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Sample records for marrow stromal osteoblast

  1. TGF-beta1 release from biodegradable polymer microparticles: its effects on marrow stromal osteoblast function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, L.; Yaszemski, M. J.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Controlled release of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) to a bone defect may be beneficial for the induction of a bone regeneration cascade. The objectives of this work were to assess the feasibility of using biodegradable polymer microparticles as carriers for controlled TGF-beta1 delivery and the effects of released TGF-beta1 on the proliferation and differentiation of marrow stromal cells in vitro. METHODS: Recombinant human TGF-beta1 was incorporated into microparticles of blends of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Fluorescein isothiocynate-labeled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) was co-encapsulated as a porogen. The effects of PEG content (0, 1, or 5% by weight [wt%]) and buffer pH (3, 5, or 7.4) on the protein release kinetics and the degradation of PLGA were determined in vitro for as long as 28 days. Rat marrow stromal cells were seeded on a biodegradable poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) substrate. The dose response and biological activity of released TGF-beta1 was determined after 3 days in culture. The effects of TGF-beta1 released from PLGA/PEG microparticles on marrow stromal cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation were assessed during a 21-day period. RESULTS: TGF-beta1 was encapsulated along with FITC-BSA into PLGA/PEG blend microparticles and released in a multiphasic fashion including an initial burst for as long as 28 days in vitro. Increasing the initial PEG content resulted in a decreased cumulative mass of released proteins. Aggregation of FITC-BSA occurred at lower buffer pH, which led to decreased release rates of both proteins. The degradation of PLGA was increased at higher PEG content and significantly accelerated at acidic pH conditions. Rat marrow stromal cells cultured on PPF substrates showed a dose response to TGF-beta1 released from the microparticles similar to that of added TGF-beta1, indicating that the activity of TGF-beta1 was retained during microparticle

  2. Osteochondral interface generation by rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts coculture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Teh, Thomas Kok Hiong; Ravi, Sujata; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Cho Hong

    2012-09-01

    Physiological osteochondral interface regeneration is a significant challenge. This study aims to investigate the effect of the coculture of chondrogenic rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) with rabbit osteoblasts in a specially designed two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) co-interface culture to develop the intermediate osteochondral region in vitro. The 2D-3D coculture system was set up by first independently culturing chondrogenic rBMSCs on a scaffold and osteoblasts in cell culture plates, and subsequently placed in contact and cocultured. As control, samples not cocultured with osteoblasts were used. The regulatory effects exerted by osteoblasts on chondrogenic rBMSCs were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To study the effect of coculture on cells located in different parts of the scaffold, samples were separated into two parts and significantly different gene expression patterns were found between them. In comparison with the control group, a significant moderate downregulation of chondrogenic marker genes, such as Collagen II and Aggrecan was observed. However, the Sox-9 and Collagen I expression increased. More importantly, chondrogenic rBMSCs in the coculture system were shown to form the osteochondral interface layer by expressing calcified cartilage zone specific extracellular matrix marker Collagen X and the hypertrophic chondrocyte marker MMP-13, which were not observed in the control group. Specifically, only the chondrogenic rBMSC layer in contact with the osteoblasts expressed Collagen X and MMP-13, indicating the positive influence of the coculture upon interface formation. Biochemical analyses, histology results, and immunohistochemical staining further supported this observation. In conclusion, this study revealed that specific regulatory stimulations from osteoblasts in the 2D-3D interface coculture system could induce the formation of ostochondral interface for the purpose of osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID

  3. Demineralized bone promotes chondrocyte or osteoblast differentiation of human marrow stromal cells cultured in collagen sponges.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuanhu; Yates, Karen E; Eid, Karim; Glowacki, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Demineralized bone implants have been used for many types of craniomaxillofacial, orthopedic, periodontal, and hand reconstruction procedures. In previous studies, we showed that demineralized bone powder (DBP) induces chondrogenesis of human dermal fibroblasts in a DBP/collagen sponge system that optimized interactions between particles of DBP and target cells in cell culture. In this study, we test the hypothesis that DBP promotes chondrogenesis or osteogenesis of human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) in 3-D collagen sponge culture, depending upon the culture conditions. We first confirmed that hMSCs have chondrogenic potential when treated with TGF-beta, either in 2-D monolayer cultures or in 3-D porous collagen sponges. Second, we found that DBP markedly enhanced chondrogenesis in hMSCs in 3-D sponges, as assessed by metachromasia and expression of chondrocyte-specific genes AGGRECAN, COL II, and COL X. Human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) were used to define mechanisms of chondroinduction because unlike hMSCs they have no inherent chondrogenic potential. In situ hybridization revealed that hDFs vicinal to DBPs express chondrocyte-specific genes AGGRECAN or COL II. Macroarray analysis showed that DBP activates TGF-beta/BMP signaling pathway genes in hDFs. Finally, DBP induced hMSCs to express the osteoblast phenotype when cultured with osteogenic supplements. These studies show how culture conditions can influence the differentiation pathway that human marrow stromal cells follow when stimulated by DBP. These results support the potential to engineer cartilage or bone in vitro by using human bone marrow stromal cells and DBP/collagen scaffolds. PMID:15735899

  4. BST2 Mediates Osteoblast Differentiation via the BMP2 Signaling Pathway in Human Alveolar-Derived Bone Marrow Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Su-Hyang; Kim, Jae Goo; Kim, Beom-Su; Lee, Jun; Pi, Sung-Hee; Lim, Hyun-Dae; Shin, Hong-In; Cho, Eui-Sic; You, Hyung-Keun

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling the differentiation of bone marrow stromal stem cells into osteoblasts remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated whether bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST2) influences differentiation toward the osteoblasts lineage. BST2 mRNA expression in human alveolar-derived bone marrow stromal cells (hAD-BMSCs) increased during differentiation into osteoblasts. hAD-BMSCs differentiation into osteoblasts and the mRNA expression of the bone-specific markers alkaline phosphatase, collagen type α 1, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and osterix were reduced by BST2 knockdown using siRNA. Furthermore, BST2 knockdown in hAD-BMSCs resulted in decreased RUNX2 mRNA and protein expression. We hypothesized that BST2 is involved in differentiation of into osteoblasts via the BMP2 signaling pathway. Accordingly, we evaluated the mRNA expression levels of BMP2, BMP receptors (BMPR1 and 2), and the downstream signaling molecules SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in BST2 knockdown cells. BMP2 expression following the induction of differentiation was significantly lower in BST2 knockdown cells than in cells treated with a non-targeting control siRNA. Similar results were found for the knockdown of the BMP2 receptor- BMPR1A. We also identified significantly lower expression of SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in the BST2 knockdown cells than control cells. Our data provide the first evidence that BST2 is involved in the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells via the regulation of the BMP2 signaling pathway. PMID:27359105

  5. BST2 Mediates Osteoblast Differentiation via the BMP2 Signaling Pathway in Human Alveolar-Derived Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Su-Hyang; Kim, Jae Goo; Kim, Beom-Su; Lee, Jun; Pi, Sung-Hee; Lim, Hyun-Dae; Shin, Hong-In; Cho, Eui-Sic

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling the differentiation of bone marrow stromal stem cells into osteoblasts remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated whether bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST2) influences differentiation toward the osteoblasts lineage. BST2 mRNA expression in human alveolar-derived bone marrow stromal cells (hAD-BMSCs) increased during differentiation into osteoblasts. hAD-BMSCs differentiation into osteoblasts and the mRNA expression of the bone-specific markers alkaline phosphatase, collagen type α 1, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and osterix were reduced by BST2 knockdown using siRNA. Furthermore, BST2 knockdown in hAD-BMSCs resulted in decreased RUNX2 mRNA and protein expression. We hypothesized that BST2 is involved in differentiation of into osteoblasts via the BMP2 signaling pathway. Accordingly, we evaluated the mRNA expression levels of BMP2, BMP receptors (BMPR1 and 2), and the downstream signaling molecules SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in BST2 knockdown cells. BMP2 expression following the induction of differentiation was significantly lower in BST2 knockdown cells than in cells treated with a non-targeting control siRNA. Similar results were found for the knockdown of the BMP2 receptor- BMPR1A. We also identified significantly lower expression of SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in the BST2 knockdown cells than control cells. Our data provide the first evidence that BST2 is involved in the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells via the regulation of the BMP2 signaling pathway. PMID:27359105

  6. The effect of different implant biomaterials on the behavior of canine bone marrow stromal cells during their differentiation into osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Özdal-Kurt, F; Tuğlu, I; Vatansever, H S; Tong, S; Şen, B H; Deliloğlu-Gürhan, S I

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of different implant biomaterials on cultured canine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) undergoing differentiation into osteoblasts (dBMSC). BMSC were isolated from canine humerus by marrow aspiration, cultured and differentiated on calcium phosphate scaffold (CPS), hydroxyapatite, hydroxyapatite in gel form and titanium mesh. We used the MTT method to determine the effects of osteogenic media on proliferation. The characteristics of dBMSC were assessed using alizarin red (AR), immunocytochemistry and osteoblastic markers including alkaline phosphatase/von Kossa (ALP/VK), osteocalcin (OC) and osteonectin (ON), and ELISA. The morphology of dBMSC on the biomaterials was investigated using inverted phase contrast microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. We detected expression of ALP/VK, AR, OC and ON by day 7 of culture; expression increased from day 14 until day 21. CPS supported the best adhesion, cell spreading, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. The effects of the biomaterials depended on their surface properties. Expression of osteoblastic markers showed that canine dBMSCs became functional osteoblasts. Tissue engineered stem cells can be useful clinically for autologous implants for treating bone wounds. PMID:27182756

  7. A cost-effective method to enhance adenoviral transduction of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Buo, Atum M; Williams, Mark S; Kerr, Jaclyn P; Stains, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    We report here a method for the use of poly-l-lysine (PLL) to markedly improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in culture and in situ, which are typically difficult to transduce. We show by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry that the addition of PLL to the viral-containing medium significantly increases the number of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive osteoblasts and BMSCs transduced with an enhanced GFP-expressing adenovirus. We also demonstrate that PLL can greatly enhance the adenoviral transduction of osteoblasts and osteocytes in situ in ex vivo tibia and calvaria, as well as in long bone fragments. In addition, we validate that PLL can improve routine adenoviral transduction studies by permitting the use of low multiplicities of infection to obtain the desired biologic effect. Ultimately, the use of PLL to facilitate adenoviral gene transfer in osteogenic cells can provide a cost-effective means of performing efficient gene transfer studies in the context of bone research. PMID:27547486

  8. Bone marrow stromal/stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles regulate osteoblast activity and differentiation in vitro and promote bone regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yunhao; Wang, Lian; Gao, Zhengliang; Chen, Genyin; Zhang, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are secreted by diverse tissues and play important roles in cell-cell communication, organ interactions and tissue homeostasis. Studies have reported the use of EVs to stimulate tissue regeneration, such as hepatic cell regeneration, and to treat diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension. However, little is known about the osteogenic effect of EVs. In this study, we explore the role of bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs in the regulation of osteoblast activity and bone regeneration. We isolated bone marrow stromal/stem cell (BMSC)-derived EVs through gradient ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration, and tested the influence of the EVs on osteogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. The results indicated that EVs positively regulated osteogenic genes and osteoblastic differentiation but did not inhibit proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, we constructed an EVs delivery system to stimulate bone formation in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with calvarial defects. We found that BMSC-derived EVs led to more bone formation in the critical-size calvarial bone defects. Moreover, we found that miR-196a plays an essential role in the regulation of osteoblastic differentiation and the expression of osteogenic genes. We anticipate that our assay using bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs will become a valuable tool for promoting bone regeneration. PMID:26911789

  9. Bone marrow stromal/stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles regulate osteoblast activity and differentiation in vitro and promote bone regeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yunhao; Wang, Lian; Gao, Zhengliang; Chen, Genyin; Zhang, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are secreted by diverse tissues and play important roles in cell-cell communication, organ interactions and tissue homeostasis. Studies have reported the use of EVs to stimulate tissue regeneration, such as hepatic cell regeneration, and to treat diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension. However, little is known about the osteogenic effect of EVs. In this study, we explore the role of bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs in the regulation of osteoblast activity and bone regeneration. We isolated bone marrow stromal/stem cell (BMSC)-derived EVs through gradient ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration, and tested the influence of the EVs on osteogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. The results indicated that EVs positively regulated osteogenic genes and osteoblastic differentiation but did not inhibit proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, we constructed an EVs delivery system to stimulate bone formation in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with calvarial defects. We found that BMSC-derived EVs led to more bone formation in the critical-size calvarial bone defects. Moreover, we found that miR-196a plays an essential role in the regulation of osteoblastic differentiation and the expression of osteogenic genes. We anticipate that our assay using bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs will become a valuable tool for promoting bone regeneration. PMID:26911789

  10. Early osteoblastic differentiation induced by dexamethasone enhances adenoviral gene delivery to marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Blum, Jeremy S; Parrott, M Brandon; Mikos, Antonios G; Barry, Michael A

    2004-03-01

    We investigated the implications of induced osteogenic differentiation on gene delivery in multipotent rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs). Prior to genetic manipulation cells were cultured with or without osteogenic supplements (5x10(-8) M dexamethasone, 160 microM l-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate, and 10 mM beta-glycerophosphate). Comparison of liposome, retroviral, and adenoviral vectors demonstrated that all three vectors could mediate gene delivery to primary rat MSCs. When these vectors were applied in the absence or presence of osteogenic supplements, we found that MSCs differentiated prior to transduction with adenovirus type 5 vectors produced a 300% increase in transgene expression compared to MSCs that were not exposed to osteogenic supplements. This differentiation effect appeared specific to adenoviral mediated gene delivery, since there was minimal increase in retroviral gene delivery and no increase in liposome gene delivery when MSCs were treated with osteogenic supplements. In addition, we also determined this increase in transgene production to occur at a higher concentration of dexamethasone (5x10(-8) M) in the culture medium of MSCs prior to adenoviral transduction. We found that this increased transgene production could be extended to the osteogenic protein, human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP-2). When delivered by an adenoviral vector, hBMP-2 transgene production could be increased from 1.4 ng/10(5) cells/3 days to 4.3 ng/10(5) cells/3 days by culture of MSCs with osteogenic supplements prior to transduction. These results indicate that the utility of MSCs as a therapeutic protein delivery mechanism through genetic manipulation can be enhanced by pre-culture of these cells with dexamethasone. PMID:15013104

  11. Up-regulation of BMP2/4 signaling increases both osteoblast-specific marker expression and bone marrow adipogenesis in Gja1Jrt/+ stromal cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zappitelli, Tanya; Chen, Frieda; Aubin, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Gja1Jrt/+ mice carry a mutation in one allele of the gap junction protein α1 gene (Gja1), resulting in a G60S connexin 43 (Cx43) mutant protein that is dominant negative for Cx43 protein production of <50% of wild-type (WT) levels and significantly reduced gap junction formation and function in osteoblasts and other Cx43-expressing cells. Previously we reported that Gja1Jrt/+ mice exhibited early-onset osteopenia caused by activation of osteoclasts secondary to activation of osteoblast lineage cells, which expressed increased RANKL and produced an abnormal resorption-stimulating bone matrix high in BSP content. Gja1Jrt/+ mice also displayed early and progressive bone marrow atrophy, with a significant increase in bone marrow adiposity versus WT littermates but no increase in adipose tissues elsewhere in the body. BMP2/4 production and signaling were increased in Gja1Jrt/+ trabecular bone and osteogenic stromal cell cultures, which contributed to the up-regulated expression of osteoblast-specific markers (e.g., Bsp and Ocn) in Gja1Jrt/+ osteoblasts and increased Pparg2 expression in bone marrow–derived adipoprogenitors in vitro. The elevated levels of BMP2/4 signaling in G60S Cx43-containing cells resulted at least in part from elevated levels of cAMP. We conclude that up-regulation of BMP2/4 signaling in trabecular bone and/or stromal cells increases osteoblast-specific marker expression in hyperactive Gja1Jrt/+ osteoblasts and may also increase bone marrow adipogenesis by up-regulation of Pparg2 in the Cx43-deficient Gja1Jrt/+ mouse model. PMID:25568340

  12. Fluid flow increases mineralized matrix deposition in 3D perfusion culture of marrow stromal osteoblasts in a dose-dependent manner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gregory N.; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; van den Dolder, Juliette; Sheffield, Tiffany L.; Ambrose, Catherine G.; Jansen, John A.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Bone is a complex highly structured mechanically active 3D tissue composed of cellular and matrix elements. The true biological environment of a bone cell is thus derived from a dynamic interaction between responsively active cells experiencing mechanical forces and a continuously changing 3D matrix architecture. To investigate this phenomenon in vitro, marrow stromal osteoblasts were cultured on 3D scaffolds under flow perfusion with different rates of flow for an extended period to permit osteoblast differentiation and significant matrix production and mineralization. With all flow conditions, mineralized matrix production was dramatically increased over statically cultured constructs with the total calcium content of the cultured scaffolds increasing with increasing flow rate. Flow perfusion induced de novo tissue modeling with the formation of pore-like structures in the scaffolds and enhanced the distribution of cells and matrix throughout the scaffolds. These results represent reporting of the long-term effects of fluid flow on primary differentiating osteoblasts and indicate that fluid flow has far-reaching effects on osteoblast differentiation and phenotypic expression in vitro. Flow perfusion culture permits the generation and study of a 3D, actively modeled, mineralized matrix and can therefore be a valuable tool for both bone biology and tissue engineering.

  13. Osteoblastic phenotype of rat marrow stromal cells cultured in the presence of dexamethasone, beta-glycerolphosphate, and L-ascorbic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peter, S. J.; Liang, C. R.; Kim, D. J.; Widmer, M. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the time course of addition of osteogenic supplements dexamethasone, beta-glycerolphosphate, and L-ascorbic acid to rat marrow stromal cells, and the exposure time on the proliferation and differentiation of the cells. It was the goal of these experiments to determine the time point for supplement addition to optimize marrow stromal cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation. To determine this, two studies were performed; one study was based on the age of the cells from harvest, and the other study was based on the duration of exposure to supplemented medium. Cells were seen to proliferate rapidly at early time points in the presence and absence of osteogenic supplements as determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation into the DNA of replicating cells. These results were supported by cell counts ascertained through total DNA analysis. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin production at 21 days were highest for both experimental designs when the cells were exposed to supplemented medium immediately upon harvest. The ALP levels at 21 days were six times greater for cells maintained in supplements throughout than for control cells cultured in the absence of supplements for both studies, reaching an absolute value of 75 x 10(-7) micromole/min/cell. Osteocalcin production reached 20 x 10(-6) ng/cell at 21 days in both studies for cells maintained in supplemented medium throughout the study, whereas the control cells produced an insignificant amount of osteocalcin. These results suggest that the addition of osteogenic supplements to marrow-derived cells early in the culture period did not inhibit proliferation and greatly enhanced the osteoblastic phenotype of cells in a rat model.

  14. Calcitonin gene-related peptide promotes the expression of osteoblastic genes and activates the WNT signal transduction pathway in bone marrow stromal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, RI; YUAN, ZHI; LIU, JIERONG; LIU, JIAN

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to induce osteoblastic differentiation and alkaline phosphatase activity in bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs). However, it has remained elusive whether this effect is mediated by CGRP receptors directly or whether other signaling pathways are involved. The present study assessed the possible involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the activation of CGRP signaling during the differentiation of BMSCs. First, the differentiation of BMSCs was induced in vitro and the expression of CGRP receptors was examined by western blot analysis. The effects of exogenous CGRP and LiCl, a stimulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, on the osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs were assessed; furthermore, the expression of mRNA and proteins involved in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was assessed using quantitative PCR and western blot analyses. The results revealed that CGRP receptors were expressed throughout the differentiation of BMSCs, at days 7 and 14. Incubation with CGRP and LiCl led to the upregulation of the expression of osteoblastic genes associated with the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, including the mRNA of c-myc, cyclin D1, Lef1, Tcf7 and β-catenin as well as β-catenin protein. However, the upregulation of these genes and β-catenin protein was inhibited by CGRP receptor antagonist or secreted frizzled-related protein, an antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The results of the present study therefore suggested that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be involved in CGRP- and LiCl-promoted osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs. PMID:27082317

  15. Calcitonin gene-related peptide promotes the expression of osteoblastic genes and activates the WNT signal transduction pathway in bone marrow stromal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ri; Yuan, Zhi; Liu, Jierong; Liu, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to induce osteoblastic differentiation and alkaline phosphatase activity in bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs). However, it has remained elusive whether this effect is mediated by CGRP receptors directly or whether other signaling pathways are involved. The present study assessed the possible involvement of the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway in the activation of CGRP signaling during the differentiation of BMSCs. First, the differentiation of BMSCs was induced in vitro and the expression of CGRP receptors was examined by western blot analysis. The effects of exogenous CGRP and LiCl, a stimulator of the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway, on the osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs were assessed; furthermore, the expression of mRNA and proteins involved in the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway was assessed using quantitative PCR and western blot analyses. The results revealed that CGRP receptors were expressed throughout the differentiation of BMSCs, at days 7 and 14. Incubation with CGRP and LiCl led to the upregulation of the expression of osteoblastic genes associated with the Wnt/β‑catenin pathway, including the mRNA of c‑myc, cyclin D1, Lef1, Tcf7 and β‑catenin as well as β‑catenin protein. However, the upregulation of these genes and β‑catenin protein was inhibited by CGRP receptor antagonist or secreted frizzled‑related protein, an antagonist of the Wnt/β‑catenin pathway. The results of the present study therefore suggested that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be involved in CGRP‑ and LiCl-promoted osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs. PMID:27082317

  16. Ectopic bone formation by marrow stromal osteoblast transplantation using poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams implanted into the rat mesentery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishaug-Riley, S. L.; Crane, G. M.; Gurlek, A.; Miller, M. J.; Yasko, A. W.; Yaszemski, M. J.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Porous biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams were seeded with rat marrow stromal cells and implanted into the rat mesentery to investigate in vivo bone formation at an ectopic site. Cells were seeded at a density of 6.83 x 10(5) cells/cm2 onto polymer foams having pore sizes ranging from either 150 to 300 to 710 microns and cultured for 7 days in vitro prior to implantation. The polymer/cell constructs were harvested after 1, 7, 28, or 49 days in vivo and processed for histology and gel permeation chromatography. Visual observation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections and von Kossa-stained sections revealed the formation of mineralized bonelike tissue in the constructs within 7 days postimplantation. Ingrowth of vascular tissue was also found adjacent to the islands of bone, supplying the necessary metabolic requirements to the newly formed tissue. Mineralization and bone tissue formation were investigated by histomorphometry. The average penetration depth of mineralized tissue in the construct ranged from 190 +/- 50 microns for foams with 500-710-microns pores to 370 +/- 160 microns for foams with 150-300-microns pores after 49 days in vivo. The mineralized bone volume per surface area and total bone volume per surface area had maximal values of 0.28 +/- 0.21 mm (500-710-microns pore size, day 28) and 0.038 +/- 0.024 mm (150-300-microns, day 28), respectively. As much as 11% of the foam volume penetrated by bone tissue was filled with mineralized tissue. No significant trends over time were observed for any of the measured values (penetration depth, bone volume/surface area, or percent mineralized bone volume). These results suggest the feasibility of bone formation by osteoblast transplantation in an orthotopic site where not only bone formation from transplanted cells but also ingrowth from adjacent bone may occur.

  17. Upregulation of long non-coding RNA HIF 1α-anti-sense 1 induced by transforming growth factor-β-mediated targeting of sirtuin 1 promotes osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yao; Wang, Shilong; Tang, Chaoliang; Chen, Wenjun

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the regulatory mechanism of long non-coding RNA hypoxia-inducible factor 1α-anti‑sense 1 (lncRNA HIF1α-AS1) in osteoblast differentiation as well as its targeting by sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), which may be inhibited by transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Real‑time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), western blot analysis, lncRNA PCR arrays and chromatin immunoprecipitation were performed in order to examine the interference of SIRT1 expression by TGF‑β, the effects of SIRT1 overexpression on lncRNA HIF1α‑AS1 and the regulation of the expression of homeobox (HOX)D10, which promotes BMSC differentiation, by lncRNA HIF1α‑AS1. The results showed that TGF‑β interfered with SIRT1 expression. Furthermore, lncRNA HIF1α‑AS1 was significantly downregulated following overexpression of SIRT1. In addition, low expression of HIF1α‑AS1 was sufficient to block the expression of HOXD10. The present study further demonstrated that downregulation of HOXD10 by HIF1α‑AS1 interfered with acetylation, and subsequently resulted in the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. These results suggested that HIF1α‑AS1 is an essential mediator of osteoblast differentiation, and may thus represent a gene‑therapeutic agent for the treatment of human bone diseases. PMID:26460121

  18. The effect of autologous bone marrow stromal cells differentiated on scaffolds for canine tibial bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Özdal-Kurt, F; Tuğlu, I; Vatansever, H S; Tong, S; Deliloğlu-Gürhan, S I

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow contains mesenchymal stem cells that form many tissues. Various scaffolds are available for bone reconstruction by tissue engineering. Osteoblastic differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) promote osteogenesis on scaffolds and stimulate bone regeneration. We investigated the use of cultured autologous BMSC on different scaffolds for healing defects in tibias of adult male canines. BMSC were isolated from canine humerus bone marrow, differentiated into osteoblasts in culture and loaded onto porous ceramic scaffolds including hydroxyapatite 1, hydroxyapatite gel and calcium phosphate. Osteoblast differentiation was verified by osteonectine and osteocalcine immunocytochemistry. The scaffolds with stromal cells were implanted in the tibial defect. Scaffolds without stromal cells were used as controls. Sections from the defects were processed for histological, ultrastructural, immunohistochemical and histomorphometric analyses to analyze the healing of the defects. BMSC were spread, allowed to proliferate and differentiate to osteoblasts as shown by alizarin red histochemistry, and osteocalcine and osteonectine immunostaining. Scanning electron microscopy showed that BMSC on the scaffolds were more active and adhesive to the calcium phosphate scaffold compared to the others. Macroscopic bone formation was observed in all groups, but scaffolds with stromal cells produced significantly better results. Bone healing occurred earlier and faster with stromal cells on the calcium phosphate scaffold and produced more callus compared to other scaffolds. Tissue healing and osteoblastic marker expression also were better with stromal cells on the scaffolds. Increased trabecula formation, cell density and decreased fibrosis were observed in the calcium phosphate scaffold with stromal cells. Autologous cultured stromal cells on the scaffolds were useful for healing of canine tibial bone defects. The calcium phosphate scaffold was the best for both cell

  19. COL1A1 and miR-29b show lower expression levels during osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells from Osteogenesis Imperfecta patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) cases are caused by mutations in one of the two genes, COL1A1 and COL1A2 encoding for the two chains that trimerize to form the procollagen 1 molecule. However, alterations in gene expression and microRNAs (miRNAs) are responsible for the regulation of cell fate determination and may be evolved in OI phenotype. Methods In this work, we analyzed the coding region and intron/exon boundaries of COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes by sequence analysis using an ABI PRISM 3130 automated sequencer and Big Dye Terminator Sequencing protocol. COL1A1 and miR-29b expression were also evaluated during the osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) by qRT-PCR using an ABI7500 Sequence Detection System. Results We have identified eight novel mutations, where of four may be responsible for OI phenotype. COL1A1 and miR-29b showed lower expression values in OI type I and type III samples. Interestingly, one type III OI sample from a patient with Bruck Syndrome showed COL1A1 and miR-29b expressions alike those from normal samples. Conclusions Results suggest that the miR-29b mechanism directed to regulate collagen protein accumulation during mineralization is dependent upon the amount of COL1A1 mRNA. Taken together, results indicate that the lower levels observed in OI samples were not sufficient for the induction of miR-29b. PMID:24767406

  20. Leptin Receptor Promotes Adipogenesis and Reduces Osteogenesis by Regulating Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Adult Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Yue, Rui; Zhou, Bo O; Shimada, Issei S; Zhao, Zhiyu; Morrison, Sean J

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal stem cells (SSCs) that are the major source of osteoblasts and adipocytes in adult bone marrow express leptin receptor (LepR). To test whether LepR regulates SSC function, we conditionally deleted Lepr from limb bone marrow stromal cells, but not from the axial skeleton or hypothalamic neurons, using Prx1-Cre. Prx1-Cre;Lepr(fl/fl) mice exhibited normal body mass and normal hematopoiesis. However, limb bones from Prx1-Cre;Lepr(fl/fl) mice exhibited increased osteogenesis, decreased adipogenesis, and accelerated fracture healing. Leptin increased adipogenesis and reduced osteogenesis by activating Jak2/Stat3 signaling in bone marrow stromal cells. A high-fat diet increased adipogenesis and reduced osteogenesis in limb bones from wild-type mice, but not from Prx1-Cre;Lepr(fl/fl) mice. This reflected local effects of LepR on osteogenesis and adipogenesis by bone marrow stromal cells and systemic effects on bone resorption. Leptin/LepR signaling regulates adipogenesis and osteogenesis by mesenchymal stromal cells in the bone marrow in response to diet and adiposity. PMID:27053299

  1. Osterix marks distinct waves of primitive and definitive stromal progenitors during bone marrow development

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Pinho, Sandra; Ahmed, Jalal; Kunisaki, Yuya; Hanoun, Maher; Mendelson, Avital; Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Frenette, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem and progenitor cells (MSPCs) contribute to bone marrow (BM) homeostasis by generating multiple types of stromal cells. MSPCs can be labeled in the adult BM by Nestin-GFP, whereas committed osteoblast progenitors are marked by Osterix expression. However, the developmental origin and hierarchical relationship of stromal cells remain largely unknown. Here, using a lineage-tracing system, we describe three distinct waves of contributions of Osterix+ cells in the BM. First, Osterix+ progenitors in the fetal BM contribute to nascent bone tissues and transient stromal cells that are replaced in the adult marrow. Second, Osterix-expressing cells perinatally contribute to osteolineages and long-lived BM stroma, which have characteristics of Nestin-GFP+ MSPCs. Third, Osterix labeling in the adult marrow is osteolineage-restricted, devoid of stromal contribution. These results uncover a broad expression profile of Osterix and raise the intriguing possibility that distinct waves of stromal cells, primitive and definitive, may organize the developing BM. PMID:24823377

  2. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 facilitates the growth and chemo-resistance of leukemia cells in the bone marrow by modulating osteoblast functions

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Keiki; Miyata, Yasuhiko; Nakayama, Takayuki; Saito, Shigeki; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Nishiwaki, Satoshi; Mizuno, Hiroki; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Kato, Hidefumi; Ueda, Ryuzo; Takami, Akiyoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells and osteoblasts play major roles in forming and modulating the bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic microenvironment. We have reported that FGF2 compromises stromal cell support of normal hematopoiesis. Here, we examined the effects of FGF2 on the leukemia microenvironment. In vitro, FGF2 significantly decreased the number of stromal-dependent and stromal-independent G0-leukemia cells in the stromal layers. Accordingly, CML cells placed on FGF2-treated stromal layers were more sensitive to imatinib. Conversely, FGF2 increased the proliferation of osteoblasts via FGFR1 IIIc, but its effects on osteoblast support of leukemia cell growth were limited. We next treated a human leukemia mouse model with Ara-C with/without systemic FGF2 administration. BM sections from FGF2-treated mice had thickened bone trabeculae and increased numbers of leukemia cells compared to controls. Leukemia cell density was increased, especially in the endosteal region in FGF2/Ara-C -treated mice compared to mice treated with Ara-C only. Interestingly, FGF2 did not promote leukemia cell survival in Ara-C treated spleen. Microarray analysis showed that FGF2 did not alter expression of many genes linked to hematopoiesis in osteoblasts, but modulated regulatory networks involved in angiogenesis and osteoblastic differentiation. These observations suggest that FGF2 promotes leukemia cell growth in the BM by modulating osteoblast functions. PMID:27481339

  3. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 facilitates the growth and chemo-resistance of leukemia cells in the bone marrow by modulating osteoblast functions.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Keiki; Miyata, Yasuhiko; Nakayama, Takayuki; Saito, Shigeki; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Nishiwaki, Satoshi; Mizuno, Hiroki; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Kato, Hidefumi; Ueda, Ryuzo; Takami, Akiyoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells and osteoblasts play major roles in forming and modulating the bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic microenvironment. We have reported that FGF2 compromises stromal cell support of normal hematopoiesis. Here, we examined the effects of FGF2 on the leukemia microenvironment. In vitro, FGF2 significantly decreased the number of stromal-dependent and stromal-independent G0-leukemia cells in the stromal layers. Accordingly, CML cells placed on FGF2-treated stromal layers were more sensitive to imatinib. Conversely, FGF2 increased the proliferation of osteoblasts via FGFR1 IIIc, but its effects on osteoblast support of leukemia cell growth were limited. We next treated a human leukemia mouse model with Ara-C with/without systemic FGF2 administration. BM sections from FGF2-treated mice had thickened bone trabeculae and increased numbers of leukemia cells compared to controls. Leukemia cell density was increased, especially in the endosteal region in FGF2/Ara-C -treated mice compared to mice treated with Ara-C only. Interestingly, FGF2 did not promote leukemia cell survival in Ara-C treated spleen. Microarray analysis showed that FGF2 did not alter expression of many genes linked to hematopoiesis in osteoblasts, but modulated regulatory networks involved in angiogenesis and osteoblastic differentiation. These observations suggest that FGF2 promotes leukemia cell growth in the BM by modulating osteoblast functions. PMID:27481339

  4. Property of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Derived From Bone Fragments Removed in Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Abe, Shigehiro; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Bone tissue engineering is in the process of making the shift from bench to bed. Organ as a cell source is important for tissue engineering. The appropriate cells should be harvested without invasiveness and ethical problems. The authors focused on mandibular cortex bone fragments removed in sagittal split ramus osteotomy as a cell source for bone tissue engineering. These bone fragments were discarded after surgery until now. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were harvested from inside of bone fragments, which is an endosteal region. Endosteal region is known to be a hematopoietic stem cell niche and harbors osteoblasts, preosteoblasts, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Bone marrow stromal cells could be cultured easily, and grew rapidly in vitro under ordinary serum-supplemented culture condition. The expression pattern of surface markers of BMSCs was the same as that of MSCs. Bone marrow stromal cells could differentiated into multiple mesenchymal lineages (osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, and smooth muscle cells). These results indicated the existence of MSCs in BMSCs. The osteoblastic characters of BMSCs were examined more closely. Bone marrow stromal cells showed a high alkaline phosphatase activity, and expressed osteoblastic markers (PTHr, bone sialoprotein, Type I collagen, Rnut-related transcription factor 2, and osteocalcin). In transplantation experiments, BMSCs generated ectopic bone tissues on the border of hydroxyapatite scaffold without osteogenic differentiation-inducing agents such as dexamethasone (Dex) or bone morphogenetic protein. The results of this study suggest that mandibular cortex bone fragments removed in sagittal split ramus osteotomy are a good cell source for bone tissue engineering. PMID:27171960

  5. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Basem M; Al-Shammary, Asma; Skagen, Peter; Abu Dawud, Raed; Adjaye, James; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Kassem, Moustapha

    2015-11-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and prospective isolation of BMSCs and committed progenitors are lacking. Here, we compared the transcriptome profile of CD markers expressed at baseline and during the course of osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation of two well-characterized osteogenic-committed murine BMSCs (mBMSC(Bone)) and adipogenic-committed mBMSCs (mBMSC(Adipo)), respectively. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a core set of canonical mBMSC CD markers with comparable expression levels in mBMSC(Bone) and mBMSC(Adipo) at baseline and during their differentiation. We identified 11 CD markers that are differentially expressed between mBMSC(Adipo) and mBMSC(Bone). Among these, we identified osteoprogenitor-associated CD markers expressed only in mBMSC(Bone): CD34, CD54, CD73, CD132, CD200, CD227 and adipoprogenitor-associated CD markers expressed only in mBMSC(Adipo): CD53, CD80, CD134, CD141 and CD212. FACS analysis confirmed these results. We selected CD34 for further analysis. CD34 was expressed at baseline of mouse stromal cell line ST2, primary mBMSCs, mBMSC(Bone) and its expression decreased during osteoblast differentiation. FACS-sorted CD34(+) primary mBMSCs exhibited higher expression of 70% osteoblast-associated genes, and formed significantly higher heterotopic bone in vivo when implanted subcutaneously in immune-deficient mice compared with CD34(-) primary mBMSCs. Our results demonstrate that a set of CD markers can distinguish osteoprogenitor versus adipoprogenitor populations of mBMSCs. CD34 is suitable for prospective isolation of mouse bone marrow osteoprogenitors. PMID:26413784

  6. Therapy Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xinchun; Hu, Jinxia; Cui, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and major cause of disability worldwide. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to improve functional outcome after stroke. In this review, we will focus on the protective effects of BMSCs on ischemic brain and the relative molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of BMSCs on stroke. PMID:27069533

  7. Activation of GLP-1 Receptor Promotes Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Osteogenic Differentiation through β-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jingru; Ma, Xue; Wang, Ning; Jia, Min; Bi, Long; Wang, Yunying; Li, Mingkai; Zhang, Huinan; Xue, Xiaoyan; Hou, Zheng; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Zhibin; He, Gonghao; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Summary Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in regulating bone remodeling, and GLP-1 receptor agonist shows a positive relationship with osteoblast activity. However, GLP-1 receptor is not found in osteoblast, and the mechanism of GLP-1 receptor agonist on regulating bone remodeling is unclear. Here, we show that the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) promoted bone formation and increased bone mass and quality in a rat unloading-induced bone loss model. These functions were accompanied by an increase in osteoblast number and serum bone formation markers, while the adipocyte number was decreased. Furthermore, GLP-1 receptor was detected in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), but not in osteoblast. Activation of GLP-1 receptor by Ex-4 promoted the osteogenic differentiation and inhibited BMSC adipogenic differentiation through regulating PKA/β-catenin and PKA/PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling. These findings reveal that GLP-1 receptor regulates BMSC osteogenic differentiation and provide a molecular basis for therapeutic potential of GLP-1 against osteoporosis. PMID:26947974

  8. Interaction between bone marrow stromal cells and neuroblastoma cells leads to a VEGFA-mediated osteoblastogenesis.

    PubMed

    HaDuong, Josephine H; Blavier, Laurence; Baniwal, Sanjeev K; Frenkel, Baruch; Malvar, Jemily; Punj, Vasu; Sposto, Richard; DeClerck, Yves A

    2015-08-15

    The potential role of osteoblasts in bone and bone marrow (BM) metastases in neuroblastoma (NBL) remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of NBL cells on the osteoblastic differentiation of BM-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMMSC). We show that the presence of NBL cells enhanced the osteoblastic differentiation of BMMSC driven by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4, in the absence of any effect on NBL cell proliferation. Expression profiles of BMMSC driven toward osteoblastic differentiation revealed an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor A (Vegfa) expression in the presence of NBL cells. We demonstrated that NBL cells increased BMMSC-derived VEGFA mRNA and protein and that this was enhanced by BMP-4. However, in similar conditions, neither the addition of an mVEGFA blocking antibody nor exogenous recombinant (r) mVEGFA affected osteoblastic differentiation. In contrast, siRNA- mediated knock-down of VEGFA in BMMSC prevented osteoblastic differentiation in BMP-4-treated cocultures, an effect that was not reversed in the presence of rmVEGFA. An analysis of murine bones injected with hNBL cells revealed an increase of mVEGFA producing cells near tumor cells concomitantly with an increase in Vegfa and Runx2 mRNA. This coincided with an increase in osteoclasts, in Rankl/Opg mRNA ratio and with the formation of osteolytic lesions. Thus NBL cells promote osteoblastogenesis in the BM by increasing VEGFA expression in BMMSC. Our study provides a new insight into the role of VEGFA in NBL metastases by pointing to the role of stroma-derived intracrine VEGFA in osteoblastogenesis. PMID:25648303

  9. Enhancement of osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells cultured by selective combination of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2).

    PubMed

    Maegawa, Naoki; Kawamura, Kenji; Hirose, Motohiro; Yajima, Hiroshi; Takakura, Yoshinori; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that bone marrow contains mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which can show osteoblastic differentiation when cultured in osteogenic medium containing ascorbic acid, beta-glycerophosphate and dexamethasone. The differentiation results in the appearance of osteoblasts, together with the formation of bone matrix; thus, in vitro cultured bone (osteoblasts/bone matrix) could be fabricated by MSC culture. This type of cultured bone has already been used in clinical cases involving orthopaedic problems. To improve the therapeutic effect of the cultured bone, we investigated the culture conditions that contributed to extensive osteoblastic differentiation. Rat bone marrow was primarily cultured to expand the number of MSCs and further cultured in osteogenic medium for 12 days. The culture was also conducted in a medium supplemented with either bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) or fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), or with sequential combinations of both supplements. Among them, the sequential supplementation of FGF-2 followed by BMP-2 showed high alkaline phosphatase activity, sufficient bone-specific osteocalcein expression and abundant bone matrix formation of the MSC culture. These data implied that the number of responding cells or immature osteoblasts was increased by the supplementation of FGF-2 in the early phase of the culture and that these cells can show osteoblastic differentiation, of which capability was augmented by BMP-2 in the late phase. The sequential supplementation of these cytokines into MSC culture might be suitable for the fabrication of ideal cultured bone for use in bone tissue engineering. PMID:18038421

  10. Characterization of Cellular and Molecular Heterogeneity of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Elsafadi, Mona; Manikandan, Muthurangan; Atteya, Muhammad; Hashmi, Jamil Amjad; Iqbal, Zafar; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Alfayez, Musaad; Kassem, Moustapha; Mahmood, Amer

    2016-01-01

    Human bone marrow-derived stromal stem cells (hBMSC) exhibit multiple functions, including differentiation into skeletal cells (progenitor function), hematopoiesis support, and immune regulation (nonprogenitor function). We have previously demonstrated the presence of morphological and functional heterogeneity of hBMSC cultures. In the present study, we characterized in detail two hTERT-BMSC clonal cell populations termed here CL1 and CL2 that represent an opposing phenotype with respect to morphology, markers expression: alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and CD146, and ex vivo differentiation potential. CL1 differentiated readily to osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes as shown by expression of lineage specific genes and proteins. Whole genome transcriptome profiling of CL1 versus CL2 revealed enrichment in CL1 of bone-, mineralization-, and skeletal muscle-related genes, for example, ALP, POSTN, IGFBP5 BMP4, and CXCL12. On the other hand, CL2 transcriptome was enriched in immune modulatory genes, for example, CD14, CD99, NOTCH3, CXCL6, CFB, and CFI. Furthermore, gene expression microarray analysis of osteoblast differentiated CL1 versus CL2 showed significant upregulation in CL1 of bone development and osteoblast differentiation genes which included several homeobox genes: TBX15, HOXA2 and HOXA10, and IGF1, FGFR3, BMP6, MCAM, ITGA10, IGFBP5, and ALP. siRNA-based downregulation of the ALP gene in CL1 impaired osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. Our studies demonstrate the existence of molecular and functional heterogeneity in cultured hBMSC. ALP can be employed to identify osteoblastic and adipocytic progenitor cells in the heterogeneous hBMSC cultures. PMID:27610142

  11. Characterization of Cellular and Molecular Heterogeneity of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Elsafadi, Mona; Manikandan, Muthurangan; Atteya, Muhammad; Hashmi, Jamil Amjad; Iqbal, Zafar; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Alfayez, Musaad

    2016-01-01

    Human bone marrow-derived stromal stem cells (hBMSC) exhibit multiple functions, including differentiation into skeletal cells (progenitor function), hematopoiesis support, and immune regulation (nonprogenitor function). We have previously demonstrated the presence of morphological and functional heterogeneity of hBMSC cultures. In the present study, we characterized in detail two hTERT-BMSC clonal cell populations termed here CL1 and CL2 that represent an opposing phenotype with respect to morphology, markers expression: alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and CD146, and ex vivo differentiation potential. CL1 differentiated readily to osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes as shown by expression of lineage specific genes and proteins. Whole genome transcriptome profiling of CL1 versus CL2 revealed enrichment in CL1 of bone-, mineralization-, and skeletal muscle-related genes, for example, ALP, POSTN, IGFBP5 BMP4, and CXCL12. On the other hand, CL2 transcriptome was enriched in immune modulatory genes, for example, CD14, CD99, NOTCH3, CXCL6, CFB, and CFI. Furthermore, gene expression microarray analysis of osteoblast differentiated CL1 versus CL2 showed significant upregulation in CL1 of bone development and osteoblast differentiation genes which included several homeobox genes: TBX15, HOXA2 and HOXA10, and IGF1, FGFR3, BMP6, MCAM, ITGA10, IGFBP5, and ALP. siRNA-based downregulation of the ALP gene in CL1 impaired osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. Our studies demonstrate the existence of molecular and functional heterogeneity in cultured hBMSC. ALP can be employed to identify osteoblastic and adipocytic progenitor cells in the heterogeneous hBMSC cultures. PMID:27610142

  12. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor reprograms bone marrow stromal cells to actively suppress B lymphopoiesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Day, Ryan B.; Bhattacharya, Deepta; Nagasawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that mediate the shift from lymphopoiesis to myelopoiesis in response to infectious stress are largely unknown. We show that treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), which is often induced during infection, results in marked suppression of B lymphopoiesis at multiple stages of B-cell development. Mesenchymal-lineage stromal cells in the bone marrow, including CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells and osteoblasts, constitutively support B lymphopoiesis through the production of multiple B trophic factors. G-CSF acting through a monocytic cell intermediate reprograms these stromal cells, altering their capacity to support B lymphopoiesis. G-CSF treatment is associated with an expansion of CAR cells and a shift toward osteogenic lineage commitment. It markedly suppresses the production of multiple B-cell trophic factors by CAR cells and osteoblasts, including CXCL12, kit ligand, interleukin-6, interleukin-7, and insulin-like growth factor-1. Targeting bone marrow stromal cells is one mechanism by which inflammatory cytokines such as G-CSF actively suppress lymphopoiesis. PMID:25814527

  13. Metallofullerene nanoparticles promote osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells through BMP signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kangning; Cao, Weipeng; Hao, Xiaohong; Xue, Xue; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Juan; Zhao, Yuliang; Meng, Jie; Sun, Baoyun; Zhang, Jinchao; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Although endohedral metallofullerenol [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles have anti-tumor efficiency and mostly deposit in the bones of mice, how these nanoparticles act in bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) remains largely unknown. Herein, we observed that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles facilitated the differentiation of MSCs toward osteoblasts, as evidenced by the enhancement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation upon [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticle treatment. Mechanistically, the effect of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles on ALP activity was inhibited by the addition of noggin as an inhibitor of the BMP signaling pathway. Moreover, the in vivo results of the ovariectomized rats further indicated that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles effectively improved bone density and prevented osteoporosis.Although endohedral metallofullerenol [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles have anti-tumor efficiency and mostly deposit in the bones of mice, how these nanoparticles act in bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) remains largely unknown. Herein, we observed that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles facilitated the differentiation of MSCs toward osteoblasts, as evidenced by the enhancement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation upon [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticle treatment. Mechanistically, the effect of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles on ALP activity was inhibited by the addition of noggin as an inhibitor of the BMP signaling pathway. Moreover, the in vivo results of the ovariectomized rats further indicated that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles effectively improved bone density and prevented osteoporosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33575a

  14. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances osteogenesis and represses adipogenic differentiation of human primary bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Heim, M; Frank, O; Kampmann, G; Sochocky, N; Pennimpede, T; Fuchs, P; Hunziker, W; Weber, P; Martin, I; Bendik, I

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of the phytoestrogen genistein and 17beta-estradiol in human bone marrow stromal cells, undergoing induced osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation. Profiling of estrogen receptors (ERs)-alpha, -beta1, -beta2, -beta3, -beta4, -beta5, and aromatase mRNAs revealed lineage-dependent expression patterns. During osteogenic differentiation, the osteoblast-determining core binding factor-alpha1 showed a progressive increase, whereas the adipogenic regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) was sequentially decreased. This temporal regulation of lineage-determining marker genes was strongly enhanced by genistein during the early osteogenic phase. Moreover, genistein increased alkaline phosphatase mRNA levels and activity, the osteoprotegerin:receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand gene expression ratio, and the expression of TGFbeta1. During adipogenic differentiation, down-regulation in the mRNA levels of PPARgamma and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-alpha at d 3 and decreased lipoprotein lipase and adipsin mRNA levels at d 21 were observed after genistein treatment. This led to a lower number of adipocytes and a reduction in the size of their lipid droplets. At d 3 of adipogenesis, TGFbeta1 was strongly up-regulated by genistein in an ER-dependent manner. Blocking the TGFbeta1 pathway abolished the effects of genistein on PPARgamma protein levels and led to a reduction in the proliferation rate of precursor cells. Overall, genistein enhanced the commitment and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells to the osteoblast lineage but did not influence the late osteogenic maturation markers. Adipogenic differentiation and maturation, on the other hand, were reduced by genistein (and 17beta-estradiol) via an ER-dependent mechanism involving autocrine or paracrine TGFbeta1 signaling. PMID:14605006

  15. Regulation of human bone marrow stromal cell proliferation and differentiation capacity by glucocorticoid receptor and AP-1 crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Cárcamo-Orive, Iván; Gaztelumendi, Ainhoa; Delgado, Jesús; Tejados, Naiara; Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Fernández-Rueda, Jon; Pennington, Daniel J; Trigueros, César

    2010-01-01

    Although marrow adipocytes and osteoblasts derive from a common bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), the mechanisms that underlie osteoporosis-associated bone loss and marrow adipogenesis during prolonged steroid treatment are unclear. We show in human BMSCs (hBMSCs) that glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling in response to high concentrations of glucocorticoid (GC) supports adipogenesis but inhibits osteogenesis by reducing c-Jun expression and hBMSC proliferation. Conversely, significantly lower concentrations of GC, which permit hBMSC proliferation, are necessary for normal bone mineralization. In contrast, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling increases both JNK/c-Jun activity and hBMSC expansion, favoring osteogenic differentiation instead of adipogenesis. Indeed, PDGF antagonizes the proadipogenic qualities of GC/GR signaling. Thus our results reveal a novel c-Jun-centered regulatory network of signaling pathways in differentiating hBMSCs that controls the proliferation-dependent balance between osteogenesis and adipogenesis. PMID:20499359

  16. Advanced glycation end products suppress osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Yamaguchi, Toru; Kaji, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Ippei; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2013-08-30

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are involved in bone quality deterioration in diabetes mellitus. We previously showed that AGE2 or AGE3 inhibited osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization of mouse stromal ST2 cells, and also induced apoptosis and decreased cell growth. Although quality management for synthesized proteins in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for the maturation of osteoblasts, the effects of AGEs on ER stress in osteoblast lineage are unknown. We thus examined roles of ER stress in AGE2- or AGE3-induced suppression of osteoblastogenesis of ST2 cells. An ER stress inducer, thapsigargin (TG), induced osteoblastic differentiation of ST2 cells by increasing the levels of Osterix, type 1 collagen (Col1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN) mRNA. AGE2 or AGE3 suppressed the levels of ER stress sensors such as IRE1α, ATF6 and OASIS, while they increased the levels of PERK and its downstream molecules, ATF4. A reduction in PERK level by siRNA did not affect the AGEs-induced suppression of the levels of Osterix, Col1 and OCN mRNA. In conclusion, AGEs inhibited the osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells by suppressing ER stress sensors and accumulating abnormal proteins in the cells. This process might accelerate AGEs-induced suppression of bone formation found in diabetes mellitus. PMID:23933252

  17. Characterization of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Hamzic, Edita; Whiting, Karen; Gordon Smith, Edward; Pettengell, Ruth

    2015-06-01

    In aplastic anaemia (AA), haemopoietic activity is significantly reduced and generally attributed to failure of haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) within the bone marrow (BM). The regulation of haemopoiesis depends on the interaction between HSC and various cells of the BM microenvironment, including mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). MSC involvement in the functional restriction of HSC in AA is largely unknown and therefore, the physical and functional properties of AA MSC were studied in vitro. MSC were characterized by their phenotype and ability to form adherent stromal layers. The functional properties of AA MSC were assessed through proliferative, clonogenic and cross-over culture assays. Results indicate that although AA MSC presented typical morphology and distinctive mesenchymal markers, stromal formation was reduced, with 50% of BM samples failing to produce adherent layers. Furthermore, their proliferative and clonogenic capacity was markedly decreased (P = 0·03 and P = 0·04 respectively) and the ability to sustain haemopoiesis was significantly reduced, as assessed by total cell proliferation (P = 0·032 and P = 0·019 at Week 5 and 6, respectively) and clonogenic potential of HSC (P = 0·02 at Week 6). It was concluded that the biological characteristics of AA MSC are different from those of control MSC and their in vitro haemopoiesis-supporting ability is significantly reduced. PMID:25819548

  18. Isolation and characterization of primary bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhe; Ghazanfari, Roshanak; Zacharaki, Dimitra; Lim, Hooi Ching; Scheding, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Bone marrow (BM) contains a rare population of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which have been characterized as nonhematopoietic skeletal progenitor cells with central importance for the hematopoietic microenvironment. Classically, MSCs are isolated by plastic adherence and subsequent culture. However, as cultured stromal cells differ from their in vivo progenitors, it is important to identify the phenotype of the primary MSCs to study these cells in more detail. In the past years, several surface markers have been reported to be suitable for effective enrichment of BM-MSCs, and recent data indicate that the putative MSC stem/progenitor cell population in human adult BM is highly enriched in Lin(-) CD45(-) CD271(+) CD140a (PDGFRα)(low/-) cells. Moreover, surface marker combinations have been described for the isolation of MSCs from murine BM. On the basis of these findings, the role of primary MSCs can now be studied in normal and, importantly, diseased BM. Furthermore, genetically engineered mouse models have been developed as powerful tools to investigate well-defined BM stromal cell populations in vivo. Our discussion aims to provide a concise overview of the current state of the art in BM-MSC isolation in humans and briefly present murine MSC isolation approaches and genetic models. PMID:27270495

  19. Effects of continuous and pulsatile PTH treatments on rat bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Chiming; Frei, Hanspeter Burt, Helen M.; Rossi, Fabio

    2009-03-20

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) differentiation and proliferation are controlled by numerous growth factors and hormones. Continuous parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment has been shown to decrease osteoblast differentiation, whereas pulsatile PTH increases osteoblast differentiation. However, the effects of PTH treatments on MSCs have not been investigated. This study showed continuous PTH treatment in the presence of dexamethasone (DEX) promoted osteogenic differentiation of rat MSCs in vitro, as demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, number of ALP expressing cells, and up-regulation of PTH receptor-1, ALP, and osteocalcin mRNA expressions. In contrast, pulsatile PTH treatment was found to suppress osteogenesis of rat MSCs, possibly by promoting the maintenance of undifferentiated cells. Additionally, the observed effects of PTH were strongly dependent on the presence of DEX. MSC proliferation however was not influenced by PTH independent of treatment regimen and presence or absence of DEX. Furthermore, our work raised the possibility that PTH treatment may modulate stem/progenitor cell activity within MSC cultures.

  20. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells differentiate to osteoblast and chondroblast lineages upon incubation with conditioned media from dental pulp stem cell-derived osteoblasts and auricle cartilage chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Carbone, A; Valente, M; Annacontini, L; Castellani, S; Di Gioia, S; Parisi, D; Rucci, M; Belgiovine, G; Colombo, C; Di Benedetto, A; Mori, G; Lo Muzio, L; Maiorella, A; Portincasa, A; Conese, M

    2016-01-01

    The potential of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (ADSCs) to differentiate into either osteoblasts or chondrocytes is controversial. In this study we investigated the multicapacity potential of ADSCs to differentiate towards adipocyte, osteoblast, and chondrocyte lineages when cells are seeded onto plastic in comparison with incubation with conditioned media (CM) obtained from differentiated cell types.ADSCs, obtained from liposuctions, were characterized for mesenchymal and hematopoietic markers by cytofluorimetry. Their differentiation capacity towards adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes was investigated by histochemistry methods (Oil-Red-O staining, Safranin O and Alizarin Red staining, respectively). Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and dedifferentiated auricle derived-chondrocytes were differentiated towards osteoblastic and chondrocytic lineages respectively, and the CM obtained from these cultures was used to induce differentiation of ADSCs. ADSCs were positive for mesenchymal markers (CD29, CD105, CD73, CD44), but not for hematopoietic lineage markers (CD14, CD34, CD45) and this behavior was conserved from the isolation up to the fifth passage. While ADSCs were readily differentiated in adipocytes, they were not towards chondrocytes and osteoblastic lineages, a behavior different from that of bone marrow-derived MSCs that differentiated into the three lineages at two weeks post-induction. Only ADSCs treated with CM from cultured chondrocytes and DPSCs, produced glycosaminoglycans and mineralized matrix. These results indicate that ADSCs need growth/morphogenic factor supplementation from the tissue environment to be appropriately differentiated to mesodermic lineages. PMID:27049081

  1. Myxomatous stromal changes and necrosis of bone marrow--a retrospective study of 3 years.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nalini; Kumar, Vijay; Varma, Neelam; Garewal, Gurjeevan; Das, Reena; Ahluwalia, Jasmina; Dash, Sumitra

    2004-07-01

    Myxomatous stromal changes and bone marrow necrosis (BMN) are uncommon histologic findings. These changes have been found in various conditions like disseminated carcinomatosis, postchemotherapy cases, chronic infections, infiltrative disorders of the marrow etc. The present study is a retrospective study of 3 years (Jan, 1999 to Dec. 2001) from Deptt. Of Hematology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh (India). During this period, 3740 bone marrow samples were examined. Myxomatous stromal changes and bone marrow necrosis were noted in 0.43% (16/3740) and 0.45% (17/3740) samples respectively. In addition to common causes of myxomatous stromal changes and bone marrow necrosis as described in the literature, this study highlights the association of these conditions with some of the rarer entities like hyperoxalosis, leishmaniasis, parvovirus induced marrow aplasia and cryptococcal infection. There is paucity of such associations in the literature. PMID:16295422

  2. Interleukin-1β modulates endochondral ossification by human adult bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Mumme, Marcus; Scotti, Celeste; Papadimitropoulos, Adam; Todorov, Athanas; Hoffmann, Waldemar; Bocelli-Tyndall, Chiara; Jakob, Marcel; Wendt, David; Martin, Ivan; Barbero, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines present in the milieu of the fracture site are important modulators of bone healing. Here we investigated the effects of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) on the main events of endochondral bone formation by human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC), namely cell proliferation, differentiation and maturation/remodelling of the resulting hypertrophic cartilage. Low doses of IL-1β (50 pg/mL) enhanced colony-forming units-fibroblastic (CFU-f) and -osteoblastic (CFU-o) number (up to 1.5-fold) and size (1.2-fold) in the absence of further supplements and glycosaminoglycan accumulation (1.4-fold) upon BM-MSC chondrogenic induction. In osteogenically cultured BM-MSC, IL-1β enhanced calcium deposition (62.2-fold) and BMP-2 mRNA expression by differential activation of NF-κB and ERK signalling. IL-1β-treatment of BM-MSC generated cartilage resulted in higher production of MMP-13 (14.0-fold) in vitro, mirrored by an increased accumulation of the cryptic cleaved fragment of aggrecan, and more efficient cartilage remodelling/resorption after 5 weeks in vivo (i.e., more TRAP positive cells and bone marrow, less cartilaginous areas), resulting in the formation of mature bone and bone marrow after 12 weeks. In conclusion, IL-1β finely modulates early and late events of the endochondral bone formation by BM-MSC. Controlling the inflammatory environment could enhance the success of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of fractures by resident MSC and as well as improve the engineering of implantable tissues. PMID:23007908

  3. Effect of 5-azacytidine on gene expression in marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, D F; Nemunaitis, J; Tompkins, C; Singer, J W

    1989-01-01

    When exposed to 5-azacytidine, marrow stromal cells from active long-term marrow cultures and cell lines derived from simian virus 40-transformed stromal cells rapidly upregulated c-abl and interleukin-6 transcripts while downregulating the expression of collagen I, a major matrix protein. Similar effects occurred with interleukin-1 alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha, although the time course was considerably prolonged. Images PMID:2474760

  4. Effects of Age on Parathyroid Hormone Signaling in Human Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuanhu; Bueno, Ericka M.; Kim, Sung Won; Amato, Ilaria; Shen, Longxiang; Hahne, Jochen; Bleiberg, Ilan; Morley, Paul; Glowacki, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Summary Human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) have the potential to differentiate into osteoblasts; there are age-related decreases in their proliferation and differentiation to osteoblasts. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), when applied intermittently in vivo, has osteoanabolic effects in a variety of systems. In this study, we compared PTH signaling and osteoanabolic effects in hMSCs from young and old subjects. There were age-related decreases in expression of PTH/PTHrP receptor type 1 (PTHR1) gene (p=0.049, n=19) and in PTH activation of CREB (p=0.029, n=7) and PTH stabilization of β-catenin (p=0.018, n=7). Three human PTH peptides, PTH1–34, PTH1-31C (Ostabolin-C, Leu27, Cyclo[Glu22-Lys26]-hPTH1–31), and PTH1–84 (10 nM) stimulated osteoblast differentiation with hMSCs. Treatment with PTH1–34 resulted in a significant 67% increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in hMSCs obtained from younger subjects (<50-year-old, n=5), compared with an 18% increase in hMSCs from elders (>55-year-old, n=7). Both knockdown of CREB and treatment with a PKA inhibitor H-89 blocked PTH stimulation of osteoblast differentiation in hMSCs from young subjects. The PTH peptides significantly stimulated proliferation of hMSCs. Treatment with PTH1–34 resulted in an average of twice as many cells in cultures of hMSCs from young subjects (n=4), but had no effect with hMSCs from elders (n=7). Upregulation of PTHR1 by 24-hour pre-treatment with 100 nM dexamethasone rescued PTH stimulation of proliferation in hMSCS from elders. In conclusion, age-related intrinsic alterations in signaling responses to osteoanabolic agents like PTH may contribute to cellular and tissue aging of the human skeleton. PMID:21518242

  5. MicroRNAs Regulate Osteogenesis and Chondrogenesis of Mouse Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suomi, Salla; Taipaleenmäki, Hanna; Seppänen, Anne; Ripatti, Tommi; Väänänen, Kalervo; Hentunen, Teuvo; Säämänen, Anna-Marja; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that bind to target mRNA leading to translational arrest or mRNA degradation. To study miRNA-mediated regulation of osteogenesis and chondrogenesis, we compared the expression of 35 miRNAs in osteoblasts and chondroblasts derived from mouse marrow stromal cells (MSCs). Differentiation of MSCs resulted in up- or downregulation of several miRNAs, with miR-199a expression being over 10-fold higher in chondroblasts than in undifferentiated MSCs. In addition, miR-124a was strongly upregulated during chondrogenesis while the expression of miR-96 was substantially suppressed. A systems biological analysis of the potential miRNA target genes and their interaction networks was combined with promoter analysis. These studies link the differentially expressed miRNAs to collagen synthesis and hypoxia, key pathways related to bone and cartilage physiology. The global regulatory networks described here suggest for the first time how miRNAs and transcription factors are capable of fine-tuning the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of mouse MSCs. PMID:19787082

  6. New Bone Formation in Tuberculous-Infected Vertebral Body Defect after Administration of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Kurniawati, Tri; Siregar, Nurjati Chairani; Syahrurachman, Agus; Dilogo, Ismail Hadisubroto; Iskandriati, Diah; Fitri, Arni Diana

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Preliminary experimental study using a rabbit spondylitis model. Purpose To observe the ossification in a micro-environment containing live Mycobacterium tuberculosis transplanted with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in rabbits. Overview of Literature BMSCs differentiate to osteoblasts and then osteocytes during ossification. Mycobacterium tuberculosis does not affect BMSC growth in vitro. Methods Six rabbits were divided into two groups of three rabbits. One group was positive for spondylitis tuberculosis by culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and histopathologically. The other group was positive by PCR and histopathologically. Both groups were treated using BMSC transplantation and anti-tuberculosis drugs. After 6 weeks, ossification was evaluated by enumerating the number of osteoblasts, osteocytes, and lesion level of calcium. Results Mean number of osteoblasts was 207.00±31.00 in the first group and 220.33±73.46 in the second group. Mean number of intra-lesions osteocytes was in the first and second group was 18.33±30.04 and 31.00±26.87, respectively. Mean calcium level in the first group and second group was 2.94%±0.89% and 2.51%±0.13%, respectively. Total ossification score in the first and second group was 31.00 and 25.67, respectively. Conclusions Mycobacterium tuberculosis provides support for new bone formation by stimulating intra-lesion calcium metabolism. The microscopic environment containing live Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhances ossification. PMID:26949451

  7. Stromal cell migration precedes hemopoietic repopulation of the bone marrow after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Werts, E.D.; Gibson, D.P.; Knapp, S.A.; DeGowin, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Circulation of hemopoietic stem cells into an irradiated site has been thoroughly documented, but migration of stromal cells to repair radiation damage has not. We determined the radiosensitivity of mouse bone marrow stroma and evaluated stromal and hemopoietic repopulation in x-irradiated marrow. The D/sub 0/ for growth of colonies of marrow stromal cells (MSC) was 215 to 230 rad. Total-body irradiation (TB) obliterated marrow stromal and hemopoietic cells within 3 days. In contrast, 1 day after 1000 rad leg irradiation (LI), MSC rose to 80% of normal, but fell to 34% by 3 days and recovered to 72% by 30 days. However, femoral nucleated cells diminished to 20% by 3 days and recovered to 74% of normal by 30 days. Likewise, differentiated marrow cells and hemopoietic stem cells were initially depleted. With 1000 rad LI followed 3 h later by 1000 rad to the body while shielding the leg, MSC and femoral nucleated cells recovered to values intermediate between 1000 rad TB and 1000 rad LI. We concluded that: (1) the D/sub 0/ for MSC was 215 to 230 rad, (2) stromal repopulation preceded hemopoietic recovery, and (3) immigration of stromal cells from an unirradiated sanctuary facilitated hemopoietic repopulation of a heavily irradiated site.

  8. Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells: A Reliable, Challenging Tool for In Vitro Osteogenesis and Bone Tissue Engineering Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Ute; Müller, Katrin; Preissler, Carolin; Noack, Carolin; Boxberger, Sabine; Dieter, Peter; Bornhäuser, Martin; Wobus, Manja

    2016-01-01

    Adult human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) are important for many scientific purposes because of their multipotency, availability, and relatively easy handling. They are frequently used to study osteogenesis in vitro. Most commonly, hBMSC are isolated from bone marrow aspirates collected in clinical routine and cultured under the “aspect plastic adherence” without any further selection. Owing to the random donor population, they show a broad heterogeneity. Here, the osteogenic differentiation potential of 531 hBMSC was analyzed. The data were supplied to correlation analysis involving donor age, gender, and body mass index. hBMSC preparations were characterized as follows: (a) how many passages the osteogenic characteristics are stable in and (b) the influence of supplements and culture duration on osteogenic parameters (tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), octamer binding transcription factor 4, core-binding factor alpha-1, parathyroid hormone receptor, bone gla protein, and peroxisome proliferator-activated protein γ). The results show that no strong prediction could be made from donor data to the osteogenic differentiation potential; only the ratio of induced TNAP to endogenous TNAP could be a reliable criterion. The results give evidence that hBMSC cultures are stable until passage 7 without substantial loss of differentiation potential and that established differentiation protocols lead to osteoblast-like cells but not to fully authentic osteoblasts. PMID:27293446

  9. Molecular signature and in vivo behavior of bone marrow endosteal and subendosteal stromal cell populations and their relevance to hematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Balduino, Alex; Mello-Coelho, Valeria; Wang, Zhou; Taichman, Russell S.; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Weeraratna, Ashani T.; Becker, Kevin G.; Mello, Wallace de; Taub, Dennis D.; Borojevic, Radovan

    2012-11-15

    In the bone marrow cavity, hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been shown to reside in the endosteal and subendosteal perivascular niches, which play specific roles on HSC maintenance. Although cells with long-term ability to reconstitute full hematopoietic system can be isolated from both niches, several data support a heterogenous distribution regarding the cycling behavior of HSC. Whether this distinct behavior depends upon the role played by the stromal populations which distinctly create these two niches is a question that remains open. In the present report, we used our previously described in vivo assay to demonstrate that endosteal and subendosteal stromal populations are very distinct regarding skeletal lineage differentiation potential. This was further supported by a microarray-based analysis, which also demonstrated that these two stromal populations play distinct, albeit complementary, roles in HSC niche. Both stromal populations were preferentially isolated from the trabecular region and behave distinctly in vitro, as previously reported. Even though these two niches are organized in a very close range, in vivo assays and molecular analyses allowed us to identify endosteal stroma (F-OST) cells as fully committed osteoblasts and subendosteal stroma (F-RET) cells as uncommitted mesenchymal cells mainly represented by perivascular reticular cells expressing high levels of chemokine ligand, CXCL12. Interestingly, a number of cytokines and growth factors including interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-7, IL-15, Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) were also found to be differentially expressed by F-OST and F-RET cells. Further microarray analyses indicated important mechanisms used by the two stromal compartments in order to create and coordinate the 'quiescent' and 'proliferative' niches in which hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors reside.

  10. Large-scale gene expression profiling data of bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors.

    PubMed

    Stiehler, Maik; Rauh, Juliane; Bünger, Cody; Jacobi, Angela; Vater, Corina; Schildberg, Theresa; Liebers, Cornelia; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Bretschneider, Henriette

    2016-09-01

    This data article contains data related to the research article entitled, "in vitro characterization of bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors" [1]. Osteoarthritis (OA) represents the main indication for total joint arthroplasty and is one of the most frequent degenerative joint disorders. However, the exact etiology of OA remains unknown. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can be easily isolated from bone marrow aspirates and provide an excellent source of progenitor cells. The data shows the identification of pivotal genes and pathways involved in osteoarthritis by comparing gene expression patterns of BMSCs from osteoarthritic versus healthy donors using an array-based approach. PMID:27508214

  11. Prostacyclin Suppresses Twist Expression in the Presence of Indomethacin in Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Oliver; Herten, Monika; Fischer, Johannes; Haversath, Marcel; Beck, Sascha; Classen, Tim; Warwas, Sebastian; Tassemeier, Tjark; Landgraeber, Stefan; Lensing-Höhn, Sabine; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Jäger, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Background Iloprost, a stable prostacyclin I2 analogue, seems to have an osteoblast-protective potential, whereas indomethacin suppresses new bone formation. The aim of this study was to investigate human bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) proliferation and differentiation towards the osteoblastic lineage by administration of indomethacin and/or iloprost. Material/Methods Human bone marrow cells were obtained from 3 different donors (A=26 yrs/m; B=25 yrs/f, C=35 yrs/m) via vacuum aspiration of the iliac crest followed by density gradient centrifugation and flow cytometry with defined antigens (CD105+/73+/45−/14−). The cells were seeded and incubated as follows: without additives (Group 0; donor A/B/C), with 10−7 M iloprost only (Group 0+ilo; A/B), with indomethacin only in concentrations of 10−6 M (Group 1, A), 10−5 M (Group 2, B), 10−4 M (Group 3, A/B), and together with 10−7 M iloprost (Groups 4–6, A/B/C). On Day 10 and 28, UV/Vis spectrometric and immunocytochemical assays (4 samples per group and donor) were performed to investigate cell proliferation (cell count measurement) and differentiation towards the osteoblastic lineage (CD34−, CD45−, CD105+, type 1 collagen (Col1), osteocalcin (OC), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Runx2, Twist, specific ALP-activity). Results Indomethacin alone suppressed BMSC differentiation towards the osteoblastic lineage by downregulation of Runx2, Col1, and ALP. In combination with indomethacin, iloprost increased cell proliferation and differentiation and it completely suppressed Twist expression at Day 10 and 28. Iloprost alone did not promote cell proliferation, but moderately enhanced Runx2 and Twist expression. However, the proliferative effects and the specific ALP-activity varied donor-dependently. Conclusions Iloprost partially antagonized the suppressing effects of indomethacin on BMSC differentiation towards the osteoblast lineage. It enhanced the expression of Runx2 and, only in the presence of indomethacin

  12. Expression of glypican-4 in haematopoietic-progenitor and bone-marrow-stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Siebertz, B; Stöcker, G; Drzeniek, Z; Handt, S; Just, U; Haubeck, H D

    1999-01-01

    Heparan sulphate proteoglycans and the extracellular matrix of bone-marrow-stromal cells are important components of the microenvironment of haematopoietic tissues and are involved in the interaction of haematopoietic stem and stromal cells. Previous studies have emphasized the role of heparan sulphate proteoglycan synthesis by bone-marrow-stromal cells. In the present study we describe the expression of glypican-4 (GPC-4), belonging to the glypican family, in bone-marrow-stromal cells and haematopoietic-progenitor cells of human and murine origin. Expression of GPC-4 was shown on the mRNA-level by reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analysis. Amplification products were cloned and sequenced, to confirm these results. To analyze the expression of GPC-4 on the protein level, polyclonal antibodies against selected peptides were raised in rabbits. Western blot analysis showed expression of GPC-4 as a heparan sulphate proteoglycan in the human haematopoietic-progenitor cell line TF-1 and normal human bone marrow. These results were confirmed by FACS analysis of TF-1 cells. Furthermore, GPC-4-positive progenitor cells and stromal cells were enriched from normal human bone marrow by magnetic-cell sorting and analysed by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. PMID:10585884

  13. Serotonin augments smooth muscle differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Nobuaki; McCuaig, Sarah; O'Sullivan, Michael J; Martin, James G

    2014-05-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) contain a subset of multipotent stem cells. Here, we demonstrate that serotonin, a biogenic amine released by platelets and mast cells, can induce the smooth muscle differentiation of BMSCs. Brown Norway rat BMSCs stimulated with serotonin had increased expression of the smooth muscle markers smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) and α actin (α-SMA) by qPCR and Western blot, indicating smooth muscle differentiation. This was accompanied by a concomitant down-regulation of the microRNA miR-25-5p, which was found to negatively regulate smooth muscle differentiation. Serotonin upregulated serum response factor (SRF) and myocardin, transcription factors known to induce contractile protein expression in smooth muscle cells, while it down-regulated Elk1 and Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), known to induce proliferation. Serotonin increased SRF binding to promoter regions of the MHC and α-SMA genes, assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Induction of smooth muscle differentiation by serotonin was blocked by the knock-down of SRF and myocardin. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 was constitutively expressed by BMSCs and serotonin triggered its release. Inhibition of miR-25-5p augmented TGF-β1 expression, however the differentiation of BMSCs was not mediated by TGF-β1. These findings demonstrate that serotonin promotes a smooth muscle-like phenotype in BMSCs by altering the balance of SRF, myocardin, Elk1 and KLF4 and miR-25-5p is involved in modulating this balance. Therefore, serotonin potentially contributes to the pathogenesis of diseases characterized by tissue remodeling with increased smooth muscle mass. PMID:24595007

  14. Clinical Characteristics Influence In Vitro Action of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 in Human Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuanhu; Glowacki, Julie; Kim, Sung Won; Hahne, Jochen; Geng, Shuo; Mueller, Stefan M.; Shen, Longxiang; Bleiberg, Ilan; LeBoff, Meryl S.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D is important for bone health, with low vitamin D levels being associated with skeletal fragility and fractures. Among its other biological activities, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), stimulates the in vitro differentiation of human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) to osteoblasts, which can be monitored by increases in Alkaline Phosphatase enzyme activity or osteocalcin gene expression. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that age and clinical attributes of subjects influence in vitro responsiveness of hMSCs to 1,25(OH)2D3. In a cohort of subjects whose hMSCs were isolated from bone marrow discarded during hip replacement surgery for osteoarthritis, there were significant inverse correlations with age for bone mineral density, renal function, body mass index, fat mass index, and lean mass index (n=36–53). There were significant correlations with serum 25(OH)D for serum PTH, body mass index, fat mass index, and lean mass index (n=47–50). In vivo-in vitro correlation analyses indicated that there were significantly greater in vitro effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 to stimulate osteoblast differentiation in hMSCs obtained from subjects who were younger than 65 years of age, or who had serum 25(OH)D ≤20 ng/mL, elevated serum PTH, or better renal function, assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate. The greater in vitro stimulation of osteoblast differentiation by 1,25(OH)2D3 in hMSCs from vitamin D-deficient subjects suggests that vitamin D repletion may lead to more vigorous bone formation in subjects at risk. PMID:22576852

  15. Bone formation by three-dimensional stromal osteoblast culture in biodegradable polymer scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishaug, S. L.; Crane, G. M.; Miller, M. J.; Yasko, A. W.; Yaszemski, M. J.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Bone formation was investigated in vitro by culturing stromal osteoblasts in three-dimensional (3-D), biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams. Three polymer foam pore sizes, ranging from 150-300, 300-500, and 500-710 microns, and two different cell seeding densities, 6.83 x 10(5) cells/cm2 and 22.1 x 10(5) cells/cm2, were examined over a 56-day culture period. The polymer foams supported the proliferation of seeded osteoblasts as well as their differentiated function, as demonstrated by high alkaline phosphatase activity and deposition of a mineralized matrix by the cells. Cell number, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineral deposition increased significantly over time for all the polymer foams. Osteoblast foam constructs created by seeding 6.83 x 10(5) cells/cm2 on foams with 300-500 microns pores resulted in a cell density of 4.63 x 10(5) cells/cm2 after 1 day in culture; they had alkaline phosphatase activities of 4.28 x 10(-7) and 2.91 x 10(-6) mumol/cell/min on Days 7 and 28, respectively; and they had a cell density that increased to 18.7 x 10(5) cells/cm2 by Day 56. For the same constructs, the mineralized matrix reached a maximum penetration depth of 240 microns from the top surface of the foam and a value of 0.083 mm for mineralized tissue volume per unit of cross sectional area. Seeding density was an important parameter for the constructs, but pore size over the range tested did not affect cell proliferation or function. This study suggests the feasibility of using poly(alpha-hydroxy ester) foams as scaffolding materials for the transplantation of autogenous osteoblasts to regenerate bone tissue.

  16. Comparing the immunosuppressive potency of naïve marrow stromal cells and Notch-transfected marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background SB623 cells are expanded from marrow stromal cells (MSCs) transfected with a Notch intracellular domain (NICD)-expressing plasmid. In stroke-induced animals, these cells reduce infarct size and promote functional recovery. SB623 cells resemble the parental MSCs with respect to morphology and cell surface markers despite having been in extended culture. MSCs are known to have immunosuppressive properties; whether long-term culture of MSCs impact their immunomodulatory activity has not been addressed. Methods To assess the possible senescent properties of SB623 cells, we performed cell cycle related assays and beta-galactosidase staining. To assess the immunomodulatory activity of these expanded NICD-transfected MSCs, we performed co-cultures of SB623 cells or MSCs with either enriched human T cells or monocytes and assessed cytokine production by flow cytometry. In addition, we monitored the immunosuppressive activity of SB623 cells in both allogenic and xenogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Results Compared to MSCs, we showed that a small number of senescent-like cells appear in each lot of SB623 cells. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that these cells suppress human T cell proliferation in both the allogeneic and xenogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) in a manner comparable to MSCs. IL-10 producing T cells were generated and monocyte-dendritic cell differentiation was dampened by co-culture with SB623 cells. Compared to the parental MSCs, SB623 cells appear to exert a greater inhibitory impact on the maturation of dendritic cells as demonstrated by a greater reduction in the surface expression of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD86. Conclusion The results demonstrated that the immunosuppressive activity of the expanded NICD-transfected MSCs is comparable to the parental MSCs, in spite of the appearance of a small number of senescent-like cells. PMID:21982515

  17. Expression of bone morphogenetic proteins in stromal cells from human bone marrow long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Martinovic, Snjezana; Mazic, Sanja; Kisic, Veronika; Basic, Nikolina; Jakic-Razumovic, Jasminka; Borovecki, Fran; Batinic, Drago; Simic, Petra; Grgurevic, Lovorka; Labar, Boris; Vukicevic, Slobodan

    2004-09-01

    Highly purified primitive hemopoietic stem cells express BMP receptors but do not synthesize bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). However, exogenously added BMPs regulate their proliferation, differentiation, and survival. To further explore the mechanism by which BMPs might be involved in hemopoietic differentiation, we tested whether stromal cells from long-term culture (LTC) of normal human bone marrow produce BMPs, BMP receptors, and SMAD signaling molecules. Stromal cells were immunohistochemically characterized by the presence of lyzozyme, CD 31, factor VIII, CD 68, S100, alkaline phosphatase, and vimentin. Gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and the presence of BMP protein was confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The supportive role of the stromal cell layer in hemopoiesis in vitro was confirmed by a colony assay of clonogenic progenitors. Bone marrow stromal cells express mRNA and protein for BMP-3, -4, and -7 but not for BMP-2, -5, and -6 from the first to the eighth week of culture. Furthermore, stromal cells express the BMP type I receptors, activin-like kinase-3 (ALK-3), ALK-6, and the downstream transducers SMAD-1, -4, and -5. Thus, human bone marrow stromal cells synthesize BMPs, which might exert their effects on hemopoietic stem cells in a paracrine manner through specific BMP receptors. PMID:15314083

  18. Bone marrow stromal cell adhesion and morphology on micro- and sub-micropatterned titanium.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Aaron F; De Howitt, Natalie; Gott, Shannon C; Miller, Christopher; Rao, Masaru P; Liu, Huinan

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the adhesion and morphology of bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSCs) on bulk titanium (Ti) substrates with precisely-patterned surfaces consisting of groove-based gratings with groove widths ranging from 50 micro m down to 0.5 micro m (500 nm). Although it is well known that certain surface patterning enhances osteoblast (bone-forming cell) functions, past studies on cell-pattern interactions reported in the literature have heavily relied on surface patterning on materials with limited clinical relevance for orthopedic applications, such as polymeric substrates. The clinical need for improving osseointegration and juxtaposed bone formation around load-bearing Ti implants motivated this in vitro study. BMSCs were selected as model cells due to their important role in bone regeneration. The results showed significantly greater BMSC adhesion density and more favorable cell morphology on sub-micropatterned gratings when compared with larger micropatterned gratings and non-patterned control surfaces after both 24 hr and 72 hr cultures. We observed increasing cellular alignment and elongation with decreasing feature size. We also identified two distinctive cellular morphologies: Type I-Attached and spread cells that elongated along the pattern axes; and Type II-Superficially adhered round cells. Sub-micropatterned gratings demonstrated significantly greater Type I cell density than the non-patterned control, and lower Type II cell density than the larger micropatterned gratings. Collectively, these results suggest potential for rationally designing nano-scale surface topography on Ti implants to improve osseointegration. PMID:24734518

  19. Dexamethasone Regulates EphA5, a Potential Inhibitory Factor with Osteogenic Capability of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Okawa, Atsushi; Sotome, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the importance of quality management procedures for the handling of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and provided evidence for the existence of osteogenic inhibitor molecules in BMSCs. One candidate inhibitor is the ephrin type-A receptor 5 (EphA5), which is expressed in hBMSCs and upregulated during long-term culture. In this study, forced expression of EphA5 diminished the expression of osteoblast phenotypic markers. Downregulation of endogenous EphA5 by dexamethasone treatment promoted osteoblast marker expression. EphA5 could be involved in the normal growth regulation of BMSCs and could be a potential marker for replicative senescence. Although Eph forward signaling stimulated by ephrin-B-Fc promoted the expression of ALP mRNA in BMSCs, exogenous addition of EphA5-Fc did not affect the ALP level. The mechanism underlying the silencing of EphA5 in early cultures remains unclear. EphA5 promoter was barely methylated in hBMSCs while histone deacetylation could partially suppress EphA5 expression in early-passage cultures. In repeatedly passaged cultures, the upregulation of EphA5 independent of methylation could competitively inhibit osteogenic signal transduction pathways such as EphB forward signaling. Elucidation of the potential inhibitory function of EphA5 in hBMSCs may provide an alternative approach for lineage differentiation in cell therapy strategies and regenerative medicine. PMID:27057165

  20. Dexamethasone Regulates EphA5, a Potential Inhibitory Factor with Osteogenic Capability of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Okawa, Atsushi; Sotome, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the importance of quality management procedures for the handling of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and provided evidence for the existence of osteogenic inhibitor molecules in BMSCs. One candidate inhibitor is the ephrin type-A receptor 5 (EphA5), which is expressed in hBMSCs and upregulated during long-term culture. In this study, forced expression of EphA5 diminished the expression of osteoblast phenotypic markers. Downregulation of endogenous EphA5 by dexamethasone treatment promoted osteoblast marker expression. EphA5 could be involved in the normal growth regulation of BMSCs and could be a potential marker for replicative senescence. Although Eph forward signaling stimulated by ephrin-B-Fc promoted the expression of ALP mRNA in BMSCs, exogenous addition of EphA5-Fc did not affect the ALP level. The mechanism underlying the silencing of EphA5 in early cultures remains unclear. EphA5 promoter was barely methylated in hBMSCs while histone deacetylation could partially suppress EphA5 expression in early-passage cultures. In repeatedly passaged cultures, the upregulation of EphA5 independent of methylation could competitively inhibit osteogenic signal transduction pathways such as EphB forward signaling. Elucidation of the potential inhibitory function of EphA5 in hBMSCs may provide an alternative approach for lineage differentiation in cell therapy strategies and regenerative medicine. PMID:27057165

  1. Gap-junctional communication of bone marrow stromal cells is resistant to irradiation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Umezawa, A.; Harigaya, K.; Abe, H.; Watanabe, Y. )

    1990-10-01

    Bone marrow is one of the most radiosensitive organs. Irradiation causes a marked decrease in the total number of hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow. The reticular meshwork structure of marrow stromal cells, however, is relatively resistant to irradiation. Unimpaired stromal cell structure has been thought to be a prerequisite for the repopulation of hematopoietic cells during recovery from the effects of irradiation. The reticular framework is maintained by cell adhesion apparatuses such as gap junctions. The in vitro radiobiologic survival values of a cloned stromal cell line, H-1/A, were studied (n = 1.8, D0 = 138 cGy). Radiation doses of up to 4000 cGy had no detectable effects on the production of colony-stimulating factor 1. H-1/A cells communicate with each other via gap junctions as determined by the sensitive dye-transfer method. Gap-junctional communication between H-1/A cells was resistant to different levels of irradiation (500 to 10,000 cGy), but it was lost during adipocyte differentiation of H-1/A cells. Marrow stromal cells, which are important in the recovery of hematopoiesis, seemed capable of coordination with each other through gap junctions even when exposed to radiation.

  2. Current Opinion of Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation for Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    KURODA, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews recent advancement and perspective of bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplantation for ischemic stroke, based on current information of basic and translational research. The author would like to emphasize that scientific approach would enable us to apply BMSC transplantation into clinical situation in near future. PMID:26984453

  3. ERR{alpha} regulates osteoblastic and adipogenic differentiation of mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajalin, Ann-Marie; Pollock, Hanna; Aarnisalo, Piia

    2010-05-28

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor-{alpha} (ERR{alpha}) has been reported to have both a positive and a negative regulatory role in osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. We have studied the role of ERR{alpha} in osteoblastic and adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from ERR{alpha} deficient mice and their differentiation capacities were compared to that of the wild-type cells. ERR{alpha} deficient cultures displayed reduced cellular proliferation, osteoblastic differentiation, and mineralization. In the complementary experiment, overexpression of ERR{alpha} in MC3T3-E1 cells increased the expression of osteoblastic markers and mineralization. Alterations in the expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) may at least partially explain the effects on mineralization as BSP expression was reduced in ERR{alpha} deficient MSCs and enhanced upon ERR{alpha} overexpression in MC3T3-E1 cells. Furthermore, a luciferase reporter construct driven by the BSP promoter was efficiently transactivated by ERR{alpha}. Under adipogenic conditions, ERR{alpha} deficient cultures displayed reduced adipocytic differentiation. Our data thus propose a positive role for ERR{alpha} in osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. The variability in the results yielded in the different studies implies that ERR{alpha} may play different roles in bone under different physiological conditions.

  4. Characterization of the in vitro stromal microenvironment of human bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Strobel, E S; Gay, R E; Greenberg, P L

    1986-09-01

    Utilizing long-term in vitro culture techniques, we characterized the cellular composition and functional attributes of the human in vitro bone marrow stromal microenvironment. Morphologic, specific cytochemical and immunologic methods demonstrated that the marrow stromal adherent layer (AL) reached confluency at two to three weeks, and was comprised of 60%-70% fibroblastic cells, 10%-20% endothelial cells, 10%-20% monocyte/macrophages and 5%-10% fat-laden adherent cells. These proportions of cell types persisted for at least three months concomitant with proliferation of CFU-gm and BFU-e. In contrast, umbilical cord blood cells did not form a stromal AL despite persistence of hemopoietic progenitor cell proliferation. These findings provide a basis for improved understanding of cellular interactions regulating hemopoiesis. PMID:3534110

  5. Bone marrow stromal cell assays – in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Pamela Gehron; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Riminucci, Mara; Bianco, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Populations of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived “mesenchymal stem cells”) contain a a subset of cells that are able to recapitulate the formation of a bone/marrow organ (skeletal stem cells, SSCs). The biological properties of BMSC cultures are assessed by a variety of assays, both in vitro and in vivo. Application of these assays in an appropriate fashion provide a great deal of information on the role of BMSCs, and the subset of SSCs, in health and in disease. PMID:24482181

  6. [Bone marrow stromal damage mediated by immune response activity].

    PubMed

    Vojinović, J; Kamenov, B; Najman, S; Branković, Lj; Dimitrijević, H

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate influence of activated immune response on hematopoiesis in vitro, using the experimental model of BCG immunized BALB/c mice and in patients with chronic immunoactivation: long-lasting infections, autoimmunity or malignancy. We correlated changes in long term bone marrow cultures (Dexter) and NBT reduction with appearance of anemia in patients and experimental model of immunization by BCG. Increased spontaneous NBT reduction pointed out role of macrophage activation in bone marrow stroma damage. Long-term bone marrow cultures showed reduced number of hematopoietic cells, with predomination of fibroblasts and loss of fat cells. This results correlated with anemia and leucocytosis with stimulated myelopoiesis in peripheral blood. Activation of immune response, or acting of any agent that directly changes extracellular matrix and cellularity of bone marrow, may result in microenviroment bone marrow damage that modify hematopoiesis. PMID:18173180

  7. [Effects of growth factors on multipotent bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells].

    PubMed

    Molchanova, E A; Paiushina, O V; Starostin, V I

    2008-01-01

    Multipotent bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells are progenitors of various cell types capable of long-term self-maintenance. These cells are an adequate model for studying the most important problems in cell biology, such as self-maintenance of stem cells and regulation of their differentiation. Moreover, these cells are a promising resource for regenerative medicine. In this context, isolation of the earliest multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, their in vitro maintenance in an undifferentiated state, and stimulation of their differentiation in a desired direction appear to be most important. To successfully use the multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells both in fundamental studies and in therapy, it is necessary to modify and standardize the composition of culture medium, replacing blood serum with certain growth factors. These factors have influence on the proliferation and differentiation of most cell types, including multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. This paper is a review of available data concerning the effects of some growth factors on the multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells of the bone marrow. PMID:19198070

  8. Regulation of CXCL12 expression by canonical Wnt signaling in bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masato; Sato, Mari M; Nashimoto, Masayuki

    2011-05-01

    CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1, SDF-1), produced by stromal and endothelial cells including cells of the bone marrow, binds to its receptor CXCR4 and this axis regulates hematopoietic cell trafficking. Recently, osteoclast precursor cells were found to express CXCR4 and a potential role for the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis during osteoclast precursor cell recruitment/retention and development was proposed as a regulator of bone resorption. We examined the role of canonical Wnt signaling in regulating the expression of CXCL12 in bone marrow stromal cells. In mouse stromal ST2 cells, CXCL12 mRNA was expressed, while its expression was reduced in Wnt3a over-expressing ST2 (Wnt3a-ST2) cells or by treatment with lithium chloride (LiCl). Wnt3a decreased CXCL12 levels in culture supernatants from mouse bone marrow stromal cells. The culture supernatant from Wnt3a-ST2 cells also reduced migratory activity of bone marrow-derived cells in a Transwell migration assay. Silencing of glycogen synthase kinase-3β decreased CXCL12 expression, suggesting that the canonical Wnt signaling pathway regulates CXCL12 expression. In a transfection assay, LiCl down-regulated the activity of a reporter gene, a 1.8kb fragment of the 5'-flanking region of the CXCL12 gene. These results show that canonical Wnt signaling regulates CXCL12 gene expression at the transcriptional level, and this is the first study linking chemokine expression to canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:21296678

  9. Mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow treated with bovine tendon extract acquire the phenotype of mature tenocytes☆

    PubMed Central

    Augusto, Lívia Maria Mendonça; Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro; Bonfim, Danielle Cabral; dos Santos Cavalcanti, Amanda; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Duarte, Maria Eugênia Leite

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated in vitro differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow, in tenocytes after treatment with bovine tendon extract. Methods Bovine tendons were used for preparation of the extract and were stored at −80 °C. Mesenchymal stromal cells from the bone marrow of three donors were used for cytotoxicity tests by means of MTT and cell differentiation by means of qPCR. Results The data showed that mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow treated for up to 21 days in the presence of bovine tendon extract diluted at diminishing concentrations (1:10, 1:50 and 1:250) promoted activation of biglycan, collagen type I and fibromodulin expression. Conclusion Our results show that bovine tendon extract is capable of promoting differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in tenocytes. PMID:26962503

  10. Tributyltin engages multiple nuclear receptor pathways and suppresses osteogenesis in bone marrow multipotent stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Baker, Amelia H; Watt, James; Huang, Cassie K; Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Schlezinger, Jennifer J

    2015-06-15

    Organotins are members of the environmental obesogen class of contaminants because they activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), the essential regulator of adipogenesis. Exposure to thiazolidinediones (PPARγ ligands used to treat type 2 diabetes) is associated with increased fractures. Diminished bone quality likely results from PPARγ's role in promoting adipogenesis while suppressing osteogenesis of bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC). We hypothesized that tributyltin (TBT) would be a potent modifier of BM-MSC differentiation and a negative regulator of bone formation. Organotins interact with both PPARγ and retinoid X receptors (RXR), suggesting that they activate multiple nuclear receptor pathways. To investigate the role of RXR in the actions of TBT, the effects of PPARγ (rosiglitazone) and RXR (bexarotene, LG100268) agonists were compared to the effects of TBT in BMS2 cells and primary mouse BM-MSC cultures. In BMS2 cells, TBT induced the expression of Fabp4, Abca1, and Tgm2 in an RXR-dependent manner. All agonists suppressed osteogenesis in primary mouse BM-MSC cultures, based on decreased alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization, and expression of osteoblast-related genes. While rosiglitazone and TBT strongly activated adipogenesis, based on lipid accumulation and expression of adipocyte-related genes, the RXR agonists did not. Extending these analyses to other RXR heterodimers showed that TBT and the RXR agonists activated the liver X receptor pathway, whereas rosiglitazone did not. Application of either a PPARγ antagonist (T0070907) or an RXR antagonist (HX531) significantly reduced rosiglitazone-induced suppression of bone nodule formation. Only the RXR antagonist significantly reduced LG100268- and TBT-induced bone suppression. The RXR antagonist also inhibited LG100268- and TBT-induced expression of Abca1, an LXR target gene, in primary BM-MSC cultures. These results provide novel evidence that

  11. Establishing a Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplant Program at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Marianna; Ren, Jiaqiang; England, Lee; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Klein, Harvey G.; Robey, Pamela G.

    2014-01-01

    A repository of cryopreserved bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) products prepared from marrow aspirates of healthy subjects has been created and is being used to treat patients with inflammatory bowel disease, cardiovascular disease, and acute graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. New methods of manufacturing BMSCs are being investigated including the use of an automated bioreactor for BMSC expansion and the replacement of fetal bovine serum with human platelet lysate as a media supplement. Efforts are also being made to identify markers that can be used to assess the potency of BMSCs. PMID:24368014

  12. Runx2 Overexpression in Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Accelerates Bone Formation in Critical-Sized Femoral Defects

    PubMed Central

    Wojtowicz, Abigail M.; Templeman, Kellie L.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.; Guldberg, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The repair of large nonunions in long bones remains a significant clinical problem due to high failure rates and limited tissue availability for auto- and allografts. Many cell-based strategies for healing bone defects deliver bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) to the defect site to take advantage of the inherent osteogenic capacity of this cell type. However, many factors, including donor age and ex vivo expansion of the cells, cause BMSCs to lose their differentiation ability. To overcome these limitations, we have genetically engineered BMSCs to constitutively overexpress the osteoblast-specific transcription factor Runx2. In the present study, we examined Runx2-modified BMSCs, delivered via polycaprolactone scaffolds loaded with type I collagen meshes, in critical-sized segmental defects in rats compared to unmodified cells, cell-free scaffolds, and empty defects. Runx2 expression in BMSCs accelerated healing of critical-sized defects compared to unmodified BMSCs and defects receiving cell-free treatments. These findings provide an accelerated method for healing large bone defects, which may reduce recovery time and the need for external fixation of critical-sized defects. PMID:20412027

  13. The influence of stereolithographic scaffold architecture and composition on osteogenic signal expression with rat bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyobum; Dean, David; Wallace, Jonathan; Breithaupt, Rob; Mikos, Antonios G.; Fisher, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Scaffold design parameters, especially physical construction factors such as mechanical stiffness of substrate materials, pore size of 3D porous scaffolds, and channel geometry, are known to influence the osteogenic signal expression and subsequent differentiation of a transplanted cell population. In this study of photocrosslinked poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) and diethyl fumarate (DEF) scaffolds, the effect of DEF incorporation ratio and pore size on the osteogenic signal expression of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was investigated. Results demonstrated that DEF concentrations and pore sizes that led to increased scaffold mechanical stiffness also upregulated osteogenic signal expression, including bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), fibroblast growth factors-2 (FGF-2), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Runx2 transcriptional factor. Similar scaffold fabrication parameters supported rapid BMSC osteoblastic differentiation, as demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin expression. When scaffolds with random architecture, fabricated by porogen leaching, were compared to those with controlled architecture, fabricated by stereolithography (SLA), results showed that SLA scaffolds with the highly permeable and porous channels also have significantly higher expression of FGF-2, TGF-β1, and VEGF. Subsequent ALP expression and osteopontin secretion were also significantly increased in SLA scaffolds. Based upon these results, we conclude that scaffold properties provided by additive manufacturing techniques such as SLA fabrication, particularly increased mechanical stiffness and high permeability, may stimulate dramatic BMSC responses that promote rapid bone tissue regeneration. PMID:21396709

  14. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles are associated with inorganic phosphate-induced osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-rong; Bai, Jing; Yuan, Shuai-jun; Yu, Cai-xia; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Tian-lan; Wang, Kui

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, we demonstrated that calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles formed in cell culture media were implicated in the process of high inorganic phosphate (Pi) mediated osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Exposure of BMSCs in vitro to high Pi-containing media reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the expressions of osteoblast-specific genes. The sediments of CaP nanoparticles were observed at the cell surface and some of them were concomitantly found inside cells at high Pi concentration. In addition, treatment the cells with pyrophosphate (PPi), an inhibitor of calcium crystal formation, abrogated the ALP activity induced by high Pi, suggesting the contribution of CaP nanoparticles. Moreover, for isolated CaP nanoparticles, there was a trend of conversion from amorphous calcium phosphate to hydroxyapatite with elevated Pi. The particle size of CaP increased and the surface morphology changed from spherical to irregular due to increased concentrations of serum proteins incorporated into CaP nanoparticles. The study demonstrated that those physicochemical properties of CaP nanoparticles played an important role in modulating BMSCs differentiation. Furthermore, the addition of Pi in the osteogenic media resulted in a dose-dependent increase in matrix mineralization, while treatment of the cells with PPi suppressed Pi-induced calcium deposition. The findings indicated that calcium deposition in the matrix partly came from the spontaneous precipitation of CaP nanoparticles. PMID:26111760

  15. Runx2 overexpression in bone marrow stromal cells accelerates bone formation in critical-sized femoral defects.

    PubMed

    Wojtowicz, Abigail M; Templeman, Kellie L; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Guldberg, Robert E; García, Andrés J

    2010-09-01

    The repair of large nonunions in long bones remains a significant clinical problem due to high failure rates and limited tissue availability for auto- and allografts. Many cell-based strategies for healing bone defects deliver bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) to the defect site to take advantage of the inherent osteogenic capacity of this cell type. However, many factors, including donor age and ex vivo expansion of the cells, cause BMSCs to lose their differentiation ability. To overcome these limitations, we have genetically engineered BMSCs to constitutively overexpress the osteoblast-specific transcription factor Runx2. In the present study, we examined Runx2-modified BMSCs, delivered via polycaprolactone scaffolds loaded with type I collagen meshes, in critical-sized segmental defects in rats compared to unmodified cells, cell-free scaffolds, and empty defects. Runx2 expression in BMSCs accelerated healing of critical-sized defects compared to unmodified BMSCs and defects receiving cell-free treatments. These findings provide an accelerated method for healing large bone defects, which may reduce recovery time and the need for external fixation of critical-sized defects. PMID:20412027

  16. Role of Nanog in the maintenance of marrow stromal stem cells during post natal bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Bais, Manish V.; Shabin, Zabrina M.; Young, Megan; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Gerstnefeld, Louis C.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is related to marrow stromal stem cell maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing Nanog expression is seen during post natal surgical bone repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog knockdown decreases post surgical bone regeneration. -- Abstract: Post natal bone repair elicits a regenerative mechanism that restores the injured tissue to its pre-injury cellular composition and structure and is believed to recapitulate the embryological processes of bone formation. Prior studies showed that Nanog, a central epigenetic regulator associated with the maintenance of embryonic stem cells (ESC) was transiently expressed during fracture healing, Bais et al. . In this study, we show that murine bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) before they are induced to undergo osteogenic differentiation express {approx}50 Multiplication-Sign the background levels of Nanog seen in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and the W20-17 murine marrow stromal cell line stably expresses Nanog at {approx}80 Multiplication-Sign the MEF levels. Nanog expression in this cell line was inhibited by BMP7 treatment and Nanog lentivrial shRNA knockdown induced the expression of the terminal osteogenic gene osteocalcin. Lentivrial shRNA knockdown or lentiviral overexpression of Nanog in bone MSCs had inverse effects on proliferation, with knockdown decreasing and overexpression increasing MSC cell proliferation. Surgical marrow ablation of mouse tibia by medullary reaming led to a {approx}3-fold increase in Nanog that preceded osteogenic differentiation during intramembranous bone formation. Lentiviral shRNA knockdown of Nanog after surgical ablation led to an initial overexpression of osteogenic gene expression with no initial effect on bone formation but during subsequent remodeling of the newly formed bone a {approx}50% decrease was seen in the expression of terminal osteogenic gene expression and a {approx}50% loss in trabecular bone mass. This

  17. Ephrin B1 Regulates Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Differentiation and Bone Formation by Influencing TAZ Transactivation via Complex Formation with NHERF1▿

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Weirong; Kim, Jonghyun; Wergedal, Jon; Chen, Shin-Tai; Mohan, Subburaman

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of ephrin B1 in humans result in craniofrontonasal syndrome. Because little is known of the role and mechanism of action of ephrin B1 in bone, we examined the function of osteoblast-produced ephrin B1 in vivo and identified the molecular mechanism by which ephrin B1 reverse signaling regulates bone formation. Targeted deletion of the ephrin B1 gene in type 1α2 collagen-producing cells resulted in severe calvarial defects, decreased bone size, bone mineral density, and trabecular bone volume, caused by impairment in osterix expression and osteoblast differentiation. Coimmunoprecipitation of the TAZ complex with TAZ-specific antibody revealed a protein complex containing ephrin B1, PTPN13, NHERF1, and TAZ in bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. Activation of ephrin B1 reverse signaling with soluble EphB2-Fc led to a time-dependent increase in TAZ dephosphorylation and shuttling from cytoplasm to nucleus. Treatment of BMS cells with exogenous EphB2-Fc resulted in a 4-fold increase in osterix expression as determined by Western blotting. Disruption of TAZ expression using specific lentivirus small hairpin RNA (shRNA) decreased TAZ mRNA by 80% and ephrin B1 reverse signaling-mediated increases in osterix mRNA by 75%. Knockdown of NHERF1 expression reduced basal levels of osterix expression by 90% and abolished ephrin B1-mediated induction of osterix expression. We conclude that locally produced ephrin B1 mediates its effects on osteoblast differentiation by a novel molecular mechanism in which activation of reverse signaling leads to dephosphorylation of TAZ and subsequent release of TAZ from the ephrin B1/NHERF1/TAZ complex to translocate to the nucleus to induce expression of the osterix gene and perhaps other osteoblast differentiation genes. Our findings provide strong evidence that ephrin B1 reverse signaling in osteoblasts is critical for BMS cell differentiation and bone formation. PMID:19995908

  18. Ephrin B1 regulates bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and bone formation by influencing TAZ transactivation via complex formation with NHERF1.

    PubMed

    Xing, Weirong; Kim, Jonghyun; Wergedal, Jon; Chen, Shin-Tai; Mohan, Subburaman

    2010-02-01

    Mutations of ephrin B1 in humans result in craniofrontonasal syndrome. Because little is known of the role and mechanism of action of ephrin B1 in bone, we examined the function of osteoblast-produced ephrin B1 in vivo and identified the molecular mechanism by which ephrin B1 reverse signaling regulates bone formation. Targeted deletion of the ephrin B1 gene in type 1alpha2 collagen-producing cells resulted in severe calvarial defects, decreased bone size, bone mineral density, and trabecular bone volume, caused by impairment in osterix expression and osteoblast differentiation. Coimmunoprecipitation of the TAZ complex with TAZ-specific antibody revealed a protein complex containing ephrin B1, PTPN13, NHERF1, and TAZ in bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. Activation of ephrin B1 reverse signaling with soluble EphB2-Fc led to a time-dependent increase in TAZ dephosphorylation and shuttling from cytoplasm to nucleus. Treatment of BMS cells with exogenous EphB2-Fc resulted in a 4-fold increase in osterix expression as determined by Western blotting. Disruption of TAZ expression using specific lentivirus small hairpin RNA (shRNA) decreased TAZ mRNA by 80% and ephrin B1 reverse signaling-mediated increases in osterix mRNA by 75%. Knockdown of NHERF1 expression reduced basal levels of osterix expression by 90% and abolished ephrin B1-mediated induction of osterix expression. We conclude that locally produced ephrin B1 mediates its effects on osteoblast differentiation by a novel molecular mechanism in which activation of reverse signaling leads to dephosphorylation of TAZ and subsequent release of TAZ from the ephrin B1/NHERF1/TAZ complex to translocate to the nucleus to induce expression of the osterix gene and perhaps other osteoblast differentiation genes. Our findings provide strong evidence that ephrin B1 reverse signaling in osteoblasts is critical for BMS cell differentiation and bone formation. PMID:19995908

  19. p38α MAPK Regulates Lineage Commitment and OPG Synthesis of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Prevent Bone Loss under Physiological and Pathological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Qian; Jia, Hao; Biswas, Soma; Li, Ping; Qiu, Shoutao; Deng, Qi; Guo, Xizhi; Ma, Gang; Ling Chau, Jenny Fang; Wang, Yibin; Zhang, Zhen-Lin; Jiang, Xinquan; Liu, Huijuan; Li, Baojie

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) are capable of differentiating into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Skewed differentiation of BM-MSCs contributes to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Yet how BM-MSC lineage commitment is regulated remains unclear. We show that ablation of p38α in Prx1+ BM-MSCs produced osteoporotic phenotypes, growth plate defects, and increased bone marrow fat, secondary to biased BM-MSC differentiation from osteoblast/chondrocyte to adipocyte and increased osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. p38α regulates BM-MSC osteogenic commitment through TAK1-NF-κB signaling and osteoclastogenesis through osteoprotegerin (OPG) production by BM-MSCs. Estrogen activates p38α to maintain OPG expression in BM-MSCs to preserve the bone. Ablation of p38α in BM-MSCs positive for Dermo1, a later BM-MSC marker, only affected osteogenic differentiation. Thus, p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in Prx1+ BM-MSCs acts to preserve the bone by promoting osteogenic lineage commitment and sustaining OPG production. This study thus unravels previously unidentified roles for p38α MAPK in skeletal development and bone remodeling. PMID:26947973

  20. BST-1, a surface molecule of bone marrow stromal cell lines that facilitates pre-B-cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Kaisho, T; Ishikawa, J; Oritani, K; Inazawa, J; Tomizawa, H; Muraoka, O; Ochi, T; Hirano, T

    1994-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are essential for B-lymphocyte development. However, how stromal cells regulate B lymphopoiesis is not clear. In this paper, we report the molecular cloning of a stromal cell line-derived glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored molecule, BST-1, that facilitates pre-B-cell growth. The deduced amino acid sequence of BST-1 exhibited 33% identity with CD38. BST-1 was expressed in a wide range of tissues and in umbilical vein endothelial cells, whereas it was scarcely expressed in a variety of hematopoietic cell lines. The gene for BST-1 was assigned to chromosome 14q32.3, where immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes are clustered. BST-1 expression was enhanced in rheumatoid arthritis patient-derived bone marrow stromal cell lines that were previously shown to have an enhanced ability to support the growth of a pre-B-cell line as compared with stromal cell lines derived from healthy donors. Images PMID:8202488

  1. Extracellular calcium (Ca2+(o))-sensing receptor in a murine bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2): potential mediator of the actions of Ca2+(o) on the function of ST2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Kifor, O.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+(o)) homeostasis by mediating the actions of Ca2+(o) on parathyroid gland and kidney. Bone marrow stromal cells support the formation of osteoclasts from their progenitors as well as the growth of hematopoietic stem cells by secreting humoral factors and through cell to cell contact. Stromal cells also have the capacity to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts. Bone resorption by osteoclasts probably produces substantial local increases in Ca2+(o) that could provide a signal for stromal cells in the immediate vicinity, leading us to determine whether such stromal cells express the CaR. In this study, we used the murine bone marrow-derived, stromal cell line, ST2. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis, using an antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in ST2 cells. We also identified CaR transcripts in ST2 cells by Northern analysis using a CaR-specific probe and by RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products. Exposure of ST2 cells to high Ca2+(o) (4.8 mM) or to the polycationic CaR agonists, neomycin (300 microM) or gadolinium (100 microM), stimulated both chemotaxis and DNA synthesis in ST2 cells. Therefore, taken together, our data strongly suggest that the bone marrow-derived stromal cell line, ST2, possesses both CaR protein and messenger RNA that are very similar if not identical to those in parathyroid and kidney. Furthermore, as ST2 cells have the potential to differentiate into osteoblasts, the CaR in stromal cells could participate in bone turnover by stimulating the proliferation and migration of such cells to sites of bone resorption as a result of local, osteoclast-mediated release of Ca2+(o) and, thereafter, initiating bone formation after their differentiation into osteoblasts.

  2. Human term placenta-derived mesenchymal stromal cells are less prone to osteogenic differentiation than bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Gregor A; Ulrich, Christine; Ruh, Manuel; Abele, Harald; Schäfer, Richard; Kluba, Torsten; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2011-04-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) can be isolated from different tissues. They are capable of differentiating in vitro, for example, to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, or adipocytes. In contrast to CD34 for hematopoietic stem cells, a distinct MSC-defining antibody is not available. Further, for hematopoietic cells lineage-defining antigens such as CD3 or CD20 are known. In contrast, for MSC-derived cells lineage-associated cell surface markers are far from being established. We therefore investigated expression of cell surface antigens on human term placenta-derived MSC (pMSC) in more detail and correlated expression pattern to the osteogenic differentiation capacity of the MSC. We report that pMSC expressed the typical cell surface antigens at levels comparable to bone marrow-derived MSC (bmMSC), including CD73, CD90, and CD105, but did not express CD11b, CD34, and CD45. Further, CD164, TNAP, and the W5C5 antigens were detected on pMSC, whereas CD349 was not observed. Some pMSC expressed CD146 at low or moderate levels, and their osteogenic differentiation potential was weak. In contrast, bmMSC expressed CD146 at high levels, expression of alkaline phosphatase was significantly higher, and they presented a pronounced osteogenic differentiation potential. We conclude that MSC from different sources differ in their expression of distinct markers, and that this may correlate in part with their lineage determination. Thus, a higher percentage of bmMSC expressed CD146 at prominent levels and such cells may be better suited for bone repair. In contrast, many pMSC expressed CD146 at low or moderate levels. They, therefore, may be suitable for applications in which osteogenic differentiation is undesirable. PMID:21047215

  3. Effect of therapeutic levels of doxycycline and minocycline in the proliferation and differentiation of human bone marrow osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Fernandes, Maria Helena

    2007-03-01

    Semi-synthetic tetracyclines (TCs) have been reported to reduce pathological bone resorption through several mechanisms, although their effect over bone physiological metabolism is not yet fully understood. The present study aims at evaluate the behaviour of osteoblastic-induced human bone marrow cells regarding proliferation and functional activity, in the presence of representative therapeutic concentrations of doxycycline and minocycline. First passage human osteoblastic bone marrow cells were cultured for 35 days in conditions known to favor osteoblastic differentiation. Doxycycline (1-25 micro g/ml) or minocycline (1-50 micro g/ml) were added continuously, with the culture medium, twice a week with every medium change. Cultures were characterised at several time points for cell proliferation and function. Present data showed that 1 micro g/ml of both tetracyclines, level representative of that attained in plasma and crevicular fluid with the standard therapeutic dosage, increased significantly the proliferation of human bone marrow osteoblastic cells without altering their specific phenotype and functional activity. Long-term exposure to these TCs induced a significant increase in the number of active osteoblastic cells that yielded a proportional amount of a normal mineralised matrix, suggesting a potential application in therapeutic approaches aiming to increase bone formation. The presence of higher levels of these agents led to a dose-dependent deleterious effect over cell culture, delaying cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:17141175

  4. The differentiation directions of the bone marrow stromal cells under modeling microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, Olga; Rodionova, Natalia; Katkova, Olena

    Within experiments on rats simulating microgravity by base load remove from back limbs (duration of the experiment 1,5 months) on marrow stromal cells cultures (ex vivo, in vitro) comprising osteogenic cells-predecessors, extracted from femurs, studied their peculiarities of the colony formation ablity, the cell structure, some cytological and ultra-structural characteristics and differentiation direction. It was found that that under microgravity conditions there is a decline of the stromal cells colony formation intensity, decrease of the colonies size and cells mitotic activity that indicates decrease of their growth potential. Both in control and in experiment the colonies were presented by population of low-differentiated cells, differentiated cells and mature cells. The comparative cytological and morphometric analysis have shown that the studied stromal cells in colonies have the smaller sizes, more elongated shape, and higher nucleocytoplasmic ratio. Cells composition in the experiment colonies is reliably different by the ratio of the low-differentiating to being differentiated cells; a ratio of low-differentiated to already differentiated cells; ratio of differentiated cells to total number of all cells. In comparison with control group, amount of the cells passed trough a differentiation stage and mature cells in colonies is decreased by 3 to 4 times. Among the differentiated stromal cells in colonies increasing amount of adipocytes was revealed. The analysis of electron microscope microphotographs showed that in osteogenic cells differentiated under microgravity conditions, there is a reduction of the specific volume of a granular endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi's complex and quantity of nuclei reduction that indicates depression of the specific biosyntheses process intensity in cells. The increase of lysosomes and myelinic structures quantity is linked to organelles partial reduction. Consolidation of mitochondrias is an evidence of the cells’ energy

  5. Multiparameter Analysis of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Identifies Distinct Immunomodulatory and Differentiation-Competent Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    James, Sally; Fox, James; Afsari, Farinaz; Lee, Jennifer; Clough, Sally; Knight, Charlotte; Ashmore, James; Ashton, Peter; Preham, Olivier; Hoogduijn, Martin; Ponzoni, Raquel De Almeida Rocha; Hancock, Y.; Coles, Mark; Genever, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also called bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells) provide hematopoietic support and immunoregulation and contain a stem cell fraction capable of skeletogenic differentiation. We used immortalized human BMSC clonal lines for multi-level analysis of functional markers for BMSC subsets. All clones expressed typical BMSC cell-surface antigens; however, clones with trilineage differentiation capacity exhibited enhanced vascular interaction gene sets, whereas non-differentiating clones were uniquely CD317 positive with significantly enriched immunomodulatory transcriptional networks and high IL-7 production. IL-7 lineage tracing and CD317 immunolocalization confirmed the existence of a rare non-differentiating BMSC subtype, distinct from Cxcl12-DsRed+ perivascular stromal cells in vivo. Colony-forming CD317+ IL-7hi cells, identified at ∼1%–3% frequency in heterogeneous human BMSC fractions, were found to have the same biomolecular profile as non-differentiating BMSC clones using Raman spectroscopy. Distinct functional identities can be assigned to BMSC subpopulations, which are likely to have specific roles in immune control, lymphopoiesis, and bone homeostasis. PMID:26070611

  6. Histological Study of Bone Marrow and Umbilical Cord Stromal Cell Transplantation in Regenerating Rat Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Zarbakhsh, Sam; Goudarzi, Nasim; Shirmohammadi, Maryam; Safari, Manouchehr

    2016-01-01

    Objective Bone marrow and umbilical cord stromal cells are multipotential stem cells that have the ability to produce growth factors that play an important role in survival and generation of axons. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of the two different mesenchymal stem cells on peripheral nerve regeneration. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, a 10 mm segment of the left sciatic nerve of male Wistar rats (250-300 g) was removed with a silicone tube interposed into this nerve gap. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and human umbilical cord stromal cells (HUCSCs) were respectively obtained from rat and human. The cells were sepa- rately cultured and transplanted into the nerve gap. The sciatic nerve regeneration was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and light and electron microscopy. Moreover, histo- morphology of the gastrocnemius muscle was observed. Results The nerve regeneration in the BMSCs and HUCSCs groups that had received the stem cells was significantly more favorable than the control group. In addition, the BM- SCs group was significantly more favorable than the HUCSCs group (P<0.05). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that both homograft BMSCs and het- erograft HUCSCs may have the potential to regenerate peripheral nerve injury and transplantation of BMSCs may be more effective than HUCSCs in rat. PMID:26862526

  7. Hematopoietic microenvironment. Origin, lineage, and transplantability of the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow cultures from chimeric mice

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, S.; Fleischman, R.A.

    1988-04-01

    Studies of bone marrow transplant patients have suggested that the stromal cells of the in vitro hematopoietic microenvironment are transplantable into conditioned recipients. Moreover, in patients with myeloproliferative disorders, all of the stromal cells, which include presumptive endothelial cells, appear to be derived from hematopoietic precursors. To confirm these findings, we have constructed two chimeric mouse models: (a) traditional radiation chimeras, and (b) fetal chimeras, produced by placental injection of bone marrow into genetically anemic Wx/Wv fetuses, a technique that essentially precludes engraftment of nonhematopoietic cells. Using two-color indirect immunofluorescence, the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow culture derived from these chimeras were analyzed for donor or host origin by strain-specific H-2 antigens, and for cell lineage by a variety of other specific markers. 75-95% of the stromal cells were shown to be hematopoietic cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, based upon donor origin, phagocytosis, and expression of specific hematopoietic surface antigens. The remaining 5-25% of the stromal cells were exclusively host in origin. Apart from occasional fat cells, these cells uniformly expressed collagen type IV, laminin, and a surface antigen associated with endothelial cells. Since these endothelial-like cells are not transplantable into radiation or fetal chimeras, they are not derived from hematopoietic stem cells. The contrast between our findings and human studies suggests either unexpected species differences in the origin of stromal lineages or limitations in the previous methodology used to detect nonhematopoietic stromal cells.

  8. Increased Longevity of Hematopoiesis in Continuous Marrow Cultures and Radiation Resistance of Marrow Stromal and Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells from Caspase-1 Homozygous Recombinant-negative (Knockout) Mice

    PubMed Central

    EPPERLY, MICHAEL; BERHANE, HEBIST; CAO, SHAONAN; SHIELDS, DONNA; FRANICOLA, DARCY; GOFF, JULIE P.; ZHANG, XICHEN; WANG, HONG; FRIEDLANDER, ROBERT; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim We determined whether absence of caspase-1 altered the stress response of hematopoietic and bone marrow stromal cells in vitro. Materials and Methods Long-term bone marrow cultures from caspase-1 –/– and control caspase-1 +/+ mice were established and the derived bone marrow stromal and interleukin-3 (Il-3)-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell lines were evaluated for radiosensitivity. Results Long-term bone marrow cultures from caspase-1 –/– mice generated hematopoietic cells for over 30 weeks in vitro, significantly longer than controls did (p=0.0018). Bone marrow stromal (mesenchymal stem cell) and Il-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell lines from caspase-1–/– marrow cultures compared to caspase-1 +/+ were radioresistant (p=0.0486 and p=0.0235 respectively). Total-body irradiated caspase-1 –/– mice were not significantly radioresistant compared to controls (p=0.6542). Conclusion Caspase-1 deletion increases hematopoiesis and radioresistance of bone marrow cells in vitro. PMID:23812211

  9. Estrogen deficiency inducing shifted cytokines profile in bone marrow stromal cells inhibits Treg cells function in OVX mice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q-M; Liu, D-C; Zhang, X-C; Wu, J-P; Ding, L; Meng, D-H; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to reveal the effect of estrogen deficiency on Treg cells population in bone marrow in the development of osteoclastogenis with comparing the differences about Treg cells phenotypes and cytokines related with the homeostasis and functions maintenance of Treg cells in bone marrow in OVX mice and health control group. Wide—type C57BL/6 mice were operated OVX to mimic estrogen deficiency in PMO women. Treg cells population and their surface markers expressions were detected by flow cytometry. Cytokines profiles in bone marrow with examined by real—time PCR and ELISA analysis. Signal pathways and key modulators responsible to inflammatory cytokines expressions in bone marrow stromal cells were also detected with using western blotting. Estrogen deficiency in OVX mice decreased Treg cells and their functions, and cytokines profile in bone marrow were found shifted in bone marrow when compared with control group. Consistent to these observations, signal pathways in bone marrow stromal cells were reported altered by estrogen deficiency in our model. Estrogen deficiency effects Treg cells population and their functions in OVX mice with altering cytokines profile in bone marrow stromal cells. PMID:26025405

  10. Notch signalling drives bone marrow stromal cell-mediated chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Takam Kamga, Paul; Bassi, Giulio; Cassaro, Adriana; Midolo, Martina; Di Trapani, Mariano; Gatti, Alessandro; Carusone, Roberta; Resci, Federica; Perbellini, Omar; Gottardi, Michele; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Nwabo Kamdje, Armel Hervé; Ambrosetti, Achille; Krampera, Mauro

    2016-04-19

    Both preclinical and clinical investigations suggest that Notch signalling is critical for the development of many cancers and for their response to chemotherapy. We previously showed that Notch inhibition abrogates stromal-induced chemoresistance in lymphoid neoplasms. However, the role of Notch in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its contribution to the crosstalk between leukemia cells and bone marrow stromal cells remain controversial. Thus, we evaluated the role of the Notch pathway in the proliferation, survival and chemoresistance of AML cells in co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells expanded from both healthy donors (hBM-MSCs) and AML patients (hBM-MSCs*). As compared to hBM-MSCs, hBM-MSCs* showed higher level of Notch1, Jagged1 as well as the main Notch target gene HES1. Notably, hBM-MSCs* induced expression and activation of Notch signalling in AML cells, supporting AML proliferation and being more efficientin inducing AML chemoresistance than hBM-MSCs*. Pharmacological inhibition of Notch using combinations of Notch receptor-blocking antibodies or gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), in presence of chemotherapeutic agents, significant lowered the supportive effect of hBM-MSCs and hBM-MSCs* towards AML cells, by activating apoptotic cascade and reducing protein level of STAT3, AKT and NF-κB.These results suggest that Notch signalling inhibition, by overcoming the stromal-mediated promotion of chemoresistance,may represent a potential therapeutic targetnot only for lymphoid neoplasms, but also for AML. PMID:26967055

  11. Notch signalling drives bone marrow stromal cell-mediated chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kamga, Paul Takam; Bassi, Giulio; Cassaro, Adriana; Midolo, Martina; Di Trapani, Mariano; Gatti, Alessandro; Carusone, Roberta; Resci, Federica; Perbellini, Omar; Gottardi, Michele; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Kamdje, Armel Hervé Nwabo; Ambrosetti, Achille; Krampera, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Both preclinical and clinical investigations suggest that Notch signalling is critical for the development of many cancers and for their response to chemotherapy. We previously showed that Notch inhibition abrogates stromal-induced chemoresistance in lymphoid neoplasms. However, the role of Notch in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its contribution to the crosstalk between leukemia cells and bone marrow stromal cells remain controversial. Thus, we evaluated the role of the Notch pathway in the proliferation, survival and chemoresistance of AML cells in co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells expanded from both healthy donors (hBM-MSCs) and AML patients (hBM-MSCs*). As compared to hBM-MSCs, hBM-MSCs* showed higher level of Notch1, Jagged1 as well as the main Notch target gene HES1. Notably, hBM-MSCs* induced expression and activation of Notch signalling in AML cells, supporting AML proliferation and being more efficientin inducing AML chemoresistance than hBM-MSCs*. Pharmacological inhibition of Notch using combinations of Notch receptor-blocking antibodies or gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), in presence of chemotherapeutic agents, significant lowered the supportive effect of hBM-MSCs and hBM-MSCs* towards AML cells, by activating apoptotic cascade and reducing protein level of STAT3, AKT and NF-κB. These results suggest that Notch signalling inhibition, by overcoming the stromal-mediated promotion of chemoresistance,may represent a potential therapeutic targetnot only for lymphoid neoplasms, but also for AML. PMID:26967055

  12. A simple and efficient method for deriving neurospheres from bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Qin; Mu Jun; Li Qi; Li Ao; Zeng Zhilei; Yang Jun; Zhang Xiaodong; Tang Jin; Xie Peng

    2008-08-08

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be differentiated into neuronal and glial-like cell types under appropriate experimental conditions. However, previously reported methods are complicated and involve the use of toxic reagents. Here, we present a simplified and nontoxic method for efficient conversion of rat MSCs into neurospheres that express the neuroectodermal marker nestin. These neurospheres can proliferate and differentiate into neuron, astrocyte, and oligodendrocyte phenotypes. We thus propose that MSCs are an emerging model cell for the treatment of a variety of neurological diseases.

  13. Generation of clinical grade human bone marrow stromal cells for use in bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Robey, Pamela G; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Ren, Jiaqiang; Klein, Harvey G; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David F

    2015-01-01

    In current orthopaedic practice, there is a need to increase the ability to reconstruct large segments of bone lost due to trauma, resection of tumors and skeletal deformities, or when normal regenerative processes have failed such as in non-unions and avascular necrosis. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells), when used in conjunction with appropriate carriers, represent a means by which to achieve bone regeneration in such cases. While much has been done at the bench and in pre-clinical studies, moving towards clinical application requires the generation of clinical grade cells. What is described herein is an FDA-approved cell manufacturing procedure for the ex vivo expansion of high quality, biologically active human BMSCs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Stem Cells and Bone. PMID:25064527

  14. Osteoblastic potency of bone marrow cells cultivated on functionalized biometals with cyclic RGD-peptide.

    PubMed

    Jäger, M; Böge, C; Janissen, R; Rohrbeck, D; Hülsen, T; Lensing-Höhn, S; Krauspe, R; Herten, M

    2013-10-01

    The fixation of cementless endoprostheses requires excellent fixation at the bone implant interface. Although the surface structures of these implants are designed to promote osteoblastic differentiation, poor bone quality may prevent or delay osseointegration. There is evidence that RGD peptides known as recognition motifs for various integrins, promote cellular adhesion, influence cellular proliferation, and differentiation of local cells. In this study, five different metal surfaces were analyzed: Sandblasted (TiSa) and polished (TiPol) Ti6Al4V, porocoated (CCPor) and polished (CCPol) cobalt chrome and polished stainless steel (SS) were coated by ethanol amine and poly(ethylene glycol) to attach covalently RGD peptides. Human mesenchymal stromal cells of healthy donors were cultivated onto prior functionalized metal surfaces for 14 days without osteogenic stimulation. Cell proliferation and differentiation were quantitatively evaluated for native (I), NaOH pre-activated (II), NaOH pre-activated, and PEG-coated (III) as well as for RGD (IV) coated surfaces. The RGD immobilization efficiency was analyzed by epi-fluorescence spectroscopy, cell morphology was documented by light and scanning electron microscopy. The RGD-binding efficiency was TiSa > TiPol > SS > CCPor > CCPol. RGD coated surfaces showed the highest average cell proliferation on CCPol > SS > CCPor > TiSa ≥ TiPol, whereas cellular differentiation mostly correlated with the observed proliferation results, such as CCPol > TiSa > SS > CCPor > TiPol. Considering statistical analyses (significance level of α = 0.05), the RGD-coating of all biometals in comparison and in respect of their particular controls showed no significant improvement in cellular proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation. PMID:23529934

  15. [Analysis of sensitivity of stromal stem cells (CFU-f) from rat bone marrow and fetal liver to 5-fluorouracil].

    PubMed

    Paiushina, O V; Damaratskaia, E I; Bueverova, E I; Nikonova, T M; Butorina, N N; Molchanova, E A; Starostin, V I

    2006-01-01

    The sensitivity of stromal stem cells (CFU-f) from rat bone marrow and fetal liver to the cytotoxic effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was compared in vivo and in vitro. Cells from both tissues demonstrated a similar resistance to 5-FU in vitro; however, stromal stem cells from fetal liver proved notably more sensitive to 5-FU compared to marrow CFU-f in vivo. Cells forming colonies of different size were identified in stem cell populations from both tissues. Cells giving rise to small colonies had a higher resistance to 5-FU both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:17168462

  16. Restoration of the GM2 ganglioside metabolism in bone marrow-derived stromal cells from Tay-Sachs disease animal model.

    PubMed

    Martino, S; Cavalieri, C; Emiliani, C; Dolcetta, D; Cusella De Angelis, M G; Chigorno, V; Severini, G M; Sandhoff, K; Bordignon, C; Sonnino, S; Orlacchio, A

    2002-08-01

    The therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived stromal cells for the therapy of Tay-Sachs disease is primarily related to the restoration of their own GM2 ganglioside storage. With this aim, we produced bone marrow-derived stromal cells from the adult Tay-Sachs animal model and transduced them with a retroviral vector encoding for the alpha-subunit of the lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase A (E.C. 3.2.1.52). Our results demonstrate that transduced Tay-Sachs bone marrow-derived stromal cells have beta-hexosaminidase A comparable to that of bone marrow-derived stromal cells from wild-type mice. Moreover, beta-hexosaminidase A in transduced Tay-Sachs bone marrow-derived stromal cells was able to hydrolyze the GM2 ganglioside in a feeding experiment, thus demonstrating the correction of the altered phenotype. PMID:12374215

  17. Enhanced accumulation of adipocytes in bone marrow stromal cells in the presence of increased extracellular and intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Katoh, Youichi; Nakamura, Kyoko; Itoh, Seigo; Iesaki, Takafumi; Daida, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Yuji; Okada, Takao

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} enhances adipocyte accumulation in the presence of adipogenic inducers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} enhances both proliferation and adipocyte differentiation in BMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} induces an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} in BMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An intracellular Ca{sup 2+} chelator suppresses the enhancement in adipocyte accumulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Controlling [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} may govern the balance of adipocyte and osteoblast development. -- Abstract: The bone marrow stroma contains osteoblasts and adipocytes that have a common precursor: the pluripotent mesenchymal stem cell found in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Local bone marrow Ca{sup 2+} levels can reach high concentrations due to bone resorption, which is one of the notable features of the bone marrow stroma. Here, we describe the effects of high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} on the accumulation of adipocytes in the bone marrow stroma. Using primary mouse BMSCs, we evaluated the level of adipocyte accumulation by measuring Oil Red O staining and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity. High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} enhanced the accumulation of adipocytes following treatment with both insulin and dexamethasone together but not in the absence of this treatment. This enhanced accumulation was the result of both the accelerated proliferation of BMSCs and their differentiation into adipocytes. Using the fura-2 method, we also showed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} induces an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. An intracellular Ca{sup 2+} chelator suppressed the enhancement in adipocyte accumulation due to increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} in BMSCs. These data suggest a new role for extracellular Ca{sup 2+} in the bone marrow stroma: increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} induces an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} levels, which in turn enhances the accumulation of

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of miRNA-mRNA Interactions in Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Ilango; Yang, Xiaodong; Brown, Joseph; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Torok–Storb, Beverly; Kabos, Peter; Hesselberth, Jay R.; Pillai, Manoj M.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, lineage commitment, and differentiation in adult vertebrates requires extrinsic signals provided by cells in the marrow microenvironment (ME) located within the bone marrow. Both secreted and cell-surface bound factors critical to this regulation have been identified, yet control of their expression by cells within the ME has not been addressed. Herein we hypothesize that microRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to their controlled expression. MiRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that bind to target mRNAs and downregulate gene expression by either initiating mRNA degradation or preventing peptide translation. Testing the role of miRNAs in downregulating gene expression has been difficult since conventional techniques used to define miRNA-mRNA interactions are indirect and have high false-positive and negative rates. In this report, a genome-wide biochemical technique (high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation or HITS-CLIP) was used to generate unbiased genome-wide maps of miRNA-mRNA interactions in two critical cellular components of the marrow ME: marrow stromal cells and bone marrow endothelial cells. Analysis of these datasets identified miRNAs as direct regulators of JAG1, WNT5A, MMP2, and VEGFA; four factors that are important to ME function. Our results show the feasibility and utility of unbiased genome-wide biochemical techniques in dissecting the role of miRNAs in regulation of complex tissues such as the marrow ME. PMID:24038734

  19. Effects of the bifunctional sulfoxide MMS350, a radiation mitigator, on hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures and on radioresistance of marrow stromal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Ashwin; Epperly, Michael W; Cao, Shaonan; Franicola, Darcy; Shields, Donna; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Sprachman, Melissa M; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    The ionizing irradiation mitigator MMS350 prolongs survival of mice treated with total-body irradiation and prevents radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis when added to drinking water at day 100 after thoracic irradiation. The effects of MMS350 on hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow culture and on the radiobiology of derived bone marrow stromal cell lines were tested. Long-term bone marrow cultures were established from C57BL/6NTac mice and maintained in a high-humidity incubator, with 7% CO2 and the addition of 100 μM MMS350 at the weekly media change. Over 10 weeks in culture, MMS350 had no significant effect on maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell production, or on nonadherent cells or colony-forming units of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Stromal cell lines derived from non MMS350-treated long-term cultures or control stromal cells treated with MMS350 were radioresistant in the clonogenic survival curve assay. MMS350 is a non-toxic, highly water-soluble radiation mitigator that exhibits radioprotective effects on bone marrow stromal cells. PMID:24982210

  20. Assessment of the role of flavonoids for inducing osteoblast differentiation in isolated mouse bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Swati; Bankar, Rohini; Roy, Partha

    2013-06-15

    Quercetin and rutin are common flavonoids in fruit and vegetables, and have been reported to affect bone development. However, the effect of flavonoids on osteoblast differentiation remains a matter of controversy. In the present study, mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) were isolated and characterized for their use in osteoblast differentiation using two flavonoids, quercetin and rutin. BMMSCs were cultured in various concentrations of quercetin and rutin during the osteoblast differentiation period of 10 days. Both quercetin and rutin were found to up regulate the osteoblast differentiation in dose dependent manner, albeit to lesser extent in case of former than that of latter. Quercetin and rutin also increased alkaline phosphatase activity by about 150 and 240% and demonstrated mineralization up to 110 and 200% respectively as compared to control (which was considered as 100%). Further, both the flavonoids were also found to increase the expression of some of the prominent markers for differentiation of osteoblast like osteopontin, osterix, RunX2, osteoprotegerin and osteocalcin. The current data suggests that certain classes of flavonoids like rutin and quercetin can be used in the cure and management of osteodegenerative disorders due to their osteoblast specific differentiation activities. PMID:23570998

  1. Silicate bioceramics enhanced vascularization and osteogenesis through stimulating interactions between endothelia cells and bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Xue, Ke; Kong, Ni; Liu, Kai; Chang, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    The facts that biomaterials affect the behavior of single type of cells have been widely accepted. However, the effects of biomaterials on cell-cell interactions have rarely been reported. Bone tissue engineering involves osteoblastic cells (OCs), endothelial cells (ECs) and the interactions between OCs and ECs. It has been reported that silicate biomaterials can stimulate osteogenic differentiation of OCs and vascularization of ECs. However, the effects of silicate biomaterials on the interactions between ECs and OCs during vascularization and osteogenesis have not been reported, which are critical for bone tissue regeneration in vivo. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) bioceramics on interactions between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and on stimulation of vascularization and osteogenesis in vivo through combining co-cultures with CS containing scaffolds. Specifically, the effects of CS on the angiogenic growth factor VEGF, osteogenic growth factor BMP-2 and the cross-talks between VEGF and BMP-2 in the co-culture system were elucidated. Results showed that CS stimulated co-cultured HBMSCs (co-HBMSCs) to express VEGF and the VEGF activated its receptor KDR on co-cultured HUVECs (co-HUVECs), which was also up-regulated by CS. Then, BMP-2 and nitric oxide expression from the co-HUVECs were stimulated by CS and the former stimulated osteogenic differentiation of co-HBMSCs while the latter stimulated vascularization of co-HVUECs. Finally, the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/CS composite scaffolds with the co-cultured HBMSCs and HUVECs significantly enhanced vascularization and osteogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo, which indicates that it is a promising way to enhance bone regeneration by combining scaffolds containing silicate bioceramics and co-cultures of ECs and OCs. PMID:24486216

  2. Sera of overweight people promote in vitro adipocyte differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Overweight status should not be considered merely an aesthetic concern; rather, it can incur health risks since it may trigger a cascade of events that produce further fat tissue through altered levels of circulating signaling molecules. There have been few studies addressing the effect of overweight status on the physiological functions of stem cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are the progenitors of adipocytes and osteocytes and are a subset of the bone marrow stromal cell population. Methods We decided to investigate the influence of overweight individuals’ sera on in vitro MSC proliferation and differentiation. Results We observed that in vitro incubation of bone marrow stromal cells with the sera of overweight individuals promotes the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs while partially impairing proper osteogenesis. Conclusions These results, which represent a pilot study, might suggest that becoming overweight triggers further weight gains by promoting a bias in the differentiation potential of MSCs toward adipogenesis. The circulating factors involved in this phenomenon remain to be determined, since the great majority of the well known pro-inflammatory cytokines and adipocyte-secreted factors we investigated did not show relevant modifications in overweight serum samples compared with controls. PMID:24405848

  3. Lamellar Spacing in Cuboid Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds Regulates Bone Formation by Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Afghani, Shahrzad; Franco, Jaime; Launey, Max; Marshall, Sally; Marshall, Grayson W.; Nissenson, Robert; Lee, Janice; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Saiz, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Background A major goal in bone engineering is the creation of large volume constructs (scaffolds and stem cells) that bear load. The scaffolds must satisfy two competing requirements—they need be sufficiently porous to allow nutrient flow to maintain cell viability, yet sufficiently dense to bear load. We studied the effect of scaffold macroporosity on bone formation and scaffold strength, for bone formed by human bone marrow stromal cells. Methods Rigid cubical hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate scaffolds were produced by robo-casting. The ceramic line thickness was held constant, but the distance between adjacent lines was either 50, 100, 200, 500, or 1000 μm. Cultured human bone marrow stromal cells were combined with the scaffolds in vitro; transplants were placed into the subcutis of immunodeficient mice. Transplants were harvested 9, 18, 23, 38, or 50 weeks later. Bone formation and scaffold strength were analyzed using histology and compression testing. Results Sixty transplants were evaluated. Cortical bone increased with transplant age, and was greatest among 500 μm transplants. In contrast, maximum transplant strength was greatest among 200 μm transplants. Conclusions Lamellar spacing within scaffolds regulates the extent of bone formation; 500 μm yields the most new bone, whereas 200 μm yields the strongest transplants. PMID:21294634

  4. Engraftment and regenerative effects of bone marrow stromal cell transplantation on damaged rat olfactory mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jang-Woo; Jo, Hyo Gyeong; Park, Sang Man; Ku, Cheol Hyo; Park, Dong-Joon

    2016-09-01

    To develop a new therapeutic method to treat olfactory deficits, we investigated the engraftment and regenerative effects of transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) on damaged rat olfactory mucosa. To induce olfactory nerve degeneration, one side of the olfactory mucosa of Sprague-Dawley rats was damaged via Triton X-100 irrigation. Phosphate-buffered saline containing syngeneic BMSCs was injected into the olfactory mucosa for transplantation. PKH fluorescent cell dye labeling of BMSCs was used to monitor the transplanted cells. After transplantation of BMSCs, the thickness and regeneration of olfactory mucosa were analyzed using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining. S100 immunohistochemical staining was used to measure nerve sheath regeneration. The increase in NGF (nerve growth factor) level in the olfactory mucosa was measured by Western blot analysis. Transplanted bone marrow stromal cells were engrafted to the lamia propria of damaged mucosa. The mean time for normalization of thickness and morphological recovery of the olfactory mucosa was 4 weeks in the therapeutic group and 9 weeks in the control group. S100 immunoreactivity was higher on the BMSC-treated side than on the control side. During regeneration, the expression of NGF increased in the olfactory mucosa of the experimental group. Based on these results, BMSC transplantation accelerated regeneration of olfactory mucosa damaged by Triton X-100, and NGF may be essential to this regenerative process. PMID:26940801

  5. Human bone marrow stromal cells display variable anatomic site-dependent response and recovery from irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Damek-Poprawa, Monika; Stefanik, Derek; Levin, Lawrence M.; Akintoye, Sunday O.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Orofacial bone is commonly affected by osteoradionecrosis (ORN) during head and neck cancer radiotherapy possibly due to interactions of several factors including radiation damage to resident bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Irradiation causes DNA damage, triggers p53-dependent signaling resulting in either cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis. In same individuals, disproportionately higher rapid growth of orofacial BMSCs relative to those of axial/appendicular bones suggests their response to radiation is skeletally site-specific. We hypothesized that survival and osteogenic recovery capacity of irradiated human BMSCs is site-dependent based on anatomic skeletal site of origin. Methods Early passage BMSCs from maxilla, mandible and iliac crest of four normal volunteers were exposed to 2.5 to 10 Gy gamma radiation to evaluate clonogenic survival, effects on cell cycle, DNA damage, p53-related response and in vivo osteogenic regenerative capacity. Results Orofacial bone marrow stromal cells (OF-MSCs) survived higher radiation doses and recovered quicker than iliac crest (IC-MSCs) based on clonogenic survival, proliferation and accumulation in G0G1 phase. Post-irradiation p53 level was relatively unchanged but expression of p21, a downstream effector was moderately increased in OF-MSCs. Re-establishment of in vivo bone regeneration was delayed more in irradiated IC-MSCs relative to OF-MSCs. Conclusions Effect of irradiation on human BMSCs was skeletal site-specific with OF-MSCs displaying higher radio-resistance and quicker recovery than IC-MSCs. PMID:20378097

  6. Interleukin-33 is expressed in differentiated osteoblasts and blocks osteoclast formation from bone marrow precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Jochen; Bickert, Thomas; Beil, F Timo; Zaiss, Mario M; Albers, Joachim; Wintges, Kristofer; Streichert, Thomas; Klaetschke, Kristin; Keller, Johannes; Hissnauer, Tim-Nicolas; Spiro, Alexander S; Gessner, Andre; Schett, Georg; Amling, Michael; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Horst, Andrea Kristina; Schinke, Thorsten

    2011-04-01

    Since the hematopoetic system is located within the bone marrow, it is not surprising that recent evidence has demonstrated the existence of molecular interactions between bone and immune cells. While interleukin 1 (IL-1) and IL-18, two cytokines of the IL-1 family, have been shown to regulate differentiation and activity of bone cells, the role of IL-33, another IL-1 family member, has not been addressed yet. Since we observed that the expression of IL-33 increases during osteoblast differentiation, we analyzed its possible influence on bone formation and observed that IL-33 did not affect matrix mineralization but enhanced the expression of Tnfsf11, the gene encoding RANKL. This finding led us to analyze the skeletal phenotype of Il1rl1-deficient mice, which lack the IL-33 receptor ST2. Unexpectedly, these mice displayed normal bone formation but increased bone resorption, thereby resulting in low trabecular bone mass. Since this finding suggested a negative influence of IL-33 on osteoclastogenesis, we next analyzed osteoclast differentiation from bone marrow precursor cells and observed that IL-33 completely abolished the generation of TRACP(+) multinucleated osteoclasts, even in the presence of RANKL and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Although our molecular studies revealed that IL-33 treatment of bone marrow cells caused a shift toward other hematopoetic lineages, we further observed a direct negative influence of IL-33 on the osteoclastogenic differentiation of RAW264.7 macrophages, where IL-33 repressed the expression of Nfatc1, which encodes one of the key transciption factors of osteoclast differentiation. Taken together, these findings have uncovered a previously unknown function of IL-33 as an inhibitor of bone resorption. PMID:20939024

  7. Loss of Asxl1 Alters Self-Renewal and Cell Fate of Bone Marrow Stromal Cell, Leading to Bohring-Opitz-like Syndrome in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Xing, Caihong; Rhodes, Steven D; He, Yongzheng; Deng, Kai; Li, Zhaomin; He, Fuhong; Zhu, Caiying; Nguyen, Lihn; Zhou, Yuan; Chen, Shi; Mohammad, Khalid S; Guise, Theresa A; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Xu, Mingjiang; Wang, Qian-Fei; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2016-06-14

    De novo ASXL1 mutations are found in patients with Bohring-Opitz syndrome, a disease with severe developmental defects and early childhood mortality. The underlying pathologic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Using Asxl1-targeted murine models, we found that Asxl1 global loss as well as conditional deletion in osteoblasts and their progenitors led to significant bone loss and a markedly decreased number of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) compared with wild-type littermates. Asxl1(-/-) BMSCs displayed impaired self-renewal and skewed differentiation, away from osteoblasts and favoring adipocytes. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed altered expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, skeletal development, and morphogenesis. Furthermore, gene set enrichment analysis showed decreased expression of stem cell self-renewal gene signature, suggesting a role of Asxl1 in regulating the stemness of BMSCs. Importantly, re-introduction of Asxl1 normalized NANOG and OCT4 expression and restored the self-renewal capacity of Asxl1(-/-) BMSCs. Our study unveils a pivotal role of ASXL1 in the maintenance of BMSC functions and skeletal development. PMID:27237378

  8. Comparison between 8-prenylnarigenin and narigenin concerning their activities on promotion of rat bone marrow stromal cells' osteogenic differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ming, L G; Ge, B F; Wang, M G; Chen, K M

    2012-12-01

    A number of recent studies have suggested that flavonols (a class of phytochemical with many biological activities), might exert protective effects against post-menopausal bone loss. In the present study, we compared naringenin (NG) and 8-prenylnaringenin (PNG), two major naturally occurring flavonols, on in vitro differentiation of osteoblasts and bone resorbing activity, of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Our results indicated that both compounds, at 10(-6)  m, enhanced BMSCs' differentiation. Then effects of the two compounds at 10(-6)  m on ALP activity, osteocalcin secretion and calcium deposition, were compared over a time course. Numbers and areas of colonies stained for ALP (CFU-F(ALP) ) expression, and mineralized bone nodules, were histochemically analysed after 12 days and 16 days osteogenic induction, respectively. Expression of BMP-2, OPG, OSX, RUNX-2 genes and p38MAPK protein were examined using real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively. The data presented indicate that PNG, significantly enhanced the rat BMSCs' differentiation and mineralization through the BMP-2/p38MAPK/Runx2/Osterix signal pathway, greater than did NG. In conclusion, PNG has a more pronounced ability to enhance osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, than NG. PMID:23106298

  9. Route of delivery influences biodistribution of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells following experimental bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangjing; Eid, Saada; Dennis, James E; Cooke, Kenneth R; Auletta, Jeffery J; Lee, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have shown promise as treatment for graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT). Mechanisms mediating in vivo effects of MSCs remain largely unknown, including their biodistribution following infusion. To this end, human bone-marrow derived MSCs (hMSCs) were injected via carotid artery (IA) or tail vein (TV) into allogeneic and syngeneic BMT recipient mice. Following xenogeneic transplantation, MSC biodistribution was measured by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using hMSCs transduced with a reporter gene system containing luciferase and by scintigraphic imaging using hMSCs labeled with [99mTc]-HMPAO. Although hMSCs initially accumulated in the lungs in both transplant groups, more cells migrated to organs in alloBMT recipient as measured by in vivo BLI and scintigraphy and confirmed by ex vivo BLI imaging, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. IA injection resulted in persistent whole–body hMSC distribution in alloBMT recipients, while hMSCs were rapidly cleared in the syngeneic animals within one week. In contrast, TV-injected hMSCs were mainly seen in the lungs with fewer cells traveling to other organs. Summarily, these results demonstrate the potential use of IA injection to alter hMSC biodistribution in order to more effectively deliver hMSCs to targeted tissues and microenvironments. PMID:27330253

  10. Bone Marrow Regeneration Promoted by Biophysically Sorted Osteoprogenitors From Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Zhiyong; Lee, Wong Cheng; Guan, Guofeng; Nyan, Lin Myint; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue repair deficiencies can be supplemented through strategies to isolate, expand in vitro, and reimplant regenerative cells that supplant damaged cells or stimulate endogenous repair mechanisms. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), a subset of which is described as mesenchymal stem cells, are leading candidates for cell-mediated bone repair and wound healing, with hundreds of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. An outstanding key challenge for successful clinical translation of MSCs is the capacity to produce large quantities of cells in vitro with uniform and relevant therapeutic properties. By leveraging biophysical traits of MSC subpopulations and label-free microfluidic cell sorting, we hypothesized and experimentally verified that MSCs of large diameter within expanded MSC cultures were osteoprogenitors that exhibited significantly greater efficacy over other MSC subpopulations in bone marrow repair. Systemic administration of osteoprogenitor MSCs significantly improved survival rates (>80%) as compared with other MSC subpopulations (0%) for preclinical murine bone marrow injury models. Osteoprogenitor MSCs also exerted potent therapeutic effects as “cell factories” that secreted high levels of regenerative factors such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenetic protein 2, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 1, and angiopoietin-1; this resulted in increased cell proliferation, vessel formation, and reduced apoptosis in bone marrow. This MSC subpopulation mediated rescue of damaged marrow tissue via restoration of the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, as well as subsequent hematopoiesis. Together, the capabilities described herein for label-freeisolation of regenerative osteoprogenitor MSCs can markedly improve the efficacy of MSC-based therapies. PMID:25411477

  11. Bone marrow-derived osteoblast progenitor cells in circulating blood contribute to ectopic bone formation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuru, Satoru; Tamai, Katsuto . E-mail: tamai@gts.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Yamazaki, Takehiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2007-03-09

    Recent studies have suggested the existence of osteoblastic cells in the circulation, but the origin and role of these cells in vivo are not clear. Here, we examined how these cells contribute to osteogenesis in a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced model of ectopic bone formation. Following lethal dose-irradiation and subsequent green fluorescent protein-transgenic bone marrow cell-transplantation (GFP-BMT) in mice, a BMP-2-containing collagen pellet was implanted into muscle. Three weeks later, a significant number of GFP-positive osteoblastic cells were present in the newly generated ectopic bone. Moreover, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) from the BMP-2-implanted mouse were then shown to include osteoblast progenitor cells (OPCs) in culture. Passive transfer of the PBMNCs isolated from the BMP-2-implanted GFP-mouse to the BMP-2-implanted nude mouse led to GFP-positive osteoblast accumulation in the ectopic bone. These data provide new insight into the mechanism of ectopic bone formation involving bone marrow-derived OPCs in circulating blood.

  12. Increased extracellular and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} lead to adipocyte accumulation in bone marrow stromal cells by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Katoh, Youichi; Miyamoto, Yuki; Itoh, Seigo; Daida, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Yuji; Okada, Takao

    2015-02-20

    Mesenchymal stem cells found in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are the common progenitors for both adipocyte and osteoblast. An increase in marrow adipogenesis is associated with age-related osteopenia and anemia. Both extracellular and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) are versatile signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of cell functions, including proliferation and differentiation. We have recently reported that upon treatment of BMSCs with insulin and dexamethasone, both high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} enhanced adipocyte accumulation, which suggested that increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} caused by bone resorption may accelerate adipocyte accumulation in aging and diabetic patients. In this study, we used primary mouse BMSCs to investigate the mechanisms by which high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} may enhance adipocyte accumulation. In the process of adipocyte accumulation, two important keys are adipocyte differentiation and the proliferation of BMSCs, which have the potential to differentiate into adipocytes. Use of MTT assay and real-time RT-PCR revealed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} (ionomycin)-dependent adipocyte accumulation is caused by enhanced proliferation of BMSCs but not enhanced differentiation into adipocytes. Using fura-2 fluorescence-based approaches, we showed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} (addition of CaCl{sub 2}) leads to increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Flow cytometric methods revealed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK independently of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. The inhibition of ERK by U0126 and PD0325901 enhanced the differentiation of BMSCs into adipocytes. These data suggest that increased extracellular Ca{sup 2+} provides the differentiation of BMSCs into adipocytes by the suppression of ERK activity independently of increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, which results in BMSC proliferation. - Highlights:

  13. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Verônica Fernandes; Bonfim, Danielle Cabral; Cavalcanti, Amanda dos Santos; Fernandes, Marco Cury; Kahn, Suzana Assad; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Lima, Inayá Correa; Murray, Samuel S.; Murray, Elsa J. Brochmann; Duarte, Maria Eugenia Leite

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we could obtain an enriched population of cells with a greater therapeutic potential. We characterized two populations of bone marrow-derived cells, those that adhered by three days (R-cells) and those that did not adhere by three days but did by six days (L-cells). Clones derived from L-cells could be induced into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. L-cells appeared to have greater proliferative capacity, as manifested by larger colony diameter and clones with higher CD146 expression. Only clones from L-cells developed bone marrow stroma in vivo. We conclude that the use of late adherence of BMSCs is one parameter that can be used to enrich for cells that will constitute a superior final product for cell therapy in orthopedics. PMID:23710460

  14. Deletion of BMP receptor type IB decreased bone mass in association with compromised osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ce; Iura, Ayaka; Terajima, Masahiko; Liu, Fei; Lyons, Karen; Pan, Haichun; Zhang, Honghao; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Mishina, Yuji; Sun, Hongchen

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that disruption of two type I BMP receptors, Bmpr1a and Acvr1, respectively, in an osteoblast-specific manner, increased bone mass in mice. BMPR1B, another BMP type I receptor, is also capable of binding to BMP ligands and transduce BMP signaling. However, little is known about the function of BMPR1B in bone. In this study, we investigated the bone phenotype in Bmpr1b null mice and the impacts of loss of Bmpr1b on osteoblasts and osteoclasts. We found that deletion of Bmpr1b resulted in osteopenia in 8-week-old male mice, and the phenotype was transient and gender specific. The decreased bone mass was neither due to the changes in osteoblastic bone formation activity nor osteoclastic bone resorption activity in vivo. In vitro differentiation of Bmpr1b null osteoclasts was increased but resorption activity was decreased. Calvarial pre-osteoblasts from Bmpr1b mutant showed comparable differentiation capability in vitro, while they showed increased BMP-SMAD signaling in culture. Different from calvarial pre-osteoblasts, Bmpr1b mutant bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors showed compromised differentiation in vitro, which may be a reason for the osteopenic phenotype in the mutant mice. In conclusion, our results suggested that BMPR1B plays distinct roles from BMPR1A and ACVR1 in maintaining bone mass and transducing BMP signaling. PMID:27048979

  15. Deletion of BMP receptor type IB decreased bone mass in association with compromised osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ce; Iura, Ayaka; Terajima, Masahiko; Liu, Fei; Lyons, Karen; Pan, Haichun; Zhang, Honghao; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Mishina, Yuji; Sun, Hongchen

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that disruption of two type I BMP receptors, Bmpr1a and Acvr1, respectively, in an osteoblast-specific manner, increased bone mass in mice. BMPR1B, another BMP type I receptor, is also capable of binding to BMP ligands and transduce BMP signaling. However, little is known about the function of BMPR1B in bone. In this study, we investigated the bone phenotype in Bmpr1b null mice and the impacts of loss of Bmpr1b on osteoblasts and osteoclasts. We found that deletion of Bmpr1b resulted in osteopenia in 8-week-old male mice, and the phenotype was transient and gender specific. The decreased bone mass was neither due to the changes in osteoblastic bone formation activity nor osteoclastic bone resorption activity in vivo. In vitro differentiation of Bmpr1b null osteoclasts was increased but resorption activity was decreased. Calvarial pre-osteoblasts from Bmpr1b mutant showed comparable differentiation capability in vitro, while they showed increased BMP-SMAD signaling in culture. Different from calvarial pre-osteoblasts, Bmpr1b mutant bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors showed compromised differentiation in vitro, which may be a reason for the osteopenic phenotype in the mutant mice. In conclusion, our results suggested that BMPR1B plays distinct roles from BMPR1A and ACVR1 in maintaining bone mass and transducing BMP signaling. PMID:27048979

  16. Content of stromal precursor cells in heterotopic transplants of bone marrow in CBA mice of various ages.

    PubMed

    Gorskaya, Yu F; Kuralesova, A I; Shuklina, E Yu; Nesterenko, V G

    2002-02-01

    Efficiency of colony formation of stromal precursor cells in cultured bone marrow transplants from old (24 month) CBA mice implanted to young (2-month-old) mice almost 3-fold surpassed that in cultured transplants implanted to old recipients. The content of nucleated cells in bone marrow transplants from senescence accelerated mice SAMP increased more than 2-fold, if SAMR mice with normal aging rate were used as the recipients instead of SAMP mice. Bone marrow taken from old and young CBA mice endured the same number of transplantations if the recipient mice were of the same age (5 month). It was concluded that stromal tissue considerably changes with age and is under strict control of the body. PMID:12432868

  17. Human bone marrow stromal cell responses on electrospun silk fibroin mats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyoung-Joon; Chen, Jingsong; Karageorgiou, Vassilis; Altman, Gregory H; Kaplan, David L

    2004-03-01

    Fibers with nanoscale diameters provide benefits due to high surface area for biomaterial scaffolds. In this study electrospun silk fibroin-based fibers with average diameter 700+/-50 nm were prepared from aqueous regenerated silkworm silk solutions. Adhesion, spreading and proliferation of human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) on these silk matrices was studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and MTT analyses demonstrated that the electrospun silk matrices supported BMSC attachment and proliferation over 14 days in culture similar to native silk fibroin (approximately 15 microm fiber diameter) matrices. The ability of electrospun silk matrices to support BMSC attachment, spreading and growth in vitro, combined with a biocompatibility and biodegradable properties of the silk protein matrix, suggest potential use of these biomaterial matrices as scaffolds for tissue engineering. PMID:14615169

  18. Cytocompatible, Photoreversible, and Self-Healing Hydrogels for Regulating Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lianlian; Xu, Kaige; Ge, Liangpeng; Wan, Wenbing; Darabi, Ali; Xing, Malcolm; Zhong, Wen

    2016-09-01

    Photo-crosslinking and self-healing have received considerable attention for the design of intelligent materials. A novel photostimulated, self-healing, and cytocompatible hydrogel system is reported. A coumarin methacrylate crosslinker is synthesized to modify the polyacrylamide-based hydrogels. With the [2+2] cyclo-addition of coumarin moieties, the hydrogels exhibit excellent self-healing capacity when they are exposed to light with wavelengths at 280 and 365 nm, respectively. To enhance cell compatibility, a poly (amidoamine) crosslinker is also synthesized. Variations in light exposure times and irradiation wavelengths are found to alter the self-healing property of the hydrogels. The hydrogels are shown to induce a regular cellular pattern. The hydrogels are used to regulate bone marrow stromal cells differentiation. The relative mRNA expressions are recorded to monitor the osteogenic differentiation of the cells. PMID:27280860

  19. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  20. Transplanted murine long-term repopulating hematopoietic cells can differentiate to osteoblasts in the marrow stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Ted J; Otsuru, Satoru; Marino, Roberta; Rasini, Valeria; Veronesi, Elena; Murgia, Alba; Lahti, Jill; Boyd, Kelli; Dominici, Massimo; Horwitz, Edwin M

    2013-06-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can give rise to donor-derived osteopoiesis in mice and humans; however, the source of this activity, whether a primitive osteoprogenitor or a transplantable marrow cell with dual hematopoietic and osteogenic potential, has eluded detection. To address this issue, we fractionated whole BM from mice according to cell surface immunophenotype and assayed the hematopoietic and osteopoietic potentials of the transplanted cells. Here, we show that a donor marrow cell capable of robust osteopoiesis possesses a surface phenotype of c-Kit(+) Lin(-) Sca-1(+) CD34(-/lo), identical to that of the long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cell (LTR-HSC). Secondary BMT studies demonstrated that a single marrow cell able to contribute to hematopoietic reconstitution in primary recipients also drives robust osteopoiesis and LT hematopoiesis in secondary recipients. These findings indicate that LTR-HSC can give rise to progeny that differentiate to osteoblasts after BMT, suggesting a mechanism for prompt restoration of the osteoblastic HSC niche following BM injury, such as that induced by clinical BMT preparative regimens. An understanding of the mechanisms that regulate this differentiation potential may lead to novel treatments for disorders of bone as well as methods for preserving the integrity of endosteal hematopoietic niches. PMID:23587920

  1. Different Procoagulant Activity of Therapeutic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Bone Marrow and Placental Decidua.

    PubMed

    Moll, Guido; Ignatowicz, Lech; Catar, Rusan; Luecht, Christian; Sadeghi, Behnam; Hamad, Osama; Jungebluth, Philipp; Dragun, Duska; Schmidtchen, Artur; Ringdén, Olle

    2015-10-01

    While therapeutic mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have usually been obtained from bone marrow, perinatal tissues have emerged as promising new sources of cells for stromal cell therapy. In this study, we present a first safety follow-up on our clinical experience with placenta-derived decidual stromal cells (DSCs), used as supportive immunomodulatory and regenerative therapy for patients with severe complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We found that DSCs are smaller, almost half the volume of MSCs, which may favor microvascular passage. DSCs also show different hemocompatibility, with increased triggering of the clotting cascade after exposure to human blood and plasma in vitro. After infusion of DSCs in HSCT patients, we observed a weak activation of the fibrinolytic system, but the other blood activation markers remained stable, excluding major adverse events. Expression profiling identified differential levels of key factors implicated in regulation of hemostasis, such as a lack of prostacyclin synthase and increased tissue factor expression in DSCs, suggesting that these cells have intrinsic blood-activating properties. The stronger triggering of the clotting cascade by DSCs could be antagonized by optimizing the cell graft reconstitution before infusion, for example, by use of low-dose heparin anticoagulant in the cell infusion buffer. We conclude that DSCs are smaller and have stronger hemostatic properties than MSCs, thus triggering stronger activation of the clotting system, which can be antagonized by optimizing the cell graft preparation before infusion. Our results highlight the importance of hemocompatibility safety testing for every novel cell therapy product before clinical use, when applied using systemic delivery. PMID:26192403

  2. Transcriptome analysis of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Martinaud, Christophe; Desterke, Christophe; Konopacki, Johanna; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.; Pieri, Lisa; Guglielmelli, Paola; Dupriez, Brigitte; Ianotto, Jean-Christophe; Boutin, Laetitia; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Le Bousse-Kerdilès, Marie-Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasm whose severity and treatment complexity are attributed to the presence of bone marrow (BM) fibrosis and alterations of stroma impairing the production of normal blood cells. Despite the recently discovered mutations including the JAK2V617F mutation in about half of patients, the primitive event responsible for the clonal proliferation is still unknown. In the highly inflammatory context of PMF, the presence of fibrosis associated with a neoangiogenesis and an osteosclerosis concomitant to the myeloproliferation and to the increase number of circulating hematopoietic progenitors suggests that the crosstalk between hematopoietic and stromal cells is deregulated in the PMF BM microenvironmental niches. Within these niches, mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC) play a hematopoietic supportive role in the production of growth factors and extracellular matrix which regulate the proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. A transcriptome analysis of BM-MSC in PMF patients will help to characterize their molecular alterations and to understand their involvement in the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell deregulation that features PMF. PMID:26484208

  3. Data on nitric oxide production by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Najar, Mehdi; Fayyad-Kazan, Mohammad; Fayyad-Kazan, Hussein; Meuleman, Nathalie; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2016-09-01

    Due to its anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive potential, Nitric oxide (NO), a gaseous radical, is of special importance during graft-versus-host diseases (GVHD) and feoto-maternal tolerance. NO is a major mediator of murine mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)-immunosuppressive capacity. In this data article, we characterized NO production by human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBMSCs). MSCs, isolated from healthy donors (n=5), were defined according to the International Society for cellular Therapy (ISCT) guidelines. Based on a fluorometric detection system, and upon using Nitrite ([Formula: see text])/Nitrate ( [Formula: see text]) Assay Kit, the amounts of NO metabolites ( [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) produced by hBMSCs, being grown in a culture medium either lacking (constitutive condition) or containing IL-4, IL-10 or a pro-inflammatory cytokine cocktail made of IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-α and IFN-γ, were assessed. All assays were carried out in triplicates and the mean values are reported. The data from this study supports and corroborates the discussion associated with our previously published work entitled "The Immunomodulatory Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: A Story of a Regulatory Network" (Najar et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27536712

  4. Dissecting the Role of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Bone Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Buenrostro, Denise; Park, Serk In; Sterling, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-induced bone disease is a dynamic process that involves interactions with many cell types. Once metastatic cancer cells reach the bone, they are in contact with many different cell types that are present in the cell-rich bone marrow. These cells include the immune cells, myeloid cells, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and mesenchymal stem cells. Each of these cell populations can influence the behavior or gene expression of both the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment. Additionally, the tumor itself can alter the behavior of these bone marrow cells which further alters both the microenvironment and the tumor cells. While many groups focus on studying these interactions, much remains unknown. A better understanding of the interactions between the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment will improve our knowledge on how tumors establish in bone and may lead to improvements in diagnosing and treating bone metastases. This review details our current knowledge on the interactions between tumor cells that reside in bone and their microenvironment. PMID:25054153

  5. In vitro osteogenic induction of bone marrow stromal cells with encapsulated gene-modified bone marrow stromal cells and in vivo implantation for orbital bone repair.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuan; Zhou, Huifang; Yan, Chenxi; Wang, Yefei; Xiao, Caiwen; Gu, Ping; Fan, Xianqun

    2014-07-01

    Osteogenic induction with either growth factors or genetic modification has limitations due to the short half-life and cost of the former, or safety concerns regarding the latter. The objective of this study was to employ a microcapsulation technique to separate genetically modified and nonmodified bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) to establish a cost-effective and biosafe osteogenic induction methodology with functional evaluation in vitro and in vivo in a canine model. Autologous BMSCs were isolated and transduced with adenoviral vectors containing either BMP-2 or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or were dual transduced followed by encapsulation in alginate microcapsules using an electrostatic bead generator. After cocultured with encapsulated cells, normal autologous BMSCs were analyzed for osteogenic differentiation and seeded onto tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds for in vivo implantation to repair orbital wall bone defects (12 mm in diameter) in a canine model. In vitro assays showed that the expression of the transduced genes was significantly upregulated, with significantly more transduced proteins released from the transduced cells compared with control cells. Importantly, examination of the BMSCs induced by soluble factors released from the encapsulated cells revealed a significant upregulation of expression of osteogenic markers Runx2, BSP, OPN, and OCN in dual-transduction or induction groups. In addition, dual transduction and induction resulted in the highest increase of alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization compared with other experimental groups. In vivo assays using CT, micro-CT, and histology further supported the qPCR and western blot findings. In conclusion, encapsulation of genetically modified BMSCs was able to release a sufficient amount of BMP-2 and VEGF, which effectively induced osteogenic differentiation of normal-cultured BMSCs and demonstrated bone repair of the orbital wall defect after implantation with

  6. Paracrine Factors Produced by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Induce Apoptosis and Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chu; Soori, Mehrnoosh; Miles, Fayth; Sikes, Robert A.; Carson, Daniel D.; Chung, Leland L.W.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Preferential bony metastasis of human prostate cancer (PCa) cells contributes to disease mortality and morbidity. Local factors in bone stromal extracellular matrix microenvironment affect tumor growth through paracrine interactions between tumor and stromal cells. Methods Using co-culture and medium transfer, we used several methods to assess interactions between PCa and bone stromal cells using three PCa cell lines: PC3, LNCaP, and the LNCaP derivative, C4-2B. Results Co-culture of LNCaP and C4-2B cells with bone marrow stromal cell lines, HS27a and HS5, decreased cell number, as did culture with conditioned medium (CM) harvested from these two cell lines suggesting a soluble paracrine factor was responsible. PC3 cell growth was unaffected. CM harvested from bone stromal cell lines triggered apoptosis in LNCaP and C4-2B cell lines, but not in PC3 cells. Surviving C4-2B cells grown in bone stromal cell CM over several days were growth arrested, suggesting presence of a growth inhibitor. Apoptosis induced by CM was dose-dependent. Flow cytometry demonstrated that over a five day culture period in stromal cell CM, LNCaP and C4-2B cell lines, but not PC3 cells, underwent greater apoptosis than parallel cultures in SF medium. The LNCaP and C4-2B cells showed morphology and biomarker expression consistent with transdifferentiation towards a neuroendocrine phenotype after exposure to stromal cell CM. Conclusions The reactive bone stromal microenvironment initially is hostile to PCa cells producing widespread apoptosis. Activation of transdifferentiation in a subset of apoptotic resistant cells may support phenotypic adaptation during disease progression in bone, eventually favoring lethal disease. PMID:20665531

  7. Osteoblast-Specific Deletion of Pkd2 Leads to Low-Turnover Osteopenia and Reduced Bone Marrow Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhousheng; Cao, Li; Liang, Yingjuan; Huang, Jinsong; Stern, Amber Rath; Dallas, Mark; Johnson, Mark; Quarles, Leigh Darryl

    2014-01-01

    Polycystin-1 (Pkd1) interacts with polycystin-2 (Pkd2) to form an interdependent signaling complex. Selective deletion of Pkd1 in the osteoblast lineage reciprocally regulates osteoblastogenesis and adipogenesis. The role of Pkd2 in skeletal development has not been defined. To this end, we conditionally inactivated Pkd2 in mature osteoblasts by crossing Osteocalcin (Oc)-Cre;Pkd2+/null mice with floxed Pkd2 (Pkd2flox/flox) mice. Oc-Cre;Pkd2flox/null (Pkd2Oc-cKO) mice exhibited decreased bone mineral density, trabecular bone volume, cortical thickness, mineral apposition rate and impaired biomechanical properties of bone. Pkd2 deficiency resulted in diminished Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expressions in bone and impaired osteoblastic differentiation ex vivo. Expression of osteoblast-related genes, including, Osteocalcin, Osteopontin, Bone sialoprotein (Bsp), Phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome (Phex), Dentin matrix protein 1 (Dmp1), Sclerostin (Sost), and Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) were reduced proportionate to the reduction of Pkd2 gene dose in bone of Oc-Cre;Pkd2flox/+ and Oc-Cre;Pkd2flox/null mice. Loss of Pkd2 also resulted in diminished peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) expression and reduced bone marrow fat in vivo and reduced adipogenesis in osteoblast culture ex vivo. Transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) and Yes-associated protein (YAP), reciprocally acting as co-activators and co-repressors of Runx2 and PPARγ, were decreased in bone of Oc-Cre;Pkd2flox/null mice. Thus, Pkd1 and Pkd2 have coordinate effects on osteoblast differentiation and opposite effects on adipogenesis, suggesting that Pkd1 and Pkd2 signaling pathways can have independent effects on mesenchymal lineage commitment in bone. PMID:25464512

  8. Screening and Identification of Highly Specific MAbs for Discovering Novel Biomarkers of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingyuan; Lin, Nanjing; Kang, Yanyan; Li, Linfeng; Zheng, Wenyun

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are very useful model systems for a better understanding of cell behavior and differential gene expression. Up to now, there have not been specific markers and MAbs for BMSCs that hamper the identification and isolation of BMSCs populations. In this study, chicken BMSCs were isolated from 1-day-old Beijing fatty chickens by adherent culture. After biological characteristics were detected, the chicken BMSCs were used to immunize BALB/c mice to prepare BMSCs-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) by the routine hybridoma technique. These MAbs were characterized by FACS analysis, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, subtype identification, and Western blotting assay and were used to explore markers of chicken BMSCs. Our data showed that BMSCs expressing antigens CD29, CD44, and CD105, but not expressing antigens CD34, CD45, and CD11b, could be isolated from postnatal chicken bone marrow and hold great potential for multiline age differentiation. Meanwhile, we obtained two hybridoma cell lines secreting chicken BMSCs-specific MAbs (named CHK1 and CHK2), which specifically recognized the surface antigens expressed on chicken BMSCs. According to our subtype identification, heavy chains of CHK1 and CHK2 were typed as IgG1 and IgG2b, respectively; all the light strands were kappa subtype. MAbs CHK1 and CHK2 can be used to develop the detection assay and to discover novel biomarkers of chicken BMSCs. PMID:27556910

  9. Identification of suitable reference genes in bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors.

    PubMed

    Schildberg, Theresa; Rauh, Juliane; Bretschneider, Henriette; Stiehler, Maik

    2013-11-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are key cellular components for musculoskeletal tissue engineering strategies. Furthermore, recent data suggest that BMSCs are involved in the development of Osteoarthritis (OA) being a frequently occurring degenerative joint disease. Reliable reference genes for the molecular evaluation of BMSCs derived from donors exhibiting OA as a primary co-morbidity have not been reported on yet. Hence, the aim of the study was to identify reference genes suitable for comparative gene expression analyses using OA-BMSCs. Passage 1 bone marrow derived BMSCs were isolated from n=13 patients with advanced stage idiopathic hip osteoarthritis and n=15 age-matched healthy donors. The expression of 31 putative reference genes was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using a commercially available TaqMan(®) assay. Calculating the coefficient of variation (CV), mRNA expression stability was determined and afterwards validated using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Importin 8 (IPO8), TATA box binding protein (TBP), and cancer susceptibility candidate 3 (CASC3) were identified as the most stable reference genes. Notably, commonly used reference genes, e.g. beta-actin (ACTB) and beta-2-microglobulin (B2M) were among the most unstable genes. For normalization of gene expression data of OA-BMSCs the combined use of IPO8, TBP, and CASC3 gene is recommended. PMID:24080205

  10. Concise review: optimizing expansion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Allison I; Leach, J Kent

    2014-05-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have demonstrated success in the clinical treatment of hematopoietic pathologies and cardiovascular disease and are the focus of treating other diseases of the musculoskeletal, digestive, integumentary, and nervous systems. However, during the requisite two-dimensional (2D) expansion to achieve a clinically relevant number of cells, MSCs exhibit profound degeneration in progenitor potency. Proliferation, multilineage potential, and colony-forming efficiency are fundamental progenitor properties that are abrogated by extensive monolayer culture. To harness the robust therapeutic potential of MSCs, a consistent, rapid, and minimally detrimental expansion method is necessary. Alternative expansion efforts have exhibited promise in the ability to preserve MSC progenitor potency better than the 2D paradigm by mimicking features of the native bone marrow niche. MSCs have been successfully expanded when stimulated by growth factors, under reduced oxygen tension, and in three-dimensional bioreactors. MSC therapeutic value can be optimized for clinical applications by combining system inputs to tailor culture parameters for recapitulating the niche with probes that nondestructively monitor progenitor potency. The purpose of this review is to explore how modulations in the 2D paradigm affect MSC progenitor properties and to highlight recent efforts in alternative expansion techniques. PMID:24682286

  11. Evaluation of epithelial chimerism after bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cell infusion in intestinal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, S; Gurkan, U A; Guven, S; Koyuncu, G; Tan, S; Karaca, C; Ozdogan, O; Dogan, M; Tugmen, C; Pala, E E; Bayol, U; Baran, M; Kurtulmus, Y; Pirim, I; Kebapci, E; Demirci, U

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation is the most effective treatment for patients with short bowel syndrome and small bowel insufficiencies. We evaluated epithelial chimerism after infusion of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) in patients undergoing cadaveric donor isolated intestinal transplantation (I-ITx). BMSCs were isolated from patients' bone marrow via iliac puncture and expanded in vitro prior to infusion. Two out of the 3 patients were infused with autologous BMSCs, and small intestine tissue biopsies collected post-operatively were analyzed for epithelial chimerism using XY fluorescent in situ hybridization and short tandem repeat polymerase chain reaction. We observed epithelial chimeric effect in conditions both with and without BMSC infusion. Although our results suggest a higher epithelial chimerism effect with autologous BMSC infusion in I-ITx, the measurements in multiple biopsies at different time points that demonstrate the reproducibility of this finding and its stability or changes in the level over time would be beneficial. These approaches may have potential implications for improved graft survival, lower immunosuppressant doses, superior engraftment of the transplanted tissue, and higher success rates in I-ITx. PMID:25131122

  12. Radiologic Differences between Bone Marrow Stromal and Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Lines from Fanconi Anemia (Fancd2−/−) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berhane, Hebist; Epperly, Michael W.; Goff, Julie; Kalash, Ronny; Cao, Shaonan; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Shields, Donna; Houghton, Frank; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Parmar, Kalindi; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    FancD2 plays a central role in the human Fanconi anemia DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. Fancd2−/− mice exhibit many features of human Fanconi anemia including cellular DNA repair defects. Whether the DNA repair defect in Fancd2−/− mice results in radiologic changes in all cell lineages is unknown. We measured stress of hematopoiesis in long-term marrow cultures and radiosensitivity in clonogenic survival curves, as well as comet tail intensity, total antioxidant stores and radiation-induced gene expression in hematopoietic progenitor compared to bone marrow stromal cell lines. We further evaluated radioprotection by a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant GS-nitroxide, JP4-039. Hematopoiesis longevity in Fancd2−/− mouse long-term marrow cultures was diminished and bone marrow stromal cell lines were radiosensitive compared to Fancd2+/+ stromal cells (Fancd2−/− D0 = 1.4 ± 0.1 Gy, ñ = 5.0 ± 0.6 vs. Fancd2+/+ D0 = 1.6 ± 0.1 Gy, ñ = 6.7 ± 1.6), P = 0.0124 for D0 and P = 0.0023 for ñ, respectively). In contrast, Fancd2−/− IL-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cells were radioresistant (D0 = 1.71 ± 0.04 Gy and ñ = 5.07 ± 0.52) compared to Fancd2+/+ (D0 = 1.39 ± 0.09 Gy and ñ = 2.31 ± 0.85, P = 0.001 for D0). CFU-GM from freshly explanted Fancd2−/− marrow was also radioresistant. Consistent with radiosensitivity, irradiated Fancd2−/− stromal cells had higher DNA damage by comet tail intensity assay compared to Fancd2+/+ cells (P < 0.0001), slower DNA damage recovery, lower baseline total antioxidant capacity, enhanced radiation-induced depletion of antioxidants, and increased CDKN1A-p21 gene transcripts and protein. Consistent with radioresistance, Fancd2−/− IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells had higher baseline and post irradiation total antioxidant capacity. While, there was no detectable alteration of radiation-induced cell cycle arrest with Fancd2−/− stromal cells, hematopoietic progenitor cells showed reduced G2/M

  13. Radiologic differences between bone marrow stromal and hematopoietic progenitor cell lines from Fanconi Anemia (Fancd2(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Hebist; Epperly, Michael W; Goff, Julie; Kalash, Ronny; Cao, Shaonan; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Shields, Donna; Houghton, Frank; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Parmar, Kalindi; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    FancD2 plays a central role in the human Fanconi anemia DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. Fancd2(-/-) mice exhibit many features of human Fanconi anemia including cellular DNA repair defects. Whether the DNA repair defect in Fancd2(-/-) mice results in radiologic changes in all cell lineages is unknown. We measured stress of hematopoiesis in long-term marrow cultures and radiosensitivity in clonogenic survival curves, as well as comet tail intensity, total antioxidant stores and radiation-induced gene expression in hematopoietic progenitor compared to bone marrow stromal cell lines. We further evaluated radioprotection by a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant GS-nitroxide, JP4-039. Hematopoiesis longevity in Fancd2(-/-) mouse long-term marrow cultures was diminished and bone marrow stromal cell lines were radiosensitive compared to Fancd2(+/+) stromal cells (Fancd2(-/-) D0 = 1.4 ± 0.1 Gy, ñ = 5.0 ± 0.6 vs. Fancd2(+/+) D0 = 1.6 ± 0.1 Gy, ñ = 6.7 ± 1.6), P = 0.0124 for D0 and P = 0.0023 for ñ, respectively). In contrast, Fancd2(-/-) IL-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cells were radioresistant (D0 = 1.71 ± 0.04 Gy and ñ = 5.07 ± 0.52) compared to Fancd2(+/+) (D0 = 1.39 ± 0.09 Gy and ñ = 2.31 ± 0.85, P = 0.001 for D0). CFU-GM from freshly explanted Fancd2(-/-) marrow was also radioresistant. Consistent with radiosensitivity, irradiated Fancd2(-/-) stromal cells had higher DNA damage by comet tail intensity assay compared to Fancd2(+/+) cells (P < 0.0001), slower DNA damage recovery, lower baseline total antioxidant capacity, enhanced radiation-induced depletion of antioxidants, and increased CDKN1A-p21 gene transcripts and protein. Consistent with radioresistance, Fancd2(-/-) IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells had higher baseline and post irradiation total antioxidant capacity. While, there was no detectable alteration of radiation-induced cell cycle arrest with Fancd2(-/-) stromal cells, hematopoietic progenitor cells showed reduced G2/M cell cycle

  14. Transforming growth factor-{beta} inhibits CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein expression and PPAR{gamma} activity in unloaded bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ahdjoudj, S.; Kaabeche, K.; Holy, X.; Fromigue, O.; Modrowski, D.; Zerath, E.; Marie, P.J. . E-mail: pierre.marie@larib.inserm.fr

    2005-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating the adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vivo remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects of transforming growth factor beta-2 (TGF-{beta}2) on transcription factors involved in adipogenic differentiation induced by hind limb suspension in rat bone marrow stromal cells in vivo. Time course real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of gene expression showed that skeletal unloading progressively increases the expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP){alpha} and C/EBP{beta} {alpha} at 5 days in bone marrow stromal cells resulting in increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}2) transcripts at 7 days. TGF-{beta}2 administration in unloaded rats corrected the rise in C/EBP{alpha} and C/EBP{beta} transcripts induced by unloading in bone marrow stromal cells. This resulted in inhibition of PPAR{gamma}2 expression that was associated with increased Runx2 expression. Additionally, the inhibition of C/EBP{alpha} and C/EBP{beta} expression by TGF-{beta}2 was associated with increased PPAR{gamma} serine phosphorylation in bone marrow stromal cells, a mechanism that inhibits PPAR{gamma} transactivating activity. The sequential inhibitory effect of TGF-{beta}2 on C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{beta}, and PPAR{gamma}2 resulted in reduced LPL expression and abolition of bone marrow stromal cell adipogenic differentiation, which contributed to prevent bone loss induced by skeletal unloading. We conclude that TGF-{beta}2 inhibits the excessive adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells induced by skeletal unloading by inhibiting C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{beta}, and PPAR{gamma} expression and activity, which provides a sequential mechanism by which TGF-{beta}2 regulates adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vivo.

  15. Retroviral interleukin 1alpha gene transfer in bone marrow stromal cells in a primate model: induction of myelopoiesis stimulation.

    PubMed

    de Revel, Thierry; Becard, Nicolas; Sorg, Tania; Rousseau, Sandrine; Spano, Jean Philippe; Thiebot, Hugues; Methali, Magid; Gras, Gabriel; Le Grand, Roger; Dormont, Dominique

    2002-09-01

    Effects of interleukin 1-alpha (IL-1alpha), a proinflammatory cytokine with pleiotropic activity, in the myelopoietic setting, is mainly linked to its ability to increase haematopoietic growth factor production by bone marrow stromal cells. In order to minimize systemic effects of IL-1alpha therapy, we proposed a model of retroviral IL-1alpha gene transfer within bone marrow stromal cells in the macaque cynomolgus. Invitro, 10-15% of bone marrow stromal cells was effectively transduced by retroviral vector (murine Moloney leukaemia virus-derived) expressing IL-1alpha/LacZ, or LacZ alone as control marker, as assessed by betaGal staining. IL-1alpha gene expression was upregulated [semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)] within the transduced cells and the cell supernatant showed an increased production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and an increased clonogenic activity (colony-forming cell assay). Ex vivo autologous expanded IL-1alpha/LacZ transduced bone marrow stromal cells were reinfused in two macaques (and two control animals for LacZ alone as controls), without clinical systemic toxicity; LacZ expression by RT-PCR was detected in one animal of each group between d 4 and 9. A slight increase of the peripheral blood leucocyte counts (both polymorphonuclear cells and monocytes) of the two animals transduced with IL-1alpha/LacZ was observed within 10 d, indicating stimulation of myelopoiesis. PMID:12181061

  16. EFFECTS OF PAMIDRONATE ON HUMAN ALVEOLAR OSTEOBLASTS IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Marolt, Darja; Cozin, Matthew; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Cremers, Serge; Landesberg, Regina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Administration of bisphosphonates has recently been associated with the development of osteonecrotic lesions of the jaw (ONJ). To elucidate the potential contributions of osteogenic cells to the development and regeneration of ONJ, we have isolated primary cells from human alveolar and long/iliac bones, and examined the effects of pamidronate on cell viability, proliferation, osteogenesis and wound healing. Materials and Methods Primary human osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells were isolated from alveolar and iliac/long bone and marrow tissue. Cellular proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, apoptosis (TUNEL, Caspase-3, and DAPI assays) and wound healing in an in vitro scratch assay were assessed after exposure to pamidronate at a range of clinically relevant doses. Results Primary alveolar osteoblasts proliferated at significantly higher rates than long/iliac bone osteoblasts in vitro. Upon exposure of alveolar osteoblasts and long/iliac bone marrow stromal cells to pamidronate for more than 72h, we have observed significantly decreased cell viability, proliferation, osteogenesis and in vitro wound healing at ≥6 × 10−5 M pamidronate, with the induction of apoptosis in ~20% of cell population. Conclusions The remodeling activity of alveolar bone, indicated by higher proliferation of alveolar osteoblasts, could be negatively affected by exposure to high concentrations of pamidronate over extended periods of time. The absence of anabolic effects of pamidronate on alveolar osteoblasts, and induction of apoptosis in osteogenic cells could negatively affect bone balance at this site, and contribute to osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:21856057

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species Limit the Ability of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Support Hematopoietic Reconstitution in Aging Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Rahul; Krishnan, Shyam; Roy, Sushmita; Chattopadhyay, Saborni; Kumar, Vikash

    2016-01-01

    Aging of organ and abnormal tissue regeneration are recurrent problems in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. This is most crucial in case of high-turnover tissues, like bone marrow (BM). Using reciprocal transplantation experiments in mouse, we have shown that self-renewal potential of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and BM cellularity are markedly influenced with the age of the recipient mice rather than donor mice. Moreover, accumulation of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) in BM stromal cells compared to HSPC compartment, in time-dependent manner, suggests that oxidative stress is involved in suppression of BM cellularity by affecting microenvironment in aged mice. Treatment of these mice with a polyphenolic antioxidant curcumin is found to partially quench ROS, thereby rescues stromal cells from oxidative stress-dependent cellular injury. This rejuvenation of stromal cells significantly improves hematopoietic reconstitution in 18-month-old mice compared to age control mice. In conclusion, this study implicates the role of ROS in perturbation of stromal cell function upon aging, which in turn affects BM's reconstitution ability in aged mice. Thus, a rejuvenation therapy using curcumin, before HSPC transplantation, is found to be an efficient strategy for successful marrow reconstitution in older mice. PMID:27140293

  18. Comparative Study on Functional Effects of Allotransplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Adipose Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction on Tendon Repair: A Biomechanical Study in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Behfar, Mehdi; Javanmardi, Sara; Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Objective Tendon never returns to its complete biological and mechanical properties after repair. Bone marrow and, recently, adipose tissue have been used as sources of mesenchymal stem cells which have been proven to enhance tendon healing. In the present study, we compared the effects of allotransplantation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) and adipose derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) on tendon mechanical properties after experimentally induced flexor tendon transection. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we used 48 adult male New Zealand white rabbits. Twelve of rabbits were used as donors of bone marrow and adipose tissue, the rest were divided into control and treatment groups. The injury model was a unilateral complete transection of the deep digital flexor tendon. Immediately after suture repair, 4×106cells of either fresh SVF from enzymatic digestion of adipose tissue or cultured BMSCs were intratendinously injected into tendon stumps in the treatment groups. Controls received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Immobilization with a cast was continued for two weeks after surgery. Animals were sacrificed three and eight weeks after surgery and tendons underwent mechanical evaluations. The differences among the groups were analyzed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey’s multiple comparisons test. Results Stromal cell transplantation resulted in a significant increase in ultimate and yield loads, energy absorption, and stress of repairs compared to the controls. However, there were no statistically significant changes detected in terms of stiffness. In comparison, we observed no significant differences at the third week between SVF and BMSCs treated tendons in terms of all load related properties. However, at the eighth week SVF transplantation resulted in significantly increased energy absorption, stress and stiffness compared to BMSCs. Conclusion The enhanced biomechanical properties of

  19. Early Osteogenic Signal Expression of Rat Bone Marrow Stromal Cells is Influenced by Both Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticle Content and Initial Cell Seeding Density in Biodegradable Nanocomposite Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyobum; Dean, David; Lu, Anqi; Mikos, Antonios G.; Fisher, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Incorporation of hydroxyapatite (HA) within a degradable polymeric scaffold may provide a favorable synthetic microenvironment that more closely mimics natural bone tissue physiology. Both incorporation of HA nanoparticles and alteration of paracrine cell-cell signaling distances may affect the intercellular signaling mechanism and facilitate the enhanced osteogenic signal expressions among the implanted cell population. In this study, we investigate the effect of the incorporation of HA nanoparticles into poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) scaffolds on the surface properties of composite scaffolds and early osteogenic growth factor gene expression in relation to initial cell seeding density. The result of surface characterization indicated that HA addition improved surface properties of PPF/HA composite scaffolds by showing increased roughness, hydrophilicity, protein adsorption, and initial cell attachment. Rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), which were CD34(−), CD45(−), CD29(+), and CD90(+), were cultured on 3D macroporous PPF/HA scaffolds with two different initial cell seeding densities (0.33 and 1.00 million cells per scaffold) for 8 days. Results demonstrated that endogenous osteogenic signal expression profiles, including bone morphogenetic protein-2, fibroblast growth factor-2, and transforming growth factor-β1, as well as the transcriptional factor Runx2 were affected by both HA amount and initial cell seeding density. Upregulated expression of osteogenic growth factor genes was related to subsequent osteoblastic differentiation of rat BMSCs on 3D scaffolds, as characterized by alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin mRNA expression, and calcium deposition. Thus PPF/HA composite scaffold construction parameters, including incorporated HA amount and initial cell seeding density, may be utilized to induce the osteoblastic differentiation of transplanted rat BMSCs. PMID:21074640

  20. Specific profiles of ion channels and ionotropic receptors define adipose- and bone marrow derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Forostyak, Oksana; Butenko, Olena; Anderova, Miroslava; Forostyak, Serhiy; Sykova, Eva; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Dayanithi, Govindan

    2016-05-01

    Adherent, fibroblastic cells from different tissues are thought to contain subsets of tissue-specific stem/progenitor cells (often called mesenchymal stem cells). These cells display similar cell surface characteristics based on their fibroblastic nature, but also exhibit differences in molecular phenotype, growth rate, and their ability to differentiate into various cell phenotypes. The mechanisms underlying these differences remain poorly understood. We analyzed Ca(2+) signals and membrane properties in rat adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in basal conditions, and then following a switch into medium that contains factors known to modify their character. Modified ADSCs (mADSCs) expressed L-type Ca(2+) channels whereas both L- and P/Q- channels were operational in mBMSCs. Both mADSCs and mBMSCs possessed functional endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) stores, expressed ryanodine receptor-1 and -3, and exhibited spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations. The mBMSCs expressed P2X7 purinoceptors; the mADSCs expressed both P2X (but not P2X7) and P2Y (but not P2Y1) receptors. Both types of stromal cells exhibited [Ca(2+)]i responses to vasopressin (AVP) and expressed V1 type receptors. Functional oxytocin (OT) receptors were, in contrast, expressed only in modified ADSCs and BMSCs. AVP and OT-induced [Ca(2+)]i responses were dose-dependent and were blocked by their respective specific receptor antagonists. Electrophysiological data revealed that passive ion currents dominated the membrane conductance in ADSCs and BMSCs. Medium modification led to a significant shift in the reversal potential of passive currents from -40 to -50mV in cells in basal to -80mV in modified cells. Hence membrane conductance was mediated by non-selective channels in cells in basal conditions, whereas in modified medium conditions, it was associated with K(+)-selective channels. Our results indicate that modification of ADSCs and BMSCs by alteration in medium

  1. Role of marrow architecture and stromal cells in the recovery process of aplastic marrow of lethally irradiated rats parabiosed with healthy litter mates

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, K.; Kagawa, K.; Awai, M.; Irino, S.

    1986-01-01

    Bone marrow aplasia was induced in rats by whole body lethal irradiation (1,000 rads by x-ray), and rats died of irradiation injury within 7 days. Correlative studies at light (LM), transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated swelling of endothelial and reticular cells and hemorrhage due to detachment of sinus endothelial cells on days 1 and 2. With time, structural recovery occurred without hemopoietic recovery. Reticular cells developed small intracytoplasmic lipid droplets on days 3 and 4. This resulted in fatty aplastic marrow within 7 days. On the other hand, in the marrow of irradiated rats parabiosed with healthy mates by aortic anastomosis, hemopoiesis was initiated by adhesion of nucleated blood cells to fine cytoplasmic pseudopods of fat-stored cells on days 1 and 2 after parabiosis. On days 3 to 5, reticular cells with large lipid droplets and fine pseudopods increased, then hemopoietic foci became clear and extensive. On day 8 after parabiosis, the aplastic bone marrow recovered completely both its structure and hemopoietic activity. Thus, hemopoietic recovery in lethally irradiated marrow begins with recovery of vascular endothelial cells, re-establishment of sinusoidal structure, and morphological and functional recoveries of reticular cells from fat-storage cells by releasing intracytoplasmic lipid droplets. Marrow stromal cells, namely reticular, fat-storage and fibroblastoid cells, share a common cellular origin, and regain their structure and function when fat-storage cells and fibroid cells are placed in contact with hemopoietic precursor cells.

  2. Effects of fluid flow and calcium phosphate coating on human bone marrow stromal cells cultured in a defined 2D model system.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, S; Wendt, D; Miggino, S; Papadimitropoulos, A; Fato, M; Quarto, R; Martin, I

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the long-term (10 days) application of a defined and uniform level of fluid flow (uniform shear stress of 1.2 x 10(-3) N/m(2)) on human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) cultured on different substrates (i.e., uncoated glass or calcium phosphate coated glass, Osteologictrade mark) in a 2D parallel plate model. Both exposure to flow and culture on Osteologic significantly reduced the number of cell doublings. BMSC cultured under flow were more intensely stained for collagen type I and by von Kossa for mineralized matrix. BMSC exposed to flow displayed an increased osteogenic commitment (i.e., higher mRNA expression of cbfa-1 and osterix), although phenotype changes in response to flow (i.e., mRNA expression of osteopontin, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein) were dependent on the substrate used. These findings highlight the importance of the combination of physical forces and culture substrate to determine the functional state of differentiating osteoblastic cells. The results obtained using a simple and controlled 2D model system may help to interpret the long-term effects of BMSC culture under perfusion within 3D porous scaffolds, where multiple experimental variables cannot be easily studied independently, and shear stresses cannot be precisely computed. PMID:17969030

  3. IL-6 Contributes to the Defective Osteogenesis of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells from the Vertebral Body of the Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporotic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan-yuan; Yang, Hui-lin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most prevalent skeletal system diseases. It is characterized by a decrease in bone mass and microarchitectural changes in bone tissue that lead to an attenuation of bone resistance and susceptibility to fracture. Vertebral fracture is by far the most prevalent osteoporotic fracture. In the musculoskeletal system, osteoblasts, originated from bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC), are responsible for osteoid synthesis and mineralization. In osteoporosis, BMSC osteogenic differentiation is defective. However, to date, what leads to the defective BMSC osteogenesis in osteoporosis remains an open question. In the current study, we made attempts to answer this question. A mouse model of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) was established and BMSC were isolated from vertebral body. The impairment of osteogenesis was observed in BMSC of osteoporotic vertebral body. The expression profiles of thirty-six factors, which play important roles in bone metabolisms, were compared through antibody array between normal and osteoporotic BMSC. Significantly higher secretion level of IL-6 was observed in osteoporotic BMSCs compared with normal control. We provided evidences that IL-6 over-secretion impaired osteogenesis of osteoporotic BMSC. Further, it was observed that β-catenin activity was inhibited in response to IL-6 over-secretion. More importantly, in vivo administration of IL-6 neutralizing antibody was found to be helpful to rescue the osteoporotic phenotype of mouse vertebral body. Our study provides a deeper insight into the pathophysiology of osteoporosis and identifies IL-6 as a promising target for osteoporosis therapy. PMID:27128729

  4. Evaluation of rhBMP-2 and bone marrow derived stromal cell mediated bone regeneration using transgenic fluorescent protein reporter mice

    PubMed Central

    Gohil, Shalini V.; Adams, Douglas J.; Maye, Peter; Rowe, David W.; Nair, Lakshmi S.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is use of transgenic fluorescent protein reporter mouse models to understand the cellular processes in recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) mediated bone formation. Bilateral parietal calvarial bone defects in Col3.6Topaz transgenic fluorescent osteoblast reporter mouse were used to understand the bone formation in the presence and absence of rhBMP2 and/or Col3.6Cyan bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSCs), using collagen-hydroxyapatite matrix (Healos) as a biomaterial. The bone regeneration was not confined to the site of BMP-2 implantation and significant bone formation was observed in the neighboring defect site. Osteogenic cellular activity with overlying alizarin complexone staining was observed in both the defects indicating host cell induced mineralization. However, implantation of BMSCs along with rhBMP-2 demonstrated a donor cell derived bone formation. The presence of rhBMP-2 did not support host cell recruitment in the presence of donor cells. This study demonstrates the potential of multiple fluorescent reporters to understand the cellular processes involved in the bone regeneration process using biomaterials, growth factors, and/or stem cells. PMID:24677665

  5. Tantalum coating of porous carbon scaffold supplemented with autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaowei; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Kang, Kai; Xie, Hui; Liu, Baoyi; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Jinsong; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-03-01

    Porous tantalum metal with low elastic modulus is similar to cancellous bone. Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can provide three-dimensional pore structure and serves as the ideal scaffold of tantalum coating. In this study, the biocompatibility of domestic porous tantalum was first successfully tested with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and for bone tissue repair in vivo. We evaluated cytotoxicity of RVC scaffold and tantalum coating using BMSCs. The morphology, adhesion, and proliferation of BMSCs were observed via laser scanning confocal microscope and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, porous tantalum rods with or without autologous BMSCs were implanted on hind legs in dogs, respectively. The osteogenic potential was observed by hard tissue slice examination. At three weeks and six weeks following implantation, new osteoblasts and new bone were observed at the tantalum-host bone interface and pores. At 12 weeks postporous tantalum with autologous BMSCs implantation, regenerated trabecular equivalent to mature bone was found in the pore of tantalum rods. Our results suggested that domestic porous tantalum had excellent biocompatibility and could promote new bone formation in vivo. Meanwhile, the osteogenesis of porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs was more excellent than only tantalum implantation. Future clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical efficacy of combined implantation of this domestic porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs implantation and compare their efficacy with conventional autologous bone grafting carrying blood vessel in patients needing bone repairing. PMID:26843518

  6. Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Confluence: Effects on Cell Characteristics and Methods of Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiaqiang; Wang, Huan; Tran, Katherine; Civini, Sara; Jin, Ping; Castiello, Luciano; Feng, Ji; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Robey, Pamela G.; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aims Ex vivo expansion and serial passage of human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) is required to obtain sufficient quantities for clinical therapy. The BMSC confluence criteria used to determine passage and harvest timing vary widely and the impact of confluence on BMSC properties remains controversial. The effects of confluence on BMSC properties were studied and confluence-associated markers were identified. Methods BMSC characteristics were analyzed as they grew from 50% to 100% confluence including viability, population doubling time (PDT), apoptosis, colony formation, immunosuppression, surface marker expression, global gene expression and microRNA expression. In addition, culture supernatant protein, glucose, lactate and pH levels were analyzed Results Confluence-dependent changes were detected in the expression of several cell surface markers, 39 culture supernatant proteins, 26 microRNAs and 2078 genes. Many of these surface markers, proteins, microRNAs and genes have been reported to be important in BMSC function. The PEDF/VEGF ratio increased with confluence, but 80% and 100% confluent BMSCs demonstrated a similar level of immunosuppression of mixed lymphocyte reactions. In addition, changes in lactate and glucose levels correlated with BMSC density. Discussion BMSC characteristics change as confluence increases. 100% confluent BMSCs may have compromised pro-angiogenesis properties, but may retain their immunomodulatory properties. Supernatant lactate and glucose levels can be used to estimate confluence and ensure consistency in passage and harvest timing. Flow cytometry or microRNA expression can be used to confirm that the BMSCs have been harvested at the appropriate confluence. PMID:25882666

  7. Visible red and infrared light alters gene expression in human marrow stromal fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jie; Wang, Qing; Wai, Daniel; Zhou, Qunzhou; Shi, Shihong; Le, Anh D; Shi, Songtao; Yen, Stephen L-K

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study tested whether or not gene expression in human marrow stromal fibroblast (MSF) cells depends on light wavelength and energy density. Material and Methods Primary cultures of isolated human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSC) were exposed to visible red (VR, 633 nm) and infrared (IR, 830) radiation wavelengths from a light emitting diode (LED) over a range of energy densities (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 Joules/cm2) Cultured cells were assayed for cell proliferation, osteogenic potential, adipogenesis, mRNA and protein content. mRNA was analyzed by microarray, and compared among different wavelengths and energy densities. Mesenchymal and epithelial cell responses were compared to determine whether responses were cell-type specific. Protein array analysis was used to further analyze key pathways identified by microarrays. Result Different wavelengths and energy densities produced unique sets of genes identified by microarray analysis. Pathway analysis pointed to TGF beta 1 in the visible red and Akt 1 in the infrared wavelengths as key pathways to study. TGF beta protein arrays suggested switching from canonical to non-canonical TGF beta pathways with increases to longer IR wavelengths. Microarrays suggest RANKL and TIMP 10 followed IR energy density dose response curves. Epithelial and mesenchymal cells respond differently to stimulation by light suggesting cell-type specific response is possible. Conclusions These studies demonstrate differential gene expression with different wavelengths, energy densities and cell types. These differences in gene expression have the potential to be exploited for therapeutic purposes and can help explain contradictory results in the literature when wavelengths, energy densities and cell types differ. PMID:25865533

  8. Different Balance of Wnt Signaling in Adult and Fetal Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Paciejewska, Maja M; Maijenburg, Marijke W; Gilissen, Christian; Kleijer, Marion; Vermeul, Kim; Weijer, Kees; Veltman, Joris A; von Lindern, Marieke; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Voermans, Carlijn

    2016-06-15

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are applied as novel therapeutics for their regenerative and immune-suppressive capacities. Clinical applications, however, require extensive expansion of MSCs. Fetal bone marrow-derived MSCs (FBMSCs) proliferate faster than adult bone marrow-derived MSC (ABMSCs). To optimize expansion and function of MSC in general, we explored the differences between ABMSC and FBMSC. Gene expression profiling implicated differential expression of genes encoding proteins in the Wnt signaling pathway, including excreted inhibitors of Wnt signaling, particularly by ABMSC. Both MSC types had a similar basal level of canonical Wnt signaling. Abrogation of autocrine Wnt production by inhibitor of Wnt production-2 (IWP2) reduced canonical Wnt signaling and cell proliferation of FBMSCs, but hardly affected ABMSC. Addition of exogenous Wnt3a, however, induced expression of the target genes lymphocyte enhancer-binding factor (LEF) and T-cell factor (TCF) faster and at lower Wnt3a levels in ABMSC compared to FBMSC. Medium replacement experiments indicated that ABMSC produce an inhibitor of Wnt signaling that is effective on ABMSC itself but not on FBMSC, whereas FBMSC excrete (Wnt) factors that stimulate proliferation of ABMSC. In contrast, FBMSC were not able to support hematopoiesis, whereas ABMSC displayed hematopoietic support sensitive to IWP2, the inhibitor of Wnt factor excretion. In conclusion, ABMSC and FBMSC differ in their Wnt signature. While FBMSC produced factors, including Wnt signals, that enhanced MSC proliferation, ABMSC produced Wnt factors in a setting that enhanced hematopoietic support. Thus, further unraveling the molecular basis of this phenomenon may lead to improvement of clinical expansion protocols of ABMSCs. PMID:27154244

  9. Genetic stability of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells in the Quantum System

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Mark; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Skokan, Margaret; Bryce, Steven; Schowinsky, Jeffrey; Peters, Rebecca; Vang, Boah; Brecheisen, Michelle; Startz, Thomas; Frank, Nathan; Nankervis, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Background aims The Quantum® Cell Expansion System (Quantum; Terumo BCT, Inc, Lakewood, CO, USA) is a novel hollow fiber-based device that automates and closes the cell culture process, reducing labor intensive tasks such as manual cell culture feeding and harvesting. The manual cell selection and expansion processes for the production of clinical-scale quantities of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-hMSCs) have been successfully translated onto the Quantum platform previously. The formerly static, manual, in vitro process performed primarily on tissue culture polystyrene substrates may raise the question of whether BM-hMSCs cultured on a hollow fiber platform yields comparable cell quality. Methods A rigorous battery of assays was used to determine the genetic stability of BM-hMSCs selected and produced with the Quantum. In this study, genetic stability was determined by assessing spectral karyotype, micronucleus formation and tumorigenicity to resolve chromosomal aberrations in the stem cell population. Cell phenotype, adherent growth kinetics and tri-lineage differentiation were also evaluated. HMSC bone marrow aspirates, obtained from three approved donors, were expanded in parallel using T225 culture flasks and the Quantum. Results BM-hMSCs harvested from the Quantum demonstrated immunophenotype, morphology and tri-lineage differentiation capacity characteristics consistent with the International Society of Cell Therapy standard for hMSCs. Cell populations showed no malignant neoplastic formation in athymic mice 60 days post-transplant, no clonal chromosomal aberrations were observed and no DNA damage was found as measured by micronucleus formation. Conclusions Quantum-produced BM-hMSCs are of comparable quality and demonstrate analogous genetic stability to BM-hMSCs cultured on tissue culture polystyrene substrates. PMID:23992670

  10. Comparison of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Surface Markers from Bone Marrow Aspirates and Adipose Stromal Vascular Fraction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Meghan O.; Gordon-Evans, Wanda J.; Fredericks, Lisa Page; Kiefer, Kristina; Conzemius, Michael G.; Griffon, Dominique J.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to subjectively evaluate the harvest of two areas of adipose collection and three areas of bone marrow collection as potential sites for clinical harvest of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and bone marrow concentrate for clinical use by quantifying the amount of tissue harvested, subjective ease of harvest, the variation of each site, and determining the cell surface marker characteristics using commercially available antibodies. Bone marrow and adipose tissue samples were collected from 10 adult mixed breed dogs. Adipose tissue was collected from the caudal scapular region and falciform fat ligament. Bone marrow aspirates were collected from the ilium, humerus, and tibia. Tissues were weighed (adipose) or measured by volume (bone marrow), processed to isolate the SVF or bone marrow concentrate, and flow cytometry was performed to quantitate the percentage of cells that were CD90, CD44 positive, and CD45 negative. Sites and tissue types were compared using matched pairs t-test. Subjectively subcutaneous fat collection was the most difficult and large amounts of tissue dissection were necessary. Additionally the subcutaneous area yielded less than the goal amount of tissue. The bone marrow harvest ranged from 10 to 27.5 ml. Adipose tissue had the highest concentration of cells with CD90+, CD44+, and CD45− markers (P < 0.05), and bone marrow had the highest total number of these cells at harvest (P < 0.05). Variation was high for all sites, but the adipose collection yielded more consistent results. These results describe the relative cellular components in the SVF of adipose tissue and bone marrow as defined by the biomarkers chosen. Although bone marrow yielded higher absolute cell numbers on average, adipose tissue yielded more consistent results. Fat from the falciform ligament was easily obtained with less dissection and therefore created less perceived relative patient trauma. PMID:26835460

  11. Aberrant Notch Signaling in the Bone Marrow Microenvironment of Acute Lymphoid Leukemia Suppresses Osteoblast-Mediated Support of Hematopoietic Niche Function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weihuan; Zimmerman, Grant; Huang, Xiaoran; Yu, Shuiliang; Myers, Jay; Wang, Yiwei; Moreton, Stephen; Nthale, Joseph; Awadallah, Amad; Beck, Rose; Xin, Wei; Wald, David; Huang, Alex Y; Zhou, Lan

    2016-03-15

    More than half of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients harbor gain-of-function mutations in the intracellular domain of Notch1. Diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow commonly occurs in T-ALL and relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, and is associated with worse prognosis. However, the mechanism of leukemia outgrowth in the marrow and the resulting biologic impact on hematopoiesis are poorly understood. Here, we investigated targetable cellular and molecular abnormalities in leukemia marrow stroma responsible for the suppression of normal hematopoiesis using a T-ALL mouse model and human T-ALL xenografts. We found that actively proliferating leukemia cells inhibited normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation and homing to the perivascular region. In addition, leukemia development was accompanied by the suppression of the endosteum-lining osteoblast population. We further demonstrated that aberrant Notch activation in the stroma plays an important role in negatively regulating the expression of CXLC12 on osteoblasts and their differentiation. Notch blockade reversed attenuated HSPC cycling, leukemia-associated abnormal blood lineage distribution, and thrombocytopenia as well as recovered osteoblast and HSPC abundance and improved the hematopoietic-supportive functions of osteoblasts. Finally, we confirmed that reduced osteoblast frequency and enhanced Notch signaling were also features of the marrow stroma of human ALL tissues. Collectively, our findings suggest that therapeutically targeting the leukemia-infiltrated hematopoietic niche may restore HSPC homeostasis and improve the outcome of ALL patients. PMID:26801976

  12. Mesenchymal stromal cells, colony-forming unit fibroblasts, from bone marrow of untreated advanced breast and lung cancer patients suppress fibroblast colony formation from healthy marrow.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Erica Leonor; Labovsky, Vivian; La Russa, Vincent; Vallone, Valeria Fernández; Honegger, Alba Elizabeth; Belloc, Carlos Gabriel; Wen, Huei Chi; Bordenave, Raúl Horacio; Bullorsky, Eduardo Oscar; Feldman, Leonardo; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra

    2010-03-01

    We have shown that bone marrow (BM) from untreated advanced lung and breast cancer patients (LCP and BCP) have a reduced number of colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Factors that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of CFU-F are produced by the patients' BM microenvironment. We have now examined whether conditioned media (CM) from patients' CFU-F-derived stromal cells also inhibits the colony-forming efficiency (CFE) of CFU-F in primary cultures from healthy volunteers (HV)-BM. Thus the number and proliferation potential of HV-CFU-F were also found to be decreased and similar to colony numbers and colony size of patients' CFU-F. Stromal cells from both of these types of colonies appeared relatively larger and lacked the characteristic spindle morphology typically seen in healthy stromal cells. We developed an arbitrary mesenchymal stromal cell maturational index by taking three measures consisting of stromal cell surface area, longitudinal and horizontal axis. All stromal indices derived from HV-CFU-F grown in patients' CM were similar to those from stromal elements derived from patients' CFU-F. These indices were markedly higher than stromal indices typical of HV-CFU-F cultured in healthy CM or standard medium [alpha-medium plus 20% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (FBS)]. Patients' CM had increased concentrations of the CFU-F inhibitor, GM-CSF, and low levels of bFGF and Dkk-1, strong promoters of self-renewal of MSCs, compared to the levels quantified in CM from HV-CFU-F. Moreover, the majority of patients' MSCs were unresponsive in standard medium and healthy CM to give CFU-F, indicating that the majority of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients' CFU-F are locked in maturational arrest. These results show that alterations of GM-CSF, bFGF, and Dkk-1 are associated with deficient cloning and maturation arrest of CFU-F. Defective autocrine and paracrine mechanisms may be involved in the BM microenvironments of

  13. Radioresistance of Bone Marrow Stromal and Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Lines Derived from Nrf2−/− Homozygous Deletion Recombinant-Negative Mice

    PubMed Central

    BERHANE, HEBIST; EPPERLY, MICHAEL W.; CAO, SHAONAN; GOFF, JULIE P.; FRANICOLA, DARCY; WANG, HONG; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: We determined whether bone marrow from Nrf2−/− compared with Nrf2+/+ mice differed in response to the oxidative stress of continuous marrow culture, and in radiosensitivity of derived stromal and interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cells. Materials and Methods: Hematopoiesis longevity in Nrf2−/− was compared with Nrf2+/+ mice in long-term bone marrow cultures. Clonogenic irradiation survival curves were performed on derived cell lines. Total antioxidant capacity at baseline in nonirradiated cells and at 24 hours after 5 Gy and 10 Gy irradiation was quantitated using an antioxidant reductive capacity assay. Results: Long-term cultures of bone marrow from Nrf2−/− compared to Nrf2+/+ mice demonstrated equivalent longevity of production of total cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells forming multi-lineage hematopoietic colonies over 26 weeks in culture. Both bone marrow stromal cell lines and Il-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell lines derived from Nrf2−/− mouse marrow cultures were radioresistant compared to Nrf2+/+-derived cell lines. Both DNA repair assay and total antioxidant capacity assay showed no defect in Nrf2−/− compared to Nrf2+/+ stromal cells and IL-3-dependent cells. Conclusion: The absence of a functional Nrf2 gene product does not alter cellular interactions in continuous marrow culture, nor response to dsDNA damage repair and antioxidant response. However, lack of the Nrf2 gene does confer radioresistance on marrow stromal and hematopoietic cells. PMID:23988890

  14. Spatial development of the cultivation of a bone marrow stromal cell line in porous carriers.

    PubMed

    Takagi, M; Sasaki, T; Yoshida, T

    1999-11-01

    The spatial development of the cultivation of a bone marrow stromal cell line (SR-4987) in porous carriers was investigated in order to construct a three-dimensional hematopoietic culture system. Low-rate continuous agitation, 20 rpm, was an appropriate method to achieve initial adhesion of cells onto a cellulose porous beads (CPB, 100 mum pore diameter) in a spinner bottle, compared with other methods such as centrifugation and intermittent agitation. Cell growth with continuous agitation at 70 rpm after initial cell adhesion was not inferior to that at 20 rpm. A 2- and 10-fold increase in the inoculum cell concentration for CPB and another type of porous cellulose beads (Micro-cube (MC), 500 mum pore diameter) resulted in a 1.2- and 2-fold increase in final cell concentrationm, respectively. Cells attached to the MC beads and a polyester nonwoven dic (Fibra-cell (FC)) could grow and spread well on the carriers and a fibroblast-like shape was observed under scanning electron microscopy while the cells on CPB were globular. The flatness and inner surface area of these carriers may be the reason for the differences in cell morphology. PMID:19003146

  15. Characterization and Comparison of Canine Multipotent Stromal Cells Derived from Liver and Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Malagola, Ermanno; Teunissen, Michelle; van der Laan, Luc J.W.; Verstegen, Monique M.A.; Schotanus, Baukje A.; van Steenbeek, Frank G.; Penning, Louis C.; van Wolferen, Monique E.; Tryfonidou, Marianna A.

    2016-01-01

    Liver-derived multipotent stromal cells (L-MSCs) may prove preferable for treatment strategies of liver diseases, in comparison to the widely studied bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). Canines are a large animal model, in which the pathologies of liver diseases are similar to man. This study further promotes the implementation of canine models in MSC-based treatments of liver diseases. L-MSCs were characterized and compared to BM-MSCs from the same individual. Both cell types demonstrated a spindle-shaped fibroblast-like morphology, possessed the same growth potential, and demonstrated similar immunomodulation gene expression of CD274, PTGS-1, and PTGS-2. Marked differences in cell surface markers, CD105 and CD146, distinguished these two cell populations, and L-MSCs retained a liver-specific imprinting, observed by expression of CK18 and CK19. Finally, both populations differentiated toward the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage; however, L-MSCs failed to differentiate into the chondrogenic lineage. In conclusion, characterization of canine L-MSCs and BM-MSCs demonstrated that the two cell type populations are highly comparable. Although it is still unclear which cell source is preferred for clinical application in liver treatment strategies, this study provides a foundation for future controlled studies with MSC therapy in various liver diseases in dogs before their application in man. PMID:26462417

  16. Critical role for bone marrow stromal antigen 2 in acute Chikungunya virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mahauad-Fernandez, Wadie D; Jones, Philip H; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2014-11-01

    Bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2; also known as tetherin or CD317) is an IFN-inducible gene that functions to block the release of a range of nascent enveloped virions from infected host cells. However, the role of BST-2 in viral pathogenesis remains poorly understood. BST-2 plays a multifaceted role in innate immunity, as it hinders retroviral infection and possibly promotes infection with some rhabdo- and orthomyxoviruses. This paradoxical role has probably hindered exploration of BST-2 antiviral function in vivo. We reported previously that BST-2 tethers Chikungunya virus (CHIKV)-like particles on the cell plasma membrane. To explore the role of BST-2 in CHIKV replication and host protection, we utilized CHIKV strain 181/25 to examine early events during CHIKV infection in a BST-2(-/-) mouse model. We observed an interesting dichotomy between WT and BST-2(-/-) mice. BST-2 deficiency increased inoculation site viral load, culminating in higher systemic viraemia and increased lymphoid tissues tropism. A suppressed inflammatory innate response demonstrated by impaired expression of IFN-α, IFN-γ and CD40 ligand was observed in BST-2(-/-) mice compared with the WT controls. These findings suggested that, in part, BST-2 protects lymphoid tissues from CHIKV infection and regulates CHIKV-induced inflammatory response by the host. PMID:25053563

  17. Critical role for bone marrow stromal antigen 2 in acute Chikungunya virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Mahauad-Fernandez, Wadie D.; Jones, Philip H.

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2; also known as tetherin or CD317) is an IFN-inducible gene that functions to block the release of a range of nascent enveloped virions from infected host cells. However, the role of BST-2 in viral pathogenesis remains poorly understood. BST-2 plays a multifaceted role in innate immunity, as it hinders retroviral infection and possibly promotes infection with some rhabdo- and orthomyxoviruses. This paradoxical role has probably hindered exploration of BST-2 antiviral function in vivo. We reported previously that BST-2 tethers Chikungunya virus (CHIKV)-like particles on the cell plasma membrane. To explore the role of BST-2 in CHIKV replication and host protection, we utilized CHIKV strain 181/25 to examine early events during CHIKV infection in a BST-2−/− mouse model. We observed an interesting dichotomy between WT and BST-2−/− mice. BST-2 deficiency increased inoculation site viral load, culminating in higher systemic viraemia and increased lymphoid tissues tropism. A suppressed inflammatory innate response demonstrated by impaired expression of IFN-α, IFN-γ and CD40 ligand was observed in BST-2−/− mice compared with the WT controls. These findings suggested that, in part, BST-2 protects lymphoid tissues from CHIKV infection and regulates CHIKV-induced inflammatory response by the host. PMID:25053563

  18. Augmentation of tendon attachment to porous ceramics by bone marrow stromal cells in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Yu; Yokoya, Shin; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2006-01-01

    Tendon attachment to interconnected porous calcium hydroxyapatite ceramics (IP-CHA) with cultured bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) was analysed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether BMSC in IP-CHA could augment the tendon attachment to IP-CHA histologically and biomechanically. Eighteen Japanese white rabbits were used. Cultured BMSCs were subcultured in IP-CHA. The grafted tendon and IP-CHA with BMSC complex were implanted in a bone defect of the knee [BMSC(+) group]. In the contralateral knee, a tendon and IP-CHA without BMSC complex were implanted [BMSC(-) group]. Histological findings of the interface between the tendon and IP-CHA were similar in the two groups 3 weeks after the operation. However, 6 weeks after the operation, more abundant bone formation around the tendon was observed in the BMSC(+) group. The direct apposition of the tendon to bone in pores and collagen fibre continuity between the tendon and fibrous tissue in pores were observed. In biomechanical evaluation, the maximum pull-out load of the tendon from the IP-CHA in the BMSC(+) group was significantly higher than that in the BMSC(-) group 6 weeks after the operation. BMSCs cultured in IP-CHA could augment tendon attachment to IP-CHA. PMID:16909253

  19. Dynamic nanomechanics of individual bone marrow stromal cells and cell-matrix composites during chondrogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, BoBae; Han, Lin; Frank, Eliot H; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Ortiz, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic nanomechanical properties of bovine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and their newly synthesized cartilage-like matrices were studied at nanometer scale deformation amplitudes. The increase in their dynamic modulus, |E(*)| (e.g., 2.4±0.4 kPa at 1 Hz to 9.7±0.2 kPa at 316 Hz at day 21, mean±SEM), and phase angle, δ, (e.g., 15±2° at 1 Hz to 74±1° at 316 Hz at day 21) with increasing frequency were attributed to the fluid flow induced poroelasticity, governed by both the newly synthesized matrix and the intracellular structures. The absence of culture duration dependence suggested that chondrogenesis of BMSCs had not yet resulted in the formation of a well-organized matrix with a hierarchical structure similar to cartilage. BMSC-matrix composites demonstrated different poro-viscoelastic frequency-dependent mechanical behavior and energy dissipation compared to chondrocyte-matrix composites due to differences in matrix molecular constituents, structure and cell properties. This study provides important insights into the design of optimal protocols for tissue-engineered cartilage products using chondrocytes and BMSCs. PMID:25468666

  20. Efficient differentiation of neural stem cells induced by the rat bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ping; Qiu, Fu-Cheng; Han, Rui; Zhang, Zhong-Xia; Dong, Ci; Zhang, Li-Na; Wang, Yan-Yong; Ma, Qing-Ying; Yan, Bao-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are valuable self-renewing cells that can maintain the capacity to differentiate into specific brain cell types. NSCs may repair and even replace the brain tissue, and ultimatley promoting the central nervous system regeneration. Therefore, it is important, for scientists and pjysicians, to study the method for efficient culture and differentiation of NSCs. Our previous study demonstrated that Bone Marrow Stromal Cells (BMSCs) can directly regulate the differentiation of NSCs into neurons, and soluble molecules excreted by BMSCs played a key role in this process. Hereby, we further identified the BMSCs-induced neurons could form the synapses, convey dopamine and express voltage-depend and receptor-depend calcium channels. Moreover, the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK1/2 pathway was founded to be involved in the process of neuron differentiation and proliferation by the in vitro experiments. Finally, by using protein array, we, for the first time, found that the cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-3 (CINC-3, a small molecule cytokine) can promote the leukocytes invasion into the inflammation site, and have the ability to induce mesencephal NSCs into neurons. Consequently, these positive findings suggested that our BMSCs-induced culture system could provide a useful tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms of neural differentiation of NSCs, which may be benifical for neurodegenerative diseases in the near future. PMID:26221209

  1. In vitro evaluation of textile chitosan scaffolds for tissue engineering using human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Christiane; Heinemann, Sascha; Lode, Anja; Bernhardt, Anne; Worch, Hartmut; Hanke, Thomas

    2009-05-11

    Textile chitosan fiber scaffolds were developed and tested in terms of biocompatibility for human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs). A part of the scaffolds was further modified by coating with fibrillar collagen type I in order to biologize the surface. hBMSCs of two donors were used for cell culture experiments in vitro. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed fast attachment and morphological adaptation of the cells on both the raw chitosan fibers and the collagen-coated scaffolds. Cells were osteogenically induced after 3 days and cultivated for up to 28 days on the scaffolds. Activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was analyzed to evaluate proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation. We found a 3.5-6-fold increase in the cell number, whereas the collagen coating did not noticeably influence these factors. Osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by the course of ALP activity and immunostaining of osteocalcin. The feature of the collagen-coated as well as the raw chitosan fiber scaffolds to support attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of hBMSCs suggests a potential application of chitosan fibers and textile chitosan scaffolds for the tissue engineering of bone. PMID:19344120

  2. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Produce Long-Term Pain Relief in Rat Models of Persistent Pain

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Wang, Hu; Zou, Shiping; Gu, Ming; Watanabe, Mineo; Wei, Feng; Dubner, Ronald; Huang, George T.-J.; Ren, Ke

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain conditions are difficult to treat and are major health problems. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have generated considerable interest as a candidate for cell-based therapy. BMSCs are readily accessible and are easy to isolate and expand ex vivo. Clinical studies show that direct injection of BMSCs does not produce unwanted side effects and is well tolerated and safe. Here, we show that a single systemic (intravenous) or local injection (into the lesion site) of rat primary BMSCs reversed pain hypersensitivity in rats after injury and that the effect lasted until the conclusion of the study at 22 weeks. The pain hypersensitivity was rekindled by naloxone hydrochloride, an opioid receptor antagonist that acts peripherally and centrally, when tested at 1–5 weeks after BMSC infusion. In contrast, naloxone methiodide, a peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonist, only rekindled hyperalgesia in the first 3 weeks of BMSC treatment. Focal downregulation of brainstem mu opioid receptors by RNA interference (RNAi) reversed the effect of BMSCs, when RNAi was introduced at 5- but not 1-week after BMSC transplantation. Thus, BMSCs produced long-term relief of pain and this effect involved activation of peripheral and central opioid receptors in distinct time domains. The findings prompt studies to elucidate the cellular mechanisms of the BMSC-induced pain relieving effect and translate these observations into clinical settings. PMID:21630378

  3. Monoclonal Antibody to Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Antigen 2 Protein of Swine.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ning; Meng, Qiong; Wu, Yongguang; Wang, Zhongze; Zuo, Yewen; Tong, Wu; Zheng, Hao; Li, Guoxin; Yang, Shen; Yu, Hai; Shan, Tongling; Zhou, En-Min; Tong, Guangzhi

    2016-06-01

    The bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST-2) protein was identified as a novel virus restriction factor that potently restricts the replication and egress of enveloped viruses. In this study, we generated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against porcine BST-2 encoding 34-112 aa of porcine BST-2, which was cloned and inserted into the prokaryotic expression vector pCold-I to construct a recombinant plasmid pCold-pBST-2. The recombinant porcine BST-2 protein (rpBST-2 protein) was induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Then, BALB/c mice were immunized with the purified rpBST-2 protein to prepare MAbs of BST-2. After subcloning, one strain of hybridoma cells named 1B2 secreting porcine BST-2 protein monoclonal antibody (MAb) was obtained. Indirect immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis showed that the MAb was specifically reacted with the overexpressed porcine BST-2 protein in Vero cells. The specific MAb of porcine BST-2 provides a valuable tool for further studies of BST-2 to restrict virus infection. PMID:27148642

  4. MRI evaluation of axonal reorganization after bone marrow stromal cell treatment of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Quan; Qu, Changsheng; Chopp, Michael; Ding, Guang Liang; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Helpern, Joseph A.; Jensen, Jens H.; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Li, Lian; Lu, Mei; Kaplan, David; Hu, Jiani; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Li, Qingjiang; Wang, Shiyang; Mahmood, Asim

    2012-01-01

    We treated traumatic brain injury (TBI) with human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) and evaluated the effect of treatment on white matter reorganization using MRI. We subjected male Wistar rats (n = 17) to controlled cortical impact and either withheld treatment (controls; n = 9) or inserted collagen scaffolds containing hMSCs (n = 8). Six weeks later, the rats were sacrificed and MRI revealed selective migration of grafted neural progenitor cells towards the white matter reorganized boundary of the TBI-induced lesion. Histology confirmed that the white matter had been reorganized, associated with increased fractional anisotropy (FA; p <0.01) in the recovery regions relative to the injured core region in both treated and control groups. Treatment with hMSCs increased FA in the recovery regions, lowered T2 in the core region, decreased lesion volume and improved functional recovery relative to untreated controls. Immunoreactive staining showed axonal projections emanating from neurons and extruding from the corpus callosum into the ipsilateral cortex at the boundary of the lesion. Fiber tracking (FT) maps derived from diffusion tensor imaging confirmed the immunohistological data and provided information on axonal rewiring. The apparent kurtosis coefficient (AKC) detected additional axonal remodeling regions with crossing axons, confirmed by immunohistological staining, compared with FA. Our data demonstrate that AKC, FA, FTand T2 can be used to evaluate treatment-induced white matter recovery, which may facilitate restorative therapy in patients with TBI. PMID:21432927

  5. Effects of extracellular calcium on viability and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaowen; Wang, Wei; Lin, Zhongqin; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Qingyu; Kou, Dongquan; Ying, Xiaozhou; Shen, Yue; Cheng, Xiaojie; Yu, Ziming; Peng, Lei; Lu, Chuanzhu

    2013-09-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been extensively used for tissue engineering. However, the effect of Ca(2+) on the viability and osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs has yet to be evaluated. To determine the dose-dependent effect of Ca(2+) on viability and osteogenesis of BMSCs in vitro, BMSCs were cultured in calcium-free DMEM medium supplemented with various concentrations of Ca(2+) (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mM) from calcium citrate. Cell viability was analyzed by MTT assay and osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay, Von Kossa staining, and real-time PCR. Ca(2+) stimulated BMSCs viability in a dose-dependent manner. At slightly higher concentrations (4 and 5 mM) in the culture, Ca(2+) significantly inhibited the activity of ALP on days 7 and 14 (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), significantly suppressed collagen synthesis (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), and significantly elevated calcium deposition (P < 0.01) and mRNA levels of osteocalcin (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) and osteopontin (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). Therefore, elevated concentrations of extracellular calcium may promote cell viability and late-stage osteogenic differentiation, but may suppress early-stage osteogenic differentiation in BMSCs. PMID:23749732

  6. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Stimulate an Angiogenic Program that Requires Endothelial MT1-MMP

    PubMed Central

    Kachgal, Suraj; Carrion, Bita; Janson, Isaac A.; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived stromal/stem cells (BMSCs) have recently been characterized as mediators of tissue regeneration after injury. In addition to preventing fibrosis at the wound site, BMSCs elicit an angiogenic response within the fibrin matrix. The mechanistic interactions between BMSCs and invading endothelial cells (ECs) during this process are not fully understood. Using a three-dimensional, fibrin-based angiogenesis model, we sought to investigate the proteolytic mechanisms by which BMSCs promote vessel morphogenesis. We find that BMSC-mediated vessel formation depends on the proteolytic ability of membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). Knockdown of the protease results in a small network of vessels with enlarged lumens. Contrastingly, vessel morphogenesis is unaffected by the knockdown of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Furthermore, we find that BMSC-mediated vessel morphogenesis in vivo follows mechanisms similar to what we observe in vitro. Subcutaneous, cellular fibrin implants in C.B-17/SCID mice form aberrant vasculature when MMPs are inhibited with a broad spectrum chemical inhibitor, and a very minimal amount of vessels when MT1-MMP proteolytic activity is interrupted in ECs. Other studies have debated the necessity of MT1-MMP in the context of vessel invasion in fibrin, but this study clearly demonstrates its requirement in BMSC-mediated angiogenesis. PMID:22262018

  7. Conditional Radioresistance of tet-Inducible Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Epperly, Michael W.; Chaillet, J. Richard; Kalash, Ronny; Shaffer, Ben; Goff, Julie; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Dixon, Tracy; Houghton, Frank; Wang, Hong; Berhane, Hebist; Romero, Cynthia; Kim, Jee-Hong; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial targeted manganese superoxide dismutase is a major antioxidant enzyme, the levels of which modulate the response of cells, tissues and organs to ionizing irradiation. We developed a Tet-regulated MnSOD mouse (MnSODtet) to examine the detailed relationship between cellular MnSOD concentration and radioresistance and carried out in vitro studies using bone marrow culture derived stromal cell lines (mesenchymal stem cells). Homozygous MnSODtet/tet cells had low levels of MnSOD, reduced viability and proliferation, increased radiosensitivity, elevated overall antioxidant stores, and defects in cell proliferation and DNA strand-break repair. Doxycycline (doxy) treatment of MnSODtet/tet cells increased MnSOD levels and radioresistance from ñ of 2.79 ± 1.04 to 8.69 ± 1.09 (P = 0.0060) and normalized other biologic parameters. In contrast, MnSODtet/tet cells showed minimal difference in baseline and radiation induced mRNA and protein levels of TGF-β, Nrf2 and NF-κB and radiation induced cell cycle arrest was not dependent upon MnSOD level. These novel MnSODtet/tet mouse derived cells should be valuable for elucidating several parameters of the oxidative stress response to ionizing radiation. PMID:23862693

  8. Conditional radioresistance of Tet-inducible manganese superoxide dismutase bone marrow stromal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Michael W; Chaillet, J Richard; Kalash, Ronny; Shaffer, Ben; Goff, Julie; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Dixon, Tracy; Houghton, Frank; Wang, Hong; Berhane, Hebist; Romero, Cynthia; Kim, Jee-Hong; Greenberger, Joel S

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondrial targeted manganese superoxide dismutase is a major antioxidant enzyme, the levels of which modulate the response of cells, tissues and organs to ionizing irradiation. We developed a Tet-regulated MnSOD mouse (MnSOD(tet)) to examine the detailed relationship between cellular MnSOD concentration and radioresistance and carried out in vitro studies using bone marrow culture derived stromal cell lines (mesenchymal stem cells). Homozygous MnSOD(tet/tet) cells had low levels of MnSOD, reduced viability and proliferation, increased radiosensitivity, elevated overall antioxidant stores, and defects in cell proliferation and DNA strand-break repair. Doxycycline (doxy) treatment of MnSOD(tet/tet) cells increased MnSOD levels and radioresistance from ñ of 2.79 ± 1.04 to 8.69 ± 1.09 (P = 0.0060) and normalized other biologic parameters. In contrast, MnSOD(tet/tet) cells showed minimal difference in baseline and radiation induced mRNA and protein levels of TGF-β, Nrf2 and NF-κB and radiation induced cell cycle arrest was not dependent upon MnSOD level. These novel MnSOD(tet/tet) mouse derived cells should be valuable for elucidating several parameters of the oxidative stress response to ionizing radiation. PMID:23862693

  9. Disparate osteogenic response of mandible and iliac crest bone marrow stromal cells to pamidronate

    PubMed Central

    Stefanik, D.; Sarin, J.; Lam, T.; Levin, L.; Leboy, PS; Akintoye, SO.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Long-term administration of intravenous bisphosphonates like pamidronate is associated with jaw osteonecrosis but axial and appendicular bones are unaffected. Pathogenesis of bisphosphonate-associated jaw osteonecrosis may relate to skeletal-site specific effects of bisphosphonates on osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of orofacial and axial/appendicular bones. This study evaluated and compared skeletal site-specific osteogenic response of mandible (orofacial bone) and iliac crest (axial bone) human BMSCs to pamidronate. MATERIALS AND METHODS Mandible and iliac crest BMSCs from six normal healthy volunteers were established in culture and tested with pamidronate to evaluate and compare cell survival, osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase, osteoclast differentiation in co-cultures with CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells, gene expression of receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin, and in vivo bone regeneration. BRESULTS Mandible BMSCs were more susceptible to pamidronate than iliac crest BMSCs based on decreased cell survival, lower alkaline phosphatase production and structurally less organized in vivo bone regeneration. Pamidronate promoted higher RANKL gene expression and osteoclast recruitment by mandible BMSCs. CONCLUSION Mandible and iliac crest BMSC survival and osteogenic differentiation are disparately affected by pamidronate to favor dysregulated mandible bone homeostasis. PMID:18938273

  10. Intrathecal bone marrow stromal cells inhibit neuropathic pain via TGF-β secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Park, Chul-Kyu; Xie, Rou-Gang; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains a pressing clinical problem. Here, we demonstrate that a local, intrathecal (i.t.) injection of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) following lumbar puncture alleviates early- and late-phase neuropathic pain symptoms, such as allodynia and hyperalgesia, for several weeks in murine chronic constriction injury (CCI) and spared nerve injury models. Moreover, i.t. BMSCs reduced CCI-induced spontaneous pain and axonal injury of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and inhibited CCI-evoked neuroinflammation in DRGs and spinal cord tissues. BMSCs secreted TGF-β1 into the cerebrospinal fluid, and neutralization of TGF-β1, but not IL-10, reversed the analgesic effect of BMSCs. Conversely, i.t. administration of TGF-β1 potently inhibited neuropathic pain. TGF-β1 acted as a powerful neuromodulator and rapidly (within minutes) suppressed CCI-evoked spinal synaptic plasticity and DRG neuronal hyperexcitability via TGF-β receptor 1–mediated noncanonical signaling. Finally, nerve injury upregulated CXCL12 in lumbar L4–L6 DRGs, and this upregulation caused migration of i.t.-injected BMSCs to DRGs through the CXCL12 receptor CXCR4, which was expressed on BMSCs. BMSCs that migrated from the injection site survived at the border of DRGs for more than 2 months. Our findings support a paracrine mechanism by which i.t. BMSCs target CXCL12-producing DRGs to elicit neuroprotection and sustained neuropathic pain relief via TGF-β1 secretion. PMID:26168219

  11. Multipotent bone marrow stromal cell therapy promotes endogenous cell proliferation following ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Pirzad Jahromi, Gila; Shabanzadeh Pirsaraei, Alireza; Sadr, Seyed Shahabeddin; Kaka, Golamreza; Jafari, Mahvash; Seidi, Sadegh; Charish, Jason

    2015-11-01

    Despite extensive research over the years, there still exists some debate as to what constitutes the optimal therapeutic strategy to promote recovery following stroke. Due to the complexity of injured brain pathophysiology, treatment approaches should ideally address numerous factors, ultimately aiming to promote tissue protection, axonal regrowth and functional recovery. This study extends the understanding of the effects of bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) treatment following experimentally induced ischemic stroke in rats. Focal ischemic brain injury was experimentally induced in rats by placing a preformed clot into the middle cerebral artery. Animals were injected intravenously with BMSCs at 24 h after stroke and were killed 7 days post injury. When administered BMSCs following stroke, the neurological outcome was significantly improved relative to controls. There was an increase in the number of BMSCs labelled with BrdU present in the injured hemisphere of the brain compared to the non-injured side. Furthermore, administration of BMSCs also led to increases in astrocytosis, vascularization and endogenous proliferation. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of action of BMSC treatment and further argue for the therapeutic potential of BMSCs as an effective treatment following cerebral stroke. PMID:26218989

  12. Adult rat bone marrow stromal cells express genes associated with dopamine neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Brian C.; Woodbury, Dale . E-mail: WOODBURYDL@AOL.COM; Black, Ira B.

    2006-05-19

    An intensive search is underway to identify candidates to replace the cells that degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). To date, no suitable substitute has been found. We have recently found that adult rat bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be induced to assume a neuronal phenotype in vitro. These findings may have particular relevance to the treatment of PD. We now report that adult MSCs express multiple dopaminergic genes, suggesting that they are potential candidates for cell therapy. Using RT-PCR, we have examined families of genes that are associated with the development and/or survival of dopaminergic neurons. MSCs transcribe a variety of dopaminergic genes including patched and smoothened (components of the Shh receptor), Gli-1 (downstream mediator of Shh), and Otx-1, a gene associated with formation of the mesencephalon during development. Furthermore, Shh treatment elicits a 1.5-fold increase in DNA synthesis in cultured MSCs, suggesting the presence of a functional Shh receptor complex. We have also found that MSCs transcribe and translate Nurr-1, a nuclear receptor essential for the development of dopamine neurons. In addition, MSCs express a variety of growth factor receptors including the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored ligand-binding subunit of the GDNF receptor, GFR{alpha}1, as well as fibroblast growth factor receptors one and four. The expression of genes that are associated with the development and survival of dopamine neurons suggests a potential role for these cells in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  13. Caffeine inhibits the viability and osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y; Guan, XX; Zhu, ZL; Guo, J; Huang, YC; Hou, WW; Yu, HY

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Caffeine is consumed extensively in Europe and North America. As a risk factor for osteoporosis, epidemiological studies have observed that caffeine can decrease bone mineral density, adversely affect calcium absorption and increase the risk of bone fracture. However, the exact mechanisms have not been fully investigated. Here, we examined the effects of caffeine on the viability and osteogenesis of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (rBMSCs). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cell viability, apoptosis and necrosis were quantified using thymidine incorporation and flow cytometry. Sequential gene expressions in osteogenic process were measured by real-time PCR. cAMP, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin were assessed by immunoassay, spectrophotometry and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Mineralization was determined by calcium deposition. KEY RESULTS After treating BMSCs with high caffeine concentrations (0.1–1 mM), their viability decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. This cell death was primarily due to necrosis and, to a small extent, apoptosis. Genes and protein sequentially expressed in osteogenesis, including Cbfa1/Runx2, collagen I, alkaline phosphatase and its protein, were significantly downregulated except for osteocalcin and its protein. Moreover, caffeine inhibited calcium deposition in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, but increased intracellular cAMP in a concentration-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS By suppressing the commitment of BMSCs to the osteogenic lineage and selectively inhibiting gene expression, caffeine downregulated some important events in osteogenesis and ultimately affected bone mass. PMID:20726981

  14. Bone marrow stromal cells inhibits HMGB1-mediated inflammation after stroke in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, J; Liu, B; Zhao, Q; Jin, P; Hua, F; Zhang, Z; Liu, Y; Zan, K; Cui, G; Ye, X

    2016-06-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a ligand of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), functions as a proinflammatory factor. It is mainly involved in inflammatory activation and contributes to the initiation and progression of stroke. By using a model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) in type 2 diabetic rats, we investigated the changes of pro-inflammation mediators, blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage and functional outcome after stroke. Type 2 diabetic rats did not show an increased lesion volume, but exhibited significantly increased expression of HMGB1 and RAGE, BBB leakage, as well as decreased functional outcome after stroke compared with control rats. Injection of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) into type 2 diabetic rats significantly reduced the expression of HMGB1 and RAGE, attenuated BBB leakage, and improved functional outcome after stroke. BMSCs-treated type 2 diabetic rats inhibited inflammation and improved functional outcome after stroke. Furthermore, in vitro data support the hypothesis that BMSCs-induced reduction of HMGB1 and RAGE in T2DM-MCAo rats contributed to attenuated inflammatory response in the ischemic brain, which may lead to the beneficial effects of BMSCs treatment. Further investigation of BMSCs treatment in type 2 diabetic stroke is warranted. PMID:26946264

  15. Generation of mesenchymal stromal cells in the presence of platelet lysate: a phenotypic and functional comparison of umbilical cord blood- and bone marrow-derived progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Cometa, Angela Maria; Perotti, Cesare; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Novara, Francesca; Visai, Livia; Moretta, Antonia; Del Fante, Claudia; Villa, Raffaella; Ball, Lynne M.; Fibbe, Willem E.; Maccario, Rita; Locatelli, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells are employed in various different clinical settings in order to modulate immune response. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms responsible for their immunomodulatory effects, which could be influenced by both the cell source and culture conditions. Design and Methods We tested the ability of a 5% platelet lysate-supplemented medium to support isolation and ex vivo expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells from full-term umbilical-cord blood. We also investigated the biological/functional properties of umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells, in comparison with platelet lysate-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. Results The success rate of isolation of mesenchymal stromal cells from umbilical cord blood was in the order of 20%. These cells exhibited typical morphology, immunophenotype and differentiation capacity. Although they have a low clonogenic efficiency, umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells may possess high proliferative potential. The genetic stability of these cells from umbilical cord blood was demonstrated by a normal molecular karyotype; in addition, these cells do not express hTERT and telomerase activity, do express p16ink4a protein and do not show anchorage-independent cell growth. Concerning alloantigen-specific immune responses, umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells were able to: (i) suppress T- and NK-lymphocyte proliferation, (ii) decrease cytotoxic activity and (iii) only slightly increase interleukin-10, while decreasing interferon-γ secretion, in mixed lymphocyte culture supernatants. While an indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-specific inhibitor did not reverse mesenchymal stromal cell-induced suppressive effects, a prostaglandin E2-specific inhibitor hampered the suppressive effect of both umbilical cord blood- and bone marrow-mesenchymal stromal cells on alloantigen-induced cytotoxic activity. Mesenchymal stromal cells from both sources expressed HLA

  16. Hypothalamic proline-rich polypeptide enhances bone marrow colony-forming cell proliferation and stromal progenitor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Galoyan, A A; Korochkin, L I; Rybalkina, E J; Pavlova, G V; Saburina, I N; Zaraiski, E I; Galoyan, N A; Davtyan, T K; Bezirganyan, K B; Revishchin, A V

    2008-01-01

    The AGAPEPAEPAQPGVY proline-rich peptide (PRP-1) was isolated from neurosecretory granules of the bovine neurohypophysis; it is produced by N. supraopticus and N. paraventricularis. It has been shown that PRP-1 has many potentially beneficial biological effects, including immunoregulatory, hematopoietic, antimicrobial, and antineurodegenerative properties. Here we showed that PRP increased colony-forming cell (CFC) proliferation in rat bone marrow (BM) cells in vivo. In PRP-treated rat BM, the CFU number at day 7 and day 14 was considerably increased in comparison with untreated rat BM and no difference was found at day 21 and day 28. The related peptide [arg8]vasopressin did not reveal CFC proliferation. PRP failed to farther increase CFC proliferation in vitro in BM obtained from PRP-treated or untreated rats. After 3-4 days of human BM stromal cell cultivation in the presence of 2-20 microg/ml PRP the appearance of cells expressing CD15, CD10, CD11a, CD11b, CD3, CD4, and CD16 surface antigens did not differ from the untreated cells. PRP increased the appearance of CD14-positive cells upon 3-4-day incubation with both adult and fetal BM stromal cells. Our results suggest a previously undescribed role for the hypothalamic peptide within neurosecretory hypothalamus-bone marrow humoral axis, because PRP enhances BM colony-forming cell proliferation and stromal cell differentiation. PMID:19177842

  17. Changes in compartments of hemospoietic and stromal marrow progenitor cells after continuous low dose gamma-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, E.; Starostin, V.

    The low dose continuous gamma-irradiation chosen corresponded with that affected the organisms onboard a spacecraft (Mitrikas, Tsetlin, 2000). F1 (CBAxC57Bl/6) male and female mice were used at 3 4 months of age. Experimental mice were- irradiated during 10 days to a total dose of 15 mGy (Co60 gamma-sources, mean dose rate of 1.5-2.0 mGy/day). Another group of intact mice served as control. Younger and advanced hemopoietic progenitors measured at day 11 (i.e. CFU -S-11) and day 7 (i.e. CFU-S-7), respectively, after transplantation of test donor cells were assayed by the method of Till and McCulloch (1961). Stromal changes were evaluated by estimation of in vitro fibroblastic colony-forming units (CFU -F ) content and by the ability of ectopically grafted (under renal capsule) stroma to regenerate the new bone marrow organ. CFU-S-11 number increased of 40% as compared with control and almost 2-fold higher than that of CFU-S-7. The CFU-F content increased almost of 3-fold. Size of ectopic marrow transplants was estimated at day 70 following grafting by counting myelokariocyte and CFU -S number that repopulated the newly formed bone marrow organ. It was found more than 2-fold increase of myelokariocytes in transplants produced by marrow stroma of irradiated donors. CFU -S contents in transplants increased strikingly in comparison to control level. CFU-S-7 and CFU-S-11 increased of 7.5- and of 3.7-fold, respectively, i.e. the rate of advanced CFU - S predominated. It should be noted a good correlation between number of stromal progenitor cells (CFU-F) and ectopic transplant sizes evaluated as myelokaryocyte counts when irradiated donors used. In the same time, if sizes of transplants was measured as CFU-S-7 and CFU - S-11 numbers, their increases were more pronounced. Therefore, continuous low dose gamma- irradiation augments significantly both hemopoietic and stromal progenitor cell number in bone marrow. Additionally, the ratio of distinct CFU -S subpopulations

  18. In vitro quantitation of lethal and physiologic effects of total body irradiation on stromal and hematopoietic stem cells in continuous bone marrow cultures from Rf mice

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberger, J.S.; Eckner, R.J.; Otten, J.A.; Tennant, R.W.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of in vivo total body irradiation (TBI) and interval from TBI to explant of marrow on: stromal cell proliferation in vitro; stromal cell support of hematopoiesis in continuous bone marrow culture; and generation of WEHI-3 growth factor (GF)-dependent lines of hematopoietic progenitor cells were evaluated. Explant of marrow at 2, 4, 5, or 6 months after single fraction TBI (300-800 rad) was associated with decreased longevity of hemopoiesis and a decrease in the proliferative capacity of fibroblastic adherent-stromal colony forming cells (CFUf) as measured by colony size at 14 days and number of colonies per 10/sup 6/ cells plated. In contrast, explant of marrow 8 to 24 months after TBI produced cultures with longevity that was indistinguishable from age-matched control cultures (19-24 weeks). Marrow from irradiated first and second generation recipients of serially transferred marrow demonstrated a similar 7-month in vivo recovery period; however, the plateau maximum duration of hemopoiesis did not return to control levels. Purified stromal cell cultures were prepared by corticosteroid-deprivation of explanted marrow for 28 days and were then engrafted in vitro with marrow from C57BL/6J or RfM/UN mice that had been irradiated 1 month previously. Hemopoiesis in these cultures was restored, and they produced GM-CFUc and granulocytes for 15-24 weeks. Thus, healthy stroma supported growth of recently irradiated hemopoietic cells in vitro. Indirect effects of x-irradiation on hemopoietic stem cells through damage and repair in the stromal cell compartment can be effectively studied with the present bone marrow culture system. (JMT)

  19. Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of bone marrow stromal cell surface gene, BST2, that may be involved in pre-B-cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Jun; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Tomizawa, Hitoshi

    1995-04-10

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate B-cell growth and development through their surface molecules and cytokines. In this study, we generated a mAb, RS38, that recognized a novel human membrane protein, BST-2, expressed on bone marrow stromal cell lines and synovial cell lines. We cloned a cDNA encoding BST-2 from a rheumatoid arthritis-derived synovial cell line. BST-2 is a 30- to 36-kDa type II transmembrane protein, consisting of 180 amino acids. The BST-2 gene (HGMW-approved symbol BST2) is located on chromosome 19p13.2. BST-2 is expressed not only on certain bone marrow stromal cell lines but also on various normal tissues, although its expression pattern is different from that of another bone marrow stromal cell surface molecule, BST-1. BST-2 surface expression on fibroblast cell lines facilitated the stromal cell-dependent growth of a murine bone marrow-derived pre-B-cell line, DW34. The results suggest that BST-2 may be involved in pre-B-cell growth. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Autologous bone marrow stromal cells are promising candidates for cell therapy approaches to treat bone degeneration in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lebouvier, Angélique; Poignard, Alexandre; Coquelin-Salsac, Laura; Léotot, Julie; Homma, Yasuhiro; Jullien, Nicolas; Bierling, Philippe; Galactéros, Frédéric; Hernigou, Philippe; Chevallier, Nathalie; Rouard, Hélène

    2015-11-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a frequent complication in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). To delay hip arthroplasty, core decompression combined with concentrated total bone marrow (BM) treatment is currently performed in the early stages of the osteonecrosis. Cell therapy efficacy depends on the quantity of implanted BM stromal cells. For this reason, expanded bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells) can be used to improve osteonecrosis treatment in SCD patients. In this study, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the function of BMSCs isolated from a large number of SCD patients with osteonecrosis (SCD-ON) compared with control groups (patients with osteonecrosis not related to SCD (ON) and normal donors (N)). BM total nuclear cells and colony-forming efficiency values (CFE) were significantly higher in SCD-ON patients than in age and sex-matched controls. The BMSCs from SCD-ON patients were similar to BMSCs from the control groups in terms of their phenotypic and functional properties. SCD-ON patients have a higher frequency of BMSCs that retain their bone regeneration potential. Our findings suggest that BMSCs isolated from SCD-ON patients can be used clinically in cell therapy approaches. This work provides important preclinical data that is necessary for the clinical application of expanded BMSCs in advanced therapies and medical products. PMID:26492634

  1. Targeting lysophosphatidic acid signaling retards culture-associated senescence of human marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Masahiko; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Ohkouchi, Shinya; Shibahara, Taizou; Tode, Naoki; Santoso, Arif; Daito, Hisayoshi; Ohta, Hiromitsu; Tamada, Tsutomu; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from mesenchymal tissues can propagate in vitro to some extent and differentiate into various tissue lineages to be used for cell-based therapies. Cellular senescence, which occurs readily in continual MSC culture, leads to loss of these characteristic properties, representing one of the major limitations to achieving the potential of MSCs. In this study, we investigated the effect of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a ubiquitous metabolite in membrane phospholipid synthesis, on the senescence program of human MSCs. We show that MSCs preferentially express the LPA receptor subtype 1, and an abrogation of the receptor engagement with the antagonistic compound Ki16425 attenuates senescence induction in continually propagated human MSCs. This anti-aging effect of Ki16425 results in extended rounds of cellular proliferation, increased clonogenic potential, and retained plasticity for osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Expressions of p16(Ink4a), Rb, p53, and p21(Cip1), which have been associated with cellular senescence, were all reduced in human MSCs by the pharmacological inhibition of LPA signaling. Disruption of this signaling pathway was accompanied by morphological changes such as cell thinning and elongation as well as actin filament deformation through decreased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase. Prevention of LPA receptor engagement also promoted ubiquitination-mediated c-Myc elimination in MSCs, and consequently the entry into a quiescent state, G(0) phase, of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results highlight the potential of pharmacological intervention against LPA signaling for blunting senescence-associated loss of function characteristic of human MSCs. PMID:22359668

  2. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow exhibit aberrant cytogenetics and cytokine elaboration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J C; Basu, S K; Zhao, X; Chien, S; Fang, M; Oehler, V G; Appelbaum, F R; Becker, P S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play a fundamental role in the BM microenvironment (BME) and abnormalities of these cells may contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis. The aim of the study was to characterize the cytokine and gene expression profile, immunophenotype and cytogenetics of BM-MSCs from AML patients compared to normal BM-MSCs from healthy donors. AML BM-MSCs showed decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels compared to normal BM-MSCs. AML BM-MSCs expressed similar β1 integrin, CD44, CD73, CD90 and E-cadherin compared to normal BM-MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis revealed chromosomal aberrations in AML BM-MSCs, some overlapping with and others distinct from their corresponding AML blasts. No significant difference in gene expression was detected between AML BM-MSCs compared to normal BM-MSCs; however, comparing the differences between AML and MSCs from AML patients with the differences between normal hematopoietic cells and normal MSCs by Ingenuity pathway analysis showed key distinctions of the AML setting: (1) upstream gene regulation by transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor, tissue transglutaminase 2, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4; (2) integrin and interleukin 8 signaling as overrepresented canonical pathways; and (3) upregulation of transcription factors FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog and v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog. Thus, phenotypic abnormalities of AML BM-MSCs highlight a dysfunctional BME that may impact AML survival and proliferation. PMID:25860293

  3. In situ chondrogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in bioactive self-assembled peptide gels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Soo Hyun; Jung, Youngmee

    2015-07-01

    Articular cartilage is a specific tissue that lacks nerves and blood vessels and has limited self-repair abilities. Accordingly, it is necessary to develop new technology for the regeneration of cartilage to overcome therapeutic limitations. Recently, there have been several studies investigating the use of peptide hydrogel scaffolds, which are biocompatible and have low immunogenicity, for cartilage tissue engineering. In this study, we used self-assembled peptide hydrogels with repeating peptide sequences and bioactive motifs at the end of repeating sequences, which are collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs). CMPs that have a unique collagen-like triple helical conformation have been shown to associate with collagen molecules and fibers via a strand invasion process. In order to confirm the biological activities of the modified bioactive peptide hydrogels, the role of functional motifs in in situ chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) was examined. To compensate for the weaker mechanical properties of peptide hydrogels, we used poly (L-lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL) scaffolds, which were loaded with the self-assembled peptides into which the bioactive motifs had been incorporated. Then, we performed in vitro and in vivo analyses with the rBMSC/PLCL-peptide hydrogel complexes. The results indicated that the secretion of a cartilage-specific extracellular matrix and gene expression concerned with chondrogenic differentiation were increased by CMP motifs. In conclusion, it was confirmed that CMP-modified self-assembled peptide hydrogels could effectively enhance chondrogenic differentiation in situ, and, consequently, they could be a good biomaterial for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25540912

  4. Administration of bone marrow stromal cells in sepsis attenuates sepsis-related coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lifei; Huang, Yueyue; Pan, Xiaojun; Quan, Shichao; Xu, Shunyao; Li, Dequan; Song, Lijun; Zhang, Xiaomin; Chen, Wanzhou; Pan, Jingye

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Coagulopathy plays an important role in sepsis. The aim of this study was to determine whether bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) administration could attenuate coagulopathy in sepsis. Materials and methods In vitro: endothelial cells were cultured with/without BMSCs for 6 h following LPS stimulation and were collected for thrombomodulin (TM) and endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) measurements. In vivo: Thirty-six mice were randomized into sham, sepsis, and sepsis + BMSC groups (n = 12 each group). Sepsis was induced through cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). BMSC infusion was started at 6 h after CLP. Lung tissues and plasma samples were collected at 24 h after CLP for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), quantitative real-time RT-PCR, western blot, and immunohistochemistry analysis. Results In vitro: BMSCs attenuated the decrease in TM and EPCR mRNA and protein expression levels in LPS-stimulated endothelial cells. In vivo: BMSC treatment decreased lung injury and mesenteric perfusion impairment, and ameliorated coagulopathy, as suggested by the reduction in elevated TF, vWF, and TAT circulation levels. BMSC infusion decreased TF mRNA transcription and protein expression levels in lung tissues, and increased TM and EPCR mRNA transcription and expression levels. Discussion BMSC administration attenuated coagulopathy, and decreased lung injury and mesenteric perfusion impairment in sepsis. Key messages BMSCs increased the expression of TM and EPCR from endothelium cells exposed to LPS in vitro. BMSC treatment attenuated lung injury and coagulopathy in the mice cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model. BMSC administration-attenuated coagulopathy is related to the reduced expression of TF and increased expression of TM and EPCR. PMID:26969493

  5. Malignant transformation of bone marrow stromal cells induced by the brain glioma niche in rats.

    PubMed

    He, Qiuping; Zou, Xifeng; Duan, Deyi; Liu, Yujun; Xu, Qunyuan

    2016-01-01

    Normal human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can develop neoplastic cancer stem cell (CSC) properties after coculture with transformed hESCs in vitro. In the present study, the influence of the tumor microenvironment on malignant transformation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was studied after allografting a mixture of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-labeled BMSCs and C6 glioma cells into the rat brain to understand the influence of the cellular environment, especially the tumor environment, on the transformation of grafted BMSCs in the rat brain. We performed intracerebral transplantation in the rat brain using EGFP-labeled BMSCs coinjected with C6 tumor cells. After transplantation, the EGFP-labeled cells were isolated from the tumor using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the characteristics of the recovered cells were investigated. Glioma-specific biomarkers of the sorted cells and the biological characteristics of the tumors were analyzed. The BMSCs isolated from the cografts were transformed into glioma CSCs, as indicated by the marked expression of the glioma marker GFAP in glioma cells, and of Nestin and CD133 in neural stem cells and CSCs, as well as rapid cell growth, decreased level of the tumor suppressor gene p53, increased level of the oncogene murine double minute gene 2 (MDM2), and recapitulation of glioma tissues in the brain. These data suggest that BMSCs can be transformed into CSCs, which can be further directed toward glioma formation under certain conditions, supporting the notion that the tumor microenvironment is involved in transforming normal BMSCs into glial CSCs. PMID:26590986

  6. Mechanical stimulation orchestrates the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells by regulating HDAC1.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Wang, C D; Zhang, N; Tong, W X; Zhang, Y F; Shan, S Z; Zhang, X L; Li, Q F

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation and histone deacetylases (HDACs) have essential roles in regulating the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and bone formation. However, little is known regarding what regulates HDAC expression and therefore the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs during osteogenesis. In this study, we investigated whether mechanical loading regulates HDAC expression directly and examined the role of HDACs in mechanical loading-triggered osteogenic differentiation and bone formation. We first studied the microarrays of samples from patients with osteoporosis and found that the NOTCH pathway and skeletal development gene sets were downregulated in the BMSCs of patients with osteoporosis. Then we demonstrated that mechanical stimuli can regulate osteogenesis and bone formation both in vivo and in vitro. NOTCH signaling was upregulated during cyclic mechanical stretch (CMS)-induced osteogenic differentiation, whereas HDAC1 protein expression was downregulated. The perturbation of HDAC1 expression also had a significant effect on matrix mineralization and JAG1-mediated Notch signaling, suggesting that HDAC1 acts as an endogenous attenuator of Notch signaling in the mechanotransduction of BMSCs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results suggest that HDAC1 modulates the CMS-induced histone H3 acetylation level at the JAG1 promoter. More importantly, we found an inhibitory role of Hdac1 in regulating bone formation in response to hindlimb unloading in mice, and pretreatment with an HDAC1 inhibitor partly rescued the osteoporosis caused by mechanical unloading. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that mechanical stimulation orchestrates genes expression involved in the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs via the direct regulation of HDAC1, and the therapeutic inhibition of HDAC1 may be an efficient strategy for enhancing bone formation under mechanical stimulation. PMID:27171263

  7. Human alternatives to fetal bovine serum for the expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Bieback, Karen; Hecker, Andrea; Kocaömer, Asli; Lannert, Heinrich; Schallmoser, Katharina; Strunk, Dirk; Klüter, Harald

    2009-09-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for novel cell therapeutic applications. For clinical scale manufacturing, human factors from serum or platelets have been suggested as alternatives to fetal bovine serum (FBS). We have previously shown that pooled human serum (HS) and thrombin-activated platelet releasate in plasma (tPRP) support the expansion of adipose tissue-derived MSCs. Contradictory results with bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs have initiated a comprehensive comparison of HS, tPRP, and pooled human platelet lysate (pHPL) and FBS in terms of their impact on MSC isolation, expansion, differentiation, and immunomodulatory activity. In addition to conventional Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, depletion of lineage marker expressing cells (RosetteSep) and CD271+ sorting were used for BM-MSC enrichment. Cells were cultured in medium containing either 10% FBS, HS, tPRP, or pHPL. Colony-forming units and cumulative population doublings were determined, and MSCs were maximally expanded. Although both HS and tPRP comparable to FBS supported isolation and expansion, pHPL significantly accelerated BM-MSC proliferation to yield clinically relevant numbers within the first two passages. MSC quality and functionality including cell surface marker expression, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation, and immunosuppressive action were similar in MSCs from all culture conditions. Importantly, spontaneous cell transformation was not observed in any of the culture conditions. Telomerase activity was not detected in any of the cultures at any passage. In contrast to previous data from adipose tissue-derived MSCs, pHPL was found to be the most suitable FBS substitute in clinical scale BM-MSC expansion. PMID:19544413

  8. Bone marrow stromal cells as an inducer for cardiomyocyte differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Fengming; Johkura, Kohei; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Shirasawa, Sakiko; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Nagai, Mika; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2010-09-20

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) secrete soluble factors and display varied cell-biological functions. To confirm the ability and efficiency of BMSCs to induce embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into cardiomyocytes, mouse embryoid bodies (EBs) were co-cultured with rat BMSCs. After about 10 days, areas of rhythmically contracting cells in more solid aggregates became evident with bundle-like structures formed along borders between EB outgrowth and BMSC layer. ESC-derived cardiomyocytes exhibited sarcomeric striations when stained with troponin I (Trop I), organized in separated bundles. Besides, the staining for connexin 43 was detected in cell-cell junctions, which demonstrated that ESC-derived cardiomyocytes were coupled by gap junction in culture. The related genes of cardiomyocytes were found in these beating and no-beating EBs co-cultured with BMSCs. In addition, an improved efficiency of cardiomyocyte differentiation from ESC-BMSC co-culture was found in the serum-free medium: 5-fold up-regulation in the number of beating area compared with the serum medium. Effective cardiac differentiation was also recognized in transfer filter assay and in condition medium obtained from BMSC culture. A clear increase in the expression of cardiac genes and TropI protein confirmed further cardiac differentiation by BMP4 and Retinoic Acid (RA) treatment. These results demonstrate that BMSCs can induce cardiomyocyte differentiation from ESCs through soluble factors and enhance it with BMP4 or RA treatment. Serum-free ESC-BMSC co-culture represents a defined in vitro model for identifying the cardiomyocyte-inducing activity from BMSCs and, in addition, a straightforward experimental system for assessing clinical applications. PMID:20801009

  9. Age and skeletal sites affect BMP-2 responsiveness of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Osyczka, Anna Maria; Damek-Poprawa, Monika; Wojtowicz, Aleksandra; Akintoye, Sunday O

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) contain osteoprogenitors responsive to stimulation by osteogenic growth factors like bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). When used as grafts, BMSCs can be harvested from different skeletal sites such as axial, appendicular, and orofacial bones, but the lower therapeutic efficacy of BMPs on BMSCs-responsiveness in humans compared to animal models may be due partly to effects of skeletal site and age of donor. We previously reported superior differentiation capacity and osteogenic properties of orofacial BMSCs relative to iliac crest BMSCs in same individuals. This study tested the hypothesis that recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) stimulates human BMSCs differently based on age and skeletal site of harvest. Adult maxilla, mandible, and iliac crest BMSCs from same individuals and pediatric iliac crest BMSCs were comparatively assessed for BMP-2 responsiveness under serum-containing and serum-free insulin-supplemented culture conditions. Adult orofacial BMSCs were more BMP-2-responsive than iliac crest BMSCs based on higher gene transcripts of alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteogenic transcription factors MSX-2 and Osterix in serum-free insulin-containing medium. Pediatric iliac crest BMSCs were more responsive to rhBMP-2 than adult iliac crest BMSCs based on higher expression of alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin in serum-containing medium. Unlike orofacial BMSCs, MSX-2 and Osterix transcripts were similarly expressed by adult and pediatric iliac crest BMSCs in response to rhBMP-2. These data demonstrate that age and skeletal site-specific differences exist in BMSC osteogenic responsiveness to BMP-2 stimulation and suggest that MSX-2 and Osterix may be potential regulatory transcription factors in BMP-mediated osteogenesis of adult orofacial cells. PMID:19637063

  10. Age and Skeletal Sites Affect BMP-2 Responsiveness of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Osyczka, Anna M.; Damek-Poprawa, Monika; Wojtowicz, Aleksandra; Akintoye, Sunday O.

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) contain osteoprogenitors responsive to stimulation by osteogenic growth factors like bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). When used as grafts, BMSCs can be harvested from different skeletal sites such as axial, appendicular and orofacial bones, but the lower therapeutic efficacy of BMPs on BMSCs-responsiveness in humans compared to animal models may be partly due to effects of skeletal site and age of donor. We previously reported superior differentiation capacity and osteogenic properties of orofacial BMSCs relative to iliac crest BMSCs in same individuals. This study tested the hypothesis that recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) stimulates human BMSCs differently based on age and skeletal site of harvest. Adult maxilla, mandible and iliac crest BMSCs from same individuals and pediatric iliac crest BMSCs were comparatively assessed for BMP-2 responsiveness under serum-containing and serum-free insulin-supplemented culture conditions. Adult orofacial BMSCs were more BMP-2-responsive than iliac crest BMSCs based on higher gene transcripts of alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin and osteogenic transcription factors MSX-2 and Osterix in serum-free insulin-containing medium. Pediatric iliac crest BMSCs were more responsive to rhBMP-2 than adult iliac crest BMSCs based on higher expression of alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin in serum-containing medium. Unlike orofacial BMSCs, MSX-2 and Osterix transcripts were similarly expressed by adult and pediatric iliac crest BMSCs in response to rhBMP-2. These data demonstrate that age and skeletal site-specific differences exist in BMSC osteogenic responsiveness to BMP-2 stimulation and suggest that MSX-2 and Osterix may be potential regulatory transcription factors in BMP-mediated osteogenesis of adult orofacial cells. PMID:19637063

  11. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells inhibit Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Meagan; Sueblinvong, Viranuj; Eisenhauer, Philip; Ziats, Nicholas P; LeClair, Laurie; Poynter, Matthew E; Steele, Chad; Rincon, Mercedes; Weiss, Daniel J

    2011-07-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) mitigate inflammation in mouse models of acute lung injury. However, specific mechanisms of BMSC actions on CD4 T lymphocyte-mediated inflammation in vivo remain poorly understood. Limited data suggests promotion of Th2 phenotype in models of Th1-mediated diseases. However, whether this might alleviate or worsen Th2-mediated diseases such as allergic asthma is unknown. To ascertain the effects of systemic administration of BMSCs in a mouse model of Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation, ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airways inflammation was induced in wild-type C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice as well as in interferon-γ (IFNγ) receptor null mice. Effects of systemic administration during antigen sensitization of either syngeneic or allogeneic BMSC on airways hyperreactivity, lung inflammation, antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocytes, and serum immunoglobulins were assessed. Both syngeneic and allogeneic BMSCs inhibited airways hyperreactivity and lung inflammation through a mechanism partly dependent on IFNγ. However, contrary to existing data, BMSCs did not affect antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocyte proliferation but rather promoted Th1 phenotype in vivo as assessed by both OVA-specific CD4 T lymphocyte cytokine production and OVA-specific circulating immunoglobulins. BMSCs treated to prevent release of soluble mediators and a control cell population of primary dermal skin fibroblasts only partly mimicked the BMSC effects and in some cases worsened inflammation. In conclusion, BMSCs inhibit Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation by influencing antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocyte differentiation. Promotion of a Th1 phenotype in antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocytes by BMSCs is sufficient to inhibit Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation through an IFNγ-dependent process. PMID:21544902

  12. Amelioration of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes in Mice with Cells Derived from Human Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Amiel, Stephanie A.; Ajami, Sanaz; Jiang, Jie; Rela, Mohamed; Heaton, Nigel; Huang, Guo Cai

    2008-01-01

    Background Pluri-potent bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) provide an attractive opportunity to generate unlimited glucose-responsive insulin-producing cells for the treatment of diabetes. We explored the potential for human MSCs (hMSCs) to be differentiated into glucose-responsive cells through a non-viral genetic reprogramming approach. Methods and Findings Two hMSC lines were transfected with three genes: PDX-1, NeuroD1 and Ngn3 without subsequent selection, followed by differentiation induction in vitro and transplantation into diabetic mice. Human MSCs expressed mRNAs of the archetypal stem cell markers: Sox2, Oct4, Nanog and CD34, and the endocrine cell markers: PDX-1, NeuroD1, Ngn3, and Nkx6.1. Following gene transfection and differentiation induction, hMSCs expressed insulin in vitro, but were not glucose regulated. After transplantation, hMSCs differentiated further and ∼12.5% of the grafted cells expressed insulin. The graft bearing kidneys contained mRNA of insulin and other key genes required for the functions of beta cells. Mice transplanted with manipulated hMSCs showed reduced blood glucose levels (from 18.9+/−0.75 to 7.63+/−1.63 mM). 13 of the 16 mice became normoglycaemic (6.9+/−0.64 mM), despite the failure to detect the expression of SUR1, a K+-ATP channel component required for regulation of insulin secretion. Conclusions Our data confirm that hMSCs can be induced to express insulin sufficient to reduce blood glucose in a diabetic mouse model. Our triple gene approach has created cells that seem less glucose responsive in vitro but which become more efficient after transplantation. The maturation process requires further study, particularly the in vivo factors influencing the differentiation, in order to scale up for clinical purposes. PMID:18628974

  13. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yingbin; Cai, Shaoxi; Yang, Li; Yu, Shuhui; Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Haoxing; Liu, Lan; Liu, Qun; Du, Jun; Cai, Shaohui; Sung, K.L. Paul

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  14. Mechanical stimulation orchestrates the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells by regulating HDAC1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Wang, C D; Zhang, N; Tong, W X; Zhang, Y F; Shan, S Z; Zhang, X L; Li, Q F

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation and histone deacetylases (HDACs) have essential roles in regulating the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and bone formation. However, little is known regarding what regulates HDAC expression and therefore the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs during osteogenesis. In this study, we investigated whether mechanical loading regulates HDAC expression directly and examined the role of HDACs in mechanical loading-triggered osteogenic differentiation and bone formation. We first studied the microarrays of samples from patients with osteoporosis and found that the NOTCH pathway and skeletal development gene sets were downregulated in the BMSCs of patients with osteoporosis. Then we demonstrated that mechanical stimuli can regulate osteogenesis and bone formation both in vivo and in vitro. NOTCH signaling was upregulated during cyclic mechanical stretch (CMS)-induced osteogenic differentiation, whereas HDAC1 protein expression was downregulated. The perturbation of HDAC1 expression also had a significant effect on matrix mineralization and JAG1-mediated Notch signaling, suggesting that HDAC1 acts as an endogenous attenuator of Notch signaling in the mechanotransduction of BMSCs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results suggest that HDAC1 modulates the CMS-induced histone H3 acetylation level at the JAG1 promoter. More importantly, we found an inhibitory role of Hdac1 in regulating bone formation in response to hindlimb unloading in mice, and pretreatment with an HDAC1 inhibitor partly rescued the osteoporosis caused by mechanical unloading. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that mechanical stimulation orchestrates genes expression involved in the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs via the direct regulation of HDAC1, and the therapeutic inhibition of HDAC1 may be an efficient strategy for enhancing bone formation under mechanical stimulation. PMID:27171263

  15. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Li; Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin; Song, Wen-Hui; Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao; Li, Ang; Yang, Wu-Lin

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Subpopulations: Comparison of Bone Marrow and Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Busser, Hélène; Najar, Mehdi; Raicevic, Gordana; Pieters, Karlien; Velez Pombo, Rafael; Philippart, Pierre; Meuleman, Nathalie; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2015-09-15

    Preparations of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are generally obtained from unfractionated tissue cells, resulting in heterogeneous cell mixtures. Several markers were proposed to enrich these cells, but the majority of these markers are defined for bone marrow (BM). Moreover, the surface markers of freshly isolated MSCs also differ from those of cultured MSCs in addition to a phenotypic variation depending on the MSC source. For tissue engineering applications, it is crucial to start with a well-defined cell population. In this study, we performed immunomagnetic selections with five single surface markers to isolate MSC subpopulations from BM and adipose tissue (AT): CD271, SUSD2, MSCA-1, CD44, and CD34. We determined the phenotype, the clonogenicity, the proliferation, the differentiation capacity, and the immunoregulatory profile of the subpopulations obtained in comparison with unselected cells. We showed that native BM-MSCs can be enriched from the positive fractions of MSCA-1, SUSD2, and CD271 selections. In contrast, we observed that SUSD2 and MSCA-1 were unable to identify MSCs from AT, meaning they are not expressed in situ. Only the CD34(+) selection successfully isolated MSCs from AT. Interestingly, we observed that CD271 selection can define AT cell subsets with particular abilities, but only in lipoaspiration samples and not in abdominoplasty samples. Importantly, we found a population of clear CD34(+) fresh BM-MSCs displaying different properties. A single marker-based selection for MSC enrichment should be more advantageous for cell therapy and would enable the standardization of efficient and safe therapeutic intervention through the use of a well-identified and homogeneous cell population. PMID:26086188

  17. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow exhibit aberrant cytogenetics and cytokine elaboration.

    PubMed

    Huang, J C; Basu, S K; Zhao, X; Chien, S; Fang, M; Oehler, V G; Appelbaum, F R; Becker, P S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play a fundamental role in the BM microenvironment (BME) and abnormalities of these cells may contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis. The aim of the study was to characterize the cytokine and gene expression profile, immunophenotype and cytogenetics of BM-MSCs from AML patients compared to normal BM-MSCs from healthy donors. AML BM-MSCs showed decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels compared to normal BM-MSCs. AML BM-MSCs expressed similar β1 integrin, CD44, CD73, CD90 and E-cadherin compared to normal BM-MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis revealed chromosomal aberrations in AML BM-MSCs, some overlapping with and others distinct from their corresponding AML blasts. No significant difference in gene expression was detected between AML BM-MSCs compared to normal BM-MSCs; however, comparing the differences between AML and MSCs from AML patients with the differences between normal hematopoietic cells and normal MSCs by Ingenuity pathway analysis showed key distinctions of the AML setting: (1) upstream gene regulation by transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor, tissue transglutaminase 2, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4; (2) integrin and interleukin 8 signaling as overrepresented canonical pathways; and (3) upregulation of transcription factors FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog and v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog. Thus, phenotypic abnormalities of AML BM-MSCs highlight a dysfunctional BME that may impact AML survival and proliferation. PMID:25860293

  18. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:25998381

  19. Increased Gs Signaling in Osteoblasts Reduces Bone Marrow and Whole-Body Adiposity in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Cain, Corey J; Valencia, Joel T; Ho, Samantha; Jordan, Kate; Mattingly, Aaron; Morales, Blanca M; Hsiao, Edward C

    2016-04-01

    Bone is increasingly recognized as an endocrine organ that can regulate systemic hormones and metabolism through secreted factors. Although bone loss and increased adiposity appear to be linked clinically, whether conditions of increased bone formation can also change systemic metabolism remains unclear. In this study, we examined how increased osteogenesis affects metabolism by using an engineered G protein-coupled receptor, Rs1, to activate Gs signaling in osteoblastic cells in ColI(2.3)(+)/Rs1(+) transgenic mice. We previously showed that these mice have dramatically increased bone formation resembling fibrous dysplasia of the bone. We found that total body fat was significantly reduced starting at 3 weeks of age. Furthermore, ColI(2.3)(+)/Rs1(+) mice showed reduced O2 consumption and respiratory quotient measures without effects on food intake and energy expenditure. The mice had significantly decreased serum triacylglycerides, leptin, and adiponectin. Resting glucose and insulin levels were unchanged; however, glucose and insulin tolerance tests revealed increased sensitivity to insulin. The mice showed resistance to fat accumulation from a high-fat diet. Furthermore, ColI(2.3)(+)/Rs1(+) mouse bones had dramatically reduced mature adipocyte differentiation, increased Wingless/Int-1 (Wnt) signaling, and higher osteoblastic glucose utilization than controls. These findings suggest that osteoblasts can influence both local and peripheral adiposity in conditions of increased bone formation and suggest a role for osteoblasts in the regulation of whole-body adiposity and metabolic homeostasis. PMID:26901092

  20. Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) suppresses osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-09-01

    The Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases has been shown to play a key role in inflammation and bone destruction. Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been the most widely studied because of its critical role in B cells. Furthermore, recent evidence has demonstrated that blocking Btk signaling is effective in ameliorating lymphoma progression and experimental arthritis. The role of Btk in osteoblastic differentiation has not been well elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated the role of Btk in osteoblastic differentiation and investigated the effects of a Btk inhibitor on osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, primary calvarial osteoblasts, and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. Btk expression was detected in all three cell lines. Btk inhibition stimulated mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers (alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and osterix) and promoted mineralization of the extracellular matrix. In addition, Btk knockdown caused increased mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers. Furthermore, Btk inhibition suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), and protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Our results indicate that Btk may regulate osteoblastic differentiation through the MAPK, NFκB, and PKCα signaling pathways. PMID:25230818

  1. Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Osteoblasts and Adipocytes and its Role in Treatment of Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Meng, Haoye; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Chenyang; Peng, Jing; Wang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic metabolic bone disorder characterized by a decrease in bone mass and degradation of the bone microstructure, leaving bones that are fragile and prone to fracture. Most osteoporosis treatments improve symptoms, but to date there is no quick and effective therapy. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) have pluripotent potential. In adults, BMMSCs differentiate mainly into osteoblasts and adipocytes in the skeleton. However, if this differentiation is unbalanced, it may lead to a decrease in bone mass. If the number of adipocyte cells increases and that of osteoblast cells decreases, osteoporosis can result. A variety of hormones and cytokines play an important role in the regulation of BMMSCs bidirectional differentiation. Therefore, a greater understanding of the regulation mechanism of BMMSC differentiation may provide new methods to prevent and treat osteoporosis. In addition, autologous, allogeneic BMMSCs or genetically modified BMMSC transplantation can effectively increase bone mass and density, increase bone mechanical strength, correct the imbalance in bone metabolism, and increase bone formation, and is expected to provide a new strategy and method for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:26795027

  2. VEGF is a mediator of the renoprotective effects of multipotent marrow stromal cells in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Tögel, Florian; Zhang, Ping; Hu, Zhuma

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Adult stem cell treatment of complex disorders is a promising therapeutic approach and multipotent marrow stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to be effective in various animal models of diseases. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious problem in hospitalized patients and bone marrow derived multipotent MSCs have been shown to be effective in different models of AKI. The mechanism of action of MSCs is complex but involves paracrine actions including growth factor secretion. Knockdown of vascular enthothelial growth factor (VEGF) by siRNA reduced effectiveness of MSCs in the treatment of ischemic AKI in a rat model. Animals treated with MSCs had increased renal microvessel density compared to VEGF knockdown MSC‐treated and vehicle‐treated animals. These results show that VEGF is an important mediator of the early and late phase of renoprotective action after AKI in the context of stem cell treatment. PMID:19397783

  3. Bone marrow-derived stromal cells are more beneficial cell sources for tooth regeneration compared with adipose-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lanfeng; Chen, Lin; Feng, Fan; Cui, Junhui; Li, Kaide; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Tooth loss is presently a global epidemic and tooth regeneration is thought to be a feasible and ideal treatment approach. Choice of cell source is a primary concern in tooth regeneration. In this study, the odontogenic differentiation potential of two non-dental-derived stem cells, adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs), were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. ADSCs and BMSCs were induced in vitro in the presence of tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (TGC-CM) prior to implantation into the omentum majus of rats, in combination with inactivated dentin matrix (IDM). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to detect the mRNA expression levels of odontogenic-related genes. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays were used to detect the protein levels of odontogenic-specific genes, such as DSP and DMP-1 both in vitro and in vivo. The results suggest that both ADSCs and BMSCs have odontogenic differentiation potential. However, the odontogenic potential of BMSCs was greater compared with ADSCs, showing that BMSCs are a more appropriate cell source for tooth regeneration. PMID:25965323

  4. Formation and differentiation of three-dimensional rat marrow stromal cell culture on microcarriers in a rotating-wall vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Q.; Ducheyne, P.; Gao, H.; Ayyaswamy, P.

    1998-01-01

    Using a high aspect ratio vessel (HARV), this study investigated the formation of 3-D rat marrow stromal cell culture on microcarriers and the expression of bone-related biochemical markers under conditions of simulated microgravity. In addition, it calculated the shear stresses imparted on the surface of microcarriers of different densities by the medium fluid in an HARV. Secondary rat marrow stromal cells were cultured on two types of microcarriers, Cytodex-3 beads and modified bioactive glass particles. Examination of cellular morphology by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of three-dimensional multicellular aggregates consisting of multiple cell-covered Cytodex-3 microcarriers bridged together. Mineralization was observed in the aggregates. Spherical cell-bead aggregates were observed in an HARV, while cell-bead assemblies were mostly loosely packed in a chain-like or branched structure in a cell bag. The expressions of alkaline phosphatase activity, collagen type I, and osteopontin were shown via the use of histochemical staining, immunolabeling, and confocal scanning electron microscopy. Using a numerical approach, it was found that at a given rotational speed and for a given culture medium, a larger density difference between the microcarrier and the culture medium (e.g., a modified bioactive glass particle) imparted a higher maximum shear stress on the microcarrier.

  5. Marrow stromal cells as a source of progenitor cells for nonhematopoietic tissues in transgenic mice with a phenotype of osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Ruth F.; O’Hara, Michael D.; Laptev, Alexey V.; Halford, Kenneth W.; Pollard, Marea D.; Class, Reiner; Simon, Daniela; Livezey, Kristin; Prockop, Darwin J.

    1998-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells from wild-type mice were infused into transgenic mice that had a phenotype of fragile bones resembling osteogenesis imperfecta because they expressed a human minigene for type I collagen. In mice that were irradiated with potentially lethal levels (700 cGy) or sublethal levels (350 cGy), DNA from the donor marrow stromal cells was detected consistently in marrow, bone, cartilage, and lung either 1 or 2.5 mo after the infusions. The DNA also was detected but less frequently in the spleen, brain, and skin. There was a small but statistically significant increase in both collagen content and mineral content of bone 1 mo after the infusion. Similar results were obtained with infusion of relatively large amounts of wild-type whole marrow cells into the transgenic mice. In experiments in which male marrow stromal cells were infused into a female osteogenesis imperfecta-transgenic mouse, fluorescense in situ hybridization assays for the Y chromosome indicated that, after 2.5 mo, donor male cells accounted for 4–19% of the fibroblasts or fibroblast-like cells obtained in primary cultures of the lung, calvaria, cartilage, long bone, tail, and skin. In a parallel experiment in which whole marrow cells from a male mouse were infused into a female immunodeficient rag-2 mouse, donor male cells accounted for 4–6% of the fibroblasts or fibroblast-like cells in primary cultures. The results support previous suggestions that marrow stromal cells or related cells in marrow serve as a source for continual renewal of cells in a number of nonhematopoietic tissues. PMID:9448299

  6. Fasudil hydrochloride induces osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cell lines, C3H10T1/2 and ST2, via bone morphogenetic protein-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Ippei; Yamaguchi, Toru; Yano, Shozo; Yamauchi, Mika; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2010-01-01

    Rho-kinase (ROK), downstream of the mevalonate pathway, is detrimental to vessels, and suppressing its activity is a target for the treatment of human disease such as coronary artery disease and pulmonary hypertension. Recent studies have shown that ROK has a crucial role in bone metabolism. However, the role of ROK in stromal cells is still unclear. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of a ROK inhibitor, fasudil hydrochloride, on stromal cell lines, C3H10T1/2 and ST2. In both cells, Fasudil significantly stimulated alkaline phosphatase activity and enhanced cell mineralization. Moreover, fasudil significantly increased the mRNA expression of collagen-I, osteocalcin, and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). Supplementation of noggin, a BMP-2 antagonist, significantly reversed the fasudil-induced collagen-I and osteocalcin mRNA expression in both cells. These findings suggest that fasudil induces the osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells via enhancing BMP-2 expression, and that this drug might be beneficial for not only atherosclerosis but also osteoporosis by promoting bone formation. PMID:20154408

  7. Cell-cell contact between marrow stromal cells and myeloma cells via VCAM-1 and alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin enhances production of osteoclast-stimulating activity.

    PubMed

    Michigami, T; Shimizu, N; Williams, P J; Niewolna, M; Dallas, S L; Mundy, G R; Yoneda, T

    2000-09-01

    Myeloma is a unique hematologic malignancy that exclusively homes in the bone marrow and induces massive osteoclastic bone destruction presumably by producing cytokines that promote the differentiation of the hematopoietic progenitors to osteoclasts (osteoclastogenesis). It is recognized that neighboring bone marrow stromal cells influence the expression of the malignant phenotype in myeloma cells. This study examined the role of the interactions between myeloma cells and neighboring stromal cells in the production of osteoclastogenic factors to elucidate the mechanism underlying extensive osteoclastic bone destruction. A murine myeloma cell line 5TGM1, which causes severe osteolysis, expresses alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin and tightly adheres to the mouse marrow stromal cell line ST2, which expresses the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), a ligand for alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin. Co-cultures of 5TGM1 with primary bone marrow cells generated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Co-cultures of 5TGM1 with ST2 showed increased production of bone-resorbing activity and neutralizing antibodies against VCAM-1 or alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin inhibited this. The 5TGM1 cells contacting recombinant VCAM-1 produced increased osteoclastogenic and bone-resorbing activity. The activity was not blocked by the neutralizing antibody to known osteoclastogenic cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor, or parathyroid hormone-related peptide. These data suggest that myeloma cells are responsible for producing osteoclastogenic activity and that establishment of direct contact with marrow stromal cells via alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin/VCAM-1 increases the production of this activity by myeloma cells. They also suggest that the presence of stromal cells may provide a microenvironment that allows exclusive colonization of myeloma cells in the bone marrow. (Blood. 2000;96:1953-1960) PMID:10961900

  8. Prevention of graft-versus-host disease by intrabone marrow injection of donor T cells: involvement of bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, T; Inaba, M; Fukui, J; Ueda, Y; Hosaka, N; Kamiyama, Y; Ikehara, S

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new and effective method for bone marrow transplantation (BMT): bone marrow cells (BMCs) are injected directly into the bone marrow (BM) cavity of recipient mice. The intrabone marrow injection of BMCs (IBM-BMT) greatly facilitates the engraftment of donor-derived cells, and IBM-BMT can attenuate graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR), in contrast to conventional intravenous BMT (i.v.-BMT). Here, we examine the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of IBM-BMT on GVHR using animal models where GVHR is elicited. Recipient mice (C57BL/6) were irradiated and splenic T cells (as donor lymphocyte infusion: DLI) from major histocompatibility complex-disparate donors (BALB/c) were injected directly into the BM cavity (IBM-DLI) or injected intravenously (i.v.-DLI) along with IBM-BMT. The BM stromal cells (BMSCs) from these recipients were collected and related cytokines were examined. The recipient mice that had been treated with IBM-BMT + i.v.-DLI showed severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in contrast to those treated with IBM-BMT + IBM-DLI. The suppressive activity of BMSCs in this GVHD model was determined. The cultured BMSCs from the recipients treated with IBM-BMT + IBM-DLI suppressed the proliferation of responder T cells remarkably when compared with those from the recipients of IBM-BMT + i.v.-DLI in mixed leucocyte reaction. Furthermore, the level of transforming growth factor-β and hepatocyte growth factor in cultured BMSCs from IBM-BMT + IBM-DLI increased significantly when compared with those from the recipients of IBM-BMT + i.v.-DLI. Thus, the prevention of GVHD observed in the recipients of IBM-BMT + IBM-DLI was attributable to the increased production of immunosuppressive cytokines from BMSCs after interaction with host reactive T cells (in DLI). PMID:18307515

  9. Bone Marrow Stress Decreases Osteogenic Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline H; Baht, Gurpreet S; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2015-11-01

    Age-related bone loss may be a result of declining levels of stem cells in the bone marrow. Using the Col2.3Δtk (DTK) transgenic mouse, osteoblast depletion was used as a source of marrow stress in order to investigate the effects of aging on osteogenic progenitors which reside in the marrow space. Five-month-old DTK mice were treated with one or two cycles of ganciclovir to conditionally ablate differentiated osteoblasts, whereas controls were saline-treated. Treatment cycles were two weeks in length followed by four weeks of recovery. All animals were sacrificed at 8 months of age; bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were harvested for cell culture and whole bones were excised for bone quality assessment. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assays were conducted to investigate the osteogenic potential of BMSC in vitro, and RNA was extracted to assess the expression of osteoblastic genes. Bone quality assessments included bone histomorphometry, TRAP staining, microcomputed tomography, and biomechanical testing. Osteoblast depletion decreased CFU-F (fibroblast), CFU-ALP (alkaline phosphatase), and CFU-VK (von Kossa) counts and BMSC osteogenic capacity in cell culture. Ex vivo, there were no differences in bone mineral density of vertebrae or femurs between treatment groups. Histology showed a decrease in bone volume and bone connectivity with repeated osteoblast depletion; however, this was accompanied by an increase in bone formation rate. There were no notable differences in osteoclast parameters or observed bone marrow adiposity. We have developed a model that uses bone marrow stress to mimic age-related decrease in osteogenic progenitors. Our data suggest that the number of healthy BMSCs and their osteogenic potential decline with repeated osteoblast depletion. However, activity of the remaining osteoblasts increases to compensate for this loss in progenitor osteogenic potential. PMID:26220824

  10. Multipotent human stromal cells isolated from cord blood, term placenta and adult bone marrow show distinct differences in gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Matigian, Nicholas; Brooke, Gary; Zaibak, Faten; Rossetti, Tony; Kollar, Katarina; Pelekanos, Rebecca; Heazlewood, Celena; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Wells, Christine A; Atkinson, Kerry

    2015-03-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells derived from human placenta (pMSCs), and unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) derived from cord blood share many properties with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs) and are currently in clinical trials for a wide range of clinical settings. Here we present gene expression profiles of human cord blood-derived unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs), human placental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hpMSCs), and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs), all derived from four different donors. The microarray data are available on the ArrayExpress database (www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress) under accession number E-TABM-880. Additionally, the data has been integrated into a public portal, www.stemformatics.org. Our data provide a resource for understanding the differences in MSCs derived from different tissues. PMID:26484151

  11. Multipotent human stromal cells isolated from cord blood, term placenta and adult bone marrow show distinct differences in gene expression pattern

    PubMed Central

    Matigian, Nicholas; Brooke, Gary; Zaibak, Faten; Rossetti, Tony; Kollar, Katarina; Pelekanos, Rebecca; Heazlewood, Celena; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Wells, Christine A.; Atkinson, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells derived from human placenta (pMSCs), and unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) derived from cord blood share many properties with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs) and are currently in clinical trials for a wide range of clinical settings. Here we present gene expression profiles of human cord blood-derived unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs), human placental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hpMSCs), and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs), all derived from four different donors. The microarray data are available on the ArrayExpress database (www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress) under accession number E-TABM-880. Additionally, the data has been integrated into a public portal, www.stemformatics.org. Our data provide a resource for understanding the differences in MSCs derived from different tissues. PMID:26484151

  12. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa; Nagai, Mami; Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi; Roeder, Robert G.; Asano, Shigetaka; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  13. Comparing the Immunomodulatory Properties of Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue, and Birth-Associated Tissue Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mattar, Philipp; Bieback, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have gained immense attraction in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and immunotherapy. This is based on their differentiation potential and the supply of pro-regenerative and immunomodulatory signals. MSC can be isolated from a multitude of tissue sources, but mainly bone marrow, adipose tissue, and birth-associated tissues (e.g., umbilical cord, cord blood, placenta) appear to be relevant for clinical translation in immune-mediated disorders. However, only a few studies directly compared the immunomodulatory potency of MSC from different tissue sources. This review compiles the current literature regarding the similarities and differences between these three sources for MSCs with a special focus on their immunomodulatory effects on T-lymphocyte subsets and monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. PMID:26579133

  14. Effects of Cryopreservation on the Cell Viability, Proliferative Capacity and Neuronal Differentiation Potential of Canine Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    EDAMURA, Kazuya; NAKANO, Rei; FUJIMOTO, Kyohei; TESHIMA, Kenji; ASANO, Kazushi; TANAKA, Shigeo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated the cell viability, proliferative capacity and neuronal differentiation potential of canine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) after cryopreservation. BMSCs were cryopreserved using cryoprotectant solutions with 10% DMSO and 10% FBS (DF group) or without DMSO and FBS (DF-free group); fresh BMSCs were used as a control. The cell viability and proliferative capacity of BMSCs were similar in the DF-free and control groups, while those in the DF group were lower. In all groups, BMSCs differentiated into neuron-like cells that stained positive against neuron markers, and the mRNA expression levels of neuron markers increased after neuronal induction. In conclusion, cryopreservation with DF-free cryoprotectant solution did not diminish the cell viability, proliferative capacity or neuronal differentiation potential of canine BMSCs. PMID:24334862

  15. Lack of SIRPα phosphorylation and concomitantly reduced SHP-2-PI3K-Akt2 signaling decrease osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Holm, Cecilia Koskinen; Engman, Sara; Sulniute, Rima; Matozaki, Takashi; Oldenborg, Per-Arne; Lundberg, Pernilla

    2016-09-01

    Normal differentiation of bone forming osteoblasts is a prerequisite for maintenance of skeletal health and is dependent on intricate cellular signaling pathways, including the essential transcription factor Runx2. The cell surface glycoprotein CD47 and its receptor signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα) have both been suggested to regulate bone cell differentiation. Here we investigated osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells from SIRPα mutant mice lacking the cytoplasmic signaling domain of SIRPα. An impaired osteoblastogenesis in SIRPα-mutant cell cultures was demonstrated by lower alkaline phosphatase activity and less mineral formation compared to wild-type cultures. This reduced osteoblastic differentiation potential in SIRPα-mutant stromal cells was associated with a significantly reduced expression of Runx2, osterix, osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase mRNA, as well as a reduced phosphorylation of SHP-2 and Akt2, as compared with that in wild-type stromal cells. Addition of a PI3K-inhibitor to wild-type stromal cells could mimic the impaired osteoblastogenesis seen in SIRPα-mutant cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that SIRPα signaling through SHP-2-PI3K-Akt2 strongly influences osteoblast differentiation from bone marrow stromal cells. PMID:27422603

  16. Skeletal site-specific characterization of orofacial and iliac crest human bone marrow stromal cells in same individuals.

    PubMed

    Akintoye, Sunday O; Lam, Thanh; Shi, Songtao; Brahim, Jaime; Collins, Michael T; Robey, Pamela G

    2006-06-01

    Autologous grafts from axial and appendicular bones commonly used to repair orofacial bone defects often result in unfavorable outcome. This clinical observation, along with the fact that many bone abnormalities are limited to craniofacial bones, suggests that there are significant differences in bone metabolism in orofacial, axial and appendicular bones. It is plausible that these differences are dictated by site-specificity of embryological progenitor cells and osteogenic properties of resident multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs). This study investigated skeletal site-specific phenotypic and functional differences between orofacial (maxilla and mandible) and axial (iliac crest) hBMSCs in vitro and in vivo. Primary cultures of maxilla, mandible and iliac crest hBMSCs were established with and without osteogenic inducers. Site-specific characterization included colony forming efficiency, cell proliferation, life span before senescence, relative presence of surface markers, adipogenesis, osteogenesis and transplantation in immunocompromised mice to compare bone regenerative capacity. Compared with iliac crest cells, orofacial hBMSCs (OF-MSCs) proliferated more rapidly with delayed senescence, expressed higher levels of alkaline phosphatase and demonstrated more calcium accumulation in vitro. Cells isolated from the three skeletal sites were variably positive for STRO 1, a marker of hBMSCs. OF-MSCs formed more bone in vivo, while iliac crest hBMSCs formed more compacted bone that included hematopoietic tissue and were more responsive in vitro and in vivo to osteogenic and adipogenic inductions. These data demonstrate that hBMSCs from the same individuals differ in vitro and in vivo in a skeletal site-specific fashion and identified orofacial marrow stromal cells as unique cell populations. Further understanding of site-specific properties of hBMSCs and their impact on site-specific bone diseases and regeneration are needed. PMID:16403496

  17. Stromal Derived Factor-1/CXCR4 Axis Involved in Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Recruitment to Injured Liver

    PubMed Central

    Xiao Ling, Kuai; Peng, Li; Jian Feng, Zhang; Wei, Cao; Wei Yan, Yuan; Nan, Shao; Cheng Qi, Guan; Zhi Wei, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal stem cells (BMSCs) mobilization and migration to the liver was poorly understood. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) participates in BMSCs homing and migration into injury organs. We try to investigate the role of SDF-1 signaling in BMSCs migration towards injured liver. The expression of CXCR4 in BMSCs at mRNA level and protein level was confirmed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry. The SDF-1 or liver lysates induced BMSCs migration was detected by transwell inserts. CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, and anti-CXCR4 antibody were used to inhibit the migration. The Sprague-Dawley rat liver injury model was established by intraperitoneal injection of thioacetamide. The concentration of SDF-1 increased as modeling time extended, which was determined by ELISA method. The Dir-labeled BMSCs were injected into the liver of the rats through portal vein. The cell migration in the liver was tracked by in vivo imaging system and the fluorescent intensity was measured. In vivo, BMSCs migrated into injured liver which was partially blocked by AMD3100 or anti-CXCR4 antibody. Taken together, the results demonstrated that the migration of BMSCs was regulated by SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling which involved in BMSCs recruitment to injured liver. PMID:26880995

  18. Detection of organic nanoparticles in human bone marrow-derived stromal cells using ToF-SIMS and PCA.

    PubMed

    Kokesch-Himmelreich, Julia; Woltmann, Beatrice; Torger, Bernhard; Rohnke, Marcus; Arnhold, Stefan; Hempel, Ute; Müller, Martin; Janek, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    The detection and localization of polymer-based nanoparticles in human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (hBMSC) by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is reported as an example for the mass spectrometry imaging of organic nanoparticles in cell environments. Polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) nanoparticles (NP) made of polyethylenimine (PEI) and cellulose sulfate (CS), which were developed as potential drug carrier and coatings for implant materials, were chosen for the imaging experiments. To investigate whether the PEI/CS-NP were taken up by the hBMSC ToF-SIMS measurements on cross sections of the cells and depth profiling of whole, single cells were carried out. Since the mass spectra of the PEI/CS nanoparticles are close to the mass spectra of the cells principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to get specific masses of the PEI/CS-NP. Mass fragments originating from the NP compounds especially from cellulose sulfate could be used to unequivocally detect and image the PEI/CS-NP inside the hBMSC. The findings were confirmed by light and transmission electron microscopy. Graphical Abstract During ToF-SIMS analysis Bi3 (+) primary ions hit the sample surface and so called secondary ions (SI) are emitted and detected in the mass analyser. Exemplary mass images of cross sections of human mesenchymal stromal cells (red; m/z = 86.1 u) cultured with organic nanoparticles (green; m/z = 143.0 u) were obtained. PMID:25869483

  19. Micro-/Nano- sized hydroxyapatite directs differentiation of rat bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells towards an osteoblast lineage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Zhou, Gang; Zheng, Lisha; Liu, Haifeng; Niu, Xufeng; Fan, Yubo

    2012-03-01

    Regenerative medicine consisting of cells and materials provides a new way for the repair and regeneration of tissues and organs. Nano-biomaterials are highlighted due to their advantageous features compared with conventional micro-materials. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of micro-/nano- sized hydroxyapatite (μ/n-HA) on the osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs). μ/n-HA were prepared by a microwave synthesizer and precipitation method, respectively. Different sizes of μ/n-HA were characterized by IR, XRD, SEM, TEM and co-cultured with rBMSCs. It was shown that rBMSCs expressed higher levels of osteoblast-related markers by n-HA than μ-HA stimulation. The size of HA is an important factor for affecting the osteogenic differentiation of rBMSCs. This provides a new avenue for mechanistic studies of stem cell differentiation and a new approach to obtain more committed differentiated cells.

  20. Micro-/nano- sized hydroxyapatite directs differentiation of rat bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells towards an osteoblast lineage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Zhou, Gang; Zheng, Lisha; Liu, Haifeng; Niu, Xufeng; Fan, Yubo

    2012-04-01

    Regenerative medicine consisting of cells and materials provides a new way for the repair and regeneration of tissues and organs. Nano-biomaterials are highlighted due to their advantageous features compared with conventional micro-materials. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of micro-/nano- sized hydroxyapatite (μ/n-HA) on the osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs). μ/n-HA were prepared by a microwave synthesizer and precipitation method, respectively. Different sizes of μ/n-HA were characterized by IR, XRD, SEM, TEM and co-cultured with rBMSCs. It was shown that rBMSCs expressed higher levels of osteoblast-related markers by n-HA than μ-HA stimulation. The size of HA is an important factor for affecting the osteogenic differentiation of rBMSCs. This provides a new avenue for mechanistic studies of stem cell differentiation and a new approach to obtain more committed differentiated cells. PMID:22371072

  1. Influence of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow stromal cells. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Arpornmaeklong, P; Kochel, M; Depprich, R; Kübler, N R; Würzler, K K

    2004-01-01

    Recent clinical reports suggest that the application of an autologous blood plasma enriched with thrombocytes by centrifugal concentration (platelet-rich plasma: PRP) can enhance the formation of new bone. There are very fewin vitro or in vivo studies published on the efficiency of PRP. In this project a three dimensional cell culture system was used to compare PRP and rhBMP-2 in vitro. Marrow derived bone forming cells from Spraque-Dawley (SD) rats were seeded on porous collagenous carriers (d=5mm, h=3mm) at a density of 4 x 10(4) cells/carrier and exposed to different concentrations of PRP (platelet counts from 2.5 x 10(8)-1.6 x 10(7) platelets/culture), rhBMP-2 (300 ng) or plasma poor in thrombocytes (platelet-poor plasma, PPP). Cultures without additional supplements were used as controls. During a culture period of 21 days cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and calcium content (days 18, 21) were measured in 3 day intervals.PRP showed a dose dependent stimulation of cell proliferation, while reducing ALP activity and calcium deposition in the culture. BMP-2 led to an opposite cell response and induced the highest ALP activity and mineral deposition. These data suggest that PRP inhibited osteogenic differentiation of marrow derived pre-osteoblasts in a dose dependent manner. PRP is not a substitute for BMP-2 in osteogenic induction. PMID:14690661

  2. Proteoglycan synthesis in haematopoietic cells: isolation and characterization of heparan sulphate proteoglycans expressed by the bone-marrow stromal cell line MS-5.

    PubMed

    Drzeniek, Z; Siebertz, B; Stöcker, G; Just, U; Ostertag, W; Greiling, H; Haubeck, H D

    1997-10-15

    Proteoglycans of bone-marrow stromal cells and their extracellular matrix are important components of the haematopoietic microenvironment. Recently, several studies have indicated that they are involved in the interaction of haematopoietic stem and stromal cells. However, a detailed characterization of the heparan sulphate proteoglycans synthesized by bone-marrow stromal cells is still lacking. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of proteoglycans from the haematopoietic stromal cell line MS-5, that efficiently supports the growth and differentiation of human and murine haematopoietic progenitor cells. Biochemical characterization of purified proteoglycans revealed that the haematopoietic stromal cell line MS-5 synthesizes, in addition to chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans, several different heparan sulphate proteoglycans. Immunochemical analysis, using specific antibodies against the different members of the syndecan family, glypican, betaglycan and perlecan, showed that MS-5 cells synthesize all these different heparan sulphate proteoglycans. These data were further supported by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by sequence and Northern blot analysis. The relative abundance of the different heparan sulphate proteoglycans was estimated on the protein and mRNA levels. PMID:9359418

  3. Proteoglycan synthesis in haematopoietic cells: isolation and characterization of heparan sulphate proteoglycans expressed by the bone-marrow stromal cell line MS-5.

    PubMed Central

    Drzeniek, Z; Siebertz, B; Stöcker, G; Just, U; Ostertag, W; Greiling, H; Haubeck, H D

    1997-01-01

    Proteoglycans of bone-marrow stromal cells and their extracellular matrix are important components of the haematopoietic microenvironment. Recently, several studies have indicated that they are involved in the interaction of haematopoietic stem and stromal cells. However, a detailed characterization of the heparan sulphate proteoglycans synthesized by bone-marrow stromal cells is still lacking. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of proteoglycans from the haematopoietic stromal cell line MS-5, that efficiently supports the growth and differentiation of human and murine haematopoietic progenitor cells. Biochemical characterization of purified proteoglycans revealed that the haematopoietic stromal cell line MS-5 synthesizes, in addition to chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans, several different heparan sulphate proteoglycans. Immunochemical analysis, using specific antibodies against the different members of the syndecan family, glypican, betaglycan and perlecan, showed that MS-5 cells synthesize all these different heparan sulphate proteoglycans. These data were further supported by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by sequence and Northern blot analysis. The relative abundance of the different heparan sulphate proteoglycans was estimated on the protein and mRNA levels. PMID:9359418

  4. Marrow Stromal Cells Migrate Throughout Forebrain and Cerebellum, and They Differentiate into Astrocytes after Injection into Neonatal Mouse Brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopen, Gene C.; Prockop, Darwin J.; Phinney, Donald G.

    1999-09-01

    Stem cells are a valuable resource for treating disease, but limited access to stem cells from tissues such as brain restricts their utility. Here, we injected marrow stromal cells (MSCs) into the lateral ventricle of neonatal mice and asked whether these multipotential mesenchymal progenitors from bone marrow can adopt neural cell fates when exposed to the brain microenvironment. By 12 days postinjection, MSCs migrated throughout the forebrain and cerebellum without disruption to the host brain architecture. Some MSCs within the striatum and the molecular layer of the hippocampus expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein and, therefore, differentiated into mature astrocytes. MSCs also populated neuron rich regions including the Islands of Calleja, the olfactory bulb, and the internal granular layer of the cerebellum. A large number of MSCs also were found within the external granular layer of the cerebellum. In addition, neurofilament positive donor cells were found within the reticular formation of the brain stem, suggesting that MSCs also may have differentiated into neurons. Therefore, MSCs are capable of producing differentiated progeny of a different dermal origin after implantation into neonatal mouse brains. These results suggest that MSCs are potentially useful as vectors for treating a variety of central nervous system disorders.

  5. Direct Reprogramming of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Functional Renal Cells Using Cell-free Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Tomasoni, Susanna; Benedetti, Valentina; Longaretti, Lorena; Rota, Cinzia; Todeschini, Marta; Rizzo, Paola; Introna, Martino; Grazia de Simoni, Maria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Goligorsky, Michael S.; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes—formation of “domes” and tubule-like structures—and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy. PMID:25754206

  6. Hydrogen gas treatment prolongs replicative lifespan of bone marrow multipotential stromal cells in vitro while preserving differentiation and paracrine potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Haruhisa; Guan, Jianjun; Tamama, Kenichi

    2010-07-02

    Cell therapy with bone marrow multipotential stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represents a promising approach in the field of regenerative medicine. Low frequency of MSCs in adult bone marrow necessitates ex vivo expansion of MSCs after harvest; however, such a manipulation causes cellular senescence with loss of differentiation, proliferative, and therapeutic potentials of MSCs. Hydrogen molecules have been shown to exert organ protective effects through selective reduction of hydroxyl radicals. As oxidative stress is one of the key insults promoting cell senescence in vivo as well as in vitro, we hypothesized that hydrogen molecules prevent senescent process during MSC expansion. Addition of 3% hydrogen gas enhanced preservation of colony forming early progenitor cells within MSC preparation and prolonged the in vitro replicative lifespan of MSCs without losing differentiation potentials and paracrine capabilities. Interestingly, 3% hydrogen gas treatment did not decrease hydroxyl radical, protein carbonyl, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, suggesting that scavenging hydroxyl radical might not be responsible for these effects of hydrogen gas in this study.

  7. Wnt-dependent osteogenic commitment of bone marrow stromal cells using a novel GSK3β inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cook, David A; Fellgett, Simon W; Pownall, Mary E; O'Shea, Patrick J; Genever, Paul G

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) can differentiate into multiple lineages including osteogenic and adipogenic cells. Wnt signalling has been implicated in controlling BMSC fate, but the mechanisms are unclear and apparently conflicting data exist. Here we show that a novel glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibitor, AR28, is a potent activator of canonical Wnt signalling using in vitro β-catenin translocation studies and TCF-reporter assays. In vivo, AR28 induced characteristic axis duplication and secondary regions of chordin expression in Xenopus laevis embryos. Using human BMSCs grown in adipogenic medium, we confirmed that AR28-mediated Wnt signalling caused a significant (p<0.05) dose-dependent reduction of adipogenic markers. In osteogenic media, including dexamethasone, AR28 caused significant (p<0.05) decreases in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity compared to vehicle controls, indicative of a reduced osteogenic response. However, when excluding dexamethasone from the osteogenic media, increases in both ALP and mineralisation were identified following AR28 treatment, which was blocked by mitomycin C. Pre-treatment of BMSCs with AR28 for 7 days before osteogenic induction also increased ALP activity and mineralisation. Furthermore, BMP2-induced osteogenic differentiation was strongly enhanced by AR28 addition within 3 days, but without concomitant changes in cell number, therefore revealing BMP-dependent and independent mechanisms for Wnt-induced osteogenesis. PMID:24382458

  8. Bone marrow stromal cells enhance prostate cancer cell invasion through type I collagen in an MMP-12 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Nabha, Sanaa M.; dos Santos, Emanuel Burck; Yamamoto, Hamilto A.; Belizi, Abdelfettah; Dong, Zhong; Meng, Hong; Saliganan, Allen; Sabbota, Aaron; Bonfil, R. Daniel; Cher, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    At the cellular level, the process of bone metastasis involves many steps. Circulating cancer cells enter the marrow, proliferate, induce neovascularization, and ultimately expand into a clinically detectable, often symptomatic, metastatic deposit. Although the initial establishment and later expansion of the metastatic deposit in bone require tumor cells to possess invasive capability, the exact proteases responsible for this phenotype are not well known. The objective of our study was to take an unbiased approach to determine which proteases were expressed and functional during the initial interactions between prostate cancer cells and bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. We found that the combination of human prostate cancer PC3 and BMS cells stimulates the invasive ability of cancer cells through type I collagen. The use of inhibitors for each of the major protease families indicated that 1 or more MMPs was/were responsible for the BMS-induced invasion. Gene profiling and semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed an increased expression of several MMP genes because of PC3/BMS cell interaction. However, only MMP-12 showed an increase in protein expression. Downregulation of MMP-12 expression in PC3 cells by siRNA inhibited the enhanced invasion induced by PC3/BMS cell interaction. In vivo, MMP-12 was found to be primarily expressed by prostate cancer cells growing in bone. Our data suggest that BMS cells induce MMP-12 expression in prostate cancer cells, which results in invasive cells capable of degradation of type I collagen. PMID:18324629

  9. Structurally-diverse, PPARγ-activating environmental toxicants induce adipogenesis and suppress osteogenesis in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Watt, James; Schlezinger, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental obesogens are a newly recognized category of endocrine disrupting chemicals that have been implicated in contributing to the rising rates of obesity in the United States. While obesity is typically regarded as an increase in visceral fat, adipocyte accumulation in the bone has been linked to increased fracture risk, lower bone density, and osteoporosis. Exposure to environmental toxicants that activate peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a critical regulator of the balance of differentiation between adipogenesis and osteogenesis, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of osteoporosis. However, induction of adipogenesis and suppression of osteogenesis are separable activities of PPARγ, and ligands may selectively alter these activities. It currently is unknown whether suppression of osteogenesis is a common toxic endpoint of environmental PPARγ ligands. Using a primary mouse bone marrow culture model, we tested the hypothesis that environmental toxicants acting as PPARγ agonists divert the differentiation pathway of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells towards adipogenesis and away from osteogenesis. The toxicants tested included the organotins tributyltin and triphenyltin, a ubiquitous phthalate metabolite (mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, MEHP), and two brominated flame retardants (tetrabromobisphenol-a, TBBPA, and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, METBP). All of the compounds activated PPARγ1 and 2. All compounds increased adipogenesis (lipid accumulation, Fabp4 expression) and suppressed osteogenesis (alkaline phosphatase activity, Osx expression) in mouse primary bone marrow cultures, but with different potencies and efficacies. Despite structural dissimilarities, there was a strong negative correlation between efficacies to induce adipogenesis and suppress osteogenesis, with the organotins being distinct in their exceptional ability to suppress osteogenesis. As human exposure to a mixture of

  10. Structurally-diverse, PPARγ-activating environmental toxicants induce adipogenesis and suppress osteogenesis in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Watt, James; Schlezinger, Jennifer J

    2015-05-01

    Environmental obesogens are a newly recognized category of endocrine disrupting chemicals that have been implicated in contributing to the rising rates of obesity in the United States. While obesity is typically regarded as an increase in visceral fat, adipocyte accumulation in the bone has been linked to increased fracture risk, lower bone density, and osteoporosis. Exposure to environmental toxicants that activate peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a critical regulator of the balance of differentiation between adipogenesis and osteogenesis, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of osteoporosis. However, induction of adipogenesis and suppression of osteogenesis are separable activities of PPARγ, and ligands may selectively alter these activities. It currently is unknown whether suppression of osteogenesis is a common toxic endpoint of environmental PPARγ ligands. Using a primary mouse bone marrow culture model, we tested the hypothesis that environmental toxicants acting as PPARγ agonists divert the differentiation pathway of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells towards adipogenesis and away from osteogenesis. The toxicants tested included the organotins tributyltin and triphenyltin, a ubiquitous phthalate metabolite (mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, MEHP), and two brominated flame retardants (tetrabromobisphenol-a, TBBPA, and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, METBP). All of the compounds activated PPARγ1 and 2. All compounds increased adipogenesis (lipid accumulation, Fabp4 expression) and suppressed osteogenesis (alkaline phosphatase activity, Osx expression) in mouse primary bone marrow cultures, but with different potencies and efficacies. Despite structural dissimilarities, there was a strong negative correlation between efficacies to induce adipogenesis and suppress osteogenesis, with the organotins being distinct in their exceptional ability to suppress osteogenesis. As human exposure to a mixture of

  11. Isolation and Manufacture of Clinical-Grade Bone Marrow-Derived Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, Renuka P; Hanley, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with both regenerative and immunomodulatory capacities. These unique properties make them appealing as a biologic, with multiple phase 1-3 clinical trials currently testing their safety and efficacy. Although expanding MSCs does not require extensive manipulation, expanding MSCs for use in clinical trials does require the knowledge and safety that are delineated in current good manufacturing practices (GMPs). Here we briefly detail the characteristics of MSCs and considerations for expanding them for clinical use. We then include a step-by-step protocol for expanding MSCs for early phase clinical trials, with important notes to consider during the expansion of these MSCs. PMID:27236680

  12. Using the quantum cell expansion system for the automated expansion of clinical-grade bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Martin-Manso, Gema; Hanley, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) constitute a promising therapeutic approach. However, the extremely low frequency of hMSCs in bone marrow makes the translation of these regulatory cells to clinical therapies difficult for large patient populations. Here, we describe a good manufacturing practices-compliant procedure for the expansion of hMSCs using the Quantum Cell Expansion System. This closed and automated system allows the large-scale expansion of hMSCs while maintaining their multipotency, immunophenotype, morphology, and karyotype. PMID:25523809

  13. Thyrostimulin Regulates Osteoblastic Bone Formation During Early Skeletal Development.

    PubMed

    Bassett, J H Duncan; van der Spek, Anne; Logan, John G; Gogakos, Apostolos; Bagchi-Chakraborty, Jayashree; Murphy, Elaine; van Zeijl, Clementine; Down, Jenny; Croucher, Peter I; Boyde, Alan; Boelen, Anita; Williams, Graham R

    2015-09-01

    The ancestral glycoprotein hormone thyrostimulin is a heterodimer of unique glycoprotein hormone subunit alpha (GPA)2 and glycoprotein hormone subunit beta (GPB)5 subunits with high affinity for the TSH receptor. Transgenic overexpression of GPB5 in mice results in cranial abnormalities, but the role of thyrostimulin in bone remains unknown. We hypothesized that thyrostimulin exerts paracrine actions in bone and determined: 1) GPA2 and GPB5 expression in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, 2) the skeletal consequences of thyrostimulin deficiency in GPB5 knockout (KO) mice, and 3) osteoblast and osteoclast responses to thyrostimulin treatment. Gpa2 and Gpb5 expression was identified in the newborn skeleton but declined rapidly thereafter. GPA2 and GPB5 mRNAs were also expressed in primary osteoblasts and osteoclasts at varying concentrations. Juvenile thyrostimulin-deficient mice had increased bone volume and mineralization as a result of increased osteoblastic bone formation. However, thyrostimulin failed to induce a canonical cAMP response or activate the noncanonical Akt, ERK, or mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38) signaling pathways in primary calvarial or bone marrow stromal cell-derived osteoblasts. Furthermore, thyrostimulin did not directly inhibit osteoblast proliferation, differentiation or mineralization in vitro. These studies identify thyrostimulin as a negative but indirect regulator of osteoblastic bone formation during skeletal development. PMID:26018249

  14. The monitoring of gene functions on a cell-defined siRNA microarray in human bone marrow stromal and U2OS cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hi Chul; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Shum, David; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Lee, Eun Ju; Kwon, Yong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we developed a cell defined siRNA microarray (CDSM) for human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) designed to control the culture of cells inside the spot area without reducing the efficiency of siRNA silencing, “Development of a cell-defined siRNA microarray for analysis of gene functionin human bone marrow stromal cells” (Kim et al., 2016 [1]). First, we confirmed that p65 protein inhibition efficiency was maintained when hBMSCs were culture for 7 days on the siRNA spot, and siRNA spot activity remained in spite of long term storage (10 days and 2 months). Additionally, we confirmed p65 protein inhibition in U2OS cells after 48 h reverse transfection. PMID:27054175

  15. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Qin; Tang, Ying; Fu, Rao; Meng, Qiu-Hua; Zhou, Xue; Ling, Ze-Min; Cheng, Xiao; Tian, Su-Wei; Wang, Guo-Jie; Liu, Xue-Guo; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats. PMID:25816076

  16. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, YING-QIN; TANG, YING; FU, RAO; MENG, QIU-HUA; ZHOU, XUE; LING, ZE-MIN; CHENG, XIAO; TIAN, SU-WEI; WANG, GUO-JIE; LIU, XUE-GUO; ZHOU, LI-HUA

    2015-01-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats. PMID:25816076

  17. [Effect of bone marrow stromal cells on the apoptotic sensitivity of HL-60 and HL-60/VCR cells].

    PubMed

    Liang, Rong; Huang, Gao-Sheng; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Xie-Qun; Bai, Qing-Xian; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Wang, Juan-Hong; Wang, Wen-Qing; Guo, Ying

    2005-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of human bone marrow fibroblastoid stromal cell line (HFCL) on chemosensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia sensitive HL-60 cell line and multidrug-resistant (MDR) HL-60/VCR cell line in vitro co-culture. Setting up co-culture system of HL-60 or HL-60/VCR cells in direct contact with HFCL cells, or with HFCL cells separated by transwell, and exposing HL-60 or HL-60/VCR cells to different concentrations of topotecon (TPT), morphologic evidence for apoptosis was determined by staining with Wright-Giemsa stain and acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB). Cell cycle, sub-G(1) and annexin V FITC staining were detected by flow cytometry. The expression of active caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Pgp was detected by Western blot. The results showed that HL-60 or HL-60/VCR cells treated by TPT revealed characteristic apoptotic morphological changes by Wright-Giemsa and AO/EB staining. The percentage of annexin V-positive cells and apoptotic cells decreased when they were cocultured with HFCL cells. The proportion of G(0)/G(1) HL-60 or HL-60/VCR cells treated by TPT increased and the sub-G(1) appeared significantly, but apoptotic and sub-G cells reduced after direct contact with HFCL cells. Meanwhile, although HL-60 or HL-60/VCR cells treated by TPT expressed activated caspase-3, and the expression of Bcl-2 decreased, the expression of activated caspase-3 decreased and Bcl-2 increased after direct contact with HFCL cells. In conclusion, HFCL stromal cells can prevent TPT-induced apoptosis in HL-60 and HL-60/VCR cells via modulation of Bcl-2 and active caspase-3. PMID:15854294

  18. Functionally and Phenotypically Distinct Subpopulations of Marrow Stromal Cells Are Fibroblast in Origin and Induce Different Fates in Peripheral Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Mineo; Sandstrom, Richard S.; Delrow, Jeffrey J.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells constitute a heterogeneous population of cells, typically isolated after expansion in culture. In vivo, stromal cells often exist in close proximity or in direct contact with monocyte-derived macrophages, yet their interaction with monocytes is largely unexplored. In this report, isolated CD146+ and CD146− stromal cells, as well as immortalized cell lines representative of each (designated HS27a and HS5, respectively), were shown by global DNase I hypersensitive site mapping and principal coordinate analysis to have a lineage association with marrow fibroblasts. Gene expression profiles generated for the CD146+ and CD146− cell lines indicate significant differences in their respective transcriptomes, which translates into differences in secreted factors. Consequently, the conditioned media (CM) from these two populations induce different fates in peripheral blood monocytes. Monocytes incubated in CD146+ CM acquire a tissue macrophage phenotype, whereas monocytes incubated in CM from CD146− cells express markers associated with pre-dendritic cells. Importantly, when CD14+ monocytes are cultured in contact with the CD146+ cells, the combined cell populations, assayed as a unit, show increased levels of transcripts associated with organismal development and hematopoietic regulation. In contrast, the gene expression profile from cocultures of monocytes and CD146− cells does not differ from that obtained when monocytes are cultured with CD146− CM. These in vitro results show that the CD146+ marrow stromal cells together with monocytes increase the expression of genes relevant to hematopoietic regulation. In vivo relevance of these data is suggested by immunohistochemistry of marrow biopsies showing juxtaposed CD146+ cells and CD68+ cells associated with these upregulated proteins. PMID:24131213

  19. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. {yields} Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. {yields} Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. {yields} Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed

  20. Apatite formation on bioactive calcium-silicate cements for dentistry affects surface topography and human marrow stromal cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Taddei, Paola; Perut, Francesca; Tinti, Anna; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Prati, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The effect of ageing in phosphate-containing solution of bioactive calcium-silicate cements on the chemistry, morphology and topography of the surface, as well as on in vitro human marrow stromal cells viability and proliferation was investigated. A calcium-silicate cement (wTC) mainly based on dicalcium-silicate and tricalcium-silicate was prepared. Alpha-TCP was added to wTC to obtain wTC-TCP. Bismuth oxide was inserted in wTC to prepare a radiopaque cement (wTC-Bi). A commercial calcium-silicate cement (ProRoot MTA) was tested as control. Cement disks were aged in DPBS for 5 h ('fresh samples'), 14 and 28 days, and analyzed by ESEM/EDX, SEM/EDX, ATR-FTIR, micro-Raman techniques and scanning white-light interferometry. Proliferation, LDH release, ALP activity and collagen production of human marrow stromal cells (MSC) seeded for 1-28 days on the cements were evaluated. Fresh samples exposed a surface mainly composed of calcium-silicate hydrates CSH (from the hydration of belite and alite), calcium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and ettringite. Apatite nano-spherulites rapidly precipitated on cement surfaces within 5 h. On wTC-TCP the Ca-P deposits appeared thicker than on the other cements. Aged cements showed an irregular porous calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) coating, formed by aggregated apatite spherulites with interspersed calcite crystals. All the experimental cements exerted no acute toxicity in the cell assay system and allowed cell growth. Using biochemical results, the scores were: fresh cements>aged cements for cell proliferation and ALP activity (except for wTC-Bi), whereas fresh cements

  1. Accumulation of apoptosis-insensitive human bone marrow-mesenchymal stromal cells after long-term expansion.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sin-Gu; Cho, Goang-Won

    2016-07-01

    Cells undergo replicative senescence during in vitro expansion, which is induced by the accumulation of cellular damage caused by excessive reactive oxygen species. In this study, we investigated whether long-term-cultured human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are insensitive to apoptotic stimulation. To examine this, we established replicative senescent cells from long-term cultures of human bone marrow MSCs. Senescent cells were identified based on declining population doublings, increased expression of senescence markers p16 and p53 and increased senescence-associated β-gal activity. In cell viability assays, replicative senescent MSCs in late passages (i.e. 15-19 passages) resisted damage induced by oxidative stress more than those in early passages did (i.e. 7-10 passages). This resistance occurred via caspase-9 and caspase-3 rather than via caspase-8. The senescent cells are gradually accumulated during long-term expansion. The oxidative stress-sensitive proteins ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and p53 were phosphorylated, and the expression of apoptosis molecules Bax increased, and Bcl-2 decreased in early passage MSCs; however, the expression of the apoptotic molecules did less change in response to apoptotic stimulation in late-passage MSCs, suggesting that the intrinsic apoptotic signalling pathway was not induced by oxidative stress in long-term-cultured MSCs. Based on these results, we propose that some replicative senescent cells may avoid apoptosis signalling via impairment of signalling molecules and accumulation during long-term expansion. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27212655

  2. Exacerbation of acute kidney injury by bone marrow stromal cells from rats with persistent renin-angiotensin system activation.

    PubMed

    Kankuri, Esko; Mervaala, Elina E; Storvik, Markus; Ahola, Aija M J; Levijoki, Jouko; Müller, Dominik N; Finckenberg, Piet; Mervaala, Eero M

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension and persistent activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are predisposing factors for the development of acute kidney injury (AKI). Although bone-marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) have shown therapeutic promise in treatment of AKI, the impact of pathological RAS on BMSC functionality has remained unresolved. RAS and its local components in the bone marrow are involved in several key steps of cell maturation processes. This may also render the BMSC population vulnerable to alterations even in the early phases of RAS pathology. We isolated transgenic BMSCs (TG-BMSCs) from young end-organ-disease-free rats with increased RAS activation [human angiotensinogen/renin double transgenic rats (dTGRs)] that eventually develop hypertension and die of end-organ damage and kidney failure at 8 weeks of age. Control cells (SD-BMSCs) were isolated from wild-type Sprague-Dawley rats. Cell phenotype, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and respiration were assessed, and gene expression profiling was carried out using microarrays. Cells' therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in a rat model of acute ischaemia/reperfusion-induced AKI. Serum urea and creatinine were measured at 24 h and 48 h. Acute tubular damage was scored and immunohistochemistry was used for evaluation for markers of inflammation [monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), ED-1], and kidney injury [kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL)]. TG-BMSCs showed distinct mitochondrial morphology, decreased cell respiration and increased production of ROS. Gene expression profiling revealed a pronounced pro-inflammatory phenotype. In contrast with the therapeutic effect of SD-BMSCs, administration of TG-BMSCs in the AKI model resulted in exacerbation of kidney injury and high mortality. Our results demonstrate that early persistent RAS activation can dramatically compromise therapeutic potential of BMSCs by causing a shift into a pro

  3. Adult equine bone marrow stromal cells produce a cartilage-like ECM mechanically superior to animal-matched adult chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kopesky, P W; Lee, H-Y; Vanderploeg, E J; Kisiday, J D; Frisbie, D D; Plaas, A H K; Ortiz, C; Grodzinsky, A J

    2010-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the age-dependent mechanical phenotype of bone marrow stromal cell- (BMSC-) and chondrocyte-produced cartilage-like neo-tissue and to elucidate the matrix-associated mechanisms which generate this phenotype. Cells from both immature (2-4 month-old foals) and skeletally-mature (2-5 year-old adults) mixed-breed horses were isolated from animal-matched bone marrow and cartilage tissue, encapsulated in self-assembling-peptide hydrogels, and cultured with and without TGF-beta1 supplementation. BMSCs and chondrocytes from both donor ages were encapsulated with high viability. BMSCs from both ages produced neo-tissue with higher mechanical stiffness than that produced by either young or adult chondrocytes. Young, but not adult, chondrocytes proliferated in response to TGF-beta1 while BMSCs from both age groups proliferated with TGF-beta1. Young chondrocytes stimulated by TGF-beta1 accumulated ECM with 10-fold higher sulfated-glycosaminoglycan content than adult chondrocytes and 2-3-fold higher than BMSCs of either age. The opposite trend was observed for hydroxyproline content, with BMSCs accumulating 2-3-fold more than chondrocytes, independent of age. Size-exclusion chromatography of extracted proteoglycans showed that an aggrecan-like peak was the predominant sulfated proteoglycan for all cell types. Direct measurement of aggrecan core protein length and chondroitin sulfate chain length by single molecule atomic force microscopy imaging revealed that, independent of age, BMSCs produced longer core protein and longer chondroitin sulfate chains, and fewer short core protein molecules than chondrocytes, suggesting that the BMSC-produced aggrecan has a phenotype more characteristic of young tissue than chondrocyte-produced aggrecan. Aggrecan ultrastructure, ECM composition, and cellular proliferation combine to suggest a mechanism by which BMSCs produce a superior cartilage-like neo-tissue than either young or adult chondrocytes. PMID:20153827

  4. Immunoregulatory effects on T lymphocytes by human mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow, amniotic fluid, and placenta.

    PubMed

    Mareschi, Katia; Castiglia, Sara; Sanavio, Fiorella; Rustichelli, Deborah; Muraro, Michela; Defedele, Davide; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Fagioli, Franca

    2016-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a promising tool in cell therapies because of their multipotent, bystander, and immunomodulatory properties. Although bone marrow represents the main source of MSCs, there remains a need to identify a stem cell source that is safe and easily accessible and yields large numbers of cells without provoking debates over ethics. In this study, MSCs isolated from amniotic fluid and placenta were compared with bone marrow MSCs. Their immunomodulatory properties were studied in total activated T cells (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA-PBMCs). In particular, an in vitro co-culture system was established to study: (i) the effect on T-lymphocyte proliferation; (ii) the presence of T regulatory lymphocytes (Treg); (iii) the immunophenotype of various T subsets (Th1 and Th2 naïve, memory, effector lymphocytes); (iv) cytokine release and master gene expression to verify Th1, Th2, and Th17 polarization; and (v) IDO production. Under all co-culture conditions with PHA-PBMCs and MSCs (independently of tissue origin), data revealed: (i) T proliferation inhibition; (ii) increase in naïve T and decrease in memory T cells; (iii) increase in T regulatory lymphocytes; (iv) strong Th2 polarization associated with increased interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 levels, Th1 inhibition (significant decreases in interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, and interleukin-12) and Th17 induction (production of high concentrations of interleukins-6 and -17); (v) indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase mRNA induction in MSCs co-cultured with PHA-PBMCs. AF-MSCs had a more potent immunomodulatory effect on T cells than BM-MSCs, only slightly higher than that of placenta MSCs. This study indicates that MSCs isolated from fetal tissues may be considered a good alternative to BM-MSCs for clinical applications. PMID:26577566

  5. Bone marrow stromal cells from multiple myeloma patients uniquely induce bortezomib resistant NF-κB activity in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Components of the microenvironment such as bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are well known to support multiple myeloma (MM) disease progression and resistance to chemotherapy including the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. However, functional distinctions between BMSCs in MM patients and those in disease-free marrow are not completely understood. We and other investigators have recently reported that NF-κB activity in primary MM cells is largely resistant to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, and that further enhancement of NF-κB by BMSCs is similarly resistant to bortezomib and may mediate resistance to this therapy. The mediating factor(s) of this bortezomib-resistant NF-κB activity is induced by BMSCs is not currently understood. Results Here we report that BMSCs specifically derived from MM patients are capable of further activating bortezomib-resistant NF-κB activity in MM cells. This induced activity is mediated by soluble proteinaceous factors secreted by MM BMSCs. Among the multiple factors evaluated, interleukin-8 was secreted by BMSCs from MM patients at significantly higher levels compared to those from non-MM sources, and we found that IL-8 contributes to BMSC-induced NF-κB activity. Conclusions BMSCs from MM patients uniquely enhance constitutive NF-κB activity in MM cells via a proteinaceous secreted factor in part in conjunction with IL-8. Since NF-κB is known to potentiate MM cell survival and confer resistance to drugs including bortezomib, further identification of the NF-κB activating factors produced specifically by MM-derived BMSCs may provide a novel biomarker and/or drug target for the treatment of this commonly fatal disease. PMID:20604947

  6. The therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells on hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bayo, Juan; Marrodán, Mariano; Aquino, Jorge B; Silva, Marcelo; García, Mariana G; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-03-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are more often obtained from adult and extraembryonic tissues, with the latter sources being likely better from a therapeutic perspective. MSCs show tropism towards inflamed or tumourigenic sites. Mechanisms involved in MSC recruitment into tumours are comprehensively analysed, including chemoattractant signalling axes, endothelial adhesion and transmigration. In addition, signals derived from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumour microenvironment and their influence in MSC tropism and tumour recruitment are dissected, as well as the present controversy regarding their influence on tumour growth and/or metastasis. Finally, evidences available on the use of MSCs and other selected progenitor/stem cells as vehicles of antitumourigenic genes are discussed. A better knowledge of the mechanisms involved in progenitor/stem cell recruitment to HCC tumours is proposed in order to enhance their tumour targeting which may result in improvements in cell-based gene therapy strategies. PMID:24112437

  7. Cathepsin X is secreted by human osteoblasts, digests CXCL-12 and impairs adhesion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Staudt, Nicole D.; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Kalbacher, Hubert; Stevanovic, Stefan; Carmona, Adriana K.; Bogyo, Matthew; Klein, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cells are retained within discrete bone marrow niches through the effects of cell adhesion molecules and chemokine gradients. However, a small proportion of hematopoietic stem cells can also be found trafficking in the peripheral blood. During induced stem cell mobilization a proteolytic microenvironment is generated, but whether proteases are also involved in physiological trafficking of hematopoietic stem cells is not known. In the present study we examined the expression, secretion and function of the cysteine protease cathepsin X by cells of the human bone marrow. Design and Methods Human osteoblasts, bone marrow stromal cells and hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells were analyzed for the secretion of cathepsin X by western blotting, active site labeling, immunofluorescence staining and activity assays. A possible involvement of cathepsin X in cell adhesion and CXCL-12-mediated cell migration was studied in functional assays. Matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis revealed the digestion mechanism of CXCL-12 by cathepsin X. Results Osteoblasts and stromal cells secrete cathepsin X, whereas hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells do not. Using a cathepsin X-selective substrate, we detected the catalytic activity of cathepsin X in cell culture supernatants of osteoblasts. Activated cathepsin X is able to reduce cellular adhesive interactions between CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and adherent osteoblasts. The chemokine CXCL-12, a highly potent chemoattractant for hematopoietic stem cells secreted by osteoblasts, is readily digested by cathepsin X. Conclusions The exo-peptidase cathepsin X has been identified as a new member of the group of CXCL-12-degrading enzymes secreted by non-hematopoietic bone marrow cells. Functional data indicate that cathepsin X can influence hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell trafficking in the bone marrow. PMID:20494937

  8. Id4, a new candidate gene for senile osteoporosis, acts as a molecular switch promoting osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Yagi, Ken; Yamashita, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nikaido, Itoshi; Bono, Hidemasa; Ninomiya, Yuichi; Kanesaki-Yatsuka, Yukiko; Akita, Masumi; Motegi, Hiromi; Wakana, Shigeharu; Noda, Tetsuo; Sablitzky, Fred; Arai, Shigeki; Kurokawa, Riki; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu; Schönbach, Christian; Suda, Tatsuo; Mizuno, Yosuke; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2010-07-01

    Excessive accumulation of bone marrow adipocytes observed in senile osteoporosis or age-related osteopenia is caused by the unbalanced differentiation of MSCs into bone marrow adipocytes or osteoblasts. Several transcription factors are known to regulate the balance between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the balance between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation in the bone marrow have yet to be elucidated. To identify candidate genes associated with senile osteoporosis, we performed genome-wide expression analyses of differentiating osteoblasts and adipocytes. Among transcription factors that were enriched in the early phase of differentiation, Id4 was identified as a key molecule affecting the differentiation of both cell types. Experiments using bone marrow-derived stromal cell line ST2 and Id4-deficient mice showed that lack of Id4 drastically reduces osteoblast differentiation and drives differentiation toward adipocytes. On the other hand knockdown of Id4 in adipogenic-induced ST2 cells increased the expression of Ppargamma2, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation. Similar results were observed in bone marrow cells of femur and tibia of Id4-deficient mice. However the effect of Id4 on Ppargamma2 and adipocyte differentiation is unlikely to be of direct nature. The mechanism of Id4 promoting osteoblast differentiation is associated with the Id4-mediated release of Hes1 from Hes1-Hey2 complexes. Hes1 increases the stability and transcriptional activity of Runx2, a key molecule of osteoblast differentiation, which results in an enhanced osteoblast-specific gene expression. The new role of Id4 in promoting osteoblast differentiation renders it a target for preventing the onset of senile osteoporosis. PMID:20628571

  9. SDF-1α stiffens myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells through the activation of RhoA-ROCK-Myosin II.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong Soon; Stark, Daniel J; Raphael, Robert M; Wen, Jianguo; Su, Jing; Zhou, Xiaobo; Chang, Chung-Che; Zu, Youli

    2015-03-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B lymphocyte malignancy that remains incurable despite extensive research efforts. This is due, in part, to frequent disease recurrences associated with the persistence of myeloma cancer stem cells (mCSCs). Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) play critical roles in supporting mCSCs through genetic or biochemical alterations. Previously, we identified mechanical distinctions between BMSCs isolated from MM patients (mBMSCs) and those present in the BM of healthy individuals (nBMSCs). These properties of mBMSC contributed to their ability to preferentially support mCSCs. To further illustrate mechanisms underlying the differences between mBMSCs and nBMSCs, here we report that (i) mBMSCs express an abnormal, constitutively high level of phosphorylated Myosin II, which leads to stiffer membrane mechanics, (ii) mBMSCs are more sensitive to SDF-1α-induced activation of MYL2 through the G(i./o)-PI3K-RhoA-ROCK-Myosin II signaling pathway, affecting Young's modulus in BMSCs and (iii) activated Myosin II confers increased cell contractile potential, leading to enhanced collagen matrix remodeling and promoting the cell-cell interaction between mCSCs and mBMSCs. Together, our findings suggest that interfering with SDF-1α signaling may serve as a new therapeutic approach for eliminating mCSCs by disrupting their interaction with mBMSCs. PMID:25137150

  10. Effect of Increasing Doses of γ-Radiation on Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Grown on Smooth and Rough Titanium Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Guang, Mengkai; Ye, Jun; Gong, Ping; Tang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy for oral and maxillofacial tumors could damage bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in jaw, which caused dental implant failure. However, how radiation affects BMSCs on SLA (sandblasted with large-grits, acid-etched) surfaces is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate effect of different dose of γ-radiation on BMSCs on SLA and PT (polished titanium) surfaces. Rat BMSCs were radiated with 2, 4, and 8 Gy γ-radiation and then seeded on both surfaces. Cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation were tested. The osteogenesis and the adipogenesis ability were examined by Alizarin-Red and Oil-Red staining, respectively. Real-time PCR was performed to detect osteogenic (osteocalcin, OCN; runt-related transcription factor 2, Runx2) and adipogenic (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, PPARγ) gene expression at days 7 and 14 postirradiation. Results showed that γ-radiation reduced cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation. 2 Gy radiation promoted adipogenic differentiation, but it was significantly decreased when dosage reached 4 Gy. In conclusion, results suggest that γ-radiation influenced BMSCs behaviors in a dosage-dependent manner except adipogenic differentiation, low dose promoted it, and high dose inhibited it. This effect was influenced by surface characteristics, which may explain the different failure rate of various implants in patients after radiation. PMID:26257788

  11. Effects of valproic acid on the expression of trophic factors in human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Goang-Won; Kang, Byung Yong; Kim, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2012-09-27

    The potential of human bone marrow-mesenchymal stromal cells (hBM-MSCs) to differentiate into diverse cell types and secrete a variety of trophic factors makes them an excellent cell therapy tool for intractable diseases. However, their therapeutic efficacy has not yet been satisfied in preclinical and/or clinical trials with autologous or allogenic stem cells. To improve the efficacy of stem cell therapy, optimized conditions for stem cells need to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the effects of valproic acid (VPA), an HDAC inhibitor, in human BM-MSCs and assessed the expression of trophic factors (ANG, BDNF, ECGF1, bFGF-2, GDNF, HGF, IGF-1, PIGF, TGF-β1, and β-Pix) in MSCs treated with 200μg/ml VPA for 12h. Under these conditions the features of MSCs were not changed. The VPA-treated MSCs also showed an increased cell protective effect against oxidative injuries in MTT assays and improved migratory ability when examined by the Boyden chamber assay. This suggests that MSCs may be improved by treatment with an optimal VPA dose and incubation time, which may increase the efficacy of stem cell therapy. PMID:22917608

  12. Proliferation, osteogenic differentiation, and distribution of rat bone marrow stromal cells in nonwoven fabrics by different culture methods.

    PubMed

    Ichinohe, Norihisa; Takamoto, Tomoaki; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    The proliferation, osteogenic differentiation, and distribution patterns of stromal cells from rat bone marrow were investigated in a three-dimensional nonwoven fabric of polyethylene terephthalate fiber by the static, agitated, and stirred culture methods; stirring speeds were 10, 50, and 100 rpm in the stirred culture method. The culture method affected the time profile of proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of cells or their distribution in the fabric. The extent of cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation became higher in order of the stirred at 100 rpm = the stirred at 50 rpm > the stirred at 10 rpm > the agitated > the static methods. In addition, the cells were more uniformly proliferated in the fabric by the stirred culture method with time than they were proliferated in the fabric by other methods. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium content were higher for cells cultured by the stirred culture method than those cultured by other methods. The total ALP activity, calcium content, and bone mineral density were higher for every stirred method than those for other methods. However, the distribution uniformity of cells differentiated was low irrespective of the culture method. It is concluded that the extent of proliferation and differentiation of cells or their distribution uniformity in the nonwoven fabrics was influenced by the culture method. PMID:18333809

  13. Use an alginate scaffold-bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) complex for the treatment of acute liver failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jizong; Meng, Lili; Yao, Zhicheng; Chen, Shuxian; Yang, Jun; Tang, Zhaofeng; Lin, Nan; Xu, Ruiyun

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of alginate scaffold-bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) in the treatment of acute liver failure in rats and provide a basis for in vivo application of artificial liver tissue. CM-DiI-labeled BMSCs were planted and grown on alginate scaffolds to form alginate scaffold-BMSC complex. Alginate scaffold-BMSC complex (the experimental group) or alginate scaffolds (the control group) were placed onto the surface of liver wound of rats after 70% of hepatectomy. The scaffold-BMSC complex and alginate scaffolds were removed after 4 weeks and fluorescence microscopy was used to track the growth and distribution of CM-DiI-labeled BMSCs. The liver tissues were stained for albumin and glycogen to investigate the differentiation of BMSCs on alginate scaffolds. The survival rate and liver function were also compared between the two groups of rats. BMSCs on alginate scaffolds and liver tissues were clearly demonstrated by CM-DiI labeling. BMSCs on alginate scaffolds secreted albumin and produced glycogen. The survival rate and liver function of the rats of the experimental group were significantly higher than that the control group rats. Alginate scaffold-BMSC complex promotes the regeneration of liver tissues in rats of acute liver failure. PMID:26550170

  14. Electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes combined with a coculture of bone marrow stromal cells and chondrocytes for cartilage engineering

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaomin; Feng, Bei; Huang, Chuanpei; Wang, Hao; Ge, Yang; Hu, Renjie; Yin, Meng; Xu, Zhiwei; Wang, Wei; Fu, Wei; Zheng, Jinghao

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning has recently received considerable attention, showing notable potential as a novel method of scaffold fabrication for cartilage engineering. The aim of this study was to use a coculture strategy of chondrocytes combined with electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone (GT/PCL) membranes, instead of pure chondrocytes, to evaluate the formation of cartilaginous tissue. We prepared the GT/PCL membranes, seeded bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC)/chondrocyte cocultures (75% BMSCs and 25% chondrocytes) in a sandwich model in vitro, and then implanted the constructs subcutaneously into nude mice for 12 weeks. Gross observation, histological and immunohistological evaluation, glycosaminoglycan analyses, Young’s modulus measurement, and immunofluorescence staining were performed postimplantation. We found that the coculture group formed mature cartilage-like tissue, with no statistically significant difference from the chondrocyte group, and labeled BMSCs could differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche of chondrocytes. This entire strategy indicates that GT/PCL membranes are also a suitable scaffold for stem cell-based cartilage engineering and may provide a potentially clinically feasible approach for cartilage repairs. PMID:25834428

  15. Chest wall reconstruction in a canine model using polydioxanone mesh, demineralized bone matrix and bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hua; Xu, Zhifei; Qin, Xiong; Wu, Bin; Wu, Lihui; Zhao, XueWei; Li, Yulin

    2009-07-01

    Extensive chest wall defect reconstruction remains a challenging problem for surgeons. In the past several years, little progress has been made in this area. In this study, a biodegradable polydioxanone (PDO) mesh and demineralized bone matrix (DBM) seeded with osteogenically induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were used to reconstruct a 6 cm x 5.5 cm chest wall defect. Four experimental groups were evaluated (n=6 per group): polydioxanone (PDO) mesh/DBMs/BMSCs group, polydioxanone (PDO) mesh/DBMs group, polydioxanone (PDO) mesh group, and a blank group (no materials) in a canine model. All the animals survived except those in the blank group. In all groups receiving biomaterial implants, the polydioxanone (PDO) mesh completely degraded at 24 weeks and was replaced by fibrous tissue with thickness close to that of the normal intercostal tissue (P>0.05). In the polydioxanone (PDO) mesh/DBMs/BMSCs group, new bone formation and bone-union were observed by radiographic and histological examination. More importantly, the reconstructed rib could maintain its original radian and achieve satisfactory biomechanics close to normal ribs in terms of bending stress (P>0.05). However, in the other two groups, fibrous tissue was observed in the defect and junctions, and the reconstructed ribs were easily distorted under an outer force. Based on these results, a surgical approach utilizing biodegradable polydioxanone (PDO) mesh in combination with DBMs and BMSCs could repair the chest wall defect not only in function but also in structure. PMID:19233465

  16. Electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes combined with a coculture of bone marrow stromal cells and chondrocytes for cartilage engineering.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaomin; Feng, Bei; Huang, Chuanpei; Wang, Hao; Ge, Yang; Hu, Renjie; Yin, Meng; Xu, Zhiwei; Wang, Wei; Fu, Wei; Zheng, Jinghao

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning has recently received considerable attention, showing notable potential as a novel method of scaffold fabrication for cartilage engineering. The aim of this study was to use a coculture strategy of chondrocytes combined with electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone (GT/PCL) membranes, instead of pure chondrocytes, to evaluate the formation of cartilaginous tissue. We prepared the GT/PCL membranes, seeded bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC)/chondrocyte cocultures (75% BMSCs and 25% chondrocytes) in a sandwich model in vitro, and then implanted the constructs subcutaneously into nude mice for 12 weeks. Gross observation, histological and immunohistological evaluation, glycosaminoglycan analyses, Young's modulus measurement, and immunofluorescence staining were performed postimplantation. We found that the coculture group formed mature cartilage-like tissue, with no statistically significant difference from the chondrocyte group, and labeled BMSCs could differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche of chondrocytes. This entire strategy indicates that GT/PCL membranes are also a suitable scaffold for stem cell-based cartilage engineering and may provide a potentially clinically feasible approach for cartilage repairs. PMID:25834428

  17. An amphiphilic degradable polymer/hydroxyapatite composite with enhanced handling characteristics promotes osteogenic gene expression in bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Kutikov, Artem B; Song, Jie

    2013-09-01

    Electrospun polymer/hydroxyapatite (HA) composites combining biodegradability with osteoconductivity are attractive for skeletal tissue engineering applications. However, most biodegradable polymers such as poly(lactic acid) (PLA) are hydrophobic and do not blend with adequate interfacial adhesion with HA, compromising the structural homogeneity, mechanical integrity and biological performance of the composite. To overcome this challenge, we combined a hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) block with poly(d,l-lactic acid) to improve the adhesion of the degradable polymer with HA. The amphiphilic triblock copolymer PLA-PEG-PLA (PELA) improved the stability of HA-PELA suspension at 25wt.% HA content, which was readily electrospun into HA-PELA composite scaffolds with uniform fiber dimensions. HA-PELA was highly extensible (failure strain>200% vs. <40% for HA-PLA), superhydrophilic (∼0° water contact angle vs. >100° for HA-PLA), and exhibited an 8-fold storage modulus increase (unlike deterioration for HA-PLA) upon hydration, owing to the favorable interaction between HA and PEG. HA-PELA also better promoted osteochondral lineage commitment of bone marrow stromal cells in unstimulated culture and supported far more potent osteogenic gene expression upon induction than HA-PLA. We demonstrate that the chemical incorporation of PEG is an effective strategy to improve the performance of degradable polymer/HA composites for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:23791675

  18. Characterization of BMP signaling dependent osteogenesis using a BMP depletable avianized bone marrow stromal cell line (TVA-BMSC).

    PubMed

    Yadav, Prem Swaroop; Khan, Mohd Parvez; Prashar, Paritosh; Duggal, Shivali; Rath, Srikanta Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-10-01

    Adipogenesis, chondrogenesis and osteogenesis are BMP signaling dependent differentiation processes. However, the molecular networks operating downstream of BMP signaling to bring about these distinct fates are yet to be fully elucidated. We have developed a novel Bone Marrow Stromal Cell (BMSC) derived mouse cell line as a powerful in vitro platform to conduct such experiments. This cell line is a derivative of BMSCs isolated from a tamoxifen inducible Bmp2 and Bmp4 double conditional knock-out mouse strain. These BMSCs are immortalized and stably transfected with avian retroviral receptor TVA (TVA-BMSCs), enabling an easy method for stable transduction of multiple genes in these cells. In TVA-BMSCs multiple components of BMP signaling pathway can be manipulated simultaneously. Using this cell line we have demonstrated that for osteogenesis, BMP signaling is required only for the first three days. We have further demonstrated that Klf10, an osteogenic transcription factor which is transcribed in developing bones in a BMP signaling dependent manner, can largely compensate for the loss of BMP signaling during osteogenesis of BMSCs. TVA-BMSCs can undergo chondrogenesis and adipogenesis, and hence may be used for dissection of the molecular networks downstream of BMP signaling in these differentiation processes as well. PMID:27424936

  19. The temporal expression of estrogen receptor alpha-36 and runx2 in human bone marrow derived stromal cells during osteogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, W.R.; Owens, S.E.; Wilde, C.; Pallister, I.; Kanamarlapudi, V.; Zou, W.; Xia, Z.

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ERα36 is the predominant ERα isoform involved in bone regulation in human BMSC. • ERα36 mRNA is significantly upregulated during the process of osteogenesis. • The pattern of ERα36 and runx2 mRNA expression is similar during osteogenesis. • ERα36 appears to be co-localised with runx2 during osteogenesis. - Abstract: During bone maintenance in vivo, estrogen signals through estrogen receptor (ER)-α. The objectives of this study were to investigate the temporal expression of ERα36 and ascertain its functional relevance during osteogenesis in human bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSC). This was assessed in relation to runt-related transcription factor-2 (runx2), a main modulatory protein involved in bone formation. ERα36 and runx2 subcellular localisation was assessed using immunocytochemistry, and their mRNA expression levels by real time PCR throughout the process of osteogenesis. The osteogenically induced BMSCs demonstrated a rise in ERα36 mRNA during proliferation followed by a decline in expression at day 10, which represents a change in dynamics within the culture between the proliferative stage and the differentiative stage. The mRNA expression profile of runx2 mirrored that of ERα36 and showed a degree subcellular co-localisation with ERα36. This study suggests that ERα36 is involved in the process of osteogenesis in BMSCs, which has implications in estrogen deficient environments.

  20. Osteogenic gene expression of canine bone marrow stromal cell and bacterial adhesion on titanium with different nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei-Qiang; Jiang, Xing-Quan; Xu, Ling; Zhao, Yan-Fang; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Cao, Xin

    2011-11-01

    Bacterial infection and osseointegration of implant-biomaterials all play important roles in the success of an orthopedic prosthesis or a dental-implant. In this work, we evaluated the osteogenic gene expression of canine bone marrow stromal cells (CBMSCs) and the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 12598) on different diameter TiO(2) nanotube layers. The CBMSCs cultured on 30 and 70 nm nanotubes displayed polygon shape, but obviously elongated when the diameter of nanotubes turned to 120 nm. A significant increase in CBMSCs proliferation by as much as about ∼300%, and osteogenic gene (RUNX-2, OPN, COL-1, and OCN) expression were observed on the 120 nm diameter nanotubes when compared to the smooth Ti. However, the adhesion of bacteria also increased with an increased tube diameter and reached highest value on 120 nm nanotubes after 4 h of incubation. ∼300-400% increase in bacterial attached to 120 nm nanotubes in contract to the smooth Ti. These data suggested reducing bacteria colonization should be considered when larger diameter nanotubes with better osteogenic property would be used as orthopedic implants or dental implants. PMID:21954218

  1. Cell-cell interaction between vocal fold fibroblasts and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in three-dimensional hyaluronan hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xia; Thibeault, Susan L

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotential adult cells present in all tissues. Paracrine effects and differentiating ability make MSCs an ideal cell source for tissue regeneration. However, little is known about how interactions between implanted MSCs and native cells influence cellular growth, proliferation, and behaviour. By using an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) co-culture assay of normal or scarred human vocal fold fibroblasts (VFFs) and bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) in a uniquely suited hyaluronan hydrogel (HyStem-VF), we investigated cell morphology, survival rate, proliferation and protein and gene expression of VFFs and BM-MSCs. BM-MSCs inhibited cell proliferation of both normal and scarred VFFs without changes in VFF morphology or viability. BM-MSCs demonstrated decreased proliferation and survival rate after 7 days of co-culture with VFFs. Interactions between BM-MSCs and VFFs led to a significant increase in protein secretion of collagen I and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and a decrease of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). In particular, BM-MSCs significantly upregulated matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) and HGF gene expression for scarred VFFs compared to normal VFFs, indicating the potential for increases in extracellular matrix remodelling and tissue regeneration. Application of BM-MSCs-hydrogels may play a significant role in tissue regeneration, providing a therapeutic approach for vocal fold scarring. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23653427

  2. MicroRNAs-141 and 200a regulate the SVCT2 transporter in bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Sangani, Rajnikumar; Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Kolhe, Ravindra; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H.; Chutkan, Norman; Hunter, Monte; Isales, Carlos; Hamrick, Mark; Hill, William D.; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin C is a micro-nutrient which plays an important role in bone marrow stromal cell (BMSCs) differentiation to osteogenesis. This vitamin is transported into the BMSCs through the sodium dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2). We previously reported that knockdown of the SVCT2 transporter decreases osteogenic differentiation. However, our understanding of the post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism of the SVCT2 transporter remains poor. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate the messenger RNAs of protein-coding genes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the impact of miR-141 and miR-200a on SVCT2 expression. We found that mouse BMSCs expressed miR-141 and miR-200a and repressed SVCT2 expression at the functional level by targeting the 3'-untranslated region of mRNA. We also found that miR-141 and miR-200a decreased osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, miRNA inhibitors increased SVCT2 and osteogenic gene expression in BMSCs. Taken together, these results indicate that both miRNAs are novel regulators of the SVCT2 transporter and play an important role in the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs. PMID:25617715

  3. An amphiphilic degradable polymer/hydroxyapatite composite with enhanced handling characteristics promotes osteogenic gene expression in bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kutikov, Artem B.; Song, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Electrospun polymer/hydroxyapatite (HA) composites combining biodegradability with osteoconductivity are attractive for skeletal tissue engineering applications. However, most biodegradable polymers such as PLA are hydrophobic and do not blend with adequate interfacial adhesion with HA, compromising the structural homogeneity, mechanical integrity, and biological performance of the composite. To overcome this challenge, we incorporated a hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) block to poly(D,L-lactic acid) to improve the adhesion of the degradable polymer with HA. The amphiphilic triblock copolymer PLA-PEG-PLA (PELA) improved the stability of HA-PELA suspension at 25 wt% HA content, which was readily electrospun into HA-PELA composite scaffolds with uniform fiber dimensions. HA-PELA was highly extensible (failure strain >200% vs. <40% for HA-PLA), superhydrophilic (~0° water contact angle vs. >100° for HA-PLA), and exhibited an 8-fold storage modulus increase (unlike deterioration for HA-PLA) upon hydration, owing to the favorable interaction between HA and PEG. HA-PELA also better promoted osteochondral lineage commitment of bone marrow stromal cells in unstimulated culture and supported far more potent osteogenesis upon induction than HA-PLA. We demonstrate that the chemical incorporation of PEG is an effective strategy to improve the performance of degradable polymer/HA composites for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:23791675

  4. The New Role of CD163 in the Differentiation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Vascular Endothelial-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Su, Le; Yu, Zhezheng; Zhang, Shangli; Miao, Junying

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (VECs). It is regarded as an important solution to cure many diseases, such as ischemic diseases and diabetes. However, the mechanisms underlying BMSC differentiation into VECs are not well understood. Recent reports showed that CD163 expression was associated with angiogenesis. In this study, overexpression of CD163 in BMSCs elevated the protein level of the endothelial-associated markers CD31, Flk-1, eNOS, and VE-cadherin, significantly increased the proportion of Alexa Fluor 488-acetylated-LDL-positive VECs, and promoted angiogenesis on Matrigel. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CD163 acted downstream homeobox containing 1 (Hmbox1) and upstream fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). These data suggested that CD163 was involved in Hmbox1/CD163/FGF-2 signal pathway in BMSC differentiation into vascular endothelial-like cells. We found a new signal pathway and a novel target for further investigating the gene control of BMSC differentiation into a VEC lineage. PMID:26880943

  5. Naringin Stimulates Osteogenic Differentiation of Rat Bone Marrow Stromal Cells via Activation of the Notch Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guo-Yong; Zheng, Gui-Zhou; Chang, Bo; Hu, Qin-Xiao; Lin, Fei-Xiang; Liu, De-Zhong; Wu, Chu-Cheng; Du, Shi-Xin; Li, Xue-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Naringin is a major flavonoid found in grapefruit and is an active compound extracted from the Chinese herbal medicine Rhizoma Drynariae. Naringin is a potent stimulator of osteogenic differentiation and has potential application in preventing bone loss. However, the signaling pathway underlying its osteogenic effect remains unclear. We hypothesized that the osteogenic activity of naringin involves the Notch signaling pathway. Rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured in osteogenic medium containing-naringin, with or without DAPT (an inhibitor of Notch signaling), the effects on ALP activity, calcium deposits, osteogenic genes (ALP, BSP, and cbfa1), adipogenic maker gene PPARγ2 levels, and Notch expression were examined. We found that naringin dose-dependently increased ALP activity and Alizarin red S staining, and treatment at the optimal concentration (50 μg/mL) increased mRNA levels of osteogenic genes and Notch1 expression, while decreasing PPARγ2 mRNA levels. Furthermore, treatment with DAPT partly reversed effects of naringin on BMSCs, as judged by decreases in naringin-induced ALP activity, calcium deposits, and osteogenic genes expression, as well as upregulation of PPARγ2 mRNA levels. These results suggest that the osteogenic effect of naringin partly involves the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:27069482

  6. Naringin Stimulates Osteogenic Differentiation of Rat Bone Marrow Stromal Cells via Activation of the Notch Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guo-yong; Zheng, Gui-zhou; Chang, Bo; Hu, Qin-xiao; Lin, Fei-xiang; Liu, De-zhong; Wu, Chu-cheng; Du, Shi-xin

    2016-01-01

    Naringin is a major flavonoid found in grapefruit and is an active compound extracted from the Chinese herbal medicine Rhizoma Drynariae. Naringin is a potent stimulator of osteogenic differentiation and has potential application in preventing bone loss. However, the signaling pathway underlying its osteogenic effect remains unclear. We hypothesized that the osteogenic activity of naringin involves the Notch signaling pathway. Rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured in osteogenic medium containing-naringin, with or without DAPT (an inhibitor of Notch signaling), the effects on ALP activity, calcium deposits, osteogenic genes (ALP, BSP, and cbfa1), adipogenic maker gene PPARγ2 levels, and Notch expression were examined. We found that naringin dose-dependently increased ALP activity and Alizarin red S staining, and treatment at the optimal concentration (50 μg/mL) increased mRNA levels of osteogenic genes and Notch1 expression, while decreasing PPARγ2 mRNA levels. Furthermore, treatment with DAPT partly reversed effects of naringin on BMSCs, as judged by decreases in naringin-induced ALP activity, calcium deposits, and osteogenic genes expression, as well as upregulation of PPARγ2 mRNA levels. These results suggest that the osteogenic effect of naringin partly involves the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:27069482

  7. The New Role of CD163 in the Differentiation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Vascular Endothelial-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Su, Le; Yu, Zhezheng; Zhang, Shangli; Miao, Junying

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (VECs). It is regarded as an important solution to cure many diseases, such as ischemic diseases and diabetes. However, the mechanisms underlying BMSC differentiation into VECs are not well understood. Recent reports showed that CD163 expression was associated with angiogenesis. In this study, overexpression of CD163 in BMSCs elevated the protein level of the endothelial-associated markers CD31, Flk-1, eNOS, and VE-cadherin, significantly increased the proportion of Alexa Fluor 488-acetylated-LDL-positive VECs, and promoted angiogenesis on Matrigel. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CD163 acted downstream homeobox containing 1 (Hmbox1) and upstream fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). These data suggested that CD163 was involved in Hmbox1/CD163/FGF-2 signal pathway in BMSC differentiation into vascular endothelial-like cells. We found a new signal pathway and a novel target for further investigating the gene control of BMSC differentiation into a VEC lineage. PMID:26880943

  8. Anti-senescence effects of DNA methyltransferase inhibitor RG108 in human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Youn Seo; Jeong, Sin-Gu; Cho, Goang-Won

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of DNA methylation is highly associated with ageing and ageing-related diseases. Remedy of the altered methylation pattern may provide beneficial efficacy in these diseases. In this study, we used a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, RG108, to investigate the senescence effects in human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBM-MSCs). First, we determined the optimized dose and time of RG108 treatment in hBM-MSCs to be 5 µM for 48 H, respectively. Under these conditions, the anti-senescence genes TERT, bFGF, VEGF, and ANG were increased, whereas the senescence-related genes ATM, p21, and p53 were decreased. The number of β-galactosidase-positive cells was significantly decreased in RG108-treated MSCs, whereas the rates of MSC migration and cellular protection were increased. We have shown that RG108 significantly induces the expression of TERT by blocking methylation at the TERT promoter region. Thus, these data indicate that an optimized dose of RG108 may improve the cell migration, protection, cellular senescence, which may provide a better efficacy of these cells in stem cell therapy. PMID:25952632

  9. Valproic acid promotes neuronal differentiation by induction of neuroprogenitors in human bone-marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sin-Gu; Ohn, Takbum; Kim, Seung Hyun; Cho, Goang-Won

    2013-10-25

    Recent studies have shown that the inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) induces the differentiation of diverse cancer and stem cells, which suggests HDAC inhibitors may be good candidates for the induction of stem cell differentiation. In this study, we investigated the effects of a HDAC inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), for the neuronal differentiation of human bone marrow-mesenchymal stromal cells (hBM-MSCs). VPA-treated MSCs had significant increases in their expression of the neuro-progenitor marker Nestin, Musashi, CD133, and GFAP, as measured by real-time PCR and immunoblot analysis. When VPA-pretreated MSCs were differentiated with neuronal induction media (VPA-dMSCs), they exhibited a cell body and dendritic morphology similar to neurons. The number and neurite length of these VPA-dMSCs significantly increased compared to differentiated MSCs (dMSCs). The VPA-dMSCs and dMSCs had significantly increased transcripts of neuronal-specific marker genes, including Nestin, Musashi, CD133, GFAP, NeuN, MAP-2, NF-M, KCNH1, and KCNH5. The cells also showed a higher expression of the neuronal marker proteins Nestin and NF-M from immunocytochemical staining and immunoblot analysis. This study has shown that VPA pretreatment of hBM-MSCs, following their incubation with neuronal induction media, effectively stimulates neuronal cell differentiation to BM-MSCs. PMID:24021810

  10. Oleate Abrogates Palmitate-Induced Lipotoxicity and Proinflammatory Response in Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Osteoblastic Cells.

    PubMed

    Gillet, C; Spruyt, D; Rigutto, S; Dalla Valle, A; Berlier, J; Louis, C; Debier, C; Gaspard, N; Malaisse, W J; Gangji, V; Rasschaert, J

    2015-11-01

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease associated with unequilibrated bone remodeling resulting from decreased bone formation and/or increased bone resorption, leading to progressive bone loss. In osteoporotic patients, low bone mass is associated with an increase of bone marrow fat resulting from accumulation of adipocytes within the bone marrow. Marrow adipocytes are active secretory cells, releasing cytokines, adipokines and free fatty acids (FA) that influence the bone marrow microenvironment and alter the biology of neighboring cells. Therefore, we examined the effect of palmitate (Palm) and oleate (Ole), 2 highly prevalent FA in human organism and diet, on the function and survival of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and MSC-derived osteoblastic cells. The saturated FA Palm exerted a cytotoxic action via initiation of endoplasmic reticulum stress and activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and ERK pathways. In addition, Palm induced a proinflammatory response, as determined by the up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 expression as well as the increase of IL-6 and IL-8 expression and secretion. Moreover, we showed that MSC-derived osteoblastic cells were more sensitive to lipotoxicity than undifferentiated MSC. The monounsaturated FA Ole fully neutralized Palm-induced lipotoxicity by impairing activation of the pathways triggered by the saturated FA. Moreover, Ole promoted Palm detoxification by fostering its esterification into triglycerides and storage in lipid droplets. Altogether, our data showed that physiological concentrations of Palm and Ole differently modulated cell death and function in bone cells. We therefore propose that FA could influence skeletal health. PMID:26327577

  11. Culture perfusion schedules influence the metabolic activity and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production rates of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, J; Palsson, B O; Locey, B; Emerson, S G

    1991-05-01

    The metabolic function and GM-CSF production rates of adherent human bone marrow stromal cells were investigated as functions of medium and serum feeding rates. A range of medium exchange schedules was studied, ranging from a typical Dexter culture protocol of one weekly medium exchange to a full media exchange daily, which more closely approximates what bone marrow cells experience in situ. Glucose consumption was found to be significantly higher at full daily exchange rate than at any other exchange schedule examined. However, the lactate yield on glucose was a constant, at 1.8 mol/mol, under all conditions considered. Differential serum vs. medium exchange experiment showed that both serum supply and medium nutrients were responsible for the altered behavior at high exchange rates. Glutamine consumption was found to be insignificant under all culture conditions examined. A change in exchange schedule from 50% daily medium exchange to full daily medium exchange after 14 days of culture was found to result in a transient production of GM-CSF and a change in metabolic behavior to resemble that of cultures which had full daily exchange from day one. These results suggest that both stromal cell metabolism and GM-CSF production are sensitive to medium exchange schedules. Taken together, the data presented indicate that attempts to model the function of human bone marrow in vitro may be well served by beginning with medium exchange schedules that more closely mimic the in vivo physiologic state of bone marrow. PMID:2040665

  12. Effects of acoustic and EHF impulses on multipotent stromal cells during formation of bone marrow containing heterotopic organs in tissue engineered constructions.

    PubMed

    Chaikhalyan, R K; Yusupov, V I; Gorskaya, Yu F; Kuralesova, A I; Gerasimov, Yu V; Sviridov, A P; Tambiev, A Kh; Vorob'eva, N N; Shishkova, A G Grosheva V V; Moskvina, I L; Bagratashvili, V N

    2015-03-01

    We studied the effects of physical factors (acoustic impulses of laser-induced hydrodynamics, AILIH, and EHF-radiation) on the formation of heterotopic bone marrow organs. Suspension of precipitated mouse bone marrow cells was exposed to AILIH and EHF or their combinations (AILIH+EHF, EHF+AILIH). The developed tissue engineering constructions (gelatin sponges containing 107 nucleated bone marrow cells exposed to physical factors) were transplanted under the renal capsule of syngeneic mice. Analysis of newly formed hemopoietic organs was performed after 3 and 5 months. The total amount of hemopoietic cells, number of multipotent stromal cells, efficiency of colony formation from these cells, and weight of bone capsule of the transplants were measured. Microscopic study showed that 5-month transplants were significantly larger than 3-month transplants and contained 3-fold more hemopoietic cells (20-fold in the AILIH+EHF group). The number of multipotent stromal cells was maximum in EHF+AILIH group (by 2.2 times higher than in the control) and minimum in AILIH+EHF group. Exposure to EHF+AILIH had most pronounced effect on the formation of the bone marrow transplants. The weight of bone capsules more rapidly increased in gelatin sponges of 3-month transplants of EHF+AILIH and AILIH groups. These data suggest that the studied physical factors can be used for acceleration of rehabilitation process. PMID:25778661

  13. Bisphosphonate- and statin-induced enhancement of OPG expression and inhibition of CD9, M-CSF, and RANKL expressions via inhibition of the Ras/MEK/ERK pathway and activation of p38MAPK in mouse bone marrow stromal cell line ST2.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Yanae, Masashi; Kato, Chisato; Takagoshi, Risa; Komai, Makiko; Nishida, Shozo

    2012-09-25

    Osteoclast differentiation is influenced by receptor activator of the NF-κB ligand (RANKL), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), and CD9, which are expressed on bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts. In addition, osteoprotegerin (OPG) is known as an osteoclastogenesis inhibitory factor. In this study, we investigated whether bisphosphonates and statins increase OPG expression and inhibit the expression of CD9, M-CSF, and RANKL in the bone marrow-derived stromal cell line ST2. We found that bisphosphonates and statins enhanced OPG mRNA expression and inhibited the expression of CD9, M-CSF, and RANKL mRNA. Futhermore, bisphosphonates and statins decreased the membrane localization of Ras and phosphorylated ERK1/2, and activated the p38MAPK. This indicates that bisphosphonates and statins enhanced OPG expression, and inhibited the expression of CD9, M-CSF, and RANKL through blocking the Ras/ERK pathway and activating p38MAPK. Accordingly, we believe that its clinical applications will be investigated in the future for the development of osteoporosis therapy. PMID:22579611

  14. Effect of Short-Term Stimulation with Interleukin-1β and Differentiation Medium on Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Paracrine Activity in Coculture with Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Jan O.; Loebel, Claudia; Bara, Jennifer J.; Fussinger, Marc Anton; Alini, Mauro; Stoddart, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) exhibit the potential to accelerate bone healing by enhanced osteogenic differentiation. Interleukin-1β is highly expressed during fracture healing and has been demonstrated to exert a significant impact on the differentiation behaviour of hMSCs. Here, we investigate the effect of 2-hour IL-1β stimulation on the differentiation and paracrine activity of hMSCs in coculture with osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Methods. hMSCs from 3 donors were incubated for 2 hours with 10 ng/mL IL-1β and subsequently cocultured with MG63-GFP cells either in control or in differentiation medium in a transwell system for 28 days. Genetic and functional effects were investigated. Results. hMSCs cultured in control medium exhibited a regulatory effect on cocultured MG63-GFP cells, resulting in upregulation of osteogenic gene expression in combination with increased ALP activity. However, while stimulated hMSCs cultured under differentiation conditions exhibit signs of osteogenic differentiation, osteogenic differentiation also caused an impaired regulatory effect on the cocultured MG63-GFP cells. Conclusion. Short stimulation of hMSCs has the potential to modify their long-term behaviour. In addition, undifferentiated hMSCs are able to regulate osteoblast differentiation; however, this regulatory function is lost upon osteogenic differentiation in vitro. This offers a novel approach for clinical cell therapy protocols. PMID:26798640

  15. Canine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells suppress alloreactive lymphocyte proliferation in vitro but fail to enhance engraftment in canine bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Sik; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Graves, Scott S; Iwata, Mineo; Venkataraman, G M; Mielcarek, Marco; Peterson, Laura J; Ikehara, Susumu; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Storb, Rainer

    2011-04-01

    Stable mixed hematopoietic chimerism has been consistently established in dogs who were mildly immunosuppressed by 200 cGy of total body irradiation (TBI) before undergoing dog leukocyte antigen (DLA)-identical bone marrow (BM) transplantation and who received a brief course of immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil (28 days) and cyclosporine (35 days) after transplantation. However, when TBI was reduced from 200 to 100 cGy, grafts were nearly uniformly rejected within 3-12 weeks. Here, we asked whether stable engraftment could be accomplished after a suboptimal dose of 100 cGy TBI with host immunosuppression enhanced by donor-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) given after transplantation. MSCs were cultured from BM cells and evaluated in vitro for antigen expression. They showed profound immunosuppressive properties in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) in a cell dose-dependent manner not restricted by DLA. MSC and lymphocyte contact was not required, indicating that immunosuppression was mediated by soluble factors. Prostaglandin E2 was increased in culture supernatant when MSCs were cocultured in MLRs. The addition of indomethacin restored lymphocyte proliferation in cultures containing MSCs. MSCs expressed CD10, CD13, CD29, CD44, CD73/SH-3, CD90/Thy-1, and CD106/VCAM-1. For in vivo studies, MSCs were injected on the day of BM grafting and on day 35, the day of discontinuation of posttransplantation cyclosporine. MSCs derived from the respective BM donors failed to avert BM graft rejection in 4 dogs who received DLA-identical grafts after nonmyeloablative conditioning with 100 cGy TBI in a time course not significantly different from that of control dogs not given MSCs. Although the MSCs displayed in vitro characteristics similar to those reported for MSCs from other species, their immunosuppressive qualities failed to sustain stable BM engraftment in vivo in this canine model. PMID:20457265

  16. Characterization of Gaucher disease bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells reveals an altered inflammatory secretome

    PubMed Central

    Campeau, Philippe M.; Rafei, Moutih; Boivin, Marie-Noëlle; Sun, Ying; Grabowski, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    Gaucher disease causes pathologic skeletal changes that are not fully explained. Considering the important role of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in bone structural development and maintenance, we analyzed the cellular biochemistry of MSCs from an adult patient with Gaucher disease type 1 (N370S/L444P mutations). Gaucher MSCs possessed a low glucocerebrosidase activity and consequently had a 3-fold increase in cellular glucosylceramide. Gaucher MSCs have a typical MSC marker phenotype, normal osteocytic and adipocytic differentiation, growth, exogenous lactosylceramide trafficking, cholesterol content, lysosomal morphology, and total lysosomal content, and a marked increase in COX-2, prostaglandin E2, interleukin-8, and CCL2 production compared with normal controls. Transcriptome analysis on normal MSCs treated with the glucocerebrosidase inhibitor conduritol B epoxide showed an up-regulation of an array of inflammatory mediators, including CCL2, and other differentially regulated pathways. These cells also showed a decrease in sphingosine-1-phosphate. In conclusion, Gaucher disease MSCs display an altered secretome that could contribute to skeletal disease and immune disease manifestations in a manner distinct and additive to Gaucher macrophages themselves. PMID:19587377

  17. Enhanced osteoblast and osteoclast responses to a thin film sputtered hydroxyapatite coating.

    PubMed

    Hao, J; Kuroda, S; Ohya, K; Bartakova, S; Aoki, H; Kasugai, S

    2011-06-01

    A sputtering technique followed by a low temperature hydrothermal treatment has been demonstrated to produce a dense-and-bioactive hydroxyapatite thin film coating. The purpose of the present study was to investigate osteoblast and osteoclast responses to the hydroxyapatite coated plates and titanium plates with similar roughness. Rat bone marrow stromal cells were cultured on these plates to induce osteoblasts. The cells showed a significantly enhanced proliferation on the hydroxyapatite surface, accompanied by increase of osteoblastic phenotypes. The co-cultured osteoclasts exhibited the significantly different cell number and morphology between the hydroxyapatite and the titanium surfaces. A series of osteoclast marker genes were more stimulated on the hydroxyapatite and thirty two percent of the hydroxyapatite surface area could be resorbed by osteoclasts. The thin film sputtered hydroxyapatite could provide a favorable surface for both osteoblast and osteoclast formation and their function, indicating its good osteoconductivity and biodegradability. PMID:21567286

  18. miR-210 promotes osteoblastic differentiation through inhibition of AcvR1b.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Ninomiya, Yuichi; Yagi, Ken; Yatsuka-Kanesaki, Yukiko; Suda, Tatsuo; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Amemiya, Tomoyuki; Tashiro, Hideo; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2009-07-01

    Although microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in many biological processes, the mechanisms whereby miRNAs regulate osteoblastic differentiation are poorly understood. Here, we found that BMP-4-induced osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow-derived ST2 stromal cells was promoted and repressed after transfection of sense and antisense miR-210, respectively. A reporter assay demonstrated that the activin A receptor type 1B (AcvR1b) gene was a target for miR-210. Furthermore, inhibition of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)/activin signaling in ST2 cells with SB431542 promoted osteoblastic differentiation. We conclude that miR-210 acts as a positive regulator of osteoblastic differentiation by inhibiting the TGF-beta/activin signaling pathway through inhibition of AcvR1b. PMID:19520079

  19. Steroid regulation of proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells: a gender difference.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liu; Sultana, Habiba; Paulius, Karina; Zhang, Guoquan

    2009-04-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered a potential cell source for stem cell-based bone tissue engineering. However, noticeable limitations of insufficient supply and reduction of differentiation potential impact the feasibility of their clinical application. This study investigated the in vitro function of steroids and gender differences on the proliferation and differentiation of rat MSCs. Bone marrow MSCs of age-matched rats were exposed to proliferation and osteogenic differentiation media supplements with various concentrations of 17beta-estradiol (E2) and dexamethasone. Cell proliferation was measured by MTS assay; osteogenic markers and steroid-associated growth factors and receptors were evaluated by ELISA and real-time PCR. The results revealed that supplements of E2 and dexamethasone increase MSC proliferation in a biphasic manner. The optimal dose and interaction of steroids required to improve MSC proliferation effectively varied depending on the gender of donors. Supplementation of E2 effectively improves osteogenic differentiation markers including ALP, osteocalcin and calcium levels for MSCs isolated from both male and female donors. The mRNA of TGF-beta1 and BMP-7 are also up-regulated. However, effective doses to maximally improve osteogenic potentials and growth factors for MSCs are different between male and female donors. The relationship between steroid receptors, osteogenic markers and cytokines are also varied by genders. The outcomes of the present study strongly indicate that steroids potentially function as an effective modulator to improve the capacity of MSCs in bone regeneration. It provides crucial information for improving and optimizing MSCs for future clinical application of bone regeneration. PMID:19429449

  20. In vitro characterization of bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors.

    PubMed

    Stiehler, Maik; Rauh, Juliane; Bünger, Cody; Jacobi, Angela; Vater, Corina; Schildberg, Theresa; Liebers, Cornelia; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Bretschneider, Henriette

    2016-05-01

    BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, provide an excellent source of progenitor cells for regenerative therapy. To assess whether osteoarthritis (OA) affects the regenerative potential of BMSCs we compared the proliferation and differentiation potential as well as the surface marker expression profile of OA- versus control BMSCs. BMSCs were isolated from bone marrow aspirates of n=14 patients with advanced-stage idiopathic hip OA (67±6years) and n=15 healthy individuals (61±4years). Proliferation was quantified by total DNA content and colony-forming-units of fibroblastsmax (CFU-F) assay. Differentiation assays included immunohistology, cell-specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and osteogenic, chondrogenic as well as adipogenic marker gene qRT-PCR. Expression of BMSC-associated surface markers was analyzed using flow cytometry. No significant intergroup differences were observed concerning the proliferation potential, cell-specific ALP activity as well as adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation marker gene expressions. Interestingly, SOX9 gene expression levels were significantly increased in OA-BMSCs after 14days of chondrogenic stimulation (p<0.01). The surface markers CD73, CD90 and STRO-1 were elevated in relation to CD14, CD34 and CD45 in both groups (p<0.0001). Notably, OA-BMSCs showed significantly increased CD90 (p<0.01) and decreased CD166 (p<0.001) levels. Overall, the in vitro characteristics of BMSCs are not markedly influenced by OA. However, increased SOX9 and CD90 as well as reduced CD166 expression levels in OA-BMSCs warrant further investigation. These data will help to further understand the role of BMSC in OA and facilitate the application of autologous cell-based strategies for musculoskeletal tissue regeneration in OA patients. PMID:27155399

  1. Spleen tyrosine kinase suppresses osteoblastic differentiation through MAPK and PKCα.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Higuchi, Chikahisa; Nakura, Akio; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2011-08-12

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is a non-receptor protein kinase present in abundance in a wide range of hematopoietic cells. Syk reportedly plays a crucial role in immune signaling in B cells and cells bearing Fcγ-activation receptors. The role of syk in osteoblastic differentiation has not been well elucidated. We report herein the role of syk in osteoblastic differentiation. We investigated the effects of two syk inhibitors on osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. Expression of syk was detected in these two cell lines. Two syk inhibitors stimulated mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers (ALP, Runx2, Osterix). Mineralization of extracellular matrix was also promoted by treatment with syk inhibitors. Knockdown of Syk caused increased mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers. In addition, syk inhibitor and knockdown of Syk suppressed phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Our results indicate that syk might regulate osteoblastic differentiation through MAPK and PKCα. PMID:21782794

  2. Cigarette smoke extract inhibits chemotaxis and collagen gel contraction mediated by human bone marrow osteoprogenitor cells and osteoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangde; Kohyama, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Abe, Shinji; Kim, Hui Jung; Reed, Elizabeth C; Rennard, Stephen I

    2003-05-01

    Cell migration and matrix remodeling are key events in tissue repair and restructuring. Osteoblasts are responsible for the production of new bone matrix during bone remodeling. The activity of these cells can be modulated by a number of factors. The current study evaluated the hypothesis that cigarette smoke extract can alter repair and remodeling responses of human osteoprogenitor cells and osteoblast-like cells and, therefore, could explain one mechanism by which cigarette smoking leads to osteoporosis. Human osteoprogenitor cells were isolated from normal human bone marrow and maintained in culture under either control conditions or conditions that induced differentiation into osteoblast-like cells. Both cell types migrated toward fibronectin and PDGF-BB as chemoattractants. Neither responded to TGF-beta1. The osteoprogenitor cells were more active in their chemotactic response. The chemotactic response of both cell types was inhibited by cigarette smoke extract in a concentration-dependent manner. Both cell types, when cultured in three-dimensional native collagen gels maintained in floating culture, induced contraction of their surrounding matrices. Contraction was augmented by serum, PDGF-BB, and TGF-beta1. Osteoprogenitor cells were less active in inducing contraction than were osteoblast-like cells. Contraction of both cell types was inhibited by cigarette smoke extract. Cigarette smoke extract also inhibited the production of fibronectin by both cell types maintained in three-dimensional culture. Addition of exogenous fibronectin partially restored the ability of the cells to contract three-dimensional collagen gels. The current study demonstrates that cigarette smoke can interfere with the ability of bone cells to participate in repair and remodeling events. Such an effect may be one mechanism leading to the development of osteoporosis. PMID:12730796

  3. Effect of AGM and fetal liver-derived stromal cell lines on globin expression in adult baboon (P. anubis) bone marrow-derived erythroid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Donald; Vaitkus, Kestutis; Ruiz, Maria Armila; Ibanez, Vinzon; Kouznetsova, Tatiana; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Mahmud, Nadim; DeSimone, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the hypothesis that the erythroid micro-environment plays a role in regulation of globin gene expression during adult erythroid differentiation. Adult baboon bone marrow and human cord blood CD34+ progenitors were grown in methylcellulose, liquid media, and in co-culture with stromal cell lines derived from different developmental stages in identical media supporting erythroid differentiation to examine the effect of the micro-environment on globin gene expression. Adult progenitors express high levels of γ-globin in liquid and methylcellulose media but low, physiological levels in stromal cell co-cultures. In contrast, γ-globin expression remained high in cord blood progenitors in stromal cell line co-cultures. Differences in γ-globin gene expression between adult progenitors in stromal cell line co-cultures and liquid media required cell-cell contact and were associated with differences in rate of differentiation and γ-globin promoter DNA methylation. We conclude that γ-globin expression in adult-derived erythroid cells can be influenced by the micro-environment, suggesting new potential targets for HbF induction. PMID:22693559

  4. Effect of AGM and Fetal Liver-Derived Stromal Cell Lines on Globin Expression in Adult Baboon (P. anubis) Bone Marrow-Derived Erythroid Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Donald; Vaitkus, Kestutis; Ruiz, Maria Armila; Ibanez, Vinzon; Kouznetsova, Tatiana; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Mahmud, Nadim; DeSimone, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the hypothesis that the erythroid micro-environment plays a role in regulation of globin gene expression during adult erythroid differentiation. Adult baboon bone marrow and human cord blood CD34+ progenitors were grown in methylcellulose, liquid media, and in co-culture with stromal cell lines derived from different developmental stages in identical media supporting erythroid differentiation to examine the effect of the micro-environment on globin gene expression. Adult progenitors express high levels of γ-globin in liquid and methylcellulose media but low, physiological levels in stromal cell co-cultures. In contrast, γ-globin expression remained high in cord blood progenitors in stromal cell line co-cultures. Differences in γ-globin gene expression between adult progenitors in stromal cell line co-cultures and liquid media required cell-cell contact and were associated with differences in rate of differentiation and γ-globin promoter DNA methylation. We conclude that γ-globin expression in adult-derived erythroid cells can be influenced by the micro-environment, suggesting new potential targets for HbF induction. PMID:22693559

  5. Specially modified stromal and immune microenvironment in injected bone marrow following intrabone transplantation facilitates allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell engraftment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Su, Yingjun; Chen, Jianwu; Song, Yajuan; Zhuang, Ran; Xiao, Bo; Guo, Shuzhong

    2016-07-01

    For allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the first key step is the engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) barrier. Intrabone bone marrow transplantation (IBBMT) could replace more recipient stromal cells with donor cells and facilitate allogeneic organ transplantation compared with the conventional intravenous approach. However, it remains unknown whether and how IBBMT reconstructs the immune microenvironment for allogeneic HSCs. We explored where the BM microenvironment changes by determining BM stromal cell chimerism and measuring the change in CXCL-12 expression and regulatory T cells in recipient BM. We found that most stromal cells were replaced by allogeneic cells in the injected BM, with higher expression of immune regulatory cytokines (interleukin-10) compared with the contralateral BM and the intravenous group BM. This difference was independent of injury caused by intrabone injection. Consistent with the microenvironment modification, the allogeneic the engraftment rate and reconstitution capacity of HSCs were enhanced in the injected BM compared with the contralateral BM and intravenous group BM. Surgical removal of the injected bone at 7 days rather than 21 days reduced the levels of allogeneic granulocytes and HSCs in the peripheral blood. In conclusion, IBBMT specially modifies stromal cells in the injected BM which provide immune protective cues that improve the engraftment of allogeneic HSCs in an early period. PMID:27090963

  6. Origin of osteoclasts: Mature monocytes and macrophages are capable of differentiating into osteoclasts under a suitable microenvironment prepared by bone marrow-derived stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takahisa; Suda, Tatsuo ); Nishihara, Tatsuji; Koga, Toshihiko ); Martin, T.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors previously reported that osteoclast-like cells were formed in cocultures of a mouse marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2) with mouse spleen cells in the presence of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. In this study, they developed a new coculture system to determine the origin of osteoclasts. When relatively small numbers of mononuclear cells obtained from mouse bone marrow, spleen, thymus, or peripheral blood were cultured for 12 days on the ST2 cell layers, they formed colonies with a linear relationship between the number of colonies formed and the number of hemopoietic cells inoculated. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive monoculear and multinucleated cells appeared in the colonies (TRAPase-positive colonies) in response to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. When hemopoietic cells suspended in a collagen-gel solution were cultured on the ST2 cell layers to prevent their movement, TRAPase-positive colonies were similarly formed, indicating that each colony originated from a single cell. Salmon {sup 125}I-labeled calcitonin specifically bound to the TRAPase-positive cells. Resorption lacunae were formed on dentine slices on which cocultures were performed. These results indicate that osteoclasts are also derived from the mature monocytes and macrophages when a suitable microenvironment is provided by bone marrow-derived stromal cells.

  7. Phenotypic differences in white-tailed deer antlerogenic progenitor cells and marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Daley, Ethan L H; Alford, Andrea I; Miller, Joshua D; Goldstein, Steven A

    2014-05-01

    Deer antlers are bony appendages that are annually cast and rapidly regrown in a seasonal process coupled to the reproductive cycle. Due to the uniqueness of this process among mammals, we reasoned that a fundamental characterization of antler progenitor cell behavior may provide insights that could lead to improved strategies for promoting bone repair. In this study, we investigated whether white-tailed deer antlerogenic progenitor cells (APC) conform to basic criteria defining mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). In addition, we tested the effects of the artificial glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) on osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation as well as the degree of apoptosis during the latter. Comparisons were made to animal-matched marrow-derived MSC. APC and MSC generated similar numbers of colonies. APC cultures expanded less rapidly overall but experienced population recovery at later time points. In contrast to MSC, APC did not display adipogenic in vitro differentiation capacity. Under osteogenic culture conditions, APC and MSC exhibited different patterns of alkaline phosphatase activity over time. DEX increased APC alkaline phosphatase activity only initially but consistently led to decreased activity in MSC. APC and MSC in osteogenic culture underwent different time and DEX-dependent patterns of mineralization, yet APC and MSC achieved similar levels of mineral accrual in an ectopic ossicle model. During chondrogenic differentiation, APC exhibited high levels of apoptosis without a reduction in cell density. DEX decreased proteoglycan production and increased apoptosis in chondrogenic APC cultures but had the opposite effects in MSC. Our results suggest that APC and MSC proliferation and differentiation differ in their dependence on time, factors, and milieu. Antler tip APC may be more lineage-restricted osteo/chondroprogenitors with distinctly different responses to apoptotic and glucocorticoid stimuli. PMID:24313802

  8. Neuroprotective Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation in Combination With Treadmill Exercise Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes cognitive impairments, motor deficits, and neuropsychiatric/behavioral deficits problems. Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) facilitates functional recovery from brain insults. Treadmill exercise increases neurogenesis and inhibits apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the effects of BMSC transplantation in combination with treadmill exercise on memory function, by evaluating its effect on neurogenesis and apoptosis in the hippocampus following TBI. Methods: TBI was induced using an electromagnetic-controlled cortical impact device. BMSCs were transplanted into both sides of traumatic scar region 1 week after TBI induction. One week after transplantation of BMSCs, the rats in the exercise groups were trained to run on a treadmill for 30 minutes once daily for 28 days. Step-down avoidance task and radial 8-arm maze test were conducted. Levels of 5-bromo-2ʹ-deoxyuridine and caspase-3 were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Western blot was used to evaluate the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine kinase B (TrkB), total-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (t-ERK1/2), phosphorylated-ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2), Bcl-2, and Bax. Results: TBI deteriorated memory function, suppressed neurogenesis, and accelerated apoptosis in the hippocampus. Treadmill exercise and BMSC transplantation independently improved memory function by increasing neurogenesis with suppression of apoptosis through the BDNF-ERK pathway in the TBI-induced rats. Combination of BMSC transplantation with treadmill exercise showed additional enhancement of neurogenesis and suppression of apoptosis in the hippocampus. Conclusions: The present study shows that treadmill exercise may aid the therapeutic effect of BMSC transplantation on TBI in rats. PMID:27230460

  9. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Clinical Scale Culture: In Vitro Evaluation of Their Differentiation, Hematopoietic Support, and Immunosuppressive Capacities.

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Orduña, Guadalupe R; Mayani, Héctor; Castro-Manrreza, Marta E; Flores-Figueroa, Eugenia; Flores-Guzmán, Patricia; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Hernández-Estévez, Erika; Castell-Rodríguez, Andrés E; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana K; Legorreta-Haquet, María V; Santiago-Osorio, Edelmiro; Montesinos, Juan J

    2016-09-01

    The differentiation capacity, hematopoietic support, and immunomodulatory properties of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) make them attractive therapeutic agents for a wide range of diseases. Clinical scale cultures (CSCs) have been used to expand BM-MSCs for their use in cell therapy protocols; however, little is known about the functionality of the expanded cells. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the functional characteristics of BM-MSCs expanded from CSCs to determine the quality of the cells for cellular therapy protocols. To address this issue, we analyzed the morphology, immunophenotype, differentiation potential (adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic), hematopoietic support, and immunosuppressive capacity of BM-MSCs from short scale cultures (SSCs) and CSCs in a comparative manner. After 12 days of culture in CSCs (HYPERFlask System), BM-MSCs reached cell numbers of 125.52 × 10(6) ± 25.6 × 10(6) MSCs, which corresponded to the number of cells required for transplantation (∼1.7 × 10(6) MSCs/kg for a 70-kg patient). After expansion, BM-MSCs expressed the characteristic markers CD73, CD90, and CD105; however, expansion decreased their differentiation capacity toward the adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages and their ability to inhibit T-cell proliferation compared with SSCs-MSCs. Importantly, CSCs-MSCs maintained the ability to support the proliferation and expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells and the capacity to express the molecules, cytokines, and extracellular matrix proteins involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Our study highlights the need to evaluate the functional properties of the expanded BM-MSCs for verification of their quality for cell therapy protocols. PMID:27462977

  10. Cross-Talk Between Human Tenocytes and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Potentiates Extracellular Matrix Remodeling In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ekwueme, Emmanuel C.; Shah, Jay V.; Mohiuddin, Mahir; Ghebes, Corina A.; Crispim, João F.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Fernandes, Hugo A.M.; Freeman, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon and ligament (T/L) pathologies account for a significant portion of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders. Tissue engineering has emerged as a promising solution in the regeneration of both tissues. Specifically, the use of multipotent human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) has shown great promise to serve as both a suitable cell source for tenogenic regeneration and a source of trophic factors to induce tenogenesis. Using four donor sets, we investigated the bidirectional paracrine tenogenic response between human hamstring tenocytes (hHT) and bone marrow-derived hMSC. Cell metabolic assays showed that only one hHT donor experienced sustained notable increases in cell metabolic activity during co-culture. Histological staining confirmed that co-culture induced elevated collagen protein levels in both cell types at varying time-points in two of four donor sets assessed. Gene expression analysis using qPCR showed the varied up-regulation of anabolic and catabolic markers involved in extracellular matrix maintenance for hMSC and hHT. Furthermore, analysis of hMSC/hHT co-culture secretome using a reporter cell line for TGF-β, a potent inducer of tenogenesis, revealed a trend of higher TGF-β bioactivity in hMSC secretome compared to hHT. Finally, hHT cytoskeletal immunostaining confirmed that both cell types released soluble factors capable of inducing favorable tenogenic morphology, comparable to control levels of soluble TGF-β1. These results suggest a potential for TGF-β-mediated signaling mechanism that is involved during the paracrine interplay between the two cell types that is reminiscent of T/L matrix remodeling/ turnover. These findings have significant implications in the clinical use of hMSC for common T/L pathologies. PMID:26308651

  11. Cell biological effects of mechanical stimulations generated by focused extracorporeal shock wave applications on cultured human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Suhr, Frank; Delhasse, Yvonne; Bungartz, Gerd; Schmidt, Annette; Pfannkuche, Kurt; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2013-09-01

    Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) bear tremendous clinical potential due to their immunomodulatory properties in transplantation settings and their contribution to tissue regeneration. In fact, they are among the most promising types of stem-like cells for therapeutic applications and are the subject of intense research. However, the clinical use of hBMSCs has been confounded by limitations in their availability; they are scarce cells cumbersome to isolate and purify. Additionally, they are difficult to target to the site of injury in regeneration experiments. In order to combat these limitations, focused extracorporeal shock waves (fESW, 0.2/0.3mJ∗mm(-2)) were applied to purified, cultured hBMSCs. fESW (0.2mJ∗mm(-2)) stimulations were found to increase hBMSCs' growth rate (p<0.05), proliferation (p<0.05), migration, cell tracking and wound healing (p<0.05, respectively), as well as to reduce the rate of apoptosis activation (p<0.05). The increase in hBMSC migration behavior was found to be mediated by active remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton as indicated by increased directed stress fiber formations (p<0.05). Furthermore, hBMSCs maintain their differentiation potentials after fESW treatment, whereas 0.2mJ∗mm(-2) is the most effective application. In conclusion, our results establish first-timely that hBMSCs' behavior can be modified and optimized in response to defined mechanical stimulation. These findings appear particularly promising as they suggest that mechanical stress preconditions hBMSCs for improved therapeutic performance without genetic manipulations and that mechanically preconditioned hBMSCs will be advantageous for hBMSC-based tissue regeneration. Therefore, this approach opens the door for exploiting the full potential of these cells in regenerative medicine. PMID:23880536

  12. Further observations on the behavioral and neural effects of bone marrow stromal cells in rodent pain models

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Chu, Yu-Xia; Imai, Satoshi; Yang, Jia-Le; Zou, Shiping; Mohammad, Zaid; Wei, Feng; Dubner, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Background Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have shown potential to treat chronic pain, although much still needs to be learned about their efficacy and mechanisms of action under different pain conditions. Here, we provide further convergent evidence on the effects of BMSCs in rodent pain models. Results In an orofacial pain model involving injury of a tendon of the masseter muscle, BMSCs attenuated behavioral pain conditions assessed by von Frey filaments and a conditioned place avoidance test in female Sprague-Dawley rats. The antihyperalgesia of BMSCs in females lasted for <8 weeks, which is shorter than that seen in males. To relate preclinical findings to human clinical conditions, we used human BMSCs. Human BMSCs (1.5 M cells, i.v.) attenuated mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by spinal nerve ligation and suppressed spinal nerve ligation-induced aversive behavior, and the effect persisted through the 8-week observation period. In a trigeminal slice preparation, BMSC-treated and nerve-injured C57B/L mice showed reduced amplitude and frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents, as well as excitatory synaptic currents evoked by electrical stimulation of the trigeminal nerve root, suggesting inhibition of trigeminal neuronal hyperexcitability and primary afferent input by BMSCs. Finally, we observed that GluN2A (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2A) tyrosine phosphorylation and protein kinase Cgamma (PKCγ) immunoreactivity in rostral ventromedial medulla was suppressed at 8 weeks after BMSC in tendon-injured rats. Conclusions Collectively, the present work adds convergent evidence supporting the use of BMSCs in pain control. As PKCγ activity related to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation is critical in opioid tolerance, these results help to understand the mechanisms of BMSC-produced long-term antihyperalgesia, which requires opioid receptors in rostral ventromedial medulla and apparently lacks the development of tolerance

  13. Comparative cellular and molecular analyses of pooled bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells during continuous passaging and after successive cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Nathan, Kavitha Ganesan; Singh, Gurbind; Thrichelvam, Saratha Thevi; Mohd Yusof, Nurul Ain Nasim; Fakharuzi, Noor Atiqah; Zakaria, Zubaidah; Bhonde, Ramesh; Das, Anjan Kumar; Majumdar, Anish Sen

    2012-10-01

    The clinical application of human bone marrow derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) requires expansion, cryopreservation, and transportation from the laboratory to the site of cell implantation. The cryopreservation and thawing process of MSCs may have important effects on the viability, growth characteristics and functionality of these cells both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, MSCs after two rounds of cryopreservation have not been as well characterized as fresh MSCs from the transplantation perspective. The objective of this study was to determine if the effect of successive cryopreservation of pooled MSCs during the exponential growth phase could impair their morphology, phenotype, gene expression, and differentiation capabilities. MSCs cryopreserved at passage 3 (cell bank) were thawed and expanded up to passage 4 and cryopreserved for the second time. These cells (passive) were then thawed and cultured up to passage 6, and, at each passage MSCs were characterized. As control, pooled passage 3 cells (active) after one round of cryopreservation were taken all the way to passage 6 without cryopreservation. We determined the growth rate of MSCs for both culture conditions in terms of population doubling number (PDN) and population doubling time (PDT). Gene expression profiles for pluripotency markers and tissue specific markers corresponding to neuroectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm lineages were also analyzed for active and passive cultures of MSC. The results show that in both culture conditions, MSCs exhibited similar growth properties, phenotypes and gene expression patterns as well as similar differentiation potential to osteo-, chondro-, and adipo-lineages in vitro. To conclude, it appears that successive or multiple rounds of cryopreservation of MSCs did not alter the fundamental characteristics of these cells and may be used for clinical therapy. PMID:22615164

  14. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo. PMID:26808122

  15. Identification of Pathways Mediating Growth Differentiation Factor5-Induced Tenogenic Differentiation in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sik-Loo; Ahmad, Tunku Sara; Ng, Wuey-Min; Azlina, Amir Abbas; Azhar, Mahmood Merican; Selvaratnam, Lakshmi; Kamarul, Tunku

    2015-01-01

    To date, the molecular signalling mechanisms which regulate growth factors-induced MSCs tenogenic differentiation remain largely unknown. Therefore, a study to determine the global gene expression profile of tenogenic differentiation in human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) using growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) was conducted. Microarray analyses were conducted on hMSCs cultures supplemented with 100 ng/ml of GDF5 and compared to undifferentiated hMSCs and adult tenocytes. Results of QuantiGene® Plex assay support the use and interpretation of the inferred gene expression profiles and pathways information. From the 27,216 genes assessed, 873 genes (3.21% of the overall human transcriptome) were significantly altered during the tenogenic differentiation process (corrected p<0.05). The genes identified as potentially associated with tenogenic differentiation were ARHGAP29, CCL2, integrin alpha 8 and neurofilament medium polypeptides. These genes, were mainly associated with cytoskeleton reorganization (stress fibers formation) signaling. Pathway analysis demonstrated the potential molecular pathways involved in tenogenic differentiation were: cytoskeleton reorganization related i.e. keratin filament signaling and activin A signaling; cell adhesion related i.e. chemokine and adhesion signaling; and extracellular matrix related i.e. arachidonic acid production signaling. Further investigation using atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated apparent cytoskeleton reorganization in GDF5-induced hMSCs suggesting that cytoskeleton reorganization signaling is an important event involved in tenogenic differentiation. Besides, a reduced nucleostemin expression observed suggested a lower cell proliferation rate in hMSCs undergoing tenogenic differentiation. Understanding and elucidating the tenogenic differentiation signalling pathways are important for future optimization of tenogenic hMSCs for functional tendon cell-based therapy and

  16. Comparative osteogenesis of maxilla and iliac crest human bone marrow stromal cells attached to oxidized titanium - a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Akintoye, Sunday O; Giavis, Parascevi; Stefanik, Derek; Levin, Lawrence; Mante, Francis K

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Severe alveolar bone loss affects dental implant placement. Bone augmentation by grafting iliac crest bone rich in osteoprogenitor cells like bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) requires a second surgical procedure in non-orofacial bone. Skeletal site-specific osteogenesis indicates maxilla and mandible BMSCs are highly proliferative and exhibit osteogenic properties superior to iliac crest BMSCs. Alveolar bone can be easily obtained during routine dental surgery, but it is unclear if titanium-attached alveolar BMSCs will retain their superior osteogenic properties. This study evaluated and compared in vitro osteogenic properties of titanium-attached maxilla and iliac crest BMSCs in same individuals. Materials and Methods Primary culture of maxilla and iliac crest BMSCs from four normal healthy volunteers were expanded in culture. In 24-well plates, first passage BMSCs were seeded directly (1 × 104 cells/well) on oxidized titanium discs (1.27cm diameter and 2mm thickness) or tissue culture plate. Each cell type was assessed for affinity for titanium, post-attachment survival and osteogenic differentiation based on alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin expressions. Results There was no difference in the affinity of maxilla and iliac crest BMSCs to titanium. However, titanium-attached maxilla BMSCs were apparently more osteogenically responsive than iliac crest cells based on calcium accumulation and gene expression of alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin. But these differences were not statistically significant in this small patient sample. Conclusion Maxilla and iliac crest BMSCs have similar attachment affinity for titanium. This pilot study indicate that titanium-attached maxilla BMSCs were more osteogenically responsive and may be a viable and more readily available donor graft material in implant dentistry. PMID:18983324

  17. Gamma irradiation preserves immunosuppressive potential and inhibits clonogenic capacity of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Ana Valéria Gouveia; Riewaldt, Julia; Wehner, Rebekka; Schmitz, Marc; Odendahl, Marcus; Bornhäuser, Martin; Tonn, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for the treatment of graft-versus-host and autoimmune diseases. Here, by virtue of their immunosuppressive effects, they are discussed to exhibit inhibitory actions on various immune effector cells, including T lymphocytes that promote the underlying pathology. While it becomes apparent that MSCs exhibit their therapeutic effect in a transient manner, they are usually transplanted from third party donors into heavily immunocompromised patients. However, little is known about potential late complications of persisting third party MSCs in these patients. We therefore analysed the effect of gamma irradiation on the potency and proliferation of MSCs to elucidate an irradiation dose, which would allow inhibition of MSC proliferation while at the same time preserving their immunosuppressive function. Bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) were gamma-irradiated at increasing doses of 5, 10 and 30 Gy and subsequently assessed by colony formation unit (CFU)-assay, Annexin V-staining and in a mixed lymphocyte reaction, to assess colony growth, apoptosis and the immunosuppressive capacity, respectively. Complete loss of proliferative capacity measured by colony formation was observed after irradiation with a dose equal to or greater than 10 Gy. No significant decrease of viable cells was detected, as compared to non-irradiated BM-MSCs. Notably, irradiated BM-MSCs remained highly immunosuppressive in vitro for at least 5 days after irradiation. Gamma irradiation does not impair the immunosuppressive capacity of BM-MSCs in vitro and thus might increase the safety of MSC-based cell products in clinical applications. PMID:24655362

  18. Large-scale expansion of pre-isolated bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in serum-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Gottipamula, Sanjay; Muttigi, Manjunatha S; Chaansa, S; Ashwin, K M; Priya, Nancy; Kolkundkar, Udaykumar; SundarRaj, Swathi; Majumdar, Anish Sen; Seetharam, Raviraja N

    2016-02-01

    The regenerative potential of mesenchymal stromal or stem cells (MSCs) has generated tremendous interest for treating various degenerative diseases. Regulatory preference is to use a culture medium that is devoid of bovine components for stem cell expansion intended for therapeutic applications. However, a clear choice an alternative to fetal bovine serum (FBS) has not yet emerged. We have screened five different commercially available serum-free media (SFM) for their ability to support the growth and expansion of pre-isolated undifferentiated bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) and compared the results with cells grown in standard FBS-containing medium as control. In addition, based on initial screening results, BD Mosaic™ Mesenchymal Stem Cell Serum-free (BD-SFM) medium was evaluated in large-scale cultures for the performance and culture characteristics of BM-MSCs. Of the five different serum-free media, BD-SFM enhanced BM-MSCs growth and expansion in Cell STACK (CS), but the cell yield per CS-10 was less when compared to the control medium. The characteristics of MSCs were measured in terms of population doubling time (PDT), cell yield and expression of MSC-specific markers. Significant differences were observed between BD-SFM and control medium in terms of population doublings (PDs), cell yield, CFU-F and morphological features, whereas surface phenotype and differentiation potentials were comparable. The BD-SFM-cultured MSCs were also found to retain the differentiation potential, immune-privileged status and immunosuppressive properties inherent to MSCs. Our results suggest that BD-SFM supports large-scale expansion of BM-MSCs for therapeutic use. PMID:23495227

  19. Influence of biomechanical and biochemical stimulation on the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells seeded on polyurethane scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    TENG, SONGSONG; LIU, CHAOXU; GUENTHER, DANIEL; OMAR, MOHAMED; NEUNABER, CLAUDIA; KRETTEK, CHRISTIAN; JAGODZINSKI, MICHAEL

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to compare the effects of cyclic compression, perfusion, dexamethasone (DEX) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) on the proliferation and differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in polyurethane scaffolds in a perfusion bioreactor. Polyurethane scaffolds seeded with hBMSCs were cultured under six different conditions, as follows: 10% Cyclic compression at 0.5 and 5 Hz; 10 ml/min perfusion; 100 nM DEX; 100 ng/ml BMP-7; and 1 ml/min perfusion without mechanical and biochemical stimulation (control). On days 7 and 14, samples were tested for the following data: Cell proliferation; mRNA expression of Runx2, COL1A1 and osteocalcin; osteocalcin content; calcium deposition; and the equilibrium modulus of the tissue specimen. The results indicated that BMP-7 and 10 ml/min perfusion promoted cell proliferation, which was inhibited by 5 Hz cyclic compression and DEX. On day 7, the 5 Hz cyclic compression inhibited Runx2 expression, whereas the 0.5 Hz cyclic compression and BMP-7 upregulated the COL1A1 mRNA levels on day 7 and enhanced the osteocalcin expression on day 14. The DEX-treated hBMSCs exhibited downregulated osteocalcin expression. After 14 days, the BMP-7 group exhibited the highest calcium deposition, followed by the 0.5 Hz cyclic compression and the DEX groups. The equilibrium modulus of the engineered constructs significantly increased in the BMP-7, 0.5 Hz cyclic compression and DEX groups. In conclusion, the present results suggest that BMP-7 and perfusion enhance cell proliferation, whereas high frequency cyclic compression inhibits the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. Low frequency cyclic compression is more effective than DEX, but less effective compared with BMP-7 on the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs seeded on polyurethane scaffolds. PMID:27284290

  20. Demonstration of the presence of independent pre-osteoblastic and pre-adipocytic cell populations in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Post, S; Abdallah, B M; Bentzon, J F; Kassem, M

    2008-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are defined as plastic-adherent, clonal cells that are common progenitors for osteoblasts and adipocytes. An inverse relationship between bone and fat has been observed in several clinical conditions and has been suggested to be caused by re-directing MSC differentiation into one particular lineage. However, this inverse relationship between bone and fat is not consistent and under certain in vivo conditions, bone and fat can change independently suggesting separate precursor cell populations. In order to test for this hypothesis, we extensively characterized two plastic-adherent clonal MSC lines (mMSC1 and mMSC2) derived from murine bone marrow. The two cell lines grew readily in culture and have undergone more than 100 population doublings with no apparent differences in their growth rates. Both cell lines were positive for the murine MSC marker Sca-1 and mMSC1 was also positive for CD13. Both cell lines were exposed to in vitro culture induction of osteogenesis and adipogenesis. mMSC1 and not mMSC2 were only able to differentiate to adipocytes evidenced by the expression of adipocyte markers (aP2, adiponectin, adipsin, PPARgamma2 and C/EBPa) and the presence of mature adipocytes visualized by Oil Red O staining. On the other hand, mMSC2 and not mMSC1 differentiated to osteoblast lineage as demonstrated by up-regulation of osteoblastic makers (CBFA1/RUNX2, Osterix, alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein and osteopontin) and formation of alizarin red stained mineralized matrix in vitro. Consistent with the in vitro results, mMSC2 and not mMSC1, were able to form bone in vivo after subcutaneous implantation in immune-deficient (NOD/SCID) mice. Our data suggest that contrary to the current belief, bone marrow contains clonal subpopulations of cells that are committed to either osteoblast or adipocyte lineage. These cell populations may undergo independent changes during aging and in bone diseases and thus represent important targets for

  1. Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)-1/2 Triggering of Multiple Myeloma Cells Modulates Their Adhesion to Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Enhances Bortezomib-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Jahangir; Mutis, Tuna; Garssen, Johan; Redegeld, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    In multiple myeloma (MM), the malignant plasma cells usually localize to the bone marrow where they develop drug resistance due to adhesion to stromal cells and various environmental signals. Hence, modulation of this interaction is expected to influence drug sensitivity of MM cells. Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands have displayed heterogeneous effects on B-cell malignancies and also on MM cells in a few recent studies, but effects on adhesion and drug sensitivity of myeloma cells in the context of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have never been investigated. In the present study, we explored the modulatory effects of TLR1/2 ligand (Pam3CSK4) on adhesion of human myeloma cells to BMSCs. It is shown that TLR1/2 triggering has opposite effects in different HMCLs on their adhesion to BMSCs. Fravel, L363, UM-6, UM-9 and U266 showed increased adhesion to BMSC in parallel with an increased surface expression of integrin molecules α4 and αVβ3. OPM-1, OPM-2 and NCI-H929 showed a dose-dependent decrease in adhesion upon TLR activation following a downregulation of β7 integrin expression. Importantly, TLR1/2 triggering increased cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of bortezomib in myeloma cells independent of the effect on stromal cell adhesion. Moreover, the apoptosis-enhancing effect of Pam3CSK4 paralleled induction of cleaved caspase-3 protein in FACS analysis suggesting a caspase-dependent mechanism. Our findings uncover a novel role of TLR activation in MM cells in the context of bone marrow microenvironment. Stimulation of TLR1/2 bypasses the protective shield of BMSCs and may be an interesting strategy to enhance drug sensitivity of multiple myeloma cells. PMID:24794258

  2. Effect of surface modification of nanofibres with glutamic acid peptide on calcium phosphate nucleation and osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Ozan; Kumar, Ankur; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong; Cui, Tong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2016-02-01

    Biomineralization is mediated by extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins with amino acid sequences rich in glutamic acid. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium phosphate deposition on aligned nanofibres surface-modified with a glutamic acid peptide on osteogenic differentiation of rat marrow stromal cells. Blend of EEGGC peptide (GLU) conjugated low molecular weight polylactide (PLA) and high molecular weight poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was electrospun to form aligned nanofibres (GLU-NF). The GLU-NF microsheets were incubated in a modified simulated body fluid for nucleation of calcium phosphate crystals on the fibre surface. To achieve a high calcium phosphate to fibre ratio, a layer-by-layer approach was used to improve diffusion of calcium and phosphate ions inside the microsheets. Based on dissipative particle dynamics simulation of PLGA/PLA-GLU fibres, > 80% of GLU peptide was localized to the fibre surface. Calcium phosphate to fibre ratios as high as 200%, between those of cancellous (160%) and cortical (310%) bone, was obtained with the layer-by-layer approach. The extent of osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of marrow stromal cells seeded on GLU-NF microsheets was directly related to the amount of calcium phosphate deposition on the fibres prior to cell seeding. Expression of osteogenic markers osteopontin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin and type 1 collagen increased gradually with calcium phosphate deposition on GLU-NF microsheets. Results demonstrate that surface modification of aligned synthetic nanofibres with EEGGC peptide dramatically affects nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate crystals on the fibres leading to increased osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells and mineralization. PMID:23897753

  3. Clonal analysis of multipotent stromal cells derived from CD271+ bone marrow mononuclear cells: functional heterogeneity and different mechanisms of allosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Kuçi, Zyrafete; Seiberth, Julia; Latifi-Pupovci, Hatixhe; Wehner, Sibylle; Stein, Stefan; Grez, Manuel; Bönig, Halvard; Köhl, Ulrike; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Kuçi, Selim

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports demonstrated a relationship between proliferation potential and trilineage differentiation in mesenchymal stromal cell-derived clones generated using plastic adherence (PA-MSCs). However, there are no reports presenting a clonal analysis of the proliferative potential, differentiation potential and allosuppressive effects of human mesenchymal stromal cell subsets. In this study, we performed a clonal analysis of mesenchymal stromal cells generated from human CD271+ bone marrow mononuclear cells (CD271-MSCs). After transfection with the gene encoding green fluorescent protein, the cells were single-cell sorted and cultured for 2–4 weeks. A population doubling analysis demonstrated that 25% of CD271-MSC clones are fast-proliferating clones compared to only 10% of PA-MSC clones. Evaluation of the allosuppressive potential demonstrated that 81.8% of CD271-MSC clones were highly allosuppressive compared to only 58% of PA-MSC clones. However, no consistent correlation was observed between allosuppression and proliferative potential. Prostaglandin E2 levels were positively correlated with the allosuppressive activity of individual clones, suggesting that this molecule may be a useful predictive biomarker for the allosuppressive potential of mesenchymal stromal cells. In contrast, inhibitory studies of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase indicated that none of the clones used this enzyme to mediate their allosuppressive effect. Differentiation studies revealed the presence of tripotent, bipotent and unipotent CD271-MSC and PA-MSC clones which suppressed the allogeneic reaction to differing extents in vitro. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate differences between CD271-MSCs and PA-MSCs and indicate that neither proliferation potential nor differentiation potential represents a consistent predictive parameter for the immunomodulatory effects of either type of mesenchymal stromal cells. PMID:23975178

  4. Effects of Kagocel® on the Counts of Multipotent Stromal Cells, Expression of Cytokine Genes in Primary Cultures of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells, and Serum Cytokine Concentrations in CBA Mice.

    PubMed

    Gorskaya, Yu F; Grabko, V I; Konopleva, M V; Suslov, A P; Nesterenko, V G

    2015-06-01

    The efficiency of cloning of bone marrow multipotent stromal cells (ECF-MSC) from CBA mice and the MSC counts in the femoral bone increased 24 h after a single in vivo (but not in vitro) injection of kagocel (active substance of antiviral drug Kagocel (®) ) 1.4 times (in response to 50-80 μg) and 4.6 times (in response to 250 μg). The maximum increase of ECF-MSC in response to 50 μg per mouse was detected just 1 h after Kagocel injection to intact mice and to mice previously receiving the drug for 3 days (2 and 1.7 times, respectively). The increase of ECF-MSC was 3-fold less intense in response to oral Kagocel in a dose of 250 μg/mouse vs. intraperitoneal Kagocel, ECF-MSC corresponding to its level in response to oral Poly (I:C). In vivo Kagocel led to emergence of proinflammatory cytokine IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-8 mRNA in primary cultures of bone marrow stromal cells. Serum concentrations of IL-2, IL-5, IL-10, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, and IL-12 increased 1.5 and 2 times just 1 h after Kagocel injection in doses of 30-50 and 250 μg, respectively, to intact mice and to animals previously treated with the drug for 3 days. The cytokine concentrations normalized after 3 h and increased again after 24 h, though did not reach the levels recorded 1 h after the drug injection. These data indicated that the therapeutic and preventive effects of Kagocel, together with its previously demonstrated stimulation of α- and β-interferon production during several days, could be due to the capacity of this drug to increase the bone marrow ECF-MSC, serum cytokine concentrations, and induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes in the bone marrow stromal cells 1 h after its injection. PMID:26087752

  5. Lack of DNA polymerase theta (POLQ) radiosensitizes bone marrow stromal cells in vitro and increases reticulocyte micronuclei after total-body irradiation.

    PubMed

    Goff, Julie P; Shields, Donna S; Seki, Mineaki; Choi, Serah; Epperly, Michael W; Dixon, Tracy; Wang, Hong; Bakkenist, Christopher J; Dertinger, Stephen D; Torous, Dorothea K; Wittschieben, John; Wood, Richard D; Greenberger, Joel S

    2009-08-01

    Abstract Mammalian POLQ (pol theta) is a specialized DNA polymerase with an unknown function in vivo. Roles have been proposed in chromosome stability, as a backup enzyme in DNA base excision repair, and in somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. The purified enzyme can bypass AP sites and thymine glycol. Mice defective in POLQ are viable and have been reported to have elevated spontaneous and radiation-induced frequencies of micronuclei in circulating red blood cells. To examine the potential roles of POLQ in hematopoiesis and in responses to oxidative stress responses, including ionizing radiation, bone marrow cultures and marrow stromal cell lines were established from Polq(+/+) and Polq(-/-) mice. Aging of bone marrow cultures was not altered, but Polq(-/-) cells were more sensitive to gamma radiation than were Polq(+/+) cells. The D(0) was 1.38 +/- 0.06 Gy for Polq(+/+) cells compared to 1.27 +/- 0.16 and 0.98 +/- 0.10 Gy (P = 0.032) for two Polq(-/-) clones. Polq(-/-) cells were moderately more sensitive to bleomycin than Polq(+/+) cells and were not hypersensitive to paraquat or hydrogen peroxide. ATM kinase activation appeared to be normal in gamma-irradiated Polq(-/-) cells. Inhibition of ATM kinase activity increased the radiosensitivity of Polq(+/+) cells slightly but did not affect Polq(-/-) cells. Polq(-/-) mice had more spontaneous and radiation-induced micronucleated reticulocytes than Polq+/+ and (+/-) mice. The sensitivity of POLQ-defective bone marrow stromal cells to ionizing radiation and bleomycin and the increase in micronuclei in red blood cells support a role for this DNA polymerase in cellular tolerance of DNA damage that can lead to double-strand DNA breaks. PMID:19630521

  6. Interactions between Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Adipocytes, and Osteoblasts in a 3D Tri-Culture Model of Hyperglycemic Conditions in the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rinker, Torri E.; Hammoudi, Taymour M.; Kemp, Melissa L.; Lu, Hang; Temenoff, Johnna S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have found that uncontrolled diabetes and consequential hyperglycemic conditions can lead to increased incidence of osteoporosis. Osteoblasts, adipocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are all components of the bone marrow microenvironment and thus may have an effect on diabetes-related osteoporosis. However, few studies have investigated the influence of these three cell types on each other, especially in the context of hyperglycemia. Thus, we developed a hydrogel-based 3D culture platform engineered to allow live-cell retrieval in order to investigate the interactions between MSCs, osteoblasts, and adipocytes in mono-, co-, and tri-culture configurations under hyperglycemic conditions for 7 days of culture. Gene expression, histochemical analysis of differentiation markers, and cell viability were measured for all cell types, and MSC-laden hydrogels were degraded to retrieve cells to assess colony-forming capacity. Multivariate models of gene expression data indicated that primary discrimination was dependent on neighboring cell type, validating the need for co-culture configurations to study conditions modeling this disease state. MSC viability and clonogenicity were reduced when mono- and co-cultured with osteoblasts in high glucose levels. In contrast, MSCs had no reduction of viability or clonogenicity when cultured with adipocytes in high glucose conditions and adipogenic gene expression indicated that cross-talk between MSCs and adipocytes may occur. Thus, our unique culture platform combined with post-culture multivariate analysis provided novel insight into cellular interactions within the MSC microenvironment and highlights the necessity of multi-cellular culture systems for further investigation of complex pathologies such as diabetes and osteoporosis. PMID:24463781

  7. Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Peptide Prevents Serum Deprivation-Induced Apoptosis in Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Osteoblastic Cells.

    PubMed

    Berlier, J L; Kharroubi, I; Zhang, J; Dalla Valle, A; Rigutto, S; Mathieu, M; Gangji, V; Rasschaert, J

    2015-12-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC) are able to differentiate into cells of connective tissue lineages, including bone and cartilage. They are therefore considered as a promising tool for the treatment of bone degenerative diseases. One of the major issues in regenerative cell therapy is the biosafety of fetal bovine serum used for cell culture. Therefore, the development of a culture medium devoid of serum but preserving hBMSC viability will be of clinical value. The glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) has an anti-apoptotic action in insulin-producing cells. Interestingly, GIP also exerts beneficial effects on bone turnover by acting on osteoblasts and osteoclasts. We therefore evaluated the ability of GIP to prevent cell death in osteoblastic cells cultured in serum-free conditions. In hBMSC and SaOS-2 cells, activation of the GIP receptor increased intracellular cAMP levels. Serum deprivation induced apoptosis in SaOS-2 and hBMSC that was reduced by 30 and 50 %, respectively, in the presence of GIP. The protective effect of GIP involves activation of the adenylate cyclase pathway and inhibition of caspases 3/7 activation. These findings demonstrate that GIP exerts a protective action against apoptosis in hBMSC and suggest a novel approach to preserve viability of hBMSC cultured in the absence of serum. PMID:26254594

  8. Si(3)N(4)-bioglass composites stimulate the proliferation of MG63 osteoblast-like cells and support the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Amaral, M; Costa, M A; Lopes, M A; Silva, R F; Santos, J D; Fernandes, M H

    2002-12-01

    The in vitro osteocompatibility of a novel Si(3)N(4)-bioglass composite (70-30% weight proportion) with improved mechanical properties (fracture toughness = 4.4 M Pa m(1/2); bending strength = 383 +/- 47 MPa) is reported. Immersion of the composite samples in culture medium (30 min to 7 days) resulted in rapid protein adsorption to the surface and, also, dissolution of the intergranular phase of bioglass (time-dependent process) with the formation of different size cavities. "As-received" and pre-treated material samples presented a similar behaviour concerning the proliferation of MG63 osteoblast-like cells, evaluated during a 5-day culture period. Seeded materials showed a higher cell growth rate as compared to cultures performed on the standard plastic culture plates. To assess the osteogenic potential of the composite, "as-received" material samples were seeded with human bone marrow cells and cultured for 35 days in experimental conditions that favour the development of the osteoblastic phenotype. The cell adhesion process was similar to that observed in control cultures. Cells successfully adapted to the irregularities of the surface and were able to grow towards inside the cavities; in addition, osteogenic differentiation occurred with the formation of abundant cell-mediated mineralised deposits. Results suggest that this Si(3)N(4)-bioglass composite seems to be a promising candidate for high-stress medical applications. PMID:12361631

  9. Naringin promotes differentiation of bone marrow stem cells into osteoblasts by upregulating the expression levels of microRNA-20a and downregulating the expression levels of PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jifeng; Li, Jie; Fan, Qinbo

    2015-09-01

    Naringin is a dihydrotestosterone flavonoid compound that significantly inhibits bone loss, improves bone density, and enhances biomechanical anti‑compression performance. Previous studies have demonstrated that naringin improves the activity levels of osteocalcin (OC) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in MC3T3‑E1 osteoblast precursor cells. The present study investigated the effects of naringin on osteoblastic differentiation and inhibition of adipocyte formation in bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs). The levels of osteogenesis were modulated via upregulation of the expression levels of microRNA (miR)‑20a, and downregulation of the expression levels of peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor γ (PPARγ). The results indicated that naringin significantly enhanced BMSC proliferation in a dose‑dependent manner. In addition, naringin significantly increased the mRNA expression levels of OC, ALP, and collagen type I. Furthermore, naringin decreased the protein expression levels of PPARγ, and increased the expression levels of miR‑20a in the BMSCs. These results suggested that miR‑20a may regulate the expression of PPARγ in BMSCs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report naringin‑induced osteogenesis via upregulation of the expression levels of miR‑20a, and downregulation of the expression levels of PPARγ. These results indicated the important role of naringin in BMSC differentiation. PMID:26126997

  10. Polarized neural stem cells derived from adult bone marrow stromal cells develop a rosette-like structure.

    PubMed

    Darabi, Shahram; Tiraihi, Taki; Ruintan, Atefeh; Abbaszadeh, Hojatt Allah; Delshad, AliReza; Taheri, Taher

    2013-09-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were reported to form floating aggregation of cells with expression of nestin, a marker for neural stem cells (NSCs). The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the morphology and the molecular markers expressed by NSCs derived from these neurospheres. The BMSCs were isolated from Sprague Dawley rats and evaluated for osteogenesis, lipogenesis, and expression of fibronectin, CD90, CD106, CD31, and Oct4. The BMSCs were cultured with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/F12 containing 15% fetal bovine serum, then with DMEM/F12 containing 2% B27, basic fibroblast growth factor, and epidermal growth factor. The cell aggregates or spheres were stained with acridine orange, which showed that the neurospheres comprised aggregated cells at either premitotic/postsynthetic (PS), postmitotic/presynthetic (PM) phases of cell cycle, or a mixture of both. The NSCs harvested from the neurospheres were polar with eccentric nucleus, and at either a PS or a PM cell cycle phases, some cells at the latter phase tended to form rosette-like structures. The cells were immunostained for molecular markers such as nestin, neurofilament 68 (NF68), NF160, and NF200 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Myelin basic protein (MBP), the pluripotency (Oct4, Nanog, and SOX2), and the differentiation genes (NeuroD1, Tubb4, and Musashi I) were also evaluated using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Nestin, NF68, NF160, NF200, GFAP, O4, and N-cadherin were expressed in the NSCs. The percentage of immunoreactive cells to nestin was significantly higher than that of the other neuronal markers. MBP was not expressed in BMSCs, neurospheres, and NSCs. The neurospheres were immunoreactive to GFAP. RT-PCR showed the expression of NeuroD1 and Musashi I. The pluripotency gene (SOX2) was expressed in NSCs. Oct4 and Nanog were expressed in BMSCs, while Oct4 and SOX2 were expressed in the neurosphere. This indicates that a pluripotency

  11. The effect of two novel amino acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles on survival in vascular endothelial cells, bone marrow stromal cells, and macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinghua; Meng, Ning; Zhang, Yanru; Han, Lei; Su, Le; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Shangli; Zhang, Yun; Zhao, Baoxiang; Miao, Junying

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been popularly used in many fields. Recently, many kinds of MNPs are modified as new absorbents, which have attracted considerable attention and are promising to be applied in waste water. In our previous study, we synthesized two novel MNPs surface-coated with glycine or lysine, which could efficiently remove many anionic and cationic dyes under severe conditions. It should be considered that MNP residues in water may exert some side effects on human health. In the present study, we evaluated the potential nanotoxicity of MNPs in human endothelial cells, macrophages, and rat bone marrow stromal cells. The results showed that the two kinds of nanoparticles were consistently absorbed into the cell cytoplasm. The concentration of MNPs@Gly that could distinctly decrease survival was 15 μg/ml in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) or bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and 10 μg/ml in macrophages. While the concentration of MNPs@Lys that obviously reduced viability was 15 μg/ml in HUVECs or macrophages and 50 μg/ml in BMSCs. Furthermore, cell nucleus staining and cell integrity assay indicated that the nanoparticles induced cell apoptosis, but not necrosis even at a high concentration. Altogether, these data suggest that the amino acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles exert relatively high cytotoxicity. By contrast, lysine-coated magnetic nanoparticles are more secure than glycine-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  12. Incorporation of Fucoidan in β-Tricalcium phosphate-Chitosan scaffold prompts the differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells into osteogenic lineage.

    PubMed

    Puvaneswary, Subramaniam; Raghavendran, Hanumantharao Balaji; Talebian, Sepehr; Murali, Malliga Raman; A Mahmod, Suhaeb; Singh, Simmrat; Kamarul, Tunku

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we reported the fabrication and characterization of a novel tricalcium phosphate-fucoidan-chitosan (TCP-Fu-Ch) biocomposite scaffold. However, the previous report did not show whether the biocomposite scaffold can exhibit osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells in osteogenic media and normal media supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). On day 15, the release of osteocalcin, was significant in the TCP-Fu-Ch scaffold, when compared with that in the TCP-Ch scaffold, and the level of release was approximately 8 and 6 ng/ml in osteogenic and normal media supplemented with PDGF-BB, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy of the TCP-Fu-Ch scaffold demonstrated mineralization and apatite layer formation on day 14, while the addition of PDGF-BB also improved the osteogenic differentiation of the scaffold. An array of gene expression analysis demonstrated that TCP-Fu-Ch scaffold cultured in osteogenic and normal media supplemented with PDGF-BB showed significant improvement in the expression of collagen 1, Runt-related transcription factor 2, osteonectin, bone gamma-carboxyglutamate protein, alkaline phosphatase, and PPA2, but a decline in the expression of integrin. Altogether, the present study demonstrated that fucoidan-incorporated TCP-Ch scaffold could be used in the differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells and can be a potential candidate for the treatment of bone-related ailments through tissue engineering technology. PMID:27068453

  13. Incorporation of Fucoidan in β-Tricalcium phosphate-Chitosan scaffold prompts the differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells into osteogenic lineage

    PubMed Central

    Puvaneswary, Subramaniam; Raghavendran, Hanumantharao Balaji; Talebian, Sepehr; Murali, Malliga Raman; A Mahmod, Suhaeb; Singh, Simmrat; Kamarul, Tunku

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we reported the fabrication and characterization of a novel tricalcium phosphate-fucoidan-chitosan (TCP-Fu-Ch) biocomposite scaffold. However, the previous report did not show whether the biocomposite scaffold can exhibit osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells in osteogenic media and normal media supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). On day 15, the release of osteocalcin, was significant in the TCP-Fu-Ch scaffold, when compared with that in the TCP-Ch scaffold, and the level of release was approximately 8 and 6 ng/ml in osteogenic and normal media supplemented with PDGF-BB, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy of the TCP-Fu-Ch scaffold demonstrated mineralization and apatite layer formation on day 14, while the addition of PDGF-BB also improved the osteogenic differentiation of the scaffold. An array of gene expression analysis demonstrated that TCP-Fu-Ch scaffold cultured in osteogenic and normal media supplemented with PDGF-BB showed significant improvement in the expression of collagen 1, Runt-related transcription factor 2, osteonectin, bone gamma-carboxyglutamate protein, alkaline phosphatase, and PPA2, but a decline in the expression of integrin. Altogether, the present study demonstrated that fucoidan-incorporated TCP-Ch scaffold could be used in the differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells and can be a potential candidate for the treatment of bone-related ailments through tissue engineering technology. PMID:27068453

  14. Interactions between bone marrow stromal microenvironment and B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells: any role for Notch, Wnt and Hh signaling pathways?

    PubMed

    Seke Etet, Paul Faustin; Vecchio, Lorella; Nwabo Kamdje, Armel Hervé

    2012-07-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), which is the most common lymphoproliferative disorder, displays characteristics consistent with a defect in programmed cell death and exhibit prolonged survival of affected cells in vivo. When recovered from peripheral blood or lymphoid tissues of patients and cultured in vitro, CLL malignant cells rapidly undergo spontaneous apoptosis. CLL B-cells co-culture with different adherent cell types, collectively referred to as stromal cells, induces leukemia cell survival, migration, and drug resistance. In addition, such survival-promoting microenvironments can rescue leukemia cells from cytotoxic therapy, giving way to disease relapse. Quite surprisingly considering that many anti-cancer drugs, including γ-secretase inhibitors, Cyclopamine and Quercetin, were reported to block Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog anti-apoptotic signaling pathways respectively, the link between the latter anti-apoptotic pathways and bone marrow stromal cells in CLL has been pointed out only recently. Data concerning the pathogenesis of CLL have been critically reviewed in regards to the growing body of evidence indicating deregulations of Notch, Wnt and Hedgehog anti-apoptotic signaling pathways in the stromal microenvironment of affected cells. PMID:22446006

  15. Evaluation of transport conditions for autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for therapeutic application in horses.

    PubMed

    Espina, Miguel; Jülke, Henriette; Brehm, Walter; Ribitsch, Iris; Winter, Karsten; Delling, Uta

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are increasingly used for clinical applications in equine patients. For MSC isolation and expansion, a laboratory step is mandatory, after which the cells are sent back to the attending veterinarian. Preserving the biological properties of MSCs during this transport is paramount. The goal of the study was to compare transport-related parameters (transport container, media, temperature, time, cell concentration) that potentially influence characteristics of culture expanded equine MSCs. Methods. The study was arranged in three parts comparing (I) five different transport containers (cryotube, two types of plastic syringes, glass syringe, CellSeal), (II) seven different transport media, four temperatures (4 °C vs. room temperature; -20 °C vs. -80 °C), four time frames (24 h vs. 48 h; 48 h vs. 72 h), and (III) three MSC concentrations (5 × 10(6), 10 × 10(6), 20 × 10(6) MSC/ml). Cell viability (Trypan Blue exclusion; percent and total number viable cell), proliferation and trilineage differentiation capacity were assessed for each test condition. Further, the recovered volume of the suspension was determined in part I. Each condition was evaluated using samples of six horses (n = 6) and differentiation protocols were performed in duplicates. Results. In part I of the study, no significant differences in any of the parameters were found when comparing transport containers at room temperature. The glass syringe was selected for all subsequent evaluations (highest recoverable volume of cell suspension and cell viability). In part II, media, temperatures, or time frames had also no significant influence on cell viability, likely due to the large number of comparisons and small sample size. Highest cell viability was observed using autologous bone marrow supernatant as transport medium, and "transport" at 4 °C for 24 h (70.6% vs. control group 75.3%); this was not significant. Contrary, viability was unacceptably low (<40

  16. Evaluation of transport conditions for autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for therapeutic application in horses

    PubMed Central

    Espina, Miguel; Jülke, Henriette; Brehm, Walter; Ribitsch, Iris; Winter, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are increasingly used for clinical applications in equine patients. For MSC isolation and expansion, a laboratory step is mandatory, after which the cells are sent back to the attending veterinarian. Preserving the biological properties of MSCs during this transport is paramount. The goal of the study was to compare transport-related parameters (transport container, media, temperature, time, cell concentration) that potentially influence characteristics of culture expanded equine MSCs. Methods. The study was arranged in three parts comparing (I) five different transport containers (cryotube, two types of plastic syringes, glass syringe, CellSeal), (II) seven different transport media, four temperatures (4 °C vs. room temperature; −20 °C vs. −80 °C), four time frames (24 h vs. 48 h; 48 h vs. 72 h), and (III) three MSC concentrations (5 × 106, 10 × 106, 20 × 106 MSC/ml). Cell viability (Trypan Blue exclusion; percent and total number viable cell), proliferation and trilineage differentiation capacity were assessed for each test condition. Further, the recovered volume of the suspension was determined in part I. Each condition was evaluated using samples of six horses (n = 6) and differentiation protocols were performed in duplicates. Results. In part I of the study, no significant differences in any of the parameters were found when comparing transport containers at room temperature. The glass syringe was selected for all subsequent evaluations (highest recoverable volume of cell suspension and cell viability). In part II, media, temperatures, or time frames had also no significant influence on cell viability, likely due to the large number of comparisons and small sample size. Highest cell viability was observed using autologous bone marrow supernatant as transport medium, and “transport” at 4 °C for 24 h (70.6% vs. control group 75.3%); this was not significant. Contrary, viability was unacceptably low

  17. 2', 3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase cells derived from transplanted marrow stromal cells and host tissue contribute to perineurial compartment formation in injured rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qiong; Ding, Peng; Lu, Jia; Dheen, S Thameem; Moochhala, Shabbir; Ling, Eng-Ang

    2007-01-01

    Transdifferentiation of transplanted marrow stromal cells (MSCs) and reactive changes of glial cells in a completely transected rat spinal cord were examined. Marrow stromal cells exhibited 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) at the plasma membrane and this has allowed their identification after transplantation by immunoelectron microscopy. In the control rats, the lesion site showed activated microglia/neural macrophages and some elongated cells, whose cytoplasm was immunoreactive for CNP. Cells designated as CNP1 and apparently host-derived expressed CXCR4. In experimental rats receiving MSCs transplantation, CNP1 cells were increased noticeably. This was coupled with the occurrence of a different subset of CNP cells whose plasma membrane was CNP-immunoreactive and expressed CXCR4. These cells, designated as CNP2, enclosed both myelinated and unmyelinated neurites thus assuming a spatial configuration resembling that of Schwann cells. A remarkable feature was the extensive ramifications of CNP1 cells with long filopodia processes delineating the CNP2 cells and their associated neurites, forming many perineurial-like compartments. Present results have shown that CNP2 cells considered to be MSCs-derived can transform into cells resembling Schwann cells based on their spatial relation with the regenerating nerve fibers, whereas the CNP1 glial cells participate in formation of perineurial compartments, probably serving as conduits to guide the nerve fiber growth. The chemotactic migration of CNP cells either derived from host tissue or MSCs bearing CXCR4 may be attracted by stromal derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha) produced locally. The coordinated cellular interaction between transplanted MSCs and local glial cells may promote the growth of nerve fibers through the lesion site. PMID:17061258

  18. Induction of adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells into functional astrocyte-like cells: potential for restorative treatment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bahat-Stroomza, Merav; Barhum, Yael; Levy, Yossef S; Karpov, Olga; Bulvik, Shlomo; Melamed, Eldad; Offen, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with its motor phenomena due mostly to loss of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra. Pharmacological treatments aimed to increase the deficient dopaminergic neurotransmission are effective in ameliorating the cardinal symptoms, but none of these therapies is curative. It has been suggested that treatment with neurotrophic factors (NTFs) might protect and prevent death of the surviving dopaminergic neurons and induce proliferation of their axonal nerve terminals with reinnervations of the deafferented striatum. However, long-term delivery of such proteins into the CNS is problematic. We therefore aimed to differentiate ex vivo human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells into astrocyte-like cells, capable of generating NTFs for future transplantation into basal ganglia of PD patients. Indeed, mesenchymal stromal cells treated with our novel astrocyte differentiation medium, present astrocyte-like morphology and express the astrocyte markers S100beta, glutamine synthetase and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Moreover, these astrocyte-like cells produce and secrete significant amounts of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor as indicated by messenger RNA, real-time polymerase chain reaction, ELISA, and Western blot analyses. Such NTF-producing cells transplanted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats, a model of PD, produced a progressive reduction in the apomorphine-induced contralateral rotations as well as behavioral improvement in rotor-rod and the "sunflower seeds" eating motor tests. Histological assessments revealed that the engrafted cells survived and expressed astrocyte and human markers and acted to regenerate the damaged dopaminergic nerve terminal system. Findings indicate that our novel procedure to induce NTF-producing astrocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow stromal cells

  19. Arsenic induces cell apoptosis in cultured osteoblasts through endoplasmic reticulum stress

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, C.-H.; Chiu, Y.-C.; Huang, C.-F.; Chen, Y.-W.; Chen, P.-C.

    2009-12-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass resulting from an imbalance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Therefore, decreased bone formation by osteoblasts may lead to the development of osteoporosis, and rate of apoptosis is responsible for the regulation of bone formation. Arsenic (As) exists ubiquitously in our environment and increases the risk of neurotoxicity, liver injury, peripheral vascular disease and cancer. However, the effect of As on apoptosis of osteoblasts is mostly unknown. Here, we found that As induced cell apoptosis in osteoblastic cell lines (including hFOB, MC3T3-E1 and MG-63) and mouse bone marrow stromal cells (M2-10B4). As also induced upregulation of Bax and Bak, downregulation of Bcl-2 and dysfunction of mitochondria in osteoblasts. As also triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as indicated by changes in cytosolic-calcium levels. We found that As increased the expression and activities of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and calpain. Transfection of cells with GRP78 or calpain siRNA reduced As-mediated cell apoptosis in osteoblasts. Therefore, our results suggest that As increased cell apoptosis in cultured osteoblasts and increased the risk of osteoporosis.

  20. Dexamethasone Enhances Osteogenic Differentiation of Bone Marrow- and Muscle-Derived Stromal Cells and Augments Ectopic Bone Formation Induced by Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Yuasa, Masato; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Taniyama, Takashi; Masaoka, Tomokazu; Xuetao, Wei; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Horie, Masaki; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Uemura, Toshimasa; Okawa, Atsushi; Sotome, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated whether dexamethasone augments the osteogenic capability of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) and muscle tissue-derived stromal cells (MuSCs), both of which are thought to contribute to ectopic bone formation induced by bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and determined the underlying mechanisms. Rat BMSCs and MuSCs were cultured in growth media with or without 10-7 M dexamethasone and then differentiated under osteogenic conditions with dexamethasone and BMP-2. The effects of dexamethasone on cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation, and also on ectopic bone formation induced by BMP-2, were analyzed. Dexamethasone affected not only the proliferation rate but also the subpopulation composition of BMSCs and MuSCs, and subsequently augmented their osteogenic capacity during osteogenic differentiation. During osteogenic induction by BMP-2, dexamethasone also markedly affected cell proliferation in both BMSCs and MuSCs. In an in vivo ectopic bone formation model, bone formation in muscle-implanted scaffolds containing dexamethasone and BMP-2 was more than two fold higher than that in scaffolds containing BMP-2 alone. Our results suggest that dexamethasone potently enhances the osteogenic capability of BMP-2 and may thus decrease the quantity of BMP-2 required for clinical application, thereby reducing the complications caused by excessive doses of BMP-2. Highlights: 1. Dexamethasone induced selective proliferation of bone marrow- and muscle-derived cells with higher differentiation potential. 2. Dexamethasone enhanced the osteogenic capability of bone marrow- and muscle-derived cells by altering the subpopulation composition. 3. Dexamethasone augmented ectopic bone formation induced by bone morphogenetic protein-2. PMID:25659106

  1. The effect of bone allografts combined with bone marrow stromal cells on the healing of segmental bone defects in a sheep model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The repair of large bone defects is a major orthopedic challenge because autologous bone grafts are not available in large amounts and because harvesting is often associated with donor-site morbidity. Considering that bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) are responsible for the maintenance of bone turnover throughout life, we investigated bone repair at a site of a critically sized segmental defect in sheep tibia treated with BMSCs loaded onto allografts. The defect was created in the mid-portion of the tibial diaphysis of eight adult sheep, and the sheep were treated with ex-vivo expanded autologous BMSCs isolated from marrow aspirates and loaded onto cortical allografts (n = 4). The treated sheep were compared with control sheep that had been treated with cell-free allografts (n = 4) obtained from donors of the same breed as the receptor sheep. Results The healing response was monitored by radiographs monthly and by computed tomography and histology at six, ten, fourteen, and eighteen weeks after surgery. For the cell-loaded allografts, union was established more rapidly at the interface between the host bone and the allograft, and the healing process was more conspicuous. Remodeling of the allograft was complete at 18 weeks in the cell-treated animals. Histologically, the marrow cavity was reestablished, with intertrabecular spaces being filled with adipose marrow and with evidence of focal hematopoiesis. Conclusions Allografts cellularized with AOCs (allografts of osteoprogenitor cells) can generate great clinical outcomes to noncellularized allografts to consolidate, reshape, structurally and morphologically reconstruct bone and bone marrow in a relatively short period of time. These features make this strategy very attractive for clinical use in orthopedic bioengineering. PMID:24495743

  2. Paracrine effect of inflammatory cytokine-activated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and its role in osteoblast function.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Li, Guoqiang; Liu, Meng; Zhou, Tiantian; Zhou, Haibin

    2016-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a crucial function in bone regeneration. Inflammation is a well-documented component of the osteogenic microenvironment. In the present study, we investigated whether stimulation of MSCs with inflammatory cytokines promotes osteogenesis through a paracrine mediator. MSCs were pre-stimulated with the inflammatory factors IFN-γ and TNF-α. After pre-stimulation, the MSC secretion levels of IL-6, HGF, VEGF, and TGF-β were significantly elevated (p < 0.01); however, the production of IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10 was not changed (p > 0.05). MG63, an osteoblast-like cell line, was cultured in different MSC-conditioned media. After treatment with conditioned media collected from MSCs pre-treated with cytokines, the proliferation and migration of MG63 cells were significantly improved, and the expression levels of the osteoblast differentiation markers ALP, COLI, OCN and OPN were significantly increased as revealed by a quantitative PCR analysis (p < 0.05). Furthermore, an immunofluorescence staining assay showed that more MG63 cells were OPN-positive, while an Alizarin red staining indicated the increased formation of calcium nodules in the IFN-γ and TNF-α combined pretreatment group. The results indicated that conditioned medium from inflammatory cytokine-activated MSCs can significantly promote osteoblast proliferation, migration, differentiation, and mineralization and ultimately enhance osteogenesis through paracrine mechanisms. These findings present a new direction for the clinical application of MSCs in the repair of bone defects. PMID:26315505

  3. Dental pulp-derived stromal cells exhibit a higher osteogenic potency than bone marrow-derived stromal cells in vitro and in a porcine critical-size bone defect model

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jonas; Tvedesøe, Claus; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Lysdahl, Helle; Kraft, David Christian Evar; Chen, Muwan; Baas, Jorgen; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Bünger, Cody Eric

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) was compared with that of dental pulp-derived stromal cells (DPSCs) in vitro and in a pig calvaria critical-size bone defect model. Methods: BMSCs and DPSCs were extracted from the tibia bone marrow and the molar teeth of each pig, respectively. BMSCs and DPSCs were cultured in monolayer and on a three-dimensional (3D) polycaprolactone (PCL) – hyaluronic acid – tricalcium phosphate (HT-PCL) scaffold. Population doubling (PD), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and calcium deposition were measured in monolayer. In the 3D culture ALP activity, DNA content, and calcium deposition were evaluated. Six non-penetrating critical-size defects were made in each calvarium of 14 pigs. Three paired sub-studies were conducted: (1) empty defects vs. HT-PCL scaffolds; (2) PCL scaffolds vs. HT-PCL scaffolds; and (3) autologous BMSCs on HT-PCL scaffolds vs. autologous DPSCs on HT-PCL scaffolds. The observation time was five weeks. Bone volume fractions (BV/TV) were assessed with micro-computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry. Results and discussion: The results from the in vitro study revealed a higher ALP activity and calcium deposition of the DPSC cultures compared with BMSC cultures. Significantly more bone was present in the HT-PCL group than in both the pure PCL scaffold group and the empty defect group in vivo. DPSCs generated more bone than BMSCs when seeded on HT-PCL. In conclusion, DPSCs exhibited a higher osteogenic potential compared with BMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, making it a potential cell source for future bone tissue engineering. PMID:27163105

  4. ACTIVATION OF NFATC2 IN OSTEOBLASTS CAUSES OSTEOPENIA*

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Stefano; Canalis, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (Nfat)c1 to c4 are transcription factors that play an undisputable role in osteoclastogenesis. However, Nfat function in osteoblastic cells is controversial. Constitutive activation of Nfatc1 and c2 in osteoblasts suppresses cell function, although the study of Nfat in vivo has yielded conflicting results. To establish the consequences of Nfatc2 activation in osteoblasts, we generated transgenic mice where a 3.6 kilobase fragment of the collagen type I α1 promoter directs expression of a constitutively active Nfatc2 mutant (Col3.6-Nfatc2). The skeletal phenotype of Col3.6-Nfatc2 mice of both sexes and of sex-matched littermate controls was investigated by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry. Col3.6-Nfatc2 mice were born at the expected Mendelian ratio and appeared normal. Nfatc2 expression was confirmed in parietal bones from 1 and 3 month old transgenic mice. One month old Col3.6-Nfatc2 female mice exhibited cancellous bone compartment osteopenia secondary to a 30% reduction in bone formation. In contrast, cancellous femoral bone volume and bone formation were not altered in male transgenics, whereas osteoblast number was higher, suggesting incomplete osteoblast maturation. Indices of bone resorption were not affected in either sex. At 3 months of age, the skeletal phenotype evolved; and Col3.6-Nfatc2 male mice exhibited vertebral osteopenia, whereas femoral cancellous bone was not affected in either sex. Nfatc2 activation in osteoblasts had no impact on cortical bone structure. Nfatc2 activation inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation in bone marrow stromal cell cultures. In conclusion, Nfatc2 activation in osteoblasts inhibits bone formation and causes cancellous bone osteopenia. PMID:25573264

  5. Activation of Nfatc2 in osteoblasts causes osteopenia.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Stefano; Canalis, Ernesto

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (Nfat) c1 to c4 are transcription factors that play an undisputable role in osteoclastogenesis. However, Nfat function in osteoblastic cells is controversial. Constitutive activation of Nfatc1 and c2 in osteoblasts suppresses cell function, although the study of Nfat in vivo has yielded conflicting results. To establish the consequences of Nfatc2 activation in osteoblasts, we generated transgenic mice where a 3.6 kb fragment of the collagen type I α1 promoter directs expression of a constitutively active Nfatc2 mutant (Col3.6-Nfatc2). The skeletal phenotype of Col3.6-Nfatc2 mice of both sexes and of sex-matched littermate controls was investigated by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry. Col3.6- Nfatc2 mice were born at the expected Mendelian ratio and appeared normal. Nfatc2 expression was confirmed in parietal bones from 1 and 3 month old transgenic mice. One month old Col3.6-Nfatc2 female mice exhibited cancellous bone compartment osteopenia secondary to a 30% reduction in bone formation. In contrast, cancellous femoral bone volume and bone formation were not altered in male transgenics, whereas osteoblast number was higher, suggesting incomplete osteoblast maturation. Indices of bone resorption were not affected in either sex. At 3 months of age, the skeletal phenotype evolved; and Col3.6-Nfatc2 male mice exhibited vertebral osteopenia, whereas femoral cancellous bone was not affected in either sex. Nfatc2 activation in osteoblasts had no impact on cortical bone structure. Nfatc2 activation inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation in bone marrow stromal cell cultures. In conclusion, Nfatc2 activation in osteoblasts inhibits bone formation and causes cancellous bone osteopenia. PMID:25573264

  6. Proliferation, Migration, and Production of Nitric Oxide by Bone Marrow Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Wistar Rats in Hypoxia and Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Lykov, A P; Nikonorova, Yu V; Bondarenko, N A; Poveshchenko, O V; Kim, I I; Poveshchenko, A F; Konenkov, V I

    2015-08-01

    We studied proliferation, migration, and secretion of NO by bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells from Wistar rats during conditioning under hypoxic and hyperglycemic conditions and the effect of erythropoietin on these parameters. A stimulating effect of erythropoietin on cell proliferation under normal conditions and activation of cell proliferation under conditions of hypoxia and hyperglycemia were demonstrated. Erythropoietin abolishes suppression of cell proliferation in culture with normal glucose level under conditions of H2O2-induced hypoxia, while under conditions of hyperglycemia, inhibition of cell proliferation becomes more pronounced. Hypoxia promotes activation of cell migration along the growth factor concentration gradient and addition of erythropoietin to the nutrient medium leads to a decrease in cell migration activity. Erythropoietin stimulates NO production by cells cultured under the conditions of hypoxia and hyperglycemia. PMID:26388580

  7. Stromal niche communalities underscore the contribution of the matricellular protein SPARC to B-cell development and lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sangaletti, Sabina; Tripodo, Claudio; Portararo, Paola; Dugo, Matteo; Vitali, Caterina; Botti, Laura; Guarnotta, Carla; Cappetti, Barbara; Gulino, Alessandro; Torselli, Ilaria; Casalini, Patrizia; Chiodoni, Claudia; Colombo, Mario P

    2014-01-01

    Neoplastic B-cell clones commonly arise within secondary lymphoid organs (SLO). However, during disease progression, lymphomatous cells may also colonize the bone marrow (BM), where they localize within specialized stromal niches, namely the osteoblastic and the vascular niche, according to their germinal center- or extra-follicular-derivation, respectively. We hypothesized the existence of common stromal motifs in BM and SLO B-cell lymphoid niches involved in licensing normal B-cell development as well as in fostering transformed B lymphoid cells. Thus, we tested the expression of prototypical mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) markers and regulatory matricellular proteins in human BM and SLO under physiologically unperturbed conditions and during B-cell lymphoma occurrence. We identified common stromal features in the BM osteoblastic niche and SLO germinal center (GC) microenvironments, traits that were also enriched within BM infiltrates of GC-associated B-cell lymphomas, suggesting that stromal programs involved in central and peripheral B-cell lymphopoiesis are also involved in malignant B-cell nurturing. Among factors co-expressed by stromal elements within these different specialized niches, we identified the pleiotropic matricellular protein secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC). The actual role of stromal SPARC in normal B-cell lymphopoiesis, investigated in Sparc(-/-) mice and BM chimeras retaining the Sparc(-/-) genotype in host stroma, demonstrated defective BM and splenic B-cell lymphopoiesis. Moreover, in the Trp53 knockout (KO) lymphoma model, p53(-/-)/Sparc(-/-) double-KO mice displayed impaired spontaneous splenic B-cell lymphomagenesis and reduced neoplastic clone BM infiltration in comparison with their p53(-/-)/Sparc(+/+) counterparts. Our results are among the first to demonstrate the existence of common stromal programs regulating both the BM osteoblastic niche and the SLO GC lymphopoietic functions potentially fostering the genesis

  8. Clumping and Viability of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells under Different Preparation Procedures: A Flow Cytometry-Based In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Li-li; Kinnunen, Tuure; Boltze, Johannes; Nystedt, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Complications of microocclusions have been reported after intra-arterial delivery of mesenchymal stromal cells. Hence, quantification and efficient limitation of cell clumps in suspension before transplantation is important to reduce the risk. We used a flow cytometry-based pulse-width assay to assess the effects of different cell suspension concentrations (0.2–2.0 × 106/mL), storage solutions (complete growth medium, Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline, and normal saline), storage time in suspension (0–9 h), and freeze-thawing procedure on the clumping of rat bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMMSCs) and also evaluated cell viability at the same time. Surprisingly, increasing the cell concentration did not result in more cell clumps in vitro. Freshly harvested (fresh) cells in normal saline had significantly fewer cell clumps and also displayed high viability (>90%). A time-dependent reduction in viability was observed for cells in all three storage solutions, without any significant change in the clumping tendency except for cells in medium. Fresh cells were more viable than their frozen-thawed counterparts, and fresh cells in normal saline had fewer cell clumps. In conclusion, cell clumping and viability could be affected by different cell preparation procedures, and quantification of cell clumping can be conducted using the flow cytometry-based pulse-width assay before intra-arterial cell delivery. PMID:27022399

  9. Effects of the dichloromethane fraction of Dipsaci Radix on the osteoblastic differentiation of human alveolar bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Yoon-Chul; Zadeh, Homa; Park, Yoon-Jeong; Pi, Sung-Hee; Shin, Hyung-Shik; You, Hyung-Keun

    2011-01-01

    Dipsaci Radix is the dried root of Dipsacus asper Wall. It has been used in Korean herbal medicine to treat bone fractures. In this study, we examined the effect of the dichloromethane fraction of Dipsaci Radix (DR(DM)) on the osteoblastic differentiation of human alveolar bone marrow-derived MSCs (ABM-MSCs). The ABM-MSCs were isolated from healthy subjects and cultured in vitro, followed by phenotypic characterization. They showed a fibroblast-like morphology and expressed CD29, CD44, CD73, and CD105, but not CD34. Calcified nodules were generated in response to both dexamethasone (DEX) and DR(DM). There was a significant increase in the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and protein expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteocalcin (OC) in response to DEX and DR(DM) as compared to control. These results provide evidence for the osteogenic potential of cultured ABM-MSCs in response to DR(DM). Also, an active single compound was additionally isolated from DR(DM). The single compound (hederagenin 3-O-(2-O-acetyl)-α-L-arabinopyranoside) also significantly increased ALP activity and the level of protein expression of BSP and OC. These results highlight the possible clinical applications of DR(DM) and hederagenin 3-O-(2-O-acetyl)-α-L-arabinopyranoside in bone regeneration. PMID:21228489

  10. miR-23a/b regulates the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qi; Chen, Yusi; Guo, Lijuan; Jiang, Tiejian; Lin, Zhangyuan

    2016-01-01

    Age-related osteoporosis is associated with the reduced capacity of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to differentiate into osteoblasts instead of adipocytes. However, the molecular mechanisms that decide the fate of BMSCs remain unclear. In our study, microRNA-23a, and microRNA-23b (miR-23a/b) were found to be markedly downregulated in BMSCs of aged mice and humans. The overexpression of miR-23a/b in BMSCs promoted osteogenic differentiation, whereas the inhibition of miR-23a/b increased adipogenic differentiation. Transmembrane protein 64 (Tmem64), which has expression levels inversely related to those of miR-23a/b in aged and young mice, was identified as a major target of miR-23a/b during BMSC differentiation. In conclusion, our study suggests that miR-23a/b has a critical role in the regulation of mesenchymal lineage differentiation through the suppression of Tmem64. PMID:27606130

  11. miR-23a/b regulates the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qi; Chen, Yusi; Guo, Lijuan; Jiang, Tiejian; Lin, Zhangyuan

    2016-01-01

    Age-related osteoporosis is associated with the reduced capacity of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to differentiate into osteoblasts instead of adipocytes. However, the molecular mechanisms that decide the fate of BMSCs remain unclear. In our study, microRNA-23a, and microRNA-23b (miR-23a/b) were found to be markedly downregulated in BMSCs of aged mice and humans. The overexpression of miR-23a/b in BMSCs promoted osteogenic differentiation, whereas the inhibition of miR-23a/b increased adipogenic differentiation. Transmembrane protein 64 (Tmem64), which has expression levels inversely related to those of miR-23a/b in aged and young mice, was identified as a major target of miR-23a/b during BMSC differentiation. In conclusion, our study suggests that miR-23a/b has a critical role in the regulation of mesenchymal lineage differentiation through the suppression of Tmem64. PMID:27606130

  12. Zinc Finger Protein 467 Is a Novel Regulator of Osteoblast and Adipocyte Commitment*

    PubMed Central

    Quach, Julie M.; Walker, Emma C.; Allan, Elizabeth; Solano, Melissa; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Kato, Shigeaki; Sims, Natalie A.; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John

    2011-01-01

    Osteoblasts and adipocytes are derived from common mesenchymal progenitor cells. The bone loss of osteoporosis is associated with altered progenitor differentiation from an osteoblastic to an adipocytic lineage. cDNA microarrays and quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) were carried out in a differentiating mouse stromal osteoblastic cell line, Kusa 4b10, to identify gene targets of factors that stimulate osteoblast differentiation including parathyroid hormone (PTH) and gp130-binding cytokines, oncostatin M (OSM) and cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1). Zinc finger protein 467 (Zfp467) was rapidly down-regulated by PTH, OSM, and CT-1. Retroviral overexpression and RNA interference for Zfp467 in mouse stromal cells showed that this factor stimulated adipocyte formation and inhibited osteoblast commitment compared with controls. Regulation of adipocyte markers, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, C/EBPα, adiponectin, and resistin, and late osteoblast/osteocyte markers (osteocalcin and sclerostin) by Zfp467 was confirmed by Q-PCR. Intra-tibial injection of calvarial cells transduced with retroviral Zfp467 doubled the number of marrow adipocytes in C57Bl/6 mice compared with vector control-transduced cells, providing in vivo confirmation of a pro-adipogenic role of Zfp467. Furthermore, Zfp467 transactivated a PPAR-response element reporter construct and recruited a histone deacetylase complex. Thus Zfp467 is a novel co-factor that promotes adipocyte differentiation and suppresses osteoblast differentiation. This has relevance to therapeutic interventions in osteoporosis, including PTH-based therapies currently available, and may be of relevance for the use of adipose-derived stem cells for tissue engineering. PMID:21123171

  13. Induction of a program gene expression during osteoblast differentiation with strontium ranelate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Lingling; Zaidi, Samir; Peng Yuanzhen; Zhou Hang; Moonga, Baljit S.; Blesius, Alexia; Dupin-Roger, Isabelle; Zaidi, Mone . E-mail: mone.zaidi@mssm.edu; Sun Li

    2007-04-06

    Strontium ranelate, a new agent for the treatment of osteoporosis, has been shown stimulate bone formation in various experimental models. This study examines the effect of strontium ranelate on gene expression in osteoblasts, as well as the formation of mineralized (von Kossa-positive) colony-forming unit-osteoblasts (CFU-obs). Bone marrow-derived stromal cells cultured for 21 days under differentiating conditions, when exposed to strontium ranelate, displayed a significant time- and concentration-dependent increase in the expression of the master gene, Runx2, as well as bone sialoprotein (BSP), but interestingly without effects on osteocalcin. This was associated with a significant increase in the formation of CFU-obs at day 21 of culture. In U-33 pre-osteoblastic cells, strontium ranelate significantly enhanced the expression of Runx2 and osteocalcin, but not BSP. Late, more mature osteoblastic OB-6 cells showed significant elevations in BSP and osteocalcin, but with only minimal effects on Runx2. In conclusion, strontium ranelate stimulates osteoblast differentiation, but the induction of the program of gene expression appears to be cell type-specific. The increased osteoblastic differentiation is the likely basis underlying the therapeutic bone-forming actions of strontium ranelate.

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cells from pooled mononuclear cells of multiple bone marrow donors as rescue therapy in pediatric severe steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease: a multicenter survey.

    PubMed

    Kuçi, Zyrafete; Bönig, Halvard; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Bunos, Milica; Jauch, Anna; Janssen, Johannes W G; Škifić, Marijana; Michel, Kristina; Eising, Ben; Lucchini, Giovanna; Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Greil, Johann; Lang, Peter; Basu, Oliver; von Luettichau, Irene; Schulz, Ansgar; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Jarisch, Andrea; Soerensen, Jan; Salzmann-Manrique, Emilia; Seifried, Erhard; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Kuçi, Selim

    2016-08-01

    To circumvent donor-to-donor heterogeneity which may lead to inconsistent results after treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease with mesenchymal stromal cells generated from single donors we developed a novel approach by generating these cells from pooled bone marrow mononuclear cells of 8 healthy "3(rd)-party" donors. Generated cells were frozen in 209 vials and designated as mesenchymal stromal cell bank. These vials served as a source for generation of clinical grade mesenchymal stromal cell end-products, which exhibited typical mesenchymal stromal cell phenotype, trilineage differentiation potential and at later passages expressed replicative senescence-related markers (p21 and p16). Genetic analysis demonstrated their genomic stability (normal karyotype and a diploid pattern). Importantly, clinical end-products exerted a significantly higher allosuppressive potential than the mean allosuppressive potential of mesenchymal stromal cells generated from the same donors individually. Administration of 81 mesenchymal stromal cell end-products to 26 patients with severe steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease in 7 stem cell transplant centers who were refractory to many lines of treatment, induced a 77% overall response at the primary end point (day 28). Remarkably, although the cohort of patients was highly challenging (96% grade III/IV and only 4% grade II graft-versus-host disease), after treatment with mesenchymal stromal cell end-products the overall survival rate at two years follow up was 71±11% for the entire patient cohort, compared to 51.4±9.0% in graft-versus-host disease clinical studies, in which mesenchymal stromal cells were derived from single donors. Mesenchymal stromal cell end-products may, therefore, provide a novel therapeutic tool for the effective treatment of severe acute graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27175026

  15. Mesenchymal stromal cells from pooled mononuclear cells of multiple bone marrow donors as rescue therapy in pediatric severe steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease: a multicenter survey

    PubMed Central

    Kuçi, Zyrafete; Bönig, Halvard; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Bunos, Milica; Jauch, Anna; Janssen, Johannes W.G.; Škifić, Marijana; Michel, Kristina; Eising, Ben; Lucchini, Giovanna; Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Greil, Johann; Lang, Peter; Basu, Oliver; von Luettichau, Irene; Schulz, Ansgar; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Jarisch, Andrea; Soerensen, Jan; Salzmann-Manrique, Emilia; Seifried, Erhard; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Kuçi, Selim

    2016-01-01

    To circumvent donor-to-donor heterogeneity which may lead to inconsistent results after treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease with mesenchymal stromal cells generated from single donors we developed a novel approach by generating these cells from pooled bone marrow mononuclear cells of 8 healthy “3rd-party” donors. Generated cells were frozen in 209 vials and designated as mesenchymal stromal cell bank. These vials served as a source for generation of clinical grade mesenchymal stromal cell end-products, which exhibited typical mesenchymal stromal cell phenotype, trilineage differentiation potential and at later passages expressed replicative senescence-related markers (p21 and p16). Genetic analysis demonstrated their genomic stability (normal karyotype and a diploid pattern). Importantly, clinical end-products exerted a significantly higher allosuppressive potential than the mean allosuppressive potential of mesenchymal stromal cells generated from the same donors individually. Administration of 81 mesenchymal stromal cell end-products to 26 patients with severe steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease in 7 stem cell transplant centers who were refractory to many lines of treatment, induced a 77% overall response at the primary end point (day 28). Remarkably, although the cohort of patients was highly challenging (96% grade III/IV and only 4% grade II graft-versus-host disease), after treatment with mesenchymal stromal cell end-products the overall survival rate at two years follow up was 71±11% for the entire patient cohort, compared to 51.4±9.0% in graft-versus-host disease clinical studies, in which mesenchymal stromal cells were derived from single donors. Mesenchymal stromal cell end-products may, therefore, provide a novel therapeutic tool for the effective treatment of severe acute graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27175026

  16. How does the supernatant of Lactobacillus acidophilus affect the proliferation and differentiation activities of rat bone marrow-derived stromal cells?

    PubMed

    Samadikuchaksaraei, A; Gholipourmalekabadi, M; Saberian, M; Abdollahpour Alitappeh, M; Shahidi Delshad, E

    2016-01-01

    Low proliferation rate and unwanted differentiation of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (rBMSCs) during the frequent passages have limited the use of such cells in clinical cell therapy. Recently, the researchers have focused on the effects of the components produced by some bacteria on proliferation of the stem cells. In this study, we discussed the possible effects of the Lactobacillus acidophilus supernatant on proliferation and differentiation of the rBMSCs. For this aim, the cells were isolated from rat bone marrow, characterized by culturing on tissue specific differentiation media and stained. The cells (passage two) were treated with different concentrations of the L. acidophilus supernatant (0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.9, 3, 9 and 30 &mgr;l/ml) for 14 days. The proliferation and differentiation capacity of the cells were then determined by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT assay) and tissue specific staining. The results showed a positive effect of the supernatant on the cell proliferation in 3 and 9 &mgr;l/ml concentrations, while did not affect the differentiation capacity of the rBMSCs. The current study strongly suggests the L. acidophilus supernatant as an alternative material that could be added to the media with aim of improvement in the proliferation rate of the rBMSCs without affecting their differentiation capacity. PMID:27609467

  17. Comparison of Immunomodulation Properties of Porcine Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells Derived from the Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue, and Dermal Skin Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ock, Sun-A; Baregundi Subbarao, Raghavendra; Lee, Yeon-Mi; Lee, Jeong-Hyeon; Jeon, Ryoung-Hoon; Lee, Sung-Lim; Park, Ji Kwon; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) demonstrate immunomodulation capacity that has been implicated in the reduction of graft-versus-host disease. Accordingly, we herein investigated the capacity of MSCs derived from several tissue sources to modulate both proinflammatory (interferon [IFN] γ and tumor necrosis factor [TNF] α) and immunosuppressive cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF] β and interleukin [IL] 10) employing xenogeneic human MSC-mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) test. Bone marrow-derived MSCs showed higher self-renewal capacity with relatively slow proliferation rate in contrast to adipose-derived MSCs which displayed higher proliferation rate. Except for the lipoprotein gene, there were no marked changes in osteogenesis- and adipogenesis-related genes following in vitro differentiation; however, the histological marker analysis revealed that adipose MSCs could be differentiated into both adipose and bone tissue. TGFβ and IL10 were detected in adipose MSCs and bone marrow MSCs, respectively. However, skin-derived MSCs expressed both IFNγ and IL10, which may render them sensitive to immunomodulation. The xenogeneic human MLR test revealed that MSCs had a partial immunomodulation capacity, as proliferation of activated and resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells was not affected, but this did not differ among MSC sources. MSCs were not tumorigenic when introduced into immunodeficient mice. We concluded that the characteristics of MSCs are tissue source-dependent and their in vivo application requires more in-depth investigation regarding their precise immunomodulation capacities. PMID:26798368

  18. Effects of corneal stromal cell- and bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cell-conditioned media on the proliferation of corneal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Meng-Yu; Yao, Qin-Ke; Chen, Jun-Zhao; Shao, Chun-Yi; Yan, Chen-Xi; Ni, Ni; Fan, Xian-Qun; Gu, Ping; Fu, Yao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the effects of conditioned media on the proliferation of corneal endothelial cells (CECs) and to compare the efficiency of different conditioned media (CM). METHODS Rat CECs, corneal stromal cells (CSCs), bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (BEPCs), and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated and cultured in vitro. CM was collected from CSCs, BEPCs, and BMSCs. CECs were cultivated in different culture media. Cell morphology was recorded, and gene and protein expression were analyzed. RESULTS After grown in CM for 5d, CECs in each experimental group remained polygonal, in a cobblestone-like monolayer arrangement. Immunocytofluorescence revealed positive expression of Na+/K+-ATP, aquaporin 1 (AQP1), and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1). Based on quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis, Na+/K+-ATP expression in CSC-CM was notably upregulated by 1.3-fold (±0.036) (P<0.05, n=3). The expression levels of ZO-1, neuron specific enolase (NSE), Vimentin, paired homebox 6 (PAX6), and procollagen type VIII (COL8A1) were notably upregulated in each experimental group. Each CM had a positive effect on CEC proliferation, and CSC-CM had the strongest effect on proliferation. CONCLUSION CSC-CM, BEPC-CM, and BMSC-CM not only stimulated the proliferation of CECs, but also maintained the characteristic differentiated phenotypes necessary for endothelial functions. CSC-CM had the most notable effect on CEC proliferation. PMID:27158599

  19. MHC-compatible bone marrow stromal/stem cells trigger fibrosis by activating host T cells in a scleroderma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yoko; Morikawa, Satoru; Okano, Hideyuki; Mabuchi, Yo; Suzuki, Sadafumi; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Sato, Yukio; Mukai, Shin; Yaguchi, Saori; Inaba, Takaaki; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Kawakami, Yutaka; Tsubota, Kazuo; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Shimmura, Shigeto

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis of organs is observed in systemic autoimmune disease. Using a scleroderma mouse, we show that transplantation of MHC compatible, minor antigen mismatched bone marrow stromal/stem cells (BMSCs) play a role in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. Removal of donor BMSCs rescued mice from disease. Freshly isolated PDGFRα+ Sca-1+ BMSCs expressed MHC class II following transplantation and activated host T cells. A decrease in FOXP3+ CD25+ Treg population was observed. T cells proliferated and secreted IL-6 when stimulated with mismatched BMSCs in vitro. Donor T cells were not involved in fibrosis because transplanting T cell-deficient RAG2 knock out mice bone marrow still caused disease. Once initially triggered by mismatched BMSCs, the autoimmune phenotype was not donor BMSC dependent as the phenotype was observed after effector T cells were adoptively transferred into naïve syngeneic mice. Our data suggest that minor antigen mismatched BMSCs trigger systemic fibrosis in this autoimmune scleroderma model. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09394.001 PMID:26809474

  20. Human Umbilical Cord Perivascular Cells Exhibited Enhanced Migration Capacity towards Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Comparison with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: A Role for Autocrine Motility Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Jorge B.; Malvicini, Mariana; Bolontrade, Marcela; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Garcia, Mariana G.; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Unfortunately, the incidence and mortality associated with HCC are increasing. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed and the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as carrier of therapeutic genes is emerging as a promising option. Different sources of MSCs are being studied for cell therapy and bone marrow-derived cells are the most extensively explored; however, birth associated-tissues represent a very promising source. The aim of this work was to compare the in vitro and in vivo migration capacity between bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) towards HCC. We observed that HUCPVCs presented higher in vitro and in vivo migration towards factors released by HCC. The expression of autocrine motility factor (AMF) receptor, genes related with the availability of the receptor on the cell surface (caveolin-1 and -2) and metalloproteinase 3, induced by the receptor activation and important for cell migration, was increased in HUCPVCs. The chemotactic response towards recombinant AMF was increased in HUCPVCs compared to BM-MSCs, and its inhibition in the conditioned medium from HCC induced higher decrease in HUCPVC migration than in BM-MSC. Our results indicate that HUCPVCs could be a useful cellular source to deliver therapeutic genes to HCC. PMID:25147818

  1. Human umbilical cord perivascular cells exhibited enhanced migration capacity towards hepatocellular carcinoma in comparison with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells: a role for autocrine motility factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Bayo, Juan; Fiore, Esteban; Aquino, Jorge B; Malvicini, Mariana; Rizzo, Manglio; Peixoto, Estanislao; Alaniz, Laura; Piccioni, Flavia; Bolontrade, Marcela; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Garcia, Mariana G; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Unfortunately, the incidence and mortality associated with HCC are increasing. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed and the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as carrier of therapeutic genes is emerging as a promising option. Different sources of MSCs are being studied for cell therapy and bone marrow-derived cells are the most extensively explored; however, birth associated-tissues represent a very promising source. The aim of this work was to compare the in vitro and in vivo migration capacity between bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) towards HCC. We observed that HUCPVCs presented higher in vitro and in vivo migration towards factors released by HCC. The expression of autocrine motility factor (AMF) receptor, genes related with the availability of the receptor on the cell surface (caveolin-1 and -2) and metalloproteinase 3, induced by the receptor activation and important for cell migration, was increased in HUCPVCs. The chemotactic response towards recombinant AMF was increased in HUCPVCs compared to BM-MSCs, and its inhibition in the conditioned medium from HCC induced higher decrease in HUCPVC migration than in BM-MSC. Our results indicate that HUCPVCs could be a useful cellular source to deliver therapeutic genes to HCC. PMID:25147818

  2. Bone Marrow-Derived Multipotent Stromal Cells Promote Myocardial Fibrosis and Reverse Remodeling of the Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Fatkhudinov, Timur; Bolshakova, Galina; Arutyunyan, Irina; Elchaninov, Andrey; Makarov, Andrey; Kananykhina, Evgeniya; Khokhlova, Oksana; Murashev, Arkady; Glinkina, Valeria; Goldshtein, Dmitry; Sukhikh, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is increasingly recognized as a beneficial practice in various cardiac conditions, but its fundamentals remain largely unclear. The fates of transplanted multipotent stromal cells in postinfarction cardiac microenvironments are particularly understudied. To address this issue, labeled multipotent stromal cells were infused into rat myocardium at day 30 after myocardial infarction, against the background of postinfarction cardiosclerosis. Therapeutic effects of the transplantation were assessed by an exercise tolerance test. Histological examination at 14 or 30 days after the transplantation was conducted by means of immunostaining and quantitative image analysis. An improvement in the functional status of the cardiovascular system was observed after both the autologous and the allogeneic transplantations. Location of the label-positive cells within the heart was restricted to the affected part of myocardium. The transplanted cells could give rise to fibroblasts or myofibroblasts but not to cardiac myocytes or blood vessel cells. Both types of transplantation positively influenced scarring processes, and no expansion of fibrosis to border myocardium was observed. Left ventricular wall thickening associated with reduced dilatation index was promoted by transplantation of the autologous cells. According to the results, multipotent stromal cell transplantation prevents adverse remodeling and stimulates left ventricular reverse remodeling. PMID:25685158

  3. Application of perfusion culture system improves in vitro and in vivo osteogenesis of bone marrow-derived osteoblastic cells in porous ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yichao; Uemura, Toshimasa; Dong, Jian; Kojima, Hiroko; Tanaka, Junzo; Tateishi, Tetsuya

    2003-12-01

    Composites of bone marrow-derived osteoblasts (BMOs) and porous ceramics have been widely used as a bone graft model for bone tissue engineering. Perfusion culture has potential utility for many cell types in three-dimensional (3D) culture. Our hypothesis was that perfusion of medium would increase the cell viability and biosynthetic activity of BMOs in porous ceramic materials, which would be revealed by increased levels of alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OCN) and enhanced bone formation in vivo. For testing in vitro, BMO/beta-tricalcium phosphate composites were cultured in a perfusion container (Minucells and Minutissue, Bad Abbach, Germany) with fresh medium delivered at a rate of 2 mL/h by a peristaltic pump. The ALP activity and OCN content of composites were measured at the end of 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks of subculture. For testing in vivo, after subculturing for 2 weeks, the composites were subcutaneously implanted into syngeneic rats. These implants were harvested 4 or 8 weeks later. The samples then underwent a biochemical analysis of ALP activity and OCN content and were observed by light microscopy. The levels of ALP activity and OCN in the composites were significantly higher in the perfusion group than in the control group (p < 0.01), both in vitro and in vivo. Histomorphometric analysis of the hematoxylin- and eosin-stained sections revealed a higher average ratio of bone to pore in BMO/beta-TCP composites of the perfusion group after implantation: 47.64 +/- 6.16 for the perfusion group and 26.22 +/- 4.84 for control at 4 weeks (n = 6, p < 0.01); 67.97 +/- 3.58 for the perfusion group and 47.39 +/- 4.10 for control at 8 weeks (n = 6, p < 0.05). These results show that the application of a perfusion culture system during the subculture of BMOs in a porous ceramic scaffold is beneficial to their osteogenesis. After differentiation culture in vitro with the perfusion culture system, the activity of the osteoblastic cells and the

  4. Exosomes derived from mineralizing osteoblasts promote ST2 cell osteogenic differentiation by alteration of microRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yazhou; Luan, Jing; Li, Haiying; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Han, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Mineralizing osteoblasts (MOBs) can release exosomes, although the functional significance remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that exosomes derived from mineralizing pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells can promote bone marrow stromal cell (ST2) differentiation to osteoblasts. We reveal that MOB-derived exosomes significantly influence miRNA profiles in recipient ST2 cells, and these changes tend to activate the Wnt signaling pathway by inhibiting Axin1 expression and increasing β-catenin expression. We also suggest that MOB derived-exosomes partly induce the variation in miRNA expression in recipient ST2 cells by exosomal miRNA transfer. These findings suggest an exosome-mediated mode of cell-to-cell communication in the osteogenic microenvironment, and also indicate the potential of MOB exosomes in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26763102

  5. What Makes Umbilical Cord Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Superior Immunomodulators When Compared to Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Bárcia, R. N.; Santos, J. M.; Filipe, M.; Teixeira, M.; Martins, J. P.; Almeida, J.; Água-Doce, A.; Almeida, S. C. P.; Varela, A.; Pohl, S.; Dittmar, K. E. J.; Calado, S.; Simões, S. I.; Gaspar, M. M.; Cruz, M. E. M.; Lindenmaier, W.; Graça, L.; Cruz, H.; Cruz, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    MSCs derived from the umbilical cord tissue, termed UCX, were investigated for their immunomodulatory properties and compared to bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs), the gold-standard in immunotherapy. Immunogenicity and immunosuppression were assessed by mixed lymphocyte reactions, suppression of lymphocyte proliferation and induction of regulatory T cells. Results showed that UCX were less immunogenic and showed higher immunosuppression activity than BM-MSCs. Further, UCX did not need prior activation or priming to exert their immunomodulatory effects. This was further corroborated in vivo in a model of acute inflammation. To elucidate the potency differences observed between UCX and BM-MSCs, gene expression related to immune modulation was analysed in both cell types. Several gene expression profile differences were found between UCX and BM-MSCs, namely decreased expression of HLA-DRA, HO-1, IGFBP1, 4 and 6, ILR1, IL6R and PTGES and increased expression of CD200, CD273, CD274, IL1B, IL-8, LIF and TGFB2. The latter were confirmed at the protein expression level. Overall, these results show that UCX seem to be naturally more potent immunosuppressors and less immunogenic than BM-MSCs. We propose that these differences may be due to increased levels of immunomodulatory surface proteins such as CD200, CD273, CD274 and cytokines such as IL1β, IL-8, LIF and TGFβ2. PMID:26064137

  6. Dysregulated in vitro hematopoiesis, radiosensitivity, proliferation, and osteoblastogenesis with marrow from SAMP6 mice.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Regina P; Greenberger, Joel S; Goff, Julie; Cao, Shaonan; Kingston, Kiera A; Zhou, Shuanhu; Dixon, Tracy; Houghton, Frank D; Epperly, Michael W; Wang, Hong; Glowacki, Julie

    2012-06-01

    The senescence accelerated-prone mouse variant 6 (SAMP6) shows normal growth followed by rapid aging, development of osteopenia, and shortened lifespan, compared with control R1 mice. Because oxidative stress is a fundamental mechanism of tissue aging, we tested whether cellular parameters that are associated with oxidative stress are impaired with marrow from SAMP6 mice. We compared in vitro hematopoiesis, irradiation sensitivity, proliferative potential, and osteoblastogenesis with marrow cells from SAMP6 and R1 mice. Marrow cells from SAMP6 mice showed shortened in vitro hematopoiesis; their stromal cells showed greater radiation sensitivity and decreased proliferation. Consistent with those properties, there was constitutive upregulation of transforming growth factor-β(1), an inhibitor of hematopoiesis, and of cell cycle inhibitory genes, p16(INK4A) and p19(ARF). Paradoxically, there was constitutive expression of osteoblast genes in stromal cells from SAMP6 mice, but in vitro matrix mineralization was impaired. These studies and data included in other reports indicate that impaired proliferation of osteoblast progenitors in SAMP6 marrow may be a major factor contributing to accelerated loss of bone mass. In sum, marrow from SAMP6 mice had diminished capacity for long-term hematopoiesis, increased radiosensitivity, and reduced proliferative capacity. PMID:22326715

  7. Dysregulated in vitro Hematopoiesis, Radiosensitivity, Proliferation, and Osteoblastogenesis with Marrow from SAMP6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Regina P.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Goff, Julie; Cao, Shaonan; Kingston, Kiera A.; Zhou, Shuanhu; Dixon, Tracy; Houghton, Frank D.; Epperly, Michael W.; Wang, Hong; Glowacki, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The Senescence Accelerated-Prone mouse variant 6 (SAMP6) shows normal growth followed by rapid aging, development of osteopenia, and shortened lifespan, compared with control R1 mice. Because oxidative stress is a fundamental mechanism of tissue aging, we tested whether cellular parameters that are associated with oxidative stress are impaired with marrow from SAMP6 mice. We compared in vitro hematopoiesis, irradiation sensitivity, proliferative potential, and osteoblastogenesis with marrow cells from SAMP6 and R1 mice. Marrow cells from SAMP6 mice showed shortened in vitro hematopoiesis; their stromal cells showed greater radiation sensitivity and decreased proliferation. Consistent with those properties, there was constitutive upregulation of TGF-β1, an inhibitor of hematopoiesis, and of cell cycle inhibitory genes, p16INK4A and p19ARF. Paradoxically, there was constitutive expression of osteoblast genes in stromal cells from SAMP6 mice, but in vitro matrix mineralization was impaired. These studies and data included in other reports indicate that impaired proliferation of osteoblast progenitors in SAMP6 marrow may be a major factor contributing to accelerated loss of bone mass. In sum, marrow from SAMP6 mice had diminished capacity for long-term hematopoiesis, increased radiosensitivity, and reduced proliferative capacity. PMID:22326715

  8. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), but not high glucose, inhibit the osteoblastic differentiation of mouse stromal ST2 cells through the suppression of osterix expression, and inhibit cell growth and increasing cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Kyoko; Yamaguchi, Toru; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Notsu, Masakazu; Ogawa, Noriko; Yano, Shozo; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2012-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to be associated with osteoporotic fractures through a decrease in osteoblastic bone formation rather than an increase in osteoclastic bone resorption. However, its precise mechanism is unknown, and we examined whether or not high glucose or advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which play key roles in the pathogenesis and complications of diabetes, would affect the osteoblastic differentiation, growth, and apoptosis of mouse stromal ST2 cells. Ten to 200 μg/mL AGE2 or AGE3 alone dose-dependently inhibited the mineralization. AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly inhibited alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities as well as the mineralization of the cells (p < 0.01). In contrast, 22 mM glucose alone or in combination with 200 μg/mL AGE2 or AGE3 did not affect these cellular phenotypes. Real-time PCR showed that AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly decreased mRNA expressions of osteocalcin as well as osterix on day 14 (p < 0.01). Western blot analysis showed that AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) also decreased the levels of Runx2 and osterix protein expressions on days 7 and 14. AGE2 or AGE3 significantly suppressed cell growth and increased apoptotic cell death in time- and dose-dependent manners (p < 0.01). Moreover, AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly increased mRNA expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) on days 2 and 3 (p < 0.01). These results suggest that AGE2 and AGE3, but not high glucose, may inhibit the osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells by decreasing osterix expression and partly by increasing RAGE expression, as well as inhibiting cell growth and increasing cell apoptosis. PMID:22903508

  9. Interleukin-1β Suppresses the Transporter Genes Ank and Ent1 Expression in Stromal Progenitor Cells Retaining Mineralization.

    PubMed

    Ezura, Yoichi; Lin, Xin; Hatta, Arina; Izu, Yayoi; Noda, Masaki

    2016-08-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) in various tissues evokes clinical problems. Inflammatory responses of the stromal progenitor cells may be involved in its etiology. Previous report indicated that pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β enhanced the in vitro calcification of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), by suppressing the expression of ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-1 gene (ENPP1). However, possible contribution of other related factors had not been investigated. Here, we investigated the expression of regulators of extracellular pyrophosphate and nucleosides including Enpp1, Nt5e, Ank, Enptds, and Ent1, examining various connective tissue stromal progenitor cells, including bone marrow stromal cells and synovium derived cells from mouse, or bone marrow MSCs from human. Consistent with previous studies, we observed characteristic suppression of the osteoblastic marker genes by IL-1β during the osteogenic culture for 20 days. In addition, we observed a reduced expression of the important transporter genes, Ank and Ent1, whereas the alteration in Enpp1 and Nt5e levels was not always consistent among the cell types. Our results suggest that IL-1β suppresses not only the osteoblastic but also the negative regulators of soft-tissue calcification, including Ank and Ent1 in stromal progenitor cells, which may contribute to the mechanisms of HO in various disorders. PMID:27086348

  10. Expansion of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Fresh Bone Marrow in a 3D Scaffold-Based System under Direct Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Brachat, Sophie; Braccini, Alessandra; Wendt, David; Barbero, Andrea; Jacobi, Carsten; Martin, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cell (MSC) expansion in conventional monolayer culture on plastic dishes (2D) leads to progressive loss of functionality and thus challenges fundamental studies on the physiology of skeletal progenitors, as well as translational applications for cellular therapy and molecular medicine. Here we demonstrate that 2D MSC expansion can be entirely bypassed by culturing freshly isolated bone marrow nucleated cells within 3D porous scaffolds in a perfusion-based bioreactor system. The 3D-perfusion system generated a stromal tissue that could be enzymatically treated to yield CD45- MSC. As compared to 2D-expanded MSC (control), those derived from 3D-perfusion culture after the same time (3 weeks) or a similar extent of proliferation (7–8 doublings) better maintained their progenitor properties, as assessed by a 4.3-fold higher clonogenicity and the superior differentiation capacity towards all typical mesenchymal lineages. Transcriptomic analysis of MSC from 5 donors validated the robustness of the process and indicated a reduced inter-donor variability and a significant upregulation of multipotency-related gene clusters following 3D-perfusion- as compared to 2D-expansion. Interestingly, the differences in functionality and transcriptomics between MSC expanded in 2D or under 3D-perfusion were only partially captured by cytofluorimetric analysis using conventional surface markers. The described system offers a multidisciplinary approach to study how factors of a 3D engineered niche regulate MSC function and, by streamlining conventional labor-intensive processes, is prone to automation and scalability within closed bioreactor systems. PMID:25020062

  11. CD138-negative myeloma cells regulate mechanical properties of bone marrow stromal cells through SDF-1/CXCR4/AKT signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Guo, Xinyi; Su, Jing; Chen, Ruoying; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Guthold, Martin; Bonin, Keith; Zhao, Weiling; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    As the second most prevalent hematologic malignancy, multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable and relapses due to intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies that target molecular mechanisms responsible for drug resistance are attractive. Interactions of tumor cells with their surrounding microenvironment impact tumor initiation, progression and metastasis, as well as patient prognosis. This cross-talk is bidirectional. Tumor cells can also attract or activate tumor-associated stromal cells by releasing cytokines to facilitate their growth, invasion and metastasis. The effect of myeloma cells on bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) has not been well studied. In our study, we found that higher stiffness of BMSCs was not a unique characteristic of BMSCs from MM patients (M-BMSCs). BMSCs from MGUS (Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance) patients were also stiffer than the BMSCs from healthy volunteers (N-BMSCs). The stiffness of M-BMSCs was enhanced when cocultured with myeloma cells. In contrast, no changes were seen in myeloma cell-primed MGUS- and N-BMSCs. Interestingly, our data indicated that CD138− myeloma cells, but not CD138+ cells, regulated M-BMSC stiffness. SDF-1 was highly expressed in the CD138− myeloma subpopulation compared with that in CD138+ cells. Inhibition of SDF-1 using AMD3100 or knocking-down CXCR4 in M-BMSCs blocked CD138− myeloma cells-induced increase in M-BMSC stiffness, suggesting a crucial role of SDF-1/CXCR4. AKT inhibition attenuated SDF-1-induced increases in M-BMSC stiffness. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, CD138− myeloma cell-directed cross-talk with BMSCs and reveal that CD138− myeloma cells regulate M-BMSC stiffness through SDF-1/CXCR4/AKT signaling. PMID:25450979

  12. Systemic Administration of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Extracellular Vesicles Ameliorates Aspergillus Hyphal Extract-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in Immunocompetent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fernanda F.; Borg, Zachary D.; Goodwin, Meagan; Sokocevic, Dino; Wagner, Darcy E.; Coffey, Amy; Antunes, Mariana; Robinson, Kristen L.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella; Thane, Kristen; Hoffman, Andrew M.; McKenna, David H.; Rocco, Patricia R.M.

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies demonstrate that administration of either conditioned media (CM) or extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow and other sources are as effective as the MSCs themselves in mitigating inflammation and injury. The goal of the current study was to determine whether xenogeneic administration of CM or EVs from human bone marrow-derived MSCs would be effective in a model of mixed Th2/Th17, neutrophilic-mediated allergic airway inflammation, reflective of severe refractory asthma, induced by repeated mucosal exposure to Aspergillus hyphal extract (AHE) in immunocompetent C57Bl/6 mice. Systemic administration of both CM and EVs isolated from human and murine MSCs, but not human lung fibroblasts, at the onset of antigen challenge in previously sensitized mice significantly ameliorated the AHE-provoked increases in airway hyperreactivity (AHR), lung inflammation, and the antigen-specific CD4 T-cell Th2 and Th17 phenotype. Notably, both CM and EVs from human MSCs (hMSCs) were generally more potent than those from mouse MSCs (mMSCs) in most of the outcome measures. The weak cross-linking agent 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride was found to inhibit release of both soluble mediators and EVs, fully negating effects of systemically administered hMSCs but only partly inhibited the ameliorating effects of mMSCs. These results demonstrate potent xenogeneic effects of CM and EVs from hMSCs in an immunocompetent mouse model of allergic airway inflammation and they also show differences in mechanisms of action of hMSCs versus mMSCs to mitigate AHR and lung inflammation in this model. Significance There is a growing experience demonstrating benefit of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based cell therapies in preclinical models of asthma. In the current study, conditioned media (CM) and, in particular, the extracellular vesicle fraction obtained from the CM were as potent as the

  13. Human platelet lysate allows expansion and clinical grade production of mesenchymal stromal cells from small samples of bone marrow aspirates or marrow filter washouts.

    PubMed

    Capelli, C; Domenghini, M; Borleri, G; Bellavita, P; Poma, R; Carobbio, A; Micò, C; Rambaldi, A; Golay, J; Introna, M

    2007-10-01

    We compared two protocols for the expansion of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) starting from diagnostic samples of BM aspirates (2-5 ml) or using the remnants in the bag and filter at the end of the BM infusions. The protocols differed in the presence of either 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or 5% platelet lysate (PL). We obtained a significantly (P=0.02) better expansion with PL, obtaining a median 1010-fold compared to 198-fold with a selected batch of FBS and in fewer days (29.8 in PL versus 41.4 in FBS). Overall, we recovered a variable number from 54.8 x 10(6) to 365 x 10(6) hMSCs in PL versus a variable number from 2.7 x 10(6) to 31 x 10(6) in FBS. No difference could be found in terms of gross morphology, differentiation potential, surface markers and immunological properties (inhibition of allogeneic PHA response and mixed lymphocyte reaction) of cells expanded with PL or FBS. The preparations were found within the range of acceptability for all the quality control criteria. Due to the clinical grade nature of the PL and the reproducibility of separate preparations, we propose this method to obtain hMSCs even from minute amounts of BM cells. PMID:17680021

  14. Effects of in vitro chondrogenic priming time of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells on in vivo endochondral bone formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanxun; Both, Sanne K; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Wang, Yining; Jansen, John A; Yang, Fang

    2015-02-01

    Recapitulation of endochondral ossification leads to a new concept of bone tissue engineering via a cartilage intermediate as an osteoinductive template. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence of in vitro chondrogenic priming time for the creation of cartilage template on the in vivo endochondral bone formation both qualitatively and quantitatively. To this end, rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were seeded onto two scaffolds with distinguished features: a fibrous poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(ε-caprolactone) electrospun scaffold (PLGA/PCL) and a porous hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate composite (HA/TCP). The constructs were then chondrogenically differentiated for 2, 3 and 4 weeks in vitro, followed by subcutaneous implantation in vivo for up to 8 weeks. A longer chondrogenic priming time resulted in a significantly increased amount and homogeneous deposition of the cartilage matrix on both the PLGA/PCL and HA/TCP scaffolds in vitro. In vivo, all implanted constructs gave rise to endochondral bone formation, whereas the bone volume was not affected by the length of priming time. An unpolarized woven bone-like structure, with significant amounts of cartilage remaining, was generated in fibrous PLGA/PCL scaffolds, while porous HA/TCP scaffolds supported progressive lamellar-like bone formation with mature bone marrow development. These data suggest that, by utilizing a chondrogenically differentiated MSC-scaffold construct as cartilage template, 2 weeks of in vitro priming time is sufficient to generate a substantial amount of vascularized endochondral bone in vivo. The structure of the bone depends on the chemical and structural cues provided by the scaffold design. PMID:25463490

  15. A robust and reproducible animal serum-free culture method for clinical-grade bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, Anita; Oja, Sofia; Kilpinen, Lotta; Kaartinen, Tanja; Möller, Johanna; Laitinen, Saara; Korhonen, Matti; Nystedt, Johanna

    2016-08-01

    Efficient xenofree expansion methods to replace fetal bovine serum (FBS)-based culture methods are strongly encouraged by the regulators and are needed to facilitate the adoption of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapies. In the current study we established a clinically-compliant and reproducible animal serum-free culture protocol for bone marrow-(BM-) MSCs based on an optimized platelet-derived supplement. Our study compared two different platelet-derived supplements, platelet lysate PL1 versus PL2, produced by two different methods and lysed with different amounts of freeze-thaw cycles. Our study also explored the effect of a low oxygen concentration on BM-MSCs. FBS-supplemented BM-MSC culture served as control. Growth kinetics, differentiation and immunomodulatory potential, morphology, karyotype and immunophenotype was analysed. Growth kinetics in long-term culture was also studied. Based on the initial results, we chose to further process develop the PL1-supplemented culture protocol at 20 % oxygen. The results from 11 individual BM-MSC batches expanded in the chosen condition were consistent, yielding 6.60 × 10(9) ± 4.74 × 10(9) cells from only 20 ml of bone marrow. The cells suppressed T-cell proliferation, displayed normal karyotype and typical MSC differentiation potential and phenotype. The BM-MSCs were, however, consistently HLA-DR positive when cultured in platelet lysate (7.5-66.1 %). We additionally show that culture media antibiotics and sterile filtration of the platelet lysate can be successfully omitted. We present a robust and reproducible clinically-compliant culture method for BM-MSCs based on platelet lysate, which enables high quantities of HLA-DR positive MSCs at a low passage number (p2) and suitable for clinical use. PMID:25777046

  16. Cytoskeletal proteins and stem cell markers gene expression in human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells after different periods of simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershovich, P. M.; Gershovich, J. G.; Zhambalova, A. P.; Romanov, Yu. A.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (MSCs) are present in a variety of tissues during prenatal and postnatal human development. In adult organism, they are prevalent in bone marrow and supposed to be involved in space-flight induced osteopenia. We studied expression of various genes in human bone marrow MSCs after different terms of simulated microgravity (SMG) provided by Random Positioning Machine. Simulated microgravity induced transient changes in expression level of genes associated with actin cytoskeleton, especially after 48 h of SMG. However, after 120 h exposure in SMG partial restoration of gene expression levels (relative to the control) was found. Similar results were obtained with bmMSCs subjected to 24 h readaptation in static state after 24 h in SMG. Analysis of 84 genes related to identification, growth and differentiation of stem cells revealed that expression of nine genes was changed slightly after 48 h in SMG. More pronounced changes in gene expression of "stem cells markers" were observed after 120 h of simulated microgravity. Among 84 investigated genes, 30 were up-regulated and 24 were down-regulated. Finally, MSCs osteogenesis induced by long-term (10-20 days) simulation of microgravity was accompanied by down-regulation of gene expression of the main osteogenic differentiation markers ( ALPL, OMD) and master transcription osteogenic factor of MSCs ( Runx2). Thus, our study demonstrated that changes in expression level of some genes associated with actin cytoskeleton and stem cell markers are supposed to be one of the mechanisms, which contribute to precursor's cellular adaptation to the microgravity conditions. These results can clarify genomic mechanisms through which SMG reduces osteogenic differentiation of bmMSCs.

  17. Biological, functional and genetic characterization of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from pediatric patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Antonella; Biagini, Simone; Del Bufalo, Francesca; Sirleto, Pietro; Angioni, Adriano; Starc, Nadia; Li Pira, Giuseppina; Moretta, Francesca; Proia, Alessandra; Contoli, Benedetta; Genovese, Silvia; Ciardi, Claudia; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Rosti, Vittorio; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Locatelli, Franco; Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in hematopoietic microenvironment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have been claimed to occur, but little is known about the components of marrow stroma in these patients. In this study, we characterized mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM) of 45 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL-MSCs) at diagnosis (day+0) and during chemotherapy treatment (days: +15; +33; +78), the time points being chosen according to the schedule of BM aspirates required by the AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 treatment protocol. Morphology, proliferative capacity, immunophenotype, differentiation potential, immunomodulatory properties and ability to support long-term hematopoiesis of ALL-MSCs were analysed and compared with those from 41 healthy donors (HD-MSCs). ALL-MSCs were also genetically characterized through array-CGH, conventional karyotyping and FISH analysis. Moreover, we compared ALL-MSCs generated at day+0 with those isolated during chemotherapy. Morphology, immunophenotype, differentiation potential and in vitro life-span did not differ between ALL-MSCs and HD-MSCs. ALL-MSCs showed significantly lower proliferative capacity (p<0.001) and ability to support in vitro hematopoiesis (p = 0.04) as compared with HD-MSCs, while they had similar capacity to inhibit in vitro mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation (p = N.S.). ALL-MSCs showed neither the typical translocations carried by the leukemic clone (when present), nor other genetic abnormalities acquired during ex vivo culture. Our findings indicate that ALL-MSCs display reduced ability to proliferate and to support long-term hematopoiesis in vitro. ALL-MSCs isolated at diagnosis do not differ from those obtained during treatment. PMID:24244271

  18. Biological, Functional and Genetic Characterization of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Pediatric Patients Affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Antonella; Biagini, Simone; Del Bufalo, Francesca; Sirleto, Pietro; Angioni, Adriano; Starc, Nadia; Li Pira, Giuseppina; Moretta, Francesca; Proia, Alessandra; Contoli, Benedetta; Genovese, Silvia; Ciardi, Claudia; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Rosti, Vittorio; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Locatelli, Franco; Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in hematopoietic microenvironment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have been claimed to occur, but little is known about the components of marrow stroma in these patients. In this study, we characterized mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM) of 45 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL-MSCs) at diagnosis (day+0) and during chemotherapy treatment (days: +15; +33; +78), the time points being chosen according to the schedule of BM aspirates required by the AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 treatment protocol. Morphology, proliferative capacity, immunophenotype, differentiation potential, immunomodulatory properties and ability to support long-term hematopoiesis of ALL-MSCs were analysed and compared with those from 41 healthy donors (HD-MSCs). ALL-MSCs were also genetically characterized through array-CGH, conventional karyotyping and FISH analysis. Moreover, we compared ALL-MSCs generated at day+0 with those isolated during chemotherapy. Morphology, immunophenotype, differentiation potential and in vitro life-span did not differ between ALL-MSCs and HD-MSCs. ALL-MSCs showed significantly lower proliferative capacity (p<0.001) and ability to support in vitro hematopoiesis (p = 0.04) as compared with HD-MSCs, while they had similar capacity to inhibit in vitro mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation (p = N.S.). ALL-MSCs showed neither the typical translocations carried by the leukemic clone (when present), nor other genetic abnormalities acquired during ex vivo culture. Our findings indicate that ALL-MSCs display reduced ability to proliferate and to support long-term hematopoiesis in vitro. ALL-MSCs isolated at diagnosis do not differ from those obtained during treatment. PMID:24244271

  19. Bone Defect Regeneration by a Combination of a β-Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffold and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in a Non-Human Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Masaoka, Tomokazu; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Yuasa, Masato; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Taniyama, Takashi; Torigoe, Ichiro; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Okawa, Atsushi; Morita, Sadao; Sotome, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reconstruction of large bone defects is a great challenge in orthopedic research. In the present study, we prepared composites of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with three novel aspects: proliferation of BMSCs with continuous dexamethasone treatment, cell loading under low pressure, and use of autologous plasma as the cell loading medium. The effectiveness of the resulting composite for large bone-defect reconstruction was tested in a non-human primate model, and the bone union capability of the regenerated bones was examined. Materials and Methods: Primary surgery: Bone defects (5 cm long) were created in the left femurs of nine cynomolgus monkeys with resection of the periosteum (five cases) or without resection (four cases), and porous β-TCP blocks were transplanted into the defects. Secondary surgery: Bone marrow aspirates harvested from seven of the nine monkeys were cultured with dexamethasone, and BMSCs were obtained. BMSCs were suspended in autologous plasma and introduced into a porous β-TCP block under low-pressure conditions. The BMSC/β-TCP composites were transplanted into bone defects created at the same sites as the primary surgery. Bone union evaluation: Five regenerated femurs were shortened by osteotomy surgery 8 to 15 months after transplantation of the β-TCP/BMSC composites, and bone union was evaluated radiographically. Results: After the primary surgery and treatment with β-TCP alone, one of the five periosteum-resected monkeys and two of the four periosteum-preserved monkeys exhibited successful bone reconstruction. In contrast, five of the seven cases treated with the β-TCP/MSC composite showed successful bone regeneration. In four of the five osteotomy cases, bone union was confirmed. Conclusion: We validated the effectiveness of a novel β-TCP/BMSC composite for large bone defect regeneration and confirmed the bone union capability of the regenerated bone. PMID:27073583

  20. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Cardiac Cell Transplantation: Part I. Reporter Gene Design, Characterization, and Optical in Vivo Imaging of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells after Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Ziv, Keren; Ito, Ken; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Willmann, Jürgen K; Chung, Jaehoon; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Swanson, Julia C; Merk, Denis R; Lyons, Jennifer K; Yerushalmi, David; Teramoto, Tomohiko; Kosuge, Hisanori; Dao, Catherine N; Ray, Pritha; Patel, Manishkumar; Chang, Ya-Fang; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Cohen, Jeff Eric; Goldstone, Andrew Brooks; Habte, Frezghi; Bhaumik, Srabani; Yaghoubi, Shahriar; Robbins, Robert C; Dash, Rajesh; Yang, Phillip C; Brinton, Todd J; Yock, Paul G; McConnell, Michael V; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To use multimodality reporter-gene imaging to assess the serial survival of marrow stromal cells (MSC) after therapy for myocardial infarction (MI) and to determine if the requisite preclinical imaging end point was met prior to a follow-up large-animal MSC imaging study. Materials and Methods Animal studies were approved by the Institutional Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal Care. Mice (n = 19) that had experienced MI were injected with bone marrow-derived MSC that expressed a multimodality triple fusion (TF) reporter gene. The TF reporter gene (fluc2-egfp-sr39ttk) consisted of a human promoter, ubiquitin, driving firefly luciferase 2 (fluc2), enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp), and the sr39tk positron emission tomography reporter gene. Serial bioluminescence imaging of MSC-TF and ex vivo luciferase assays were performed. Correlations were analyzed with the Pearson product-moment correlation, and serial imaging results were analyzed with a mixed-effects regression model. Results Analysis of the MSC-TF after cardiac cell therapy showed significantly lower signal on days 8 and 14 than on day 2 (P = .011 and P = .001, respectively). MSC-TF with MI demonstrated significantly higher signal than MSC-TF without MI at days 4, 8, and 14 (P = .016). Ex vivo luciferase activity assay confirmed the presence of MSC-TF on days 8 and 14 after MI. Conclusion Multimodality reporter-gene imaging was successfully used to assess serial MSC survival after therapy for MI, and it was determined that the requisite preclinical imaging end point, 14 days of MSC survival, was met prior to a follow-up large-animal MSC study. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27308957

  1. In vivo formation of bone and hematopoietic territories by transplanted human bone marrow stromal cells generated in medium with and without osteogenic supplements

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Mankani, Mahesh H; Robey, Pamela Gehron

    2011-01-01

    Autologous transplantation of human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) has been successfully used for bone reconstruction. However, in order to advance this approach into the mainstream of bone tissue engineering, the conditions for BMSC cultivation and transplantation must be optimized. In a recent report, cultivation with dexamethasone (Dex) significantly increased bone formation by human BMSCs in vivo. Based on this important conclusion, we analyzed the data accumulated by our laboratory where human BMSCs have been routinely generated using media both with and without a combination of two osteogenic supplements: Dex at 10-8M and ascorbic acid phosphate (AscP) at 10-4M. Our data demonstrate that for 22 out of 24 donors, BMSC strains propagated with and without Dex/AscP formed similar amounts of bone in vivo. Thus, human BMSCs do not appear to need to be induced to osteogenic differentiation ex vivo prior to transplantation. Similarly, for 12 of 14 donors, BMSC strains cultured with and without Dex/AscP formed hematopoietic territories to a comparable extent. While Dex/AscP did not increase bone formation, they significantly stimulated BMSC in vitro proliferation without affecting the number of BMSC colonies formed by the Colony Forming Units-Fibroblast. We conclude that for the substantial majority of donors, Dex/AscP have no effect on the ability of BMSCs to form bone and myelosupportive stroma in vivo. However, due to increased BMSC proliferation, the total osteogenic population obtained from a single marrow sample is larger after cultivation with Dex/AscP than without them. Secondary to increased BMSC proliferation, Dex/AscP may stimulate bone formation if BMSCs and/or the transplantation system are less than optimal. PMID:22052864

  2. Differential effects and glucocorticoid potentiation of bone morphogenetic protein action during rat osteoblast differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boden, S D; McCuaig, K; Hair, G; Racine, M; Titus, L; Wozney, J M; Nanes, M S

    1996-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce cartilage and bone differentiation in vivo and promote osteoblast differentiation from calvarial and marrow stromal cell preparations. Functional differences between BMP-2, -4, and -6 are not well understood. Recent investigations find that these three closely related osteoinductive proteins may exert different effects in primary rat calvarial cell cultures, suggesting the possibility of unique functions in vivo. In this study, we use a fetal rat secondary calvarial cell culture system to examine the differential effects of BMP-2, -4, and -6 on early osteoblast differentiation. These cells do not spontaneously differentiate into osteoblasts, as do cells in primary calvarial cultures, but rather require exposure to a differentiation initiator such as glucocorticoid or BMP. We determined that BMP-6 is a 2- to 2.5-fold more potent inducer of osteoblast differentiation than BMP-2 or -4. BMP-6 induced the formation of more and larger bone nodules as well as increased osteocalcin secretion. The effects of all three of these BMPs were potentiated up to 10-fold by cotreatment or pretreatment with the glucocorticoid triamcinolone (Trm). The Trm effects were synergistic with those of BMP-2 or -4, suggesting that this glucocorticoid may increase the cell responsiveness to these BMPs. Finally, BMP-6 did not require either cotreatment or pretreatment with Trm to achieve greater amounts of osteoblast differentiation than seen with BMP-2 or BMP-4 treatment, suggesting that BMP-6 may act at an earlier stage of cell differentiation. PMID:8754767

  3. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo. PMID:26924503

  4. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo. PMID:26924503

  5. Navigating the bone marrow niche: translational insights and cancer-driven dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Michaela R; Rosen, Clifford J

    2016-03-01

    The bone marrow niche consists of stem and progenitor cells destined to become mature cells such as haematopoietic elements, osteoblasts or adipocytes. Marrow cells, influenced by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine factors, ultimately function as a unit to regulate bone remodelling and haematopoiesis. Current evidence highlights that the bone marrow niche is not merely an anatomic compartment; rather, it integrates the physiology of two distinct organ systems, the skeleton and the marrow. The niche has a hypoxic microenvironment that maintains quiescent haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and supports glycolytic metabolism. In response to biochemical cues and under the influence of neural, hormonal, and biochemical factors, marrow stromal elements, such as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), differentiate into mature, functioning cells. However, disruption of the niche can affect cellular differentiation, resulting in disorders ranging from osteoporosis to malignancy. In this Review, we propose that the niche reflects the vitality of two tissues - bone and blood - by providing a unique environment for stem and stromal cells to flourish while simultaneously preventing disproportionate proliferation, malignant transformation or loss of the multipotent progenitors required for healing, functional immunity and growth throughout an organism's lifetime. Through a fuller understanding of the complexity of the niche in physiologic and pathologic states, the successful development of more-effective therapeutic approaches to target the niche and its cellular components for the treatment of rheumatic, endocrine, neoplastic and metabolic diseases becomes achievable. PMID:26607387

  6. Synergistic enhancement of human bone marrow stromal cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation on BMP-2-derived and RGD peptide concentration gradients.

    PubMed

    Moore, Nicole M; Lin, Nancy J; Gallant, Nathan D; Becker, Matthew L

    2011-05-01

    Rational design of bioactive tissue engineered scaffolds for directing bone regeneration in vivo requires a comprehensive understanding of cell interactions with the immobilized bioactive molecules. In the current study, substrates possessing gradient concentrations of immobilized peptides were used to measure the concentration-dependent proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells. Two bioactive peptides, one derived from extracellular matrix protein (ECM), GRGDS, and one from bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), KIPKASSVPTELSAISTLYL, were found to synergistically enhance cell proliferation, up-regulate osteogenic mRNA markers bone sialoprotein (BSP) and Runt-related transcription factor 2, and produce mineralization at densities greater than 130 pmol cm(-2) (65 pmol cm(-2) for each peptide). In addition, COOH-terminated self-assembled monolayers alone led to up-regulated BSP mRNA levels at densities above 200 pmol cm(-2) and increased cell proliferation from day 3 to day 14. Taking further advantage of both the synergistic potentials and the concentration-dependent activities of ECM and growth-factor-derived peptides on proliferative activity and osteogenic differentiation, without the need for additional osteogenic supplements, will enable the successful incorporation of the bioactive species into biorelevant tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:21272672

  7. Expression of CD24 in Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Is Regulated by TGFβ3 and Induces a Myofibroblast-Like Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Schäck, Luisa Marilena; Buettner, Manuela; Wirth, Alexander; Krettek, Christian; Hoffmann, Andrea; Noack, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (hBMSCs) derived from the adult organism hold great promise for diverse settings in regenerative medicine. Therefore a more complete understanding of hBMSC biology to fully exploit the cells' potential for clinical settings is important. The protein CD24 has been reported to be involved in a diverse range of processes such as cancer, adaptive immunity, inflammation, and autoimmune diseases in other cell types. Its expression in hBMSCs, which has not yet been analyzed, may add an important aspect in the understanding of hBMSC biology. The present study therefore analyzes the expression, regulation, and functional implication of the surface protein CD24 in hBMSCs. Methods used are stimulation studies with TGF beta as well as shRNA-mediated knockdown and overexpression of CD24 followed by microarray, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometric analyses. To our knowledge, we demonstrate for the first time that the expression of CD24 is an inherent property of hBMSCs. Importantly, the data links the upregulation of CD24 to the adoption of a myofibroblast-like gene expression pattern in hBMSCs. We demonstrate that CD24 is an important modulator in transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGFβ3) signaling with a reciprocal regulatory relationship between these two proteins. PMID:26788063

  8. 3D cell culture and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells plated onto jet-sprayed or electrospun micro-fiber scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Meadhbh Á; Renaud, Audrey; Gamblin, Anne-Laure; D'Arros, Cyril; Nedellec, Steven; Trichet, Valerie; Layrolle, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    A major limitation of the 2D culture systems is that they fail to recapitulate the in vivo 3D cellular microenvironment whereby cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions occur. In this paper, a biomaterial scaffold that mimics the structure of collagen fibers was produced by jet-spraying. This micro-fiber polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold was evaluated for 3D culture of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in comparison with a commercially available electrospun scaffold. The jet-sprayed scaffolds had larger pore diameters, greater porosity, smaller diameter fibers, and more heterogeneous fiber diameter size distribution compared to the electrospun scaffolds. Cells on jet-sprayed constructs exhibited spread morphology with abundant cytoskeleton staining, whereas MSCs on electrospun scaffolds appeared less extended with fewer actin filaments. MSC proliferation and cell infiltration occurred at a faster rate on jet-sprayed compared to electrospun scaffolds. Osteogenic differentiation of MSCs and ECM production as measured by ALP, collagen and calcium deposition was superior on jet-sprayed compared to electrospun scaffolds. The jet-sprayed scaffold which mimics the native ECM and permits homogeneous cell infiltration is important for 3D in vitro applications such as bone cellular interaction studies or drug testing, as well as bone tissue engineering strategies. PMID:26238732

  9. The Role of Vascular Actors in Two Dimensional Dialogue of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell and Endothelial Cell for Inducing Self-Assembled Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiyan; Daculsi, Richard; Grellier, Maritie; Bareille, Reine; Bourget, Chantal; Remy, Murielle; Amedee, Joëlle

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is very important for vascularized tissue engineering. In this study, we found that a two-dimensional co-culture of human bone marrow stromal cell (HBMSC) and human umbical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) is able to stimulate the migration of co-cultured HUVEC and induce self-assembled network formation. During this process, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF165) was upregulated in co-cultured HBMSC. Meanwhile, VEGF165-receptor2 (KDR) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) were upregulated in co-cultured HUVEC. Functional studies show that neutralization of VEGF165 blocked the migration and the rearrangement of the cells and downregulated the expression of uPA and its receptor. Blocking of vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cad) did not affect the migration of co-cultured HUVEC but suppressed the self-assembled network formation. In conclusion, co-cultures upregulated the expression of VEGF165 in co-cultured HBMSC; VEGF165 then activated uPA in co-cultured HUVEC, which might be responsible for initiating the migration and the self-assembled network formation with the participation of VE-cad. All of these results indicated that only the direct contact of HBMSC and HUVEC and their respective dialogue are sufficient to stimulate secretion of soluble factors and to activate molecules that are critical for self-assembled network formation which show a great application potential for vascularization in tissue engineering. PMID:21304816

  10. In vitro generation of whole osteochondral constructs using rabbit bone marrow stromal cells, employing a two-chambered co-culture well design.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Ng, Kian Siang; Ravi, Sujata; Goh, James C H; Toh, Siew Lok

    2016-04-01

    The regeneration of whole osteochondral constructs with a physiological structure has been a significant issue, both clinically and academically. In this study, we present a method using rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured on a silk-RADA peptide scaffold in a specially designed two-chambered co-culture well for the generation of multilayered osteochondral constructs in vitro. This specially designed two-chambered well can simultaneously provide osteogenic and chondrogenic stimulation to cells located in different regions of the scaffold. We demonstrated that this co-culture approach could successfully provide specific chemical stimulation to BMSCs located on different layers within a single scaffold, resulting in the formation of multilayered osteochondral constructs containing cartilage-like and subchondral bone-like tissue, as well as the intermediate osteochondral interface. The cells in the intermediate region were found to be hypertrophic chondrocytes, embedded in a calcified extracellular matrix containing glycosaminoglycans and collagen types I, II and X. In conclusion, this study provides a single-step approach that highlights the feasibility of rabbit BMSCs as a single-cell source for multilayered osteochondral construct generation in vitro. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23495238

  11. In vitro generation of a multilayered osteochondral construct with an osteochondral interface using rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and a silk peptide-based scaffold.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Shi, Pujiang; Teh, Thomas Kok Hiong; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Ch

    2016-04-01

    Tissue engineering of a biological osteochondral multilayered construct with a cartilage-interface subchondral bone layer is a key challenge. This study presented a rabbit bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC)/silk fibroin scaffold-based co-culture approach to generate tissue-engineered osteochondral grafts with an interface. BMSC-seeded scaffolds were first cultured separately in osteogenic and chondrogenic stimulation media. The two differentiated pieces were then combined using an RADA self-assembling peptide and subsequently co-cultured. Gene expression, histological and biochemical analyses were used to evaluate the multilayered structure of the osteochondral graft. A complete osteochondral construct with a cartilage-subchondral bone interface was regenerated and BMSCs were used as the only cell source for the osteochondral construct and interface regeneration. Furthermore, in the intermediate region of co-cultured samples, hypertrophic chondrogenic gene markers type X collagen and MMP-13 were found on both chondrogenic and osteogenic section edges after co-culture. However, significant differences gene expression profile were found in distinct zones of the construct during co-culture and the section in the intermediate region had significantly higher hypertrophic chondrocyte gene expression. Biochemical analyses and histology results further supported this observation. This study showed that specific stimulation from osteogenic and chondrogenic BMSCs affected each other in this co-culture system and induced the formation of an osteochondral interface. Moreover, this system provided a possible approach for generating multilayered osteochondral constructs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23413023

  12. Bone Marrow Stromal Antigen 2 Is a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Prognosticator for Colorectal Carcinoma: A Secretome-Based Verification Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Sum-Fu; Kan, Chih-Yen; Hsiao, Yung-Chin; Tang, Reiping; Hsieh, Ling-Ling; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Tsai, Wen-Sy; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Liang, Ying; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Yu, Jau-Song

    2015-01-01

    Background. The cancer cell secretome has been recognized as a valuable reservoir for identifying novel serum/plasma biomarkers for different cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). This study aimed to verify four CRC cell-secreted proteins (tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2/trophoblast cell surface antigen 2 (TACSTD2/TROP2), tetraspanin-6 (TSPAN6), bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST2), and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 16 (NGFR)) as potential plasma CRC biomarkers. Methods. The study population comprises 152 CRC patients and 152 controls. Target protein levels in plasma and tissue samples were assessed by ELISA and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results. Among the four candidate proteins examined by ELISA in a small sample set, only BST2 showed significantly elevated plasma levels in CRC patients versus controls. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the overexpression of BST2 in CRC tissues, and higher BST2 expression levels correlated with poorer 5-year survival (46.47% versus 65.57%; p = 0.044). Further verification confirmed the elevated plasma BST2 levels in CRC patients (2.35 ± 0.13 ng/mL) versus controls (1.04 ± 0.03 ng/mL) (p < 0.01), with an area under the ROC curve (AUC) being 0.858 comparable to that of CEA (0.867). Conclusion. BST2, a membrane protein selectively detected in CRC cell secretome, may be a novel plasma biomarker and prognosticator for CRC. PMID:26494939

  13. Effect of Metformin on Viability, Morphology, and Ultrastructure of Mouse Bone Marrow-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Balb/3T3 Embryonic Fibroblast Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Czyrek, Aleksandra; Basinska, Katarzyna; Trynda, Justyna; Skaradzińska, Aneta; Siudzińska, Anna; Marędziak, Monika; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Metformin, a popular drug used to treat diabetes, has recently gained attention as a potentially useful therapeutic agent for treating cancer. In our research metformin was added to in vitro cultures of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) and Balb/3T3 fibroblast at concentration of 1 mM, 5 mM, and 10 mM. Obtained results indicated that metformin negatively affected proliferation activity of investigated cells. The drug triggered the formation of autophagosomes and apoptotic bodies in all tested cultures. Additionally, we focused on determination of expression of genes involved in insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) signaling pathway. The most striking finding was that the mRNA level of IGF2 was constant in both BMSCs and Balb/3T3. Further, the analysis of IGF2 concentration in cell supernatants showed that it decreased in BMSC cultures after 5 and 10 mM metformin treatments. In case of Balb/3T3 the concentration of IGF2 in culture supernatants decreased after 1 and 5 mM and increased after 10 mM of metformin. Our results suggest that metformin influences the cytophysiology of somatic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner causing inhibition of proliferation and abnormalities of their morphology and ultrastructure. PMID:26064951

  14. Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells enhances infiltration and survival of CNP and Schwann cells to promote axonal sprouting following complete transection of spinal cord in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Peng; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Jinkun; Xue, Liping

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the roles of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in promoting axonal regeneration after complete transection of spinal cord in adult rats. Transplantation was done 9 days after injury. Only a few BMSCs were detected at the injury site 8 weeks after transplantation, yet there was robust growth of axons. The scarcity of surviving BMSCs may attribute to the adverse conditions in their ambient environment. In this connection, the immediate accumulation of a large number of macrophages/reactive microglia following BMSCs transplantation and subsequent cavitation of tissues may be detrimental to their survival. An unexpected finding following BMSCs transplantation was the marked increase in the nestin, GFAP, NF200, olig 3 and CNP positive cells at the injury site. Immunoelectron microscopy showed CNP cells were oval or fibroblast-like and had multiple perineurial-like compartments with long extending filopodia. The spatial relationship between regenerating axons and CNP-positive cells was also confirmed by double immunofluorescence staining. Our results suggest that transplantation of BMSCs elicits the influx and survival of local cells including CNP positive cells and Schwann cells into injury site, which provide structural support for the axon regeneration and remyelination after spinal cord injury. PMID:24936216

  15. The effect of a polyurethane-based reverse thermal gel on bone marrow stromal cell transplant survival and spinal cord repair

    PubMed Central

    Ritfeld, Gaby J; Rauck, Britta; Novosat, Tabitha L; Park, Daewon; Patel, Pavan; Roos, Raymund AC; Wang, Yadong; Oudega, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy for nervous tissue repair is limited by low transplant survival. We investigated the effects of a polyurethane-based reverse thermal gel, poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(serinol hexamethylene urethane) (ESHU) on bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplant survival and repair using a rat model of spinal cord contusion. Transplantation of BMSCs in ESHU at three days post-contusion resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in BMSC survival at one week post-injury and a 66% increase in spared nervous tissue volume at four weeks post-injury. These improvements were accompanied by enhanced hindlimb motor and sensorimotor recovery. In vitro, we found that ESHU protected BMSCs from hydrogen peroxide-mediated death, resulting in a four-fold increase in BMSC survival with two-fold fewer BMSCs expressing the apoptosis marker, caspase 3 and the DNA oxidation marker, 8-Oxo-deoxyguanosine. We argue that ESHU protected BMSCs transplanted is a spinal cord contusion from death thereby augmenting their effects on neuroprotection leading to improved behavioral restoration. The data show that the repair effects of intraneural BMSC transplants depend on the degree of their survival and may have a widespread impact on cell-based regenerative medicine. PMID:24331711

  16. Molecular Imaging for Comparison of Different Growth Factors on Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells' Survival and Proliferation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hongyu; Zhang, Ran; Gao, Lina; Guo, Yanjie; Wang, Jinda; Zhang, Rongqing; Li, Xiujuan; Li, Congye; Chen, Yundai; Cao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) have emerged as promising cell candidates but with poor survival after transplantation. This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of VEGF, bFGF, and IGF-1 on BMSCs' viability and proliferation both in vivo and in vitro using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Methods. BMSCs were isolated from β-actin-Fluc(+) transgenic FVB mice, which constitutively express firefly luciferase. Apoptosis was induced by hypoxia preconditioning for up to 24 h followed by flow cytometry and TUNEL assay. 10(6) BMSCs with/without growth factors were injected subcutaneously into wild type FVB mice's backs. Survival of BMSCs was longitudinally monitored using bioluminescence imaging (BLI) for 5 weeks. Protein expression of Akt, p-Akt, PARP, and caspase-3 was detected by Western blot. Results. Hypoxia-induced apoptosis was significantly attenuated by bFGF and IGF-1 compared with VEGF and control group in vitro (P < 0.05). When combined with matrigel, IGF-1 showed the most beneficial effects in protecting BMSCs from apoptosis in vivo. The phosphorylation of Akt had a higher ratio in the cells from IGF-1 group. Conclusion. IGF-1 could protect BMSCs from hypoxia-induced apoptosis through activation of p-Akt/Akt pathway. PMID:27419126

  17. Sciatic nerve regeneration induced by transplantation of in vitro bone marrow stromal cells into an inside-out artery graft in rat.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Vahabzadeh, Behnam; Amini, Keyvan

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic injury to peripheral nerves results in considerable motor and sensory disability. Several research groups have tried to improve the regeneration of traumatized nerves by invention of favorable microsurgery. Effect of undifferentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) combined with artery graft on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve regeneration model. A 10-mm sciatic nerve defect was bridged using an artery graft (IOAG) filled with undifferentiated BMSCs (2 × 10(7) cells/mL). In control group, the graft was filled with phosphated buffer saline alone. The regenerated fibers were studied 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. Assessment of nerve regeneration was based on behavioral, functional (Walking Track Analysis), electrophysiological, histomorphometric and immuohistochemical (Schwann cell detection by S-100 expression) criteria. The behavioral, functional and electrophysiological studies confirmed significant recovery of regenerated axons in IOAG/BMSC group (P < 0.05). Quantitative morphometric analyses of regenerated fibers showed the number and diameter of myelinated fibers in IOAG/BMSC group were significantly higher than in the control group (P < 0.05). This demonstrates the potential of using undifferentiated BMSCs combined with artery graft in peripheral nerve regeneration without limitations of donor-site morbidity associated with isolation of Schwann cells. It is also cost saving due to reduction in interval from tissue collection until cell injection, simplicity of laboratory procedures compared to differentiated BMSCs and may have clinical implications for the surgical management of patients after facial nerve transection. PMID:24942097

  18. Prostaglandin E2 plays a key role in the immunosuppressive properties of adipose and bone marrow tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yanez, Rosa Oviedo, Alberto Aldea, Montserrat Bueren, Juan A. Lamana, Maria L.

    2010-11-15

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have important immunosuppressive properties, but the mechanisms and soluble factors involved in these effects remain unclear. We have studied prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) as a possible candidate implied in adipose tissue-derived MSCs (Ad-MSCs) immunosuppressive properties over dendritic cells and T lymphocytes, compared to bone marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). We found that both MSCs inhibited the maturation of myeloid-DCs and plasmocytoid-DCs. High levels of PGE2 were detected in DCs/MSCs co-cultures. Its blockade with indomethacin (IDM) allowed plasmocytoid-DCs but not myeloid-DCs maturation. Additionally, high levels of PGE2 were found in co-cultures in which Ad-MSCs or BM-MSCs inhibited activated T cells proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokines production. PGE2 blockade by IDM preserved T lymphocytes proliferation but did not restore the pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion. However, an increased expression of transcription factors and cytokines genes involved in the Th1/Th2 differentiation pathway was detected in the T cells co-cultured with Ad-MSCs, but not with BM-MSCs. In conclusion, we propose that PGE2 is a soluble factor mediating most of the immunosuppressive effects of Ad-MSCs and BM-MSCs over p-DCs maturation and activated T lymphocytes proliferation and cytokine secretion.

  19. Induction of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase in Mouse Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Exposed to 900 MHz Radiofrequency Fields: Preliminary Observations

    PubMed Central

    He, Qina; Sun, Yulong; Zong, Lin; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Several investigators have reported increased levels of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a nuclear enzyme which plays an important role in the repair of damaged DNA, in cells exposed to extremely low dose ionizing radiation which does not cause measurable DNA damage. Objective. To examine whether exposure of the cells to nonionizing radiofrequency fields (RF) is capable of increasing messenger RNA of PARP-1 and its protein levels in mouse bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Methods. BMSCs were exposed to 900 MHz RF at 120 μW/cm2 power intensity for 3 hours/day for 5 days. PARP-1 mRNA and its protein levels were examined at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 hours after exposure using RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Sham-exposed (SH) cells and those exposed to ionizing radiation were used as unexposed and positive control cells. Results. BMSCs exposed to RF showed significantly increased expression of PARP-1 mRNA and its protein levels after exposure to RF while such changes were not observed in SH-exposed cells. Conclusion. Nonionizing RF exposure is capable of inducing PARP-1. PMID:27190989

  20. Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transdifferentiation into Oligodendrocyte-Like Cells Using Triiodothyronine as a Inducer with Expression of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor α as a Maturity Marker

    PubMed Central

    Abbaszadeh, Hojjat-Allah; Tiraihi, Taki; Delshad, Ali Reza; Saghedi Zadeh, Majid; Taheri, Taher

    2013-01-01

    Background: The present study investigated the functional maturity of oligodendrocyte derived from rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). Methods: The BMSC were isolated from female Sprague-Dawley rats and evaluated for different markers, such as fibronectin, CD106, CD90, Oct-4 and CD45. Transdifferentiation of OLC from BMSC was obtained by exposing the BMSC to DMSO and 1 µM all-trans-retinoic acid during the pre-induction stage and then induced by heregulin (HRG), platelet-derived growth factor AA (PDGFR-α), fibroblast growth factor and T3. The neuroprogenitor cells (NPC) were evaluated for nestin, neurofilament 68, neurofilament 160 and glial fibrillary acidic protein gene expression using immunocytochemistry. The OLC were assessed by immunocytochemistry for O4, oligo2, O1 and MBP marker and gene expression of PDGFR-α was examined by RT-PCR. Results: Our results showed that the fibronectin, CD106, CD90, CD45 and Oct-4 were expressed after the fourth passage. Also, the yield of OLC differentiation was about 71% when using the O1, O4 and oligo2 markers. Likewise, the expression of PDGFR-α in pre-oligodendrocytes was noticed, while MBP expression was detected in oligodendrocyte after 6 days of the induction. Conclusion: The conclusion of the study showed that BMSC can be induced to transdifferentiate into mature OLC. PMID:23567847

  1. Detection of the quantity of kinesin and microgravity-sensitive kinesin genes in rat bone marrow stromal cells grown in a simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Chengzhi; Wang, Chunyan; Li, Yuan; Li, Yinghui; Dai, Zhongquan; Zhao, Dongming; Sun, Hongyi; Wu, Bin

    2011-06-01

    Kinesin and kinesin-like proteins (KLPs) constitute a superfamily of microtubule motor proteins found in all eukaryotic organisms. Members of the kinesin superfamily are known to play important roles in many fundamental cellular and developmental processes. To date, few published studies have reported on the effects of microgravity on kinesin expression. In this paper, we describe the expression pattern and microgravity-sensitive genes of kinesin in rat bone marrow stromal cells cultured in a ground-based rotating bioreactor. The quantity of kinesin under the clinorotation condition was examined by immunoblot analysis with anti-kinesin. Furthermore, the distribution of kinesin at various times during clinorotation was determined by dual immunostaining, using anti-kinesin monoclonal antibody or anti-β-tubulin monoclonal antibody. In terms of kinesin quantity, we found that the ratios of the amounts of clinorotated/stationary KLPs decreased from clinorotation day 5 to day 10, although it increased on days 2 and 3. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that kinesin in the nucleus was the first to be affected by simulated microgravity, following the kinesin at the periphery that was affected at various times during clinorotation. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of kinesin mRNA expression was performed and led to the identification of 3 microgravity-sensitive kinesin genes: KIF9, KIFC1, and KIF21A. Our results suggest that kinesin has a distinct expression pattern, and the identification of microgravity-sensitive kinesin genes offers insight into fundamental cell biology.

  2. Presentation of a novel model of chitosan- polyethylene oxide-nanohydroxyapatite nanofibers together with bone marrow stromal cells to repair and improve minor bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Emamgholi, Asgar; Rahimi, Mohsen; Kaka, Gholamreza; Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Najafi, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Various methods for repairing bone defects are presented. Cell therapy is one of these methods. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) seem to be suitable for this purpose. On the other hand, lots of biomaterials are used to improve and repair the defect in the body, so in this study we tried to produce a similar structure to the bone by the chitosan and hydroxyapatite. Materials and Methods: In this study, the solution of chitosan-nanohydroxyapatite-polyethylene oxide (PEO) Nanofibers was produced by electrospinning method, and then the BMSCs were cultured on this solution. A piece of chitosan-nanohydroxyapatite Nanofibers with BMSCs was placed in a hole with the diameter of 1 mm at the distal epiphysis of the rat femur. Then the biomechanical and radiographic studies were performed. Results: Biomechanical testing results showed that bone strength was significantly higher in the Nanofiber/BMSCs group in comparison with control group. Also the bone strength in nanofiber/BMSCs group was significant, but in nanofiber group was nearly significant. Radiographic studies also showed that the average amount of callus formation (radio opacity) in nanofiber and control group was not significantly different. The callus formation in nanofiber/BMSCs group was increased compared to the control group, and it was not significant in the nanofiber group. Conclusion: Since chitosan-nanohydroxyapatite nanofibers with BMSCs increases the rate of bone repair, the obtained cell-nanoscaffold shell can be used in tissue engineering and cell therapy, especially for bone defects. PMID:26523221

  3. Enhanced human bone marrow stromal cell affinity for modified poly(L-lactide) surfaces by the upregulation of adhesion molecular genes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xueli; Peng, Hui; Ling, Junqi; Friis, Thor; Whittaker, Andrew K; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2009-12-01

    To enhance and regulate cell affinity for poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) based materials, two hydrophilic ligands, poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (L-lysine) (PLL), were used to develop triblock copolymers: methoxy-terminated poly (ethylene glycol)-block-poly (L-lactide)-block-poly (L-lysine) (MPEG-b-PLLA-b-PLL) in order to regulate protein absorption and cell adhesion. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured on different composition of MPEG-b-PLLA-b-PLL copolymer films to determine the effect of modified polymer surfaces on BMSC attachment. To understand the molecular mechanism governing the initial cell adhesion on difference polymer surfaces, the mRNA expression of 84 human extracellular matrix (ECM) and adhesion molecules was analysed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). It was found that down regulation of adhesion molecules was responsible for the impaired BMSC attachment on PLLA surface. MPEG-b-PLLA-b-PLL copolymer films improved significantly the cell adhesion and cytoskeleton expression by upregulation of relevant molecule genes significantly. Six adhesion genes (CDH1, ITGL, NCAM1, SGCE, COL16A1, and LAMA3) were most significantly influenced by the modified PLLA surfaces. In summary, polymer surfaces altered adhesion molecule gene expression of BMSCs, which consequently regulated cell initial attachment on modified PLLA surfaces. PMID:19796804

  4. Molecular Imaging for Comparison of Different Growth Factors on Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells' Survival and Proliferation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Hongyu; Zhang, Ran; Gao, Lina; Guo, Yanjie; Wang, Jinda; Zhang, Rongqing; Li, Xiujuan; Li, Congye; Chen, Yundai; Cao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) have emerged as promising cell candidates but with poor survival after transplantation. This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of VEGF, bFGF, and IGF-1 on BMSCs' viability and proliferation both in vivo and in vitro using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Methods. BMSCs were isolated from β-actin-Fluc+ transgenic FVB mice, which constitutively express firefly luciferase. Apoptosis was induced by hypoxia preconditioning for up to 24 h followed by flow cytometry and TUNEL assay. 106 BMSCs with/without growth factors were injected subcutaneously into wild type FVB mice's backs. Survival of BMSCs was longitudinally monitored using bioluminescence imaging (BLI) for 5 weeks. Protein expression of Akt, p-Akt, PARP, and caspase-3 was detected by Western blot. Results. Hypoxia-induced apoptosis was significantly attenuated by bFGF and IGF-1 compared with VEGF and control group in vitro (P < 0.05). When combined with matrigel, IGF-1 showed the most beneficial effects in protecting BMSCs from apoptosis in vivo. The phosphorylation of Akt had a higher ratio in the cells from IGF-1 group. Conclusion. IGF-1 could protect BMSCs from hypoxia-induced apoptosis through activation of p-Akt/Akt pathway. PMID:27419126

  5. Stimulation of chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived stromal cells by a moderate-strength static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Amin, Harsh D; Brady, Mariea Alice; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Stevens, Molly M; Overby, Darryl R; Ethier, C Ross

    2014-06-01

    Tissue-engineering strategies for the treatment of osteoarthritis would benefit from the ability to induce chondrogenesis in precursor cells. One such cell source is bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs). Here, we examined the effects of moderate-strength static magnetic fields (SMFs) on chondrogenic differentiation in human BMSCs in vitro. Cells were cultured in pellet form and exposed to several strengths of SMFs for various durations. mRNA transcript levels of the early chondrogenic transcription factor SOX9 and the late marker genes ACAN and COL2A1 were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and production of the cartilage-specific macromolecules sGAG, collage type 2 (Col2), and proteoglycans was determined both biochemically and histologically. The role of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway was also examined. Results showed that a 0.4 T magnetic field applied for 14 days elicited a strong chondrogenic differentiation response in cultured BMSCs, so long as TGF-β3 was also present, that is, a synergistic response of a SMF and TGF-β3 on BMSC chondrogenic differentiation was observed. Further, SMF alone caused TGF-β secretion in culture, and the effects of SMF could be abrogated by the TGF-β receptor blocker SB-431542. These data show that moderate-strength magnetic fields can induce chondrogenesis in BMSCs through a TGF-β-dependent pathway. This finding has potentially important applications in cartilage tissue-engineering strategies. PMID:24506272

  6. Notch-Hes pathway mediates the impaired osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells from myelodysplastic syndromes patients through the down-regulation of Runx2

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chengming; Guo, Juan; Zhao, Youshan; Gu, Shucheng; Zhao, Sida; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chunkang

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMMSCs) from patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) display defective proliferative potential and impaired osteogenic differentiation ability. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the present study, the impaired osteogenic differentiation potential of BMMSCs was found in cases with RARS (83.3%), RCMD (75.0%), RAEB I (44.4%), RAEB II (40%). We also observed that MDS-BMMSCs with impaired osteogenic differentiation potential exhibited accelerate senescence and decreased hematopoietic supporting function. Further, we found that an abnormal activation of Notch-Hes signaling pathway in MDS-BMMSCs. By overexpression of Notch intracellular domain (NICD) in BMMSCs from healthy donors, we confirmed that Notch signaling pathway negatively regulated BMMSCs osteogenesis through inhibition of Runx2 transcriptional activity. Importantly, treatment with DAPT, a γ-secretase inhibitor of Notch signaling reversed the osteogenic differentiation in MDS-BMMSCs. Collectively, we provide evidence that activation of Notch-Hes signaling pathway is involved in the impaired osteogenic differentiation of MDS-BMMSCs and support the concept of a primary BMMSCs defect that might have a contributory effect in MDS pathogenesis. PMID:26692937

  7. The PI3-Kinase Delta Inhibitor Idelalisib (GS-1101) Targets Integrin-Mediated Adhesion of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Cell to Endothelial and Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiorcari, Stefania; Brown, Wells S.; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Estrov, Zeev; Maffei, Rossana; O’Brien, Susan; Sivina, Mariela; Hoellenriegel, Julia; Wierda, William G.; Keating, Michael J.; Ding, Wei; Kay, Neil E.; Lannutti, Brian J.; Marasca, Roberto; Burger, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    CLL cell trafficking between blood and tissue compartments is an integral part of the disease process. Idelalisib, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor causes rapid lymph node shrinkage, along with an increase in lymphocytosis, prior to inducing objective responses in CLL patients. This characteristic activity presumably is due to CLL cell redistribution from tissues into the blood, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We therefore analyzed idelalisib effects on CLL cell adhesion to endothelial and bone marrow stromal cells (EC, BMSC). We found that idelalisib inhibited CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC under static and shear flow conditions. TNFα-induced VCAM-1 (CD106) expression in supporting layers increased CLL cell adhesion and accentuated the inhibitory effect of idelalisib. Co-culture with EC and BMSC also protected CLL from undergoing apoptosis, and this EC- and BMSC-mediated protection was antagonized by idelalisib. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CLL cell adhesion to EC and VLA-4 (CD49d) resulted in the phosphorylation of Akt, which was sensitive to inhibition by idelalisib. These findings demonstrate that idelalisib interferes with integrin-mediated CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC, providing a novel mechanism to explain idelalisib-induced redistribution of CLL cells from tissues into the blood. PMID:24376763

  8. Adaptive response in mouse bone-marrow stromal cells exposed to 900-MHz radiofrequency fields: Gamma-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and repair.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yongxin; He, Qina; Sun, Yulong; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether radiofrequency field (RF) preexposure induced adaptive responses (AR) in mouse bone-marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and the mechanisms underlying the observed findings. Cells were preexposed to 900-MHz radiofrequency fields (RF) at 120 μW/cm(2) power intensity for 4 h/d for 5 d. Some cells were subjected to 1.5 Gy γ-radiation (GR) 4 h following the last RF exposure. The intensity of strand breaks in the DNA was assessed immediately at 4 h. Subsequently, some BMSC were examined at 30, 60, 90, or 120 min utilizing the alkaline comet assay and γ-H2AX foci technique. Data showed no significant differences in number and intensity of strand breaks in DNA between RF-exposed and control cells. A significant increase in number and intensity of DNA strand breaks was noted in cells exposed to GR exposure alone. RF followed by GR exposure significantly decreased number of strand breaks and resulted in faster kinetics of repair of DNA strand breaks compared to GR alone. Thus, data suggest that RF preexposure protected cells from damage induced by GR. Evidence indicates that in RF-mediated AR more rapid repair kinetics occurs under conditions of GR-induced damage, which may be attributed to diminished DNA strand breakage. PMID:27267824

  9. High-Fat Diet/Low-Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Type 2 Diabetes in Rats Impacts Osteogenesis and Wnt Signaling in Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weiqiang; Jiang, Xinquan; Zhang, Fuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Bone regeneration disorders are a significant problem in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are recognized as ideal seed cells for tissue engineering because they can stimulate osteogenesis during bone regeneration. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the osteogenic potential of BMSCs derived from type 2 diabetic rats and the pathogenic characteristics of dysfunctional BMSCs that affect osteogenesis. BMSCs were isolated from normal and high-fat diet+streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetic rats. Cell metabolic activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization and osteogenic gene expression were reduced in the type 2 diabetic rat BMSCs. The expression levels of Wnt signaling genes, such as β-catenin, cyclin D1 and c-myc, were also significantly decreased in the type 2 diabetic rat BMSCs, but the expression of GSK3β remained unchanged. The derived BMSCs were cultured on calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds and placed subcutaneously into nude mice for eight weeks; they were detected at a low level in newly formed bone. The osteogenic potential of the type 2 diabetic rat BMSCs was not impaired by the culture environment, but it was impaired by inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway, likely due to an insufficient accumulation of β-catenin rather than because of GSK3β stimulation. Using BMSCs derived from diabetic subjects could offer an alternative method of regenerating bone together with the use of supplementary growth factors to stimulate the Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:26296196

  10. Inhibition of miR-21 restores RANKL/OPG ratio in multiple myeloma-derived bone marrow stromal cells and impairs the resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Pitari, Maria Rita; Rossi, Marco; Amodio, Nicola; Botta, Cirino; Morelli, Eugenio; Federico, Cinzia; Gullà, Annamaria; Caracciolo, Daniele; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Arbitrio, Mariamena; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2015-09-29

    miR-21 is an oncogenic microRNA (miRNA) with an emerging role as therapeutic target in human malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM). Here we investigated whether miR-21 is involved in MM-related bone disease (BD). We found that miR-21 expression is dramatically enhanced, while osteoprotegerin (OPG) is strongly reduced, in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) adherent to MM cells. On this basis, we validated the 3'UTR of OPG mRNA as miR-21 target. Constitutive miR-21 inhibition in lentiviral-transduced BMSCs adherent to MM cells restored OPG expression and secretion. Interestingly, miR-21 inhibition reduced RANKL production by BMSCs. Overexpression of protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), which is a direct and validated target of miR-21, antagonized STAT3-mediated RANKL gene activation. Finally, we demonstrate that constitutive expression of miR-21 inhibitors in BMSCs restores RANKL/OPG balance and dramatically impairs the resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts. Taken together, our data provide proof-of-concept that miR-21 overexpression within MM-microenviroment plays a crucial role in bone resorption/apposition balance, supporting the design of innovative miR-21 inhibition-based strategies for MM-related BD. PMID:26160841

  11. Inhibition of miR-21 restores RANKL/OPG ratio in multiple myeloma-derived bone marrow stromal cells and impairs the resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Pitari, Maria Rita; Rossi, Marco; Amodio, Nicola; Botta, Cirino; Morelli, Eugenio; Federico, Cinzia; Gullà, Annamaria; Caracciolo, Daniele; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Arbitrio, Mariamena; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2015-01-01

    miR-21 is an oncogenic microRNA (miRNA) with an emerging role as therapeutic target in human malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM). Here we investigated whether miR-21 is involved in MM-related bone disease (BD). We found that miR-21 expression is dramatically enhanced, while osteoprotegerin (OPG) is strongly reduced, in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) adherent to MM cells. On this basis, we validated the 3′UTR of OPG mRNA as miR-21 target. Constitutive miR-21 inhibition in lentiviral-transduced BMSCs adherent to MM cells restored OPG expression and secretion. Interestingly, miR-21 inhibition reduced RANKL production by BMSCs. Overexpression of protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), which is a direct and validated target of miR-21, antagonized STAT3-mediated RANKL gene activation. Finally, we demonstrate that constitutive expression of miR-21 inhibitors in BMSCs restores RANKL/OPG balance and dramatically impairs the resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts. Taken together, our data provide proof-of-concept that miR-21 overexpression within MM-microenviroment plays a crucial role in bone resorption/apposition balance, supporting the design of innovative miR-21 inhibition-based strategies for MM-related BD. PMID:26160841

  12. Effect of Metformin on Viability, Morphology, and Ultrastructure of Mouse Bone Marrow-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Balb/3T3 Embryonic Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Czyrek, Aleksandra; Basinska, Katarzyna; Trynda, Justyna; Skaradzińska, Aneta; Siudzińska, Anna; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Metformin, a popular drug used to treat diabetes, has recently gained attention as a potentially useful therapeutic agent for treating cancer. In our research metformin was added to in vitro cultures of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) and Balb/3T3 fibroblast at concentration of 1 mM, 5 mM, and 10 mM. Obtained results indicated that metformin negatively affected proliferation activity of investigated cells. The drug triggered the formation of autophagosomes and apoptotic bodies in all tested cultures. Additionally, we focused on determination of expression of genes involved in insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) signaling pathway. The most striking finding was that the mRNA level of IGF2 was constant in both BMSCs and Balb/3T3. Further, the analysis of IGF2 concentration in cell supernatants showed that it decreased in BMSC cultures after 5 and 10 mM metformin treatments. In case of Balb/3T3 the concentration of IGF2 in culture supernatants decreased after 1 and 5 mM and increased after 10 mM of metformin. Our results suggest that metformin influences the cytophysiology of somatic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner causing inhibition of proliferation and abnormalities of their morphology and ultrastructure. PMID:26064951

  13. The Morphofunctional Effect of the Transplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Predegenerated Peripheral Nerve in Chronic Paraplegic Rat Model via Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Buzoianu-Anguiano, Vinnitsa; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; García-Vences, Elisa; Caballero-Chacón, Sara; Guizar-Sahagún, Gabriel; Chavez-Sanchez, Luis; Grijalva, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) is limited by poor axonal and cellular regeneration as well as the failure to replace damaged myelin. Employed separately, both the transplantation of the predegenerated peripheral nerve (PPN) and the transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to promote the regrowth and remyelination of the damaged central axons in SCI models of hemisection, transection, and contusion injury. With the aim to test the effects of the combined transplantation of PPN and BMSC on regrowth, remyelination, and locomotor function in an adult rat model of spinal cord (SC) transection, 39 Fischer 344 rats underwent SC transection at T9 level. Four weeks later they were randomly assigned to traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) without treatment, TSCI + Fibrin Glue (FG), TSCI + FG + PPN, and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs. Eight weeks after, transplantation was carried out on immunofluorescence and electron microscope studies. The results showed greater axonal regrowth and remyelination in experimental groups TSCI + FG + PPN and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs analyzed with GAP-43, neuritin, and myelin basic protein. It is concluded that the combined treatment of PPN and BMSCs is a favorable strategy for axonal regrowth and remyelination in a chronic SC transection model. PMID:26634157

  14. Stimulation of cell proliferation by glutathione monoethyl ester in aged bone marrow stromal cells is associated with the assistance of TERT gene expression and telomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Aminizadeh, Najmeh; Tiraihi, Taki; Mesbah-Namin, Seyed Alireza; Taheri, Taher

    2016-08-01

    The proliferation and differentiation potential of aged bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are significantly reduced. In order to improve the performance of the aged BMSCs, these cells were treated with 2 mM glutathione monoethyl ester (GSH-MEE) for 24 h. Proliferation rate, telomerase activity, telomere length, and differentiation to cholinergic neuron-like cells (CNLCs) were observed to increase. Though, the expression level of telomerase reverse transcriptase gene increased, but CTC1 and TEN1 genes from Ctc1-Stn1-Ten1 complex encoding proteins with regulatory function significantly decreased. Trypan blue exclusion assay was used to analyze the proliferation and, while telomere length, its several related gene expressions, and telomerase activity were measured using the real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques, respectively. CNLCs differentiation potential was evaluated by estimating the percentage of choline acetyltransferase immunereactive cells.The results suggested that GSH-MEE could improve aged rat BMSC properties and would be of potential benefit for enhancing the performance of aged people's BMSCs. PMID:27251157

  15. NOTCH-Mediated Maintenance and Expansion of Human Bone Marrow Stromal/Stem Cells: A Technology Designed for Orthopedic Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yufeng; Long, Teng; Wang, Cuicui; Mirando, Anthony J.; Chen, Jianquan; O’Keefe, Regis J.

    2014-01-01

    Human bone marrow-derived stromal/stem cells (BMSCs) have great therapeutic potential for treating skeletal disease and facilitating skeletal repair, although maintaining their multipotency and expanding these cells ex vivo have proven difficult. Because most stem cell-based applications to skeletal regeneration and repair in the clinic would require large numbers of functional BMSCs, recent research has focused on methods for the appropriate selection, expansion, and maintenance of BMSC populations during long-term culture. We describe here a novel biological method that entails selection of human BMSCs based on NOTCH2 expression and activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway in cultured BMSCs via a tissue culture plate coated with recombinant human JAGGED1 (JAG1) ligand. We demonstrate that transient JAG1-mediated NOTCH signaling promotes human BMSC maintenance and expansion while increasing their skeletogenic differentiation capacity, both ex vivo and in vivo. This study is the first of its kind to describe a NOTCH-mediated methodology for the maintenance and expansion of human BMSCs and will serve as a platform for future clinical or translational studies aimed at skeletal regeneration and repair. PMID:25368376

  16. Distribution and Viability of Fetal and Adult Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in a Biaxial Rotating Vessel Bioreactor after Seeding on Polymeric 3D Additive Manufactured Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Leferink, Anne M.; Chng, Yhee-Cheng; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with defined pore network, geometry, and therewith defined mechanical properties. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for tissue engineering-based cell therapies due to their multipotent character. One of the hurdles to overcome when combining additive manufactured scaffolds with MSCs is the resulting heterogeneous cell distribution and limited cell proliferation capacity. In this study, we show that the use of a biaxial rotating bioreactor, after static culture of human fetal MSCs (hfMSCs) seeded on synthetic polymeric scaffolds, improved the homogeneity of cell and extracellular matrix distribution and increased the total cell number. Furthermore, we show that the relative mRNA expression levels of indicators for stemness and differentiation are not significantly changed upon this bioreactor culture, whereas static culture shows variations of several indicators for stemness and differentiation. The biaxial rotating bioreactor presented here offers a homogeneous distribution of hfMSCs, enabling studies on MSCs fate in additive manufactured scaffolds without inducing undesired differentiation. PMID:26557644

  17. Delayed Minimally Invasive Injection of Allogenic Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Sheets Regenerates Large Bone Defects in an Ovine Preclinical Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Berner, Arne; Henkel, Jan; Woodruff, Maria A.; Steck, Roland; Nerlich, Michael; Schuetz, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based tissue engineering approaches are promising strategies in the field of regenerative medicine. However, the mode of cell delivery is still a concern and needs to be significantly improved. Scaffolds and/or matrices loaded with cells are often transplanted into a bone defect immediately after the defect has been created. At this point, the nutrient and oxygen supply is low and the inflammatory cascade is incited, thus creating a highly unfavorable microenvironment for transplanted cells to survive and participate in the regeneration process. We therefore developed a unique treatment concept using the delayed injection of allogenic bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) sheets to regenerate a critical-sized tibial defect in sheep to study the effect of the cells’ regeneration potential when introduced at a postinflammatory stage. Minimally invasive percutaneous injection of allogenic BMSCs into biodegradable composite scaffolds 4 weeks after the defect surgery led to significantly improved bone regeneration compared with preseeded scaffold/cell constructs and scaffold-only groups. Biomechanical testing and microcomputed tomography showed comparable results to the clinical reference standard (i.e., an autologous bone graft). To our knowledge, we are the first to show in a validated preclinical large animal model that delayed allogenic cell transplantation can provide applicable clinical treatment alternatives for challenging bone defects in the future. PMID:25834121

  18. Ectopic bone formation using an injectable biphasic calcium phosphate/Si-HPMC hydrogel composite loaded with undifferentiated bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Trojani, Christophe; Boukhechba, Florian; Scimeca, Jean-Claude; Vandenbos, Fanny; Michiels, Jean-François; Daculsi, Guy; Boileau, Pascal; Weiss, Pierre; Carle, Georges F; Rochet, Nathalie

    2006-06-01

    We have used a new synthetic injectable composite constituted of hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) particles in suspension in a self-hardening Si-hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) hydrogel. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the biocompatibility and the new bone formation efficacy of this scaffold loaded with undifferentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). This biomaterial was mixed extemporaneously with BMSCs prepared from C57BL/6 mice, injected in subcutaneous and intramuscular sites and retrieved 4 and 8 weeks after implantation. Dissection of the implants revealed a hard consistency and the absence of a fibrous capsule reflecting a good integration into the host tissues. Histological analysis showed mineralized woven bone in the granule inter-space with numerous active osteoclasts attached to the particles as assessed by the presence of multinucleated cells positively stained for TRAP activity and for the a3 subunit of the V-ATPase. Small vessels were homogenously distributed in the whole implants. Similar results were obtained in SC and IM sites and no bone formation was observed in the control groups when cell-free and particle-free transplants were injected. These results indicate that this injectable biphasic calcium phosphate-hydrogel composite mixed with undifferentiated BMSCs is a new promising osteoinductive bone substitute. It also provides with an original in vivo model of osteoclast differentiation and function. PMID:16510180

  19. Comparative miRNA-Based Fingerprinting Reveals Biological Differences in Human Olfactory Mucosa- and Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Susan Louise; Johnstone, Steven Andrew; McGrath, Michael Anthony; Mallinson, David; Barnett, Susan Carol

    2016-05-10

    Previously we reported that nestin-positive human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from the olfactory mucosa (OM) enhanced CNS myelination in vitro to a greater extent than bone-marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). miRNA-based fingerprinting revealed the two MSCs were 64% homologous, with 26 miRNAs differentially expressed. We focused on miR-146a-5p and miR-140-5p due to their reported role in the regulation of chemokine production and myelination. The lower expression of miR-140-5p in OM-MSCs correlated with higher secretion of CXCL12 compared with BM-MSCs. Addition of CXCL12 and its pharmacological inhibitors to neural co-cultures supported these data. Studies on related miR-146a-5p targets demonstrated that OM-MSCs had lower levels of Toll-like receptors and secreted less pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-8, and CCL2. OM-MSCs polarized microglia to an anti-inflammatory phenotype, illustrating potential differences in their inflammatory response. Nestin-positive OM-MSCs could therefore offer a cell transplantation alternative for CNS repair, should these biological behaviors be translated in vivo. PMID:27117785

  20. Enhanced Ex Vivo Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Progenitors on Native and Spin Coated Acellular Matrices Prepared from Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wasnik, Samiksha; Kantipudi, Suma; Kirkland, Mark A.; Pande, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular microenvironment in bone marrow (BM) is known to regulate the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We have developed cell-free matrices from a BM stromal cell line (HS-5), which can be used as substrates either in native form or as tissue engineered coatings, for the enhanced ex vivo expansion of umbilical cord blood (UCB) derived HSPC. The physicochemical properties (surface roughness, thickness, and uniformity) of native and spin coated acellular matrices (ACM) were studied using scanning and atomic force microscopy (SEM and AFM). Lineage-specific expansion of HSPC, grown on these substrates, was evaluated by immunophenotypic (flow cytometry) and functional (colony forming) assays. Our results show that the most efficient expansion of lineage-specific HSPC occurred on spin coated ACM. Our method provides an improved protocol for ex vivo HSPC expansion and it offers a system to study the in vivo roles of specific molecules in the hematopoietic niche that influence HSPC expansion. PMID:26981135

  1. Gremlin 1 Identifies a Skeletal Stem Cell with Bone, Cartilage, and Reticular Stromal Potential

    PubMed Central

    Worthley, Daniel L.; Churchill, Michael; Compton, Jocelyn T.; Tailor, Yagnesh; Rao, Meenakshi; Si, Yiling; Levin, Daniel; Schwartz, Matthew G.; Uygur, Aysu; Hayakawa, Yoku; Gross, Stefanie; Renz, Bernhard W.; Setlik, Wanda; Martinez, Ashley N.; Chen, Xiaowei; Nizami, Saqib; Lee, Heon Goo; Kang, H. Paco; Caldwell, Jon-Michael; Asfaha, Samuel; Westphalen, C. Benedikt; Graham, Trevor; Jin, Guangchun; Nagar, Karan; Wang, Hongshan; Kheirbek, Mazen A.; Kolhe, Alka; Carpenter, Jared; Glaire, Mark; Nair, Abhinav; Renders, Simon; Manieri, Nicholas; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Fox, James G.; Reichert, Maximilian; Giraud, Andrew S.; Schwabe, Robert F.; Pradere, Jean-Phillipe; Walton, Katherine; Prakash, Ajay; Gumucio, Deborah; Rustgi, Anil K.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Friedman, Richard A.; Gershon, Michael D.; Sims, Peter; Grikscheit, Tracy; Lee, Francis Y.; Karsenty, Gerard; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Wang, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cells that maintain and repair the postnatal skeleton remain undefined. One model suggests that perisinusoidal mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) give rise to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, marrow stromal cells, and adipocytes, although the existence of these cells has not been proven through fate-mapping experiments. We demonstrate here that expression of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist gremlin 1 defines a population of osteochondroreticular (OCR) stem cells in the bone marrow. OCR stem cells self-renew and generate osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and reticular marrow stromal cells, but not adipocytes. OCR stem cells are concentrated within the metaphysis of long bones not in the perisinusoidal space and are needed for bone development, bone remodeling, and fracture repair. Grem1 expression also identifies intestinal reticular stem cells (iRSCs) that are cells of origin for the periepithelial intestinal mesenchymal sheath. Grem1 expression identifies distinct connective tissue stem cells in both the bone (OCR stem cells) and the intestine (iRSCs). PMID:25594183

  2. Extracellular vesicles from bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells transport tumor regulatory microRNA, proteins, and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Vallabhaneni, Krishna C; Penfornis, Patrice; Dhule, Santosh; Guillonneau, Francois; Adams, Kristen V; Mo, Yin Yuan; Xu, Rui; Liu, Yiming; Watabe, Kounosuke; Vemuri, Mohan C; Pochampally, Radhika

    2015-03-10

    Human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs) have been shown to support breast cancer cell proliferation and metastasis, partly through their secretome. hMSCs have a remarkable ability to survive for long periods under stress, and their secretome is tumor supportive. In this study, we have characterized the cargo of extracellular vesicular (EV) fraction (that is in the size range of 40-150nm) of serum deprived hMSCs (SD-MSCs). Next Generation Sequencing assays were used to identify small RNA secreted in the EVs, which indicated presence of tumor supportive miRNA. Further assays demonstrated the role of miRNA-21 and 34a as tumor supportive miRNAs. Next, proteomic assays revealed the presence of ≈150 different proteins, most of which are known tumor supportive factors such as PDGFR-β, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2. Lipidomic assays verified presence of bioactive lipids such as sphingomyelin. Furthermore, metabolite assays identified the presence of lactic acid and glutamic acid in EVs. The co-injection xenograft assays using MCF-7 breast cancer cells demonstrated the tumor supportive function of these EVs. To our knowledge this is the first comprehensive -omics based study that characterized the complex cargo of extracellular vesicles secreted by hMSCs and their role in supporting breast cancers. PMID:25669974

  3. Interferon-γ and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Polarize Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Uniformly to a Th1 Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ping; Zhao, Yuanlong; Liu, Hui; Chen, Jinguo; Ren, Jiaqiang; Jin, Jianjian; Bedognetti, Davide; Liu, Shutong; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Stroncek, David

    2016-01-01

    Activated T cells polarize mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to a proinflammatory Th1 phenotype which likely has an important role in amplifying the immune response in the tumor microenvironment. We investigated the role of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), two factors produced by activated T cells, in MSC polarization. Gene expression and culture supernatant analysis showed that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulated MSCs expressed distinct sets of proinflammatory factors. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α was synergistic and induced a transcriptome most similar to that found in MSCs stimulated with activated T cells and similar to that found in the inflamed tumor microenvironment; a Th1 phenotype with the expression of the immunosuppressive factors IL-4, IL-10, CD274/PD-L1 and indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). Single cell qRT-PCR analysis showed that the combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α polarized uniformly to this phenotype. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α results in the synergist uniform polarization of MSCs toward a primarily Th1 phenotype. The stimulation of MSCs by IFN-γ and TNF-α released from activated tumor infiltrating T cells is likely responsible for the production of many factors that characterize the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27211104

  4. Interferon-γ and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Polarize Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Uniformly to a Th1 Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ping; Zhao, Yuanlong; Liu, Hui; Chen, Jinguo; Ren, Jiaqiang; Jin, Jianjian; Bedognetti, Davide; Liu, Shutong; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Stroncek, David

    2016-01-01

    Activated T cells polarize mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to a proinflammatory Th1 phenotype which likely has an important role in amplifying the immune response in the tumor microenvironment. We investigated the role of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), two factors produced by activated T cells, in MSC polarization. Gene expression and culture supernatant analysis showed that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulated MSCs expressed distinct sets of proinflammatory factors. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α was synergistic and induced a transcriptome most similar to that found in MSCs stimulated with activated T cells and similar to that found in the inflamed tumor microenvironment; a Th1 phenotype with the expression of the immunosuppressive factors IL-4, IL-10, CD274/PD-L1 and indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). Single cell qRT-PCR analysis showed that the combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α polarized uniformly to this phenotype. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α results in the synergist uniform polarization of MSCs toward a primarily Th1 phenotype. The stimulation of MSCs by IFN-γ and TNF-α released from activated tumor infiltrating T cells is likely responsible for the production of many factors that characterize the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27211104

  5. Possible Mechanism of Therapeutic Effect of 3-Methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Combination Treatment in Rat Ischemic Stroke Model

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-Hua; Chen, Jin; Shen, Hua-Chao; Ye, Min; Liu, Xiao-Fei; Ding, Wen-Sen; Sheng, Ya-Feng; Ding, Xin-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: The functional improvement following bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transplantation after stroke is directly related to the number of engrafted cells and neurogenesis in the injured brain. Here, we tried to evaluate whether 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (MCI-186), a free radical scavenger, might influence BMSCs migration to ischemic brain, which could promote neurogenesis and thereby enhance treatment effects after stroke. Methods: Rat transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model was established. Two separate MCAO groups were administered with either MCI-186 or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution to evaluate the expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in ischemic brain, and compared to that in sham group (n = 5/group/time point[at 1, 3, and 7 days after operation]). The content of chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4, a main receptor of SDF-1) at 7 days after operation was also observed on cultured BMSCs. Another four MCAO groups were intravenously administered with either PBS, MCI-186, BMSCs (2 × 106), or a combination of MCI-186 and BMSCs (n = 10/group). 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and Nestin double-immunofluorescence staining was performed to identify the engrafted BMSCs and neuronal differentiation. Adhesive-removal test and foot-fault evaluation were used to test the neurological outcome. Results: MCI-186 upregulated the expression of SDF-1 in ischemic brain and CXCR4 content in BMSCs was enhanced after hypoxic stimulation. When MCAO rats were treated with either MCI-186, BMSCs, or a combination of MCI-186 and BMSCs, the neurologic function was obviously recovered as compared to PBS control group (P < 0.01 or 0.05, respectively). Combination therapy represented a further restoration, increased the number of BMSCs and Nestin+ cells in ischemic brain as compared with BMSCs monotherapy (P < 0.01). The number of engrafted-BMSCs was correlated with the density of neuronal cells in ischemic brain (r = 0.72, P < 0.01) and

  6. Hdac3 Deficiency Increases Marrow Adiposity and Induces Lipid Storage and Glucocorticoid Metabolism in Osteochondroprogenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Carpio, Lomeli R; Schulze, Ryan J; Pierce, Jessica L; McNiven, Mark A; Farr, Joshua N; Khosla, Sundeep; Oursler, Merry Jo; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss and increased marrow adiposity are hallmarks of aging skeletons. Conditional deletion of histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) in murine osteochondroprogenitor cells causes osteopenia and increases marrow adiposity, even in young animals, but the origins of the increased adiposity are unclear. To explore this, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) from Hdac3-depleted and control mice were cultured in osteogenic medium. Hdac3-deficient cultures accumulated lipid droplets in greater abundance than control cultures and expressed high levels of genes related to lipid storage (Fsp27/Cidec, Plin1) and glucocorticoid metabolism (Hsd11b1) despite normal levels of Pparγ2. Approximately 5% of the lipid containing cells in the wild-type cultures expressed the master osteoblast transcription factor Runx2, but this population was threefold greater in the Hdac3-depleted cultures. Adenoviral expression of Hdac3 restored normal gene expression, indicating that Hdac3 controls glucocorticoid activation and lipid storage within osteoblast lineage cells. HDAC3 expression was reduced in bone cells from postmenopausal as compared to young women, and in osteoblasts from aged as compared to younger mice. Moreover, phosphorylation of S424 in Hdac3, a posttranslational mark necessary for deacetylase activity, was suppressed in osseous cells from old mice. Thus, concurrent declines in transcription and phosphorylation combine to suppress Hdac3 activity in aging bone, and reduced Hdac3 activity in osteochondroprogenitor cells contributes to increased marrow adiposity associated with aging. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26211746

  7. Hdac3 Deficiency Increases Marrow Adiposity and Induces Lipid Storage and Glucocorticoid Metabolism in Osteochondroprogenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Carpio, Lomeli R; Schulze, Ryan J; Pierce, Jessica L; McNiven, Mark A; Farr, Joshua N; Khosla, Sundeep; Oursler, Merry Jo; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss and increased marrow adiposity are hallmarks of aging skeletons. Conditional deletion of histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) in murine osteochondroprogenitor cells causes osteopenia and increases marrow adiposity, even in young animals, but the origins of the increased adiposity are unclear. To explore this, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) from Hdac3-depleted and control mice were cultured in osteogenic medium. Hdac3-deficient cultures accumulated lipid droplets in greater abundance than control cultures and expressed high levels of genes related to lipid storage (Fsp27/Cidec, Plin1) and glucocorticoid metabolism (Hsd11b1) despite normal levels of Pparγ2. Approximately 5% of the lipid containing cells in the wild-type cultures expressed the master osteoblast transcription factor Runx2, but this population was threefold greater in the Hdac3-depleted cultures. Adenoviral expression of Hdac3 restored normal gene expression, indicating that Hdac3 controls glucocorticoid activation and lipid storage within osteoblast lineage cells. HDAC3 expression was reduced in bone cells from postmenopausal as compared to young women, and in osteoblasts from aged as compared to younger mice. Moreover, phosphorylation of S424 in Hdac3, a posttranslational mark necessary for deacetylase activity, was suppressed in osseous cells from old mice. Thus, concurrent declines in transcription and phosphorylation combine to suppress Hdac3 activity in aging bone, and reduced Hdac3 activity in osteochondroprogenitor cells contributes to increased marrow adiposity associated with aging. PMID:26211746

  8. Injection time-dependent effect of adult human bone marrow stromal cell transplantation in a rat model of severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Young; Chun, Min Ho; Kim, Sang Tae; Lim, Dong-pyo

    2013-03-01

    The object of this study is to evaluate the effects of injecting adult human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) into rats with severe traumatic brain injury in acute phase and to determine more optimal injection timing between day 1 and day 2 postinjury. The lateral fluid percussion injury model was used. Adult hBMSCs were transplanted into hemisphere to injury sites in the corpus callosum ipsilateral on day 1 (n = 12) or day 7 (n = 8) after injury. A control group (n = 7) underwent only a sham operation without stem cell transplantation. Rats in all groups were analyzed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and by using behavioral, rotarod, and Barnes maze tests on day 1, 7, 14, and 42. Another nine randomly designated rats were sacrificed for immunohistochemical staining. Behavioral test scores increased significantly at all time-points after TBI in the day 7-injected group, compared to the others (p=0.008). GFAP staining was lower on day 42 in day 7-injected rats than in those injected on day 1. But no significant inter- or intra-group differences were observed for other tests. The injection of hBMSCs was found to have limited therapeutic potential with respect to neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury. However, because injection on day 7 after TBI produced greater functional improvements in neurobehavioral tests and more effectively suppressed astroglial activation than an injection on post-injury day 1, we cautiously recommend the injection time of day 7 post injury in hBMSCs transplantation in severe TBI, rather than day 1 post injury but further studies on developing hBMSC-based new therapeutic approaches should be warranted for improving neuroprotection in severe TBI. PMID:23363468

  9. Local delivery of allogeneic bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for cutaneous wound healing in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Summer E; Kleinbeck, Kyle R; Cantu, David; Kim, Jaeyhup; Bentz, Michael L; Faucher, Lee D; Kao, W John; Hematti, Peiman

    2016-02-01

    Wound healing remains a major challenge in modern medicine. Bone marrow- (BM) and adipose tissue- (AT) derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are of great interest for tissue reconstruction due to their unique immunological properties and regenerative potential. The purpose of this study was to characterize BM and AT-MSCs and evaluate their effect when administered in a porcine wound model. MSCs were derived from male Göttingen Minipigs and characterized according to established criteria. Allogeneic BM- or AT-MSCs were administered intradermally (1 x 10(6) cells) into partial-thickness wounds created on female animals, and covered with Vaseline® gauze or fibrin in a randomized pattern. Animals were euthanized at 7, 10, 14 and 21 days. Tissues were analyzed visually for healing and by microscopic examination for epidermal development and remodelling. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the presence of male DNA in the specimens. All wounds were healed by 14 days. MSC-injected wounds were associated with improved appearance and faster re-epithelialization compared to saline controls. Evaluation of rete ridge depth and architecture showed that MSC treatment promoted a faster rate of epidermal maturation. Male DNA was detected in all samples at days 7 and 10, suggesting the presence of MSCs. We showed the safety, feasibility and potential efficacy of local injection of allogeneic BM- and AT-MSCs for treatment of wounds in a preclinical model. Our data in this large animal model support the potential use of BM- and AT-MSC for treatment of cutaneous wounds through modulation of healing and epithelialization. PMID:23418160

  10. Kinetics of in vivo bone deposition by bone marrow stromal cells within a resorbable porous calcium phosphate scaffold: an X-ray computed microtomography study.

    PubMed

    Papadimitropoulos, A; Mastrogiacomo, M; Peyrin, F; Molinari, E; Komlev, V S; Rustichelli, F; Cancedda, R

    2007-09-01

    Resorbable ceramic scaffolds based on Silicon stabilized tricalcium phosphate (Si-TCP) were seeded with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and ectopically implanted for 2, 4, and 6 months in immunodeficient mice. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the scaffold material was performed by X-ray synchrotron radiation computed microtomography (microCT) with a spatial resolution lower than 5 microm. Unique to these experiments was that microCT data were first collected on the scaffolds before implantation and then on the same scaffolds after they were seeded with BMSC, implanted in the mice and rescued after different times. Volume fraction, mean thickness and thickness distribution were evaluated for both new bone and scaffold phases as a function of the implantation time. New bone thickness increased from week 8 to week 16. Data for the implanted scaffolds were compared with those derived from the analysis of the same scaffolds prior to implantation and with data derived from 100% hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold treated and analyzed in the same way. At variance with findings with the 100% HA scaffolds a significant variation in the density of the different Si-TCP scaffold regions in the pre- and post-implantation samples was observed. In particular a post-implantation decrease in the density of the scaffolds, together with major changes in the scaffold phase composition, was noticeable in areas adjacent to newly formed bone. Histology confirmed a better integration between new bone and scaffold in the Si-TCP composites in comparison to 100% HA composites where new bone and scaffold phases remained well distinct. PMID:17657771

  11. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells with CD47 high expression via the signal transducer and activators of transcription signaling pathway preventing myocardial fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Chen, Qing-Wei; Li, Xing-Sheng; Yuan, Zhong-Ming; Li, Gui-Qiong; Ke, Da-Zhi; Wang, Li; Wu, Zhi-Qing; Luo, Shi-Lan

    2015-01-01

    This study was initiated to investigate the efficacy of myocardial fibrosis intervention via signal transducer and activators of transcription (STAT) signaling using bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in which being over-expressed with the aid of bispecific antibody (BiAb) and ultrasound-mediated microbubbles (MB). BiAb was prepared and combined with isolated MSC with CD47 overexpression from male mice and trans-fused into female mice with isoproterenol-induced myocardial fibrosis via the tail vein, followed by MB. This study included five groups. Five weeks after treatment, expression levels of the sex-determining region of Y-chromosome (SRY), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in myocardium were detected by fluorescent quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The protein expression of signal transducer and activators of transcription (STAT) 1 and STAT 3 was detected by Western blot. Results: The highest homing number of MSC was in the CD47 + MSC + BiAb + MB group, second highest in the CD47 + MSC + BiAb group, and lowest in MSC alone. Compared with the Control group, CD47 + MSC + BiAb + MB, CD47 + MSC + BiAb, CD47 + MSC and MSC groups had decreased levels of MMP-9, TIMP-1, STAT 1 and collagen deposition, and increased levels of STAT 3. Up regulated STAT 3 and down regulated TIMP-1 were significantly different in CD47 + MSC + BiAb + MB compared with CD47 + MSC or CD47 + MSC + BiAb. Conclusion: CD47 can enhance the homing rate and repairing efficacy of MSC. MSC can improve MMP-TIMP expression in injured myocardium and interfere with myocardial fibrosis after homing, a mechanism that may be related to the STAT-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:26617765

  12. Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Preconditioned Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Rescue Ischemic Rat Cortical Neurons by Enhancing Trophic Factor Release.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Seo; Noh, Min Young; Cho, Kyung Ah; Kim, Hyemi; Kwon, Min-Soo; Kim, Kyung Suk; Kim, Juhan; Koh, Seong-Ho; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) represent a promising tool for stem cell-based therapies. However, the majority of MSCs fail to reach the injury site and have only minimal therapeutic effect. In this study, we assessed whether hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) preconditioning of human BM-MSCs could increase their functional capacity and beneficial effect on ischemic rat cortical neurons. Human BM-MSCs were cultured under hypoxia (1% O2) and with long-term reoxygenation for various times to identify the optimal conditions for increasing their viability and proliferation. The effects of H/R preconditioning on the BM-MSCs were assessed by analyzing the expression of prosurvival genes, trophic factors, and cell migration assays. The functionally improved BM-MSCs were cocultured with ischemic rat cortical neurons to compare with normoxic cultured BM-MSCs. Although the cell viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs were reduced after 1 day of hypoxic culture (1% O2), when this was followed by 5-day reoxygenation, the BM-MSCs recovered and multiplied extensively. The immunophenotype and trilineage differentiation of BM-MSCs were also maintained under this H/R preconditioning. In addition, the preconditioning enhanced the expression of prosurvival genes, the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of various trophic factors and migration capacity. Finally, coculture with the H/R-preconditioned BM-MSCs promoted the survival of ischemic rat cortical neurons. H/R preconditioning of BM-MSCs increases prosurvival signals, trophic factor release, and cell migration and appears to increase their ability to rescue ischemic cortical neurons. This optimized H/R preconditioning procedure could provide the basis for a new strategy for stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke patients. PMID:25288154

  13. Potential role of 20S proteasome in maintaining stem cell integrity of human bone marrow stromal cells in prolonged culture expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Li; Song, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Liu, Xue-Qin; Zhu, Qian; Cheng, Xiao-Long; Yang, Gui-Jiao; Li, Ang; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prolonged culture expansion retards proliferation and induces senescence of hBMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced 20S proteasomal activity and expression potentially contribute to cell aging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MG132-mediated 20S proteasomal inhibition induces senescence-like phenotype. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{alpha}-GA stimulates proteasomal activity and restores replicative senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{alpha}-GA retains differentiation without affecting stem cell characterizations. -- Abstract: Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) could be used in clinics as precursors of multiple cell lineages following proper induction. Such application is impeded by their characteristically short lifespan, together with the increasing loss of proliferation capability and progressive reduction of differentiation potential after the prolonged culture expansion. In the current study, we addressed the possible role of 20S proteasomes in this process. Consistent with prior reports, long-term in vitro expansion of hBMSCs decreased cell proliferation and increased replicative senescence, accompanied by reduced activity and expression of the catalytic subunits PSMB5 and PSMB1, and the 20S proteasome overall. Application of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 produced a senescence-like phenotype in early passages, whereas treating late-passage cells with 18{alpha}-glycyrrhetinic acid (18{alpha}-GA), an agonist of 20S proteasomes, delayed the senescence progress, enhancing the proliferation and recovering the capability of differentiation. The data demonstrate that activation of 20S proteasomes assists in counteracting replicative senescence of hBMSCs expanded in vitro.

  14. Europium-doped Gd2O3 nanotubes cause the necrosis of primary mouse bone marrow stromal cells through lysosome and mitochondrion damage.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Chen, Shizhu; Duan, Jianlei; Jia, Guang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2015-05-01

    With the wide applications of europium-doped Gd2O3 nanoparticles (Gd2O3:Eu(3+) NPs) in biomedical fields, it will inevitably increase the chance of human exposure. It was reported that Gd2O3:Eu(3+) NPs could accumulate in bone. However, there have been few reports about the potential effect of Gd2O3:Eu(3+) NPs on bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). In this study, the Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes were prepared and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) excitation and emission spectra, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The cytotoxicity of Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes on BMSCs and the associated mechanisms were further studied. The results indicated that they could be uptaken into BMSCs by an energy-dependent and macropinocytosis-mediated endocytosis process, and primarily localized in lysosome. Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes effectively inhibited the viability of BMSCs in concentration and time-dependent manners. A significant increase in the percentage of late apoptotic/necrotic cells, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and the number of PI-stained cells was found after BMSCs were treated by 10, 20, and 40μg/mL of Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes for 12h. No obvious DNA ladders were detected, but a dispersed band was observed. The above results revealed that Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes could trigger cell death by necrosis instead of apoptosis. Two mechanisms were involved in Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotube-induced BMSCs necrosis: lysosomal rupture and release of cathepsins B; and the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) injury to the mitochondria and DNA. The study provides novel evidence to elucidate the toxicity mechanisms and may be beneficial to more rational applications of these nanomaterials in the future. PMID:25725393

  15. Establishment of a Cytocompatible Cell-Free Intervertebral Disc Matrix for Chondrogenesis with Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhao; Kohl, Benjamin; Kokozidou, Maria; Arens, Stephan; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-engineered intervertebral discs (IVDs) utilizing decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) could be an option for the reconstruction of impaired IVDs due to degeneration or injury. The objective of this study was to prepare a cell-free decellularized human IVD scaffold and to compare neotissue formation in response to recellularization with human IVD cells (hIVDCs) or human bone marrow-derived (hBM) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). IVDs were decellularized via freeze-thaw cycles, detergents and trypsin. Histological staining was performed to monitor cell removal and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) removal. The decellularized IVD was preconditioned using bovine serum albumin and fetal bovine serum before its cytocompatibility for dynamically cultured hBM-MSCs (chondrogenically induced or not) and hIVDCs was compared after 14 days. In addition, DNA, total collagen and GAG contents were assessed. The decellularization protocol achieved maximal cell removal, with only few remaining cell nuclei compared with native tissue, and low toxicity. The DNA content was significantly higher in scaffolds seeded with hIVDCs compared with native IVDs, cell-free and hBM-MSC-seeded scaffolds (p < 0.01). The GAG content in the native tissue was significantly higher compared to the others groups except for the scaffolds reseeded with chondrogenically induced hBM-MSCs (p < 0.05). In addition, there was a significantly increased total collagen content in the chondrogenically induced hBM-MSCs group (p < 0.01) compared with the native IVDs, cell-free and hIVDC-seeded scaffolds (p < 0.01); both recolonizing cell types were more evenly distributed on the scaffold surface, but only few cells penetrated the scaffold. The resulting decellularized ECM was cytocompatible and allowed hBM-MSCs/hIVDCs survival and ECM production. PMID:27160711

  16. Anti-inflammatory/tissue repair macrophages enhance the cartilage-forming capacity of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sesia, Sergio B; Duhr, Ralph; Medeiros da Cunha, Carolina; Todorov, Atanas; Schaeren, Stefan; Padovan, Elisabetta; Spagnoli, Giulio; Martin, Ivan; Barbero, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Macrophages are key players in healing processes. However, little is known on their capacity to modulate the differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC). Here we investigated whether macrophages (Mf) with, respectively, pro-inflammatory and tissue-remodeling traits differentially modulate chondrogenesis of bone marrow derived-MSC (BM-MSC). We demonstrated that coculture in collagen scaffolds of BM-MSC with Mf derived from monocytes polarized with M-CSF (M-Mf), but not with GM-CSF (GM-Mf) resulted in significantly higher glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content than what would be expected from an equal number of BM-MSC alone (defined as chondro-induction). Moreover, type II collagen was expressed at significantly higher levels in BM-MSC/M-Mf as compared to BM-MSC/GM-Mf constructs, while type X collagen expression was unaffected. In order to understand the possible cellular mechanism accounting for chondro-induction, developing monoculture and coculture tissues were digested and the properties of the isolated BM-MSC analysed. We observed that as compared to monocultures, in coculture with M-Mf, BM-MSC decreased less markedly in number and exhibited higher clonogenic and chondrogenic capacity. Despite their chondro-inductive effect in vitro, M-Mf did not modulate the cartilage tissue maturation in subcutaneous pockets of nude mice, as evidenced by similar accumulation of type X collagen and calcified tissue. Our results demonstrate that coculture of BM-MSC with M-Mf results in synergistic cartilage tissue formation in vitro. Such effect seems to result from the survival of BM-MSC with high chondrogenic capacity. Studies in an orthotopic in vivo model are necessary to assess the clinical relevance of our findings in the context of cartilage repair. PMID:25413299

  17. Rapidly Self-Renewing Human Multipotent Marrow Stromal Cells (hMSC) Express Sialyl Lewis X and Actively Adhere to Arterial Endothelium in a Chick Embryo Model System

    PubMed Central

    McFerrin, Harris E.; Olson, Scott D.; Gutschow, Miriam V.; Semon, Julie A.; Sullivan, Deborah E.; Prockop, Darwin J.

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been conflicting observations regarding the receptors utilized by human multipotent mesenchymal bone marrow stromal cells (hMSC) to adhere to endothelial cells (EC). To address the discrepancies, we performed experiments with cells prepared with a standardized, low-density protocol preserving a sub-population of small cells that are rapidly self-renewing. Methods Sialyl Lewis X (SLeX) and α4 integrin expression were determined by flow cytometry. Fucosyltransferase expression was determined by quantitative realtime RT-PCR. Cell adhesion assays were carried out with a panel of endothelial cells from arteries, veins and the microvasculature in vitro. In vivo experiments were performed to determine single cell interactions in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). The CAM is a well-characterized respiratory organ allowing for time-lapse image acquisition of large numbers of cells treated with blocking antibodies against adhesion molecules expressed on hMSC. Results hMSC expressed α4 integrin, SLeX and fucosyltransferase 4 and adhered to human EC from arteries, veins and the microvasculature under static conditions in vitro. In vivo, hMSC rolled on and adhered to arterioles in the chick embryo CAM, whereas control melanoma cells embolized. Inhibition of α4 integrin and/or SLeX with blocking antibodies reduced rolling and adhesion in arterioles and increased embolism of hMSC. Conclusions The results demonstrated that rapidly self-renewing hMSC were retained in the CAM because they rolled on and adhered to respiratory arteriolar EC in an α4 integrin- and SLeX-dependent manner. It is therefore important to select cells based on their cell adhesion receptor profile as well as size depending on the intended target of the cell and the injection route. PMID:25144321

  18. The Roles of Matrix Polymer Crystallinity and Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles in Modulating Material Properties of Photo-crosslinked Composites and Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanfeng; Kempen, Diederik H. R.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Lu, Lichun

    2010-01-01

    Two poly(ε-caprolactone fumarate)s (PCLFs) with distinct physical properties have been employed to prepare nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles via photo-crosslinking. The two PCLFs are PCLF530 and PCLF2000, named after their precursor PCL diol molecular weight of 530 and 2000 g.mol-1, respectively. Crosslinked PCLF530 is amorphous while crosslinked PCLF2000 is semi-crystalline with a melting temperature (Tm) of ∼40 °C and a crystallinity of 40%. Consequently, the rheological and mechanical properties of crosslinked PCLF2000 are significantly greater than those of crosslinked PCLF530. Structural characterizations and physical properties of both series of crosslinked PCLF/HA nanocomposites with HA compositions of 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, and 30% have been investigated. By adding HA nanoparticles, crosslinked PCLF530/HA nanocomposites demonstrate enhanced rheological and mechanical properties while the enhancement in compressive modulus is less prominent in crosslinked PCLF2000/HA nanocomposites. In vitro cell attachment and proliferation have been performed using rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and correlated with the material properties. Cell attachment and proliferation on crosslinked PCLF530/HA nanocomposite disks have been enhanced strongly with increasing the HA composition. However, surface morphology and surface chemistry such as composition, hydrophilicity, and the capability of adsorbing protein cannot be used to interpret the cell responses on different samples. Instead, the role of surface stiffness in regulating cell responses can be supported by the correlation between the change in compressive modulus and BMSC proliferation on these two series of crosslinked PCLFs and PCLF/HA nanocomposites. PMID:19339048

  19. A subset of bone marrow stromal cells regulate ATP-binding cassette gene expression via insulin-like growth factor-I in a leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Benabbou, Nadia; Mirshahi, Pezhman; Bordu, Camille; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Tang, Ruoping; Therwath, Amu; Soria, Jeannette; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Mirshahi, Massoud

    2014-10-01

    The importance of the insulin-like growth factor, IGF, as a signaling axis in cancer development, progression and metastasis is highlighted by its effects on cancer cells, notably proliferation and acquired resistance. The role of the microenvironment within which cancer cells evolve and which mediates this effect is far from clear. Here, the involvement of IGF-I in inducing multidrug resistance in a myeloid leukemia cell line, grown in the presence of bone marrow-derived stromal cells called 'Hospicells' (BMH), is demonstrated. We found that i) drug sensitive as well as resistant leukemia cells express IGF-I and its receptor IGF-IR. However, the resistant cells were found to secrete high levels of IGF-I. ii) Presence of exogenous IGF-I promoted cell proliferation, which decreased when an inhibitor of IGF-IR (picropodophyllin, PPP) was added. iii) BMH and IGF-I are both involved in the regulation of genes of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) related to resistance development (MDR1, MRP1, MRP2, MRP3 and BCRP). iv) The levels of ABC gene expression by leukemia cells were found to increase in the presence of increasing numbers of BMH. However, these levels decreased when IGF-IR was inhibited by addition of PPP. v) Co-culture of the drug-sensitive leukemia cells with BMH induced protection against the action of daunorubicin. This chemoresistance was amplified by the presence of IGF-I whereas it decreased when IGF-IR was inhibited. Our results underline the role of microenvironment in concert with the IGF-1 pathway in conferring drug resistance to leukemia cells. PMID:25095896

  20. Autologous bone marrow stromal cell transplantation as a treatment for acute radiation enteritis induced by a moderate dose of radiation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenda; Chen, Jiang; Liu, Xu; Li, Hongyu; Qi, Xingshun; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-05-01

    Radiation enteritis is one of the most common complications of cancer radiotherapy, and the development of new and effective measures for its prevention and treatment is of great importance. Adult bone marrow stromal stem cells (ABMSCs) are capable of self-renewal and exhibit low immunogenicity. In this study, we investigated ABMSC transplantation as a treatment for acute radiation enteritis. We developed a dog model of acute radiation enteritis using abdominal intensity-modulated radiation therapy in a single X-ray dose of 14 Gy. ABMSCs were cultured in vitro, identified via immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, and double labeled with CM-Dil and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) before transplantation, which took place 48 hours after abdominal irradiation in a single fraction. The dog model of acute radiation enteritis was transplanted with cultured ABMSCs labeled with CM-Dil and SPIO into the mesenteric artery through the femoral artery. Compared with untreated control groups, dogs treated with ABMSCs exhibited substantially longer survival time and improved relief of clinical symptoms. ABMSC transplantation induced the regeneration of the intestinal epithelium and the recovery of intestinal function. Furthermore, ABMSC transplantation resulted in elevated serum levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-11 (IL10) and intestinal radioprotective factors, such as keratinocyte growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor-2, and platelet-derived growth factor-B while reducing the serum level of the inflammatory cytokine IL17. ABMSCs induced the regeneration of the intestinal epithelium and regulated the secretion of serum cytokines and the expression of radioprotective proteins and thus could be beneficial in the development of novel and effective mitigators of and protectors against acute radiation enteritis. PMID:26763584

  1. Resorbable glass-ceramic phosphate-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: synthesis, properties, and in vitro effects on human marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Leonardi, Elisa; Baldini, Nicola; Bretcanu, Oana; Verné, Enrica; Baino, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    Highly porous bioresorbable glass-ceramic scaffolds were prepared via sponge replication method by using an open-cell polyurethane foam as a template and phosphate-based glass powders. The glass, belonging to the P2O5-SiO2-CaO-MgO-Na2O-K2O system, was synthesized by a melting-quenching route, ground, and sieved to obtain powders with a grain size of less than 30 μm. A slurry containing glass powders, polyvinyl alcohol, and water was prepared to coat the polymeric template. The removal of the polymer and the sintering of the glass powders were performed by a thermal treatment, in order to obtain an inorganic replica of the template structure. The structure and properties of the scaffold were investigated from structural, morphological, and mechanical viewpoints by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, density measurements, image analysis, and compressive tests. The scaffolds exhibited a trabecular architecture that closely mimics the structure of a natural spongy bone. The solubility of the porous structures was assessed by soaking the samples in acellular simulated body fluid (SBF) and Tris-HCl for different time frames and then by assessing the scaffold weight loss. As far as the test in SBF is concerned, the nucleation of hydroxyapatite on the scaffold trabeculae demonstrates the bioactivity of the material. Biological tests were carried out using human bone marrow stromal cells to test the osteoconductivity of the material. The cells adhered to the scaffold struts and were metabolically active; it was found that cell differentiation over proliferation occurred. Therefore, the produced scaffolds, being biocompatible, bioactive, resorbable, and structurally similar to a spongy bone, can be proposed as interesting candidates for bone grafting. PMID:20566654

  2. Toll-Like Receptor 3 and Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling Proteins Regulate CXCR4 and CXCR7 Expression in Bone Marrow-Derived Human Multipotent Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Henkle, Sarah L.; Coffelt, Seth B.; Betancourt, Aline M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of bone marrow-derived human multipotent stromal cells (hMSC) in cell-based therapies has dramatically increased in recent years, as researchers have exploited the ability of these cells to migrate to sites of tissue injury, inflammation, and tumors. Our group established that hMSC respond to “danger” signals – by-products of damaged, infected or inflamed tissues – via activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). However, little is known regarding downstream signaling mediated by TLRs in hMSC. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate that TLR3 stimulation activates a Janus kinase (JAK) 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 pathway, and increases expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1 and SOCS3 in hMSC. Our studies suggest that each of these SOCS plays a distinct role in negatively regulating TLR3 and JAK/STAT signaling. TLR3-mediated interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) expression was inhibited by SOCS3 overexpression in hMSC while SOCS1 overexpression reduced STAT1 activation. Furthermore, our study is the first to demonstrate that when TLR3 is activated in hMSC, expression of CXCR4 and CXCR7 is downregulated. SOCS3 overexpression inhibited internalization of both CXCR4 and CXCR7 following TLR3 stimulation. In contrast, SOCS1 overexpression only inhibited CXCR7 internalization. Conclusion/Significance These results demonstrate that SOCS1 and SOCS3 each play a functionally distinct role in modulating TLR3, JAK/STAT, and CXCR4/CXCR7 signaling in hMSC and shed further light on the way hMSC respond to danger signals. PMID:22745793

  3. Evaluation of GMP-compliant culture media for in vitro expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Wuchter, Patrick; Vetter, Marcel; Saffrich, Rainer; Diehlmann, Anke; Bieback, Karen; Ho, Anthony D; Horn, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from human bone marrow serve as a resource for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. Clinical applications require standardized protocols according to good manufacturing practice (GMP) guidelines. Donor variability as well as the intrinsic heterogeneity of MSC populations must be taken into consideration. The composition of the culture medium is a key factor in successful MSC expansion. The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the efficiency of xeno-free human platelet lysate (HPL)-based cell expansion with two commercially available media-StemPro MSC SFM CTS (for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications) and MSCGM (non-GMP-compliant, for research only)-in an academic setting as the first optimization step toward GMP-compliant manufacturing. We report the feasibility of MSC expansion up to the yielded cell number with all three media. MSCs exhibited the typical fibroblastoid morphology, with distinct differences in cell size depending on the medium. The differentiation capacity and characteristic immunophenotype were confirmed for all MSC populations. Proliferation was highest using StemPro MSC SFM CTS, whereas HPL medium was more cost-effective and its composition could be adjusted individually according to the respective needs. In summary, we present a comprehensive evaluation of GMP-compatible culture media for MSC expansion. Both StemPro and HPL medium proved to be suitable for clinical application and allowed sufficient cell proliferation. Specific differences were observed and should be considered according to the intended use. This study provides a detailed cost analysis and tools that may be helpful for the establishment of GMP-compliant MSC expansion. PMID:26911671

  4. Autogenous bone marrow stromal cell sheets-loaded mPCL/TCP scaffolds induced osteogenesis in a porcine model of spinal interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Abbah, Sunny A; Lam, Christopher X F; Ramruttun, Kumarsing A; Goh, James C H; Wong, Hee-Kit

    2011-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether a tissue-engineered construct composed of autogenous cell sheets and a polycaprolactone-based bioresorbable scaffold would enhance bone regeneration and spinal interbody fusion in a large animal model. Porcine-derived autogenous bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured into multilayered cell sheets were induced into osteogenic differentiation with dexamethasone, l-ascorbic acid, and β-glycerol phosphate. These cell sheets were assembled with bioresorbable scaffolds made from medical-grade poly(epsilon-caprolactone) incorporating 20% β-tricalcium phosphate (mPCL/TCP) as tissue-engineered BMSC constructs. L2/3, L4/5 discectomies and decortication of the vertebral end plates were performed on 16 SPF Yorkshire pigs through an anterolateral approach. The tissue-engineered BMSC constructs were transplanted into the prepared intervertebral disc spaces of half of the pigs (n = 8), whereas cell-free mPCL/TCP served as controls in the remaining pigs. New bone formation and spinal fusion were evaluated at 3 and 6 months using microcomputed tomography, histology, fluorochrome bone labeling, and biomechanical testing. New bone formation was evident as early as 3 months in the BMSC group. At 6 months, bony fusion was observed in >60% (5/8) of segments in the BMSC group. None of the control animals with cell-free scaffold showed fusion at both time points. Biomechanical evaluation further revealed a significantly increased segmental stability in the BMSC group compared with the cell-free group at 6 months postimplantation (p < 0.01). These findings suggest that mPCL/TCP scaffolds loaded with in vitro differentiated autogenous BMSC sheets could induce bone formation and interbody fusion. This in turn resulted in enhanced segmental stability of the lumbar spine. PMID:20973747

  5. Bone marrow stromal cells use TGF-beta to suppress allergic responses in a mouse model of ragweed-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Krisztian; Keane-Myers, Andrea; Brown, Jared M; Metcalfe, Dean D; Gorham, James D; Gorham, Jared D; Bundoc, Virgilio G; Bundoc, Victor G; Hodges, Marcus G; Jelinek, Ivett; Madala, Satish; Karpati, Sarolta; Mezey, Eva

    2010-03-23

    Bone marrow stromal cells [BMSCs; also known as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)] effectively suppress inflammatory responses in acute graft-versus-host disease in humans and in a number of disease models in mice. Many of the studies concluded that BMSC-driven immunomodulation is mediated by the suppression of proinflammatory Th1 responses while rebalancing the Th1/Th2 ratio toward Th2. In this study, using a ragweed induced mouse asthma model, we studied if BMSCs could be beneficial in an allergic, Th2-dominant environment. When BMSCs were injected i.v. at the time of the antigen challenge, they protected the animals from the majority of asthma-specific pathological changes, including inhibition of eosinophil infiltration and excess mucus production in the lung, decreased levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) in bronchial lavage, and lowered serum levels of Th2 immunoglobulins (IgG1 and IgE). To explore the mechanism of the effect we used BMSCs isolated from a variety of knockout mice, performed in vivo blocking of cytokines and studied the effect of asthmatic serum and bronchoalveolar lavage from ragweed challenged animals on the BMSCs in vitro. Our results suggest that IL-4 and/or IL-13 activate the STAT6 pathway in the BMSCs resulting in an increase of their TGF-beta production, which seems to mediate the beneficial effect, either alone, or together with regulatory T cells, some of which might be recruited by the BMSCs. These data suggest that, in addition to focusing on graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune diseases, allergic conditions--specifically therapy resistant asthma--might also be a likely target of the recently discovered cellular therapy approach using BMSCs. PMID:20231466

  6. Canine Platelet Lysate Is Inferior to Fetal Bovine Serum for the Isolation and Propagation of Canine Adipose Tissue- and Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Keith A.; Gibson, Thomas W. G.; Chong, Andrew; Co, Carmon; Koch, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are increasingly investigated for their clinical utility in dogs. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) is a common culture supplement used for canine MSC expansion. However, FBS content is variable, its clinical use carries risk of an immune response, and its cost is increasing due to global demand. Platelet lysate (PL) has proven to be a suitable alternative to FBS for expansion of human MSC. Hypothesis and Objectives We hypothesized that canine adipose tissue (AT) and bone marrow (BM) MSC could be isolated and expanded equally in PL and FBS at conventionally-used concentrations with differentiation of these MSC unaffected by choice of supplement. Our objectives were to evaluate the use of canine PL in comparison with FBS at four stages: 1) isolation, 2) proliferation, 3) spontaneous differentiation, and 4) directed differentiation. Results 1) Medium with 10% PL was unable to isolate MSC. 2) MSC, initially isolated in FBS-supplemented media, followed a dose-dependent response with no significant difference between PL and FBS cultures at up to 20% (AT) or 30% (BM) enrichment. Beyond these respective peaks, proliferation fell in PL cultures only, while a continued dose-dependent proliferation response was noted in FBS cultures. 3) Further investigation indicated PL expansion culture was inducing spontaneous adipogenesis in concentrations as low as 10% and as early as 4 days in culture. 4) MSC isolated in FBS, but expanded in either FBS or PL, maintained ability to undergo directed adipogenesis and osteogenesis, but not chondrogenesis. Conclusions/Significance Canine PL did not support establishment of MSC colonies from AT and BM, nor expansion of MSC, which appear to undergo spontaneous adipogenesis in response to PL exposure. In vivo studies are warranted to determine if concurrent use of MSC with any platelet-derived products such as platelet-rich plasma are associated with synergistic, neutral or antagonistic effects. PMID:26353112

  7. Beneficial reciprocal effects of bone marrow stromal cells and Schwann cells from adult rats in a dynamic co-culture system in vitro without intercellular contact

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, LI-NA; CUI, XIAO-JUN; SU, KAI-XIN; WANG, XIAO-HONG; GUO, JIN-HUA

    2015-01-01

    In order to examine how implanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) encourage peripheral nerve regeneration, the present study investigated the interaction of BMSCs and Schwann cells (SCs) using an indirect in vitro co-culture model. SCs and BMSCs were obtained from adult Sprague-Dawley rats. The passaged BMSCs were CD29- and CD44-positive but CD45-negative and were co-cultured with the primary SCs using a Millicell system, which allows BMSCs and SCs to grow in the same culture medium but without direct contact. Expression of the typical SC markers S-100 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) of the treated BMSCs as well as the proliferation capacity of the co-cultured SCs was evaluated by immunocytochemical staining on the 3rd and 5th day of co-culture. Immunocytochemical staining showed that >75% of the BMSCs in the indirect co-culture model were GFAP- and S-100-positive on the 3rd and 5th day after co-culture, as opposed to <5% of the BMSCs in the control group. On the 3rd day after co-culture, only a few co-cultured BMSCs showed the typical SC-like morphology, while most BMSCs still kept their native appearance. By contrast, on the 5th day after co-culture, almost all of the co-cultured BMSCs appeared with the typical SC-like morphology. Furthermore, 70.71% of the SCs in the indirect co-culture model were S-100-positive on the 5th day of co-culture, as opposed to >30.43% of the SCs in the control group. These results indicated that BMSCs may interact synergistically with SCs with regard to promoting peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26133460

  8. Human mesenchymal stromal cells attenuate graft-versus-host disease and maintain graft-versus-leukemia activity following experimental allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Auletta, Jeffery J; Eid, Saada K; Wuttisarnwattana, Patiwet; Silva, Ines; Metheny, Leland; Keller, Matthew D; Guardia-Wolff, Rocio; Liu, Chen; Wang, Fangjing; Bowen, Theodore; Lee, Zhenghong; Solchaga, Luis A; Ganguly, Sudipto; Tyler, Megan; Wilson, David L; Cooke, Kenneth R

    2015-02-01

    We sought to define the effects and underlying mechanisms of human, marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) on graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) activity. Irradiated B6D2F1 mice given C57BL/6 BM and splenic T cells and treated with hMSCs had reduced systemic GvHD, donor T-cell expansion, and serum TNFα and IFNγ levels. Bioluminescence imaging demonstrated that hMSCs redistributed from lungs to abdominal organs within 72 hours, and target tissues harvested from hMSC-treated allogeneic BMT (alloBMT) mice had less GvHD than untreated controls. Cryoimaging more precisely revealed that hMSCs preferentially distributed to splenic marginal zones and regulated T-cell expansion in the white pulp. Importantly, hMSCs had no effect on in vitro cytotoxic T-cell activity and preserved potent GvL effects in vivo. Mixed leukocyte cultures containing hMSCs exhibited decreased T-cell proliferation, reduced TNFα, IFNγ, and IL-10 but increased PGE2 levels. Indomethacin and E-prostanoid 2 (EP2) receptor antagonisms both reversed while EP2 agonism restored hMSC-mediated in vitro T-cell suppression, confirming the role for PGE2 . Furthermore, cyclo-oxygenase inhibition following alloBMT abrogated the protective effects of hMSCs. Together, our data show that hMSCs preserve GvL activity and attenuate GvHD and reveal that hMSC biodistribute to secondary lymphoid organs wherein they attenuate alloreactive T-cell proliferation likely through PGE2 induction. PMID:25336340

  9. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Cardiac Cell Transplantation: Part II. In Vivo Imaging of Bone Marrow