKA is not recommended. Either large dowels generated with commercially available equipment or free hand shell allografts can be implanted in more posterior lesions. Current recommendations for fresh allografts stored at 4C advise implantation within 21-28 d of procurement for optimum chondrocyte viability, following screening and testing protocols. Higher rates of successful allograft transplantation are observed in younger patients, unipolar lesions, normal or corrected malalignment, and defects that are treated within 12 mo of symptom onset. Patients with bipolar lesions, uncorrectable malalignment, advanced osteoarthritis, and those over 40 tend to have less favourable outcomes. PMID:25893177

  19. Skin allografts in lethally irradiated animals repopulated with syngeneic hemopoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Total body irradiation and repopulation with syngeneic hemopoietic cells can be used to induce tolerance to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatched heart and kidney grafts in rats and mice. However, this protocol does not work for MHC mismatched skin grafts in rats or mice. Furthermore, LEW rats that accept WF cardiac allografts after irradiation and repopulation reject subsequent WF skin grafts. Treatment of skin allograft donors with methotrexate prior to grafting onto irradiated and reconstituted mice resulted in doubling of the mean survival time. Analysis of which antigens provoked skin graft rejection by irradiation and reconstituted animals revealed the importance of I region antigens. Cardiac allograft acceptance by irradiated and reconstituted animals is mediated by suppressor cells found in the spleen. Adoptively tolerant LEW rats accepted WF skin grafts in 50% of grafted animals. Analysis of this phenomenon revealed that the adoptive transfer procedure itself was important in achieving skin allograft acceptance by these animals. In general, it seems that the lack of ability of irradiated and reconstituted animals to accept fully MHC disparate skin grafts results from the inability of these animals to suppress lymph node effector cells against I region antigen seen on highly immunogenic allogeneic Langerhans cells in the skin.

  20. Cutting edge: membrane lymphotoxin regulates CD8(+) T cell-mediated intestinal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Z; Wang, J; Meng, L; Wu, Q; Kim, O; Hart, J; He, G; Zhou, P; Thistlethwaite, J R; Alegre, M L; Fu, Y X; Newell, K A

    2001-11-01

    Blocking the CD28/B7 and/or CD154/CD40 costimulatory pathways promotes long-term allograft survival in many transplant models where CD4(+) T cells are necessary for rejection. When CD8(+) T cells are sufficient to mediate rejection, these approaches fail, resulting in costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. To address this problem we examined the role of lymphotoxin-related molecules in CD8(+) T cell-mediated rejection of murine intestinal allografts. Targeting membrane lymphotoxin by means of a fusion protein, mAb, or genetic mutation inhibited rejection of intestinal allografts by CD8(+) T cells. This effect was associated with decreased monokine induced by IFN-gamma (Mig) and secondary lymphoid chemokine (SLC) gene expression within allografts and spleens respectively. Blocking membrane lymphotoxin did not inhibit rejection mediated by CD4(+) T cells. Combining disruption of membrane lymphotoxin and treatment with CTLA4-Ig inhibited rejection in wild-type mice. These data demonstrate that membrane lymphotoxin is an important regulatory molecule for CD8(+) T cells mediating rejection and suggest a strategy to avoid costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. PMID:11673481

  1. Sensitivity of scintigraphy with /sup 111/In-lymphocytes for detection of cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, S.B.; Eisen, H.J.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R.; Bolman, R.M. 3d.

    1988-12-01

    We recently demonstrated the feasibility of noninvasive detection of cardiac allograft rejection after administration of indium-111-labeled lymphocytes. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the technique, as well as its value for delineating the severity of rejection, we studied 16 dogs with heterotopic thoracic cardiac allografts. Five animals were evaluated while exposed to immunosuppressive agents. Animals were scanned sequentially after administration of 100-400 microCi of indium-111-labeled autologous lymphocytes. Myocardial lymphocyte infiltration was expressed as the indium excess (IE), defined as the ratio of indium activity of the transplant or native heart compared with that in blood. Scintigraphic results were compared with characteristics of simultaneously obtained endomyocardial biopsies. Among 17 biopsy documented episodes of rejection, 16 were detected scintigraphically. Among 18 biopsies with no evidence of rejection, scintigraphy was uniformly negative. Thus, the sensitivity and specificity of scintigraphy were 94 and 100%, respectively. Biopsies graded as showing no rejection were associated with an IE of 0.3 +/- 0.5 (+/- SD); those graded as mild, 2.8 +/- 1.7; those as moderate, 10.7 +/- 7.2; and those graded as indicative of severe rejection, 14.2 +/- 4.5. Thus, scintigraphy with indium-111-labeled lymphocytes sensitively and specifically detects cardiac allograft rejection and delineates the intensity of the rejection process. It should be useful clinically for assessing potential allograft rejection noninvasively.

  2. Material Properties of Fresh Cold-stored Allografts for Osteochondral Defects at 1 Year

    PubMed Central

    Ranawat, Anil S.; Vidal, Armando F.; Chen, Chris T.; Zelken, Jonathan A.; Turner, A. Simon

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the long-term properties of fresh cold-stored osteochondral allograft tissue. We hypothesized fresh cold-stored tissue would yield superior material properties in an in vivo ovine model compared to those using freeze-thawed acellular grafts. In addition, we speculated that a long storage time would yield less successful grafts. We created 10-mm defects in medial femoral condyles of 20 sheep. Defects were reconstructed with allograft plugs stored at 4°C for 1, 14, and 42 days; control specimens were freeze-thawed or defect-only. At 52 weeks, animals were euthanized and retrieved grafts were analyzed for cell viability, gross morphology, histologic grade, and biomechanical and biochemical analysis. Explanted cold-stored tissue had superior histologic scores over freeze-thawed and defect-only grafts. Specimens stored for 1 and 42 days had higher equilibrium moduli and proteoglycan content than freeze-thawed specimens. We observed no difference among any of the cold-stored specimens for chondrocyte viability, histology, equilibrium aggregate modulus, proteoglycan content, or hypotonic swelling. Reconstructing cartilage defects with cold-stored allograft resulted in superior histologic and biomechanical properties compared with acellular freeze-thawed specimens; however, storage time did not appear to be a critical factor in the success of the transplanted allograft. PMID:18528743

  3. Functional capacity and rehabilitation of recipients with a functioning renal allograft for ten years or more.

    PubMed

    Flechner, S M; Novick, A C; Braun, W E; Popowniak, K L; Steinmuller, D

    1983-06-01

    Forty-nine renal transplant recipients who had a single functioning allograft for ten or more years are reviewed. There were 17 cadaver recipients and 32 living-related recipients. Most patients have enjoyed excellent long-term renal function with stable mean daily dosages of azathioprine and prednisone. Fifty-three percent of patients never experienced a rejection episode, and 24% of patients experienced only one rejection episode. Five recipients (10%) developed malignancy following transplantation. Based on the Karnofsky activity scale, 80% of patients enjoyed unrestricted activity at ten years posttransplant. The two major factors contributing to declining activity were progression of systemic diseases such as atherosclerosis or diabetes, and declining allograft function. Following transplantation, all patients developed renewed interest in sexual activity, all men were potent, and all women experienced regular menses. Nine men achieved fatherhood and five women underwent successful pregnancy. Currently, 46 recipients are alive with a functioning allograft. These data confirm the ability of recipients with a long-term functioning renal allograft to return to the work force, participate in preillness levels of activity, and enjoy sexual activity and parenthood. PMID:6408771

  4. PD-L1 Deficiency within Islets Reduces Allograft Survival in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dongxia; Duan, Wu; Li, Yakun; Wang, Zhimin; Li, Shanglin; Gong, Nianqiao; Chen, Gang; Chen, Zhishui; Wan, Chidan; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Islet transplantation may potentially cure type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, immune rejection, especially that induced by the alloreactive T-cell response, remains a restraining factor for the long-term survival of grafted islets. Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) is a negative costimulatory molecule. PD-L1 deficiency within the donor heart accelerates allograft rejection. Here, we investigate whether PD-L1 deficiency in donor islets reduces allograft survival time. Methods Glucose Stimulation Assays were performed to evaluate whether PD-L1 deficiency has detrimental effects on islet function. Islets isolated from PDL1-deficient mice or wild- type (WT) mice (C57BL/6j) were implanted beneath the renal capsule of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic BALB/c mice. Blood glucose levels and graft survival time after transplantation were monitored. Moreover, we analyzed the residual islets, infiltrating immune cells and alloreactive cells from the recipients. Results PD-L1 deficiency within islets does not affect islet function. However, islet PD-L1 deficiency increased allograft rejection and was associated with enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration and recipient T-cell alloreactivity. Conclusions This is the first report to demonstrate that PD-L1 deficiency accelerated islet allograft rejection and regulated recipient alloimmune responses. PMID:26990974

  5. Reversal of Diabetes by Islet Transplantation: Vulnerability of the Established Allograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, K. M.; Prowse, S. J.; Lafferty, K. J.

    1981-09-01

    Nonspecific stimulation of the immune system of CBA mice carrying a functional BALB/c islet allograft failed to trigger graft rejection. Only three of six animals rejected their graft when injected intravenously with 105, 106, and 107 peritoneal cells of BALB/c origin over a 3-month period commencing 100 days after transplantation.

  6. Reconstruction of large traumatic segmental defects of the femur using segmental allograft with vascularized fibula inlay.

    PubMed

    Ridha, Hyder; Bernard, Jason; Gateley, David; Vesely, Martin J

    2011-07-01

    Segmental defects of the distal femur following trauma pose a reconstructive challenge. A stable reconstruction capable of withstanding high forces while allowing early mobility is paramount. The Capanna technique of reconstruction combining allograft with vascularized bone graft provides such a construct and has been described for oncological resection. We describe a modified Capanna technique, the "inlay" construct. Three reconstructions were performed for distal femoral segmental loss following trauma. One patient had bilateral reconstructions. Bone defects measuring 11, 9, and 8 cm were reconstructed using a large segmental allograft and free fibular flap inlay assembly. Both patients made uneventful recoveries and achieved full weight-bearing without walking aids 6 months postreconstruction. Range of movement of each knee joint achieved at least 90 degrees of active flexion. We have shown that large segmental traumatic defects of the femur can be successfully reconstructed using segmental allograft with vascularized fibula inlay. This reconstruction provides early mechanical stability, protecting the fibula from fracturing and allowing axial loading of healing bone. The inlay assembly allows a large area of bony contact between allograft and vascularized bone, optimizing bony healing. It is a good alternative to other established techniques of managing significant segmental defects of the distal femur. PMID:21717390

  7. Timing of Pregnancy After Kidney Transplantation and Risk of Allograft Failure.

    PubMed

    Rose, C; Gill, J; Zalunardo, N; Johnston, O; Mehrotra, A; Gill, J S

    2016-08-01

    The optimal timing of pregnancy after kidney transplantation remains uncertain. We determined the risk of allograft failure among women who became pregnant within the first 3 posttransplant years. Among 21 814 women aged 15-45 years who received a first kidney-only transplant between 1990 and 2010 captured in the United States Renal Data System, n = 729 pregnancies were identified using Medicare claims. The probability of allograft failure from any cause including death (ACGL) at 1, 3, and 5 years after pregnancy was 9.6%, 25.9%, and 36.6%. In multivariate analyses, pregnancy in the first posttransplant year was associated with an increased risk of ACGL (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00, 1.40) and death censored graft loss (DCGL) (HR:1.25; 95% CI 1.04, 1.50), while pregnancy in the second posttransplant year was associated with an increased risk of DCGL (HR: 1.26; 95% CI 1.06, 1.50). Pregnancy in the third posttransplant year was not associated with an increased risk of ACGL or DCGL. These findings demonstrate a higher incidence of allograft failure after pregnancy than previously reported and that the increased risk of allograft failure extends to pregnancies in the second posttransplant year. PMID:26946063

  8. Repair of a Gingival Fenestration Using an Acellular Dermal Matrix Allograft.

    PubMed

    Breault, Lawrence G; Brentson, Raquel C; Fowler, Edward B; Bisch, Frederick C

    2016-01-01

    A case report illustrating the successful treatment of a gingival fenestration with an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) allograft. After 2½ months of healing, the ADM was completely integrated into the soft tissues of the mandibular anterior gingiva with complete resolution of the gingival fenestration, resulting in excellent gingival esthetics. PMID:26874103

  9. Effects of IFNγ administration on allograft rejection in ginbuna crucian carp.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Yasuhiro; Hatanaka, Chihiro; Matsuura, Yuta; Miyazawa, Ryuichiro; Yabu, Takeshi; Moritomo, Tadaaki; Nakanishi, Teruyuki

    2016-09-01

    In vertebrates, the rejection of allografts is primarily accomplished by cell-mediated immunity. We recently identified four IFNγ isoforms with antiviral activity in ginbuna crucian carp, Carassius auratus langsdorfii. However, involvement of the IFNγ isoforms in cell-mediated immunity, especially in T cell function remains unknown. Here we investigate expression of the IFNγ isoforms and effects of administration of recombinant IFNγ (rgIFNγ) isoforms in ginbuna scale allograft rejection. All four IFNγ isoforms showed significantly higher expression with the progression of graft rejection. Administration of rgIFNγrel 1 but not rgIFNγrel 2, rgIFNγ1 nor rgIFNγ2 enhanced allograft rejection. The number of CD4(+) and CD8α(+) cells increased in early stages of rejection, while sIgM(+) cells were higher than controls at day 0 and 5 in the rgIFNγrel 1 administrated group. Expression of IFNγ1 and IFNγ2 mRNA was significantly up-regulated by rgIFNγrel 1 administration, while that of IFNγrel 1 and IFNγrel 2 was not. These results suggest different contributions of the four IFNγ isoforms toward the immune responses comprising allograft rejection. PMID:27156851

  10. Histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate for pancreas allograft preservation: the Indiana University experience.

    PubMed

    Fridell, J A; Mangus, R S; Powelson, J A

    2010-05-01

    Histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK) has been scrutinized for use in pancreas transplantation. A recent case series and a United Network for Organ Sharing data base review have suggested an increased incidence of allograft pancreatitis and graft loss with HTK compared to the University of Wisconsin solution (UW). Conversely, a recent randomized, controlled study failed to show any significant difference between HTK and UW for pancreas allograft preservation. This study was a retrospective review of all pancreas transplants performed at Indiana University between 2003 and 2009 comparing preservation with HTK or UW. Data included recipient and donor demographics, 7-day, 90-day and 1-year graft survival, peak 30-day serum amylase and lipase, HbA1c and C-peptide levels. Of the 308 pancreas transplants, 84% used HTK and 16% UW. There were more SPK compared to pancreas after kidney and pancreas transplant alone in the HTK group. Donor and recipient demographics were similar. There was no significant difference in 7-day, 90-day or 1-year graft survival, 30-day peak serum amylase and lipase, HbA1c or C-peptide. No clinically significant difference between HTK and UW for pancreas allograft preservation was identified. Specifically, in the context of low-to-moderate flush volume and short cold ischemia time (allograft pancreatitis or graft loss was observed. PMID:20353471

  11. A comparative study of acellular nerve xenografts and allografts in repairing rat facial nerve defects.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haitao; Xiao, Hongxi; Liu, Huawei; Niu, Yu; Yan, Rongzeng; Hu, Min

    2015-10-01

    Acellular nerves are composed of a basal lamina tube, which retains sufficient bioactivity to promote axon regeneration, thereby repairing peripheral nerve gaps. However, the clinical application of acellular allografts has been restricted due to its limited availability. To investigate whether xenografts, a substitute to allograft acellular nerves in abundant supply, could efficiently promote nerve regeneration, rabbit and rat acellular nerve grafts were used to reconstruct 1 cm defects in Wistar rat facial nerves. Autologous peroneal nerve grafts served as a positive control group. A total of 12 weeks following the surgical procedure, the axon number, myelinated axon number, myelin sheath thickness, and nerve conduction velocity of the rabbit and rat‑derived acellular nerve grafts were similar, whereas the fiber diameter of the rabbit‑derived acellular xenografts decreased, as compared with those of rat‑derived acellular allografts. Autografts exerted superior effects on nerve regeneration; however, no significant difference was observed between the axon number in the autograft group, as compared with the two acellular groups. These results suggested that autografts perform better than acellular nerve grafts, and chemically extracted acellular allografts and xenografts have similar effects on the regeneration of short facial nerve defects. PMID:26239906

  12. Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes (IBMFS)

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI IBMFS Cohort Study consists of affected individuals and their immediate families in North America who have an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS)-either one that has been specifically identified and defined, or bone marrow failure that appears to be inherited but has not yet been clearly identified as having a genetic basis.

  13. Total Aortic Arch Replacement: Superior Ventriculo-Arterial Coupling with Decellularized Allografts Compared with Conventional Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Schmack, Bastian; Korkmaz, Sevil; Li, Shiliang; Chaimow, Nicole; Pätzold, Ines; Becher, Peter Moritz; Hartyánszky, István; Soós, Pál; Merkely, Gergő; Németh, Balázs Tamás; Istók, Roland; Veres, Gábor; Merkely, Béla; Terytze, Konstantin; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, no experimental or clinical study provides detailed analysis of vascular impedance changes after total aortic arch replacement. This study investigated ventriculoarterial coupling and vascular impedance after replacement of the aortic arch with conventional prostheses vs. decellularized allografts. Methods After preparing decellularized aortic arch allografts, their mechanical, histological and biochemical properties were evaluated and compared to native aortic arches and conventional prostheses in vitro. In open-chest dogs, total aortic arch replacement was performed with conventional prostheses and compared to decellularized allografts (n = 5/group). Aortic flow and pressure were recorded continuously, left ventricular pressure-volume relations were measured by using a pressure-conductance catheter. From the hemodynamic variables end-systolic elastance (Ees), arterial elastance (Ea) and ventriculoarterial coupling were calculated. Characteristic impedance (Z) was assessed by Fourier analysis. Results While Ees did not differ between the groups and over time (4.1±1.19 vs. 4.58±1.39 mmHg/mL and 3.21±0.97 vs. 3.96±1.16 mmHg/mL), Ea showed a higher increase in the prosthesis group (4.01±0.67 vs. 6.18±0.20 mmHg/mL, P<0.05) in comparison to decellularized allografts (5.03±0.35 vs. 5.99±1.09 mmHg/mL). This led to impaired ventriculoarterial coupling in the prosthesis group, while it remained unchanged in the allograft group (62.5±50.9 vs. 3.9±23.4%). Z showed a strong increasing tendency in the prosthesis group and it was markedly higher after replacement when compared to decellularized allografts (44.6±8.3dyn·sec·cm−5 vs. 32.4±2.0dyn·sec·cm−5, P<0.05). Conclusions Total aortic arch replacement leads to contractility-afterload mismatch by means of increased impedance and invert ventriculoarterial coupling ratio after implantation of conventional prostheses. Implantation of decellularized allografts preserves vascular impedance

  14. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Autograft Versus Allograft in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Atanda, Alfred; O’Brien, Daniel Francis; Kraeutler, Matthew John; Flato, Russell R.; Salminen, Matthew Robert; Henrichsen, Kevin; Kane, Patrick; Dodson, Christopher C.; Cohen, Steven B.; Ciccotti, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Traditionally, bone-patella tendon-bone (BTB) autograft has been the gold standard graft choice for younger, athletic patients requiring ACL reconstruction. However, donor site morbidity, post-operative patella fracture, and increased operative time have led many surgeons to choose BTB allograft for their reconstructions. Opponents of allografts feel that slower healing time, higher rate of graft failure, and potential for disease transmission makes them undesirable graft choices in athletic patients. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical outcomes, both subjective and objective, of young patients that who have undergone either BTB autograft or allograft reconstructions with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. Methods: One hundred and twenty patients (60 autograft, 60 allograft), age 25 and below at time of surgery, were contacted after being retrospectively identified as patients having an ACL reconstruction with either a BTB allograft or autograft by one senior surgeon. Patients were administered the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale and IKDC Subjective Knee Evaluation questionnaires. Fifty (25 BTB autograft and 25 BTB allograft) of the 120 returned for physical examination as well as completion of a single leg hop test and laxity evaluation using a KT-1000 arthrometer evaluation. Of the 120 patients contacted, there were a total of 7 failures (5.8%) requiring revision, 6 in the allograft group (86%) and 1 in the autograft group (14%). Results: The average Lysholm scores were 89.0 and 89.56 and the average IKDC scores were 90.8 and 92.1 in the autograft and allograft groups respectively. The differences in the Lysholm scores and the IKDC scores were not significant. The single leg hop and KT-1000 scores were also not significantly different. One autograft patient had a minor motion deficit. Three allograft patients had a grade 1 Lachman and pivot glide. One autograft patient and two allograft patients had mild patellafemoral crepitus. There was no

  15. Infiltration of Macrophages Correlates with Severity of Allograft Rejection and Outcome in Human Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bourier, Felix; Kühne, Louisa; Banas, Miriam C.; Rümmele, Petra; Wurm, Simone; Banas, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite substantial progress in recent years, graft survival beyond the first year still requires improvement. Since modern immunosuppression addresses mainly T-cell activation and proliferation, we studied macrophage infiltration into the allografts of 103 kidney transplant recipients during acute antibody and T-cell mediated rejection. Macrophage infiltration was correlated with both graft function and graft survival until month 36 after transplantation. Results Macrophage infiltration was significantly elevated in antibody-mediated and T-cell mediated rejection, but not in kidneys with established IFTA. Treatment of rejection with steroids was less successful in patients with more prominent macrophage infiltration into the allografts. Macrophage infiltration was accompanied by increased cell proliferation as well as antigen presentation. With regard to the compartmental distribution severity of T-cell-mediated rejection was correlated to the amount of CD68+ cells especially in the peritubular and perivascular compartment, whereas biopsies with ABMR showed mainly peritubular CD68 infiltration. Furthermore, severity of macrophage infiltration was a valid predictor of resulting creatinine values two weeks as well as two and three years after renal transplantation as illustrated by multivariate analysis. Additionally performed ROC curve analysis showed that magnitude of macrophage infiltration (below vs. above the median) was a valid predictor for the necessity to restart dialysis. Having additionally stratified biopsies in accordance to the magnitude of macrophage infiltration, differential CD68+ cell infiltration was reflected by striking differences in overall graft survival. Conclusion The differences in acute allograft rejection have not only been reflected by different magnitudes of macrophage infiltration, but also by compartment-specific infiltration pattern and subsequent impact on resulting allograft function as well as need for dialysis

  16. Proteinuria as a Noninvasive Marker for Renal Allograft Histology and Failure: An Observational Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Naesens, Maarten; Lerut, Evelyne; Emonds, Marie-Paule; Herelixka, Albert; Evenepoel, Pieter; Claes, Kathleen; Bammens, Bert; Sprangers, Ben; Meijers, Björn; Jochmans, Ina; Monbaliu, Diethard; Pirenne, Jacques; Kuypers, Dirk R J

    2016-01-01

    Proteinuria is routinely measured to assess renal allograft status, but the diagnostic and prognostic values of this measurement for renal transplant pathology and outcome remain unclear. We included 1518 renal allograft recipients in this prospective, observational cohort study. All renal allograft biopsy samples with concomitant data on 24-hour proteinuria were included in the analyses (n=2274). Patients were followed for ≥7 years post-transplantation. Compared with proteinuria <0.3 g/24 h, the hazard ratios for graft failure were 1.14 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.81 to 1.60; P=0.50), for proteinuria 0.3-1.0 g/24 h, 2.17 (95% CI, 1.49 to 3.18; P<0.001), for proteinuria 1.0-3.0 g/24 h, and 3.01 (95% CI, 1.75 to 5.18; P<0.001), for proteinuria >3.0 g/24 h, independent of GFR and allograft histology. The predictive performance of proteinuria for graft failure was lower at 3 months after transplant (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve [AUC] 0.64, P<0.001) than at 1, 2, and 5 years after transplant (AUC 0.73, 0.71, and 0.77, respectively, all P<0.001). Independent determinants of proteinuria were repeat transplantation, mean arterial pressure, transplant glomerulopathy, microcirculation inflammation, and de novo/recurrent glomerular disease. The discriminatory power of proteinuria for these intragraft injury processes was better in biopsy samples obtained >3 months after transplant (AUC 0.73, P<0.001) than in those obtained earlier (AUC 0.56, P<0.01), with 85% specificity but lower sensitivity (47.8%) for proteinuria >1.0 g/24 h. These data support current clinical guidelines to routinely measure proteinuria after transplant, but illustrate the need for more sensitive biomarkers of allograft injury and prognosis. PMID:26152270

  17. Antibody Mediated Rejection as a Contributor to Previously Unexplained Early Liver Allograft Loss

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Jacqueline G.; Kaneku, Hugo; Demetris, Anthony J.; Marr, John D.; Shiller, S. Michelle; Susskind, Brian M.; Tillery, Glenn W.; Terasaki, Paul I.; Klintmalm, Göran B.

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed 60 patients with idiopathic early allograft loss (defined as death or retransplantation <90 days) to determine the relative contribution of preformed donor specific HLA alloantibodies (DSA) to this endpoint and defined strict criteria for the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in liver allografts. Inclusion criteria encompassed availability of a pre-transplant serum sample and both post-reperfusion and follow-up tissue specimens for “blinded” retrospective re-review of histology and C4d staining. AMR was diagnosed based on the presence of all 4 strict criteria: 1) DSA in serum; 2) histopathological evidence of diffuse microvascular injury/microvasculitis, consistent with antibody-mediated injury; 3) diffuse C4d staining in the portal microvasculature with or without staining in the sinusoids or central veins in at least one sample; and 4) exclusion of other causes of a similar type of injury. Patients thought to be experiencing definite AMR on the basis of routine histopathology alone showed the highest levels of DSA sensitization. Forty percent of patients with pre-transplant DSA with a pattern of bead saturation after serial dilutions developed AMR. One additional multiparous female developed, what appeared to be, a strong “recall” response resulting in combined AMR and ACR causing graft failure. A contribution of DSA to allograft failure could not be excluded in three additional patients who received marginal grafts. In conclusion, liver allograft recipients with high mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) preformed DSA despite dilution seem to be at risk for clinically significant allograft injury, and possibly loss, from AMR often in combination with ACR. PMID:24382837

  18. Renal medullary changes in renal allograft recipients with raised serum creatinine

    PubMed Central

    Sis, B; Sarioglu, S; Celik, A; Kasap, B; Yildiz, S; Kavukcu, S; Gulay, H; Camsari, T

    2006-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the renal medulla may reflect rejection related changes and thus have a predictive value in the assessment of acute renal allograft rejection or chronic graft damage. Methods 75 post‐transplant biopsies from 57 patients were scored according to the Banff 1997 scheme. The biopsies with adequate cortical and medullary tissue (n = 23) were selected and medullary tissues were reviewed for rejection related lesions except intimal arteritis. Chronic damage was determined by image analysis depending on periodic acid‐methenamine silver (PAMS)‐Masson trichrome (MT) staining. Medullary and cortical changes were compared. Results Interstitial inflammation and tubulitis were more frequent and severe in the cortex (p<0.001). Medullary tubulitis was associated with intimal arteritis (p = 0.003, r = 0.598). Medullary interstitial inflammation (n = 8) and tubulitis (n = 4) were associated with cortical borderline changes (n = 5) or allograft rejection (n = 3). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of medullary inflammatory changes in predicting cortical allograft rejection were 43%, 69%, 37%, and 73%, respectively. A significant association was observed between medullary MT‐SAP and cortical PAMS‐SAP values (p = 0.02, R2 = 0.23). Conclusions Acute rejection related lesions are more common and severe in the cortex, and the renal medulla does not sufficiently reflect cortical rejection. The positive and negative predictive values of medullary changes for allograft rejection are low, and medullary inflammation is not a reliable indicator of allograft rejection. Increased medullary fibrosis is correlated with chronic cortical damage. PMID:16461569

  19. Surgical Treatment of Pyogenic Spondylitis with the Use of Freeze-Dried Structural Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Soo; Yoon, Jong-Won; Park, Hyun; Lee, Chul-Hee; Hwang, Soo-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Radical debridement and reconstruction is necessary for surgical treatment of pyogenic spondylitis to control infection and to provide segmental stability. The authors identified 25 patients who underwent surgery for pyogenic spondylitis using freeze-dried structural allograft for reconstruction. This study aimed to evaluate and demonstrate the effectiveness and safety of a freeze-dried structural allograft during the surgical treatment of pyogenic spondylitis. Methods From January 2011 to May 2013, we retrospectively reviewed 25 surgically treated patients of pyogenic spondylitis. Surgical techniques used were anterior radical debridement and reconstruction with a freeze-dried structural allograft and instrumentation. In these 25 patients, we retrospectively examined whether the symptoms had improved and the infection was controlled after surgery by evaluating laboratory data, clinical and radiological outcomes. The average follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 12.2-37.5 months). Results The infection resolved in all of the patients and there were no cases of recurrent infection. The mean Visual Analog Scale score was 6.92 (range, 5-10) before surgery and 1.90 (range, 0-5) at the time of the last follow-up. Preoperatively, lower extremity motor deficits related to spinal infection were noted in 10 patients, and they improved in 7 patients after surgery. Follow-up computed tomographic scans were obtained from 10 patients, and osseous union between the vertebral body and the structural allograft was achieved in 2 patients. Conclusion The freeze-dried structural allograft can be a safe and effective alternative for surgical treatment of pyogenic spondylitis, and another option for vertebral reconstruction instead of using the other materials. PMID:25346759

  20. Conversion from calcineurin inhibitor to sirolimus in pediatric chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Falger, Jutta C; Mueller, Thomas; Arbeiter, Klaus; Boehm, Michael; Regele, Heinz; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2006-06-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy is a major cause for allograft loss in renal transplantation. Sirolimus was recently introduced as a potent non-nephrotoxic alternative to calcineurin inhibitors. In the present study, effects of a conversion protocol were investigated in pediatric chronic allograft nephropathy with declining glomerular filtration rate (GFR), defined by a Schwartz formula clearance below 60 mL/1.73 m(2)/min, steadily increasing serum creatinine and allograft biopsy. In eight children with a median age of 12.8 yr, sirolimus was started at median 32 months after transplantation with a loading dose of 0.24 mg/kg bodyweight (BW), followed by 0.2 mg/kgBW/day, aimed at trough levels of 15-20 ng/mL. Calcineurin inhibitors were reduced to 50% at the start of sirolimus and discontinued at median 7 days when target levels of sirolimus were reached. Following conversion, changes of GFR significantly stabilized (-2.9 vs. +0.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/month, p = 0.025). Individual GFR increased in five out of eight patients (p = 0.026), and only one child exhibited unaltered progression of graft failure. In the responders, mean serum creatinine improved by 0.3 mg/dL (p = 0.043). Effects were not dependent on GFR at conversion, or on time post-transplantation. Blood pressure, hematological parameters and proteinuria remained stable during the observation period, and serum lipids increased transiently. About half of the children suffered from infectious complications. No child had to be taken off sirolimus; there was no graft loss during the observation period. In conclusion, conversion from calcineurin inhibitors to sirolimus is an effective protocol with tolerable side effects to stabilize renal graft function for at least one yr in the majority of children with biopsy-proven chronic allograft nephropathy. PMID:16712606

  1. The essential role of annexin A1 mimetic peptide in the skin allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Rodrigo Antonio Parra; Mimura, Kallyne Kioko Oliveira; Araujo, Leandro Pires; Greco, Karin Vicente; Oliani, Sonia Maria

    2016-02-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs have a critical role in inhibiting tissue damage and allograft rejection. Studies have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of the annexin A1 (AnxA1) in the regulation of transmigration and apoptosis of leucocytes. In the present study, an experimental skin allograft model was used to evaluate a potential protective effect of AnxA1 in transplantation survival. Mice were used for the skin allograft model and pharmacological treatments were carried out using either the AnxA1 mimetic peptide Ac2-26, with or without cyclosporine A (CsA), starting 3 days before surgery until rejection. Graft survival, skin histopathology, leucocyte transmigration and expression of AnxA1 and AnxA5 post-transplantation were analysed. Pharmacological treatment with Ac2-26 increased skin allograft survival related with inhibition of neutrophil transmigration and induction of apoptosis, thereby reducing the tissue damage compared with control animals. Moreover, AnxA1 and AnxA5 expression increased after Ac2-26 treatment in neutrophils. Interestingly, the combination of Ac2-26 and cyclosporine A showed similar survival of transplants when compared with the cyclosporine A group, which could be attributed to a synergistic effect of both drugs. Investigations in vitro revealed that cyclosporine A inhibited extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation induced by Ac2-26 in neutrophils. Overall, the results suggest that AnxA1 has an essential role in augmenting the survival of skin allograft, mainly owing to inhibition of neutrophil transmigration and enhancement of apoptosis. This effect may lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches relevant to transplant rejection. PMID:23897745

  2. Socket preservation and sinus augmentation using a medical grade calcium sulfate hemihydrate and mineralized irradiated cancellous bone allograft composite.

    PubMed

    Bagoff, Robert; Mamidwar, Sachin; Chesnoiu-Matei, Ioana; Ricci, John L; Alexander, Harold; Tovar, Nick M

    2013-06-01

    Regeneration and preservation of bone after the extraction of a tooth are necessary for the placement of a dental implant. The goal is to regenerate alveolar bone with minimal postoperative pain. Medical grade calcium sulfate hemihydrate (MGCSH) can be used alone or in combination with other bone grafts; it improves graft handling characteristics and particle containment of particle-based bone grafts. In this case series, a 1:1 ratio mix of MGCSH and mineralized irradiated cancellous bone allograft (MICBA) was mixed with saline and grafted into an extraction socket in an effort to maintain alveolar height and width for future implant placement. MGCSH can be used in combination with other bone grafts and can improve handling characteristics and graft particle containment of particle-based bone grafts. In the cases described, we found that an MGCSH:MICBA graft can potentially be an effective bone graft composite. It has the ability to act as a space maintainer and as an osteoconductive trellis for bone cells, thereby promoting bone regeneration in the extraction socket. MGCSH, a cost-effective option, successfully improved MICBA handling characteristics, prevented soft tissue ingrowth, and assisted in the regeneration of bone. PMID:21905884

  3. Adenovirus-mediated HIF-1α gene transfer promotes repair of mouse airway allograft microvasculature and attenuates chronic rejection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinguo; Khan, Mohammad A; Tian, Wen; Beilke, Joshua; Natarajan, Ramesh; Kosek, Jon; Yoder, Mervin C; Semenza, Gregg L; Nicolls, Mark R

    2011-06-01

    Chronic rejection, manifested as small airway fibrosis (obliterative bronchiolitis [OB]), is the main obstacle to long-term survival in lung transplantation. Recent studies demonstrate that the airways involved in a lung transplant are relatively hypoxic at baseline and that OB pathogenesis may be linked to ischemia induced by a transient loss of airway microvasculature. Here, we show that HIF-1α mediates airway microvascular repair in a model of orthotopic tracheal transplantation. Grafts with a conditional knockout of Hif1a demonstrated diminished recruitment of recipient-derived Tie2⁺ angiogenic cells to the allograft, impaired repair of damaged microvasculature, accelerated loss of microvascular perfusion, and hastened denudation of epithelial cells. In contrast, graft HIF-1α overexpression induced via an adenoviral vector prolonged airway microvascular perfusion, preserved epithelial integrity, extended the time window for the graft to be rescued from chronic rejection, and attenuated airway fibrotic remodeling. HIF-1α overexpression induced the expression of proangiogenic factors such as Sdf1, Plgf, and Vegf, and promoted the recruitment of vasoreparative Tie2⁺ cells. This study demonstrates that a therapy that enhances vascular integrity during acute rejection may promote graft health and prevent chronic rejection. PMID:21606594

  4. In Vivo Transplantation of Autogenous Marrow-Derived Cells Following Rapid Intraoperative Magnetic Separation Based on Hyaluronan to Augment Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Powrnima; Fleury, Sean; Luangphakdy, Viviane; Shinohara, Kentaro; Pan, Hui; Boehm, Cynthia; Vasanji, Amit; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Walker, Esteban; Yaszemski, Michael; Hascall, Vincent; Zborowski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This project was designed to test the hypothesis that rapid intraoperative processing of bone marrow based on hyaluronan (HA) could be used to improve the outcome of local bone regeneration if the concentration and prevalence of marrow-derived connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) could be increased and nonprogenitors depleted before implantation. Methods HA was used as a marker for positive selection of marrow-derived CTPs using magnetic separation (MS) to obtain a population of HA-positive cells with an increased CTP prevalence. Mineralized cancellous allograft (MCA) was used as an osteoconductive carrier scaffold for loading of HA-positive cells. The canine femoral multidefect model was used and four cylindrical defects measuring 10 mm in diameter and 15 mm in length were grafted with MCA combined with unprocessed marrow or with MS processed marrow that was enriched in HA+ CTPs and depleted in red blood cells and nonprogenitors. Outcome was assessed at 4 weeks using quantitative 3D microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis of bone formation and histomorphological assessment. Results Histomorphological assessment showed a significant increase in new bone formation and in the vascular sinus area in the MS-processed defects. Robust bone formation was found throughout the defect area in both groups (defects grafted with unprocessed marrow or with MS processed marrow.) Percent bone volume in the defects, as assessed by micro-CT, was greater in defects engrafted with MS processed cells, but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion Rapid intraoperative MS processing to enrich CTPs based on HA as a surface marker can be used to increase the concentration and prevalence of CTPs. MCA grafts supplemented with heparinized bone marrow or MS processed cells resulted in a robust and advanced stage of bone regeneration at 4 weeks. A greater new bone formation and vascular sinus area was found in defects grafted with MS processed cells

  5. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma with bone marrow metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zen, H G; Jame, J M; Chang, A Y; Li, W Y; Law, C K; Chen, K Y; Lin, C Z

    1991-02-01

    Five of 23 patients with recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) were diagnosed to have bone marrow metastasis. They all had advanced local-regional disease, and were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive radiotherapy after the initial diagnosis. Bone marrow metastasis developed 4-24 months later. The clinical features were anemia (5 of 5), leukopenia (3 of 5), thrombocytopenia (4 of 5), sepsis (3 of 5), tenderness of the sternum (3 of 5), and fever (4 of 5). Patients frequently had elevation of serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALK-P), and IgG and IgA antibody titers to Epstein-Barr viral capsid antigen when bone marrow involvement was diagnosed. However, clinical manifestations and laboratory tests were not specific. It is important that three patients had normal bone scans. All five patients had a rapid downhill course; four patients died within 23 days, and the fifth 3 months after the diagnosis of bone marrow metastasis. We concluded that bone marrow was a common metastatic site in NPC patients. Bone marrow metastasis adversely affected patients' survival and required a high index of suspicion for diagnosis. We suggested that bone marrow biopsy should be considered as a routine staging procedure in NPC patients and indicated especially when patients presented with abnormal blood counts, sepsis, bone pain, or tenderness of the sternum. It may be positive in the face of a normal bone scan. PMID:1987743

  6. Polyoma (BK) virus associated urothelial carcinoma originating within a renal allograft five years following resolution of polyoma virus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Steven P; Myers-Gurevitch, Patricia M; Chu, Stacy; Robinson, Brian D; Dadhania, Darshana; Seshan, Surya V

    2016-03-01

    A direct role for BK polyomavirus infection in malignant tumors of renal allografts and urinary tract is emerging. Case reports suggest a link between BK virus (BKV) reactivation and development of malignancy in renal allograft recipients. Herein we describe the first case of BKV positive invasive urothelial carcinoma within the renal allograft, presenting with chronic diarrhea and weight loss 5 years following resolution of BK viremia/nephropathy (BKVN). Unique to our case was the remote history of BK viremia/BKVN, rising titer of anti-HLA antibody and presence of renal limited urothelial carcinoma with microinvasion of malignant cells staining positive for SV40 large T antigen (T-Ag). These findings suggest that persistence of subclinical BKV infection within the renal allograft may play a role in the malignant transformation of epithelial cells. Patients with history of BKVN may be at risk for kidney and urinary tract malignancy despite resolution of BK viremia/BKVN. PMID:26709521

  7. MicroRNA-10b downregulation mediates acute rejection of renal allografts by derepressing BCL2L11

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaoyou; Dong, Changgui; Jiang, Zhengyao; Wu, William K.K.; Chan, Matthew T.V.; Zhang, Jie; Li, Haibin; Qin, Ke; Sun, Xuyong

    2015-04-10

    Kidney transplantation is the major therapeutic option for end-stage kidney diseases. However, acute rejection could cause allograft loss in some of these patients. Emerging evidence supports that microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation is implicated in acute allograft rejection. In this study, we used next-generation sequencing to profile miRNA expression in normal and acutely rejected kidney allografts. Among 75 identified dysregulated miRNAs, miR-10b was the most significantly downregulated miRNAs in rejected allografts. Transfecting miR-10b inhibitor into human renal glomerular endothelial cells recapitulated key features of acute allograft rejection, including endothelial cell apoptosis, release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor α, interferon-γ, and chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2) and chemotaxis of macrophages whereas transfection of miR-10b mimics had opposite effects. Downregulation of miR-10b directly derepressed the expression of BCL2L11 (an apoptosis inducer) as revealed by luciferase reporter assay. Taken together, miR-10b downregulation mediates many aspects of disease pathogenicity of acute kidney allograft rejection. Restoring miR-10b expression in glomerular endothelial cells could be a novel therapeutic approach to reduce acute renal allograft loss. - Highlights: • miR-10b was the most downregulated microRNAs in acutely rejected renal allografts. • miR-10b downregulation triggered glomerular endothelial cell apoptosis. • miR-10b downregulation induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. • miR-10b downregulation derepressed its pro-apoptotic target BCL2L11.

  8. Use of [18F]FDG PET to Monitor The Development of Cardiac Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Kevin P.; Dearling, Jason L. J.; Seto, Tatsuichiro; Dunning, Patricia; Fahey, Frederic; Packard, Alan B.; Briscoe, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has the potential to be a specific, sensitive and quantitative diagnostic test for transplant rejection. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) and 13N-labeled ammonia ([13N]NH3) small animal PET imaging in a well-established murine cardiac rejection model. Methods Heterotopic transplants were performed using minor MHC mismatched B6.C-H2bm12 donor hearts in C57BL/6(H-2b) recipients. C57BL/6 donor hearts into C57BL/6 recipients served as isograft controls. [18F]FDG PET imaging was performed weekly between post-transplant days 7 and 42 and the percent injected dose was computed for each graft. [13N]NH3 imaging was performed to evaluate myocardial perfusion. Results There was a significant increase in [18F]FDG uptake in allografts from day 14 to day 21 (1.6% to 5.2%; P<0.001) and uptake in allografts was significantly increased on post-transplant days 21 (5.2% vs. 0.9%; P=0.005) and 28 (4.8% vs. 0.9%; P=0.006) compared to isograft controls. Furthermore, [18F]FDG uptake correlated with an increase in rejection within allografts between days 14 and 28 post-transplant. Finally, the uptake of [13N]NH3 was significantly lower relative to the native heart in allografts with chronic vasculopathy compared to isograft controls on day 28 (P=0.01). Conclusions PET imaging with [18F]FDG can be used following transplantation to monitor the evolution of rejection. In addition, decreased uptake of [13N]NH3 in rejecting allografts may be reflective of decreased myocardial blood flow. These data suggest that combined [18F]FDG and [13N]NH3 PET imaging could be used as a non-invasive, quantitative technique for serial monitoring of allograft rejection and has potential application in human transplant recipients. PMID:25675207

  9. Analyzing the cellular contribution of bone marrow to fracture healing using bone marrow transplantation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Colnot, C. . E-mail: colnotc@orthosurg.ucsf.edu; Huang, S.; Helms, J.

    2006-11-24

    The bone marrow is believed to play important roles during fracture healing such as providing progenitor cells for inflammation, matrix remodeling, and cartilage and bone formation. Given the complex nature of bone repair, it remains difficult to distinguish the contributions of various cell types. Here we describe a mouse model based on bone marrow transplantation and genetic labeling to track cells originating from bone marrow during fracture healing. Following lethal irradiation and engraftment of bone marrow expressing the LacZ transgene constitutively, wild type mice underwent tibial fracture. Donor bone marrow-derived cells, which originated from the hematopoietic compartment, did not participate in the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages during fracture healing. Instead, the donor bone marrow contributed to inflammatory and bone resorbing cells. This model can be exploited in the future to investigate the role of inflammation and matrix remodeling during bone repair, independent from osteogenesis and chondrogenesis.

  10. The versatility of a glycerol-preserved skin allograft as an adjunctive treatment to free flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mat Saad, A. Z.; Khoo, T. L.; Dorai, A. A.; Halim, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    Skin allografts have been used in medical practice for over a century owing to their unique composition as a biological dressing. Skin allografts can be obtained in several preparations such as cryopreserved, glycerol-preserved, and fresh allograft. A glycerol-preserved allograft (GPA) was introduced in the early 1980s. It has several advantages compared with other dressings such as ease of processing, storage and transport, lower cost, less antigenicity, antimicrobial properties, and neo-vascularisation promoting properties. Skin allografts are mainly used in the management of severe burn injuries, chronic ulcers, and complex, traumatic wounds. Published reports of the use of skin allografts in association with free flap surgery are few or non existent. We would like to share our experience of several cases of free tissue transfer that utilised GPA as a temporary wound dressing in multiple scenarios. On the basis of this case series, we would like to recommend that a GPA be used as a temporary dressing in conjunction with free flap surgery when required to protect the flap pedicle, allowing time for the edema to subside and the wound can then be closed for a better aesthetic outcome. PMID:19881027

  11. Lentivirus IL-10 gene therapy down-regulates IL-17 and attenuates mouse orthotopic lung allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, S; Sato, M; Loisel-Meyer, S; Matsuda, Y; Oishi, H; Guan, Z; Saito, T; Yeung, J; Cypel, M; Hwang, D M; Medin, J A; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of lentivirus-mediated IL-10 gene therapy to target lung allograft rejection in a mouse orthotopic left lung transplantation model. IL-10 may regulate posttransplant immunity mediated by IL-17. Lentivirus-mediated trans-airway luciferase gene transfer to the donor lung resulted in persistent luciferase activity up to 6 months posttransplant in the isograft (B6 to B6); luciferase activity decreased in minor-mismatched allograft lungs (B10 to B6) in association with moderate rejection. Fully MHC-mismatched allograft transplantation (BALB/c to B6) resulted in severe rejection and complete loss of luciferase activity. In minor-mismatched allografts, IL-10-encoding lentivirus gene therapy reduced the acute rejection score compared with the lentivirus-luciferase control at posttransplant day 28 (3.0 ± 0.6 vs. 2.0 ± 0.6 (mean ± SD); p = 0.025; n = 6/group). IL-10 gene therapy also significantly reduced gene expression of IL-17, IL-23, and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor (ROR)-γt without affecting levels of IL-12 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Cells expressing IL-17 were dramatically reduced in the allograft lung. In conclusion, lentivirus-mediated IL-10 gene therapy significantly reduced expression of IL-17 and other associated genes in the transplanted allograft lung and attenuated posttransplant immune responses after orthotopic lung transplantation. PMID:23601206

  12. A comparative evaluation of freeze dried bone allograft and decalcified freeze dried bone allograft in the treatment of intrabony defects: A clinical and radiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Gothi, Rajat; Bansal, Mansi; Kaushik, Mayur; Khattak, Braham Prakash; Sood, Nikhil; Taneja, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ideal graft material for regenerative procedures is autogenous bone graft but the major disadvantage with this graft is the need for a secondary surgical site to procure donor material and the frequent lack of intraoral donor site to obtain sufficient quantities of autogenous bone for multiple or deep osseous defects. Hence, to overcome these disadvantages, bone allografts were developed as an alternative source of graft material. Materials and Methods: In 10 patients with chronic periodontitis, 20 bilateral infrabony defects were treated with freeze dried bone allograft (FDBA-Group A) and decalcified freeze dried bone allograft (DFDBA-Group B). Clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed preoperatively and at 3 months and 6 months postoperatively. Data thus obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. Results: Significant improvement in the reduction in probing depth and relative attachment level (RAL) from the baseline to 3 months to baseline to 6 months in group A and group B, which was statistically significant but no statistically significant reduction was seen between 3 months and 6 months. On inter-group comparison, no significant differences were observed at all-time points. In adjunct to the probing depth and RAL, the radiographic area of the defect showed a similar trend in intra-group comparison and no significant difference was seen on inter-group comparison at all-time points. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that DFDBA did not show any improvement in the clinical and radiographic parameters in the treatment of the intrabony defects as compared to FDBA. PMID:26392690

  13. Preventing stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Stroke - prevention; CVA - prevention; cerebral vascular accident - prevention; TIA - prevention, transient ischemic attack - prevention ... Clinical Cardiology; Council on Functional Genomics and ... Council on Hypertension. Guidelines for the primary prevention ...

  14. Bone marrow transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia: factors associated with early mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Bortin, M.M.; Gale, R.P.; Kay, H.E.; Rimm, A.A.

    1983-03-04

    Comprehensive data were reported to the International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry, Milwaukee, regarding 156 patients with acute myelogenous leukemia who were treated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation between 1978 and 1980. The minimum observation period was 15 months after transplant and most deaths occurred within the first six months. Prognostic factors were evaluated for associations with early mortality or life-threatening complications. Most early deaths were due to infections, interstitial pneumonitis, and graft-v-host disease (GVHD). Multivariate analyses disclosed five factors with significant associations with early death or a major cause of early death: (1) disease status; (2) dose-rate of irradiation; (3) drug used to prevent GVHD; (4) severity of GVHD; and (5) dose of marrow cells.It is emphasized that several of the important prognostic factors are within the control of the referring physician or the transplant team.

  15. Effect of selective T cell depletion of host and/or donor bone marrow on lymphopoietic repopulation, tolerance, and graft-vs-host disease in mixed allogeneic chimeras (B10 + B10. D2----B10)

    SciTech Connect

    Ildstad, S.T.; Wren, S.M.; Bluestone, J.A.; Barbieri, S.A.; Stephany, D.; Sachs, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with a mixture of T cell-depleted syngeneic plus T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow (B10 + B10.D2----B10) leads to the induction of mixed lymphopoietic chimerism, excellent survivals, specific in vivo transplantation tolerance to subsequent donor strain skin grafts, and specific in vitro unresponsiveness to allogeneic donor lymphoid elements as assessed by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) proliferative and cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) cytotoxicity assays. When B10 recipient mice received mixed marrow inocula in which the syngeneic component had not been T cell depleted, whether or not the allogeneic donor marrow was treated, they repopulated exclusively with host-type cells, promptly rejected donor-type skin allografts, and were reactive in vitro to the allogeneic donor by CML and MLR assays. In contrast, T cell depletion of the syngeneic component of the mixed marrow inocula resulted in specific acceptance of allogeneic donor strain skin grafts. Such animals were specifically unreactive to allogeneic donor lymphoid elements in vitro by CML and MLR, but were reactive to third party. When both the syngeneic and allogeneic marrow were T cell depleted, variable percentages of host- and donor-type lymphoid elements were detected in the mixed reconstituted host. When only the syngeneic bone marrow was T cell depleted, animals repopulated exclusively with donor-type cells. Although these animals had detectable in vitro anti-host (B10) reactivity by CML and MLR and reconstituted as fully allogeneic chimeras, they exhibited excellent survival and had no in vivo evidence for graft-vs-host disease. Experiments in which untreated donor spleen cells were added to the inocula in this last group suggest that the presence of T cell-depleted syngeneic bone marrow cells diminishes graft-vs-host disease and the mortality from it.

  16. Bone marrow lesions: A systematic diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Filippo Del; Farahani, Sahar J; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow lesions on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are common and may be seen with various pathologies. The authors outline a systematic diagnostic approach with proposed categorization of various etiologies of bone marrow lesions. Utilization of typical imaging features on conventional MR imaging techniques and other problem-solving techniques, such as chemical shift imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), to achieve accurate final diagnosis has been highlighted. PMID:25114392

  17. Fat embolism syndrome following bone marrow harvesting.

    PubMed

    Baselga, J; Reich, L; Doherty, M; Gulati, S

    1991-06-01

    A case of fat embolism syndrome is reported following an uncomplicated bone marrow harvest. The presenting symptoms were restlessness, shortness of breath and arterial hypoxemia. A lung perfusion scan ruled out the presence of a lung thromboembolism. The patient received supportive therapy and recovered within a few hours. We speculate that the larger gauge needle (13 vs 15) used to aspirate the bone marrow may have represented increased trauma to the iliac crest leading to fat embolism. PMID:1873595

  18. Navigating the bone marrow niche: translational insights and cancer-driven dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Michaela R; Rosen, Clifford J

    2016-03-01

    The bone marrow niche consists of stem and progenitor cells destined to become mature cells such as haematopoietic elements, osteoblasts or adipocytes. Marrow cells, influenced by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine factors, ultimately function as a unit to regulate bone remodelling and haematopoiesis. Current evidence highlights that the bone marrow niche is not merely an anatomic compartment; rather, it integrates the physiology of two distinct organ systems, the skeleton and the marrow. The niche has a hypoxic microenvironment that maintains quiescent haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and supports glycolytic metabolism. In response to biochemical cues and under the influence of neural, hormonal, and biochemical factors, marrow stromal elements, such as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), differentiate into mature, functioning cells. However, disruption of the niche can affect cellular differentiation, resulting in disorders ranging from osteoporosis to malignancy. In this Review, we propose that the niche reflects the vitality of two tissues - bone and blood - by providing a unique environment for stem and stromal cells to flourish while simultaneously preventing disproportionate proliferation, malignant transformation or loss of the multipotent progenitors required for healing, functional immunity and growth throughout an organism's lifetime. Through a fuller understanding of the complexity of the niche in physiologic and pathologic states, the successful development of more-effective therapeutic approaches to target the niche and its cellular components for the treatment of rheumatic, endocrine, neoplastic and metabolic diseases becomes achievable. PMID:26607387

  19. [Treatment of an old Achilles tendon rupture with allografts. Report of case series].

    PubMed

    Matus-Jiménez, J; Martínez-Arredondo, H

    2011-01-01

    Rupture of Achilles tendon occurs at 2-6 cm from its attachment in the calcaneus; its frequency is estimated at 7-18 cases per 100,000 population in the United States and it occurs more frequently in males. The diagnosis is made clinically and with ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging and treatment may be divided into acute or late. We present herein the use of allograft to treat patients with ruptures more than six weeks old; several techniques were used depending on the rupture site and the available allograft. Ten plasties were performed in ten patients with ruptures that occurred a mean of 8 months back; early rehabilitation was instituted and weight bearing was allowed at 4 weeks with a brace, which was removed at 12 weeks; patients could run at 12 weeks. Four wound dehiscence complications were reported, which resolved with second intention healing without the need for any other surgery, with good results and patient satisfaction. PMID:22512126

  20. Prospective coronary angioscopy assessment of allograft coronary artery disease in human cardiac transplant recipients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ashit; Ventura, Hector O.; Collins, Tyrone J.; Ramee, Stephen R.; White, Christopher J.

    1993-09-01

    Annual angiographic assessment to determine the presence or progression of allograft coronary artery disease (CAD) has been unable to modify the natural history of this disease. Coronary angioscopy is a sensitive method to detect the early presence of coronary artery disease and in a retrospective analysis severity of CAD by angioscopy correlated with the time since transplantation. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate progression of coronary artery disease over a one year period in 40 cardiac transplant recipients. The progression of coronary artery disease as assessed by angioscopy is directly related to time after transplantation and therefore angioscopy may be the method of choice for detection and evaluation of therapeutic regimens to control allograft coronary artery disease.

  1. Treatment of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis Recurrence in the Renal Allograft: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Minh-Ha; Chan, Cynthia; Pasch, Whitney; Carpenter, Philip; Ichii, Hirohito; Foster, Clarence

    2016-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) causes glomerular lesions that can progress to end-stage renal disease. It is suspected to be caused by a circulating factor that is amenable to plasmapheresis removal and exhibits a risk for recurrence in the renal allograft. We present two patients with FSGS recurrence in their allograft kidneys diagnosed by biopsy after significant proteinuria developed in the posttransplant setting. Treatment with therapeutic plasma exchange induced long-term remission in both patients. Spot urine protein:creatinine ratios were monitored and treatment was continued until a target of <0.5 was achieved. In patient number two, a second peak in proteinuria and azotemia was ultimately attributable to ureteral stenosis and these values normalized following repair. In conclusion, therapeutic plasma exchange is an effective treatment for FSGS recurring following renal transplant. PMID:27099858

  2. Preprosthetic alveolar ridge correction using glutaraldehyde cross-linked, lyophilized scleral allografts.

    PubMed

    Spatzner, M; Deporter, D A

    1990-03-01

    Following the loss of a maxillary anterior tooth, there is often a change in the topography of the residual alveolar ridge, resulting in a ridge defect that requires surgical correction by the dentist before the placement of a fixed prosthesis. The present study utilized glutaraldehyde cross-linked, lyophilized human sclera as an allograft material to correct such ridge defects. The cases treated with this allograft were followed postoperatively for 3 months and were objectively assessed by digitization of sectioned sequential stone casts. The results showed statistically significant improvement at the grafted sites with no shrinkage at 3 months and verified that glutaraldehyde cross-linked, freeze-dried human sclera is useful in localized ridge augmentation procedures. PMID:2115820

  3. Arsenic trioxide attenuated the rejection of major histocompatibility complex fully-mismatched cardiac allografts in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, S; Zhang, Q Y; Zhou, B; Xue, L; Chen, H; Wang, Y; Zheng, S S

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the effects of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) on allogeneic immune response using a mouse heart transplantation model. Mice were randomly divided into 4 groups of 6 animals each. The control group received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS); the As(2)O(3)-treated group, intraperitoneal (IP) injection of As(2)O(3) (1 mg/kg) from days -3 to 10 after heart transplantation. The cyclosporine (CsA)-treated group was given a subtherapeutic dose of CsA (10 mg/kg) IP, and the As(2)O(3) plus CsA-treated group, a combined protocol of As(2)O(3) and CsA. Six days after transplantation, cardiac allografts were harvested for immunohistology and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. The survival of the allografts was significantly improved among the As(2)O(3)-treated group compared with the control group (17.2 +/- 1.9 vs 8.0 +/- 0.9 days; P < .05). A marked prolongation (28.6 +/- 6.0 days) of graft survival was achieved by the combined protocol compared with the CsA-treated group (9.6 +/- 3.0 days; P < .05) or the As(2)O(3)-treated group. Allografts of As(2)O(3)-treated and As(2)O(3) plus CsA-treated mice showed a changing pattern of Th1/Th2 cytokine mRNA expression. Allograft rejection was apparently alleviated by low-dose As(2)O(3), and particularly when combined with a subtherapeutic CsA dose. PMID:19545743

  4. Results of reconstruction of massive irreparable rotator cuff tears using a fascia lata allograft

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrios, Varvitsiotis; Athanasios, Papaspiliopoulos; Eleni, Antipa; Xenofon, Papacharalampous; George, Flevarakis; John, Feroussis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the advances in surgical treatment options, massive rotator cuff (r-c) tears still represent a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. This study assesses the effectiveness of fascia lata allograft in reconstruction of massive and irreparable r-c tear and to evaluate the healing and functional outcomes. Materials and Methods: 68 patients (38 men, 30 women, mean age 64.9 years) with massive or irreparable r-c tears were treated with placement of fascia lata allograft to fill the defect between February 2006 and February 2010. At 43 months followup they were evaluated clinically using the constant score, preoperatively and postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound were used postoperatively, to assess the integrity of the allograft at the repair site. Postoperatively, standard rehabilitation protocol was followed with gradual restoration. Results: Postoperative constant score increased from 32.5 preoperatively to 88.7 postoperatively. The most important was the pain relief from 2.4 preoperatively to 14.1 postoperatively and range of motion. The results of the MRI were not reliable, but the ultrasound was satisfactory. Finally, there was no infection or rejection of the graft in any of the patients. Conclusions: Despite advances in surgical methods, there is still not a universally accepted treatment for massive and irreparable rotator cuff tears, because the standard methods have dubious results, with excessive retear rates and poor outcomes, necessitating the need for new repair strategies. We documented significant clinical improvement using fascia lata allograft in the repair of massive irreparable r-c tear, acting as scaffold to bridge the defect, enhancing the healing at the repair site. PMID:26015630

  5. Iatrogenic Arteriovenous Fistula in a Renal Allograft: The Result of a TAD Guidewire Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Elliott, Catherine; Khaw, Kok-Tee; Belli, Anna-Maria; Patel, Uday

    2000-07-15

    A case is presented of an iatrogenic arteriovenous fistula developing in a renal allograft following guidewire manipulation during transplant renal artery angioplasty. Hyperdynamic flow through the fistula was causing a shunt of blood away from the renal cortex as demonstrated on sonography and scintigraphy. Selective embolization was performed, correcting the maldistribution of flow to the peripheral renal cortex. The diagnosis and difficulty in management of asymptomatic renal arteriovenous fistulae is also discussed.

  6. Liver allograft rejection in sensitized recipients. Observations in a clinically relevant small animal model.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, K.; Murase, N.; Becich, M. J.; Furuya, T.; Todo, S.; Fung, J. J.; Starzl, T. E.; Demetris, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    A sequential analysis of liver allograft rejection in sensitized rats using immunopathological and ultrastructural microscopy is described. Lewis rats were primed with four ACI skin grafts and challenged with an arterialized ACI orthotopic liver allograft 14 to 17 weeks later. The sensitization resulted in a mix of IgG and IgM lymphocytotoxic antibodies at a titer of 1:512 at the time of transplantation. Specificity analysis of pretransplant immune sera revealed a predominance of IgG anti-class I major histocompatibility complex (RT1) antibodies with a minor IgG fraction showing apparent endothelial cell specificity (non-RT1). This level of sensitization was associated with accelerated graft failure in 3 to 5 days from mixed humoral and cellular rejection. Sequential analysis of serial posttransplant graft biopsies revealed diffuse vascular IgG deposition and platelet thrombi in portal veins and periportal sinusoids within 3 minutes after reperfusion. This was followed by endothelial cell hypertrophy and vacuolization, periportal hepatocyte necrosis, arterial spasm, focal large bile duct necrosis, and hilar mast cell infiltration and degranulation. However, the liver allografts did not fail precipitously and hyperacute rejection was not seen. Kupffer cell phagocytosis of the sinusoidal platelets began as early as 30 minutes posttransplant and by 24 hours, the platelet thrombi had decreased. Cholangioles appeared focally at the edge of the limiting plates by 2 to 3 days, apparently in response to earlier periportal hepatocyte damage. A mononuclear portal and perivenular infiltrate became evident at 3 days, and graft failure was attributed to both antibody and cell-mediated rejection (Furuya et al: Preformed lymphocytotoxic antibodies: Hepatology 1992, 16: 1415-1422). The model described resembles observations in crossmatch positive human liver allograft recipients. The mechanisms of hepatic graft resistance to antibody mediated rejection and the possible long term

  7. Treatment Modality Affects Allograft-Derived Schwann Cell Phenotype and Myelinating Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Ayato; Moradzadeh, Arash; Tong, Alice; Wei, Cindy; Tuffaha, Sami H.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Tung, Thomas H.; Parsadanian, Alexander; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Myckatyn, Terence M.

    2009-01-01

    We used peripheral nerve allografts, already employed clinically to reconstruct devastating peripheral nerve injuries, to study Schwann cell (SC) plasticity in adult mice. By modulating the allograft treatment modality we were able to study migratory, denervated, rejecting, and reinnervated phenotypes in transgenic mice whose SCs expressed GFP under regulatory elements of either the S100β (S100-GFP) or nestin (Nestin-GFP) promoters. Well-differentiated SCs strongly expressed S100-GFP, while Nestin-GFP expression was stimulated by denervation, and in some cases, axons were constitutively labeled with CFP to enable in vivo imaging. Serial imaging of these mice demonstrated that untreated allografts were rejected within 20 days. Cold preserved (CP) allografts required an initial phase of SC migration that preceded axonal regeneration thus delaying myelination and maturation of the SC phenotype. Mice immunosuppressed with FK506 demonstrated mild subacute rejection, but the most robust regeneration of myelinated and unmyelinated axons and motor endplate reinnervation. While characterized by fewer regenerating axons, mice treated with the co-stimulatory blockade (CSB) agents anti-CD40L mAb and CTLAIg-4 demonstrated virtually no graft rejection during the 28 day experiment, and had significant increases in myelination, connexin-32 expression, and Akt phosphorylation compared with any other group. These results indicate that even with SC rejection, nerve regeneration can occur to some degree, particularly with FK506 treatment. However, we found that co-stimulatory blockade facilitate optimal myelin formation and maturation of SCs as indicated by protein expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), connexin-32 and phospho-Akt. PMID:18514192

  8. Is there significant variation in the material properties of four different allografts implanted for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Penn, David; Willet, Thomas L; Glazebrook, Mark; Snow, Martyn; Stanish, William D

    2009-03-01

    The aims of our study were to: (1) determine if there are differences in the material properties of tendon obtained from implanted tibialis anterior, achilles, bone-patella- bone and tibialis posterior allografts; (2) determine the variability in material properties between the implanted specimens. A total of 60 specimens were collected from fresh frozen allografts implanted at ACL reconstruction. Specimens collected included 15 tibialis anterior, 15 tibialis posterior, 15 achilles and 15 bone-patella-bone tendons. Each specimen was mounted in a custom made cryogrip. The mounted specimens were loaded onto a MTS Testline servo-hydraulic testing machine in a uni-axial tensile test configuration. Specimens were subjected to a strain rate of 5% per second until the ultimate tensile stress (UTS), failure strain and high strain modulus was calculated for each specimen after being normalized for specimen dimensions. Individual material properties were tested using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Tukey's B test with a P value of <0.05 considered significant. Homogeneity of variance was assessed using the Levene's test. As a result, no significant difference was found between all four grafts with regards to UTS, failure strain or high strain linear modulus. The UTS was plotted against the modulus demonstrating a linear relationship which is typical of soft tissues. Significant variability in the results were observed. In conclusion, there was no significant statistical difference between the material properties of the four tendon allografts tested. But significant variability in results was observed within groups and between groups, which may provide one explanation for the range of results in allograft ACL reconstruction reported in the literature. PMID:19039574

  9. 'Getting under our skin': Introducing banked allograft skin to burn surgery in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Allorto, Nikki; Rogers, Alan David; Rode, Heinz

    2016-09-01

    Deceased donor skin possesses many of the properties of the ideal biological dressing, and a well-stocked skin bank has become a critically important asset for the modern burn surgeon. Without it, managing patients with extensive burns and wounds becomes far more challenging, and outcomes are significantly worse. With the recent establishment of such a bank in South Africa, the challenge facing the medical fraternity is to facilitate tissue donation so that allograft skin supply can match the enormous demand. PMID:27601105

  10. Perforin and granzyme B. Cytolytic proteins up-regulated during rejection of rat small intestine allografts.

    PubMed

    McDiarmid, S V; Farmer, D G; Kuniyoshi, J S; Robert, M; Khadavi, A; Shaked, A; Busuttil, R W

    1995-03-15

    Perforin and granzyme B are 2 cytolytic proteins specific to activated killer cells, particularly CTL. We have studied the mRNA expression of these 2 proteins by a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method in a unidirectional model of rat small intestine transplant rejection. The allograft group consisted of Lewis x Brown Norway F1 donors into Lewis recipients. The isograft controls were Lewis donors into Lewis recipients. Grafts were placed heterotopically and no immunosuppression was given. Five animals in each group were killed at postoperative days (POD) 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, and 14. mRNA was extracted and a semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was performed. For the semiquantitative analysis, we compared scintillation counts from excised bands. Results were expressed as a percent activity compared with beta-actin. From the same tissue samples, a histologic evaluation was made and rejection was graded according to severity. The isograft controls showed no evidence of histologic rejection and a very low expression of mRNA for perforin and granzyme B from POD 3-14. In contrast, the allograft group began to show histologic evidence of mild rejection on POD 5. By day 7, rejection was moderately severe and associated with a significant up-regulation of perforin and granzyme B in the allografts compared with the controls (P < 0.01), which persisted through POD 14. Peak expression for perforin and granzyme B was on POD 10 and 8, respectively. We conclude that the up-regulation of perforin and granzyme B in rat small intestine transplant allografts is a useful marker of clinically important rejection. PMID:7886805

  11. Improved pregnancy outcome in a patient with renal allograft nephropathy undergoing temporary hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Jayyousi, R; Carr, S; Hodgett, S; Scudamore, I; Howarth, E; Singlehurst, A; Brunskill, N

    2003-12-01

    We report a case of a woman with a poorly functioning renal allograft and a positive anti-cardiolipin antibody who was dialysis-independent and conceived 18 months following her transplant. She was electively maintained on hemodialysis during the pregnancy and delivered a live infant at 31 weeks gestation. Her renal function returned to prepregnancy levels post partum and she remained dialysis-independent. PMID:14690260

  12. Dynamic Quantification of Host Schwann Cell Migration into Peripheral Nerve Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Elizabeth L.; Myckatyn, Terence M.; Tong, Alice Y.; Yee, Andrew; Yan, Ying; Magill, Christina K.; Johnson, Philip J.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Host Schwann cell (SC) migration into nerve allografts is the limiting factor in the duration of immunosuppression following peripheral nerve allotransplantation, and may be affected by different immunosuppressive regimens. Our objective was to compare SC migration patterns between clinical and experimental immunosuppression regimens both over time and at the harvest endpoint. Eighty mice that express GFP under the control of the Schwann cell specific S100 promoter were engrafted with allogeneic, nonfluorescent sciatic nerve grafts. Mice received immunosuppression with either tacrolimus (FK506), or experimental T-cell triple costimulation blockade (CSB), consisting of CTLA4-immunoglobulin fusion protein, anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody, and anti-inducible costimulator monoclonal antibody. Migration of GFP-expressing host SCs into wild-type allografts was assessed in vivo every 3 weeks until 15 weeks postoperatively, and explanted allografts were evaluated for immunohistochemical staining patterns to differentiate graft from host SCs. Immunosuppression with tacrolimus exhibited a plateau of SC migration, characterized by significant early migration (< 3 weeks) followed by a constant level of host SCs in the graft (15 weeks). At the endpoint, graft fluorescence was decreased relative to surrounding host nerve, and donor SCs persisted within the graft. CSB-treated mice displayed gradually increasing migration of host SCs into the graft, without the plateau noted in tacrolimus-treated mice, and also maintained a population of donor SCs at the 15-week endpoint. SC migration patterns are affected by immunosuppressant choice, particularly in the immediate postoperative period, and the use of a single treatment of CSB may allow for gradual population of nerve allografts with host SCs. PMID:20633557

  13. Recurrent and de novo disease after renal transplantation: a report from the Renal Allograft Disease Registry.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Sundaram; Savin, Virginia J

    2004-08-01

    Recurrent and de novo disease is an increasing problem and is known to negatively impact transplant graft survival. Immunosuppressive medications have not had an impact on the prevalence of recurrent and de novo disease. Renal Allograft Disease Registry (RADR) was established to study the prevalence, impact and risk factors for the development of recurrent and de novo disease. Retrospective and prospective study on recurrent disease is discussed in this manuscript. PMID:15265160

  14. Bone marrow transplantation for patients with acquired severe aplastic anemia using cyclophosphamide and antithymocyte globulin: the experience from a single center.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, Abderrahman; Ben Othman, Tarek; Ladeb, Saloua; Torjman, Lamia; Hsaïri, Mohamed; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim

    2003-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2001, 31 (24 male, 7 female) patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) and a median age of 19 years (range, 4-39 years) received an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Marrow donors were genotypically HLA-identical siblings in 30 cases and a monozygous twin in one case. The median time from diagnosis to bone marrow transplantation was 1 month (range, 0.5-5 months). Conditioning regimen consisted of cyclophosphamide (CY) combined with antithymocyte globulin (ATG), in all patients. For graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prophylaxis, all patients received methotrexate and cyclosporin. A total of 84% of patients had sustained grafts, whereas 16% rejected grafts between 3 and 20 months after transplantation. Of the five rejecting patients, three are alive with successful second engraftments and two died from infections. Acute grade II-IV GvHD was seen in only 11% of patients. A limited chronic GvHD was seen in one patient. With a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 5-42 months), survival rate was 86% and Karnofsky score was at least 90%. This study confirms the high success rate of the CY/ATG regimen in SAA allografted from an HLA-identical sibling. Early and late graft failure remains a problem and may require modification of this regimen. PMID:12764353

  15. Recurrence of light chain deposit disease after renal allograft transplantation: potential role of rituximab?

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Dirk R J; Lerut, Evelyne; Claes, Kathleen; Evenepoel, Pieter; Vanrenterghem, Yves

    2007-04-01

    Light chain deposit disease (LCDD) is a monoclonal plasma cell disorder characterized by tissue deposition of nonamyloid immunoglobulin light chains, predominantly kappa chains, causing renal insufficiency. LCDD reoccurs almost invariably after renal grafting, leading to early graft loss, usually within a time span of months to years. We describe a female patient with LCDD who lost her first living donor graft after 1 year due to extensive recurrence of kappa chain deposition. Rituximab was administered on the seventh day after her second transplantation with a graft from a deceased donor, in order to prevent early recurrence of LCDD. The 2-year protocol biopsy - similarly to the completely normal 1-year protocol biopsy - revealed persistent absence of light chain deposition on light microscopy but immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy showed very mild recurrence of light chain deposits. A second 4-week course of rituximab was repeated because of these electron microscopic findings. Subsequently, free kappa light chain concentration decreased from 693 to 74 mg/l and remained low 4 months after completion of therapy. Rituximab could be considered for delaying early LCDD recurrence in patients in whom treatment of the underlying bone marrow disorder failed or is contraindicated, but maintenance therapy is apparently necessary to consolidate this response. PMID:17326779

  16. Osteosarcoma after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Hideaki; Maeda, Naoko; Sekimizu, Masahiro; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Horibe, Keizo

    2013-03-01

    Three children treated with bone marrow transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Diamond-Blackfan anemia, and congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia developed secondary osteosarcoma in the left tibia at the age of 13, 13, and 9 years, respectively, at 51, 117, and 106 months after transplantation, respectively. Through treatment with chemotherapy and surgery, all 3 patients are alive without disease. We surveyed the literature and reviewed 10 cases of osteosarcoma after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT), including our 3 cases. Eight of the patients had received myeloablative total body irradiation before SCT. The mean interval from SCT to the onset of osteosarcoma was 6 years and 4 months, and the mean age at the onset of osteosarcoma was 14 years and 5 months. The primary site of the post-SCT osteosarcoma was the tibia in 6 of 10 cases, in contrast to de novo osteosarcoma, in which the most common site is the femur. At least 7 of the 10 patients are alive without disease. Osteosarcoma should be one of the items for surveillance in the follow-up of patients who undergo SCT. PMID:22995925

  17. Frequency of HLA-G exon 8 polymorphisms and kidney allograft outcome in Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Aghdaie, Mahdokht H; Azarpira, Negar; Kazemi, Kurosh; Geramizadeh, Bita; Darai, Masumeh; Malekhoseini, Seid Ali

    2011-06-01

    The 14-bp polymorphism in exon 8 of the HLA-G gene is associated with HLA-G mRNA stability and the patterns of alternative isoform splicing and may influence the functionality of the HLA-G molecule. HLA-G expression was related to allograft acceptance and fewer episodes of acute rejection during heart, kidney and liver-kidney transplantation. In order to determine a possible correlation between the 14-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism and kidney allograft outcome in our population, genomic DNA was isolated from 144 patients who had received isolated kidney allografts. The recipients was divided into two groups, grafts presenting features of rejection group and a non-rejection group, and compared them with a control group of 100 healthy subjects. There was no significant difference in allelic frequencies of 14-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism between normal controls and kidney transplant patients. No significant difference was found between the RG and the NRG regarding the 14-bp genotypes and alleles. Therefore, additional studies with more sample size from other populations with analysis of other HLA-G polymorphisms are necessary to define this polymorphism as a valuable clinical marker. PMID:21107725

  18. Effect of Low-Level Laser Therapy on Incorporation of Block Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Valiati, Renato; Paes, Jefferson Viapiana; de Moraes, Aury Nunes; Gava, Aldo; Agostini, Michelle; Masiero, Anelise Viapiana; de Oliveira, Marilia Gerhardt; Pagnoncelli, Rogério Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the incorporation of deep-frozen block allografts in a rabbit model. Background Data Studies have shown that LLLT has beneficial effects on tissue repair and new bone formation. Methods Bone tissue was harvested from two rabbits, processed by deep-freezing and grafted into the calvaria of 12 animals, which were then randomly allocated into two groups: experimental (L) and control (C). Rabbits in group L were irradiated with an aluminum gallium arsenide diode laser (AlGaAs; wavelength 830 nm, 4 J/cm2), applied to four sites on the calvaria, for a total dose of 16 J/cm2 per session. The total treatment dose after eight sessions was 128 J/cm2. Animals were euthanized at 35 (n = 6) or 70 days (n = 6) postoperatively. Results Deep-freeze-processed block allografts followed by LLLT showed incorporation at the graft-host interface, moderate bone remodeling, partial filling of osteocyte lacunae, less inflammatory infiltrate in the early postoperative period, and higher collagen deposition than the control group. Conclusion Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that allograft bone processed by deep-freezing plus LLLT is suitable as an alternative for the treatment of bone defects. Use of the deep-freezing method for processing of bone grafts preserves the structural and osteoconductive characteristics of bone tissue. PMID:23155359

  19. Monitoring of canine pancreas allograft function with measurements of urinary amylase.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, H; Deane, S A; Allen, R D; Hawthorne, W J; Williamson, P; Grierson, J M; Stewart, G J; Little, J M

    1988-07-01

    A canine model of whole pancreas transplantation with pancreaticocystostomy was studied for predictability of graft rejection using urinary amylase (UA) monitoring. Six pancreatectomized dogs were transplanted without immunosuppression and with acute rejection occurring at a median of 9.5 days (range 7-12 days). A differential loss of allograft exocrine and endocrine function was demonstrated, with a gradual decrease in UA after transplantation but maintenance of fasting blood glucose levels (FBGL) till the day before complete loss of graft structure. Another 13 dogs treated with cyclosporin (25 mg/kg per day) had prolonged graft survival (P less than 0.01) with an actuarial median survival of 91 days (range 8-159 days). Five allografts were lost because of rejection and eight dogs died with functioning grafts. Fasting spot levels of UA less than 5000 iu/l or less than 10,000 iu/l had a positive predictivity of graft failure of 71% or 31%, respectively. Falls of UA levels of greater than 75% in 24 h and 48 h were seen equally in both rejecting and functioning allografts. This study confirmed the role of UA as an earlier marker of rejection than FBGL. The clinical role of UA will be important, but its use as a predictor of pancreas rejection may be dependent on a fall to a predetermined level rather than the rate of fall. PMID:2473736

  20. Lung transplantation in the rat. III. Functional studies in iso- and allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Marck, K.W.; Prop, J.; Wildevuur, C.R.

    1983-08-01

    Recently a microsurgical technique for orthotopic left lung transplantation in the rat was developed. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the operation itself and of an unmodified rejection reaction on the function of the transplanted rat lung. Orthotopic left lung transplantation was performed in 59 rats (34 isografts and 25 allografts). Isografts demonstrated a mean left lung perfusion of 23.1% in the first two postoperative weeks. Seven out of the 10 animals, subjected to a repeated scintigraphy 5-10 weeks later, had an increased graft perfusion, resulting in an almost normal mean left lung perfusion of 34.8%. At that time chest roentgenography revealed a good aeration of the grafts, that at autopsy had a normal aspect. Allografts showed an initial mean left lung perfusion (24.6%) similar to the isografts, which, however, declined sharply a few days later (4.3%). At that time chest roentgenography revealed totally opalescent grafts that at autopsy had the hepatized aspect characteristic of lung allograft rejection. These results of isogeneic and allogeneic lung transplantation in the rat were comparable with those of canine auto- and allotransplantation. For immunogenetic and economical reasons lung transplantation in the rat is a good alternative animal model in lung transplantation research.

  1. The long-term fate of fresh and frozen orthotopic bone allografts in genetically defined rats.

    PubMed

    Bos, G D; Goldberg, V M; Gordon, N H; Dollinger, B M; Zika, J M; Powell, A E; Heiple, K G

    1985-01-01

    Fresh and frozen orthotopic iliac crest bone grafts in rats were studied histologically for determination of the long-term effects of histocompatibility matching and the freezing process on orthotopic bone graft incorporation. Grafts exchanged between groups of inbred rats, syngeneic or differing with respect to major or minor histocompatibility loci, were studied histologically at 20, 30, 40, 50, and 150 days after bone transplantation. A numerical histologic scoring system was developed and used by three observers for evaluation of coded hematoxylin and eosin sections. All frozen graft groups had the same fate regardless of histocompatibility relations between donors and recipients, and all grafts were inferior to fresh syngeneic grafts. Both fresh allograft groups received similar scores and initially at 20 and 30 days had scores similar to those of the fresh syngeneic groups. In the later intervals, however, the fresh allografts were inferior to the fresh syngeneic grafts and similar to the frozen groups. This is consistent with an older model describing two distinct phases of osteogenesis. In the long term, frozen syngeneic and fresh and frozen allografts across major and minor histocompatibility barriers were comparable, but all were significantly inferior to fresh syngeneic bone grafts. PMID:3893828

  2. Prolongation of rat heart allografts by donor-specific blood transfusion treated with ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.F.; Iga, C.; Lau, H.; Hardy, M.A.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of donor-specific blood transfusion was compared to that of UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion on heart allograft survival in inbred rats with major histocompatibility differences. In one series ACI rats received heterotopic heart grafts from Lewis rats and 1 mL transfusion of donor-type blood at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to the transplantation. Fifty percent of the grafts were permanently accepted (survival greater than 200 days). Following UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion, 55% of the grafts survived indefinitely. In a mixed lymphocyte reaction ACI lymphocytes are weak responders to Lewis lymphocytes. In another series, Lewis rats received ACI hearts. Donor-specific transfusions at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to transplantation did not significantly alter the survival of heart allografts. Lewis lymphocytes react strongly to ACI stimulator cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. However, when the donor blood was UVB-irradiated prior to transfusion, the ACI allograft survival was significantly prolonged in this ACI-to-Lewis strain combination. When Lewis rats received W/F hearts following either donor-specific or UVB-irradiated donor-specific transfusions, the hearts' survival was similarly and significantly prolonged, but did not become permanent. Mixed lymphocyte reaction reveals that the stimulation index of Lewis lymphocytes against W/F lymphocytes is greater than that of ACI versus Lewis, but is less than that between Lewis responder cells against ACI stimulators.

  3. Treatment with insulin analog X10 and IGF-1 increases growth of colon cancer allografts.

    PubMed

    Hvid, Henning; Blouin, Marie-José; Birman, Elena; Damgaard, Jesper; Poulsen, Fritz; Fels, Johannes Josef; Fledelius, Christian; Hansen, Bo Falck; Pollak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with an increased risk for development of certain forms of cancer, including colon cancer. The publication of highly controversial epidemiological studies in 2009 raised the possibility that use of the insulin analog glargine increases this risk further. However, it is not clear how mitogenic effects of insulin and insulin analogs measured in vitro correlate with tumor growth-promoting effects in vivo. The aim of this study was to examine possible growth-promoting effects of native human insulin, insulin X10 and IGF-1, which are considered positive controls in vitro, in a short-term animal model of an obesity- and diabetes-relevant cancer. We characterized insulin and IGF-1 receptor expression and the response to treatment with insulin, X10 and IGF-1 in the murine colon cancer cell line (MC38 cells) in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we examined pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and monitored growth of MC38 cell allografts in mice with diet-induced obesity treated with human insulin, X10 and IGF-1. Treatment with X10 and IGF-1 significantly increased growth of MC38 cell allografts in mice with diet-induced obesity and we can therefore conclude that supra-pharmacological doses of the insulin analog X10, which is super-mitogenic in vitro and increased the incidence of mammary tumors in female rats in a 12-month toxicity study, also increase growth of tumor allografts in a short-term animal model. PMID:24260289

  4. Histopathology of cell mediated immune reaction in mouse colon--allograft rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Holden, R J; Ferguson, A

    1976-01-01

    Grafts of mouse fetal colon, implanted beneath the renal capsule of adult hosts, have been used to study the growth and development of colonic isografts and the rejection of colonic allografts. Isografts grew normally and maintained a structure similar to normal colon. Grafts between strains with H2 histocompatibility differences were rejected by 13 days after transplantation. Early progressive infiltration of the grafts by lymphoid cells was followed by increasing damage to, and subsequent loss of, the epithelial cell layer and destruction of the underlying muscle, changes which parallel those seen in rejection of skin and small bowel. The increase in survival time which is seen in allografts between strains with H2 identity was longer in the colon than has been seen in the skin or small bowel; none of the allografts of colon were completely rejected before 30 days, and some remained viable at 50 days. Comparison of the appearances of rejection in the colon with those of ulcerative colitis and colonic Crohn's disease does not show the striking similarity which is seen between small bowel rejection and coeliac disease. Many of the individual features of these diseases are, however, present in the course of colonic rejection. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:976806

  5. Urinary cell mRNA profiles predictive of human kidney allograft status.

    PubMed

    Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana; Ding, Ruchuang; Sharma, Vijay K; Schwartz, Joseph E; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2014-03-01

    Kidney allograft status is currently characterized using the invasive percutaneous needle core biopsy procedure. The procedure has become safer over the years, but challenges and complications still exist including sampling error, interobserver variability, bleeding, arteriovenous fistula, graft loss, and even death. Because the most common type of acute rejection is distinguished by inflammatory cells exiting the intravascular compartment and gaining access to the renal tubular space, we reasoned that a kidney allograft may function as an in vivo flow cytometer and sort cells involved in rejection into urine. To test this idea, we developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for absolute quantification of mRNA and pre-amplification protocols to overcome the low RNA yield from urine. Here, we review our single center urinary cell mRNA profiling studies that led to the multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation (CTOT-04) study and the discovery and validation of a 3-gene signature of 18S rRNA-normalized measures of CD3ε mRNA and IP-10 mRNA and 18S rRNA that is diagnostic and predictive of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft. We also review our development of a 4-gene signature of mRNAs for vimentin, NKCC2, E-cadherin, and 18S rRNA diagnostic of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy (IF/TA). PMID:24517436

  6. Fascia lata allograft bridging of a rotator cuff tear in a rabbit animal model

    PubMed Central

    Varvitsiotis, Dimitrios; Papaspiliopoulos, Athanasios; Vlachou, Vasiliki; Feroussis, John; Papalois, Apostolos; Papacharalampous, Xenofon; Soucacos, Panayotis N.; Zoubos, Aristides

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Despite advances in surgical treatment options, large rotator cuff (r-c) tears still represent a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temporary and spatial histological incorporation of fascia lata allografts, used for bridging artificially created defects of the r-c. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two rabbits were divided into two groups and a supraspinatus tendinous defect was created. Half of the rabbit population underwent repair only, while in the other half, the defect was bridged utilizing fascia lata allograft. The animals were euthanized at 2, 4, and 6 weeks postoperative. Half of the specimens were evaluated histologically and the other half underwent mechanical testing. Results: There was an increased remodeling activity, fibroblastic in growth and strong presence of collagen fibers observed at 6 weeks on both groups. A gradually increasing mechanical strength was noticed by week 6 and increased toughness was also found at the same time period. There was no significant difference observed between the two groups regarding their histological and mechanical properties. Conclusions: In the difficult scenario of a large irreparable tear where the simple suture of the remaining r-c is impossible, allograft bridging, could be used with satisfactory results. Clinical Relevance: Treatment Study, Level 1. PMID:25114414

  7. Tube shunt coverage with gamma-irradiated cornea allograft (VisionGraft)

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Feyzahan; Moster, Marlene R; Cvintal, Victor; Hu, Wanda D; Waisbourd, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical outcomes of tube shunt coverage using sterile gamma-irradiated cornea allograft. Patients and methods The Wills Eye Hospital Glaucoma Research Center retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 165 patients who underwent glaucoma tube shunt procedures using sterile gamma-irradiated cornea allograft (VisionGraft) between December 2012 and November 2013. Demographic characteristics, type of tube shunt, and position were noted. Complications were recorded at 1 day; 1 week; 1, 3, 6, and 12 months; and on the final postoperative visit. Results One hundred and sixty-nine eyes of 165 patients were included. The mean follow-up time was 4.8±3.5 (ranging from 1 to 16) months. There was no evidence of immunological reaction, infection, or exposure in 166 eyes (98.2%). Three eyes (1.8%) experienced graft or tube exposure within the first 3 postoperative months. Two of the cases had underlying diseases: bullous pemphigoid and chronic allergic conjunctivitis. Conclusion Coverage of tube shunts using gamma-irradiated cornea allograft had a low exposure rate and was well tolerated. The graft can be stored long term at room temperature and has an excellent postoperative cosmetic appearance. PMID:25995612

  8. Tunable Delivery of Bioactive Peptides from HA Biomaterials and Allograft Bone Using Variable Length Polyglutamate Domains

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Bonnie K.; Webb, William M.; Bonvallet, Paul P.; Bellis, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) biomaterials and allograft bone are common alternatives to autogenous grafts, however these materials lack the strong osteoinductive potential of autologous bone. Previous studies have established that polyglutamate domains, which bind selectively to HA, can be engineered onto bioactive peptides as a mechanism for coupling osteoinductive signals onto HA and allograft. In the current investigation, we adapted the polyglutamate approach to tailor delivery of a model collagen-derived peptide, DGEA, by manipulating the number of glutamates in the HA binding domain. Specifically, DGEA was modified with diglutamate (E2-DGEA), tetraglutamate (E4-DGEA) or heptaglutamate (E7-DGEA), and it was found that initial peptide binding to HA and allograft was significantly enhanced as the number of glutamates increased. We also determined that the rate of release of polyglutamate-DGEA from substrates over a 5-day interval increased proportionally as the number of glutamate residues was decreased. Additionally, we tuned the peptide release rate by creating mixtures of E2-DGEA, E4-DGEA and E7-DGEA, and observed that release kinetics of the mixtures were distinct from pure solutions of each respective peptide. These collective results suggest that variable length polyglutamate domains provide an effective mechanism for controlled delivery of osteoregenerative peptides on HA-containing bone graft materials. PMID:23625466

  9. Comparison of Fusion Rates between Glycerol-Preserved and Frozen Composite Allografts in Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rodway, Ian; Gander, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Background. This retrospective, two cohort series study was designed to compare a room temperature, glycerol-preserved composite pinned bone allograft (G-CPBA) with the same graft type provided in a frozen state (F-CPBA) for use as a cervical interbody spacer in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods. A comprehensive chart review was performed for 67 sequential patients that received either a F-CPBA or a G-CPBA and had at least one-year follow-up. Twenty-eight patients had received G-CPBA grafts and 37 patients had received F-CPBA grafts. Two additional 2-level patients had received one of each type of grafts. Results. At 3 months, 45.3% (29 of 64) of glycerol-preserved and 41.4% (29 of 70) of frozen allografts, respectively, were considered to be fused radiographically. At 12 months, 100% of both treatment groups (41 glycerol-preserved and 45 frozen) were considered fused. Fusion rates for G-CPBA were statistically similar to F-CPBA at both 3 and 12 months (P = 0.6535 and >0.999, resp.). There were no allograft related complications in either treatment group. Conclusions. 100% fusion rates were attained by both treatment groups at 12 months and were similar at short-term follow-up for all comparable levels. Level of Evidence. Level of evidence is III.

  10. Sterilization of allograft bone: is 25 kGy the gold standard for gamma irradiation?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huynh; Morgan, David A F; Forwood, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    For several decades, a dose of 25 kGy of gamma irradiation has been recommended for terminal sterilization of medical products, including bone allografts. Practically, the application of a given gamma dose varies from tissue bank to tissue bank. While many banks use 25 kGy, some have adopted a higher dose, while some choose lower doses, and others do not use irradiation for terminal sterilization. A revolution in quality control in the tissue banking industry has occurred in line with development of quality assurance standards. These have resulted in significant reductions in the risk of contamination by microorganisms of final graft products. In light of these developments, there is sufficient rationale to re-establish a new standard dose, sufficient enough to sterilize allograft bone, while minimizing the adverse effects of gamma radiation on tissue properties. Using valid modifications, several authors have applied ISO standards to establish a radiation dose for bone allografts that is specific to systems employed in bone banking. These standards, and their verification, suggest that the actual dose could be significantly reduced from 25 kGy, while maintaining a valid sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10(-6). The current paper reviews the methods that have been used to develop radiation doses for terminal sterilization of medical products, and the current trend for selection of a specific dose for tissue banks. PMID:16821106

  11. Studies Introducing Costimulation Blockade for Vascularized Composite Allografts in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Freitas, A M; Samy, K P; Farris, A B; Leopardi, F V; Song, M; Stempora, L; Strobert, E A; Jenkins, J A; Kirk, A D; Cendales, L C

    2015-08-01

    Vascularized composite allografts (VCAs) are technically feasible. Similar to other organ transplants, VCAs are hampered by the toxicity and incomplete efficacy associated with conventional immunosuppression. Complications attributable to calcineurin inhibitors remain prevalent in the clinical cases reported to date, and these loom particularly large given the nonlifesaving nature of VCAs. Additionally, acute rejection remains almost ubiquitous, albeit controllable with current agents. Costimulation blockade offers the potential to provide prophylaxis from rejection without the adverse consequences of calcineurin-based regimens. In this study, we used a nonhuman-primate model of VCA in conjunction with immunosuppressive regimens containing combinations of B7-specific costimulation blockade with and without adhesion blockade with LFA3-Ig to determine what adjunctive role these agents could play in VCA transplantation when combined with more conventional agents. Compared to tacrolimus, the addition of belatacept improved rejection free allograft survival. The combination with LFA3-Ig reduced CD2(hi) memory T cells, however did not provide additional protection against allograft rejection and hindered protective immunity. Histology paralleled clinical histopathology and Banff grading. These data provide the basis for the study of costimulation blockade in VCA in a relevant preclinical model. PMID:26139552

  12. Role of TLRs and DAMPs in allograft inflammation and transplant outcomes.

    PubMed

    Braza, Faouzi; Brouard, Sophie; Chadban, Steve; Goldstein, Daniel R

    2016-05-01

    Graft inflammation impairs the induction of solid organ transplant tolerance and enhances acute and chronic rejection. Elucidating the mechanisms by which inflammation is induced after organ transplantation could lead to novel therapeutics to improve transplant outcomes. In this Review we describe endogenous substances - damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) - that are released after allograft reperfusion and induce inflammation. We also describe innate immune signalling pathways that are activated after solid organ transplantation, with a focus on Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and their signal adaptor, MYD88. Experimental and clinical studies have yielded a large body of evidence that TLRs and MYD88 are instrumental in initiating allograft inflammation and promoting the development of acute and chronic rejection. Ongoing clinical studies are testing TLR inhibition strategies in solid organ transplantation, although avoiding compromising host defence to pathogens is a key challenge. Further elucidation of the mechanisms by which sterile inflammation is induced, maintained and amplified within the allograft has the potential to lead to novel anti-inflammatory treatments that could improve outcomes for solid organ transplant recipients. PMID:27026348