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Sample records for mars-gram sensitivity studies

  1. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The poster provides an overview of techniques to improve the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) sensitivity. It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) when used for sensitivity studies for TES MapYear = 0 and large optical depth values such as tau = 3 is less than realistic. A preliminary fix has been made to Mars-GRAM by adding a density factor value that was determined for tau = 0.3, 1 and 3.

  2. Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Precision of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with TES observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. The addition of these density factors to Mars-GRAM will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  3. Updating Mars-GRAM to Increase the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hiliary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). During the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process, it was discovered that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear set to 0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. As a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. Currently, these density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls. Results will be presented from work being done to derive better multipliers by including variation with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data. The addition of these more precise density factors to Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  4. Improving Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Extensively utilized for numerous mission applications, the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model. In a Monte-Carlo mode, Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is used to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). Mars-GRAM has been found to be inexact when used during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3. Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) from the surface to 80 km altitude. Mars-GRAM with the MapYear parameter set to 0 utilizes results from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 at all locations for the entire year. Imprecise atmospheric density and pressure at all altitudes is a consequence of this use of MGCM with tau=3. Density factor values have been determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 as a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem. These factors adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. These density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls and are included in Mars-GRAM Release 1.3. Work currently being done, to derive better multipliers by including variations with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data, will be highlighted in the presentation. The TES limb data utilized in this process has been validated by a comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). This comparison study was undertaken for locations on Mars of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST. The more precise density factors will be included in Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 and thus improve the results of future sensitivity studies done for large

  5. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3 is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars- GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars- GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. Unrealistic energy absorption by uniform atmospheric dust leads to an unrealistic thermal energy balance on the polar caps. The outcome is an inaccurate cycle of condensation/sublimation of the polar caps and, as a consequence, an inaccurate cycle of total atmospheric mass and global-average surface pressure. Under an assumption of unchanged temperature profile and hydrostatic equilibrium, a given percentage change in surface pressure would produce a corresponding percentage change in density at all altitudes. Consequently, the final result of a change in surface pressure is an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, a density factor value was determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear=0 with MapYears 1 and 2 MGCM output

  6. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justh, H. L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM’s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3 is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. Unrealistic energy absorption by uniform atmospheric dust leads to an unrealistic thermal energy balance on the polar caps. The outcome is an inaccurate cycle of condensation/sublimation of the polar caps and, as a consequence, an inaccurate cycle of total atmospheric mass and global-average surface pressure. Under an assumption of unchanged temperature profile and hydrostatic equilibrium, a given percentage change in surface pressure would produce a corresponding percentage change in density at all altitudes. Consequently, the final result of a change in surface pressure is an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, a density factor value was determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with MapYears 1 and 2 MGCM output

  7. Mars-GRAM 2010: Improving the Precision of Mars-GRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, H. L.; Justus, C. G.; Ramey, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) when used for sensitivity studies for Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) MapYear=0 and large optical depth values, such as tau=3, is less than realistic. Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). Mars-GRAM 2005 has been validated against Radio Science data, and both nadir and limb data from TES. Traditional Mars-GRAM options for representing the mean atmosphere along entry corridors include: (1) TES mapping year 0, with user-controlled dust optical depth and Mars-GRAM data interpolated from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) results driven by selected values of globally-uniform dust optical depth, or (2) TES mapping years 1 and 2, with Mars-GRAM data coming from MGCM results driven by observed TES dust optical depth. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on NASA Ames MGCM. Above 80 km, Mars-GRAM is based on the University of Michigan Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This choice of data has led to discrepancies that have become apparent during recent sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depths. Unrealistic energy absorption by time-invariant atmospheric dust leads to an unrealistic thermal energy balance on the polar caps. The outcome is an inaccurate cycle of condensation/sublimation of the polar caps and, as a consequence, an inaccurate cycle of total atmospheric mass and global-average surface pressure. Under an assumption of unchanged temperature profile and hydrostatic equilibrium, a given percentage change in surface pressure would produce a corresponding percentage

  8. Mars-GRAM 2010: Additions and Resulting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Burns, K. Lee

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM has been utilized during previous aerobraking operations in the atmosphere of Mars. Mars-GRAM has also been used in the prediction and validation of Mars Pathfinder hypersonic aerodynamics, the aerothermodynamic and entry dynamics studies for Mars Polar Lander, the landing site selection process for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), the Mars Aerocapture System Study (MASS) as well as the Aerocapture Technology Assessment Group (TAG). Most recently, Mars-GRAM 2010 was used to develop the onboard atmospheric density estimator that is part of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. The most recent release of Mars-GRAM 2010 contains several changes including an update to Fortran 90/95 and the addition of adjustment factors. Following the completion of a comparison analysis between Mars-GRAM, Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), as well as Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) aerobraking density data, adjustment factors were added to Mars-GRAM 2010 that alter the input data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) and the University of Michigan Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM) for the mapping year 0 user-controlled dust case. The addition of adjustment factors resolved the issue of previous versions of Mars-GRAM being less than realistic when used for sensitivity studies for mapping year 0 and large optical depth values, such as tau equal to 3. Mars-GRAM was evaluated at locations and times of TES limb observations and adjustment factors were determined. For altitudes above 80 km and below 135 km, Mars-GRAM (MTGCM) densities were compared to aerobraking densities measured by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) to determine the adjustment

  9. The Next Generation of Mars-GRAM and Its Role in the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Ramey, Holly S.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM 2010 is currently being used to develop the onboard atmospheric density estimator that is part of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. In previous versions, Mars-GRAM was less than realistic when used for sensitivity studies for Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) MapYear=0 and large optical depth values, such as tau=3. A comparison analysis has been completed between Mars-GRAM, TES and data from the Planetary Data System (PDS) resulting in updated coefficients for the functions relating density, latitude, and longitude of the sun. The adjustment factors are expressed as a function of height (z), Latitude (Lat) and areocentric solar longitude (Ls). The latest release of Mars-GRAM 2010 includes these adjustment factors that alter the in-put data from MGCM and MTGCM for the Mapping Year 0 (user-controlled dust) case. The greatest adjustment occurs at large optical depths such as tau greater than 1. The addition of the adjustment factors has led to better correspondence to TES Limb data from 0-60 km as well as better agreement with MGS, ODY and MRO data at approximately 90-135 km. Improved simulations utilizing Mars-GRAM 2010 are vital to developing the onboard atmospheric density estimator for the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. Mars-GRAM 2010 was not the only planetary GRAM utilized during phase 1 of this plan; Titan-GRAM and Venus-GRAM were used to generate density data sets for Aerobraking Design Reference Missions. These data sets included altitude profiles (both vertical and along a trajectory), GRAM perturbations (tides, gravity waves, etc.) and provided density and scale height values for analysis by other Autonomous Aero-braking team members.

  10. Modeling Martian Dust Using Mars-GRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    Engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). Mars-GRAM and MGCM use surface topography from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), with altitudes referenced to the MOLA areoid, or constant potential surface. Traditional Mars-GRAM options for representing the mean atmosphere along entry corridors include: TES Mapping Years 1 and 2, with Mars-GRAM data coming from MGCM model results driven by observed TES dust optical depth TES Mapping Year 0, with user-controlled dust optical depth and Mars-GRAM data interpolated from MGCM model results driven by selected values of globally-uniform dust optical depth. Mars-GRAM 2005 has been validated against Radio Science data, and both nadir and limb data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES).

  11. Global Summary MGS TES Data and Mars-Gram Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C.; Johnson, D.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) is an engineering-level Mars atmosphere model widely used for many Mars mission applications. From 0-80 km, it is based on NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM), while above 80 km it is based on University of Arizona Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model. Mars-GRAM 2001 and MGCM use surface topograph$ from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Validation studies are described comparing Mars-GRAM with a global summary data set of Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data. TES averages and standard deviations were assembled from binned TES data which covered surface to approx. 40 km, over more than a full Mars year (February, 1999 - June, 2001, just before start of a Mars global dust storm). TES data were binned in 10-by-10 degree latitude-longitude bins (i.e. 36 longitude bins by 19 latitude bins), 12 seasonal bins (based on 30 degree increments of Ls angle). Bin averages and standard deviations were assembled at 23 data levels (temperature at 21 pressure levels, plus surface temperature and surface pressure). Two time-of day bins were used: local time near 2 or 14 hours local time). Two dust optical depth bins wereused: infrared optical depth either less than or greater than 0.25 (which corresponds to visible optical depth either less than or greater than about 0.5). For interests in aerocapture and precision entry and landing, comparisons focused on atmospheric density. TES densities versus height were computed from TES temperature versus pressure, using assumptions of perfect gas law and hydrostatics. Mars-GRAM validation studies used density ratio (TES/Mars-GRAM) evaluated at data bin center points in space and time. Observed average TES/Mars-GRAM density ratios were generally 1+/-0.05, except at high altitudes (15-30 km, depending on season) and high latitudes (> 45 deg N), or at most altitudes in the southern hemisphere at Ls approx. 90 and 180deg

  12. Mars-Gram Validation with Mars Global Surveyor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Johnson, D.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) is an engineering-level Mars atmosphere model widely used for many b4ars mission applications. From 0-80 km, it is based on NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM), while above 80 km it is based on University of Arizona Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model. Mars-GRAM 2001 and MGCM use surface topography from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Validation studies are described comparing Mars-GRAM with Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science (RS) and Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data. RS data from 2480 profiles were used, covering latitudes 75deg S to 72deg N, surface to approx. 40 km, for seasons ranging from areocentric longitude of Sun (Ls) = 70-160deg and 265-310deg. RS data spanned a range of local times, mostly 0-9 hours and 18-24 hours. For interests in aerocapture and precision landing, comparisons concentrated on atmospheric density. At a fixed height of 20 km, measured RS density varied by about a factor of 2.5 over the range of latitudes and Ls values observed. Evaluated at matching positions and times, average RS/Mars-GRAM density ratios were generally lf0.05, except at heights above approx. 25 km and latitudes above approx.50deg N. Average standard deviation of RS/Mars-GRAM density ratio was 6%. TES data were used covering surface to approx. 40 km, over more than a full Mars year (February, 1999 - June, 2001, just before start of Mars global dust storm). Depending on season, TES data covered latitudes 85deg S to 85deg N. Most TES data were concentrated near local times 2 hours and 14 hours. Observed average TES/Mars-GRAM density ratios were generally 1+/-0.05, except at high altitudes (15-30 km, depending on season) and high latitudes (> 45deg N), or at most altitudes in the southern hemisphere at Ls approx. 90 and 180deg). Compared to TES averages for a given latitude and season, TES data had average density standard deviation about the mean of approx. 6

  13. Mars-GRAM Applications for Mars Science Laboratory Mission Site Selection Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary; Justus, C. G.

    2007-01-01

    An overview is presented of the Mars-Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) and its new features. One important new feature is the "auxiliary profile" option, whereby a simple input file is used to replace mean atmospheric values from Mars-GRAM's conventional (General Circulation Model) climatology. An auxiliary profile can be generated from any source of data or alternate model output. Results are presented using auxiliary profiles produced from mesoscale model output (Southwest Research Institute's Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) model and Oregon State University's Mars mesoscale model (MMM5) model) for three candidate Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) landing sites (Terby Crater, Melas Chasma, and Gale Crater). A global Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) database has also been generated for purposes of making 'Mars-GRAM auxiliary profiles. This data base contains averages and standard deviations of temperature, density, and thermal wind components, averaged over 5-by-5 degree latitude bins and 15 degree L(sub S) bins, for each of three Mars years of TES nadir data. Comparisons show reasonably good consistency between Mars-GRAM with low dust optical depth and both TES observed and mesoscale model simulated density at the three study sites. Mean winds differ by a more significant degree. Comparisons of mesoscale and TES standard deviations' with conventional Mars-GRAM values, show that Mars-GRAM density perturbations are somewhat conservative (larger than observed variability), while mesoscale-modeled wind variations are larger than Mars-GRAM model estimates. Input parameters rpscale (for density perturbations) and rwscale (for wind perturbations) can be used to "recalibrate" Mars-GRAM perturbation magnitudes to better replicate observed or mesoscale model variability.

  14. Utilizing Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) to Evaluate Entry Probe Mission Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. An overview is presented of Mars-GRAM 2005 and its new features. The "auxiliary profile" option is one new feature of Mars-GRAM 2005. This option uses an input file of temperature and density versus altitude to replace the mean atmospheric values from Mars-GRAM's conventional (General Circulation Model) climatology. Any source of data or alternate model output can be used to generate an auxiliary profile. Auxiliary profiles for this study were produced from mesoscale model output (Southwest Research Institute's Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) model and Oregon State University's Mars mesoscale model (MMM5) model) and a global Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) database. The global TES database has been specifically generated for purposes of making Mars-GRAM auxiliary profiles. This data base contains averages and standard deviations of temperature, density, and thermal wind components, averaged over 5-by-5 degree latitude-longitude bins and 15 degree Ls bins, for each of three Mars years of TES nadir data. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) sites are used as a sample of how Mars-GRAM' could be a valuable tool for planning of future Mars entry probe missions. Results are presented using auxiliary profiles produced from the mesoscale model output and TES observed data for candidate MSL landing sites. Input parameters rpscale (for density perturbations) and rwscale (for wind perturbations) can be used to "recalibrate" Mars-GRAM perturbation magnitudes to better replicate observed or mesoscale model variability.

  15. Mars Aerocapture and Validation of Mars-GRAM with TES Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2005-01-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is a widely-used engineering- level Mars atmospheric model. Applications include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry descent and landing, and aerocapture. Typical Mars aerocapture periapsis altitudes (for systems with rigid-aeroshell heat shields) are about 50 km. This altitude is above the 0-40 km height range covered by Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) nadir observations. Recently, TES limb sounding data have been made available, spanning more than two Mars years (more than 200,000 data profiles) with altitude coverage up to about 60 km, well within the height range of interest for aerocapture. Results are presented comparing Mars-GRAM atmospheric density with densities from TES nadir and limb sounding observations. A new Mars-GRAM feature is described which allows individual TES nadir or limb profiles to be extracted from the large TES databases, and to be used as an optional replacement for standard Mars-GRAM background (climatology) conditions. For Monte-Carlo applications such as aerocapture guidance and control studies, Mars-GRAM perturbations are available using these TES profile background conditions.

  16. Validation of Mars-GRAM and Planned New Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2004-01-01

    For altitudes below 80 km, Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) is based on output climatology from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). At COSPAR 2002, results were presented of validation tests of Mars-GRAM versus data from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Radio Science (RS) experiment. Further validation tests are presented comparing Mars- GRAM densities with those from the European Mars Climate Database (MCD), and comparing densities from both Mars-GRAM and MCD against TES observations. Throughout most of the height and latitude range of TES data (040 km and 70s to 70N), good agreement is found between atmospheric densities from Mars-GRAM and MCD. However, at the season and latitude zone for Mars Phoenix arrival and landing (Ls = 65 to 80 degrees and latitude 65 to 75N), Mars-GRAM densities are about 30 to 45 percent higher than MCD densities near 40 km altitude. Further evaluation is warranted concerning potential impact of these model differences on planning for Phoenix entry and descent. Three planned features for Mars-GRAM update are also discussed: (1) new MGCM and Thermospheric General Circulation Model data sets to be used as a revised basis for Mars-GRAM mean atmosphere, (2) a new feature to represent planetary-scale traveling waves for upper altitude density variations (such as found during Mars Odyssey aerobraking), and (3) a new model for effects of high resolution topographic slope on winds near the surface (0 to 4.5 km above MOLA topography level). Mars-GRAM slope winds will be computed from a diagnostic (algebraic) relationship based on Ye, Segal, and Pielke (1990). This approach differs from mesoscale models (such as MRAMS and Mars MM5), which use prognostic, full-physics solutions of the time- and space-dependent differential equations of motion. As such, slope winds in Mars-GRAM will be consistent with its "engineering-level" approach, and will be extremely fast and easy to evaluate

  17. Applications of Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) Supporting Mission Site Selection for Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) is an engineering level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. An overview is presented of Mars-GRAM 2005 and its new features. One new feature of Mars-GRAM 2005 is the 'auxiliary profile' option. In this option, an input file of temperature and density versus altitude is used to replace mean atmospheric values from Mars-GRAM's conventional (General Circulation Model) climatology. An auxiliary profile can be generated from any source of data or alternate model output. Auxiliary profiles for this study were produced from mesoscale model output (Southwest Research Institute's Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) model and Oregon State University's Mars mesoscale model (MMM5)model) and a global Thermal Emission Spectrometer(TES) database. The global TES database has been specifically generated for purposes of making Mars-GRAM auxiliary profiles. This data base contains averages and standard deviations of temperature, density, and thermal wind components,averaged over 5-by-5 degree latitude-longitude bins and 15 degree L(s) bins, for each of three Mars years of TES nadir data. Results are presented using auxiliary profiles produced from the mesoscale model output and TES observed data for candidate Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) landing sites. Input parameters rpscale (for density perturbations) and rwscale (for wind perturbations) can be used to "recalibrate" Mars-GRAM perturbation magnitudes to better replicate observed or mesoscale model variability.

  18. Additions to Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.

    1991-01-01

    Three major additions or modifications were made to the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM): (1) in addition to the interactive version, a new batch version is available, which uses NAMELIST input, and is completely modular, so that the main driver program can easily be replaced by any calling program, such as a trajectory simulation program; (2) both the interactive and batch versions now have an option for treating local-scale dust storm effects, rather than just the global-scale dust storms in the original Mars-GRAM; and (3) the Zurek wave perturbation model was added, to simulate the effects of tidal perturbations, in addition to the random (mountain wave) perturbation model of the original Mars-GRAM. A minor modification has also been made which allows heights to go below local terrain height and return realistic pressure, density, and temperature (not the surface values) as returned by the original Mars-GRAM. This feature will allow simulations of Mars rover paths which might go into local valley areas which lie below the average height of the present, rather coarse-resolution, terrain height data used by Mars-GRAM. Sample input and output of both the interactive and batch version of Mars-GRAM are presented.

  19. Additions to Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (MARS-GRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Three major additions or modifications were made to the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM): (1) in addition to the interactive version, a new batch version is available, which uses NAMELIST input, and is completely modular, so that the main driver program can easily be replaced by any calling program, such as a trajectory simulation program; (2) both the interactive and batch versions now have an option for treating local-scale dust storm effects, rather than just the global-scale dust storms in the original Mars-GRAM; and (3) the Zurek wave perturbation model was added, to simulate the effects of tidal perturbations, in addition to the random (mountain wave) perturbation model of the original Mars-GRAM. A minor modification was also made which allows heights to go 'below' local terrain height and return 'realistic' pressure, density, and temperature, and not the surface values, as returned by the original Mars-GRAM. This feature will allow simulations of Mars rover paths which might go into local 'valley' areas which lie below the average height of the present, rather coarse-resolution, terrain height data used by Mars-GRAM. Sample input and output of both the interactive and batch versions of Mars-GRAM are presented.

  20. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) and Database for Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Johnson, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) is an engineering-level Mars atmosphere model widely used for many Mars mission applications. From 0-80 km, it is based on NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model, while above 80 km it is based on Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model. Mars-GRAM 2001 and MGCM use surface topography from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter. Validation studies are described comparing Mars-GRAM with Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science and Thermal Emission Spectrometer data. RS data from 2480 profiles were used, covering latitudes 75 deg S to 72 deg N, surface to approximately 40 km, for seasons ranging from areocentric longitude of Sun (Ls) = 70-160 deg and 265-310 deg. RS data spanned a range of local times, mostly 0-9 hours and 18-24 hours. For interests in aerocapture and precision landing, comparisons concentrated on atmospheric density. At a fixed height of 20 km, RS density varied by about a factor of 2.5 over ranges of latitudes and Ls values observed. Evaluated at matching positions and times, these figures show average RSMars-GRAM density ratios were generally 1+/-)0.05, except at heights above approximately 25 km and latitudes above approximately 50 deg N. Average standard deviation of RSMars-GRAM density ratio was 6%. TES data were used covering surface to approximately 40 km, over more than a full Mars year (February, 1999 - June, 2001, just before start of a Mars global dust storm). Depending on season, TES data covered latitudes 85 deg S to 85 deg N. Most TES data were concentrated near local times 2 hours and 14 hours. Observed average TES/Mars-GRAM density ratios were generally 1+/-0.05, except at high altitudes (15-30 km, depending on season) and high latitudes (greater than 45 deg N), or at most altitudes in the southern hemisphere at Ls approximately 90 and 180 deg. Compared to TES averages for a given latitude and season, TES data had average density standard deviation about the mean of

  1. Independent Verification of Mars-GRAM 2010 with Mars Climate Sounder Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Burns, Kerry L.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission and engineering applications. Applications of Mars-GRAM include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry, descent and landing, and aerocapture. Atmospheric influences on landing site selection and long-term mission conceptualization and development can also be addressed utilizing Mars-GRAM. Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte Carlo mode, to perform high-fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing. Mars-GRAM is an evolving software package resulting in improved accuracy and additional features. Mars-GRAM 2005 has been validated against Radio Science data, and both nadir and limb data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). Above 80 km, Mars-GRAM is based on the University of Michigan Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM). The most recent release of Mars-GRAM 2010 includes an update to Fortran 90/95 and the addition of adjustment factors. These adjustment factors are applied to the input data from the MGCM and the MTGCM for the mapping year 0 user-controlled dust case. The adjustment factors are expressed as a function of height (z), latitude and areocentric solar longitude (Ls).

  2. Mars global reference atmosphere model (Mars-GRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, Bonnie F.

    1992-01-01

    Mars-GRAM is an empirical model that parameterizes the temperature, pressure, density, and wind structure of the Martian atmosphere from the surface through thermospheric altitudes. In the lower atmosphere of Mars, the model is built around parameterizations of height, latitudinal, longitudinal, and seasonal variations of temperature determined from a survey of published measurements from the Mariner and Viking programs. Pressure and density are inferred from the temperature by making use of the hydrostatic and perfect gas laws relationships. For the upper atmosphere, the thermospheric model of Stewart is used. A hydrostatic interpolation routine is used to insure a smooth transition from the lower portion of the model to the Stewart thermospheric model. Other aspects of the model are discussed.

  3. Utilizing Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) to Evaluate Entry Probe Mission Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    Engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL)1. Traditional Mars-GRAM options for representing the mean atmosphere along entry corridors include: a) TES Mapping Years 1 and 2, with Mars-GRAM data coming from MGCM model results driven by observed TES dust optical depth; and b) TES Mapping Year 0, with user-controlled dust optical depth and Mars-GRAM data interpolated from MGCM model results driven by selected values of globally-uniform dust optical depth. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). Mars-GRAM and MGCM use surface topography from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), with altitudes referenced to the MOLA areoid, or constant potential surface. Mars-GRAM 2005 has been validated2 against Radio Science data, and both nadir and limb data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES)

  4. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) Version 3.8: Users Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, B. F.

    1999-05-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) Version 3.8 is presented and its new features are discussed. Mars-GRAM uses new values of planetary reference ellipsoid radii, gravity term, and rotation rate (consistent with current JPL values) and includes centrifugal effects on gravity. The model now uses NASA Ames Global Circulation Model low resolution topography. Curvature corrections are applied to winds and limits based on speed of sound are applied. Altitude of the F1 ionization peak and density scale height, including effects of change of molecular weight with altitude are computed. A check is performed to disallow temperatures below CO2 sublimination. This memorandum includes instructions on obtaining Mars-GRAM source code and data files and running the program. Sample input and output are provided. An example of incorporating Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code is also given.

  5. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) Version 3.8: Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, B. F.

    1999-01-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) Version 3.8 is presented and its new features are discussed. Mars-GRAM uses new values of planetary reference ellipsoid radii, gravity term, and rotation rate (consistent with current JPL values) and includes centrifugal effects on gravity. The model now uses NASA Ames Global Circulation Model low resolution topography. Curvature corrections are applied to winds and limits based on speed of sound are applied. Altitude of the F1 ionization peak and density scale height, including effects of change of molecular weight with altitude are computed. A check is performed to disallow temperatures below CO2 sublimination. This memorandum includes instructions on obtaining Mars-GRAM source code and data files and running the program. Sample input and output are provided. An example of incorporating Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code is also given.

  6. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM): Release No. 2 - Overview and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, B.; Johnson, D.; Tyree, L.

    1993-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM), a science and engineering model for empirically parameterizing the temperature, pressure, density, and wind structure of the Martian atmosphere, is described with particular attention to the model's newest version, Mars-GRAM, Release No. 2 and to the improvements incorporated into the Release No. 2 model as compared with the Release No. 1 version. These improvements include (1) an addition of a new capability to simulate local-scale Martian dust storms and the growth and decay of these storms; (2) an addition of the Zurek and Haberle (1988) wave perturbation model, for simulating tidal perturbation effects; and (3) a new modular version of Mars-GRAM, for incorporation as a subroutine into other codes.

  7. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2001 Version (Mars-GRAM 2001): Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Johnson, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    This document presents Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2001 Version (Mars-GRAM 2001) and its new features. As with the previous version (mars-2000), all parameterizations fro temperature, pressure, density, and winds versus height, latitude, longitude, time of day, and season (Ls) use input data tables from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) for the surface through 80-km altitude and the University of Arizona Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM) for 80 to 70 km. Mars-GRAM 2001 is based on topography from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) and includes new MGCM data at the topographic surface. A new auxiliary program allows Mars-GRAM output to be used to compute shortwave (solar) and longwave (thermal) radiation at the surface and top of atmosphere. This memorandum includes instructions on obtaining Mars-GRAN source code and data files and for running the program. It also provides sample input and output and an example for incorporating Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code.

  8. Evaluating Mars Science Laboratory Landing Sites with the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, H. L.; Justus, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL) [1]. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). Mars-GRAM and MGCM use surface topography from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), with altitudes referenced to the MOLA areoid, or constant potential surface. Traditional Mars-GRAM options for representing the mean atmosphere along entry corridors include: (1) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) mapping years 1 and 2, with Mars-GRAM data coming from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) results driven by observed TES dust optical depth or (2) TES mapping year 0, with user-controlled dust optical depth and Mars-GRAM data interpolated from MGCM model results driven by selected values of globally-uniform dust optical depth. Mars-GRAM 2005 has been validated [2] against Radio Science data, and both nadir and limb data from TES [3]. There are several new features included in Mars-GRAM 2005. The first is the option to use input data sets from MGCM model runs that were designed to closely simulate conditions observed during the first two years of TES observations at Mars. The TES Year 1 option includes values from April 1999 through January 2001. The TES Year 2 option includes values from February 2001 through December 2002. The second new feature is the option to read and use any auxiliary profile of temperature and density versus altitude. In exercising the auxiliary profile Mars-GRAM option, values from the auxiliary profile replace data from the original MGCM databases. Some examples of auxiliary profiles include data from TES nadir or limb observations and Mars mesoscale model output at a particular

  9. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 3.34): Programmer's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, Bonnie F.; Johnson, Dale L.

    1996-01-01

    This is a programmer's guide for the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 3.34). Included are a brief history and review of the model since its origin in 1988 and a technical discussion of recent additions and modifications. Examples of how to run both the interactive and batch (subroutine) forms are presented. Instructions are provided on how to customize output of the model for various parameters of the Mars atmosphere. Detailed descriptions are given of the main driver programs, subroutines, and associated computational methods. Lists and descriptions include input, output, and local variables in the programs. These descriptions give a summary of program steps and 'map' of calling relationships among the subroutines. Definitions are provided for the variables passed between subroutines through common lists. Explanations are provided for all diagnostic and progress messages generated during execution of the program. A brief outline of future plans for Mars-GRAM is also presented.

  10. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2000 Version (Mars-GRAM 2000): Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, B. F.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2000 Version (Mars-GRAM 2000) and its new features. All parameterizations for temperature, pressure, density, and winds versus height, latitude, longitude, time of day, and L(sub s) have been replaced by input data tables from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) for the surface through 80-km altitude and the University of Arizona Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM) for 80 to 170 km. A modified Stewart thermospheric model is still used for higher altitudes and for dependence on solar activity. "Climate factors" to tune for agreement with GCM data are no longer needed. Adjustment of exospheric temperature is still an option. Consistent with observations from Mars Global Surveyor, a new longitude-dependent wave model is included with user input to specify waves having 1 to 3 wavelengths around the planet. A simplified perturbation model has been substituted for the earlier one. An input switch allows users to select either East or West longitude positive. This memorandum includes instructions on obtaining Mars-GRAM source code and data files and for running the program. It also provides sample input and output and an example for incorporating Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code.

  11. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) Applications for Mars Science Laboratory Mission Site Selection Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, H. L.; Justus, C. G.

    2007-01-01

    The new Mars-GRAM auxiliary profile capability, using data from TES observations, mesoscale model output, or other sources, allows a potentially higher fidelity representation of the atmosphere, and a more accurate way of estimating inherent uncertainty in atmospheric density and winds. Figure 3 indicates that, with nominal value rpscale=1, Mars-GRAM perturbations would tend to overestimate observed or mesoscale-modeled variability. To better represent TES and mesoscale model density perturbations, rpscale values as low as about 0.4 could be used. Some trajectory model implementations of Mars-GRAM allow the user to dynamically change rpscale and rwscale values with altitude. Figure 4 shows that an mscale value of about 1.2 would better replicate wind standard deviations from MRAMS or MMM5 simulations at the Gale, Terby, or Melas sites. By adjusting the rpscale and rwscale values in Mars-GRAM based on figures such as Figure 3 and 4, we can provide more accurate end-to-end simulations for EDL at the candidate MSL landing sites.

  12. A Revised Thermosphere for the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM Version 3.4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Johnson, D. L.; James, B. F.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the newly-revised model thermosphere for the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM, Version 3.4). It also provides descriptions of other changes made to the program since publication of the programmer's guide for Mars-GRAM Version 3.34. The original Mars-GRAM model thermosphere was based on the global-mean model of Stewart. The revised thermosphere is based largely on parameterizations derived from output data from the three-dimensional Mars Thermospheric Global Circulation Model (MTGCM). The new thermospheric model includes revised dependence on the 10.7 cm solar flux for the global means of exospheric temperature, temperature of the base of the thermosphere, and scale height for the thermospheric temperature variations, as well as revised dependence on orbital position for global mean height of the base of the thermosphere. Other features of the new thermospheric model are: (1) realistic variations of temperature and density with latitude and time of day, (2) more realistic wind magnitudes, based on improved estimates of horizontal pressure gradients, and (3) allowance for user-input adjustments to the model values for mean exospheric temperature and for height and temperature at the base of the thermosphere. Other new features of Mars-GRAM 3.4 include: (1) allowance for user-input values of climatic adjustment factors for temperature profiles from the surface to 75 km, and (2) a revised method for computing the sub-solar longitude position in the 'ORBIT' subroutine.

  13. Surveillance Metrics Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bierbaum, R; Hamada, M; Robertson, A

    2011-11-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  14. Surveillance metrics sensitivity study.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Michael S.; Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Robertson, Alix A.

    2011-09-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  15. Sensitized Liquid Hydrazine Detonation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathgeber, K. A.; Keddy, C. P.; Bunker, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Vapor-phase hydrazine (N2H4) is known to be very sensitive to detonation while liquid hydrazine is very insensitive to detonation, theoretically requiring extremely high pressures to induce initiation. A review of literature on solid and liquid explosives shows that when pure explosive substances are infiltrated with gas cavities, voids, and/or different phase contaminants, the energy or shock pressure necessary to induce detonation can decrease by an order of magnitude. Tests were conducted with liquid hydrazine in a modified card-gap configuration. Sensitization was attempted by bubbling helium gas through and/or suspending ceramic microspheres in the liquid. The hydrazine was subjected to the shock pressure from a 2 lb (0.9 kg) Composition C-4 explosive charge. The hydrazine was contained in a 4 in. (10.2 cm) diameter stainless steel cylinder with a 122 in(sup 3) (2 L) volume and sealed with a polyethylene cap. Blast pressures from the events were recorded by 63 high speed pressure transducers located on three radial legs extending from 4 to 115 ft (1.2 to 35.1 in) from ground zero. Comparison of the neat hydrazine and water baseline tests with the "sensitized" hydrazine tests indicates the liquid hydrazine did not detonate under these conditions.

  16. Icing Encounter Duration Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Lee, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study performed to investigate how aerodynamic performance degradation progresses with time throughout an exposure to icing conditions. It is one of the first documented studies of the effects of ice contamination on aerodynamic performance at various points in time throughout an icing encounter. Both a 1.5 and 6 ft chord, two-dimensional, NACA-23012 airfoils were subjected to icing conditions in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel for varying lengths of time. At the end of each run, lift, drag, and pitching moment measurements were made. Measurements with the 1.5 ft chord model showed that maximum lift and pitching moment degraded more rapidly early in the exposure and degraded more slowly as time progressed. Drag for the 1.5 ft chord model degraded more linearly with time, although drag for very short exposure durations was slightly higher than expected. Only drag measurements were made with the 6 ft chord airfoil. Here, drag for the long exposures was higher than expected. Novel comparison of drag measurements versus an icing scaling parameter, accumulation parameter times collection efficiency was used to compare the data from the two different size model. The comparisons provided a means of assessing the level of fidelity needed for accurate icing simulation.

  17. Lunar magnetic permeability studies and magnetometer sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    A regression of quiet magnetic field components simultaneously measured by the two Explorer 35 magnetometers reveals uncertainties in effective sensitivity factors of up to a few percent in one or both of these instruments. Given this, the validity of previous lunar permeability studies based on Explorer 35/ALSEP regressions, wherein inferences are drawn from regression line slopes differing from unity by the order of one percent, is called into question. We emphasize the need to critically address the question of small deviations in magnetometer sensitivity factors from nominal values as a part of any two-magnetometer lunar permeability study.

  18. Advanced protein crystal growth programmatic sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the costs of various APCG (Advanced Protein Crystal Growth) program options and to determine the parameters which, if changed, impact the costs and goals of the programs and to what extent. This was accomplished by developing and evaluating several alternate programmatic scenarios for the microgravity Advanced Protein Crystal Growth program transitioning from the present shuttle activity to the man tended Space Station to the permanently manned Space Station. These scenarios include selected variations in such sensitivity parameters as development and operational costs, schedules, technology issues, and crystal growth methods. This final report provides information that will aid in planning the Advanced Protein Crystal Growth Program.

  19. Turbulence sensitivity study in the IBI region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reffray, G.; Chanut, J.; Cailleau, S.; Levier, B.

    2009-04-01

    In the framework of building a high resolution operational system covering the IBI area (Iberian Biscay Irish), a turbulence sensitivity study is carried out to improve the results of the NEMO model. This is particularly important on the shelf where the mixing is very strong and mainly induced by the intense tidal currents. The investigated work is to test some parameterizations more sophisticated (for ex: stability functions from Canuto (2001) or surface boundary conditions including wave effects from Mellor and Blumberg 2003) and to note if the biases with the observations are reduced as expected. To make this numerical study easier, the Generic Length Scale model (Umlauf and Burchard, 2003) has been implemented. The choice of the dissipation rate as turbulent scale has been done because this closure is well documented and contrary to the Mellor-Yamada turbulent scale, this equation does not need any wall function to provide results physically relevant.

  20. Ramp Compression Experiments - a Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, M; Reisman, D

    2007-02-26

    We present the first sensitivity study of the material isentropes extracted from ramp compression experiments. We perform hydrodynamic simulations of representative experimental geometries associated with ramp compression experiments and discuss the major factors determining the accuracy of the equation of state information extracted from such data. In conclusion, we analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively the major experimental factors that determine the accuracy of equations of state extracted from ramp compression experiments. Since in actual experiments essentially all the effects discussed here will compound, factoring out individual signatures and magnitudes, as done in the present work, is especially important. This study should provide some guidance for the effective design and analysis of ramp compression experiments, as well as for further improvements of ramp generators performance.

  1. Chemical feedbacks in climate sensitivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietmüller, Simone; Ponater, Michael; Sausen, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Interactively coupled climate chemistry models extend the number of feedback mechanisms in climate change simulations by allowing a variation of several radiatively actice chemical tracers that are prescribed in conventional climate models. Different perturbation experiments including chemical feedbacks were performed using the chemistry-climate model system EMAC coupled to the mixed layer ocean model MLO. The influence of the chemical feedbacks O3, CH4 and N2O on climate response and climate sensitivity is quantified for a series of CO2-perturbation simulations: Equilibrium climate sensitivity is dampened, if chemical feedbacks are included. In case of a CO2 doubling simulation chemical feedbacks decrease climate sensitivity by -3.6% and in case of a 4*CO2 simulation by -8.1%. Analysis of the chemical feedbacks reveals, that the negative feedback of ozone, mainly the feedback of stratospheric ozone, is responsible for this dampening. The radiative feedbacks of CH4 and N2O are negligible, mainly because the model system does not allow interactive emission feedbacks at the Earth's surface for these gases. The feedback of physical parameters is significantly modified by the presence of chemical feedbacks. In case of the CO2-perturbation experiments the negative stratospheric ozone feedback is accompanied by a negative stratospheric H2O feedback change of the same order of magnitude. So the dampening effect of the direct O3 radiative feedback is enhanced. A non-linearity in the damping is found with increasing CO2 concentrations. Reasons are the nonlinear feedbacks of ozone, temperature, and stratospheric water vapor. Additional 6*CO2 simulations with and without chemical feedbacks included show, that the presence of chemic feedbacks helps to prevent a runaway greenhouse effect, as the O3 distribution can react to the upward shift of the tropopause. Also experiments driven by anthropogenic NOx- and CO-emissions were performed, where chemically active trace gases act

  2. Sensitivity Studies for Assimilated Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Winslow, Nathan; Wargan, Krzysztof; Rood, Richard; Pawson, Steven

    2002-01-01

    An ozone data assimilation system at the NASA/Goddard Data Assimilation Office (DAO) produces three-dimensional global ozone fields. They are obtained by assimilating ozone retrieved from the Solar Backscatter UltraViolet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument and the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP TOMS) measurements into an off-line parameterized chemistry and transport model. In this talk we focus on the quality of lower stratospheric assimilated ozone profiles. Ozone in the lower stratosphere plays a key role in the forcing of climate. A biased ozone field in this region will adversely impact calculations of the stratosphere-troposphere exchange and, when used as a first guess in retrievals, the values determined from satellite observations. The SBUV/2 ozone data have a coarse vertical resolution with increased uncertainty below the ozone maximum, and TOMS provides only total ozone columns. Thus, the assimilated ozone profiles in the lower stratosphere are only weakly constrained by the incoming SBUV and TOMS data. Consequently, the assimilated ozone distribution should be sensitive to changes in inputs to the statistical analysis scheme. We investigate the sensitivity of assimilated ozone profiles to changes in a variety of system inputs: TOMS and SBUV/2 data selection, forecast and observations error covariance models, inclusion or omission of a parameterized chemistry model, and different versions of DAO assimilated wind fields used to drive the transport model. Comparisons of assimilated ozone fields with independent observations, primarily ozone sondes, are used to determine the impact of each of these changes.

  3. HCIT Broadband Contrast Performance Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shaklan, Stuart; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2012-01-01

    One of the important milestones of the TPF Coronagraph project is to demonstrate the ability to predict the performance sensitivities of the system at levels consistent with exo-planet detection requirement. We want to gain some general understanding about the potentials and the limitations of the current single-Deformable-Mirror (DM) High-contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) system through modeling and simulations. Specifically, we want to understand the effects of some common errors on the EFC-based control of e-field over a half dark-hole region and broadband contrast. Investigated errors include: (1) Absorbing particles on a flat-mirror (2) Defects on the Occulter surface (3) Dead actuators on the DM. We also investigated the effects of control bandwidth on the broadband contrast. We used a MACOS-based simulation algorithm which (1) combines a ray trace, diffraction model, & a broadband wavefront control algorithm (2) is capable of performing full three-dimensional near-field diffraction analysis

  4. Tropical cirrus cloud radiative forcing: Sensitivity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E.J.; Kinne, S.; Toon, O.B.

    1994-09-01

    We have performed one dimensional radiative transfer calculations to evaluate the impact of cirrus clouds on the tropical radiation budget. We investigate the sensitivity of solar and infrared fluxes to cloud optical depth, particle size distributions, and cloud height. If the observed solar cloud forcing in excess of 100 W/sq m is to be attributed to cirrus anvils alone, then the optical depth of these anvils must be at least 5 (assuming 50% cloud cover and an ice crystal effective radius of 15 microns). The net radiative forcing of cirrus near the tropical tropopause is positive (heating) for cloud optical depths less than about 16 and negative (cooling) for larger optical depths. If cirrus clouds alone are responsible for the equal and opposite shortwave and longwave cloud forcing in excess of 100 W/sq m observed by Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), then the cirrus must typically take the form of deep, optically thick clouds with relatively small particles (radii of 10-20 microns) and cloud-tops well below the tropopause. The maintenance of this balance on monthly time scales can be attributed to a variety of correlations: The cloud cover of optically thick cirrus or thin cirrus overlying low-level stratus clouds could vary; or cirrus anvil height cloud increase along with a decrease in the ice crystal effective radius and an increase in optical depth. It would be of great interest to determine observationally which of these correlations is responsible for the observed lack of variation in cloud forcing.

  5. A study of eigenvalue sensitivity for hydrodynamic stability operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Peter J.; Henningson, Dan S.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    1993-01-01

    The eigenvalue sensitivity for hydrodynamic stability operators is investigated. Classical matrix perturbation techniques as well as the concept of epsilon-pseudospectra are applied to show that parts of the spectrum are highly sensitive to small perturbations. Applications are drawn from incompressible plane Couette flow, trailing line vortex flow, and compressible Blasius boundary-layer flow. Parameter studies indicate a monotonically increasing effect of the Reynolds number on the sensitivity. The phenomenon of eigenvalue sensitivity is due to the nonnormality of the operators and their discrete matrix analogs and may be associated with large transient growth of the corresponding initial value problem.

  6. Measuring chemical sensitivity prevalence: a questionnaire for population studies.

    PubMed Central

    Kipen, H M; Hallman, W; Kelly-McNeil, K; Fiedler, N

    1995-01-01

    Because no information exists on the prevalence of chemical sensitivity syndromes such as multiple chemical sensitivities, a questionnaire for use in population studies was developed and tested to assess the presence or absence of chemical sensitivity. Seven hundred five individuals attending clinics answered a questionnaire asking whether each of 122 common substances caused symptoms. Results showed that patients with multiple chemical sensitivities and asthma had average total scores that were significantly different from each other and from those of each of the other diagnostic categories. Higher total scores were also reported by female patients. The instrument described here may facilitate meaningful prevalence studies of multiple chemical sensitivities. It will also allow study of chemically induced symptoms in other conditions such as asthma. PMID:7702128

  7. Sensitivity Study for Long Term Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Allan L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates using Markov models to establish system and maintenance requirements for small electronic controllers where the goal is a high probability of continuous service for a long period of time. The system and maintenance items considered are quality of components, various degrees of simple redundancy, redundancy with reconfiguration, diagnostic levels, periodic maintenance, and preventive maintenance. Markov models permit a quantitative investigation with comparison and contrast. An element of special interest is the use of conditional probability to study the combination of imperfect diagnostics and periodic maintenance.

  8. Grid Sensitivity Study for Slat Noise Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Buning, Pieter G.

    2014-01-01

    The slat noise from the 30P/30N high-lift system is being investigated through computational fluid dynamics simulations in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustics solver. Many previous simulations have been performed for the configuration, and the case was introduced as a new category for the Second AIAA workshop on Benchmark problems for Airframe Noise Configurations (BANC-II). However, the cost of the simulations has restricted the study of grid resolution effects to a baseline grid and coarser meshes. In the present study, two different approaches are being used to investigate the effect of finer resolution of near-field unsteady structures. First, a standard grid refinement by a factor of two is used, and the calculations are performed by using the same CFL3D solver employed in the majority of the previous simulations. Second, the OVERFLOW code is applied to the baseline grid, but with a 5th-order upwind spatial discretization as compared with the second-order discretization used in the CFL3D simulations. In general, the fine grid CFL3D simulation and OVERFLOW calculation are in very good agreement and exhibit the lowest levels of both surface pressure fluctuations and radiated noise. Although the smaller scales resolved by these simulations increase the velocity fluctuation levels, they appear to mitigate the influence of the larger scales on the surface pressure. These new simulations are used to investigate the influence of the grid on unsteady high-lift simulations and to gain a better understanding of the physics responsible for the noise generation and radiation.

  9. HCIT Broadband Contrast Performance Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shaklan, Stuart; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2012-01-01

    The High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory employs a broadband wavefront correction algorithm called Electric Field Conjugation (EFC) to obtain the required 10-10 contrast. This algorithm works with one deformable mirror (DM) to estimate the electric-field to be controlled, and with one or multiple DM's to create a "darkhole" in a predefined region of the image plane where terrestrial planets would be found. We have investigated the effects of absorbing dust particles on a flat optic, absorbing spots on the occulting mask, dead actuators on the DM, and the effects of control bandwidth on the efficiency of the EFC algorithm in a Lyot coronagraph configuration. The structural design of the optical system as well as the parameters of various optical elements used in the analysis is drawn from those of the HCIT system that have been implemented with one DM. The simulation takes into account the surface errors of various optical elements. Results of some of these studies have been verified by actual measurements.

  10. Intercultural Sensitivity through Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Melanie; Miranda, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    One of the foremost-cited rationales for study abroad during college is the development of a global perspective and intercultural sensitivity. Although this argument is mentioned frequently in promotional materials for study abroad, it has not yet been backed by research based on the outcomes of students' study abroad experiences. As more…

  11. Sensitivity study for s process nucleosynthesis in AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koloczek, A.; Thomas, B.; Glorius, J.; Plag, R.; Pignatari, M.; Reifarth, R.; Ritter, C.; Schmidt, S.; Sonnabend, K.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a large-scale sensitivity study of reaction rates in the main component of the s process. The aim of this study is to identify all rates, which have a global effect on the s process abundance distribution and the three most important rates for the production of each isotope. We have performed a sensitivity study on the radiative 13C-pocket and on the convective thermal pulse, sites of the s process in AGB stars. We identified 22 rates, which have the highest impact on the s-process abundances in AGB stars.

  12. Sensitivity study on durability variables of marine concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin'gang; Li, Kefei

    2013-06-01

    In order to study the influence of parameters on durability of marine concrete structures, the parameter's sensitivity analysis was studied in this paper. With the Fick's 2nd law of diffusion and the deterministic sensitivity analysis method (DSA), the sensitivity factors of apparent surface chloride content, apparent chloride diffusion coefficient and its time dependent attenuation factor were analyzed. The results of the analysis show that the impact of design variables on concrete durability was different. The values of sensitivity factor of chloride diffusion coefficient and its time dependent attenuation factor were higher than others. Relative less error in chloride diffusion coefficient and its time dependent attenuation coefficient induces a bigger error in concrete durability design and life prediction. According to probability sensitivity analysis (PSA), the influence of mean value and variance of concrete durability design variables on the durability failure probability was studied. The results of the study provide quantitative measures of the importance of concrete durability design and life prediction variables. It was concluded that the chloride diffusion coefficient and its time dependent attenuation factor have more influence on the reliability of marine concrete structural durability. In durability design and life prediction of marine concrete structures, it was very important to reduce the measure and statistic error of durability design variables.

  13. Aspartame Sensitivity? A Double Blind Randomised Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat; Thatcher, Natalie J.; Hammersley, Richard; Rigby, Alan S.; Pechlivanis, Alexandros; Gooderham, Nigel J.; Holmes, Elaine; le Roux, Carel W.; Atkin, Stephen L.; Courts, Fraser

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspartame is a commonly used intense artificial sweetener, being approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose. There have been concerns over aspartame since approval in the 1980s including a large anecdotal database reporting severe symptoms. The objective of this study was to compare the acute symptom effects of aspartame to a control preparation. Methods This was a double-blind randomized cross over study conducted in a clinical research unit in United Kingdom. Forty-eight individual who has self reported sensitivity to aspartame were compared to 48 age and gender matched aspartame non-sensitive individuals. They were given aspartame (100mg)-containing or control snack bars randomly at least 7 days apart. The main outcome measures were acute effects of aspartame measured using repeated ratings of 14 symptoms, biochemistry and metabonomics. Results Aspartame sensitive and non-sensitive participants differed psychologically at baseline in handling feelings and perceived stress. Sensitive participants had higher triglycerides (2.05 ± 1.44 vs. 1.26 ± 0.84mmol/L; p value 0.008) and lower HDL-C (1.16 ± 0.34 vs. 1.35 ± 0.54 mmol/L; p value 0.04), reflected in 1H NMR serum analysis that showed differences in the baseline lipid content between the two groups. Urine metabonomic studies showed no significant differences. None of the rated symptoms differed between aspartame and control bars, or between sensitive and control participants. However, aspartame sensitive participants rated more symptoms particularly in the first test session, whether this was placebo or control. Aspartame and control bars affected GLP-1, GIP, tyrosine and phenylalanine levels equally in both aspartame sensitive and non-sensitive subjects. Conclusion Using a comprehensive battery of psychological tests, biochemistry and state of the art metabonomics there was no evidence of any acute adverse responses to aspartame. This independent study gives reassurance to both regulatory bodies

  14. Comparative study of normal and sensitive skin aerobic bacterial populations

    PubMed Central

    Hillion, Mélanie; Mijouin, Lily; Jaouen, Thomas; Barreau, Magalie; Meunier, Pauline; Lefeuvre, Luc; Lati, Elian; Chevalier, Sylvie; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if the sensitive skin syndrome, a frequent skin disorder characterized by abnormal painful reactions to environmental factors in the absence of visible inflammatory response, could be linked to a modification in the skin bacterial population. A total of 1706 bacterial isolates was collected at the levels of the forehead, cheekbone, inner elbow, and lower area of the scapula on the skin of normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers of both sexes and of different ages. Among these isolates, 21 strains were randomly selected to validate in a first step the Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI)-Biotyper process as an efficient identification tool at the group and genus levels, by comparison to API® strips and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing identification techniques. In a second step, identification of the skin microbiota isolates by the MALDI-Biotyper tool allowed to pinpoint some differences in terms of bacterial diversity with regard to the collection area, and the volunteer's age and gender. Finally, comparison of the skin microbiota from normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers pointed out gender-related variations but no detectable correlation between a phylum, a genus or a dominant bacterial species and the sensitive skin phenotype. This study reveals that there is no dysbiosis of aerobic cultivable bacteria associated with the sensitive skin syndrome and further demonstrates that the MALDI-Biotyper is a powerful technique that can be efficiently employed to the study of cultivable human skin bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on bacteria in the sensitive skin syndrome. These results are of potential importance for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries, which are looking for new strategies to treat this multiparametric disorder. PMID:24151137

  15. Comparative study of normal and sensitive skin aerobic bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Hillion, Mélanie; Mijouin, Lily; Jaouen, Thomas; Barreau, Magalie; Meunier, Pauline; Lefeuvre, Luc; Lati, Elian; Chevalier, Sylvie; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if the sensitive skin syndrome, a frequent skin disorder characterized by abnormal painful reactions to environmental factors in the absence of visible inflammatory response, could be linked to a modification in the skin bacterial population. A total of 1706 bacterial isolates was collected at the levels of the forehead, cheekbone, inner elbow, and lower area of the scapula on the skin of normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers of both sexes and of different ages. Among these isolates, 21 strains were randomly selected to validate in a first step the Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI)-Biotyper process as an efficient identification tool at the group and genus levels, by comparison to API(®) strips and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing identification techniques. In a second step, identification of the skin microbiota isolates by the MALDI-Biotyper tool allowed to pinpoint some differences in terms of bacterial diversity with regard to the collection area, and the volunteer's age and gender. Finally, comparison of the skin microbiota from normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers pointed out gender-related variations but no detectable correlation between a phylum, a genus or a dominant bacterial species and the sensitive skin phenotype. This study reveals that there is no dysbiosis of aerobic cultivable bacteria associated with the sensitive skin syndrome and further demonstrates that the MALDI-Biotyper is a powerful technique that can be efficiently employed to the study of cultivable human skin bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on bacteria in the sensitive skin syndrome. These results are of potential importance for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries, which are looking for new strategies to treat this multiparametric disorder. PMID:24151137

  16. Sensitivity and uncertainty studies of the CRAC2 computer code.

    PubMed

    Kocher, D C; Ward, R C; Killough, G G; Dunning, D E; Hicks, B B; Hosker, R P; Ku, J Y; Rao, K S

    1987-12-01

    We have studied the sensitivity of health impacts from nuclear reactor accidents, as predicted by the CRAC2 computer code, to the following sources of uncertainty: (1) the model for plume rise, (2) the model for wet deposition, (3) the meteorological bin-sampling procedure for selecting weather sequences with rain, (4) the dose conversion factors for inhalation as affected by uncertainties in the particle size of the carrier aerosol and the clearance rates of radionuclides from the respiratory tract, (5) the weathering half-time for external ground-surface exposure, and (6) the transfer coefficients for terrestrial foodchain pathways. Predicted health impacts usually showed little sensitivity to use of an alternative plume-rise model or a modified rain-bin structure in bin-sampling. Health impacts often were quite sensitive to use of an alternative wet-deposition model in single-trial runs with rain during plume passage, but were less sensitive to the model in bin-sampling runs. Uncertainties in the inhalation dose conversion factors had important effects on early injuries in single-trial runs. Latent cancer fatalities were moderately sensitive to uncertainties in the weathering half-time for ground-surface exposure, but showed little sensitivity to the transfer coefficients for terrestrial foodchain pathways. Sensitivities of CRAC2 predictions to uncertainties in the models and parameters also depended on the magnitude of the source term, and some of the effects on early health effects were comparable to those that were due only to selection of different sets of weather sequences in bin-sampling. PMID:3444936

  17. Anxiety Sensitivity and Panic Attacks: A 1-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wen; Zinbarg, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a risk factor for panic genesis has obtained compelling support, but the clinical/practical importance of AS in panic genesis has been questioned. In addition, the association between panic experience and AS increase has not been clearly demonstrated. Through this 1-year longitudinal study among…

  18. Ethical problems and moral sensitivity in physiotherapy: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Kulju, Kati; Suhonen, Riitta; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2013-08-01

    This study identified and described ethical problems encountered by physiotherapists in their practice and physiotherapists' moral sensitivity in ethical situations. A questionnaire-based survey was constructed to identify ethical problems, and the Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire Revised version was used to measure moral sensitivity. Physiotherapists (n = 116) working in public health services responded to the questionnaire. Based on the results, most of the physiotherapists encounter ethical problems weekly. They concern mainly financial considerations, equality and justice, professionalism, unethical conduct of physiotherapists or other professions and patients' self-determination. The dimension of moral strength was emphasised in physiotherapists' self-evaluations of their moral sensitivity. As a conclusion, ethical problems do occur not only at individual level but also at organisational and society level. Physiotherapists seem to have moral strength for speaking on behalf of the patient. Scarce resources make them feel insufficient but much could still be done to provide quality care in co-operation with other health-care professionals. PMID:23329778

  19. Shuttle filter study. Volume 2: Contaminant generation and sensitivity studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Contaminant generation studies were conducted at the component level using two different methods, radioactive tracer technique and gravimetric analysis test procedure. Both of these were reduced to practice during this program. In the first of these methods, radioactively tagged components typical of those used in spacecraft were studied to determine their contaminant generation characteristics under simulated operating conditions. Because the purpose of the work was: (1) to determine the types and quantities of contaminants generated; and (2) to evaluate improved monitoring and detection schemes, no attempt was made to evaluate or qualify specific components. The components used in this test program were therefore not flight hardware items. Some of them had been used in previous tests; some were obsolete; one was an experimental device. In addition to the component tests, various materials of interest to contaminant and filtration studies were irradiated and evaluated for use as autotracer materials. These included test dusts, plastics, valve seat materials, and bearing cage materials.

  20. Pain sensitivity and opioid analgesia: a pharmacogenomic twin study.

    PubMed

    Angst, Martin S; Phillips, Nicholas G; Drover, David R; Tingle, Martha; Ray, Amrita; Swan, Gary E; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Clark, J David

    2012-07-01

    Opioids are the cornerstone medication for the management of moderate to severe pain. Unfortunately, vast inter-individual differences in dose requirements complicate their effective and safe clinical use. Mechanisms underlying such differences are incompletely understood, are likely multifactorial, and include genetic and environmental contributions. While accumulating evidence suggests that variants of several genes account for some of the observed response variance, the relative contribution of these factors remains unknown. This study used a twin paradigm to provide a global estimate of the genetic and environmental contributions to inter-individual differences in pain sensitivity and analgesic opioid effects. Eighty one monozygotic and 31 dizygotic twin pairs successfully underwent a computer-controlled infusion with the μ-opioid agonist alfentanil in a single occasion, randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled study design. Pain sensitivity and analgesic effects were assessed with experimental heat and cold pressor pain models along with important covariates including demographic factors, depression, anxiety, and sleep quality. Significant heritability was detected for cold pressor pain tolerance and opioid-mediated elevations in heat and cold pressor pain thresholds. Genetic effects accounted for 12-60% of the observed response variance. Significant familial effects accounting for 24-32% of observed variance were detected for heat and cold pressor pain thresholds and opioid-mediated elevation in cold pressor pain tolerance. Significant covariates included age, gender, race, education, and anxiety. Results provide a strong rationale for more detailed molecular genetic studies to elucidate mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences in pain sensitivity and analgesic opioid responses. Such studies will require careful consideration of the studied pain phenotype. PMID:22444188

  1. Contamination sensitivity of typical mirror coatings - A parametric study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osantowski, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Contamination budgeting for space optical systems basically starts at understanding the sensitivity of component performance, e.g. mirror reflectance, window transmittance, etc., to surface deposits. To evaluate contamination sensitivity for mirror coatings, eight types representative of those used in the vacuum ultraviolet, visible, and infrared were modeled assuming that the contaminant is uniformly deposited on the mirror surface. Parametric studies over a range of complex refractive indices combined with an examination of optical data available for several organic materials suggested division of the contaminant layer index into three categories, N = 1.5 + 0.1i, N = 1.5 + 0.5i, and N = 1.5 + 2.0i. Contaminant thickness sensitivity curves were then calculated for each of the selected mirror coatings. For comparative purposes, critical thicknesses for each type were extracted, assuming a reflectance loss of 10 percent was allowable. Critical thicknesses ranged from about 10 A to 1000 A depending on the specifics of coating design and spectral region.

  2. Sensitivity study of a dynamic thermodynamic sea ice model

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, D.M.; Mysak, L.A.; Manak, D.K. )

    1993-02-15

    A numerical simulation of the seasonal sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean and the Greenland, Iceland, and Norwegian seas is presented. The sea ice model is extracted from Oberhuber's (1990) coupled sea ice-mixed layer-isopycnal general circulation model and is written in spherical coordinates. The advantage of such a model over previous sea ice models is that it can be easily coupled to either global atmospheric or ocean general circulation models written in spherical coordinates. In this model, the thermodynamics are a modification of that of Parkinson and Washington, while the dynamics use the full Hibler viscous-plastic rheology. Monthly thermodynamic and dynamic forcing fields for the atmosphere and ocean are specified. The simulations of the seasonal cycle of ice thickness, compactness, and velocity, for a control set of parameters, compare favorably with the known seasonal characteristics of these fields. A sensitivity study of the control simulation of the seasonal sea ice cover is presented. The sensitivity runs are carried out under three different themes, namely, numerical conditions, parameter values, and physical processes. This last theme refers to experiments in which physical processes are either newly added or completely removed from the model. Approximately 80 sensitivity runs have been performed in which a change from the control run environment has been implemented. Comparisons have been made between the control run and a particular sensitivity run based on time series of the seasonal cycle of the domain-averaged ice thickness, compactness, areal coverage, and kinetic energy. In addition, spatially varying fields of ice thickness, compactness, velocity, and surface temperature for each season are presented for selected experiments. A brief description and discussion of the more interesting experiments are presented. The simulation of the seasonal cycle of Arctic sea ice cover is shown to be robust. 31 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Mass sensitivity studies for an inductively driven railgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, J. J., III; Young, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    Those areas which result in substantial system mass reductions for an HPG (homopolar generator) driven EML (electromagnetic launcher) are identified. Sensitivity studies are performed by varying launch mass, peak acceleration, launcher efficiency, inductance gradient, injection velocity, barrel mass per unit length, fuel tankage and pump estimates, and component energy and power densities. Two major contributors to the system mass are the allowed number of shots per barrel versus the number required for the mission, and the barrel length. The effects of component performance parameters, such as friction coefficient, injection velocity, ablation coefficient, rail resistivity, armature voltage, peak acceleration, and inductance gradient on these two areas, are addressed.

  4. Physics sensitivity studies of Fine-Grained Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xinchun; Mishra, Sanjib R.; Petti, Roberto; Hongyue, Duyang

    2015-10-15

    The reference design of the near detector for the LBNE experiment is a high-resolution Fine-Grained Tracker (FGT). We performed sensitivity studies – critical to constraining the systematics in oscillation searches – of measurements of (1) the absolute neutrino flux, (2) neutrino-nucleon quasi-elastic (QE) and (3) resonance (Res) interactions. In QE and Res emphasis is laid in identifying in situ measurables that help constrain nuclear effects such as initial state pair wise correlations and final state interactions.

  5. Sensitivity Studies of Sea Ice Formation In The Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, U.; Harms, I.; Backhaus, J. O.

    Sea ice formation is an important process in Arctic shelf seas because it determines environmental conditions in the whole Arctic, in particular at the coasts. Arctic shelf seas receive large amounts of freshwater which has a significant impact on ice forma- tion and which could be affected by climate change. In order to study the direct and indirect influence of river runoff on sea ice formation, a high resolution baroclinic 3-d circulation and sea ice model is applied to the Kara Sea. The model is forced with realistic atmospheric winds, surface heat fluxes, river runoff and tides. A vertical adaptive grid is used which provides high resolution in critical areas such as shallow estuaries, slopes or topographic obstacles. The surface following boundary layer is resolved uniformly in 4 m intervals in order to resolve the strong vertical stratification. The simulated melting rates are sensitive to the penetration depth of shortwave radia- tion into the water column. Peak runoff rates in the Kara Sea in spring might exceed 100.000 m3/s which causes high suspended loads in the water column and reduces the shortwave penetration depth considerably compared to ambient Arctic waters. As a result, coastal sea surface temperatures rise and ice melting is significantly enhanced. Our sensitivity studies show, that the indirect influence of river runoff on ice melting could play an important role in future studies on climate variability in the Arctic.

  6. Developing a temperature sensitive tool for studying spin dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickey, Kurtis Jon

    Measuring the thermodynamic properties of nanoscale structures is becoming increasingly important as heterostructures and devices shrink in size. For example, recent discoveries of spin thermal effects such as spin Seebeck and spin Peltier show that thermal gradients can manipulate spin systems and vice versa. However, the relevant interactions occur within a spin diffusion length of a spin active interface, making study of these spin thermal effects challenging. In addition, recent ferromagnetic resonance studies of spatially confined nanomagnets have shown unique magnon modes in arrays and lines which may give rise to unique magnon-phonon interactions. In this case, the small volume of magnetic material presents a challenge to measurement and as a result the bulk of the work is done on arrays with measurements of the magnetization of individual particles possible through various microscopies but limited access to thermal properties. As a result, tools capable of measuring the thermal properties of nanoscale structures are required to fully explore this emerging science. One approach to addressing this challenge is the use of microscale suspended platforms that maximize their sensitivity to these spin thermal interactions through thermal isolation from their surroundings. Combining this thermal decoupling with sensitive thermometry allows for the measurement of nanojoule heat accumulations, such as those resulting from the small heat flows associated with spin transport and spin relaxation. As these heat flows may manifest themselves in a variety of spin-thermal effects, the development of measurement platforms that can be tailored to optimize their sensitivity to specific thermal measurements is essential. To address these needs, I have fabricated thermally isolated platforms using a unique focused ion beam (FIB) machining that allow for flexible geometries as well as a wide choice of material systems. The thermal characteristics of these platforms were

  7. Computational studies of quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, Grigory

    This thesis presents a computational study of quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells. First part deals with the non-equilibrium many-body theory or non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) theory. In this approach I study electron dynamics in the quantum-dot sensitized solar cell subjected to time-dependent fields. NEGF theory, because it does not impose any conditions on a perturbation, is the fundamental one to describe ultrafast processes in small, strongly correlated systems and/or in strong fields. In this research I do not only perform analytical derivation, but also design and implement spectral numerical solution for the resulting complex system of partial integrodifferential equations. This numerical solution yielded an order of magnitude speedup over the methods used previously in the field. The forth chapter of this thesis deals with calculation of optical properties and the ground state configuration of Zn2SnO4 (ZTO). ZTO is used by experimentalists in UW to grow nanorods which are then sensitized by QDs. ZTO is a challenging material for computational analysis because of its inverse spinel structure; thus it has an immense number of configurations matching the X-ray diffraction experiments. I've applied a cluster expansion method and have found the ground state configuration and phase diagram for ZTO. Calculations of optical properties of ground state bulk ZTO were done with a recently developed DFT functional. The optical band gap obtained in these calculations matched the experimental value. The last chapter describes development of the general simulator for interdigitated array electrodes. The application of this simulation together with the experiments may lead to understanding of reaction parameters and mechanisms important for development of electrochemical solar cells.

  8. Sensitivity studies for a space-based methane lidar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Ehret, G.; Amediek, A.; Fix, A.; Wirth, M.

    2011-10-01

    Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere after water vapour and carbon dioxide. A major handicap to quantify the emissions at the Earth's surface in order to better understand biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes and potential climate feedbacks is the lack of accurate and global observations of methane. Space-based integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar has potential to fill this gap, and a Methane Remote Lidar Mission (MERLIN) on a small satellite in polar orbit was proposed by DLR and CNES in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. System simulations are used to identify key performance parameters and to find an advantageous instrument configuration, given the environmental, technological, and budget constraints. The sensitivity studies use representative averages of the atmospheric and surface state to estimate the measurement precision, i.e. the random uncertainty due to instrument noise. Key performance parameters for MERLIN are average laser power, telescope size, orbit height, surface reflectance, and detector noise. A modest-size lidar instrument with 0.45 W average laser power and 0.55 m telescope diameter on a 506 km orbit could provide 50-km averaged methane column measurement along the sub-satellite track with a precision of about 1% over vegetation. The use of a methane absorption trough at 1.65 μm improves the near-surface measurement sensitivity and vastly relaxes the wavelength stability requirement that was identified as one of the major technological risks in the pre-phase A studies for A-SCOPE, a space-based IPDA lidar for carbon dioxide at the European Space Agency. Minimal humidity and temperature sensitivity at this wavelength position will enable accurate measurements in tropical wetlands, key regions with largely uncertain methane emissions. In contrast to actual passive remote sensors, measurements in Polar Regions will be possible and biases due to aerosol layers and thin

  9. Sensitivity studies for a space-based methane lidar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Ehret, G.; Amediek, A.; Fix, A.; Wirth, M.

    2011-06-01

    Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere after water vapour and carbon dioxide. A major handicap to quantify the emissions at the Earth's surface in order to better understand biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes and potential climate feedbacks is the lack of accurate and global observations of methane. Space-based integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar has potential to fill this gap, and a Methane Remote Lidar Mission (MERLIN) on a small satellite in Polar orbit was proposed by DLR and CNES in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. System simulations are used to identify key performance parameters and to find an advantageous instrument configuration, given the environmental, technological, and budget constraints. The sensitivity studies use representative averages of the atmospheric and surface state to estimate the measurement precision, i.e. the random uncertainty due to instrument noise. Key performance parameters for MERLIN are average laser power, telescope size, orbit height, surface reflectance, and detector noise. A modest-size lidar instrument with 0.45 W average laser power and 0.55 m telescope diameter on a 506 km orbit could provide 50-km averaged methane column measurement along the sub-satellite track with a precision of about 1 % over vegetation. The use of a methane absorption trough at 1.65 μm improves the near-surface measurement sensitivity and vastly relaxes the wavelength stability requirement that was identified as one of the major technological risks in the pre-phase A studies for A-SCOPE, a space-based IPDA lidar for carbon dioxide at the European Space Agency. Minimal humidity and temperature sensitivity at this wavelength position will enable accurate measurements in tropical wetlands, key regions with largely uncertain methane emissions. In contrast to actual passive remote sensors, measurements in Polar Regions will be possible and biases due to aerosol layers and thin

  10. Sensitivity analysis in multiple imputation in effectiveness studies of psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crameri, Aureliano; von Wyl, Agnes; Koemeda, Margit; Schulthess, Peter; Tschuschke, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The importance of preventing and treating incomplete data in effectiveness studies is nowadays emphasized. However, most of the publications focus on randomized clinical trials (RCT). One flexible technique for statistical inference with missing data is multiple imputation (MI). Since methods such as MI rely on the assumption of missing data being at random (MAR), a sensitivity analysis for testing the robustness against departures from this assumption is required. In this paper we present a sensitivity analysis technique based on posterior predictive checking, which takes into consideration the concept of clinical significance used in the evaluation of intra-individual changes. We demonstrate the possibilities this technique can offer with the example of irregular longitudinal data collected with the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ-45) and the Helping Alliance Questionnaire (HAQ) in a sample of 260 outpatients. The sensitivity analysis can be used to (1) quantify the degree of bias introduced by missing not at random data (MNAR) in a worst reasonable case scenario, (2) compare the performance of different analysis methods for dealing with missing data, or (3) detect the influence of possible violations to the model assumptions (e.g., lack of normality). Moreover, our analysis showed that ratings from the patient's and therapist's version of the HAQ could significantly improve the predictive value of the routine outcome monitoring based on the OQ-45. Since analysis dropouts always occur, repeated measurements with the OQ-45 and the HAQ analyzed with MI are useful to improve the accuracy of outcome estimates in quality assurance assessments and non-randomized effectiveness studies in the field of outpatient psychotherapy. PMID:26283989

  11. Sensitivity studies for the weak r process: neutron capture rates

    SciTech Connect

    Surman, R.; Mumpower, M.; Sinclair, R.; Jones, K. L.; Hix, W. R.; McLaughlin, G. C.

    2014-04-15

    Rapid neutron capture nucleosynthesis involves thousands of nuclear species far from stability, whose nuclear properties need to be understood in order to accurately predict nucleosynthetic outcomes. Recently sensitivity studies have provided a deeper understanding of how the r process proceeds and have identified pieces of nuclear data of interest for further experimental or theoretical study. A key result of these studies has been to point out the importance of individual neutron capture rates in setting the final r-process abundance pattern for a ‘main’ (A ∼ 130 peak and above) r process. Here we examine neutron capture in the context of a ‘weak’ r process that forms primarily the A ∼ 80 r-process abundance peak. We identify the astrophysical conditions required to produce this peak region through weak r-processing and point out the neutron capture rates that most strongly influence the final abundance pattern.

  12. Verification, Validation and Sensitivity Studies in Computational Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Andrew E.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Computational techniques and software for the analysis of problems in mechanics have naturally moved from their origins in the traditional engineering disciplines to the study of cell, tissue and organ biomechanics. Increasingly complex models have been developed to describe and predict the mechanical behavior of such biological systems. While the availability of advanced computational tools has led to exciting research advances in the field, the utility of these models is often the subject of criticism due to inadequate model verification and validation. The objective of this review is to present the concepts of verification, validation and sensitivity studies with regard to the construction, analysis and interpretation of models in computational biomechanics. Specific examples from the field are discussed. It is hoped that this review will serve as a guide to the use of verification and validation principles in the field of computational biomechanics, thereby improving the peer acceptance of studies that use computational modeling techniques. PMID:17558646

  13. STUDIES ON THE SENSITIZATION OF ANIMALS WITH SIMPLE CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Landsteiner, K.; Di Somma, A. A.

    1938-01-01

    With the view of making new types of chemicals accessible for investigations on drug hypersensitiveness, methods have been devised for sensitizing animals with diazomethane and mustard oil, two non-aromatic compounds. Guinea pigs have been sensitized to diazomethane, a substance of high reactivity and known to cause severe allergic effects in man. With the second substance, allylisothiocyanate, likewise capable of forming conjugates with substances in the animal body, sensitization effects have been obtained in man and in hogs. Sensitization in human beings was successful with one out of six individuals treated. The observations indicate species and individual differences as regards the ability to become sensitized to various chemical compounds. PMID:19870801

  14. Oral Toxicity Study and Skin Sensitization Test of a Cricket.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyeon Yeol; Lee, Somin; Ahn, Kyu Sup; Kim, Hye Jin; Lee, Sang Sik; Ko, Hyuk Ju; Lee, Jin Kyu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Eun Mi; Lim, Jeong Ho; Song, Kyung Seuk

    2016-04-01

    Crickets have been attracting considerable interest in the field of nutrition and toxicology due to the global exhaustion of food resulting from a growing population. The cricket is normally eaten in several countries after roasting, similar to the grasshopper; however, safety evaluation data on cricket powder is limited. Here, we performed general toxicity studies of cricket powder including a single, 2-week repeated dose range evaluation test, a 13-week repeated oral dose toxicity test in Sprague-Dawley rats, a single oral dose toxicity test in Beagle dogs, and a skin sensitization test in guinea pigs following the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development test guidelines 406 and 408 in addition to Good Laboratory Practice. To investigate the NOAEL and target organs of cricket powder, Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 4 groups: vehicle control, 1,250 mg/kg, 2,500 mg/kg, 5,000 mg/kg dose test groups and cricket powder was administered over 13 weeks after single dose and dose range finding studies in rats based on the results of the single oral administration toxicity study in rats and Beagle dogs. The results of the study showed that the NOAEL of cricket powder was over 5,000 mg/kg for both sexes of rats without adverse effects in a 13-week repeated oral toxicity study and there was no skin hypersensitivity reaction. Therefore, our results reveal that crickets can be widely used as a new substitute food or nutrient resource. PMID:27123167

  15. Oral Toxicity Study and Skin Sensitization Test of a Cricket

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyeon Yeol; Lee, Somin; Ahn, Kyu Sup; Kim, Hye Jin; Lee, Sang Sik; Ko, Hyuk Ju; Lee, Jin Kyu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Eun Mi; Lim, Jeong Ho; Song, Kyung Seuk

    2016-01-01

    Crickets have been attracting considerable interest in the field of nutrition and toxicology due to the global exhaustion of food resulting from a growing population. The cricket is normally eaten in several countries after roasting, similar to the grasshopper; however, safety evaluation data on cricket powder is limited. Here, we performed general toxicity studies of cricket powder including a single, 2-week repeated dose range evaluation test, a 13-week repeated oral dose toxicity test in Sprague-Dawley rats, a single oral dose toxicity test in Beagle dogs, and a skin sensitization test in guinea pigs following the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development test guidelines 406 and 408 in addition to Good Laboratory Practice. To investigate the NOAEL and target organs of cricket powder, Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 4 groups: vehicle control, 1,250 mg/kg, 2,500 mg/kg, 5,000 mg/kg dose test groups and cricket powder was administered over 13 weeks after single dose and dose range finding studies in rats based on the results of the single oral administration toxicity study in rats and Beagle dogs. The results of the study showed that the NOAEL of cricket powder was over 5,000 mg/kg for both sexes of rats without adverse effects in a 13-week repeated oral toxicity study and there was no skin hypersensitivity reaction. Therefore, our results reveal that crickets can be widely used as a new substitute food or nutrient resource. PMID:27123167

  16. Parameter Sensitivity Study of the Wall Interference Correction System (WICS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Eric L.; Everhart, Joel L.; Iyer, Venkit

    2001-01-01

    An off-line version of the Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) has been implemented for the "NASA Langley National Transonic Facility. The correction capability is currently restricted to corrections for solid wall interference in the model pitch plane for Mach numbers, less than 0.45 due to a limitation in tunnel calibration data. A study to assess output sensitivity to the aerodynamic parameters of Reynolds number and Mach number was conducted on this code to further ensure quality during the correction process. In addition, this paper includes all investigation into possible correction due to a semispan test technique using a non metric standoff and all improvement to the standard data rejection algorithm.

  17. Mass sensitivity studies for an inductively driven railgun

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, J.J. ); Young, A.F. )

    1991-01-01

    One of the primary system constructs for an Electromagnetic Launcher (EML) System consists of a homopolar generator (HPG) driven by a hot hydrogen multi-stage turbine/nuclear reactor. The HPG is used to charge an inductive energy store. A key evaluation criterion for determining the viability of an EML is system mass. The objective of this paper is to identify those areas which result in substantial system mass reductions for an HPG driven EML. Sensitivity studies are performed by varying launch mass peak acceleration, launcher efficiency, inductance gradient (L{prime}), injection velocity, barrel mass per unit length, fuel tankage and pump estimates, and component energy and power densities. Two major contributors to the system mass are the allowed number of shots per barrel versus the number required for the mission, and the barrel length.

  18. A New Approach for Coupled GCM Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtman, B. P.; Duane, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    A new multi-model approach for coupled GCM sensitivity studies is presented. The purpose of the sensitivity experiments is to understand why two different coupled models have such large differences in their respective climate simulations. In the application presented here, the differences between the coupled models using the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies (COLA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) are examined. The intent is to isolate which component of the air-sea fluxes is most responsible for the differences between the coupled models and for the errors in their respective coupled simulations. The procedure is to simultaneously couple the two different atmospheric component models to a single ocean general circulation model (OGCM), in this case the Modular Ocean Model (MOM) developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL). Each atmospheric component model experiences the same SST produced by the OGCM, but the OGCM is simultaneously coupled to both AGCMs using a cross coupling strategy. In the first experiment, the OGCM is coupled to the heat and fresh water flux from the NCAR AGCM (Community Atmospheric Model; CAM) and the momentum flux from the COLA AGCM. Both AGCMs feel the same SST. In the second experiment, the OGCM is coupled to the heat and fresh water flux from the COLA AGCM and the momentum flux from the CAM AGCM. Again, both atmospheric component models experience the same SST. By comparing these two experimental simulations with control simulations where only one AGCM is used, it is possible to argue which of the flux components are most responsible for the differences in the simulations and their respective errors. Based on these sensitivity experiments we conclude that the tropical ocean warm bias in the COLA coupled model is due to errors in the heat flux, and that the erroneous westward shift in the tropical Pacific cold tongue minimum in the NCAR model is

  19. Dynamics within alkylsiloxane SAMs studied by sensitive dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Mary; Stevens, Derrick; Bochinski, Jason; Clarke, Laura

    2009-03-01

    Self assembled monolayers (SAMs) are a ubiquitous tool in modern research and their static structure has been extensively studied. Fewer investigations have addressed dynamics within these systems; however, such motions within SAMs will affect surface properties such as friction and blocking ability (permeability). In this study, sensitive, dielectric spectroscopy over a broad temperature range (4-400 K) has been employed to study relaxations within planar alkylsiloxane SAMs[1] . Highly disordered SAMs of varying density were grown by vapor deposition. Two dielectric relaxations were observed. The first, a polyethylene-like relaxation similar to that previously reported in phase-segregated alkyl side-chain polymers, is observed for all films with alkyl chains containing four or more carbons. This is an interacting or glassy relaxation. The second motion, which is observable only at high film densities, is a local mode, which follows an Arrhenius dependence on temperature, and has been previously assigned to a sub-chain rotation. [1] M.C. Scott, D.R. Stevens, J.R. Bochinski, L.I. Clarke, ACS Nano. DOI: 10.1021/nn800543j.

  20. Implications of recent multimodel attribution studies for climate sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) is inferred from estimates of instrumental-period warming attributable solely to greenhouse gases (AW), as derived in two recent multi-model detection and attribution (D&A) studies that apply optimal fingerprint methods with high spatial resolution to 3D global climate model simulations. This approach minimises the key uncertainty regarding aerosol forcing without relying on low-dimensional models. The "observed" AW distributions from the D&A studies together with an observationally-based estimate of effective planetary heat capacity (EHC) are applied as observational constraints in (AW, EHC) space. By varying two key parameters—ECS and effective ocean diffusivity—in an energy balance model forced solely by greenhouse gases, an invertible map from the bivariate model parameter space to (AW, EHC) space is generated. Inversion of the constrained (AW, EHC) space through a transformation of variables allows unique recovery of the observationally-constrained joint distribution for the two model parameters, from which the marginal distribution of ECS can readily be derived. The method is extended to provide estimated distributions for transient climate response (TCR). The AW distributions from the two D&A studies produce almost identical results. Combining the two sets of results provides best estimates (5-95 % ranges) of 1.66 (0.7-3.2) K for ECS and 1.37 (0.65-2.2) K for TCR, in line with those from several recent studies based on observed warming from all causes but with tighter uncertainty ranges than for some of those studies. Almost identical results are obtained from application of an alternative profile likelihood statistical methodology.

  1. Study of Nonclassical Fields in Phase-Sensitive Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung Shik; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    1996-01-01

    We show that the reservoir influence can be modeled by an infinite array of beam splitters. The superposition of the input fields in the beam splitter is discussed with the convolution laws for their quasiprobabilities. We derive the Fokker-Planck equation for the cavity field coupled with a phase-sensitive reservoir using the convolution law. We also analyze the amplification in the phase-sensitive reservoir with use of the modified beam splitter model. We show the similarities and differences between the dissipation and amplification models. We show that a super-Poissonian input field cannot become sub-Poissonian by the phase-sensitive amplification.

  2. Sensitivity studies for the main r process: nuclear masses

    SciTech Connect

    Aprahamian, A.; Mumpower, M.; Bentley, I.; Surman, R.

    2014-04-15

    The site of the rapid neutron capture process (r process) is one of the open challenges in all of physics today. The r process is thought to be responsible for the creation of more than half of all elements beyond iron. The scientific challenges to understanding the origin of the heavy elements beyond iron lie in both the uncertainties associated with astrophysical conditions that are needed to allow an r process to occur and a vast lack of knowledge about the properties of nuclei far from stability. One way is to disentangle the nuclear and astrophysical components of the question. On the nuclear physics side, there is great global competition to access and measure the most exotic nuclei that existing facilities can reach, while simultaneously building new, more powerful accelerators to make even more exotic nuclei. On the astrophysics side, various astrophysical scenarios for the production of the heaviest elements have been proposed but open questions remain. This paper reports on a sensitivity study of the r process to determine the most crucial nuclear masses to measure using an r-process simulation code, several mass models (FRDM, Duflo-Zuker, and HFB-21), and three potential astrophysical scenarios.

  3. Sensitivity study of SMILES-2 for chemical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Manago, Naohiro; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Ochiai, Satoshi; Baron, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Sensitivity studies of temperature and chemical species (Observed by ISS/JEM/SMILES: O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, BrO, HNO3, CH3CN, and Not observed by SMILES: Temperature, H2O, N2O, NO2, NO, CH3Cl, CO, H2CO, OH and O-atom) was carried out for the SMILES-2 proposal, a sub-mm and THz observation of limb emission from space over the spectral region from 400 GHz to 2.5 THz. Tentative but optimal candidate of frequency bands to cover these species was selected with 3 SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) mixers; SIS-1 (485-489 GHz + 523-527 GHz), SIS-2 (623-627 GHz + 648-652 GHz), SIS-3 (557 GHz + 576.3 GHz) and 2 HEB (Hot Electron Bolometer); HEB-1 (1.8 THz OH) and HEB-2 (2.06 THz O-atom). Temperature can be retrieved with 1 K precision and 1 km vertical resolution from 15 to 120 km. Other chemical species also showed very high single scan precision (random error) comparable to statistical standard error of previous satellite measurements.

  4. STUDIES ON THE SENSITIZATION OF ANIMALS WITH SIMPLE CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Henry C.; Chase, Merrill W.

    1972-01-01

    A method of establishing regular and intense sensitivity to picric acid is described, based upon an initial sensitization by a "split-adjuvant" technique in which the intradermal injection of mycobacteria in paraffin oil precedes or follows the administration of allergen to the same sites. When subsequent contact applications of picric acid are later made, the degree of sensitivity rises in steps such that reactivity occurs in tests made with low concentrations of picric acid, in the range of 0.06–0.006% but varying somewhat from one experiment to another. This heightening of picric acid reactivity represents an anamnestic response in the area of delayed hypersensitivity. The characteristics of contact reactions to the weak allergen, picric acid, differ from those encountered with covalently binding haptens, PCI and DNCB. A slow evolution from an initial micropapular reaction to full reaction requires about 3 days, leading often to a micaceous scale, with histological evidence of vesiculation even while the reaction is still feeble, and to an infiltrate containing a significant number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Substitution of an emulsion of picric acid in complete Freund's adjuvant as a priming experience proved to be much less efficient. The split-adjuvant technique offers a general plan for sensitizing with weak allergens. Indeed, technically, sensitization can be acquired even when, for priming, the allergen is applied topically over intradermal depots of mycobacteria in paraffin oil. Compatibility between sensitizer and adjuvant is not required. PMID:5060294

  5. Enhanced reward sensitivity and decreased loss sensitivity in Internet addicts: an fMRI study during a guessing task.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guangheng; Huang, Jie; Du, Xiaoxia

    2011-11-01

    As the world's fastest growing "addiction", Internet addiction should be studied to unravel the potential heterogeneity. The present study is set to examine reward and punishment processing in Internet addicts as compared to healthy controls while they subjectively experience monetary gain and loss during the performance of a guessing task. The results showed that Internet addicts associated with increased activation in orbitofrontal cortex in gain trials and decreased anterior cingulate activation in loss trials than normal controls. The results suggested that Internet addicts have enhanced reward sensitivity and decreased loss sensitivity than normal comparisons. PMID:21764067

  6. Fundamental studies of nanoarchitectured dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenzhen

    2011-12-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are a promising candidate for next-generation photovoltaic panels due to their low cost, easy fabrication processes and relatively high efficiency. Despite the considerable effort on the advancement of DSSCs, the efficiency of DSSCs has been stalled for nearly two decades due to the complex interplay among various DSSC parameters. Particularly, in a conventional DSSC, a thicker semiconductor photovoltaic (PV) layer, i.e., a dye-sensitized TiO2 nanoparticle layer, is required to accommodate more light-induced charge separation centers to enhance light harvesting efficiency. However, a thicker PV layer concurrently increases the charge transport distance in the PV layer; so the system suffers from more charge recombination, leading to significant deterioration in charge collection efficiency. The conflicting demands on the thickness of PV layer by these two critical elementary photoelectrochemical processes becomes a fundamental limitation for further advancement in DSSCs and limits the choice of redox mediators and electrode materials in DSSCs. Hence, the focus of this dissertation research work is to systematically explore a transformative way to fundamentally resolve the conflicting interplay between light harvesting and charge transport. First, our strategy is to allocate part of the roughness factor to the collecting anode instead of imparting all the roughness factors onto the semiconductor PV layer attached to the anode. As a proof of concept, we first synthesized and characterized a microscopically rough Zn collecting anode, on which ZnO nanotips are grown. For the same surface roughness factor, the length of the ZnO nanotips supported on such a rough Zn anode can be much shorter than that of the ZnO nanowires supported on a planar anode. Our Zn-microtip|ZnO-nanotip DSSCs exhibit enhanced fill factor, Voc and Jsc. The investigation of kinetics indicates that the electron collection time is much faster than the electron

  7. Paleozoic ice sheet inception; a study of paleogeographic sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, D. E.; Poulsen, C. J.; Torsvik, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Large-scale continental glaciation is thought to have been episodic throughout the Paleozoic era. Evidence of short-lived glaciation in the Ordovician, a period of questionable glaciation in the Devonian, and extensive glaciation in the Permo-Carboniferous are variously supported by the geologic record. The climatic conditions that allowed Earth to descend into icehouse conditions during these periods are not well understood. Traditionally, Paleozoic glaciation was thought to be driven by the drift of continents over the austral pole, yet a myriad of other factors play a role in global mean temperatures and the ability of an icehouse climate to initiate. In this sensitivity study we utilize a coupled GCM-ice sheet-biome model in conjunction with updated paleogeographic reconstructions to examine ice sheet initiation at 30 million year time slices throughout the Paleozoic. Each time slice is subjected to an ice-favorable orbital alignment and a range of atmospheric pCO2 concentrations in an effort to determine the influence of continent distribution and greenhouse gas concentration on ice sheet initiation. Our modeling results demonstrate that both continental configuration and atmospheric pCO2 concentration play a significant role in ice sheet initiation, ice sheet areal extent, and ice sheet volume. Our results indicate that the geographic configurations most conducive to continental glaciation occurred from the mid-Devonian to the early Carboniferous, a result that is inconsistent with the geologic record and suggests that continental drift wasn't the sole driving force behind the occurrence of Paleozoic ice ages.

  8. Sensitivity study on hydraulic well testing inversion using simulated annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Shinsuke; Najita, J.; Karasaki, Kenzi

    1997-11-01

    For environmental remediation, management of nuclear waste disposal, or geothermal reservoir engineering, it is very important to evaluate the permeabilities, spacing, and sizes of the subsurface fractures which control ground water flow. Cluster variable aperture (CVA) simulated annealing has been used as an inversion technique to construct fluid flow models of fractured formations based on transient pressure data from hydraulic tests. A two-dimensional fracture network system is represented as a filled regular lattice of fracture elements. The algorithm iteratively changes an aperture of cluster of fracture elements, which are chosen randomly from a list of discrete apertures, to improve the match to observed pressure transients. The size of the clusters is held constant throughout the iterations. Sensitivity studies using simple fracture models with eight wells show that, in general, it is necessary to conduct interference tests using at least three different wells as pumping well in order to reconstruct the fracture network with a transmissivity contrast of one order of magnitude, particularly when the cluster size is not known a priori. Because hydraulic inversion is inherently non-unique, it is important to utilize additional information. The authors investigated the relationship between the scale of heterogeneity and the optimum cluster size (and its shape) to enhance the reliability and convergence of the inversion. It appears that the cluster size corresponding to about 20--40 % of the practical range of the spatial correlation is optimal. Inversion results of the Raymond test site data are also presented and the practical range of spatial correlation is evaluated to be about 5--10 m from the optimal cluster size in the inversion.

  9. The simulated Indian monsoon: A GCM sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennessy, M. J.; Kinter, J. L., III; Kirtman, B.; Marx, L.; Nigam, S.; Schneider, E.; Shukla, J.; Straus, D.; Vernekar, A.; Xue, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A series of sensitivity experiments are conducted in an attempt to understand and correct deficiencies in the simulation of the seasonal mean Indian monsoon with a global atmospheric general circulation model. The seasonal mean precipitation is less than half that observed. This poor simulation in seasonal integrations is independent of the choice of initial conditions and global sea surface temperature data used. Experiments are performed to test the sensitivity of the Indian monsoon simulation to changes in orography, vegetation, soil, wetness, and cloudiness. The authors find that the deficiency of the model precipitation simulation may be attributed to the use of an enhanced orography in the integrations. Replacement of this orography with a mean orography results in a much more realistic simulation of Indian monsoon circulation and rainfall. Experiments with a linear primitive equation model on the sphere suggest that this striking improvement is due to modulations of the orographically forced waves in the lower troposphere. This improvement in the monsoon simulation is due to the kinematic and dynamical effects of changing the topography, rather than the thermal effects, which were minimal. The magnitude of the impact on the Indian monsoon of the other sensitivity experiments varied considerably, but was consistently less than the impact of using the mean orography. However, results from the soil moisture sensitivity experiments suggest a possibly important role for soil moisture in simulating tropical precipitation, including that associated with the Indian monsoon.

  10. Further study on highly sensitive AMS measurement of 53Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kejun, Dong; Hao, Hu; Xianggao, Wang; Chaoli, Li; Ming, He; Zhenyu, Li; Shaoyong, Wu; Jiancheng, Liu; Guowen, Zheng; Heng, Li; Zhigang, Chen; Guangshan, Liu; Jian, Yuan; Shan, Jiang

    2012-08-01

    The AMS facility at China Institute of Atomic Energy has been equipped with a ΔE-Q3D detection system for the measurements of 53Mn. While the sample material of MnO2 and the extraction ions of MnO- were used previously in AMS measurement of 53Mn with fairly good results, a method has recently been developed with the extraction of MnF- from ion source using MnF2 and MnO2 + PbF2 as sample materials. As a result, a sensitivity of 10-14 (53Mn/Mn) has been achieved. Compared with the original MnO-/MnO2 approach, the method of MnF- extraction, combined with ΔE-Q3D detection technique, demonstrated an improved sensitivity for AMS measurement of 53Mn.

  11. Oxidation phenomena: MAAP4 sensitivity studies using CORA-13 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Luche, J.; Jacqmin, L.G.

    1996-12-31

    In France, both Electricite de France and Framatome are using the modular accident analysis program (MAAP) version 4 code for severe accident scenario analyses. Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, in collaboration with them, is investigating the code prediction capabilities on hydrogen production. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the fuel-clad oxidation model on the CORA-13 test results and to find the most sensitive parameters to this reaction, especially during reflooding.

  12. HCIT Contrast Performance Sensitivity Studies: Simulation Versus Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shaklan, Stuart; Krist, John; Cady, Eric J.; Kern, Brian; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2013-01-01

    Using NASA's High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, we have experimentally investigated the sensitivity of dark hole contrast in a Lyot coronagraph for the following factors: 1) Lateral and longitudinal translation of an occulting mask; 2) An opaque spot on the occulting mask; 3) Sizes of the controlled dark hole area. Also, we compared the measured results with simulations obtained using both MACOS (Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems) and PROPER optical analysis programs with full three-dimensional near-field diffraction analysis to model HCIT's optical train and coronagraph.

  13. Gas Sensitivity Study of Polypyrrole Decorated Graphene Oxide Thick Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Pritam; Gaikwad, Ganesh; Patil, Devidas Ramrao; Naik, Jitendra

    2016-04-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) and graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites were prepared by in situ polymerization method. The synthesized nanocomposites were characterized for current-voltage characteristic, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy, which gave the evidence of the strong interaction between PPy nanofibers and GO nanosheets. The PPy/GO nanocomposites were used for the sensing of H2S, LPG, CO2 and NH3 gases respectively at room temperature. It was observed that PPy/GO nanocomposites with different GO weight ratios (5, 10 and 20 %) had better selectivity and sensitivity towards NH3 at room temperature.

  14. Cascade sensitivity studies for KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, Luigi Antonio

    2016-07-01

    KM3NeT is a future research infrastructure in the deep seas of the Mediterranean housing a large scale neutrino telescope. The first phase of construction of the telescope has started. Next step is an intermediate phase realising a detector volume of about one-third of the final detector volume. We report on calculations of the sensitivity of the KM3NeT detector to showering neutrino events, the strategy to optimise the detector to a cosmic neutrino flux analogous to the one reported by the IceCube Collaboration and the results of this strategy applied to the intermediate phase detector.

  15. An Initial Study of the Sensitivity of Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) Spacing Sensitivity to Weather and Configuration Input Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, Stephen E.; Hinton, David A.

    2000-01-01

    A study has been performed on a computer code modeling an aircraft wake vortex spacing system during final approach. This code represents an initial engineering model of a system to calculate reduced approach separation criteria needed to increase airport productivity. This report evaluates model sensitivity toward various weather conditions (crosswind, crosswind variance, turbulent kinetic energy, and thermal gradient), code configurations (approach corridor option, and wake demise definition), and post-processing techniques (rounding of provided spacing values, and controller time variance).

  16. Sensitizing the sensitizer: the synthesis and photophysical study of bodipy-Pt(II)(diimine)(dithiolate) conjugates.

    PubMed

    Lazarides, Theodore; McCormick, Theresa M; Wilson, Kristina C; Lee, Soohyun; McCamant, David W; Eisenberg, Richard

    2011-01-19

    The dyads 3, 4, and 6, combining the Bodipy chromophore with a Pt(bpy)(bdt) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, bdt = 1,2-benzenedithiolate, 3 and 6) or a Pt(bpy)(mnt) (mnt = maleonitriledithiolate, 4) moiety, have been synthesized and studied by UV-vis steady-state absorption, transient absorption, and emission spectroscopies and cyclic voltammetry. Comparison of the absorption spectra and cyclic voltammograms of dyads 3, 4, and 6 and those of their model compounds 1a, 2, 5, and 7 shows that the spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of the dyads are essentially the sum of their constituent chromophores, indicating negligible interaction of the constituent chromophores in the ground state. However, emission studies on 3 and 6 show a complete absence of both Bodipy-based fluorescence and the characteristic luminescence of the Pt(bpy)(bdt) unit. Dyad 4 shows a weak Pt(mnt)-based emission. Transient absorption studies show that excitation of the dyads into the Bodipy-based (1)ππ* excited state is followed by singlet energy transfer (SEnT) to the Pt(dithiolate)-based (1)MMLL'CT (mixed metal-ligand to ligand charge transfer) excited state (τ(SEnT)(3) = 0.6 ps, τ(SEnT)(4) = 0.5 ps, and τ(SEnT)(6) = 1.6 ps), which undergoes rapid intersystem crossing to the (3)MMLL'CT state due to the heavy Pt(II) ion. The (3)MMLL'CT state is then depopulated by triplet energy transfer (TEnT) to the low-lying Bodipy-based (3)ππ* excited state (τ(SEnT)(3) = 8.2 ps, τ(SEnT)(4) = 5 ps, and τ(SEnT)(6) = 160 ps). The transition assignments are supported by TD-DFT calculations. Both energy-transfer processes are shown to proceed via a Dexter electron exchange mechanism. The much longer time constants for dyad 6 relative to 3 are attributed to the significantly poorer coupling and resonance of charge-separated species that are intermediates in the electron exchange process. PMID:21175161

  17. The highly sensitive brain: an fMRI study of sensory processing sensitivity and response to others' emotions

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Bianca P; Aron, Elaine N; Aron, Arthur; Sangster, Matthew-Donald; Collins, Nancy; Brown, Lucy L

    2014-01-01

    Background Theory and research suggest that sensory processing sensitivity (SPS), found in roughly 20% of humans and over 100 other species, is a trait associated with greater sensitivity and responsiveness to the environment and to social stimuli. Self-report studies have shown that high-SPS individuals are strongly affected by others' moods, but no previous study has examined neural systems engaged in response to others' emotions. Methods This study examined the neural correlates of SPS (measured by the standard short-form Highly Sensitive Person [HSP] scale) among 18 participants (10 females) while viewing photos of their romantic partners and of strangers displaying positive, negative, or neutral facial expressions. One year apart, 13 of the 18 participants were scanned twice. Results Across all conditions, HSP scores were associated with increased brain activation of regions involved in attention and action planning (in the cingulate and premotor area [PMA]). For happy and sad photo conditions, SPS was associated with activation of brain regions involved in awareness, integration of sensory information, empathy, and action planning (e.g., cingulate, insula, inferior frontal gyrus [IFG], middle temporal gyrus [MTG], and PMA). Conclusions As predicted, for partner images and for happy facial photos, HSP scores were associated with stronger activation of brain regions involved in awareness, empathy, and self-other processing. These results provide evidence that awareness and responsiveness are fundamental features of SPS, and show how the brain may mediate these traits. PMID:25161824

  18. Design tradeoff studies and sensitivity analysis, appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Further work was performed on the Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Fuel economy on the order of 2 to 3 times that of a conventional vehicle, with a comparable life cycle cost, is possible. The two most significant factors in keeping the life cycle cost down are the retail price increment and the ratio of battery replacement cost to battery life. Both factors can be reduced by reducing the power rating of the electric drive portion of the system relative to the system power requirements. The type of battery most suitable for the hybrid, from the point of view of minimizing life cycle cost, is nickel-iron. The hybrid is much less sensitive than a conventional vehicle is, in terms of the reduction in total fuel consumption and resultant decreases in operating expense, to reductions in vehicle weight, tire rolling resistance, etc., and to propulsion system and drivetrain improvements designed to improve the brake specific fuel consumption of the engine under low road load conditions. It is concluded that modifications to package the propulsion system and battery pack can be easily accommodated within the confines of a modified carryover body such as the Ford Ltd.

  19. Sensitivity Studies of Air Ingress Acidents in Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Sydney J; Richards, Matt; Shepelev, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Postulated air ingress accidents, while of very low probability in a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), are of considerable interest to the plant designer, operator, and regulator because of the possibility that the core could sustain significant damage under some circumstances. Sensitivity analyses are described that cover a wide spectrum of conditions affecting outcomes of the postulated accident sequences, for both prismatic and pebble-bed core designs. The major factors affecting potential core damage are the size and location of primary system leaks, flow path resistances, the core temperature distribution, and the long-term availability of oxygen in the incoming gas from a confinement building. Typically, all the incoming oxygen entering the core area is consumed within the reactor vessel, so it is more a matter of where, not whether, oxidation occurs. An air ingress model with example scenarios and means for mitigating damage are described. Representative designs of modular HTGRs included here are a 400-MW(th) pebble-bed reactor (PBR), and a 600-MW(th) prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR) design such as the gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR).

  20. Assisted Sonication vs Conventional Transesterification Numerical Simulation and Sensitivity Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janajreh, Isam; Noorul Hussain, Mohammed; El Samad, Tala

    2015-10-01

    Transeterification is known as slow reaction that can take over several hours to complete as the two immiscible liquid reactants combine to form biodiesel and the less favorable glycerol. The quest of finding the perfect catalyst, optimal operational conditions, and reactor configuration to accelerate the reaction in mere few minutes that ensures high quality biodiesel, in economically viable way is coming along with sonication. This drastic reduction is a key enabler for the development of a continuous processing that otherwise is fairly costly and low throughput using conventional method. The reaction kinetics of sonication assisted as inferred by several authors is several time faster and this work implements these rates in a high fidelity numerical simulation model. This flow model is based on Navier-Stokes equations coupled with energy equation for non-isothermal flow and the transport equations of the multiple reactive species. The model is initially validated against experimental data from previous work of the authors using an annular reactor configuration. Following the validation, comparison of the reaction rate is shown to gain more insight to the distribution of the reaction and its attained rates. The two models (conventional and sonication) then compared on the basis of their sensitivity to the methane to oil molar ratio as the most pronounced process parameter. Both the exit reactor yield and the distribution of the species are evaluated with favorable yield under sonication process. These results pave the way to build a more robust process intensified reactor having an integrated selective heterogeneous catalyst to steer the reaction. This can avoid the downstream cleaning processes, cutting reaction time, and render economic benefit to the process.

  1. Regional Sensitivity to Neuroinflammation: In Vivo and In Vitro Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Liraz-Zaltsman, S.; Biegon, A.; Liraz-Zaltsman, S.; Alexandrovich, A.G.; Trembovler, V.; Fishbein, I.; Yaka, R.; Shohami, E.; Biegon, A.

    2010-11-23

    Neuroinflammation is involved in several acute-onset neuropathologies such as meningitis, encephalitis, stroke, and traumatic brain injury as well as in neurodegenerative diseases. All of these patholologies are associated with cognitive deficits. Using a model of pure neuroinflammation (intracisternal injection of endotoxin in mice), we tested the hypothesis that brain regions involved in cognition are the most vulnerable to inflammatory insults, and this vulnerability is an inherent property of neocortical neurons. Mice (n = 10/group) injected with endotoxin (LPS) or saline in the cisterna magna underwent neurobehavioral and cognitive testing followed by quantitative autoradiographic assessment of regional neuroinflammation with [3H]PK11195, an established marker of microgliosis. In parallel, cocultures of cortical and striatal neurons taken from embryonic day 19 rat embryos or postnatal day 1 mice expressing green fluorescent protein were exposed for 24 h to the proinflammatory cytokine TNFalpha, glutamate, or a combination of the two agents. LPS-treated mice exhibited significant deficits in memory and significant increases in specific PK11195 binding in cortical and hippocampal regions, but not in striatum. Cultured neurons of cortical origin showed significantly lower survival rate relative to striatal neurons in response to TNFalpha, glutamate, or a combination of the two agents. Furthermore, TNFalpha exerted neuroprotective rather than neurotoxic effects in the striatal but not in the cortical neurons. These results suggest that the cortex is inherently more sensitive than the striatum to the deleterious effects of neuroinflammation, and may offer an explanation for the preponderance of cognitive deficits in neuropathologies with a neuroinflammatory component.

  2. Does a Culturally Sensitive Smoking Prevention Program Reduce Smoking Intentions among Aboriginal Children? A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKennitt, Daniel W.; Currie, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if a culturally sensitive smoking prevention program would have short-term impacts on smoking intentions among Aboriginal children. Two schools with high Aboriginal enrollment were selected for the study. A grade 4 classroom in one school was randomly assigned to receive the culturally sensitive smoking…

  3. A Study of Young Children's Aesthetic Sensitivity to Drawing and Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golomb, Claire; Helmund, Judith

    This study examines the emergence of aesthetic sensitivity in the young child as a maker of art and as a critic of the work of peers. Two studies were designed to explore the child's own, mostly implicit, assumptions about child art, sensitivity to stylistic and drawing system differences, and to compositional patterns that characterize the work…

  4. The sensitivity of the KeratinoSens™ assay to evaluate plant extracts: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Andres, Eric; Sá-Rocha, Vanessa M; Barrichello, Carla; Haupt, Tina; Ellis, Graham; Natsch, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    Several tests to assess skin sensitization hazard are in peer-review for pre-validation. These tests, as well as the animal tests they aim to replace, were developed (and validated) for the testing of pure substances. However, in the cosmetic field, active ingredients are often mixtures from natural sources. It is therefore important to understand which tests could be used to evaluate their safety. Here we describe a proof-of-concept study to test whether the KeratinoSens(™) assay is able to detect sensitizing constituents within botanical mixtures. Four extracts were spiked with different doses of the sensitizers citral, cinnamic aldehyde and isoeugenol. The tested extracts were negative in the test whereas they became positive in most cases when spiked with the sensitizers. Analysis of the results from the samples spiked with different doses allowed the determination of the minimal level of sensitizers being detectable. The contribution to sensitization potential of doses of 2% and above of the spiked sensitizers were reliably detected. There were limitations for an extract with high cytotoxicity, in which case detection of the artificially spiked sensitizers proved difficult. This study gives a proof of principle for testing of mixtures in the KeratinoSens(™) assay and indicates how sensitive the assay is to detect minor components with sensitizing potential. PMID:23428960

  5. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS AND THE DESIGN OF GAS UPTAKE INHALATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas uptake studies analyzed by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been used to estimate metabolic parameters for many volatiles. he metabolic constants Vmax, Km, and Kf are typically inferred from the decline in chemical concentration observed in closed cham...

  6. Preliminary studies of combustor sensitivity to alternative fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humenik, F. M.

    1980-01-01

    Combustion problems associated with using alternative fuels ground power and aeropropulsion applications were studied. Rectangular sections designed to simulate large annular combustor test conditions were examined. The effects of using alternative fuels with reduced hydrogen content, increased aromatic content, and a broad variation in fuel property characteristics were also studied. Data of special interest were collected which include: flame radiation characteristics in the various combustor zones; the correponding increase in liner temperature from increased radiant heat flux; the effect of fuel bound nitrogen on oxides of nitrogen (NO sub x) emissions; and the overall total effect of fuel variations on exhaust emissions.

  7. Host Language Proficiency, Intercultural Sensitivity, and Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The number of foreign language students who join study abroad programs continues to increase annually, especially those who take part in short-term sojourns lasting eight weeks or less. What can be accomplished in such a short stay in the host culture? Is it possible for sojourners to enhance their proficiency in the host language and…

  8. Evaluation of the Use of Team Teaching for Delivering Sensitive Content: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerridge, Joanna; Kyle, Gaye; Marks-Maran, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Many programmes in further and higher education contain sensitive areas of content, such as diversity, racism, power and privilege, breaking bad news, counselling, sex education and ethical decision making. Team teaching may be a useful method for delivering sensitive areas of course content. This article presents a pilot study that was undertaken…

  9. Teaching Strategies and Practices that Promote a Culturally Sensitive Nursing Education: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Robin J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teaching strategies that promote a culturally sensitive nursing education and culturally sensitive nursing. The diversity of Americans has increased. Thus, the nursing student population and patient population have both become more diverse. Nursing education programs, therefore, need to know the best…

  10. Observed Sensitivity during Family Interactions and Cumulative Risk: A Study of Multiple Dyads per Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Dillon T.; Leckie, George; Prime, Heather; Perlman, Michal; Jenkins, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study sought to investigate the family, individual, and dyad-specific contributions to observed cognitive sensitivity during family interactions. Moreover, the influence of cumulative risk on sensitivity at the aforementioned levels of the family was examined. Mothers and 2 children per family were observed interacting in a round robin…

  11. A Taxometric Study of the Latent Structure of Disgust Sensitivity: Converging Evidence for Dimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Broman-Fulks, Joshua J.

    2007-01-01

    Disgust sensitivity has recently been implicated as a specific vulnerability factor for several anxiety-related disorders. However, it is not clear whether disgust sensitivity is a dimensional or categorical phenomenon. The present study examined the latent structure of disgust by applying three taxometric procedures (maximum eigenvalue, mean…

  12. An avionics sensitivity study. Volume 1: Operational considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. W.; Mcconkey, E. D.

    1976-01-01

    Equipment and operational concepts affecting aircraft in the terminal area are reported. Curved approach applications and modified climb and descent procedures for minimum fuel consumption are considered. The curved approach study involves the application of MLS guidance to enable execution of the current visual approach to Washington National Airport under instrument flight conditions. The operational significance and the flight path control requirements involved in the application of curved approach paths to this situation are considered. Alternative flight path control regimes are considered to achieve minimum fuel consumption subject to constraints related to air traffic control requirements, flight crew and passenger reactions, and airframe and powerplant limitations.

  13. A pseudo-state sensitivity study on hydrogenic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, C. P.; Badnell, N. R.; Smyth, E. S.

    2003-09-01

    An electron-impact excitation study of light hydrogenic ions has been carried out to quantify the effects of coupling to high bound/continuum states utilizing the R-matrix with pseudo-states method. As the ionization stage increases, the neglect of loss of flux into high-lying excitation/ionization channels impacts less upon excitation between the bound terms explicitly included within our close coupling expansion. C5+ is used as our benchmark study. The differences in Maxwell averaged collision strengths between a standard R-matrix calculation and those of a similar pseudo-state model across a range of temperatures shall be our criteria for judging differences. We carried out calculations for He+, Li2+, Be3+, B4+, C5+, O7+ and Ne9+ so as to provide excitation data amongst terms up to n = 5. Pseudo-state calculations were carried out for the first five ions, following a similar model to earlier neutral hydrogen work, whilst non-pseudo-state calculations sufficed for the remaining two ions. The results of these seven calculations will enhance existing excitation data sets for use in the modelling of controlled nuclear fusion plasma experiments.

  14. Requirement sensitivity studies for a future Landsat sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhaoyu; Montanaro, Matthew; Gerace, Aaron; Schott, John R.; Markham, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The Landsat program has collected imagery of the Earth for the past 40 years. Although both Landsat 7 and 8 are currently operating on-orbit, the next generation Landsat mission is already being planned. Concept studies for this mission include reproducing the Landsat 8 design (mainly push-broom imaging architecture). The definition of science requirements is an important step towards the development of instrument specifications. At this early stage, a re-evaluation of the Landsat requirements is beneficial since they might be flexible enough to relax in some areas to possibly save on manufacturing costs or may need to be tightened in other areas to produce better science products. The investigations presented here focused on spatial aliasing and spectral banding effects. The specifications of these two key performance requirements were taken from the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) sensor as a starting point for the analyses. They were then adjusted to determine their effects on the final image products through the use of standard radiometry equations and synthetic Earth scene data. The results of the modeling efforts for these two requirements concepts are presented here and could be used as a template for future instrument studies.

  15. Sensitivity Studies of the Radar-Rainfall Error Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarini, G.; Krajewski, W. F.; Ciach, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    It is well acknowledged that there are large uncertainties associated with the operational quantitative precipitation estimates produced by the U.S. national network of WSR-88D radars. These errors are due to the measurement principles, parameter estimation, and not fully understood physical processes. Comprehensive quantitative evaluation of these uncertainties is still at an early stage. The authors proposed an empirically-based model in which the relation between true rainfall (RA) and radar-rainfall (RR) could be described as the product of a deterministic distortion function and a random component. However, how different values of the parameters in the radar-rainfall algorithms used to create these products impact the model results still remains an open question. In this study, the authors investigate the effects of different exponents in the Z-R relation (Marshall- Palmer, NEXRAD, and tropical) and of an anomalous propagation (AP) removal algorithm. Additionally, they generalize the model to describe the radar-rainfall uncertainties in the additive form. This approach is fully empirically based and rain gauge estimates are considered as an approximation of the true rainfall. The proposed results are based on a large sample (six years) of data from the Oklahoma City radar (KTLX) and processed through the Hydro-NEXRAD software system. The radar data are complemented with the corresponding rain gauge observations from the Oklahoma Mesonet, and the Agricultural Research Service Micronet.

  16. Water isotopes and the Eocene. A tectonic sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrande, A. N.; Roberts, C. D.; Tripati, A.; Schmidt, G. A.

    2009-04-01

    The early Eocene (54 Million years ago) is one of the warmest periods in the last 65 Million years. Its climate is postulated to have been the result of enhanced greenhouse gas concentration, with CO2 roughly 4 times pre-industrial and methane 7 times pre-industrial concentrations. One interesting feature of this period to emerge recently is the intermittent presence of fossilized Azolla, a type of freshwater fern, in the Arctic Ocean. Synchronous (within dating error) with this appearance were major changes in the restriction of the Arctic Ocean and the other global oceans. We investigate this time period using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE-R, a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model that incorporates water isotopes throughout the hydrologic cycle, making it an ideal model to test hypotheses of past climate change and to compare to paleoclimate proxy data. We assess the impact of tectonic variability by using minimal and maximal levels of restriction for the Arctic Ocean seaways. We find that the modulation of connectivity of these basins dramatically alters global salinity distribution, leading to large changes in ocean circulation. Greater restriction of the Arctic Basin is associated with fresh and relatively warmer conditions. The same mechanisms responsible for this redistribution of salt also change the global distribution of water isotopes, and can alias (water isotope) proxy climate signals of warmth.

  17. A sensitivity study of storm cyclones with a mesoscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, K. S.; Tetzlaff, G.

    2003-04-01

    Extra tropical storms caused noticeable damages in the last decades. The evolution of strong cyclones is investigated by simulations with the nonhydrostatic limited area model 'Lokal Modell' (LM) of the German Weather Service (DWD). Which Conditions become important to distinguish an common cyclone from an storm-cyclone? Intense cyclones are mostly characterised by two typical large-scale features: high baroclinicity along the track of the low pressure system and a region of high equivalent potential temperature. For this purpose the observed values of the horizontal temperature gradient and the distribution of air moisture are varied and were used as forcing data, in such a way the development of storms was modified. The forcing data for the LM were generated by the global model of the DWD. Therefore data of real cyclones, such as the low Ginger, which occurred in 2000, were used. As the LM simulates only a limited area, the lateral bounds become problematic because of the manipulated forcing data. A procedure is tested, in order to prevent these problems. In this manner ensembles of storm scenarios were produced. The effects of various conditions were studied. Here in particular the changes in the surface velocity field were of interest. In the case of Ginger, an increase of the temperature gradient about 10 K causes an increasing of the maximum velocity about 3 m/s.

  18. Microbeam studies of the sensitivity of structures within living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braby, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    Determining the biological effects of low doses of radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET) is complicated by the stochastic nature of charged-particle interactions. Populations of cells exposed to very low radiation doses contain a few cells which have been hit by a charged particle, while the majority of the cells receive no radiation damage. At somewhat higher doses, a few cells receive two or more events. Because the effects of damage produced by separate events can interact in the cell, we have had to make assumptions about the nature of these interactions in order to interpret the results of the experiments. Many of those assumptions can be tested if we can be sure of the number of charged-particle events which occur in individual cells, and correlate this number with the biological effect. We have developed a special irradiation facility at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to control the actual number of charged particle tracks that pass through cell nuclei. The beam from a 2 MeV tandem accelerator is collimated to approximately 5 microns. Cells, grown in special dishes with 1.5 microns thick plastic bottoms, are positioned so that the desired portion of the cell aligns with the collimator. A shutter in the beam line is opened and closed after the desired number of particle tracks has been counted. This approach can be used to investigate the effects of the interaction between irradiated and unirradiated cells in an organized system, as well as to study the effects of spatial and temporal distribution of radiation damage within single cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  19. Lidar studies on climate sensitivity characteristics of tropical cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motty, G. S.; Jayeshlal, G. S.; Satyanarayana, Malladi; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.

    2016-05-01

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the Earth's radiation budget due to their high frequency of occurrence, non-spherical ice crystal formations, and variability in the scattering/absorption characteristics. Mostly, the tropical cirrus clouds are considered as greenhouse modulators. Thus the parameterization of tropical cirrus clouds in terms of the micro- physical properties and the corresponding radiative effects are highly important for the climate studies. For characterizing the radiative properties of cirrus clouds, which depend on the size, shape and number of the ice crystals, the knowledge of extinction coefficient (σ) and optical depth (τ) are necessary. The σ provides information needed for understanding the influence of the scatterers on the radiative budget whereas the τ gives an indication on the composition and thickness of the cloud. Extensive research on the tropical cirrus clouds has been carried out by using a ground based and satellite based lidar systems. In this work, the characteristics of tropical cirrus cloud derived by using the data from the ground based lidar system over the tropical site Gadanki [13.5°N, 79.2°E], India during 2010 are presented. Some of the results are compared with those obtained by us from satellite based CALIOP lidar observations of the CALIPSO mission. It is observed that there is a strong dependence of the some of the physical properties such as occurrence height, cloud temperature and the geometrical thickness on the microphysical parameters in terms of extinction coefficient and optical depth. The correlation of both the σ and τ with temperature is also observed.

  20. A taxometric study of the latent structure of disgust sensitivity: converging evidence for dimensionality.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Broman-Fulks, Joshua J

    2007-12-01

    Disgust sensitivity has recently been implicated as a specific vulnerability factor for several anxiety-related disorders. However, it is not clear whether disgust sensitivity is a dimensional or categorical phenomenon. The present study examined the latent structure of disgust by applying three taxometric procedures (maximum eigenvalue, mean above minus below a cut, and latent-mode factor analysis) to data collected from 2 large nonclinical samples on 2 different measures of disgust sensitivity. Disgust sensitivity in the first sample (n=1,153) was operationalized by disgust reactions to food, animals, body products, sex, body envelope violations, death, hygiene, and sympathetic magic, as assessed by the Disgust Sensitivity Scale (J. Haidt, C. McCauley, & P. Rozin, 1994). Disgust Sensitivity Scale indicators of core, animal reminder, and contamination disgust were also examined in the 1st sample. Disgust sensitivity in the 2nd independent sample (n=1,318) was operationalized by disgust reactions to animals, injections and blood draws, mutilation and death, rotting foods, and odors, as assessed by the Disgust Emotion Scale (R. A. Kleinknecht, E. E. Kleinknecht, & R. M. Thorndike, 1997). Results across both samples provide converging evidence that disgust sensitivity is best conceptualized as a dimensional construct, present to a greater or lesser extent in all individuals. These findings are discussed in relation to the conceptualization and assessment of disgust sensitivity as a specific dimensional vulnerability for certain anxiety and related disorders. PMID:18085936

  1. Spectral sensitivity studies on the visual system of the praying mantis, Tenodera sinensis.

    PubMed

    Sontag, C

    1971-01-01

    In these studies a constant ERG response was used as a measure of visual sensitivity to different wavelengths of light. The dark-adapted compound eye of Tenodera sinensis is dominated by a single class of photoreceptors. with a major peak of sensitivity at about 510-520 nm, and with a minor peak of sensitivity in the near-ultraviolet region at about 370 nm. The dark-adapted dorsal ocellus does not contain a homogeneous population of sensory receptors. The sensitivity function of the dark-adapted ocellus to longer wavelength light (yellow and red) is determined by a single receptor with a major peak of sensitivity in the green at 510-520 nm with some sensitivity in the near-ultraviolet. Sensitivity at shorter wavelengths (near-ultraviolet and blue), however, involves the stimulation of both this and a near-ultraviolet-sensitive receptor with a maximum sensitivity at about 370 nm. Anatomically, the sensory cells of the dorsal ocellus of Tenodera were determined histologically to be grouped into two distinct regions, each group making its own separate contribution to the ocellar nerve. This may represent the separation of two different photoreceptor types in the ocellus of the mantis. PMID:5539340

  2. CRETACEOUS CLIMATE SENSITIVITY STUDY USING DINOSAUR & PLANT PALEOBIOGEOGRAPHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, A.; Main, D. J.; Noto, C. R.; Moore, T. L.; Scotese, C.

    2009-12-01

    differed markedly from the present. Studies of past biotas and their changes may elucidate the role of climatic and geographic factors in driving changes in species distributions, ecosystem organization, and evolutionary dynamics over time.

  3. Dentine sensitivity risk factors: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Mafla, Ana Cristina; Lopez-Moncayo, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the clinical and psychological risk factors associated with dentine hypersensitivity (DH) in order to provide an early diagnosis and preventive therapy. Materials and Methods: A nested case–control study was design between 2011 and 2012. A total of 61 DH cases and 122 controls participated in this investigation. Cases and controls were matched for sex, group of age and socioeconomic status in a ratio of 1:2. DH to different stimuli such as cold, heat, acid, and sweet was asked in patient interviews, and dental examinations were used to detect DH. Clinical and psychological risk factors such as dental hygiene, periodontal disease, acid diet, alcohol consumption, psychological stress, and psychopathological symptoms were inquired. Psychological stress was measured through the PSS-10 and psychopathological symptoms were evaluated by SCL-90-R in Spanish. Descriptive and univariate binary logistic regression analysis were performed to estimate the association between clinical and psychological risk factors and the presence of DH. Results: Toothpaste abrasivity (odds ratio [OR] 1.881, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.010–3.502, P = 0.045), gingival recession (OR 2.196, 95% CI 1.020–4.728, P = 0.041), and periodontal therapy (OR 5.357, 95% CI 2.051–13.993, P < 0.001) were associated with DH. Subjects with perceived stress (OR 1.211, 95%, CI 0.518–2.833, P = 0.658), obsessive-compulsive (OR 1.266, 95%, CI 0.494–3.240, P = 0.623) and hostility (OR 1.235, 95%, CI 0.507–3.007, P = 0.642) symptoms had a clinical greater odd of DH. Conclusion: Oral hygiene products and periodontal conditions are important risk factors for DH. Individuals with perceived stress, obsessive-compulsive, and hostility symptoms may increase a clinical risk for this entity. Targeting to dental counseling focused on oral hygiene products, periodontal therapy and a psychological evaluation may be promising in DH prevention. PMID:27011732

  4. Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

    2008-12-31

    The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD

  5. Observed sensitivity during family interactions and cumulative risk: A study of multiple dyads per family.

    PubMed

    Browne, Dillon T; Leckie, George; Prime, Heather; Perlman, Michal; Jenkins, Jennifer M

    2016-07-01

    The present study sought to investigate the family, individual, and dyad-specific contributions to observed cognitive sensitivity during family interactions. Moreover, the influence of cumulative risk on sensitivity at the aforementioned levels of the family was examined. Mothers and 2 children per family were observed interacting in a round robin design (i.e., mother-older sibling, mother younger-sibling and sibling-dyad, N = 385 families). Data were dyadic, in that there were 2 directional scores per interaction, and were analyzed using a multilevel formulation of the Social Relations Model. Variance partitioning revealed that cognitive sensitivity is simultaneously a function of families, individuals and dyads, though the importance of these components varies across family roles. Cognitive sensitivity for mothers was primarily attributable to individual differences, whereas cognitive sensitivity for children was predominantly attributable to family and dyadic differences, especially for youngest children. Cumulative risk explained family and individual variance in cognitive sensitivity, particularly when actors were older or in a position of relative competence or authority (i.e., mother to children, older to younger siblings). Overall, this study demonstrates that cognitive sensitivity operates across levels of family organization, and is negatively impacted by psychosocial risk. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27337515

  6. Sensitivity study of ice crystal optical properties in the 874 GHz submillimeter band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guanglin; Yang, Ping; Wu, Dong L.

    2016-07-01

    Testing of an 874 GHz submillimeter radiometer on meteorological satellites is being planned to improve ice water content retrievals. In this paper we study the optical properties of ice cloud particles in the 874 GHz band. The results show that the bulk scattering and absorption coefficients of an ensemble of ice cloud particles are sensitive to the particle shape and effective diameter, whereas the latter is also sensitive to temperature. The co-polar back scattering cross-section is not sensitive to particle shape, temperature, and the effective diameter in the range of 50-200 μm.

  7. Neural correlates of anxiety sensitivity in panic disorder: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Sara; Radaelli, Daniele; Cucchi, Michele; Ricci, Liana; Vai, Benedetta; Smeraldi, Enrico; Benedetti, Francesco

    2015-08-30

    Panic disorder has been associated with dysfunctional neuropsychological dimensions, including anxiety sensitivity. Brain-imaging studies of the neural correlates of emotional processing have identified a network of structures that constitute the neural circuitry for emotions. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and insula, which are part of this network, are also involved in the processing of threat-related stimuli. The aim of the study was to investigate if neural activity in response to emotional stimuli in the cortico-limbic network is associated to anxiety sensitivity in panic disorder. In a sample of 18 outpatients with panic disorder, we studied neural correlates of implicit emotional processing of facial affect expressions with a face-matching paradigm; correlational analyses were performed between brain activations and anxiety sensitivity. The correlational analyses performed showed a positive correlation between anxiety sensitivity and brain activity during emotional processing in regions encompassing the PFC, ACC and insula. Our data seem to confirm that anxiety sensitivity is an important component of panic disorder. Accordingly, the neural underpinnings of anxiety sensitivity could be an interesting focus for treatment and further research. PMID:26071623

  8. A retrospective study of peanut and tree nut allergy: Sensitization and correlations with clinical manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lihua; Clements, Stacy

    2015-01-01

    Peanut (PN) and tree nut (TN) allergies are among the leading causes of fatal food-induced anaphylaxis and are increasing in prevalence, especially in children. Their cosensitization and concurrent clinical allergy have been understudied. This retrospective study investigated the correlation between PN and TN allergy, both in terms of in vitro sensitization (IVS) and clinical allergic manifestations. We conducted a retrospective medical record review at the Allergy Clinic at University Hospital of Brooklyn. Fourteen hundred six charts were reviewed, of which 76 (5.4%) had documented relevant clinical allergy: PN allergy but not TN allergy (n = 29) or TN allergy but not PN allergy (n = 11) or both (n = 30). Six patients with PN allergy but no TN exposure history were not included in the analysis. The majority of patients (67/76, 88.1%) had a concurrent history of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, or AD. Sensitivity of TN IVS predicting PN IVS was 38/39 (97%). Similarly, sensitivity of PN IVS predicting TN IVS was 38/42 (91%). Sensitivity of TN clinical allergy predicting PN allergy was 30/59 (51%). Sensitivity of PN clinical allergy predicting TN allergy was 30/41 (73%). The total number of organ systems involved in reported clinical reactions correlated with IVS to TN (p = 0.004) but not IVS to PN (p = 0.983). In summary, we found PN sensitization predicts TN sensitization in vitro, with lower predictability for clinical reactions. PMID:25860169

  9. Nursing students’ understanding of factors influencing ethical sensitivity: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Mohsenpour, Mohaddeseh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ethical sensitivity is considered as a component of professional competency of nurses. Its effects on improvement of nurses’ ethical performance and the therapeutic relationship between nurses and patients have been reported. However, very limited studies have evaluated ethical sensitivity. Since no previous Iranian research has been conducted in this regard, the present study aimed to review nursing students’ understanding of effective factors on ethical sensitivity. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was performed in Kerman, Iran, during 2009. It used semi-structured individual interviews with eight MSc nursing students to assess their viewpoints. It also included two focus groups. Purposive sampling was continued until data saturation. Data were analyzed using manifest content analysis. Results: The students’ understanding of factors influencing ethical sensitivity were summarized in five main themes including individual and spiritual characteristics, education, mutual understanding, internal and external controls, and experience of an immoral act. Conclusions: The findings of this study create a unique framework for sensitization of nurses in professional performance. The application of these factors in human resource management is reinforcement of positive aspects and decrease in negative aspects, in education can use for educational objectives setting, and in research can designing studies based on this framework and making related tools. It is noteworthy that presented classification was influenced by students themselves and mentioned to a kind of learning activity by them. PMID:24403928

  10. Study of the Sensitization on the Grain Boundary in Austenitic Stainless Steel Aisi 316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocsisová, Edina; Dománková, Mária; Slatkovský, Ivan; Sahul, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Intergranular corrosion (IGC) is one of the major problems in austenitic stainless steels. This type of corrosion is caused by precipitation of secondary phases on grain boundaries (GB). Precipitation of the secondary phases can lead to formation of chromium depleted zones in the vicinity of grain boundaries. Mount of the sensitization of material is characterized by the degree of sensitization (DOS). Austenitic stainless steel AISI 316 as experimental material had been chosen. The samples for the study of sensitization were solution annealed on 1100 °C for 60 min followed by water quenching and then sensitization by isothermal annealing on 700 °C and 650 °C with holding time from 15 to 600 min. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used for identification of secondary phases. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) was applied for characterization of grain boundary structure as one of the factors which influences on DOS.

  11. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, L.; Mekonnen, M. M.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a quickly growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of water footprint estimates to changes in important input variables and quantifies the size of uncertainty in water footprint estimates. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall) and blue (from irrigation) water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat in the Yellow River Basin in the period 1996-2005. A grid-based daily water balance model at a 5 by 5 arcmin resolution was applied to compute green and blue water footprints of the four crops in the Yellow River Basin in the period considered. The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis focused on the effects on water footprint estimates at basin level (in m3 t-1) of four key input variables: precipitation (PR), reference evapotranspiration (ET0), crop coefficient (Kc), and crop calendar. The one-at-a-time method was carried out to analyse the sensitivity of the water footprint of crops to fractional changes of individual input variables. Uncertainties in crop water footprint estimates were quantified through Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the water footprint of crops is most sensitive to ET0 and Kc, followed by crop calendar and PR. Blue water footprints were more sensitive to input variability than green water footprints. The smaller the annual blue water footprint, the higher its sensitivity to changes in PR, ET0, and Kc. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop due to combined uncertainties in climatic inputs (PR and ET0) were about ±20% (at 95% confidence interval). The effect of uncertainties in ET0 was dominant compared to that of precipitation. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop as a result of combined key input uncertainties were on average ±26% (at 95% confidence level). The sensitivities and uncertainties differ across crop types, with highest sensitivities

  12. Image quality and dose efficiency of high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging: Phantom studies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to perform an image quality comparison of high energy phase sensitive imaging with low energy conventional imaging at similar radiation doses. The comparison was performed with the following phantoms: American College of Radiology (ACR), contrast-detail (CD), acrylic edge and tissue-equivalent. Visual comparison of the phantom images indicated comparable or improved image quality for all phantoms. Quantitative comparisons were performed through ACR and CD observer studies, both of which indicated higher image quality in the high energy phase sensitive images. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of high energy phase sensitive imaging to overcome existing challenges with the clinical implementation of phase contrast imaging and improve the image quality for a similar radiation dose as compared to conventional imaging near typical mammography energies. In addition, the results illustrate the capability of phase sensitive imaging to sustain the image quality improvement at high x-ray energies and for – breast – simulating phantoms, both of which indicate the potential to benefit fields such as mammography. Future studies will continue to investigate the potential for dose reduction and image quality improvement provided by high energy phase sensitive contrast imaging. PMID:24865208

  13. Does Sensitivity to Orthographic Regularities Influence Reading and Spelling Acquisition? A 1-Year Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothe, Josefine; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; Ise, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies focused on the influence of orthographic processing on reading and spelling performance. It was found that orthographic processing is an independent predictor of reading and spelling performance in different languages and children of different ages. This study investigated sensitivity to orthographic regularities in German-speaking…

  14. Perinatal undernutrition facilitates morphine sensitization and cross-sensitization to cocaine in adult rats: a behavioral and neurochemical study.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, E E; Valdomero, A; Orsingher, O A; Cuadra, G R

    2010-01-20

    The development of sensitization to the locomotor effects of morphine and cross-sensitization between morphine and cocaine were evaluated in adult rats submitted to a protein malnutrition schedule from the 14th day of gestation up to 30 days of age (D-rats), and compared with well-nourished animals (C-rats). Dose-response curves to morphine-induced locomotor activity (5, 7.5, 10 or 15 mg/kg, i.p., every other day for 5 days) revealed a shift to the left in D-rats compared to C-rats. This implies that D-rats showed behavioral sensitization to the lower dose of morphine used (5 mg/kg), which was ineffective in C-rats. Furthermore, when a cocaine challenge (10 mg/kg, i.p) was given 48 h after the last morphine administration, only D-rats exhibited cross-sensitization in morphine-pretreated animals (7.5 and 10 mg/kg). In order to correlate the differential response observed with the functioning of the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system, extracellular dopamine (DA) levels were measured in the nucleus accumbens (core and shell) and the dorsal caudate-putamen. A challenge with cocaine in morphine pre-exposed animals produced an increase in DA release, but only in the nucleus accumbens "core" of D-rats. Similar DA levels were found in the nucleus accumbens "shell" and in the dorsal caudate-putamen of both groups. Finally, these results demonstrate that D-rats had a lower threshold for developing both a progressive behavioral sensitization to morphine and a cross-sensitization to cocaine. In accordance with these behavioral findings, a higher responsiveness of the nucleus accumbens core, expressed by increased DA levels, both basal and after cocaine challenge, was observed in D-rats. PMID:19892003

  15. An internet-based study on the relation between disgust sensitivity and emetophobia.

    PubMed

    van Overveld, Mark; de Jong, Peter J; Peters, Madelon L; van Hout, Wiljo J P J; Bouman, Theo K

    2008-01-01

    In the etiology of disgust-relevant psychopathology, such as emetophobia (fear of vomiting), two factors may be important: disgust propensity, i.e., how quickly the individual experiences disgust, and disgust sensitivity, i.e., how negatively does the individual evaluate this disgust experience [van Overveld, W. J. M., de Jong, P. J., Peters, M. L., Cavanagh, K., & Davey, G. C. L. (2006). Disgust propensity and disgust sensitivity: separate constructs that are differentially related to specific fears. Personality and Individual Differences, 41, 1241-1252]. Hence, the current study examines whether emetophobic participants display elevated levels of disgust propensity and sensitivity, and whether these factors are differentially related to emetophobia. A group of emetophobic members of a Dutch website on emetophobia (n=172), and a control group (n=39) completed an internet survey containing the Emetophobia Questionnaire, Disgust Propensity and Sensitivity Scale-Revised, Disgust Scale, and Disgust Questionnaire. Results showed that the emetophobic group displayed significantly elevated levels of both disgust propensity and disgust sensitivity compared to the control group. Most importantly, disgust sensitivity consistently was the best predictor of emetophobic complaints. PMID:17517487

  16. Study sensitivity: Evaluating the ability to detect effects in systematic reviews of chemical exposures.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Glinda S; Lunn, Ruth M; Ågerstrand, Marlene; Glenn, Barbara S; Kraft, Andrew D; Luke, April M; Ratcliffe, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    A critical step in systematic reviews of potential health hazards is the structured evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of the included studies; risk of bias is a term often used to represent this process, specifically with respect to the evaluation of systematic errors that can lead to inaccurate (biased) results (i.e. focusing on internal validity). Systematic review methods developed in the clinical medicine arena have been adapted for use in evaluating environmental health hazards; this expansion raises questions about the scope of risk of bias tools and the extent to which they capture the elements that can affect the interpretation of results from environmental and occupational epidemiology studies and in vivo animal toxicology studies, (the studies typically available for assessment of risk of chemicals). One such element, described here as "sensitivity", is a measure of the ability of a study to detect a true effect or hazard. This concept is similar to the concept of the sensitivity of an assay; an insensitive study may fail to show a difference that truly exists, leading to a false conclusion of no effect. Factors relating to study sensitivity should be evaluated in a systematic manner with the same rigor as the evaluation of other elements within a risk of bias framework. We discuss the importance of this component for the interpretation of individual studies, examine approaches proposed or in use to address it, and describe how it relates to other evaluation components. The evaluation domains contained within a risk of bias tool can include, or can be modified to include, some features relating to study sensitivity; the explicit inclusion of these sensitivity criteria with the same rigor and at the same stage of study evaluation as other bias-related criteria can improve the evaluation process. In some cases, these and other features may be better addressed through a separate sensitivity domain. The combined evaluation of risk of bias and

  17. Risk of sensitization and allergy in Ragweed workers – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to its high allergenic potential Ambrosia artemisiifolia has become a health threat in many European countries during the last few decades. Hence, several cities and communities initiated ragweed eradication campaigns. In Berlin, Germany, so-called Ambrosia scouts are being assigned the task of finding and eliminating this weed. We sought to evaluate the potential risk of sensitization and allergy in these individuals. Findings In order to assess the risk of sensitization and allergy, we followed-up 20 Ambrosia scouts by skin-prick test with inhalant allergens, immunoserological and pulmonary function tests. Additionally, medical conditions were evaluated by a questionnaire especially designed for this study. Despite close contact to ragweed over a median duration of 13.8 months, none of the participants became sensitized or allergic to ragweed. One individual developed a clinical non-relevant sensitization towards the taxiconomically-related plant mugwort. A decline in relative FEV1 was most probably due to heavy smoking. Conclusions Our surprising findings suggest that intensive contact and exposure to high ragweed pollen concentrations do not necessarily result in sensitization and/or allergy, meaning that the allergenic potential of this weed might be lower than hitherto expected. However, it is also conceivable that continuous exposure to high allergen levels induced tolerance in the ragweed workers. Due to the relatively small number of subjects studied, our results might be biased and therefore investigations on larger study groups are needed. PMID:25147570

  18. Theoretica Study of Asymmetric Double D-π-A Organic Sensitizers for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Dong Yuel; Lee, Gun Hyung; Kim, Young Sik

    2015-03-01

    Three novel dye sensitizers that were based on asymmetric double D-π-A chains with phenoxazine (POZ) and diphenylamine (DPA) as electron donors and cyanoacetic acid (CA) and 2-(1,1- dicyanomethylene) rhodanine (RD) as electron acceptors (DCPR, DRPC, DRPR) were designed, theoretically investigated, and compared with the reference dye based on asymmetric double D-π-A chains (DCPC). Using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations, we gained insight into the factors responsible for the photovoltaic properties of the dye sensitizers. Due to the different HOMO levels of each donor and the different LUMO levels of each acceptor, the absorption spectrum of each dye showed different shapes. Among the dyes, DRPR showed a broader and more bathochromically shifted absorption band than the other dies. It also showed a higher molar extinction coefficient than that of the reference dye (DCPC). This work suggests optimizing the chain of electron donors and acceptors in dye sensitizers based on asymmetric double D-π-A chains would produce good photovoltaic properties for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). PMID:26413690

  19. Importance analysis for Hudson River PCB transport and fate model parameters using robust sensitivity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Toll, J.; Cothern, K.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have performed robust sensitivity studies of the physico-chemical Hudson River PCB model PCHEPM to identify the parameters and process uncertainties contributing the most to uncertainty in predictions of water column and sediment PCB concentrations, over the time period 1977--1991 in one segment of the lower Hudson River. The term ``robust sensitivity studies`` refers to the use of several sensitivity analysis techniques to obtain a more accurate depiction of the relative importance of different sources of uncertainty. Local sensitivity analysis provided data on the sensitivity of PCB concentration estimates to small perturbations in nominal parameter values. Range sensitivity analysis provided information about the magnitude of prediction uncertainty associated with each input uncertainty. Rank correlation analysis indicated which parameters had the most dominant influence on model predictions. Factorial analysis identified important interactions among model parameters. Finally, term analysis looked at the aggregate influence of combinations of parameters representing physico-chemical processes. The authors scored the results of the local and range sensitivity and rank correlation analyses. The authors considered parameters that scored high on two of the three analyses to be important contributors to PCB concentration prediction uncertainty, and treated them probabilistically in simulations. They also treated probabilistically parameters identified in the factorial analysis as interacting with important parameters. The authors used the term analysis to better understand how uncertain parameters were influencing the PCB concentration predictions. The importance analysis allowed us to reduce the number of parameters to be modeled probabilistically from 16 to 5. This reduced the computational complexity of Monte Carlo simulations, and more importantly, provided a more lucid depiction of prediction uncertainty and its causes.

  20. Adjoint sensitivity studies of loop current and eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2013-07-01

    Adjoint model sensitivity analyses were applied for the loop current (LC) and its eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The circulation in the GoM is mainly driven by the energetic LC and subsequent LC eddy separation. In order to understand which ocean regions and features control the evolution of the LC, including anticyclonic warm-core eddy shedding in the GoM, forward and adjoint sensitivities with respect to previous model state and atmospheric forcing were computed using the MITgcm and its adjoint. Since the validity of the adjoint model sensitivities depends on the capability of the forward model to simulate the real LC system and the eddy shedding processes, a 5 year (2004-2008) forward model simulation was performed for the GoM using realistic atmospheric forcing, initial, and boundary conditions. This forward model simulation was compared to satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and sea-surface temperature (SST), and observed transport variability. Despite realistic mean state, standard deviations, and LC eddy shedding period, the simulated LC extension shows less variability and more regularity than the observations. However, the model is suitable for studying the LC system and can be utilized for examining the ocean influences leading to a simple, and hopefully generic LC eddy separation in the GoM. The adjoint sensitivities of the LC show influences from the Yucatan Channel (YC) flow and Loop Current Frontal Eddy (LCFE) on both LC extension and eddy separation, as suggested by earlier work. Some of the processes that control LC extension after eddy separation differ from those controlling eddy shedding, but include YC through-flow. The sensitivity remains stable for more than 30 days and moves generally upstream, entering the Caribbean Sea. The sensitivities of the LC for SST generally remain closer to the surface and move at speeds consistent with advection by the high-speed core of

  1. Study of the Intergranular Corrosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Stainless Steel in Transpassive Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed Behbahani, Khashayar; Najafisayar, Pooria; Pakshir, Mahmoud

    2016-06-01

    In this study, intergranular corrosion behavior of UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel was investigated using conventional potentiodynamic polarization, double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DLEPR), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique carried out at different potentials in the transpassive region. Different types of heat treatments were used to obtain samples with different degrees of sensitization. The results of the DLEPR tests showed that the solution-annealed sample and that was sensitized for half an hour would be considered as nonsensitized ones. Moreover, the sample that was sensitized for 24 h exhibits the highest value of the degree of sensitization. Polarization test results showed a typical active-passive behavior from which the transpassive potential range was determined and used as the range of the applied DC bias in the EIS experiments. Three different AC responses (including capacitive and inductive responses) were observed depending on the value of applied DC bias in the EIS experiments. In addition, it was observed that the presence of the second inductive loop at high applied DC bias is due to the adsorption of nonsoluble corrosion products on the surface of the samples. Moreover, the fitted values to the charge transfer and polarization resistances (R ct and R P) decreased as the sensitization time increased from 30 min to 24 h. Such observations were in good accordance with the metallographic examination of the corroded surfaces, carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques, revealing discontinuous grain boundary attack in nonsensitized samples and a continuous network of grain boundary attack in the case of sensitized ones. Moreover, as the applied DC bias increases the ferrite phase attack also occurs in the sensitized samples. In addition, approximately no pitting corrosion was observed on the surface of the corroded samples which is in accordance with their respective cyclic

  2. Study of glass transition temperature (Tg) of novel stress-sensitive composites using molecular dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, B.; Liu, Y.; Zou, J.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Dai, L. L.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the glass transition temperature (Tg) of novel stress-sensitive composites capable of detecting a damage precursor using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The molecular structures of a cross-linked epoxy network (which consist of epoxy resin, hardener and stress-sensitive material) have been simulated and experimentally validated. The chemical constituents of the molecular structures are di-glycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF: epoxy resin), di-ethylene tri-amine (DETA: hardener) and tris-(cinnamoyloxymethyl)-ethane (TCE: stress-sensitive material). The cross-linking degree is varied by manipulating the number of covalent bonds through tuning a cutoff distance between activated DGEBF and DETA during the non-equilibrium MD simulation. A relationship between the cross-linking degree and Tgs has been studied numerically. In order to validate a proposed MD simulation framework, MD-predicted Tgs of materials used in this study have been compared to the experimental results obtained by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Two molecular models have been constructed for comparative study: (i) neat epoxy (epoxy resin with hardener) and (ii) smart polymer (neat epoxy with stress-sensitive material). The predicted Tgs show close agreement with the DSC results.

  3. Aggressive Behavior between Siblings and the Development of Externalizing Problems: Evidence from a Genetically Sensitive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Ge, Xiaojia; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the prospective links between sibling aggression and the development of externalizing problems using a multilevel modeling approach with a genetically sensitive design. The sample consisted of 780 adolescents (390 sibling pairs) who participated in 2 waves of the Nonshared Environment in Adolescent Development project.…

  4. The Effect of Nature Documentaries on Students' Environmental Sensitivity: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbas, Tasos A.; Paraskevopoulos, Stefanos; Stamou, Anastasia G.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the potential educational value of nature documentaries, the contribution of such films to environmental education is largely unknown. In the present study, we attempt to delineate the role of nature documentaries to the environmental sensitivity of students when the films are simply introduced to the class. More specifically, the present…

  5. Maternal Sensitivity and Child Secure Base Use in Early Childhood: Studies in Different Cultural Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posada, German; Trumbell, Jill; Noblega, Magaly; Plata, Sandra; Peña, Paola; Carbonell, Olga A.; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether maternal sensitivity and child security are related during early childhood and whether such an association is found in different cultural and social contexts. Mother-child dyads (N = 237) from four different countries (Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and the United States) were observed in naturalistic settings when children were…

  6. Predicting Changes in Cultural Sensitivity among Students of Spanish during Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsen, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Short-term study abroad programs of less than a semester are becoming increasingly popular among undergraduate students in the United States. However, little research has examined the changes in students' cultural sensitivity through their participation in such programs or what factors may predict growth and improvement in such areas. This study…

  7. Maternal sensitivity, infant limbic structure volume and functional connectivity: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Rifkin-Graboi, A; Kong, L; Sim, L W; Sanmugam, S; Broekman, B F P; Chen, H; Wong, E; Kwek, K; Saw, S-M; Chong, Y-S; Gluckman, P D; Fortier, M V; Pederson, D; Meaney, M J; Qiu, A

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the profound parental effects on cognitive, emotional and social development in humans remain poorly understood. Studies with nonhuman models suggest variations in parental care affect the limbic system, influential to learning, autobiography and emotional regulation. In some research, nonoptimal care relates to decreases in neurogenesis, although other work suggests early-postnatal social adversity accelerates the maturation of limbic structures associated with emotional learning. We explored whether maternal sensitivity predicts human limbic system development and functional connectivity patterns in a small sample of human infants. When infants were 6 months of age, 20 mother-infant dyads attended a laboratory-based observational session and the infants underwent neuroimaging at the same age. After considering age at imaging, household income and postnatal maternal anxiety, regression analyses demonstrated significant indirect associations between maternal sensitivity and bilateral hippocampal volume at six months, with the majority of associations between sensitivity and the amygdala demonstrating similar indirect, but not significant results. Moreover, functional analyses revealed direct associations between maternal sensitivity and connectivity between the hippocampus and areas important for emotional regulation and socio-emotional functioning. Sensitivity additionally predicted indirect associations between limbic structures and regions related to autobiographical memory. Our volumetric results are consistent with research indicating accelerated limbic development in response to early social adversity, and in combination with our functional results, if replicated in a larger sample, may suggest that subtle, but important, variations in maternal care influence neuroanatomical trajectories important to future cognitive and emotional functioning. PMID:26506054

  8. Maternal sensitivity, infant limbic structure volume and functional connectivity: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Rifkin-Graboi, A; Kong, L; Sim, L W; Sanmugam, S; Broekman, B F P; Chen, H; Wong, E; Kwek, K; Saw, S-M; Chong, Y-S; Gluckman, P D; Fortier, M V; Pederson, D; Meaney, M J; Qiu, A

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the profound parental effects on cognitive, emotional and social development in humans remain poorly understood. Studies with nonhuman models suggest variations in parental care affect the limbic system, influential to learning, autobiography and emotional regulation. In some research, nonoptimal care relates to decreases in neurogenesis, although other work suggests early-postnatal social adversity accelerates the maturation of limbic structures associated with emotional learning. We explored whether maternal sensitivity predicts human limbic system development and functional connectivity patterns in a small sample of human infants. When infants were 6 months of age, 20 mother–infant dyads attended a laboratory-based observational session and the infants underwent neuroimaging at the same age. After considering age at imaging, household income and postnatal maternal anxiety, regression analyses demonstrated significant indirect associations between maternal sensitivity and bilateral hippocampal volume at six months, with the majority of associations between sensitivity and the amygdala demonstrating similar indirect, but not significant results. Moreover, functional analyses revealed direct associations between maternal sensitivity and connectivity between the hippocampus and areas important for emotional regulation and socio-emotional functioning. Sensitivity additionally predicted indirect associations between limbic structures and regions related to autobiographical memory. Our volumetric results are consistent with research indicating accelerated limbic development in response to early social adversity, and in combination with our functional results, if replicated in a larger sample, may suggest that subtle, but important, variations in maternal care influence neuroanatomical trajectories important to future cognitive and emotional functioning. PMID:26506054

  9. Study of node and mass sensitivity of resonant mode based cantilevers with concentrated mass loading

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kewei Chai, Yuesheng; Fu, Jiahui

    2015-12-15

    Resonant-mode based cantilevers are an important type of acoustic wave based mass-sensing devices. In this work, the governing vibration equation of a bi-layer resonant-mode based cantilever attached with concentrated mass is established by using a modal analysis method. The effects of resonance modes and mass loading conditions on nodes and mass sensitivity of the cantilever were theoretically studied. The results suggested that the node did not shift when concentrated mass was loaded on a specific position. Mass sensitivity of the cantilever was linearly proportional to the square of the point displacement at the mass loading position for all the resonance modes. For the first resonance mode, when mass loading position x{sub c} satisfied 0 < x{sub c} < ∼ 0.3l (l is the cantilever beam length and 0 represents the rigid end), mass sensitivity decreased as the mass increasing while the opposite trend was obtained when mass loading satisfied ∼0.3l ≤ x{sub c} ≤ l. Mass sensitivity did not change when concentrated mass was loaded at the rigid end. This work can provide scientific guidance to optimize the mass sensitivity of a resonant-mode based cantilever.

  10. First Study on Phosphonite-Coordinated Ruthenium Sensitizers for Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Swetha, T; Mondal, Indranil; Bhanuprakash, K; Pal, Ujjwal; Singh, Surya Prakash

    2015-09-01

    For the first time we report the design and syntheses of phosphonite coordinated ruthenium(II) sensitizers bearing ĈN̂N ligand and/or terpyridine derivatives carboxylate anchor (GS11, GS12. and GS13) and its application for hydrogen production over Pt-TiO2 system. These heteroleptic complexes exhibit broad metal-to-ligand charge transfer transition band over the whole visible regime extending up to 900 nm. DFT calculations of these complexes show that the HOMO is distributed over the Ru and Cl atom whereas; LUMO is localized on the polypyridile ligand, which are anchored on TiO2 surface. Among the sensitizers tested for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution, GS12 exhibited a maximum turnover number (TON) 8605 (for 8 h), which is very high compared to the reference sensitizer (N719) with TON 163 under similar evaluation condition. The dependence of the hydrogen evolution rate at different pH using GS11, GS12, GS13, and DX-1-sensitized Pt-TiO2 has been studied and the maximum H2 production yield was obtained at pH 7 for all sensitizers. PMID:26280353

  11. Incidence and determinants of IgE-mediated sensitization in apprentices. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gautrin, D; Ghezzo, H; Infante-Rivard, C; Malo, J L

    2000-10-01

    We investigated prospectively the incidence and determinants of work-related specific skin sensitization in a cohort of 769 apprentices, including 417 in animal health technology, 230 in pastry-making, and 122 in dental-hygiene technology. Subjects were recruited when starting exposure to laboratory animals, flour, or latex. A questionnaire and skin-prick tests with common and work-related allergens were administered on entry and at follow-up visits from 8 to 44 mo; information on number of hours of exposure to specific allergens was obtained. Among 769 apprentices, 698 attended >/= 1 follow-up visit. A total of 111 subjects developed specific sensitization over the study period. The incidence of work-related sensitization (per person-year) was 8.9% (95% CI 7.3 to 11.0%) in the animal-health program, 4.2% (95% CI 1.8 to 8.2%) in the pastry-making program, and 2.5% (95% CI = 0.7 to 4.3%) in the dental-hygiene program. In the animal health group, Cox regression analyses showed that atopy, nasal, and respiratory symptoms in the pollen season, and exposure assessed by the school attended or by duration of exposure to rodents were the most significant predictors of sensitization. In the dental-hygiene program, atopy and asthma were significant determinants. This study shows that: (1) an apprenticeship in animal-health technology carries a greater risk of developing specific sensitization than do apprenticeships in pastry-making and dental-hygiene; (2) atopy, respiratory symptoms in the pollen season, and number of hours in contact with rodents determine the risk of sensitization in apprentices in the animal health program. PMID:11029321

  12. Mesoscale ensemble sensitivity analysis for predictability studies and observing network design in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Joshua

    2013-04-01

    Ensemble sensitivity analysis (ESA) is emerging as a viable alternative to adjoint sensitivity. Several open issues face ESA for forecasts dominated by mesoscale phenomena, including (1) sampling error arising from finite-sized ensembles causing over-estimated sensitivities, and (2) violation of linearity assumptions for strongly nonlinear flows. In an effort to use ESA for predictability studies and observing network design in complex terrain, we present results from experiments designed to address these open issues. Sampling error in ESA arises in two places. First, when hypothetical observations are introduced to test the sensitivity estimates for linearity. Here the same localization that was used in the filter itself can be simply applied. Second and more critical, localization should be considered within the sensitivity calculations. Sensitivity to hypothetical observations, estimated without re-running the ensemble, includes regression of a sample of a final-time (forecast) metric onto a sample of initial states. Derivation to include localization results in two localization coefficients (or factors) applied in separate regression steps. Because the forecast metric is usually a sum, and can also include a sum over a spatial region and multiple physical variables, a spatial localization function is difficult to specify. We present results from experiments to empirically estimate localization factors for ESA to test hypothetical observations for mesoscale data assimilation in complex terrain. Localization factors are first derived for an ensemble filter following the empirical localization methodology. Sensitivities for a fog event over Salt Lake City, and a Colorado downslope wind event, are tested for linearity by approximating assimilation of perfect observations at points of maximum sensitivity, both with and without localization. Observation sensitivity is then estimated, with and without localization, and tested for linearity. The validity of the

  13. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies 10 loci influencing allergic sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Raquel; Strachan, David P; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Linneberg, Allan; Curtin, John A; Warrington, Nicole M; Standl, Marie; Kerkhof, Marjan; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Bukvic, Blazenka K; Kaakinen, Marika; Sleimann, Patrick; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schramm, Katharina; Baltic, Svetlana; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Simpson, Angela; St Pourcain, Beate; Coin, Lachlan; Hui, Jennie; Walters, Eugene H; Tiesler, Carla M T; Duffy, David L; Jones, Graham; Ring, Susan M; McArdle, Wendy L; Price, Loren; Robertson, Colin F; Pekkanen, Juha; Tang, Clara S; Thiering, Elisabeth; Montgomery, Grant W; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Husemoen, Lise L; Herder, Christian; Kemp, John P; Elliot, Paul; James, Alan; Waldenberger, Melanie; Abramson, Michael J; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Knight, Julian C; Gupta, Ramneek; Thompson, Philip J; Holt, Patrick; Sly, Peter; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Blekic, Mario; Weidinger, Stephan; Hakonarsson, Hakon; Stefansson, Kari; Heinrich, Joachim; Postma, Dirkje S; Custovic, Adnan; Pennell, Craig E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Koppelman, Gerard H; Timpson, Nicholas; Ferreira, Manuel A; Bisgaard, Hans; Henderson, A John

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific IgE (allergic sensitization) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. We performed the first large-scale genome wide association study (GWAS) of allergic sensitization in 5,789 affected individuals and 10,056 controls and followed up the top SNP from 26 loci in 6,114 affected individuals and 9,920 controls. We increased the number of susceptibility loci with genome-wide significant association to allergic sensitization from three to 10, including SNPs in or near TLR6, C11orf30, STAT6, SLC25A46, HLA-DQB1, IL1RL1, LPP, MYC, IL2 and HLA-B. All the top-SNPs were associated with allergic symptoms in an independent study. Risk variants at these 10 loci were estimated to account for at least 25% of allergic sensitization and allergic rhinitis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations may provide novel insight into the etiology of allergic disease. PMID:23817571

  14. Cosmetic Contact Sensitivity in Patients with Melasma: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Prabha, Neel; Mahajan, Vikram K.; Mehta, Karaninder S.; Chauhan, Pushpinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Some of the patients with melasma perhaps have pigmented cosmetic dermatitis. However, cosmetic contact sensitivity in melasma remains poorly studied particularly in the Indian context. Objectives. To study cosmetic contact sensitivity in patients with melasma. Materials and Methods. 67 (F : M = 55 : 12) consecutive patients with melasma between 19 and 49 years of age were patch tested sequentially during January–December, 2012, with Indian Cosmetic and Fragrance Series, Indian Sunscreen Series, p-phenylenediamine, and patient's own cosmetic products. Results. 52 (78%) patients were in the age group of 20–40 years. The duration of melasma varied from 1 month to 20 years. Centrofacial, malar, and mandibular patterns were observed in 48 (72%), 18 (27%), and 1 (1%) patients, respectively. Indian Cosmetics and Fragrance Series elicited positive reactions in 29 (43.3%) patients. Cetrimide was the most common contact sensitizers eliciting positivity in 15 (52%) patients, followed by gallate mix in 9 (31%) patients and thiomersal in 7 (24%) patients. Only 2 of the 42 patients showed positive reaction from their own cosmetics while the other 5 patients had irritant reaction. Indian Sunscreen Series did not elicit any positive reaction. Conclusion. Cosmetics contact sensitivity appears as an important cause of melasma not associated with pregnancy, lactation, or hormone therapy. PMID:25132846

  15. Does a culturally sensitive smoking prevention program reduce smoking intentions among Aboriginal children? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    McKennitt, Daniel W; Currie, Cheryl L

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if a culturally sensitive smoking prevention program would have short-term impacts on smoking intentions among Aboriginal children. Two schools with high Aboriginal enrollment were selected for the study. A grade 4 classroom in one school was randomly assigned to receive the culturally sensitive smoking prevention program. A grade 4 classroom in the second school received a standard smoking prevention program delivered in this jurisdiction. Children in each classroom were tested pre- and post-intervention to measure attitude changes about smoking. There was a significant reduction in intentions to smoke among Aboriginal children who received the culturally sensitive smoking prevention program. The small overall sample size precluded a direct comparison of the efficacy of the culturally sensitive and standard programs. The present findings suggest a smoking prevention program that has been culturally adapted for Aboriginal children may reduce future smoking intentions among Aboriginal grade 4 students. Further research is needed to determine the extent to which school smoking prevention programs adapted to respect the long-standing use of tobacco in Aboriginal cultural traditions may be more effective than standard programs in reaching Aboriginal youth. PMID:22875472

  16. The sensitizing capacity of naturally occurring quinones. Experimental studies in guinea pigs. II. Benzoquinones.

    PubMed

    Schulz, K H; Garbe, I; Hausen, B M; Simatupang, M H

    1979-05-01

    Experimental studies on the sensitizing capacity of naturally occurring benzoquinones, isolated from plants and woods have been carried out in guinea pigs of the Pirbright white strain. Seven compounds were available: primin, three dalbergiones, mansonia quinone (mansonone A), 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone and rapanone. With five of these substances (primin, mansonone A, three dalbergiones) guinea pigs could be sensitized. Primin, the allergen of Primula obconica Hance (primrose) proved to be the most effective one of all quinones tested in this and the preceding studies. As a similar but weaker sensitizer R-3, 4-dimethoxydalbergione from Machaerium scleroxylon Tul. (Pao ferro, Caviuna vermelha) could be identified. The results obtained with mansonone A, a sesquiterpenoid quinone from Mansonia altissima A. Chev. demonstrate that even naturally occurring orthoquinones are capable of inducing contact allergy. Allergic cross reactions could be obtained between all chemically related mansonones A-F. The results are in good accordance with the view that the sensitizing capacity of naturally occurring quinones depends on the fundamental quinoid structure and the length, position and configuration of the aliphatic side-chain. PMID:464645

  17. Sensitization to silk allergen among workers of silk filatures in India: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Giriyanna; Vijayeendra, Anagha Manakari; Sarkar, Nivedita; Nagaraj, Chitra; Masthi, Nugehally Raju Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background Sericulture plays an eminent role in development of rural economy in India. Silk filature is a unit where silk is unwound from the cocoons and the strands are collected into skeins. During the process workers are exposed to the high molecular weight proteins like Sericin and Fibroin which are potent allergens leading to sensitization over a period of time and subsequently occupational related health disorders. Objective To identify and compare the magnitude of silk allergen sensitization in workers of silk filatures. Methods A community based comparative descriptive study was conducted for a period of 1 year at Ramanagara in south India. One hundred twenty subjects working in the silk filatures formed the study group. For comparison, 2 types of controls were selected viz.120 subjects who were not working in the silk filatures but resided in the same geographical area (control A) and 360 subjects who were not working in silk filatures as well not residing in the same geographical area (control B). Skin prick test was used to identify the silk allergen sensitization. Results Mean age was 34.14 ± 2.84 years in the study group. Mean age was 40.59 ± 14.40 years and 38.54 ± 12.20 years in control A and control B, respectively. There were 35 males (29.16%) and 85 females (70.84%) in the study group. There were 58 (48.34%) males and 62 (51.66%) females and 152 (42.2%) males and 208 females (57.8%) in control A and control B, respectively. Sensitization to silk allergen was 35.83% in the study group and 20.83% in the control group A and 11.11% in control group B. There was difference in the allergen sensitivity between the study group and control groups and it was statistically significant (chi-square = 38.08; p < 0.001). Conclusion There is high burden of silk allergen sensitization among silk filature workers. PMID:27141481

  18. A study of the enhanced sensitizing capacity of a contact allergen in lipid vesicle formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Simonsson, Carl; Madsen, Jakob Torp; Graneli, Annette; Andersen, Klaus E.; Karlberg, Ann-Therese; Jonsson, Charlotte A.; Ericson, Marica B.

    2011-05-01

    The growing focus on nanotechnology and the increased use of nano-sized structures, e.g. vesicles, in topical formulations has led to safety concerns. We have investigated the sensitizing capacity and penetration properties of a fluorescent model compound, rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC), when administered in micro- and nano-scale vesicle formulations. The sensitizing capacity of RBITC was studied using the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) and the skin penetration properties were compared using diffusion cells in combination with two-photon microscopy (TPM). The lymph node cell proliferation, an indicator of a compounds sensitizing capacity, increased when RBITC was applied in lipid vesicles as compared to an ethanol:water (Et:W) solution. Micro-scale vesicles showed a slightly higher cell proliferative response compared to nano-scale vesicles. TPM imaging revealed that the vesicle formulations improved the skin penetration of RBITC compared to the Et:W solution. A strong fluorescent region in the stratum corneum and upper epidermis implies elevated association of RBITC to these skin layers when formulated in lipid vesicles. In conclusion, the results indicate that there could be an elevated risk of sensitization when haptens are delivered in vehicles containing lipid vesicles. Although the size of the vesicles seems to be of minor importance, further studies are needed before a more generalized conclusion can be drawn. It is likely that the enhanced sensitizing capacity is a consequence of the improved penetration and increased formation of hapten-protein complexes in epidermis when RBITC is delivered in ethosomal formulations. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted

  19. Wheat sensitization and work-related symptoms in the baking industry are preventable. An epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Houba, R; Heederik, D; Doekes, G

    1998-11-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted among 393 workers from 21 bakeries to study the relationship between wheat allergen exposure and wheat sensitization and work-related allergic symptoms. Exposure to wheat allergens was characterized by a recently developed and validated immunoassay. Specific IgE antibodies against wheat flour and common allergens were measured by immunoassays, and work-related allergic symptoms were registered by questionnaire. A strong and positive association was found between wheat flour allergen exposure and wheat flour sensitization. This relationship was steepest and strongest in atopics. Prevalence ratios for high and medium wheat allergen exposure were 5.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-16.2), and 2.7 (0.5-14.5) for atopic workers, and 2.5 (0.8-7.5) and 1.4 (0. 3-6.4) for nonatopics, compared with workers with low wheat allergen exposure. In sensitized bakers those with an elevated allergen exposure had more often work-related symptoms, with prevalence ratios for high and medium wheat allergen exposure of 3.5 (CI 1.6-7. 5) and 2.6 (CI 0.9-7.8), respectively, compared with workers with low wheat allergen exposure. The existence of exposure-sensitization gradients suggests that work-related sensitization risk will be negligible when exposure levels will be reduced to average exposure concentration of 0.2 microgram/m3 wheat allergen or approximately 0.5 mg/m3 inhalable dust during a work shift. PMID:9817699

  20. Critical analysis of studies concerning reports of respiratory sensitization to certain wood dusts.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Brock

    2005-01-01

    Studies have been published reporting that exposures to certain wood dusts are sensitizing, resulting in respiratory symptoms in susceptible individuals. Many of the publications in this field are case reports that collectively have a number of important shortcomings. Illuminating these should further our understanding of whether respiratory sensitization results from occupational exposure to particular wood dusts. The aim of this study was to critically review and understand the evidence to date regarding reported respiratory sensitization in connection with wood dusts from oak, beech, pine, ash, and western red cedar. Publications dealing with these commercially important woods in North America have been selected from the Pubmed/Medline database (1966 to the present) using the key word, wood dust. These articles, along with supporting references on procedures and techniques, are reviewed according to the strengths and weaknesses of evidence and conclusions presented. Evidence from skin testing, specific immunoglobulin E measurements, and basophil histamine release tests suggests that reported symptoms are not likely to be immunologically derived. Because of methodological problems, challenge tests with specific wood dusts do not support the conclusion that reactions to certain wood dusts are specific. Experiments with nonspecific bronchoconstrictive agents indicate that a number of study subjects possess hyperresponsive airways. Thus, select individuals can demonstrate various respiratory symptoms in the woodworking industry, but any specificity or direct cause is currently unproved. Current studies do not support that exposure to wood dusts from a number of common North American wood species causes immunologic sensitization in woodworkers. Rather, symptoms reported in some studies of exposed workers seem to follow the paradigm for nonspecific respiratory responses in individuals with hyperresponsive airways. PMID:16270718

  1. A sensitivity study of weather data inaccuracies on evaporation duct height algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, John

    1991-05-01

    The sensitivity of five evaporation duct height algorithms to errors in shipboard meteorological data is examined, and the algorithms are intercompared. The data set used was generated parametrically so a large variation of environmental conditions could be considered. The errors in the meteorological data consisted of two types: uncorrelated random errors associated with sensor inaccuracies and both random and systematic errors due to the influence of ship-induced distortions. Before considering any errors, however, algorithm-to-algorithm differences of 10%-70% in the computed duct height are demonstrated and related to the assumptions and simplifications used during algorithm development. The sensitivity study shows that although the evaporation duct height algorithms have different genealogies, they have similar sensitivities. The sensitivities to errors caused by sensor inaccuracies range from 10% to 50% relative uncertainty in the calculated duct height, except for extremely low duct heights where the uncertainties are greater. During the daytime the relative uncertainties due to errors caused by ship-induced distortions are approximately 10%-20% higher than those due to the sensor errors, and they are about 50%-75% smaller at night because of a lack of solar heating of the ship. These conclusions represent a best-case scenario for Navy operational applications because of the omission of some sources of error, the optimistic ship error characteristics used, and the assumption of horizontal homogeneity in the near-surface refractivity field.

  2. Time-Resolved Study on Xanthene Dye-Sensitized Carbon Nitride Photocatalytic Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiyu; Li, Shuang; Lu, Rong; Yu, Anchi

    2015-10-01

    Dye sensitization is a promising strategy to extend the visible light absorption of carbon nitride (C3N4) and increase the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution efficiency of C3N4 under visible light irradiation. However, the interaction dynamics between C3N4 and a sensitized dye has not been reported in the literature. Herein, we selected four commonly used xanthene dyes such as fluorescein, dibromofluorescein, eosin Y, and erythrosine B and prepared their corresponding dye-sensitized-C3N4 composites. For the first time, we derived the electron transfer rate from the LUMO of each photoexcited xanthene dye to the conduction band of C3N4 using picoesecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements. We also obtained the reduction potentials of all selected xanthene dyes and C3N4 with cyclic voltammetry measurements. The cyclic voltammetry measurements gave a consistent result with the picosecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Besides, the possibility of the selected xanthene dye as an acceptor for the hole of the photoexcited C3N4 was also discussed. We believe this study is significant for the researcher to understanding the fundamental aspects in the xanthene dye-sensitized-C3N4 photocatalytic systems. PMID:26389679

  3. A Novel Touch-Sensitive Apparatus for Behavioral Studies in Unrestrained Squirrel Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kangas, Brian D.; Bergman, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing sophistication and affordability of touch-sensitive technology, its use in the behavioral sciences has been limited. The present paper describes the design and empirical validation of a novel touch-sensitive operant conditioning chamber for use with unrestrained squirrel monkeys. In addition, results from a variant of a commonly employed animal model of learning, the repeated acquisition task, demonstrated the effectiveness of this chamber in programming an assay of complex behavior. Finally, results from a study with Δ9-tetrahyrdrocannabinol, the active ingredient in marijuana, showed that its effects in this novel touchscreen chamber were consistent with its dose-related effects on learning using more conventional approaches. Overall, these studies indicate the touchscreen apparatus provides effective means for programming complex behavioral tasks to assess the effects of pharmacological agents on cognitive function. PMID:22790109

  4. Maternal Sensitivity and Child Secure Base Use in Early Childhood: Studies in Different Cultural Contexts.

    PubMed

    Posada, German; Trumbell, Jill; Noblega, Magaly; Plata, Sandra; Peña, Paola; Carbonell, Olga A; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether maternal sensitivity and child security are related during early childhood and whether such an association is found in different cultural and social contexts. Mother-child dyads (N = 237) from four different countries (Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and the United States) were observed in naturalistic settings when children were between 36 and 72 months of age. Maternal and child behavior during interactions at home and in the playground were described using Q methodology. Findings reveal that across cultures, concurrent maternal sensitivity and more specific behavioral domains of maternal care (e.g., contributions to harmonious interactions and secure base support) are important for children's attachment security during early childhood. Implications for the study of attachment relationships beyond infancy and in diverse contexts are highlighted. PMID:26525825

  5. Alignment and Polarization Sensitivity Study on the Cassini: CIRS FIR Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooke, Julie; Hagopian, John

    1998-01-01

    The Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument flying on the Cassini spacecraft to Saturn is a cryogenic spectrometer with far-infrared (FIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) channels. The CIRS FIR channel is a polarizing interferometer that contains three polarizing grid components. These components are an input polarizer, a polarizing beamsplitter, and an output polarizer/analyzer. They consist of a 1.5 micron thick mylar substrate with 2 microns wide copper wires, with 2 microns spacing (4 microns pitch) photolithographically deposited on the substrate. This paper details the alignment sensitivity studies performed on the polarizing beamsplitter, and the polarization sensitivity studies performed on all three polarizing components in the FIR interferometer.

  6. N Reactor core heatup sensitivity study for the 32-inch unit cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.; Zimmerman, B.; Heard, F.

    1988-02-01

    A number of N Reactor core heatup studies have been performed using the TRUMP-BD computer code. These studies were performed to address questions concerning the dependency of results on potential variations in the material properties and/or modeling assumptions. This report described and documents a series of 31 TRUMP-BD runs that were performed to determine the sensitivity of calculated inner-fuel temperatures to a variety of TRUMP input parameters and also to a change in the node density in a high-temperature-gradient region. The results of this study are based on the 32-in. model. 18 refs., 17 figs., 2 tab.

  7. First principles DFT study of dye-sensitized CdS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Kalpna; Singh, Kh. S.; Kishor, Shyam; Josefesson, Ida; Odelius, Michael; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2014-04-24

    Dye-sensitized quantum dots (QDs) are considered promising candidates for dye-sensitized solar cells. In order to maximize their efficiency, detailed theoretical studies are important. Here, we report a first principles density functional theory (DFT) investigation of experimentally realized dye - sensitized QD / ligand systems, viz., Cd{sub 16}S{sub 16}, capped with acetate molecules and a coumarin dye. The hybrid B3LYP functional and a 6−311+G(d,p)/LANL2dz basis set are used to study the geometric, energetic and electronic properties of these clusters. There is significant structural rearrangement in all the clusters studied - on the surface for the bare QD, and in the positions of the acetate / dye ligands for the ligated QDs. The density of states (DOS) of the bare QD shows states in the band gap, which disappear on surface passivation with the acetate molecules. Interestingly, in the dye-sensitised QD, the HOMO is found to be localized mainly on the dye molecule, while the LUMO is on the QD, as required for photo-induced electron injection from the dye to the QD.

  8. Assessment of musculoskeletal pain sensitivity and temporal summation by cuff pressure algometry: a reliability study.

    PubMed

    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Finocchietti, Sara; Handberg, Gitte; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is linked with sensitization, and standardized methods for assessment are needed. This study investigated (1) the test-retest reliability of computer-controlled cuff-pressure algometry (pain thresholds and temporal pain summation) on the arm and leg and (2) conditioned pain modulation (CPM) assessed by cuff algometry. The influences of age and gender were evaluated. On 2 different days, cuff pain threshold (cPPT), cuff pain tolerance (cPTT), and temporal summation of pain (TSP) by visual analog scale scores to 10 repeated cuff stimulations at cPTT intensity, as well as pressure pain threshold with handheld pressure algometry, were assessed in 136 healthy subjects. In one session, cuff pain sensitivity was also assessed before and after cold pressor-induced CPM. Good-to-excellent intraclass correlations (0.60-0.90) were demonstrated for manual and cuff algometry, and no systematic bias between sessions was found for cPPT, cPTT, and TSP on the leg and for cPTT and TSP on the arm. Cuff pressure pain threshold and cPTT were higher in men compared with women (P < 0.05). Middle-aged subjects had higher pressure pain threshold, but lower cPPT and cPTT, compared with younger subjects (P < 0.05). Temporal summation of pain was increased in women compared with men (P < 0.05). Cuff algometry was sensitive to CPM demonstrated as increased cPPT and cPTT and reduced TSP (P < 0.05). Reliability and sensitivity of computer-controlled cuff algometry for pain assessment is comparable with manual pressure algometry and constitutes a user-independent method for assessment of pain. Difference in age-related pain sensitivity between manual and cuff algometry should be further investigated. PMID:26172551

  9. A case study for evaluating potential soil sensitivity in aridland systems.

    PubMed

    Peterman, Wendy L; Ferschweiler, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Globally, ecosystems are subjected to prolonged droughts and extreme heat events, leading to forest die-offs and dominance shifts in vegetation. Some scientists and managers view soil as the main resource to be considered in monitoring ecosystem responses to aridification. As the medium through which precipitation is received, stored, and redistributed for plant use, soil is an important factor in the sensitivity of ecosystems to a drying climate. This study presents a novel approach to evaluating where on a landscape soils may be most sensitive to drying, making them less resilient to disturbance, and where potential future vegetation changes could lead to such disturbance. The drying and devegetation of arid lands can increase wind erosion, contributing to aerosol and dust emissions. This has implications for air quality, human health, and water resources. This approach combines soil data with vegetation simulations, projecting future vegetation change, to create maps of potential areas of concern for soil sensitivity and dust production in a drying climate. Consistent with recent observations, the projections show shifts from grasslands and woodlands to shrublands in much of the southwestern region. An increase in forested area occurs, but shifts in the dominant types and spatial distribution of the forests also are seen. A net increase in desert ecosystems in the region and some changes in alpine and tundra ecosystems are seen. Approximately 124,000 km(2) of soils flagged as "sensitive" are projected to have vegetation change between 2041 and 2050, and 82,927 km(2) of soils may become sensitive because of future vegetation changes. These maps give managers a way to visualize and identify where soils and vegetation should be investigated and monitored for degradation in a drying climate, so restoration and mitigation strategies can be focused in these areas. PMID:26272449

  10. Study on an auto-correlation-function-based damage index: Sensitivity analysis and structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Muyu; Schmidt, Rüdiger

    2015-12-01

    The damage index based on the auto correlation function to detect the damage of the structure under white noise excitation is studied in detail in this paper. The maximum values of the auto correlation function of the vibration response signals (displacement, velocity and acceleration) from different measurement points of the structure are collected and formulated as a vector called Auto Correlation Function at Maximum Point Value Vector (AMV), which is expressed as a weighted combination of the Hadamard product of two mode shapes. AMV is normalized by its root mean square value so that the influence of the excitation can be eliminated. Sensitivity analysis for the different parts of the normalized AMV shows that the sensitivity of the normalized AMV to the local stiffness is dependent most on the sensitivity of the Hadamard product of the two lower order mode shapes to the local stiffness, which has a sudden change of the value around the local stiffness change position. The sensitivity of the normalized AMV has the similar shape and same trend that shows it is a very good damage indicator even for the very small damage. The relative change of the normalized AMV before and after damage occurs in the structure is adopted as the damage index to show the damage location. Several examples of the stiffness reduction detection of a 12-story shear frame structure are utilized to validate the results in sensitivity analysis, illustrate the effectiveness and anti-noise ability of the AMV-based damage detection method and compare the effect of the response type on the detectability of the normalized AMV.

  11. Evaluation of Pre-Transplant Panel Reactive Antibody Levels and Sensitization: A Single-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Can, Özgür; Gökçe, Ali Murat; Canbakan, Mustafa; Ata, Pınar; Şahin, Gülizar Manga; Titiz, Mesut İzzet; Apaydın, Süheyla

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sensitization is one of the most important barriers against transplantation. Our aim was to evaluate the sensitization status of our patients awaiting cadaveric transplantation and to identify factors causing sensitization. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 140 patients on the cadaveric waiting list during January 2014 were included in this retrospective cross-sectional study. The parametric t-test and the non-parametric chi-square test were used to detect differences between PRA-positive and -negative patients. Multivariate analysis was used to identify factors associated with PRA positivity. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare PRA-negative and -positive results. RESULTS Anti-HCV positivity (p=0.040), history of transfusion (p=0.041), and mean number of blood product transfused (p=0.047) were significantly related to class 1 PRA positivity. History of transfusion (p=0.038) and mean number of blood product transfused (p=0.044) were related to class 2 PRA positivity. The multivariate analysis indicated that transfusion and more than 5 units of blood product transfused were related to either class 1 or class 2 PRA positivity. No associations were found between PRA positivity and pregnancy, transplantation, age, sex, infection, abortion, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis B, or time spent on dialysis and being on the transplantation waiting list. CONCLUSIONS Anti-HCV positivity and transfusion are risk factors for sensitization. Particular emphasis should be given to sensitization and its prevention to reduce waiting time for transplantation. PMID:27618946

  12. Numerical modeling of stress in stenotic arteries with microcalcifications: a parameter sensitivity study.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jonathan F

    2011-01-01

    As a follow-up to the work presented in Wenk et al. (2010, "Numerical Modeling of Stress in Stenotic Arteries With Microcalcifications: A Micromechanical Approximation," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 132, p. 091011), a formal sensitivity study was conducted in which several model parameters were varied. The previous work only simulated a few combinations of the parameters. In the present study, the fibrous cap thickness, longitudinal position of the region of microcalcifications, and volume fraction of microcalcifications were varied over a broader range of values. The goal of the present work is to investigate the effects of localized regions of microcalcifications on the stress field of atherosclerotic plaque caps in a section of carotid artery. More specifically, the variations in the magnitude and location of the maximum circumferential stress were assessed for a range of parameters using a global sensitivity analysis method known as Sobol' indices. The stress was calculated by performing finite element simulations of three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models, while the sensitivity indices were computed using a Monte Carlo scheme. The results indicate that cap thickness plays a significant role in the variation in the magnitude of the maximum circumferential stress, with the sensitivity to volume fraction increasing when the region of microcalcification is located at the shoulder. However, the volume fraction played a larger role in the variation in the location of the maximum circumferential stress. This matches the finding of the previous study (Wenk et al., 2010, "Numerical Modeling of Stress in Stenotic Arteries With Microcalcifications: A Micromechanical Approximation," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 132, p. 091011), which indicates that the maximum circumferential stress always shifts to the region of microcalcification. PMID:21186905

  13. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, L.; Mekonnen, M. M.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2014-06-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a fast-growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of and uncertainty in crop water footprint (in m3 t-1) estimates related to uncertainties in important input variables. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall) and blue (from irrigation) water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat at the scale of the Yellow River basin in the period 1996-2005. A grid-based daily water balance model at a 5 by 5 arcmin resolution was applied to compute green and blue water footprints of the four crops in the Yellow River basin in the period considered. The one-at-a-time method was carried out to analyse the sensitivity of the crop water footprint to fractional changes of seven individual input variables and parameters: precipitation (PR), reference evapotranspiration (ET0), crop coefficient (Kc), crop calendar (planting date with constant growing degree days), soil water content at field capacity (Smax), yield response factor (Ky) and maximum yield (Ym). Uncertainties in crop water footprint estimates related to uncertainties in four key input variables: PR, ET0, Kc, and crop calendar were quantified through Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the sensitivities and uncertainties differ across crop types. In general, the water footprint of crops is most sensitive to ET0 and Kc, followed by the crop calendar. Blue water footprints were more sensitive to input variability than green water footprints. The smaller the annual blue water footprint is, the higher its sensitivity to changes in PR, ET0, and Kc. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop due to combined uncertainties in climatic inputs (PR and ET0) were about ±20% (at 95% confidence interval). The effect of uncertainties in ET0was dominant compared to that of PR. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop as a result of combined key input

  14. Contributions to Future Stratospheric Climate Change: An Idealized Chemistry-Climate Model Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Within the framework of an idealized model sensitivity study, three of the main contributors to future stratospheric climate change are evaluated: increases in greenhouse gas concentrations, ozone recovery, and changing sea surface temperatures (SSTs). These three contributors are explored in combination and separately, to test the interactions between ozone and climate; the linearity of their contributions to stratospheric climate change is also assessed. In a simplified chemistry-climate model, stratospheric global mean temperature is most sensitive to CO2 doubling, followed by ozone depletion, then by increased SSTs. At polar latitudes, the Northern Hemisphere (NH) stratosphere is more sensitive to changes in CO2, SSTs and O3 than is the Southern Hemisphere (SH); the opposing responses to ozone depletion under low or high background CO2 concentrations, as seen with present-day SSTs, are much weaker and are not statistically significant under enhanced SSTs. Consistent with previous studies, the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation is found to increase in an idealized future climate; SSTs contribute most to this increase in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) region, while CO2 and ozone changes contribute most in the stratosphere and mesosphere.

  15. Association of oxidative status and insulin sensitivity in periparturient dairy cattle: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, A; Hernández, J; Benedito, J L; Castillo, C

    2016-04-01

    Post-parturient insulin resistance (IR) is a common feature in all mammalian animals. However, in dairy cows, it can be exacerbated because of high milk yield, leading to excessive negative energy balance, which is related with increased disease incidence, reduced milk production and worsened reproductive performance. IR has been extensively investigated in humans suffering from diabetes mellitus. In these subjects, it is known that oxidative stress (OS) plays a causative role in the onset of IR. Although OS occurs in transitional dairy cattle, there are yet no studies that investigated the association between IR and OS in dairy cattle. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a relationship between OS and IR in dairy cattle. Serum samples were taken repeatedly from 22 dairy cows from 2 months prior to the expected calving date to 2 months after calving and were analysed for markers of metabolic and redox balance. Surrogate indices of insulin sensitivity were also calculated. Generalised linear mixed models revealed an effect of the oxidative status on peripheral insulin concentration and on indices of insulin sensitivity. Hence, field trials should investigate the effectiveness of antioxidant therapy on insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues during the transition period of dairy cattle. PMID:26174108

  16. Thermal performance sensitivity studies in support of material modeling for extended storage of used nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cuta, Judith M.; Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-08-15

    The work reported here is an investigation of the sensitivity of component temperatures of a storage system, including fuel cladding temperatures, in response to age-related changes that could degrade the design-basis thermal behavior of the system. Three specific areas of interest were identified for this study. • degradation of the canister backfill gas from pure helium to a mixture of air and helium, resulting from postulated leakage due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of canister welds • changes in surface emissivity of system components, resulting from corrosion or other aging mechanisms, which could cause potentially significant changes in temperatures and temperature distributions, due to the effect on thermal radiation exchange between components • changes in fuel and basket temperatures due to changes in fuel assembly position within the basket cells in the canister The purpose of these sensitivity studies is to provide a realistic example of how changes in the physical properties or configuration of the storage system components can affect temperatures and temperature distributions. The magnitudes of these sensitivities can provide guidance for identifying appropriate modeling assumptions for thermal evaluations extending long term storage out beyond 50, 100, 200, and 300 years.

  17. A hierarchical Bayesian approach to adaptive vision testing: A case study with the contrast sensitivity function

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hairong; Kim, Woojae; Hou, Fang; Lesmes, Luis Andres; Pitt, Mark A.; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Myung, Jay I.

    2016-01-01

    Measurement efficiency is of concern when a large number of observations are required to obtain reliable estimates for parametric models of vision. The standard entropy-based Bayesian adaptive testing procedures addressed the issue by selecting the most informative stimulus in sequential experimental trials. Noninformative, diffuse priors were commonly used in those tests. Hierarchical adaptive design optimization (HADO; Kim, Pitt, Lu, Steyvers, & Myung, 2014) further improves the efficiency of the standard Bayesian adaptive testing procedures by constructing an informative prior using data from observers who have already participated in the experiment. The present study represents an empirical validation of HADO in estimating the human contrast sensitivity function. The results show that HADO significantly improves the accuracy and precision of parameter estimates, and therefore requires many fewer observations to obtain reliable inference about contrast sensitivity, compared to the method of quick contrast sensitivity function (Lesmes, Lu, Baek, & Albright, 2010), which uses the standard Bayesian procedure. The improvement with HADO was maintained even when the prior was constructed from heterogeneous populations or a relatively small number of observers. These results of this case study support the conclusion that HADO can be used in Bayesian adaptive testing by replacing noninformative, diffuse priors with statistically justified informative priors without introducing unwanted bias. PMID:27105061

  18. Preliminary Thermal-Mechanical Sizing of Metallic TPS: Process Development and Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poteet, Carl C.; Abu-Khajeel, Hasan; Hsu, Su-Yuen

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to perform sensitivity studies and develop a process to perform thermal and structural analysis and sizing of the latest Metallic Thermal Protection System (TPS) developed at NASA LaRC (Langley Research Center). Metallic TPS is a key technology for reducing the cost of reusable launch vehicles (RLV), offering the combination of increased durability and competitive weights when compared to other systems. Accurate sizing of metallic TPS requires combined thermal and structural analysis. Initial sensitivity studies were conducted using transient one-dimensional finite element thermal analysis to determine the influence of various TPS and analysis parameters on TPS weight. The thermal analysis model was then used in combination with static deflection and failure mode analysis of the sandwich panel outer surface of the TPS to obtain minimum weight TPS configurations at three vehicle stations on the windward centerline of a representative RLV. The coupled nature of the analysis requires an iterative analysis process, which will be described herein. Findings from the sensitivity analysis are reported, along with TPS designs at the three RLV vehicle stations considered.

  19. Case study sensitivity analysis of transmission spectra for water contaminant monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.; Yapijakis, C.; Aiken, D.; Shabaev, A.; Ramsey, S.; Peak, J.

    2016-05-01

    Monitoring of contaminants associated with specific water resources using transmission spectra, with respect to types and relative concentrations, requires tracking statistical profiles of water contaminants in terms of spatial-temporal distributions of electromagnetic absorption spectra ranging from the ultraviolet to infrared. For this purpose, correlation between spectral signatures and types of contaminants within specific water resources must be made, as well as correlation of spectral signatures with results of processes for removal of contaminants, such as ozonation. Correlation between absorption spectra and changes in chemical and physical characteristics of contaminants, within a volume of sampled solution, requires sufficient sensitivity. The present study examines the sensitivity of transmission spectra with respect to general characteristics of water contaminants for spectral analysis of water samples.

  20. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio; Welsch, Carsten P

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed. PMID:21034082

  1. A study of the simulated evolution of the spectral sensitivity of visual agent receptors.

    PubMed

    Liese, A; Polani, D; Uthmann, T

    2001-01-01

    In this article we study a model for the evolution of the spectral sensitivity of visual receptors for agents in a continuous virtual environment. The model uses a genetic algorithm (GA) to evolve the agent sensors along with the control of the agents by requiring the agents to solve certain tasks in the simulation environment. The properties of the evolved sensors are analyzed for different scenarios. In particular, it is shown that the GA is able to find a balance between sensor costs and agent performance in such a way that the spectral sensor sensitivity reflects the emission spectrum of the target objects and that the capability of the sensors to evolve can help the agents significantly in adapting to their task. PMID:11580876

  2. Study of the sensitivity of gas sensing by use of index-guiding photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Guang; Liu, Si-Ying; Song, Zhao-Yuan; Han, Yin; Cheng, Tong-Lei; Zhou, Gui-Yao; Hou, Lan-Tian

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate an absorption transmission spectrum of CH(4) in a 16.9 cm long index-guiding photonic crystal fiber (PCF) fabricated in our laboratory. One of the main factors to improve the sensitivity is to increase the fraction of power in PCF cladding air holes. We study the fraction of power in PCF cladding air holes as a function of the index-guiding PCF parameters. We found that a PCF with small spacing and a large air-filling ratio has a higher fraction of power in its cladding air holes. At the same time the mode area in this PCF is small and would generate strong nonlinear effects in the fiber. If we use a PCF in which the core is formed by missing seven air holes, it is immediately obvious that the PCF used as a sensor has higher sensitivity and a larger mode area. PMID:17676130

  3. Screening for symptomatic metal sensitivity: a prospective study of 92 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Niki, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hideo; Otani, Toshiro; Yatabe, Taku; Kondo, Makoto; Yoshimine, Fumihiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2005-03-01

    Metal sensitivity (MS) reactions to implant metals represent a rare but well-documented complication following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Although 20-25% of post-TJA patients develop MS, only a few highly susceptible patients (< 1%) exhibit symptoms. Whether surgeons should perform screening for MS is currently a matter of debate. The present study investigated the clinical importance of screening for patients predisposed to symptomatic MS, and the specific metals causing symptomatic MS following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Between 2000 and 2002, a total of 108 primary TKAs were performed on 92 patients. Preoperatively, all patients underwent modified lymphocyte stimulation test (mLST) to Ni, Co, Cr, and Fe. Of the 92 patients, 24 (26%) displayed positive preoperative responses to at least one metal. Five patients displayed implant metal-related eczema and were all mLST-positive preoperatively, suggesting that screening for symptomatic MS is clinically useful. Two of these underwent revision TKA and thereafter, eczema healed and mLST results changed from positive to negative. All mLST-positive patients were divided into three groups: Group I, patients with eczema; Group II, patients with clear history of MS; and Group III, patients neither eczema nor history of MS. When the type of sensitive metals were compared among the three groups, a significant association between presence of Cr-sensitivity and development of eczema (P < 0.05) was identified. No significant association was observed between other metals and development of eczema or history of MS. This indicates that Cr is a potential candidate metal for causing eczema in our TKA series, and Cr-sensitivity may offer a potential predictor for symptomatic MS. The present study indicates that the surgeons should undertake routine preoperative screening for MS, particularly to Cr. PMID:15369690

  4. A comprehensive evaluation of various sensitivity analysis methods: A case study with a hydrological model

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Yanjun; Duan, Qingyun; Gong, Wei; Tong, Charles; Sun, Yunwei; Chu, Wei; Ye, Aizhong; Miao, Chiyuan; Di, Zhenhua

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) is a commonly used approach for identifying important parameters that dominate model behaviors. We use a newly developed software package, a Problem Solving environment for Uncertainty Analysis and Design Exploration (PSUADE), to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of ten widely used SA methods, including seven qualitative and three quantitative ones. All SA methods are tested using a variety of sampling techniques to screen out the most sensitive (i.e., important) parameters from the insensitive ones. The Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model, which has thirteen tunable parameters, is used for illustration. The South Branch Potomac River basin near Springfield, West Virginia in the U.S. is chosen as the study area. The key findings from this study are: (1) For qualitative SA methods, Correlation Analysis (CA), Regression Analysis (RA), and Gaussian Process (GP) screening methods are shown to be not effective in this example. Morris One-At-a-Time (MOAT) screening is the most efficient, needing only 280 samples to identify the most important parameters, but it is the least robust method. Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS), Delta Test (DT) and Sum-Of-Trees (SOT) screening methods need about 400–600 samples for the same purpose. Monte Carlo (MC), Orthogonal Array (OA) and Orthogonal Array based Latin Hypercube (OALH) are appropriate sampling techniques for them; (2) For quantitative SA methods, at least 2777 samples are needed for Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) to identity parameter main effect. McKay method needs about 360 samples to evaluate the main effect, more than 1000 samples to assess the two-way interaction effect. OALH and LPτ (LPTAU) sampling techniques are more appropriate for McKay method. For the Sobol' method, the minimum samples needed are 1050 to compute the first-order and total sensitivity indices correctly. These comparisons show that qualitative SA methods are more efficient

  5. Is Hiding Foot and Mouth Disease Sensitive Behavior for Farmers? A Survey Study in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Gunarathne, Anoma; Kubota, Satoko; Kumarawadu, Pradeep; Karunagoda, Kamal; Kon, Hiroichi

    2016-02-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) has a long history in Sri Lanka and was found to be endemic in various parts of the country and constitutes a constant threat to farmers. In Sri Lanka, currently there is no regular, nationwide vaccination programme devised to control FMD. Therefore, improving farmers' knowledge regarding distinguishing FMD from other diseases and ensuring prompt reporting of any suspicion of FMD as well as restricting movement of animals are critical activities for an effective FMD response effort. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between farmers' knowledge levels and their behaviors to establish a strategy to control FMD. In our study, item count technique was applied to estimate the number of farmers that under-report and sell FMD-infected animals, although to do so is prohibited by law. The following findings were observed: about 63% of farmers have very poor knowledge of routes of FMD transmission; 'under-reporting' was found to be a sensitive behavior and nearly 23% of the farmers were reluctant to report FMD-infected animals; and 'selling FMD-infected animals' is a sensitive behavior among high-level knowledge group while it is a non-sensitive behavior among the low-level knowledge group. If farmers would understand the importance of prompt reporting, they may report any suspected cases of FMD to veterinary officials. However, even if farmers report honestly, they do not want to cull FMD-infected animals. Thus, education programs should be conducted not only on FMD introduction and transmission, but also its impact. Furthermore, consumers may criticize the farmers for culling their infected animals. Hence, not only farmers, but also consumers need to be educated on the economic impact of FMD and the importance of controlling an outbreak. If farmers have a high knowledge of FMD transmission, they consider selling FMD-infected animals as a sensitive behavior. Therefore, severe punishment should be levied for

  6. A comprehensive evaluation of various sensitivity analysis methods: A case study with a hydrological model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gan, Yanjun; Duan, Qingyun; Gong, Wei; Tong, Charles; Sun, Yunwei; Chu, Wei; Ye, Aizhong; Miao, Chiyuan; Di, Zhenhua

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) is a commonly used approach for identifying important parameters that dominate model behaviors. We use a newly developed software package, a Problem Solving environment for Uncertainty Analysis and Design Exploration (PSUADE), to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of ten widely used SA methods, including seven qualitative and three quantitative ones. All SA methods are tested using a variety of sampling techniques to screen out the most sensitive (i.e., important) parameters from the insensitive ones. The Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model, which has thirteen tunable parameters, is used for illustration. The South Branch Potomac River basin nearmore » Springfield, West Virginia in the U.S. is chosen as the study area. The key findings from this study are: (1) For qualitative SA methods, Correlation Analysis (CA), Regression Analysis (RA), and Gaussian Process (GP) screening methods are shown to be not effective in this example. Morris One-At-a-Time (MOAT) screening is the most efficient, needing only 280 samples to identify the most important parameters, but it is the least robust method. Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS), Delta Test (DT) and Sum-Of-Trees (SOT) screening methods need about 400–600 samples for the same purpose. Monte Carlo (MC), Orthogonal Array (OA) and Orthogonal Array based Latin Hypercube (OALH) are appropriate sampling techniques for them; (2) For quantitative SA methods, at least 2777 samples are needed for Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) to identity parameter main effect. McKay method needs about 360 samples to evaluate the main effect, more than 1000 samples to assess the two-way interaction effect. OALH and LPτ (LPTAU) sampling techniques are more appropriate for McKay method. For the Sobol' method, the minimum samples needed are 1050 to compute the first-order and total sensitivity indices correctly. These comparisons show that qualitative SA methods are more

  7. Sensitivity studies of spin cut-off models on fission fragment observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thulliez, L.; Litaize, O.; Serot, O.

    2016-03-01

    A fission fragment de-excitation code, FIFRELIN, is being developed at CEA Cadarache. It allows probing the characteristics of the prompt emitted particles, neutrons and gammas, during the de-excitation process of fully accelerated fission fragments. The knowledge of the initial states of the fragments is important to accurately reproduce the fission fragment observables. In this paper a sensitivity study of various spin cut-off models, completely defining the initial fission fragment angular momentum distribution has been performed. This study shows that the choice of the model has a significant impact on gamma observables such as spectrum and multiplicity and almost none on the neutron observables.

  8. Sensitivity of Rooftop PV Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market Assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2013-01-01

    The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The SolarDS model was used to simulate rooftop PV demand for this study, based on several PV market assumptions--future electricity rates, customer access to financing, and others--in addition to the SunShot PV price projections. This paper finds that modeled PV demand is highly sensitive to several non-price market assumptions, particularly PV financing parameters.

  9. Structural sensitivity studies of ethylene hydrogenation on platinum and rhodium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, M.A. |

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene and hydrogen on the well characterized surfaces of the noble metals platinum and rhodium has been studied for the purposes of determining the relative activity of these two substrates as well as the degree of structure sensitivity. The Pt(111) and the Rh(755) single crystal surfaces,as well as Pt and Rh foils, were employed as substrates to study the effect of surface step structure on reactivity. In addition, vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed for ethylene adsorption on the stepped Rh(755) surface. The catalytic reaction were obtained using a combined ultrahigh vacuum chamber coupled with an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber that functioned as a batch reactor. Samples could be prepared using standard surface science techniques and characterized for surface composition and geometry using Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction. A comparison of the reactivity of Rh(111) with the results from this study on Rh(755) allows a direct determination of the effect of step structure on ethylene hydrogenation activity. Structure sensitivity is expected to exhibit orders of magnitude differences in rate as surface orientation is varied. In this case, no significant differences were found, confirming the structure insensitivity of this reaction over this metal. The turnover frequency of the Rh(111) surface, 5 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1}, is in relatively good agreement with the turnover frequency of 9 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1} measured for the Rh(755) surface. Rate measurements made on the Pt(111) surface and the Pt foil are in excellent agreement, both measuring 3 {times} 10{sup 2} s{sup minus}1. Likewise, it is concluded that no strong structure sensitivity for the platinum surfaces exists. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy studies of adsorbed ethylene on the Rh(755) surface compare favorably with the ethylidyne spectra obtained on the Rh(111) and Rh(100) surfaces.

  10. Study of single and combined mass-sensitive observables of cosmic ray induced extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegarzadeh, G.; Nemati, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, combinations of the global arrival time, (Δτ_{global}), pseudorapidity, and lateral density distribution (ρ_{μ}) of muons, which are three mass-sensitive observables of cosmic ray induced extensive air showers, have been used as new parameters to study the primary mass discrimination around the knee energies (100 TeV-10 PeV). This is a simulation-based study and the simulations have been performed for the KASCADE array at Karlsruhe and the Alborz-I array at Tehran to study the effect of the altitude on the quality of the primary mass discrimination. The merit factors of the single and combined three mass-sensitive observables have been calculated to compare the discrimination power of combined and single observables. We have used the CORSIKA 7.4 code to simulate the extensive air showers (EASs) sample sets. Considering all aspects of our study, it is found that the ratio of the global time to the lateral density distribution of the muons gives better results than other ratios; also in the case of single observables, the muon density gives better results compared with the other observables. Also it is shown that below 1 PeV primary energies, the ratio of the muon global time to the muon density (Δτ_{global}/ρ_{μ}) results in a better mass discrimination relative to the muon density only.

  11. Developmental effects of decision-making on sensitivity to reward: An fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Jarcho, Johanna M; Benson, Brenda E; Plate, Rista C; Guyer, Amanda E; Detloff, Allison M; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Ernst, Monique

    2012-01-01

    Studies comparing neural correlates of reward processing across development yield inconsistent findings. This challenges theories characterizing adolescents as globally hypo- or hypersensitive to rewards. Developmental differences in reward sensitivity may fluctuate based on reward magnitude, and on whether rewards require decision-making. We examined whether these factors modulate developmental differences in neural response during reward anticipation and/or receipt in 26 adolescents (14.05±2.37yrs) and 26 adults (31.25±8.23yrs). Brain activity was assessed with fMRI during reward anticipation, when subjects made responses with-vs.-without decision-making, to obtain large–vs.–small rewards, and during reward receipt. When reward-receipt required decision-making, neural activity did not differ by age. However, when reward receipt did not require decision-making, neural activity varied by development, reward magnitude, and stage of the reward task. During anticipation, adolescents, but not adults, exhibited greater activity in the insula, extending into putamen, and cingulate gyrus for large-vs.-small incentives. During feedback, adults, but not adolescents, exhibited greater activity in the precuneus for large-vs.-small incentives. These data indicate that age-related differences in reward sensitivity cannot be characterized by global hypo- or hyper-responsivity. Instead, neural responding in striatum, prefrontal cortex and precuneus is influenced by both situational demands and developmental factors. This suggests nuanced maturational effects in adolescent reward sensitivity. PMID:22591860

  12. Luminophore Application Study of Polymer-Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Hirotaka; Hayashi, Tatsunori; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    A polymer-ceramic pressure-sensitive paint (PC-PSP) is a fast responding and sprayable PSP which has been applied for capturing global unsteady flows. The luminophore application process is studied to enhance the characterization of the PC-PSP. A dipping deposition method is used to apply a luminophore on a polymer-ceramic coating. The method selects a solvent by its polarity index. The characterization includes the signal level, pressure sensitivity, temperature dependency, and response time. It is found that the luminophore application process affects the steady-state characterizations, such as the signal level, pressure sensitivity, and temperature dependency. A range of change for each characterization, which is based on the minimum quantity, is a factor of 4.7, 9, and 3.8, respectively. A response time on the order of ten microseconds is shown. The application process is not a dominant factor for changing the response time, which is within the uncertainty of the thickness variation. Comparisons of the effects on the luminophore application process and the polymer content are made to discuss the PC-PSP characterization results. PMID:23760088

  13. Application and sensitivity studies of the orographic cloud model MCCP (Mountain Cloud Chemistry Program) PLUVIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, E.G.; Luecken, D.J.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1987-07-01

    A special MCCP version of the PLUVIUS MOD 5.0 reactive storm model (MCCP PLUVIUS) was applied to conditions representative of Mt. Mitchell, North Carolina. Tests were also conducted to determine the sensitivity of the model to various meteorological and chemical parameters. Results of the modeling investigation indicate that aqueous concentrations and deposition fluxes of pollutants are location dependent. The greatest concentrations occur at the edges of the cloud, where the liquid water content is low, and the greatest deposition flux occurs on the windward side of the mountain. For conditions considered representative of summertime conditions at Mt. Mitchell, predicted ion concentrations in deposited cloud water at a point corresponding to the MCCP field station are within the ranges actually observed. Sensitivity studies indicate that in-cloud oxidation of SO/sub 2/ makes a limited contribution to total sulfate deposition for typical concentrations of SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. However, sulfate deposition predicted by MCCP PLUVIUS is extremely sensitive to the value selected for aerosol sulfate existing in the modeled air mass prior to cloud formation. Hydrogen ion deposition predicted by the model is strongly influenced by input values for gas-phase nitric acid and ammonia. 11 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Assessment of thermal sensitivity of CT during heating of liver: an ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Pandeya, G D; Greuter, M J W; Schmidt, B; Flohr, T; Oudkerk, M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the thermal sensitivity of CT during heating of ex-vivo animal liver. Methods Pig liver was indirectly heated from 20 to 90 °C by passage of hot air through a plastic tube. The temperature in the heated liver was measured using calibrated thermocouples. In addition, image acquisition was performed with a multislice CT scanner before and during heating of the liver sample. The reconstructed CT images were then analysed to assess the change of CT number as a function of temperature. Results During heating, a decrease in CT numbers was observed as a hypodense area on the CT images. In addition, the hypodense area extended outward from the heat source during heating. The analysis showed a linear decrease of CT number as a function of temperature. From this relationship, we derived a thermal sensitivity of CT for pig liver tissue of −0.54±0.03 HU °C−1 with an r2 value of 0.91. Conclusions The assessment of the thermal sensitivity of CT in ex-vivo pig liver tissue showed a linear dependency on temperature ≤90 °C. This result may be beneficial for the application of isotherms or thermal maps in CT images of liver tissue. PMID:22919016

  15. Endogenous Opioid-Masked Latent Pain Sensitization: Studies from Mouse to Human

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Jørgen B.; Werner, Marianne; Taylor, Bradley K.; Werner, Mads U.

    2015-01-01

    Following the resolution of a severe inflammatory injury in rodents, administration of mu-opioid receptor inverse agonists leads to reinstatement of pain hypersensitivity. The mechanisms underlying this form of latent pain sensitization (LS) likely contribute to the development of chronic pain, but LS has not yet been demonstrated in humans. Using a C57BL/6 mouse model of cutaneous mild heat injury (MHI) we demonstrated a dose-dependent reinstatement of pain sensitization, assessed as primary (P < 0.001) and secondary hyperalgesia (P < 0.001) by naloxone (0.3–10 mg/kg), 168 hrs after the induction of MHI. Forward-translating the dose data to a human MHI model (n = 12) we could show that LS does indeed occur after naloxone 2 mg/kg, 168 hrs after a MHI. Our previous unsuccessful efforts to demonstrate unmasking of LS in humans are thus likely explained by an insufficient naloxone dose (0.021 mg/kg). However, while LS was consistently demonstrated in 21/24 mice, LS was only seen in 4/12 subjects. This difference is likely due to selection bias since the C57BL/6 mouse strain exhibits markedly enhanced pain sensitivity in assays of acute thermal nociception. Future exploratory studies in humans should prioritize inclusion of “high-sensitizers” prone to develop LS and use post-surgical models to elucidate markers of vulnerability to chronic postsurgical pain. Trial Registration EudraCT 2012-005663-27 PMID:26305798

  16. Altered sensitivity to excitotoxic cell death and glutamate receptor expression between two commonly studied mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Rozzy; Kovács, Attila D.; Pearce, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in glutamatergic synapse function have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many different neurological disorders including ischemia, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. While studying glutamate receptor function in juvenile Batten disease on the C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEv mouse backgrounds, we noticed differences unlikely to be due to mutation difference alone. We report here that primary cerebellar granule cell cultures from C57BL/6J mice are more sensitive to NMDA-mediated cell death. Moreover, sensitivity to AMPA-mediated excitotoxicity is more variable and is dependent upon the treatment conditions and age of the cultures. Glutamate receptor surface expression levels examined in vitro by in situ ELISA and in vivo by Western blot in surface cross-linked cerebellar samples indicated that these differences in sensitivity are likely due to strain-dependent differences in cell surface receptor expression levels. We propose that differences in glutamate receptor expression and in excitotoxic vulnerability should be taken into consideration in the context of characterizing disease models on the C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEv mouse backgrounds. PMID:20544821

  17. Hydrocarbon dissociation on palladium studied with a hydrogen sensitive Pd-metal-oxide-semiconductor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannetun, H.; Lundström, I.; Petersson, L.-G.

    1988-01-01

    The polycrystalline Pd surface of a hydrogen sensitive palladium-silicon dioxide-silicon [Pd-MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor)] structure has been exposed to small unsaturated hydrocarbons in the temperature range 300-500 K. Apart from the hydrogen response of the Pd-MOS structure also work function (ΔΦ) and electron energy-loss studies were performed. At 500 K the hydrocarbons dissociate completely upon adsorption and produce a surface with atomically adsorbed carbon. The Pd-MOS structure can be used to observe both the dehydrogenation of the hydrocarbon molecules and the process of carbon adsorbing on the palladium surface. The sticking coefficient at this temperature for all hydrocarbons is close to unity. Furthermore, the hydrogen sensitivity of the structure is not drastically reduced by the adsorbed carbon. If the hydrocarbon adsorption is performed at 300 K there is still, at least on the initially clean surface, a large dehydrogenation. The dissociation is, however, not at all complete and there are considerable amounts of hydrocarbon species adsorbed for each gas. The induced work function shifts due to the different hydrocarbons vary from -1.0 to -1.7 eV. The hydrogen sensitivity of the Pd-MOS structure is reduced for growing hydrocarbon coverages and disappears completely for work function shifts of -1.7 eV.

  18. 20th century precipitation changes in the Sahel region: sensitivity studies with ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, D.; Baumgartner, D.; Wild, M.

    2012-04-01

    The 20th century has seen an enormous growth in population and industrialization. These changes are accompanied, among others, by a substantial increase in aerosol emission. To learn more about associated consequences for the climate system we have carried out a comparatively large set of transient sensitivity studies with the global atmosphere only climate model ECHAM5-HAM, using aerosol emission data from NIES (National Institute of Environmental Studies, Japan) and prescribed, observation based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the Hadley Center. The sensitivity studies cover the period from 1870 to 2005 and comprise ensembles of simulations (up to 13 members per ensemble), which allow to address the role of different aerosol species, greenhouse gases, and prescribed sea surface temperatures. We present a preliminary analysis of these global simulation data for the Sahel region (land within 20W / 35E / 10N / 20N). The annual cycle as well as the overall temporal evolution of precipitation in the Sahel according to CRU (Climate Research Unit, UK) is captured well by the model simulations: two comparatively wet phases in the 1930s and 1950s, a more or less continuous decline thereafter, and a renewed increase in precipitation since the 1980s. This decline / renewed incline since the 1950s is, however, about twice as strong in the CRU data than in the model data. The sensitivity studies reveal SSTs as a prominent factor for the time evolution of precipitation, while the atmosphere only effect of aerosols plays a minor role for the modeled precipitation. The observation based prescribed SSTs may, however, encapsulate and aerosol effect already.

  19. Sensitivity study of an image processing workflow on synchrotron μ-CT images of Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, Leon; Berg, Steffen; Ott, Holger; Armstrong, Ryan T.; Enzmann, Frieder; Kersten, Michael

    2014-05-01

    For the present study, the sensitivity of the threshold value for watershed-based segmentation and global threshold segmentation was assessed on μ-CT images of fine grained Berea sandstone. The sensitivities were assessed in terms of porosity, permeability, single-phase flow simulations and capillary pressure curves that were calculated from the segmented data. The μ-CT images of fine grained Berea sandstone with a resolution of 3 μm/pixel was segmented using different threshold values that were systematically varied, which resulted in slightly different structures for the pore space. The results show, that watershed-based segmentation is more robust than global threshold segmentation and that the measured permeability showed a stronger sensitivity to threshold variation than porosity, indicating that it is a more sensitive parameter to image segmentation settings. Calculated permeability and capillary pressure curves matched well with experimental data revealing that the average pores and pore throats of the watershed-based segmented structure were segmented accurately. In contrast, capillary pressure curves indicated that pore sizes near the resolution limit of 3 μm, located in kaolinite rich areas of the rock, were not segmented correctly and thus caused the disagreement between the experimental measured porosity and that measured from the digital rock image. We conclude that capillary pressure curves and permeability values that result from the digital rock data is more indicative of the flow relevant fraction of the pore structure and are therefore better suited as validation criterion than porosity data. Numerical modeling of two-phase flow on segmented data from high resolution μ-CT images enhances our understanding of the dynamics of multiphase-flow of immiscible fluids at the pore-scale. To be confident about simulated data it is therefore important to identify meaningful properties, e.g. permeability, that can be used as benchmark parameters for

  20. Laboratory Measurements and Model Sensitivity Studies of Dust Deposition Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Fan, Jiwen; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2012-08-16

    We investigated the ice nucleating properties of mineral dust particles to understand the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties to two different representations of contact angle in the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). These contact angle representations are based on two sets of laboratory deposition ice nucleation measurements: Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles of 100, 300 and 500 nm sizes were tested at three different temperatures (-25, -30 and -35 C), and 400 nm ATD and kaolinite dust species were tested at two different temperatures (-30 and -35 C). These measurements were used to derive the onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RH{sub ice}) required to activate 1% of dust particles as ice nuclei, from which the onset single contact angles were then calculated based on CNT. For the probability density function (PDF) representation, parameters of the log-normal contact angle distribution were determined by fitting CNT-predicted activated fraction to the measurements at different RH{sub ice}. Results show that onset single contact angles vary from {approx}18 to 24 degrees, while the PDF parameters are sensitive to the measurement conditions (i.e. temperature and dust size). Cloud modeling simulations were performed to understand the sensitivity of cloud properties (i.e. ice number concentration, ice water content, and cloud initiation times) to the representation of contact angle and PDF distribution parameters. The model simulations show that cloud properties are sensitive to onset single contact angles and PDF distribution parameters. The comparison of our experimental results with other studies shows that under similar measurement conditions the onset single contact angles are consistent within {+-}2.0 degrees, while our derived PDF parameters have larger discrepancies.

  1. A piecewise modeling approach for climate sensitivity studies: Tests with a shallow-water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Aimei; Qiu, Chongjian; Niu, Guo-Yue

    2015-10-01

    In model-based climate sensitivity studies, model errors may grow during continuous long-term integrations in both the "reference" and "perturbed" states and hence the climate sensitivity (defined as the difference between the two states). To reduce the errors, we propose a piecewise modeling approach that splits the continuous long-term simulation into subintervals of sequential short-term simulations, and updates the modeled states through re-initialization at the end of each subinterval. In the re-initialization processes, this approach updates the reference state with analysis data and updates the perturbed states with the sum of analysis data and the difference between the perturbed and the reference states, thereby improving the credibility of the modeled climate sensitivity. We conducted a series of experiments with a shallow-water model to evaluate the advantages of the piecewise approach over the conventional continuous modeling approach. We then investigated the impacts of analysis data error and subinterval length used in the piecewise approach on the simulations of the reference and perturbed states as well as the resulting climate sensitivity. The experiments show that the piecewise approach reduces the errors produced by the conventional continuous modeling approach, more effectively when the analysis data error becomes smaller and the subinterval length is shorter. In addition, we employed a nudging assimilation technique to solve possible spin-up problems caused by re-initializations by using analysis data that contain inconsistent errors between mass and velocity. The nudging technique can effectively diminish the spin-up problem, resulting in a higher modeling skill.

  2. A magnetotelluric study of the sensitivity of an area to seismoelectric signals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balasis, G.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Eftaxias, K.

    2005-01-01

    During recent years, efforts at better understanding the physical properties of precursory ultra-low frequency pre-seismic electric signals (SES) have been intensified. Experiments show that SES cannot be observed at all points of the Earth's surface but only at certain so-called sensitive sites. Moreover, a sensitive site is capable of collecting SES from only a restricted number of seismic areas (selectivity effect). Tberefore the installation of a permanent station appropriate for SES collection should necessarily be preceded by a pilot study over a broad area and for a long duration. In short, a number of temporary stations are installed and, after the occurrence of several significant earthquakes (EQs) from a given seismic area, the most appropriate (if any) of these temporary stations, in the sense that they happen to collect SES, can be selected as permanent. Such a long experiment constitutes a serious disadvantage in identifying a site as SES sensitive. However, the SES sensitivity of a site should be related to the geoelectric structure of the area that hosts the site as well as the regional geoelectric structure between the station and the seismic focal area. Thus, knowledge of the local and regional geoelectric structure can dramatically reduce the time involved in identifying SES sites. hi this paper the magnetotelluric method is used to investigate the conductivity structure of an area where a permanent SES station is in operation. Although general conclusions cannot be drawn, the area surrounding an SES site near Ioannina, Greece is characterized by: (1) major faults in the vicinity; (2) highly resistive structure flanked by abrupt conductivity contrasts associated with large-scale geologic contacts, and (3) local inhomogeneities in conductivity structure. The above results are consistent with the fact that electric field amplitudes from remotely-generated signals should be appreciably stronger at such sites when compared to neighboring sites

  3. Abatacept improves whole-body insulin sensitivity in rheumatoid arthritis: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Ursini, Francesco; Russo, Emilio; Letizia Hribal, Marta; Mauro, Daniele; Savarino, Francesca; Bruno, Caterina; Tripolino, Cesare; Rubino, Mariangela; Naty, Saverio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2015-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by increased insulin resistance, a well-known risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of abatacept on insulin sensitivity in RA patients with moderate to severe disease despite treatment with methotrexate. Fifteen RA patients were recruited for the present study. Patients were evaluated at time 0 and after 6 months of the treatment with i.v. abatacept at the dosage recommended for weight range. Evaluation included oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at both time points. Insulin sensitivity was estimated with insulin sensitivity index (ISI) by Matsuda, a measure of whole-body insulin sensitivity. ISI significantly increased after the treatment with abatacept from 3.7 ± 2.6 to 5.0 ± 3.2 (P = 0.003) with a mean difference of 1.23. Analysis of glucose and insulin values during OGTT revealed a reduction of both glucose (303.9 ± 73.4 mg/dL min versus 269.2 ± 69.5 mg/dL min, P = 0.009) and insulin (208.4 ± 119.7 mg/dL min versus 158.0 ± 95.3 mg/dL min, P = 0.01) area under the curves (AUCs). Accordingly also glycated hemoglobin significantly improved (5.5 ± 0.4% versus 5.3 ± 0.3%, P = 0.04). No significant differences were found for measures of β-cell function insulinogenic index (1.11 ± 1.19 versus 1.32 ± 0.82, P = 0.77) and oral disposition index (2.0 ± 5.4 versus 6.0 ± 6.0, P = 0.25). Treatment with abatacept seems to be able to improve whole-body insulin sensitivity in RA patients without affecting β-cell function. PMID:26020396

  4. Parametric Sensitivity Study of Operating and Design Variables in Wellbore Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, G.; Shook, G.M.; Mines, G.L.; Bloomfield, K.K.

    2004-05-01

    This report documents the results of an extensive sensitivity study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This study investigated the effects of various operating and design parameters on wellbore heat exchanger performance to determine conditions for optimal thermal energy extraction and evaluate the potential for using a wellbore heat exchanger model for power generation. Variables studied included operational parameters such as circulation rates, wellbore geometries and working fluid properties, and regional properties including basal heat flux and formation rock type. Energy extraction is strongly affected by fluid residence time, heat transfer contact area, and formation thermal properties. Water appears to be the most appropriate working fluid. Aside from minimal tubing insulation, tubing properties are second order effects. On the basis of the sensitivity study, a best case model was simulated and the results compared against existing low-temperature power generation plants. Even assuming ideal work conversion to electric power, a wellbore heat exchange model cannot generate 200 kW (682.4e+3 BTU/h) at the onset of pseudosteady state. Using realistic conversion efficiency, the method is unlikely to generate 50 kW (170.6e+3 BTU/h).

  5. Study of the sensitivity of neonates to digoxin: contribution of erythrocyte /sup 86/Rb uptake test

    SciTech Connect

    Zannad, F.; Marchal, F.; Royer, R.J.; Vert, P.; Robert, J.

    1981-01-01

    In general, there is little agreement how digoxin should be used in newborn, and the results of studies in this field seem contradictory. This study attempts a quantitative assessment of the number and the sensitivity of cellular receptors for digoxin in the organism, by the in vitro measurement of erythrocyte /sup 86/Rb neonates compared with adults and old people. Red blood cells are first incubated with differing concentrations of digoxin, and then incubated with /sup 86/Rb. The initial level of /sup 86/Rb uptake (Rbi) is that observed in the absence of digoxin. The 50% index of captation (IC50) is the digoxin concentration in nanograms per ml at which /sup 86/Rb uptake is half Rbi. Three grups of patients were studied: Group I: 12 neonates, less that 5 days old; Group II: 11 adults (26 to 57 years old); Group III: 9 elderly people (71 to 82 years old). Rbi was significantly lower in neonates (Mean +/- SD: 25.8% +/- 3.5, P less than 0.001) and in the elderly (29.9% +/- 3.1) than in adults (36.8% +/- 4.6). IC50 was significantly lower in the elderly (12.1 mg/ml +/- 2.4) than in the adult patients (20.5 ng/ml +/- 5.5, P less than 0.001). In the newborns, values of IC50 were widely scattered (16.2 ng/ml +/- 7.2). The authors suggest that since Rbi reflects Na+, K+-ATPase activity, this activity is diminished in newborn and old people, and indicates that they have fewer cellular recaptors for digoxin than adults. In the elderly, the low IC50 would imply increased sensitivity to digoxin. In neonates, the wide range of values for IC50 suggests considerable individual variation in sensitivity to digoxin. The results aer consistent with the recently recomnended lower dosages of digoxin i neonates.

  6. Microcalorimetry is a sensitive method for studying the effect of nucleotide mutation on promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhu, Juncheng; Liu, Yi; Shen, Ping; Qu, Songsheng

    2005-03-31

    Microcalorimetric method was successfully used to study the effect of nucleotide mutations on promoter activity and identify the important nucleotide necessary for the promoter function in Escherichia coli. The thermokinetic parameters, such as k, I and IC(50), were calculated from the metabolic power-time curves obtained by microcalorimetric measurement using the TAM air Isothermal Microcalorimeter (manufactured by Thermometric AB company of Sweden). Analysis of these data revealed that different nucleotide mutations in -10 box sequence of RM07 fragment had different effect on the promoter activity. Our research also suggest that the microcalorimetric method is a very sensitive and easily performed method for investigation of promoter mutation. PMID:15733578

  7. Study on The Response Improvement of A Linear Actuator Using Temperature-Sensitive Magnetic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Katsuhiro; Kanzaki, Yasunori; Ota, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Kawase, Yoshihiro

    We have been studying a linear actuator for the thermostatic switch using temperature-sensitive magnetic material (TSMM). In this paper, the effect of the geometry of TSMM on response time is investigated by computing the dynamic characteristics of the actuator employing the 3-D finite element method coupled with the equations of magnetic field, heat transfer and motion. As a result, it is found that the response of the actuator is greatly improved. The validity of the computation is clarified though the comparison with the measurement of a prototype.

  8. Turbulence Model Sensitivity and Scour Gap Effect of Unsteady Flow around Pipe: A CFD Study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abbod; Sharma, R. K.; Ganesan, P.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical investigation of incompressible and transient flow around circular pipe has been carried out at different five gap phases. Flow equations such as Navier-Stokes and continuity equations have been solved using finite volume method. Unsteady horizontal velocity and kinetic energy square root profiles are plotted using different turbulence models and their sensitivity is checked against published experimental results. Flow parameters such as horizontal velocity under pipe, pressure coefficient, wall shear stress, drag coefficient, and lift coefficient are studied and presented graphically to investigate the flow behavior around an immovable pipe and scoured bed. PMID:25136666

  9. Sensitivity Study of the Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) for Rectangular Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Eric L.; Everhart, Joel L.; Iyer, Venkit

    2001-01-01

    An off-line version of the Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) has been implemented for the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility. The correction capability is currently restricted to corrections for solid wall interference in the model pitch plane for Mach numbers less than 0.45 due to a limitation in tunnel calibration data. A study to assess output sensitivity to measurement uncertainty was conducted to determine standard operational procedures and guidelines to ensure data quality during the testing process. Changes to the current facility setup and design recommendations for installing the WICS code into a new facility are reported.

  10. Experimental Study of Highly Sensitive Sensor Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator for Wireless Strain Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao; Zhongqing; Hara, Motoaki; Mitsui, Misato; Sano, Koji; Nagasawa, Sumito; Kuwano, Hiroki

    2012-07-01

    We developed a highly sensitive strain sensor employing a surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator for a wireless sensing system. The aim of this study is to monitor the distribution of the strain in the earth crust or giant infrastructures, such as bridges, skyscrapers and power plants, for disaster prevention. A SAW strain sensor was fabricated using LiNbO3 and a quartz substrate, and applied in a tensile test by attaching the steel specimen based on Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS Z2441-1). The results confirmed that the developed sensor could detect a strain of 10-6 order with linearity.

  11. Sensitivity studies for incorporating the direct effect of sulfate aerosols into climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mary Rawlings Lamberton

    2000-09-01

    Aerosols have been identified as a major element of the climate system known to scatter and absorb solar and infrared radiation, but the development of procedures for representing them is still rudimentary. This study addresses the need to improve the treatment of sulfate aerosols in climate models by investigating how sensitive radiative particles are to varying specific sulfate aerosol properties. The degree to which sulfate particles absorb or scatter radiation, termed the direct effect, varies with the size distribution of particles, the aerosol mass density, the aerosol refractive indices, the relative humidity and the concentration of the aerosol. This study develops 504 case studies of altering sulfate aerosol chemistry, size distributions, refractive indices and densities at various ambient relative humidity conditions. Ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols are studied with seven distinct size distributions at a given mode radius with three corresponding standard deviations implemented from field measurements. These test cases are evaluated for increasing relative humidity. As the relative humidity increases, the complex index of refraction and the mode radius for each distribution correspondingly change. Mie theory is employed to obtain the radiative properties for each case study. The case studies are then incorporated into a box model, the National Center of Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) column radiation model (CRM), and NCAR's community climate model version 3 (CCM3) to determine how sensitive the radiative properties and potential climatic effects are to altering sulfate properties. This study found the spatial variability of the sulfate aerosol leads to regional areas of intense aerosol forcing (W/m2). These areas are particularly sensitive to altering sulfate properties. Changes in the sulfate lognormal distribution standard deviation can lead to substantial regional differences in the annual aerosol forcing greater than 2 W/m 2. Changes in the

  12. Mask roughness induced LER control and mitigation: aberrations sensitivity study and alternate illumination scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-04-01

    Here we conduct a mask-roughness-induced line-edge-roughness (LER) aberrations sensitivity study both as a random distribution amongst the first 16 Fringe Zernikes (for overall aberration levels of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75nm rms) as well as an individual aberrations sensitivity matrix over the first 37 Fringe Zernikes. Full 2D aerial image modeling for an imaging system with NA = 0.32 was done for both the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes on a rough mask with a replicated surface roughness (RSR) of 100 pm and a correlation length of 32 nm at the nominal extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) wavelength of 13.5nm. As the ideal RSR value for commercialization of EUVL is 50 pm and under, and furthermore as has been shown elsewhere, a correlation length of 32 nm of roughness on the mask sits on the peak LER value for an NA = 0.32 imaging optic, these mask roughness values and consequently the aberration sensitivity study presented here, represent a worst-case scenario. The illumination conditions were chosen based on the possible candidates for the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes, respectively. In the 22-nm case, a disk illumination setting of σ = 0.50 was used, and for the 16-nm case, crosspole illumination with σ = 0.10 at an optimum offset of dx = 0 and dy = .67 in sigma space. In examining how to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, we considered an alternate illumination scheme whereby a traditional dipole's angular spectrum is extended in the direction parallel to the line-and-space mask absorber pattern to represent a "strip". While this illumination surprisingly provides minimal improvement to the LER as compared to several alternate illumination schemes, the overall imaging quality in terms of image-log-slope (ILS) and contrast is improved.

  13. Mask roughness induced LER control and mitigation: aberrations sensitivity study and alternate illumination scheme

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-03-11

    Here we conduct a mask-roughness-induced line-edge-roughness (LER) aberrations sensitivity study both as a random distribution amongst the first 16 Fringe Zernikes (for overall aberration levels of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75nm rms) as well as an individual aberrations sensitivity matrix over the first 37 Fringe Zernikes. Full 2D aerial image modeling for an imaging system with NA = 0.32 was done for both the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes on a rough mask with a replicated surface roughness (RSR) of 100 pm and a correlation length of 32 nm at the nominal extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) wavelength of 13.5nm. As the ideal RSR value for commercialization of EUVL is 50 pm and under, and furthermore as has been shown elsewhere, a correlation length of 32 nm of roughness on the mask sits on the peak LER value for an NA = 0.32 imaging optic, these mask roughness values and consequently the aberration sensitivity study presented here, represent a worst-case scenario. The illumination conditions were chosen based on the possible candidates for the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes, respectively. In the 22-nm case, a disk illumination setting of {sigma} = 0.50 was used, and for the 16-nm case, crosspole illumination with {sigma} = 0.10 at an optimum offset of dx = 0 and dy = .67 in sigma space. In examining how to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, we considered an alternate illumination scheme whereby a traditional dipole's angular spectrum is extended in the direction parallel to the line-and-space mask absorber pattern to represent a 'strip'. While this illumination surprisingly provides minimal improvement to the LER as compared to several alternate illumination schemes, the overall imaging quality in terms of image-log-slope (ILS) and contrast is improved.

  14. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurement of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 microns. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the radiance signal or sensitivity to CO2 change near the surface is not significantly diminished even in the presence of aerosols and/or thin cirrus clouds in the atmosphere; (c) the modification of sunlight path length by scattering of aerosols and cirrus clouds could lead to large systematic errors in the retrieval; therefore, ancillary aerosol/cirrus cloud data are important to reduce retrieval errors; (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, must be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  15. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurements of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 micron. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the effects of other interfering constituents, such as water vapor, aerosols and cirrus clouds, on the radiance are significant but the overall effects of the modification of light path length on total back-to-space radiance sensitivity to CO2 change are minor for general cases, which means that generally the total column CO2 can be derived in high precision from the ratio of the on-line center to off-line radiances; (c) together with CO2 gas absorption aerosol/cirrus cloud layer has differential scattering which may result in the modification of on-line to off-line radiance ratio which could lead a large bias in the total column CO2 retrieval. Approaches to correct such bias need further investigation. (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature, which is achievable from new atmospheric sounders in the near future; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, should be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  16. Shyness-Sensitivity and Social, School, and Psychological Adjustment in Urban Chinese Children: A Four-Wave Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Chen, Xinyin; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study examined reciprocal contributions between shyness-sensitivity and social, school, and psychological adjustment in urban Chinese children. Longitudinal data were collected once a year from Grade 3 to Grade 6 (ages 9-12 years) for 1,171 children from multiple sources. Shyness-sensitivity positively contributed to social, school, and psychological difficulties over time, with the most consistent effects on peer preference and loneliness. Social and school adjustment negatively contributed to the development of shyness-sensitivity. The initial levels of shyness-sensitivity and social and school adjustment moderated the growth of each other, mainly as a resource-potentiating factor. The results indicate the significance of shyness-sensitivity for adjustment and the role of adjustment in the development of shyness-sensitivity in today's urban Chinese society. PMID:26331958

  17. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Diffraction Imaging Study of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.

    2003-01-01

    The study of defects and growth of protein crystals is of importance in providing a fundamental understanding of this important category of systems and the rationale for crystallization of better ordered crystals for structural determination and drug design. Yet, as a result of the extremely weak scattering power of x-rays in protein and other biological macromolecular crystals, the extinction lengths for those crystals are extremely large and, roughly speaking, of the order of millimeters on average compared to the scale of micrometers for most small molecular crystals. This has significant implication for x-ray diffraction and imaging study of protein crystals, and presents an interesting challenge to currently available x-ray analytical techniques. We proposed that coherence-based phase sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging could provide a way to augment defect contrast in x-ray diffraction images of weakly diffracting biological macromolecular crystals. I shall examine the principles and ideas behind this approach and compare it to other available x-ray topography and diffraction methods. I shall then present some recent experimental results in two model protein systems-cubic apofemtin and tetragonal lysozyme crystals to demonstrate the capability of the coherence-based imaging method in mapping point defects, dislocations, and the degree of perfection of biological macromolecular crystals with extreme sensitivity. While further work is under way, it is intended to show that the observed new features have yielded important information on protein crystal perfection and nucleation and growth mechanism otherwise unobtainable.

  18. Sensitivity studies for the main r process: β-decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpower, M.; Cass, J.; Passucci, G.; Aprahamian, A.; Surman, R.

    2014-04-15

    The pattern of isotopic abundances produced in rapid neutron capture, or r-process, nucleosynthesis is sensitive to the nuclear physics properties of thousands of unstable neutron-rich nuclear species that participate in the process. It has long been recognized that the some of the most influential pieces of nuclear data for r-process simulations are β-decay lifetimes. In light of experimental advances that have pushed measurement capabilities closer to the classic r-process path, we revisit the role of individual β-decay rates in the r process. We perform β-decay rate sensitivity studies for a main (A > 120) r process in a range of potential astrophysical scenarios. We study the influence of individual rates during (n, γ)-(γ, n) equilibrium and during the post-equilibrium phase where material moves back toward stability. We confirm the widely accepted view that the most important lifetimes are those of nuclei along the r-process path for each astrophysical scenario considered. However, we find in addition that individual β-decay rates continue to shape the final abundance pattern through the post-equilibrium phase, for as long as neutron capture competes with β decay. Many of the lifetimes important for this phase of the r process are within current or near future experimental reach.

  19. Mesoscale Assimilation of TMI Rainfall Data with 4DVAR: Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Pu, Zhaoxia

    2003-01-01

    Sensitivity studies are performed on the assimilation of TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission) Microwave Imager (TMI) derived rainfall data into a mesoscale model using a four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) technique. A series of numerical experiments is conducted to evaluate the impact of TMI rainfall data on the numerical simulation of Hurricane Bonnie (1998). The results indicate that rainfall data assimilation is sensitive to the error characteristics of the data and the inclusion of physics in the adjoint and forward models. In addition, assimilating the rainfall data alone is helpful for producing a more realistic eye and rain bands in the hurricane but does not ensure improvements in hurricane intensity forecasts. Further study indicated that it is necessary to incorporate TMI rainfall data together with other types of data such as wind data into the model, in which case the inclusion of the rainfall data further improves the intensity forecast of the hurricane. This implies that proper constraints may be needed for rainfall assimilation.

  20. Model-based POD study of manual ultrasound inspection and sensitivity analysis using metamodel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribay, Guillemette; Artusi, Xavier; Jenson, Frédéric; Reece, Christopher; Lhuillier, Pierre-Emile

    2016-02-01

    The reliability of NDE can be quantified by using the Probability of Detection (POD) approach. Former studies have shown the potential of the model-assisted POD (MAPOD) approach to replace expensive experimental determination of POD curves. In this paper, we make use of CIVA software to determine POD curves for a manual ultrasonic inspection of a heavy component, for which a whole experimental POD campaign was not available. The influential parameters were determined by expert analysis. The semi-analytical models used in CIVA for wave propagation and beam-defect interaction have been validated in the range of variation of the influential parameters by comparison with finite element modelling (Athena). The POD curves are computed for « hit/miss » and « â versus a » analysis. The verification of Berens hypothesis is evaluated by statistical tools. A sensitivity study is performed to measure the relative influence of parameters on the defect response amplitude variance, using the Sobol sensitivity index. A meta-model is also built to reduce computing cost and enhance the precision of estimated index.

  1. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  2. Numerical study of premixed HCCI engine combustion and its sensitivity to computational mesh and model uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Song-Charng; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2003-06-01

    This study used a numerical model to investigate the combustion process in a premixed iso-octane homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The engine was a supercharged Cummins C engine operated under HCCI conditions. The CHEMKIN code was implemented into an updated KIVA-3V code so that the combustion could be modelled using detailed chemistry in the context of engine CFD simulations. The model was able to accurately simulate the ignition timing and combustion phasing for various engine conditions. The unburned hydrocarbon emissions were also well predicted while the carbon monoxide emissions were under predicted. Model results showed that the majority of unburned hydrocarbon is located in the piston-ring crevice region and the carbon monoxide resides in the vicinity of the cylinder walls. A sensitivity study of the computational grid resolution indicated that the combustion predictions were relatively insensitive to the grid density. However, the piston-ring crevice region needed to be simulated with high resolution to obtain accurate emissions predictions. The model results also indicated that HCCI combustion and emissions are very sensitive to the initial mixture temperature. The computations also show that the carbon monoxide emissions prediction can be significantly improved by modifying a key oxidation reaction rate constant.

  3. Development of a sensitive mid-infrared spectrometer for the study of cooled molecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porambo, Michael W.

    The study of molecular ions is relevant to many areas of scientific interest. Mid-infrared laser spectroscopy functions as a useful tool for understanding the role of molecular ions in these areas. To this end, a broadly tunable mid-infrared difference frequency generation noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) system has been developed and characterized through rovibrational spectroscopy of methane. In addition, an attempt was made to use this spectrometer to probe molecular ions focused into an ion beam. Challenges inherent to laboratory molecular ion spectroscopy, such as quantum dilution at high internal temperatures and low ion number density, have been addressed through the development of an instrument that produces rotationally cooled molecular ions coupled to the highly sensitive spectroscopic technique NICE-OHMS. The instrument was first explored as an extension of an ion beam spectrometer by the integration of a continuous supersonic expansion discharge source for the production of the cooled molecular ions. Issues with the implementation led to the re- design of the instrument for spectroscopically probing a supersonic expansion discharge directly with NICE-OHMS. After implementing discharge modulation of the supersonic expansion source, spectra of rotationally cooled H(3/+) and HN(+/2) were acquired. This instrumental development and preliminary spectroscopy has paved the way for a new method for the sensitive spectroscopic study of cooled molecular ions that will aid further insight into these chemical species in many fields.

  4. Shyness-Sensitivity and Social, School, and Psychological Adjustment in Urban Chinese Children: A Four-Wave Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Fan; Chen, Xinyin; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study examined reciprocal contributions between shyness-sensitivity and social, school, and psychological adjustment in urban Chinese children. Longitudinal data were collected once a year from Grade 3 to Grade 6 (ages 9-12 years) for 1,171 children from multiple sources. Shyness-sensitivity positively contributed to social, school, and…

  5. Is Hiding Foot and Mouth Disease Sensitive Behavior for Farmers? A Survey Study in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Gunarathne, Anoma; Kubota, Satoko; Kumarawadu, Pradeep; Karunagoda, Kamal; Kon, Hiroichi

    2016-01-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) has a long history in Sri Lanka and was found to be endemic in various parts of the country and constitutes a constant threat to farmers. In Sri Lanka, currently there is no regular, nationwide vaccination programme devised to control FMD. Therefore, improving farmers’ knowledge regarding distinguishing FMD from other diseases and ensuring prompt reporting of any suspicion of FMD as well as restricting movement of animals are critical activities for an effective FMD response effort. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between farmers’ knowledge levels and their behaviors to establish a strategy to control FMD. In our study, item count technique was applied to estimate the number of farmers that under-report and sell FMD-infected animals, although to do so is prohibited by law. The following findings were observed: about 63% of farmers have very poor knowledge of routes of FMD transmission; ‘under-reporting’ was found to be a sensitive behavior and nearly 23% of the farmers were reluctant to report FMD-infected animals; and ‘selling FMD-infected animals’ is a sensitive behavior among high-level knowledge group while it is a non-sensitive behavior among the low-level knowledge group. If farmers would understand the importance of prompt reporting, they may report any suspected cases of FMD to veterinary officials. However, even if farmers report honestly, they do not want to cull FMD-infected animals. Thus, education programs should be conducted not only on FMD introduction and transmission, but also its impact. Furthermore, consumers may criticize the farmers for culling their infected animals. Hence, not only farmers, but also consumers need to be educated on the economic impact of FMD and the importance of controlling an outbreak. If farmers have a high knowledge of FMD transmission, they consider selling FMD-infected animals as a sensitive behavior. Therefore, severe punishment should

  6. A Sensitivity Analysis Method to Study the Behavior of Complex Process-based Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnach, M.; Neilson, R.; Bolte, J.

    2001-12-01

    The use of process-based models as a tool for scientific inquiry is becoming increasingly relevant in ecosystem studies. Process-based models are artificial constructs that simulate the system by mechanistically mimicking the functioning of its component processes. Structurally, a process-based model can be characterized, in terms of its processes and the relationships established among them. Each process comprises a set of functional relationships among several model components (e.g., state variables, parameters and input data). While not encoded explicitly, the dynamics of the model emerge from this set of components and interactions organized in terms of processes. It is the task of the modeler to guarantee that the dynamics generated are appropriate and semantically equivalent to the phenomena being modeled. Despite the availability of techniques to characterize and understand model behavior, they do not suffice to completely and easily understand how a complex process-based model operates. For example, sensitivity analysis studies model behavior by determining the rate of change in model output as parameters or input data are varied. One of the problems with this approach is that it considers the model as a "black box", and it focuses on explaining model behavior by analyzing the relationship input-output. Since, these models have a high degree of non-linearity, understanding how the input affects an output can be an extremely difficult task. Operationally, the application of this technique may constitute a challenging task because complex process-based models are generally characterized by a large parameter space. In order to overcome some of these difficulties, we propose a method of sensitivity analysis to be applicable to complex process-based models. This method focuses sensitivity analysis at the process level, and it aims to determine how sensitive the model output is to variations in the processes. Once the processes that exert the major influence in

  7. Radar sensitivity and antenna scan pattern study for a satellite-based Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Modeling global atmospheric circulations and forecasting the weather would improve greatly if worldwide information on winds aloft were available. Recognition of this led to the inclusion of the LAser Wind Sounder (LAWS) system to measure Doppler shifts from aerosols in the planned for Earth Observation System (EOS). However, gaps will exist in LAWS coverage where heavy clouds are present. The RAdar Wind Sensor (RAWS) is an instrument that could fill these gaps by measuring Doppler shifts from clouds and rain. Previous studies conducted at the University of Kansas show RAWS as a feasible instrument. This thesis pertains to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) sensitivity, transmit waveform, and limitations to the antenna scan pattern of the RAWS system. A dop-size distribution model is selected and applied to the radar range equation for the sensitivity analysis. Six frequencies are used in computing the SNR for several cloud types to determine the optimal transmit frequency. the results show the use of two frequencies, one higher (94 GHz) to obtain sensitivity for thinner cloud, and a lower frequency (24 GHz) to obtain sensitivity for thinner cloud, and a lower frequency (24 GHz) for better penetration in rain, provide ample SNR. The waveform design supports covariance estimation processing. This estimator eliminates the Doppler ambiguities compounded by the selection of such high transmit frequencies, while providing an estimate of the mean frequency. the unambiguous range and velocity computation shows them to be within acceptable limits. The design goal for the RAWS system is to limit the wind-speed error to less than 1 ms(exp -1). Due to linear dependence between vectors for a three-vector scan pattern, a reasonable wind-speed error is unattainable. Only the two-vector scan pattern falls within the wind-error limits for azimuth angles between 16 deg to 70 deg. However, this scan only allows two components of the wind to be determined. As a result, a technique is

  8. Thymidine analog methods for studies of adult neurogenesis are not equally sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Leuner, Benedetta; Glasper, Erica R.; Gould, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is often studied by labeling new cells with the thymidine analog bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and using immunohistochemical methods for their visualization. Using this approach, considerable variability has been reported in the number of new cells produced in the dentate gyrus of adult rodents. We examined whether immunohistochemical methods, including BrdU antibodies from different vendors (Vector, BD, Roche, Dako, Novocastra, Accurate) and DNA denaturation pretreatments, alter the quantitative and qualitative patterns of BrdU labeling. We also compared the sensitivity and specificity of BrdU with two other thymidine analogs, iododeoxyuridine (IdU) and chlorodeoxyuridine (CldU). We found that the number of BrdU-labeled cells in the dentate gyrus of adult rats was dependent on the BrdU antibody used but was unrelated to differences in antibody penetration. Even at a higher concentration, some antibodies stained fewer cells (Vector, Novocastra). A sensitive BrdU antibody (BD) was specific for dividing cells; all BrdU-labeled cells stained for Ki67, an endogenous marker of cell proliferation. We also observed that DNA denaturation pretreatments affected the number of BrdU-labeled cells and staining intensity for a marker of neuronal differentiation, NeuN. Finally, we found that IdU and CldU, when used at molarities comparable to those that label the maximal number of cells with BrdU, are less sensitive. These data suggest that antibody and thymidine analog selection, as well as the staining procedure employed, can affect the number of newly generated neurons detected in the adult brain thus providing a potential explanation for some of the variability in the adult neurogenesis literature. PMID:19731267

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies a potent locus associated with human opioid sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, D; Fukuda, K; Kasai, S; Hasegawa, J; Aoki, Y; Nishi, A; Saita, N; Koukita, Y; Nagashima, M; Katoh, R; Satoh, Y; Tagami, M; Higuchi, S; Ujike, H; Ozaki, N; Inada, T; Iwata, N; Sora, I; Iyo, M; Kondo, N; Won, M-J; Naruse, N; Uehara-Aoyama, K; Itokawa, M; Koga, M; Arinami, T; Kaneko, Y; Hayashida, M; Ikeda, K

    2014-01-01

    Opioids, such as morphine and fentanyl, are widely used as effective analgesics for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. In addition, the opioid system has a key role in the rewarding effects of morphine, ethanol, cocaine and various other drugs. Although opioid sensitivity is well known to vary widely among individual subjects, several candidate genetic polymorphisms reported so far are not sufficient for fully understanding the wide range of interindividual differences in human opioid sensitivity. By conducting a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS) in healthy subjects, we found that genetic polymorphisms within a linkage disequilibrium block that spans 2q33.3–2q34 were strongly associated with the requirements for postoperative opioid analgesics after painful cosmetic surgery. The C allele of the best candidate single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2952768, was associated with more analgesic requirements, and consistent results were obtained in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. In addition, carriers of the C allele in this SNP exhibited less vulnerability to severe drug dependence in patients with methamphetamine dependence, alcohol dependence, and eating disorders and a lower ‘Reward Dependence' score on a personality questionnaire in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the C/C genotype of this SNP was significantly associated with the elevated expression of a neighboring gene, CREB1. These results show that SNPs in this locus are the most potent genetic factors associated with human opioid sensitivity known to date, affecting both the efficacy of opioid analgesics and liability to severe substance dependence. Our findings provide valuable information for the personalized treatment of pain and drug dependence. PMID:23183491

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies a potent locus associated with human opioid sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, D; Fukuda, K; Kasai, S; Hasegawa, J; Aoki, Y; Nishi, A; Saita, N; Koukita, Y; Nagashima, M; Katoh, R; Satoh, Y; Tagami, M; Higuchi, S; Ujike, H; Ozaki, N; Inada, T; Iwata, N; Sora, I; Iyo, M; Kondo, N; Won, M-J; Naruse, N; Uehara-Aoyama, K; Itokawa, M; Koga, M; Arinami, T; Kaneko, Y; Hayashida, M; Ikeda, K

    2014-01-01

    Opioids, such as morphine and fentanyl, are widely used as effective analgesics for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. In addition, the opioid system has a key role in the rewarding effects of morphine, ethanol, cocaine and various other drugs. Although opioid sensitivity is well known to vary widely among individual subjects, several candidate genetic polymorphisms reported so far are not sufficient for fully understanding the wide range of interindividual differences in human opioid sensitivity. By conducting a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS) in healthy subjects, we found that genetic polymorphisms within a linkage disequilibrium block that spans 2q33.3-2q34 were strongly associated with the requirements for postoperative opioid analgesics after painful cosmetic surgery. The C allele of the best candidate single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2952768, was associated with more analgesic requirements, and consistent results were obtained in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. In addition, carriers of the C allele in this SNP exhibited less vulnerability to severe drug dependence in patients with methamphetamine dependence, alcohol dependence, and eating disorders and a lower 'Reward Dependence' score on a personality questionnaire in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the C/C genotype of this SNP was significantly associated with the elevated expression of a neighboring gene, CREB1. These results show that SNPs in this locus are the most potent genetic factors associated with human opioid sensitivity known to date, affecting both the efficacy of opioid analgesics and liability to severe substance dependence. Our findings provide valuable information for the personalized treatment of pain and drug dependence. PMID:23183491

  11. Sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Misery, L; Loser, K; Ständer, S

    2016-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical condition defined by the self-reported facial presence of different sensory perceptions, including tightness, stinging, burning, tingling, pain and pruritus. Sensitive skin may occur in individuals with normal skin, with skin barrier disturbance, or as a part of the symptoms associated with facial dermatoses such as rosacea, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Although experimental studies are still pending, the symptoms of sensitive skin suggest the involvement of cutaneous nerve fibres and neuronal, as well as epidermal, thermochannels. Many individuals with sensitive skin report worsening symptoms due to environmental factors. It is thought that this might be attributed to the thermochannel TRPV1, as it typically responds to exogenous, endogenous, physical and chemical stimuli. Barrier disruptions and immune mechanisms may also be involved. This review summarizes current knowledge on the epidemiology, potential mechanisms, clinics and therapy of sensitive skin. PMID:26805416

  12. Aerodynamic parameter studies and sensitivity analysis for rotor blades in axial flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. Danny; Peters, David A.

    1991-01-01

    The analytical capability is offered for aerodynamic parametric studies and sensitivity analyses of rotary wings in axial flight by using a 3-D undistorted wake model in curved lifting line theory. The governing equations are solved by both the Multhopp Interpolation technique and the Vortex Lattice method. The singularity from the bound vortices is eliminated through the Hadamard's finite part concept. Good numerical agreement between both analytical methods and finite differences methods are found. Parametric studies were made to assess the effects of several shape variables on aerodynamic loads. It is found, e.g., that a rotor blade with out-of-plane and inplane curvature can theoretically increase lift in the inboard and outboard regions respectively without introducing an additional induced drag.

  13. The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor for the Study of Radio Transients: Array Configuration and Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Rossina B.; Jenet, F. A.; Hicks, B.; Kassim, N. E.; Ray, P. S.; Taylor, G. B.

    2012-01-01

    The forthcoming Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM), will be an array of dipoles working between 10-88 MHz adapted from the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) design. This array will offer significant advantages over other projects for the study of radio transients, but its effectiveness will depend on the geometric details of the array. This poster presents the results of theoretical sensitivity calculations for a single 12 antenna array. An optimal configuration was found that can effectively block terrestrial signals incident from the horizon at certain "resonant" frequencies. This configuration will allow LoFASM to operate in regions with relatively high radio frequency interference. We also discuss possible transient sources that could be studied by this instrument.

  14. Recent changes in surface solar radiation and precipitation in India: sensitivity studies with ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, D.; Frischknecht, M.; Wild, M.

    2012-04-01

    Population growth and industrialization is progressing at an unprecedented rate on a global scale. One region undergoing a particularly fast transition is India. These changes are accompanied, among others, by a substantial increase in aerosol emission. To learn more about associated consequences for the climate system we have carried out a comparatively large set of transient sensitivity studies with the global atmosphere only climate model ECHAM5-HAM, using aerosol emission data from NIES (National Institute of Environmental Studies, Japan) and prescribed, observation based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the Hadley Center. The sensitivity studies cover the period from 1870 to 2005 and comprise ensembles of simulations (up to 13 members per ensemble), which allow to address the role of different aerosol species, greenhouse gases, and prescribed sea surface temperatures. We present and analysis of these simulation data with particular focus on surface solar radiation (SSR) and precipitation in India, and discuss potential physical mechanisms involved. Modeled annual mean SSR is found to decrease over the Indian subcontinent (land between 67E / 90E / 10N / 25N) at a rate of about -3 to -4 W/m2 per decade. This dimming is roughly in line with observation based estimates. The decrease is comparable under all sky conditions. Regional and seasonal differences are substantial, with the Ganges plane showing the strongest dimming. Aerosols are transported far out over the Indian ocean, leading to a substantial decrease in SSR also there. Modeled precipitation captures well the annual monsoon cycle. The observed, recent decrease in precipitation is, however, overestimated by the model. More precisely, the model captures the observed precipitation reduction in northern India in July / August, but not the observed increase in precipitation in May / June. Our sensitivity studies suggest that the atmosphere only response to increasing aerosol emissions is a reduction of

  15. Hypothesis for induction and propagation of chemical sensitivity based on biopsy studies.

    PubMed

    Meggs, W J

    1997-03-01

    The reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS), the reactive upper airways dysfunction syndrome (RUDS), the sick building syndrome (SBS), and the multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome (MCS) are overlapping disorders in which there is an intolerance to environmental chemicals. The onset of these illnesses is often associated with an initial acute chemical exposure. To understand the pathophysiology of these conditions, a study of the nasal pathology of individuals experiencing these syndromes was undertaken. Preliminary data indicate that the nasal pathology of these disorders is characterized by defects in tight junctions between cells, desquamation of the respiratory epithelium, glandular hyperplasia, lymphocytic infiltrates, and peripheral nerve fiber proliferation. These findings suggest a model for a relationship between the chronic inflammation seen in these conditions and an individual's sensitivity to chemicals. A positive feedback loop is set up: the inflammatory response to low levels of chemical irritants is enhanced due to the observed changes in the epithelium, and the epithelial changes are propagated by the inflammatory response to the chemicals. This model, combined with the concept of neurogenic switching, has the potential to explain many aspects of RADS, RUDS, SBS, and MCS in a unified way. PMID:9167982

  16. Nanoscale elemental sensitivity study of Nd₂Fe₁₄B using absorption correlation tomography.

    PubMed

    Kao, Thomas L; Shi, Crystal Y; Wang, Junyue; Mao, Wendy L; Liu, Yijin; Yang, Wenge

    2013-11-01

    Transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) is a rapidly developing technique with the capability of nanoscale three dimensional (3D) real-space imaging. Combined with the wide range in energy tunability from synchrotron sources, TXM enables the retrieval of 3D microstructural information with elemental/chemical sensitivity that would otherwise be inaccessible. The differential absorption contrast above and below absorption edges has been used to reconstruct the distributions of different elements, assuming the absorption edges of the interested elements are fairly well separated. Here we present an "Absorption Correlation Tomography" (ACT) method based on the correlation of the material absorption across multiple edges. ACT overcomes the significant limitation caused by overlapping absorption edges, significantly expands the capabilities of TXM, and makes it possible for fully quantitative nano-scale 3D structural investigation with chemical/elemental sensitivity. The capability and robustness of this new methodology is demonstrated in a case study of an important type of rare earth magnet (Nd₂Fe₁₄B). PMID:23922210

  17. Host cell reactivation studies with epidermal cells of mice sensitive and resistant to carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.E.; Strickland, A.G.

    1984-03-01

    Primary epidermal cells from AKR, BALB/c, CD-1, and SENCAR mice, listed in order of least to most sensitive to epidermal carcinogenesis by initiation and promotion protocols, were found to be equally competent to ''reactivate'' herpes simplex virus type 1 irradiated by germicidal ultraviolet radiation. Nontumorigenic BALB/c epidermal cell lines selected in vitro for resistance to terminal differentiation after in vivo or in vitro treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens showed virus survival curves similar to those of primary cells. Similarly, primary cultures which were allowed to grow to confluency following a single treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (100 ng/ml) retained normal host cell reactivation. Host cell reactivation studies with mouse dermal fibroblasts could not be done because of the failure of the herpes simplex virus to infect these cells and produce plaques. These results demonstrate that survival of ultraviolet light-damaged virus in primary epidermal cells in culture is unrelated to whether the cells are derived from mice sensitive or resistant to epidermal carcinogenesis. Furthermore, virus survival is not changed by tumor promoter treatment or by treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens which results in differentiation-resistant cells.

  18. Transport studies of quantum dots sensitized single Mn-ZnO nanowire field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Maloney, Francis Scott; Rimal, Gaurab; Poudyal, Uma; Tang, Jinke; Wang, Wenyong

    We present opto-electrical transport properties of Mn-CdSe quantum dots (QDs) sensitized single Mn-ZnO nanowire (NW) field effect transistors (FET). The ZnO NWs with 2 atomic % of Mn doping are grown by chemical vapor deposition. The NWs are ferromagnetic at low temperature. The as grown nanowires are transferred to clean SiO2/Si substrate and single nanowire field effect transistors (FET) are fabricated by standard e-beam lithography. Mobility and carrier concentration of Mn-ZnO NWs are estimated from FET device measurement which shows NWs are n-type semiconductors. Pulse laser deposition of Mn-CdSe QDs on the single NW FET significantly increases carrier concentration of the QD-NW system in dark where the QD monolayer conduction is negligibly small. The photoconductivity study of QD sensitized NW FET enlightens the conduction spectrum of QD-NW system and QD to NW carrier transfer mechanism. This work has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-FG02-10ER46728.

  19. Microarray study of temperature-dependent sensitivity and selectivity of metal/oxide sensing interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiffany, Jason; Cavicchi, Richard E.; Semancik, Stephen

    2001-02-01

    Conductometric gas microsensors offer the benefits of ppm-level sensitivity, real-time data, simple interfacing to electronics hardware, and low power consumption. The type of device we have been exploring consists of a sensor film deposited on a "microhotplate"- a 100 micron platform with built-in heating (to activate reactions on the sensing surface) and thermometry. We have been using combinatorial studies of 36-element arrays to characterize the relationship between sensor film composition, operating temperature, and response, as measured by the device's sensitivity and selectivity. Gases that have been tested on these arrays include methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane, propane, methane, acetone, benzene, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide, and are of interest in the management of environmental waste sites. These experiments compare tin oxide films modified by catalyst overlayers, and ultrathin metal seed layers. The seed layers are used as part of a chemical vapor deposition process that uses each array element's microheater to activate the deposition of SnO2, and control its microstructure. Low coverage (20 Ê) catalytic metals (Pd, Cu, Cr, In, Au) are deposited on the oxides by masked evaporation or sputtering. This presentation demonstrates the value of an array-based approach for developing film processing methods, measuring performance characteristics, and establishing reproducibility. It also illustrates how temperature-dependent response data for varied metal/oxide compositions can be used to tailor a microsensor array for a given application.

  20. Hurricane-generated currents on the outer continental shelf. 2. Model sensitivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Cortis; Thompson, J. Dana

    1989-09-01

    A numerical model described and verified in part 1 of this two-part series (Cooper and Thompson, this issue) is applied to study the sensitivity of hurricane-generated currents on the outer shelf and slope. Numerical experiments are performed in a simple basin with a straight shelf. The sensitivity of the response to changes in storm parameters, direction of storm approach, and topography is quantified. Response is measured in terms of the mixed-layer velocity and depth at sites along the storm track. Results reveal the most important factors are (in decreasing order) wind speed, storm translation speed, direction of storm approach, asymmetry in the wind field, entrainment parameterization, and advection at slower storm translation speeds. Response is largely insensitive (less than 10%) to radius of maximum wind, shelf and slope configuration, bottom friction, atmospheric pressure gradients, and further reductions in the model grid size. For a storm approaching cross shelf, the response is primarily baroclinic (greater than 90%) and only weakly dependent (less than 10%) on the water depth at the site.

  1. Contact allergens in persons with leg ulcers: a Canadian study in contact sensitization.

    PubMed

    Smart, Victoria; Alavi, Afsaneh; Coutts, Pat; Fierheller, Marjorie; Coelho, Sunita; Linn Holness, D; Sibbald, R Gary

    2008-09-01

    Individuals with chronic leg ulcers often develop contact allergic reactions to topical preparations used to treat their wounds and the surrounding skin. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of positive patch test responses to common allergens in patients with leg ulcers or venous disease. A case series of 100 consecutive, consenting patients with chronic venous disease and other causes of leg ulcers that were available for patch testing were enrolled. The patients were tested with 38 common allergens, including those most relevant to leg ulcers. A total of 46% of the patients had at least 1 positive patch test response. Multiple reactions in the same patient were common. The most frequent groups of sensitizers were fragrances, lanolin, antibacterial agents, and rubber-related allergens. Though the prevalence of positive patch test reactions is high in this population, it is lower than commonly reported. This may be the result of clinical practice that considered the avoidance of common sensitizers in the management of patients with leg ulcers. PMID:18757387

  2. Sensitivity Studies for Space-Based Global Measurements of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jian-Ping; Kawa, S. Randolph; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is well known as the primary forcing agent of global warming. Although the climate forcing due to CO2 is well known, the sources and sinks of CO2 are not well understood. Currently the lack of global atmospheric CO2 observations limits our ability to diagnose the global carbon budget (e.g., finding the so-called "missing sink") and thus limits our ability to understand past climate change and predict future climate response. Space-based techniques are being developed to make high-resolution and high-precision global column CO2 measurements. One of the proposed techniques utilizes the passive remote sensing of Earth's reflected solar radiation at the weaker vibration-rotation band of CO2 in the near infrared (approx. 1.57 micron). We use a line-by-line radiative transfer model to explore the potential of this method. Results of sensitivity studies for CO2 concentration variation and geophysical conditions (i.e., atmospheric temperature, surface reflectivity, solar zenith angle, aerosol, and cirrus cloud) will be presented. We will also present sensitivity results for an O2 A-band (approx. 0.76 micron) sensor that will be needed along with CO2 to make surface pressure and cloud height measurements.

  3. Derivation of soil thresholds for lead applying species sensitivity distribution: A case study for root vegetables.

    PubMed

    Ding, Changfeng; Ma, Yibing; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Taolin; Wang, Xingxiang

    2016-02-13

    The combination of food quality standard and soil-plant transfer models can be used to derive critical limits of heavy metals for agricultural soils. In this paper, a robust methodology is presented, taking the variations of plant species and cultivars and soil properties into account to derive soil thresholds for lead (Pb) applying species sensitivity distribution (SSD). Three species of root vegetables (four cultivars each for radish, carrot, and potato) were selected to investigate their sensitivity differences for accumulating Pb through greenhouse experiment. Empirical soil-plant transfer model was developed from carrot New Kuroda grown in twenty-one soils covering a wide variation in physicochemical properties and was used to normalize the bioaccumulation data of non-model cultivars. The relationship was then validated to be reliable and would not cause over-protection using data from field experimental sites and published independent studies. The added hazardous concentration for protecting 95% of the cultivars not exceeding the food quality standard (HC5add) were then calculated from the Burr Type III function fitted SSD curves. The derived soil Pb thresholds based on the added risk approach (total soil concentration subtracting the natural background part) were presented as continuous or scenario criteria depending on the combination of soil pH and CEC. PMID:26513560

  4. Sample size calculations for crossover thorough QT studies: satisfaction of regulatory threshold and assay sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Anand, Suraj P; Murray, Sharon C; Koch, Gary G

    2010-05-01

    The cost for conducting a "thorough QT/QTc study" is substantial and an unsuccessful outcome of the study can be detrimental to the safety profile of the drug, so sample size calculations play a very important role in ensuring adequate power for a thorough QT study. Current literature offers some help in designing such studies, but these methods have limitations and mostly apply only in the context of linear mixed models with compound symmetry covariance structure. It is not evident that such models can satisfactorily be employed to represent all kinds of QTc data, and the existing literature inadequately addresses whether there is a change in sample size and power for more general covariance structures for the linear mixed models. We assess the use of some of the existing methods to design a thorough QT study through data arising from a GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)-conducted thorough QT study, and explore newer models for sample size calculation. We also provide a new method to calculate the sample size required to detect assay sensitivity with adequate power. PMID:20358438

  5. Modeling and sensitivity study of the dual-chamber SMART (SMA ReseTtable) lift device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntz, Jonathan E.; Young, Jonathan R.; Brei, Diann; Radice, Joshua; Strom, Kenneth A.

    2007-04-01

    Morphing structures for applications such as impact mitigation is a challenging problem due to the speed and repeatability requirements that limit the viable actuation approaches. This paper examines a promising stored-energy, active-release approach that can be deployed quickly (~40 ms), is reusable/resetable and can be tuned in the field for changing conditions such as additional mass, temperature compensation or platform changes. The Dual-Chamber SMART (SMA ReseTtable) Lift is a pneumatic air spring controlled via an ultra-fast SMA actuated valve. This paper presents the modeling, sensitivity analysis and experimental validation of this new technology. A control-volume based analytical model was derived that employs compressible, sonic flow and thermodynamic relations to provide a set of differential equations that relate the design parameters (cylinder and valve geometry), application parameters (deployed mass), and operational parameters (pressure, temperature and SMA valve actuation profile), to the deployment performance (deploy time, profile, position, etc.). The model was exercised to explore the sensitivity of the performance with regards to these parameters and explore the off-line and on-line adjustability of the device's performance to compensate for cross platform applications and uncontrolled environmental effects such as temperature and added mass. As proof-of-concept, a full-scale prototype was designed via the model, built and experimentally characterized across several of the parameters for the real case-study of automotive pedestrian protection. The prototype performance agreed closely with model predictions and met the rigorous specifications of the case study with in-situ tailoring which is applicable to a wide range of morphing applications beyond this case study.

  6. Fatigue life prediction for wind turbines: A case study on loading spectra and parameter sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, H.J.; Veers, P.S.; Ashwill, T.D.

    1992-01-01

    Wind turbines are fatigue-critical machines used to produce electrical energy from the wind. These rotating machines are subjected to environmental loadings that are highly irregular in nature. Historical examples of fatigue problems in both research and commercial wind turbine development are presented. Some example data on wind turbine environments, loadings and material properties are also shown. Before a description of how the authors have chosen to attack the cumulative damage assessment, questions are presented for the reader's reflection. The solution technique used by the authors is then presented, followed by a case study applying the procedures to an actual wind turbine blade joint. The wind turbine is the 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) erected by Sandia National Laboratories near Bushland, Texas. The case study examines parameter sensitivities for realistic uncertainties in inputs defining the turbine environment, stress response and material properties. The fatigue lifetimes are calculated using a fatigue analysis program, called LIFE2, which was developed at Sandia. The LIFE2 code, described in some detail in an appendix, is a PC-based, menu-driven package that leads the user through the steps required to characterize the loading and material properties, then uses Miner's rule or a linear crack propagation rule to numerically calculate the time to failure. Only S-n based cumulative damage applications are illustrated here. The LIFE2 code is available to educational institutions for use as a case study in describing complicated loading histories and for use by students in examining, hands on, parameter sensitivity of fatigue life analysis.

  7. Fatigue life prediction for wind turbines: A case study on loading spectra and parameter sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, H. J.; Veers, P. S.; Ashwill, T. D.

    Wind turbines are fatigue-critical machines used to produce electrical energy from the wind. These rotating machines are subjected to environmental loadings that are highly irregular in nature. Historical examples of fatigue problems in both research and commercial wind turbine development are presented. Some example data on wind turbine environments, loadings and material properties are also shown. Before a description of how the authors have chosen to attack the cumulative damage assessment, questions are presented for the reader's reflection. The solution technique used by the authors is then presented, followed by a case study applying the procedures to an actual wind turbine blade joint. The wind turbine is the 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) erected by Sandia National Laboratories near Bushland, Texas. The case study examines parameter sensitivities for realistic uncertainties in inputs defining the turbine environment, stress response and material properties. The fatigue lifetimes are calculated using a fatigue analysis program, called LIFE2, which was developed at Sandia. The LIFE2 code, described in some detail in an appendix, is a PC-based, menu-driven package that leads the user through the steps required to characterize the loading and material properties, then uses Miner's rule or a linear crack propagation rule to numerically calculate the time to failure. Only S-n based cumulative damage applications are illustrated here. The LIFE2 code is available to educational institutions for use as a case study in describing complicated loading histories and for use by students in examining, hands on, parameter sensitivity of fatigue life analysis.

  8. Angiotensin II (de)sensitization: Fluid intake studies with implications for cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and hypertension is the most common risk factor for death. Although many anti-hypertensive pharmacotherapies are approved for use in the United States, rates of hypertension have increased over the past decade. This review article summarizes a presentation given at the 2015 meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior. The presentation described work performed in our laboratory that uses angiotensin II-induced drinking as a model system to study behavioral and cardiovascular effects of the renin-angiotensin system, a key component of blood pressure regulation, and a common target of anti-hypertensives. Angiotensin II (AngII) is a potent dipsogen, but the drinking response shows a rapid desensitization after repeated injections of AngII. This desensitization appears to be dependent upon the timing of the injections, requires activation of the AngII type 1 (AT1) receptor, requires activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family members, and involves the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) region as a critical site of action. Moreover, the response does not appear to be the result of a more general suppression of behavior, a sensitized pressor response to AngII, or an aversive state generated by the treatment. More recent studies suggest that the treatment regimen used to produce desensitization in our laboratory also prevents the sensitization that occurs after daily bolus injections of AngII. Our hope is that these findings can be used to support future basic research on the topic that could lead to new developments in treatments for hypertension. PMID:26801390

  9. Effect of memantine on cough reflex sensitivity: translational studies in guinea pigs and humans.

    PubMed

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; Canning, Brendan J; Garner, Rachel; Paterson, Blake

    2015-03-01

    Cough is the most common complaint for which outpatients in the United States seek medical attention, and yet available therapeutic options for cough lack proven efficacy and are further limited by safety and abuse liabilities. Thus, safe and effective cough suppressants are needed. Recent preclinical studies described the antitussive effects of memantine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channel blocker used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The goals of the present study were to compare the antitussive effects of memantine, dextromethorphan, and codeine in guinea pigs; to relate the dose-dependent actions of memantine in these studies to peak plasma concentrations achieved following oral administration; and to provide the first ever evaluation of the antitussive effect of memantine in humans. In guinea pigs, memantine and codeine were comparable in efficacy and potency but both were superior to dextromethorphan in the citric acid cough challenge model. The pharmacokinetic analyses suggest that memantine was active in guinea pigs at micromolar plasma concentrations. Subsequently, 14 healthy volunteers as well as 14 otherwise healthy adults with acute viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI) underwent capsaicin cough challenges 6 hours after ingestion of 20 mg memantine and matched placebo in a randomized, double-blind, crossover fashion. In healthy volunteers, memantine significantly inhibited cough reflex sensitivity (P = 0.034). In subjects with URI, responsiveness to capsaicin was markedly increased, and in these patients, the inhibition of cough reflex sensitivity by memantine relative to placebo did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.088). These data support further research to investigate the potential of memantine as a clinically useful antitussive. PMID:25525191

  10. DFT and TD-DFT study on geometries, electronic structures and electronic absorption of some metal free dye sensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, T.; Aroulmoji, V.; Ravindran, R. Samson; Müller, M.; Ranjitha, S.; Rajarajan, G.; Anbarasan, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    The geometries, electronic structures, polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of 2-hydroxynaphthalene-1,4-dione (henna1), 3-(5-((1E)-2-(1,4-dihydro-1,4-dioxonaphthalen-3-yloxy) vinyl) thiophen-2-yl)-2-isocyanoacrylic acid (henna2) and anthocyanin dye sensitizers were studied based on density functional theory (DFT) using the hybrid functional B3LYP. The Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectrum was investigated by using a hybrid method which combines the properties and dynamics of many-body in the presence of time-dependent (TD) potentials, i.e. TDSCF-DFT (B3LYP). Features of the electronic absorption spectrum in the visible and near-UV regions were plotted and assigned based on TD-DFT calculations. Due to the absorption, bands of the metal-organic compound are n → π* present. The calculated results suggest that the three lowest energy excited states of the investigated dye sensitizers are due to photoinduced electron transfer processes. The interfacial electron transfer between semiconductor TiO2 electrode and dye sensitizer is owing to an electron injection process from excited dye to the semiconductor's conduction band. The role of linking the henna1 dye with a carboxylic acid via a thiophene bridge was analyzed. The results are that using a stronger π-conjugate bridge as well as a strong donator and acceptor group enhances the efficiency.

  11. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF AGGREGATED ENVIRONMENTAL INDICES WITH A CASE-STUDY OF THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental indicators are often aggregated into a single index for various purposes in environmental studies. Aggregated indices derived from the same data set can differ, usually because the aggregated indices' sensitivities are not thoroughly analyzed. Furthermore, if a sens...

  12. Study of factors determining the radiation sensitivity of quartz crystal oscillators (A0189)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venables, J. D.; Ahearn, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    The correlation between defect cluster concentrations observed for different grades of quartz examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the electrical stability of quartz resonators exposed to complex radiation in an orbital LDEF was determined. It is demonstrated that the technique TEM provides a powerful method for studying the effect of radiation on crystalline quartz. Two factors suggest that the observed clusters may be responsible for the radiation-induced frequency drift and acoustic absorption effects associated with irradiated quartz resonators: (1) the clusters are expected to be very effective in modifying the piezoelectric properties of quartz because of the large strain fields associated with them; (2) both phenomena appear to be sensitive to the impurity concentration. It is suggested that TEM can be used to classify grades of quartz according to their suitability for use in radiation-hard resonators. This technique may identify the impurities that are responsible and thereby effect an improvement in the stability of quartz oscillators.

  13. Motion sickness and otolith sensitivity - A pilot study of habituation to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potvin, A. R.; Sadoff, M.; Billingham, J.

    1977-01-01

    Astronauts, particularly in Skylab flights, experienced varying degrees of motion sickness lasting 3-5 days. One possible mechanism for this motion sickness adaptation is believed to be a reduction in otolith sensitivity with an attendant reduction in sensory conflict. In an attempt to determine if this hypothesis is valid, a ground-based pilot study was conducted on a vertical linear accelerator. The extent of habituation to accelerations which initially produced motion sickness was evaluated, along with the possible value of habituation training to minimize the space motion sickness problem. Results showed that habituation occurred for 6 of the 8 subjects tested. However, in tests designed to measure dynamic and static otolith function, no significant differences between pre- and post-habituation tests were observed. Cross habituation effects to a standard Coriolis acceleration test were not significant. It is unlikely that ground-based pre-habituation to linear accelerations of the type examined would alter susceptibility to space motion sickness.

  14. Effects of Sensitive Electrical Stimulation Based Cueing in Parkinson's Disease: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Sijobert, Benoît; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Andreu, David; Verna, Claudia; Geny, Christian

    2016-06-13

    This study aims to investigate the effect of a sensitive cueing on Freezing of Gait (FOG) and gait disorders in subjects suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD). 13 participants with Parkinson's disease were equipped with an electrical stimulator and a foot mounted inertial measurement unit (IMU). An IMU based algorithm triggered in real time an electrical stimulus applied on the arch of foot at heel off detection. Starting from standing, subjects were asked to walk at their preferred speed on a path comprising 5m straight, u-turn and walk around tasks. Cueing globally decreased the time to achieve the different tasks in all the subjects. In "freezer" subjects, the time to complete the entire path was reduced by 19%. FOG events occurrence was lowered by 12% compared to baseline before and after cueing. This preliminary work showed a positive global effect of an electrical stimulation based cueing on gait and FOG in PD. PMID:27478565

  15. Effects of Sensitive Electrical Stimulation Based Cueing in Parkinson’s Disease: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Sijobert, Benoît; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Andreu, David; Verna, Claudia; Geny, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of a sensitive cueing on Freezing of Gait (FOG) and gait disorders in subjects suffering from Parkinson’s disease (PD). 13 participants with Parkinson’s disease were equipped with an electrical stimulator and a foot mounted inertial measurement unit (IMU). An IMU based algorithm triggered in real time an electrical stimulus applied on the arch of foot at heel off detection. Starting from standing, subjects were asked to walk at their preferred speed on a path comprising 5m straight, u-turn and walk around tasks. Cueing globally decreased the time to achieve the different tasks in all the subjects. In “freezer” subjects, the time to complete the entire path was reduced by 19%. FOG events occurrence was lowered by 12% compared to baseline before and after cueing. This preliminary work showed a positive global effect of an electrical stimulation based cueing on gait and FOG in PD. PMID:27478565

  16. Shelf Life and Storage Life Studies of Blue Sensitive Photopolymer for Holographic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreebha, A. B.; Rajesh, C. S.; Katha, Sudha; Kumar, P. T. Ajith

    2011-10-01

    Holographic recording materials based on photopolymerising systems have contributed significantly to the recent growth of holography. Of the available materials for holography, photopolymer is proved to be highly versatile due to its rapid dry processing, low cost, high optical quality and resolution, low diffusivity, easy preparation techniques, high diffraction efficiency, transparency in the visible spectral region etc. However, availability of commercial grade photopolymer material is very limited due to its strategic importance. On the other side, there are a set of research grade materials widely available. But, a major obstacle for the wider use of such materials is the short shelf life and storage life. The paper presents the shelf life and storage life studies of a laboratory made polymeric mixture which is sensitive to blue wave length. The material yielded stable quality and efficiency for over three months.

  17. Alluvial fan sensitivity to glacial-interglacial climate change: case studies from Death Valley.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Alexander; D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda-Boluda, Duna; Brooke, Sam

    2016-04-01

    The effects of climate change on eroding landscapes and the sedimentary record remain poorly understood. The measurement of regional grain size trends in stream-flow deposits provides one way to address this issue because, in principle, these trends embed important information on the dynamics of sediment routing systems and their sensitivity to external forcings. In many cases, downstream stratigraphic fining is primarily driven by selective deposition of sediment. The relative efficiency of this process is determined by the physical characteristics of the input sediment supply and the spatial distribution of subsidence rate, which generates the accommodation necessary for mass extraction. Here, we measure grain size fining rates from apex to toe for alluvial fan systems in Death Valley, California, which have well-exposed modern and late Pleistocene deposits, where the long-term tectonic boundary conditions are known and where climatic variation over this time period is well-constrained. Our field data demonstrate that input grain sizes and input fining rates do vary noticeably over the late Pleistocene-Holocene period in this study area, although there is little evidence for significant changes in rates of faulting in the last 200 ky. For two catchments in the Grapevine Mountains for which we have excellent stratigraphic constraints on modern and 70 ka fan deposits, we use a self-similarity based grain size fining model to understand changes in sediment flux to the fans over this time period. When calibrated with cosmogenically-derived catchment erosion rates, our results show that a 30 % decrease in average precipitation rate over this time-frame led to a 20 % decrease in sediment flux to the fans, and a clear increase in the down-fan rate of fining. This supports existing landscape evolution models that relate a decrease in precipitation rate to a decrease in sediment flux, but implies that the relationship between sediment flux and precipitation rate may be

  18. Application of TAM III to study sensitivity of soil organic matter degradation to temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikegard, Peter; Barros, Nieves; Piñeiro, Verónica

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, studies of soil biodegradation are based on CO2 dissipation rates. CO2 is a product of aerobic degradation of labile organic substrates like carbohydrates. That limits the biodegradation concept to just one of the soil organic matter fractions. This feature is responsible for some problems to settle the concept of soil organic matter (SOM) recalcitrance and for controversial results defining sensitivity of SOM to temperature. SOM consists of highly complex macromolecules constituted by fractions with different chemical nature and redox state affecting the chemical nature of biodegradation processes. Biodegradation of fractions more reduced than carbohydrates take place through metabolic pathways that dissipate less CO2 than carbohydrate respiration, that may not dissipate CO2, or that even may uptake CO2. These compounds can be considered more recalcitrant and with lower turnover times than labile SOM just because they are degraded at lower CO2 rates that may be just a consequence of the metabolic path. Nevertheless, decomposition of every kind of organic substrate always releases heat. For this reason, the measurement of the heat rate by calorimetry yields a more realistic measurement of the biodegradation of the SOM continuum. TAM III is one of the most recent calorimeters designed for directly measuring in real time the heat rate associated with any degradation process. It is designed as a multichannel system allowing the concomitant measurement of to up 24 samples at isothermal conditions or through a temperature scanning mode from 18 to 100ºC, allowing the continous measure of any sample at controlled non-isothermal conditions. The temperature scanning mode was tested in several soil samples collected at different depths to study their sensitivity to temperature changes from 18 to 35 ºC calculating the Q10 and the activation energy (EA) by the Arrhenius equation. It was attempted to associate the obtained EA values with the soil thermal

  19. Cardiac Position Sensitivity Study in the Electrocardiographic Forward Problem Using Stochastic Collocation and Boundary Element Methods

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Darrell J.; Geneser, Sarah E.; Stinstra, Jeroen G.; Kirby, Robert M.; MacLeod, Rob S.

    2012-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is ubiquitously employed as a diagnostic and monitoring tool for patients experiencing cardiac distress and/or disease. It is widely known that changes in heart position resulting from, for example, posture of the patient (sitting, standing, lying) and respiration significantly affect the body-surface potentials; however, few studies have quantitatively and systematically evaluated the effects of heart displacement on the ECG. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of positional changes of the heart on the ECG in the specific clinical setting of myocardial ischemia. To carry out the necessary comprehensive sensitivity analysis, we applied a relatively novel and highly efficient statistical approach, the generalized polynomial chaos-stochastic collocation method, to a boundary element formulation of the electrocardiographic forward problem, and we drove these simulations with measured epicardial potentials from whole-heart experiments. Results of the analysis identified regions on the body-surface where the potentials were especially sensitive to realistic heart motion. The standard deviation (STD) of ST-segment voltage changes caused by the apex of a normal heart, swinging forward and backward or side-to-side was approximately 0.2 mV. Variations were even larger, 0.3 mV, for a heart exhibiting elevated ischemic potentials. These variations could be large enough to mask or to mimic signs of ischemia in the ECG. Our results suggest possible modifications to ECG protocols that could reduce the diagnostic error related to postural changes in patients possibly suffering from myocardial ischemia. PMID:21909818

  20. Management and valuation of an environmentally sensitive area: Norfolk Broadland, England, case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, R. Kerry; Brooke, Jan

    1988-03-01

    Wetlands, like any other environmentally sensitive resource, require very careful evaluation. While it is accepted that all wetlands may be equally valuable in terms of maintaining global life-support systems, individual areas may be ranked according to their uniqueness or the irreplaceability of the resource should the wetland be developed. The various techniques available for evaluating the wetland resource in the development versus conservation conflict situation are critically assessed. Indirect appraisal via the opportunity cost method can generate valuable data which have contributed to the mitigation of such conflict situations. The Broadland, in Norfolk, England, recently designated an environmentally sensitive area (ESA), provides a case study example of wetland management. The search for an “acceptable” flood alleviation strategy for the ESA is examined in detail. The economic and environmental asset structure of the study area is examined at two levels. A basic “screening” system is applied to each of the identified flood protection planning units to enable the rank ordering of the units. A more detailed appraisal is then made of the value of selected units so that the cost-effectiveness of any planned expenditure on flood protection works can be assessed. Specific management issues and their likely effect on the environment, in terms of land use for example, are also addressed. The 1986 Agriculture Act marks a potential watershed in British conservation policy. The ESA policy encompasses a dual management strategy that attempts to stimulate compatible agricultural and conservation practices and activities. Other countries that still retain significant unspoiled wetland resources may find that preemptive regulatory government intervention in favor of conservation would help to avoid the worst aspects of the British experience.

  1. Study of Low Energy Electron Inelastic Scattering Mechanisms Using Spin Sensitive Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hongbing

    1995-01-01

    Spin sensitive electron spectroscopies were used to study low energy electron inelastic scattering from metal surfaces and thin films. In these experiments, a beam of spin polarized electrons from a GaAs source is directed on the sample surface, and the spin polarization and intensity are measured as a function of energy loss and scattering angle by a Mott electron polarimeter coupled with a concentric hemispherical energy analyzer. Systematic studies of the angular dependence of inelastically scattered electrons were conducted on a Cu(100) surface, and Mo/Cu(100), non-magnetized Fe/Cu(100), and Co/Cu(100) films. The polarization and intensity of scattered electrons were measured as function of energy loss and scattering angle. Further studies were also conducted on Ag(100) surface and amorphous Cu/Ag(100) films. From the experimental results, the angular distributions of dipole and impact scattered electrons can be determined individually and both are found to peak in the specular scattering direction. Preliminary studies were conducted on magnetized Co/Cu(100) films. The spin dependent scattering intensity asymmetry was measured, with a clearly observable peak at energy loss of ~1 eV, which coincides with the band splitting. The polarizations of secondary electrons produced by an unpolarized primary beam were also measured. The polarizations can be related to the band polarization of magnetized cobalt films.

  2. Prospective multicentre study of the U-SENS test method for skin sensitization testing.

    PubMed

    Alépée, N; Piroird, C; Aujoulat, M; Dreyfuss, S; Hoffmann, S; Hohenstein, A; Meloni, M; Nardelli, L; Gerbeix, C; Cotovio, J

    2015-12-25

    The U-SENS™ is a test method based on the human myeloid U937 cell line to assess the skin sensitisation potential of substances. To demonstrate its robustness, a multicentre validation study with four laboratories testing 24 coded substances has been conducted according to internationally agreed principles. The primary objective of the study was to enlarge the U-SENS™'s reproducibility database. Secondary objectives were to provide additional evidence on its transferability and its predictive capability. Reproducibility within laboratories was approximately 92%, while the reproducibility between laboratories was 87.5%. Predictivity for the 24 validation substances was high, with sensitivity, specificity and accuracy being on average at least 93.8%. Similar performances are obtained for 38 substances when combining the study results with those of an earlier multicentre study, as well as with an automated version of the U-SENS™. With reliability and relevance similar to comparable non-animal skin sensitisation test methods, which have achieved regulatory acceptance, it is concluded that the U-SENS™ is a well reproducible and predictive test method. This profiles the U-SENS™ as a valuable addition to the suite of non-animal testing methods for skin sensitisation with the potential to significantly contribute to the development of integrated testing strategies. PMID:26439184

  3. Remaining or becoming secure: parental sensitive support predicts attachment continuity from infancy to adolescence in a longitudinal adoption study.

    PubMed

    Beijersbergen, Mariëlle D; Juffer, Femmie; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2012-09-01

    In a longitudinal study with 125 early adopted adolescents, we examined continuity of attachment from infancy to adolescence and the role of parental sensitive support in explaining continuity or discontinuity of attachment. Assessments of maternal sensitive support and infant attachment (Strange Situation Procedure) were completed when infants were 12 months old. When the children were 14 years old, we observed mothers' sensitive support during a conflict discussion. The adolescents' attachment representations were assessed with the Adult Attachment Interview. Mothers of secure adolescents showed significantly more sensitive support during conflicts than did mothers of insecure adolescents. Overall, no continuity of attachment from infancy to adolescence was found. However, maternal sensitive support in early childhood and adolescence predicted continuity of secure attachment from 1 to 14 years, whereas less maternal sensitive support in early childhood but more maternal sensitive support in adolescence predicted children's change from insecurity in infancy to security in adolescence. We conclude that both early and later parental sensitive support are important for continuity of attachment across the first 14 years of life. PMID:22369333

  4. Postprandial glucose fluxes and insulin sensitivity during exercise: a study in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Schiavon, Michele; Hinshaw, Ling; Mallad, Ashwini; Dalla Man, Chiara; Sparacino, Giovanni; Johnson, Matthew; Carter, Rickey; Basu, Rita; Kudva, Yogish; Cobelli, Claudio; Basu, Ananda

    2013-08-15

    Quantifying the effect size of acute exercise on insulin sensitivity (SI(exercise)) and simultaneous measurement of glucose disappearance (R(d)), endogenous glucose production (EGP), and meal glucose appearance in the postprandial state has not been developed in humans. To do so, we studied 12 healthy subjects [5 men, age 37.1 ± 3.1 yr, body mass index 24.1 ± 1.1 kg/m², fat-free mass (FFM) 50.9 ± 3.9 kg] during moderate exercise at 50% V(O₂max) for 75 min, 120-195 min after a triple-tracer mixed meal consumed at time 0. Tracer infusion rates were adjusted to achieve constant tracer-to-tracee ratio and minimize non-steady-state errors. Glucose turnover was estimated by accounting for the nonstationary kinetics introduced by exercise. Insulin sensitivity index was calculated in each subject both in the absence [time (t) = 0-120 min, SI(rest)] and presence (t = 0-360 min, SI(exercise)) of physical activity. EGP at t = 0 min (13.4 ± 1.1 μM·kg FFM⁻¹·min⁻¹) fell at t = 120 min (2.4 ± 0.4 μM·kg FFM⁻¹·min⁻¹) and then rapidly rose almost eightfold at t = 180 min (18.2 ± 2.6 μM·kg FFM⁻¹·min⁻¹) before gradually falling at t = 360 min (10.6 ± 0.9 μM·kg FFM⁻¹·min⁻¹). R(d) rapidly peaked at t = 120 min at the start of exercise (89.5 ± 11.6 μM·kg FFM⁻¹·min⁻¹) and then gradually declined at t = 195 min (26.4 ± 3.3 μM·kg FFM⁻¹·min⁻¹) before returning to baseline at t = 360 min. SI(exercise) was significantly higher than SI(rest) (21.6 ± 3.7 vs. 12.5 ± 2.0 10⁻⁴ dl·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ per μU/ml, P < 0.0005). Glucose turnover was estimated for the first time during exercise with the triple-tracer technique. Our results, applying state-of-the-art techniques, show that moderate exercise almost doubles postprandial insulin sensitivity index in healthy subjects. PMID:23820621

  5. A parametric sensitivity study for single-stage-to-orbit hypersonic vehicles using trajectory optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, T. Alan; Schmidt, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    The class of hypersonic vehicle configurations with single stage-to-orbit (SSTO) capability reflect highly integrated airframe and propulsion systems. These designs are also known to exhibit a large degree of interaction between the airframe and engine dynamics. Consequently, even simplified hypersonic models are characterized by tightly coupled nonlinear equations of motion. In addition, hypersonic SSTO vehicles present a major system design challenge; the vehicle's overall mission performance is a function of its subsystem efficiencies including structural, aerodynamic, propulsive, and operational. Further, all subsystem efficiencies are interrelated, hence, independent optimization of the subsystems is not likely to lead to an optimum design. Thus, it is desired to know the effect of various subsystem efficiencies on overall mission performance. For the purposes of this analysis, mission performance will be measured in terms of the payload weight inserted into orbit. In this report, a trajectory optimization problem is formulated for a generic hypersonic lifting body for a specified orbit-injection mission. A solution method is outlined, and results are detailed for the generic vehicle, referred to as the baseline model. After evaluating the performance of the baseline model, a sensitivity study is presented to determine the effect of various subsystem efficiencies on mission performance. This consists of performing a parametric analysis of the basic design parameters, generating a matrix of configurations, and determining the mission performance of each configuration. Also, the performance loss due to constraining the total head load experienced by the vehicle is evaluated. The key results from this analysis include the formulation of the sizing problem for this vehicle class using trajectory optimization, characteristics of the optimal trajectories, and the subsystem design sensitivities.

  6. Cross-Scale Model of the Subduction Seismic Cycle: Parameter Sensitivity Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muldashev, I. A.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    We model seismic cycle of great megathrust earthquakes using finite element numerical technique that employs elasto-visco-plastic rheology consistent with laboratory data of crustal and mantle rocks and is capable to describe both geological and seismic-cycle time-scale deformation of lithosphere (see accompanied abstract by Sobolev and Muldashev). Here we present details of model design and parameter sensitivity analysis. We prepare model setup by modeling subduction process for several millions of years, with the different assumptions for initial lithospheric structure and temperature of the overriding and subducting plates and kinematic boundary conditions. As a result we obtain the subduction model with appropriate geometry and stress distribution. We then substitute static friction at the plate interface by rate and state friction law and employ adaptive time-step integration procedure that varies time step from 10-6 year at instability (earthquake), and gradually increases it to 5 years during postseismic relaxation. We study sensitivity of model in 2D to the magnitude of static friction, rate and state parameters (a, b and Lc) and viscosity in subduction channel and demonstrate agreement with theoretical expectations and observations. In particular we obtain almost linear relation between the earthquake period and stress drop from one hand and the rate and state parameter (b-a) from another, and realistic values of stress drop of few MPa for the typical great earthquakes. The model also shows classic instable behavior at low Lc (<10-20 cm) and conditionally stable behavior at high Lc (>20-25 cm).Next we investigate dependency of seismic moment (and average slip) of model earthquake on rupture area in 3D. We obtain relations close to the theoretical expectation for the average stress drop of earthquake weakly dependent from its magnitude.Finally we show consistency of our modelling results with observed surface deformation during Great Tohoku Earthquake of

  7. Eocene climate and Arctic paleobathymetry: A tectonic sensitivity study using GISS ModelE-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, C. D.; Legrande, A. N.; Tripati, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    The early Paleogene (65-45 million years ago, Ma) was a ‘greenhouse’ interval with global temperatures warmer than any other time in the last 65 Ma. This period was characterized by high levels of CO2, warm high-latitudes, warm surface-and-deep oceans, and an intensified hydrological cycle. Sediments from the Arctic suggest that the Eocene surface Arctic Ocean was warm, brackish, and episodically enabled the freshwater fern Azolla to bloom. The precise mechanisms responsible for the development of these conditions remain uncertain. We present equilibrium climate conditions derived from a fully-coupled, water-isotope enabled, general circulation model (GISS ModelE-R) configured for the early Eocene. We also present model-data comparison plots for key climatic variables (SST and δ18O) and analyses of the leading modes of variability in the tropical Pacific and North Atlantic regions. Our tectonic sensitivity study indicates that Northern Hemisphere climate would have been very sensitive to the degree of oceanic exchange through the seaways connecting the Arctic to the Atlantic and Tethys. By restricting these seaways, we simulate freshening of the surface Arctic Ocean to ~6 psu and warming of sea-surface temperatures by 2°C in the North Atlantic and 5-10°C in the Labrador Sea. Our results may help explain the occurrence of low-salinity tolerant taxa in the Arctic Ocean during the Eocene and provide a mechanism for enhanced warmth in the north western Atlantic. We also suggest that the formation of a volcanic land-bridge between Greenland and Europe could have caused increased ocean convection and warming of intermediate waters in the Atlantic. If true, this result is consistent with the theory that bathymetry changes may have caused thermal destabilisation of methane clathrates in the Atlantic.

  8. Validation of FSP Reactor Design with Sensitivity Studies of Beryllium-Reflected Critical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-02-01

    The baseline design for space nuclear power is a fission surface power (FSP) system: sodium-potassium (NaK) cooled, fast spectrum reactor with highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fuel, stainless steel (SS) cladding, and beryllium reflectors with B4C control drums. Previous studies were performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify uncertainties and biases associated with analysis methods and nuclear data. Comparison of Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR)-20 benchmark experiments with the FSP design indicated that further reduction of the total design model uncertainty requires the reduction in uncertainties pertaining to beryllium and uranium cross-section data. Further comparison with three beryllium-reflected HEU-metal benchmark experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) concluded the requirement that experimental validation data have similar cross section sensitivities to those found in the FSP design. A series of critical experiments was performed at ORCEF in the 1960s to support the Medium Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) space reactor design. The small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were graphite- or beryllium-reflected assemblies of SS-clad, HEU-O2 fuel on a vertical lift machine. All five configurations were evaluated as benchmarks. Two of the five configurations were beryllium reflected, and further evaluated using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6.1. Validation of the example FSP design model was successful in reducing the primary uncertainty constituent, the Be(n,n) reaction, from 0.28 %dk/k to 0.0004 %dk/k. Further assessment of additional reactor physics measurements performed on the SCCA experiments may serve to further validate FSP design and operation.

  9. Instrument for elemental composition studies of solids on planetary surfaces with sub-ppm detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Iakovleva, M.; Neuland, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    Current space instruments prove to be successful for a global chemical mapping of the entire planetary body or to perform a local chemical analysis, helpful in determination of modal mineralogy. Nevertheless, the sensitivity and low spatial resolution of these spectroscopic instruments limit the chemical analysis to the most abundant elements with some exceptions (e.g., measurements of Th, K, and H elements by Gamma and neutron spectrometers). Furthermore, the spectroscopic analysis typically provides the chemical composition of 1 micrometer of the uppermost surface layers, which are frequently affected by space weathering effects, again, with the exception of Gamma/neutron investigation where the composition of up to 1 m thick subsurface can be measured. New and recently accepted space instruments, such as Laser Induced Breakdown (LIBS) and Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometers (LIMS) are thought to improve these chemical analysis providing more localised chemical sampling with higher sensitivity and accuracy. We will demonstrate the performance of a highly miniaturised laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer designed for space research for the elemental analysis of solid materials (Rohner et al., 2003). The instrument enables mass spectrometric analysis with sub-ppm detection limits and a typical mass resolution of ~700, sufficient to detect all elements and their isotopes. The studies of NIST standards, minerals and meteoritic samples will be reviewed to emphasize its capability for quantitative analysis and chemical mapping of the inhomogeneous samples with a high spatial (vertical and lateral) resolution. LIMS measurements provide means for investigation of principal elements (metals, non-metals) and allow an analysis of trace elements distributed within a suite of soils and rocks. Thus, LIMS measurements will allow the identification of the mineralogical context of planetary surface and better understanding of the geologic/geochemical structure

  10. Heart Rate Variability, Insulin Resistance, and Insulin Sensitivity in Japanese Adults: The Toon Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Isao; Hitsumoto, Shinichi; Maruyama, Koutatsu; Nishida, Wataru; Eguchi, Eri; Kato, Tadahiro; Kawamura, Ryoichi; Takata, Yasunori; Onuma, Hiroshi; Osawa, Haruhiko; Tanigawa, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Although impaired cardiac autonomic function is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians, evidence in Asian populations with a lower body mass index is limited. Methods Between 2009–2012, the Toon Health Study recruited 1899 individuals aged 30–79 years who were not taking medication for diabetes. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was used to diagnose type 2 diabetes, and fasting and 2-h-postload glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. We assessed the homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and Gutt’s insulin sensitivity index (ISI). Pulse was recorded for 5 min, and time-domain heart rate variability (HRV) indices were calculated: the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) and the root mean square of successive difference (RMSSD). Power spectral analysis provided frequency domain measures of HRV: high frequency (HF) power, low frequency (LF) power, and the LF:HF ratio. Results Multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models showed decreased SDNN, RMSSD, and HF, and increased LF:HF ratio were associated significantly with increased HOMA-IR and decreased ISI. When stratified by overweight status, the association of RMSSD, HF, and LF:HF ratio with decreased ISI was also apparent in non-overweight individuals. The interaction between LF:HF ratio and decreased ISI in overweight individuals was significant, with the odds ratio for decreased ISI in the highest quartile of LF:HF ratio in non-overweight individuals being 2.09 (95% confidence interval, 1.41–3.10). Conclusions Reduced HRV was associated with insulin resistance and lower insulin sensitivity. Decreased ISI was linked with parasympathetic dysfunction, primarily in non-overweight individuals. PMID:26277879

  11. Sensitivity Studies for In-Situ Automated Tape Placement of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    2004-01-01

    This modeling effort seeks to improve the interlaminate bond strength of thermoplastic carbon composites produced by the in-situ automated tape placement (ATP) process. An existing high productivity model is extended to lower values of the Peclet number that correspond to the present operating conditions of the Langley ATP robot. (The Peclet number is the dimensionless ratio of inertial to diffusive heat transfer.) In sensitivity studies, all of the process and material parameters are individually varied. The model yields the corresponding variations in the effective bonding time (EBT) referred to the glass transition temperature. According to reptation theory, the interlaminate bond strength after wetting occurs is proportional to the one-fourth power of EBT. The model also computes the corresponding variations in the thermal input power (TIP) and the mass and volumetric process rates. Process studies show that a 10 percent increase in the consolidation length results in a 20 percent increase in EBT and a 5 percent increase in TIP. A surprising result is that a 10 K decrease in the tooling temperature results in a 25 percent increase in EBT and an 8 percent increase in TIP. Material studies show that a 10 K decrease in glass transition temperature results in an 8 percent increase in EBT and a 8 percent decrease in TIP. A 20 K increase in polymer degradation temperature results in a 23 percent increase in EBT with no change in TIP.

  12. Surface-sensitive UHV dielectric studies of nanoscale organic thin films: Adsorption, crystallization, and sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Jason M.

    Nanoscale systems are small collections of atoms or molecules, which as a result of their limited extent, show measurable thermodynamic deviations from bulk samples of the same species. The deviations may result from purely finite-size effects, or may be due to an increased significance of the interaction between the nanoscale system and its container. Ultra-thin (<100 nm) films of organic molecules adsorbed on surfaces afford unique opportunities to study the interplay of forces relevant to nanoscale physics. This thesis describes the development of a novel ultra-high vacuum apparatus to study the behavior of adsorbed polar molecules via dielectric spectroscopy (UHV-DS). Ultra-thin films are grown and characterized in-situ. The use of interdigitated electrode capacitors and a ratio-transformer bridge technique yields resolutions of ˜1 aF and ˜10-5 ppm in the capacitance and loss tangent, respectively. Typical sensitivity is 10 aF per monolayer at 80 K. Results are given for studies on water, methanol, and Cp* (a synthetic molecular rotor). The desorption event in the dielectric spectra is correlated with thermal desorption spectroscopy. During growth of methanol films, we observe partial crystallization for temperatures above ≳ 100 K. Crystallization is also observed upon heating glassy films grown at 80 K. Finally, we discuss UHV-DS as a probe for solid thin-film vapor pressure measurements, and show that our data on methanol compare favorably with those in the literature.

  13. First clinical pilot study with intravascular polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villiger, Martin; Karanasos, Antonios; Ren, Jian; Lippok, Norman; Shishkov, Milen; Daemen, Joost; Van Mieghem, Nicolas; Diletti, Roberto; Valgimigli, Marco; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; de Jaegere, Peter; Zijlstra, Felix; van Soest, Gijs; Nadkarni, Seemantini; Regar, Evelyn; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-02-01

    Polarization sensitive (PS) OCT measures the polarization states of the light backscattered by tissue and provides measures of tissue birefringence and depolarization in addition to the structural OCT signal. Ex vivo studies have demonstrated that birefringence is increased in tissue rich in collagen and with elevated smooth muscle cell content. Preliminary data further suggests that depolarization can identify regions of macrophage infiltration, lipid, and irregularly arranged collagen fibers. These are important aspects of the mechanical integrity and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. To evaluate the potential of PS-OCT in the clinical setting, we combined our custom PS-OCT system with commercially available OCT catheters (Fastview, Terumo Corporation) and performed a pilot study in 30 patients, scheduled to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on the grounds of stable or unstable angina. A total of 82 pullbacks in 39 vessels were performed, either in the native coronary arteries or post procedure. Comparing consecutive pullbacks of the same coronary artery, we found excellent agreement between the polarization features in the repeat pullbacks, validating the repeatability and robustness of PS-OCT in the clinical in vivo setting. In addition we observed that the birefringence and depolarization features vary significantly across lesions with identical structural OCT appearance, suggesting morphological subtypes. This first human pilot study proved the feasibility and robustness of intravascular PS-OCT. PS-OCT achieves improved tissue characterization and may help in identifying high-risk plaques, with the potential to ultimately improve risk stratification and help guiding PCI.

  14. Comparison study of the sensitivities of some indices of DDT exposure in human blood and urine

    SciTech Connect

    Nhachi, C.F.B.; Loewenson, R. )

    1989-10-01

    Although exposure to DDT (2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl1)1,1,1,-trichloroethane) is not normally associated with fatality or chronic adverse effects to human life, it is a known hazard to the ecosystem. Blood levels of DDT and some of its derivatives have been used to assess extent of exposure or the body load of DDT in humans. In experimental studies, ingestion of DDT has been associated with reduced liver stores of vitamin A, and increased serum levels of vitamin A. The same study also revealed a significant correlation of vitamin A and DDE serum levels. Generally an increase in excreted 17-B-hydroxycortisone has been associated with DDT exposure. Increased excretion of 6-B-hydroxycortisol has been noted in workers who were involved in the formulation of DDT. The objective of this study was to compare the sensitivities of some indices of DDT exposure in humans. The indices which were compared are serum vitamin A and DDE levels and urinary 17-B-hydroxycortisol.

  15. A Sensitivity Study of Commercial Aircraft Engine Response for Emergency Situations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; May, Ryan D.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2011-01-01

    This paper contains the details of a sensitivity study in which the variation in a commercial aircraft engine's outputs is observed for perturbations in its operating condition inputs or control parameters. This study seeks to determine the extent to which various controller limits can be modified to improve engine performance, while capturing the increased risk that results from the changes. In an emergency, the engine may be required to produce additional thrust, respond faster, or both, to improve the survivability of the aircraft. The objective of this paper is to propose changes to the engine controller and determine the costs and benefits of the additional capabilities produced by the engine. This study indicates that the aircraft engine is capable of producing additional thrust, but at the cost of an increased risk of an engine failure due to higher turbine temperatures and rotor speeds. The engine can also respond more quickly to transient commands, but this action reduces the remaining stall margin to possibly dangerous levels. To improve transient response in landing scenarios, a control mode known as High Speed Idle is proposed that increases the responsiveness of the engine and conserves stall margin

  16. Sensitive subjects: research choices and presentational challenges in studying immigrant children and families.

    PubMed

    Capps, Randy; Fix, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We write from our own experience as researchers on the integration of immigrants and their children, describing several ethical and research considerations that we addressed. In one study we examined the use of public benefits among immigrant families. This study posed issues regarding the selection of which "benefits" should be considered as "welfare"; how to construct comparison groups of immigrants versus natives; and the political sensitivities in reporting widely high use rates of certain benefits, particularly Medicaid. A second study examined the effects of parental detention and deportation on children. It raised issues regarding identifying samples of immigrants to interview, creating trust with interviewees and protecting their confidentiality, and examining the views not just of advocates and families but others involved in the process (such as law enforcement officials) to ensure their perspectives were reflected in resulting reports. A third project examined the young children of Black immigrants--a group that varies widely in their modes of entry, recency of arrival, and levels of human capital. To avoid simplistic misinterpretations, we disaggregated data by national origin where possible and ensured that the results highlight both the risks and protective factors identified. PMID:24038808

  17. Sensitivity study of reference crop evapotranspiration during growing season in the West Liao River basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhendong; He, Junshi; Dong, Kebao; Bian, Xiaodong; Li, Xiang

    2016-05-01

    We have analyzed the trends of reference crop evapotranspiration (ET0) through the Penman-Monteith model and climate factors in the West Liao River basin using the Mann-Kendall test after removing the effect of significant lag-1 serial correlation from the time series of the data by trend-free pre-whitening. The changing characteristics of the sensitivity coefficients and the spatial distribution during growing season are investigated, and the correlation between the sensitivity coefficients with elevation and the key climate factors by relative contribution and stepwise regression methods are evaluated. A significant overall increase in air temperature, and a significant decrease in wind speed, solar radiation, sunshine duration, relative humidity, and a slight decrease in ET0 are observed. Sensitivity analysis shows that ET0 is most sensitive to solar radiation, followed by relative humidity. In contrast, ET0 is least sensitive to the average air temperature. The sensitivity coefficients for the maximum and minimum air temperature and relative humidity have a significant negative correlation with elevation, while the coefficients for other variables are not strongly correlated with elevation. The spatial distribution of the sensitivity coefficients for wind speed and solar radiation is opposite, i.e., in regions where the sensitivity coefficients for wind speed are high; the sensitivity coefficients for solar radiation are low and vice versa. The sensitivity for relative humidity and average air temperature is region specific in the plain area. However, ET0 is most sensitive to the climate change in regions of high elevation. Wind speed is the most dominant contributor followed by solar radiation. Average air temperature contributes the least. The stepwise regression analysis indicates that wind speed is the foremost dominant variable influencing ET0. Relative contribution and stepwise regression analysis can be used to determine the main variables affecting ET0

  18. The sensitizing capacity of naturally occurring quinones. Experimental studies in guinea pigs. I. Naphthoquinones and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Schulz, K H; Garbe, I; Hausen, B M; Simatupang, M H

    1977-03-25

    Experimental studies on the sensitization capacity of naturally occurring naphthoquinones derived from plants and woods have been carried out with 6 compounds. With 4 of these substances (desoxylapachol, menadione, lapachenole andmacassar quinone) guinea pigs could be sensitized. Desoxylapachol, sensitizer from teak wood, and lapachenole, sensitizer from perobawood proved to be the most effective ones. Experiments with macassar quinone (oxidation product of a naphthalene constituent of macassar ebony) still demonstrate that even ortho-naphthoquinones are capable to induce contact allergy. Allergic cross reactions could be obtained with 9 out of 14 different napthoquinones. In animals sensitized with desoxylapachol menadione and lapachol showed the strongest eliciting effect. Furthermore the study demonstrated that the sensitizing effect of naphthoquinones depends on the length and position of the side chain attached to the quinoid ring as well as on the substitution of the carbon atom adjacent to the side chain bearing C-atom. With compounds substituted at this C-atom (e.g. position 3 of lapachol or didimethylallylnaphthoquinone) sensitization could not be obtained. PMID:857737

  19. ASTER spectral sensitivity of carbonate rocks - Study in Sultanate of Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Sankaran; Nasir, Sobhi

    2014-02-01

    Remote sensing satellite data plays a vital role and capable in detecting minerals and discriminating rock types for explorations of mineral resources and geological studies. Study of spectral absorption characters of remotely sensed data are under consideration by the exploration and mining companies, and demonstrating the spectral absorption characters of carbonates on the cost-effective multispectral image (rather than the hyperspectral, Lidar image) for easy understanding of all geologists and exploration communities of carbonates is very much important. The present work is an integrated study and an outcome of recently published works on the economic important carbonate rocks, includes limestone, marl, listwaenites and carbonatites occurred in parts of the Sultanate of Oman. It demonstrates the spectral sensitivity of such rocks for simple interpretation over satellite data and describes and distinguishes them based on the absorptions of carbonate minerals in the spectral bands of advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER) for mapping and exploration studies. The study results that the ASTER spectral band 8 discriminates the carbonate rocks due to the presence of predominantly occurred carbonate minerals; the ASTER band 5 distinguishes the limestones and marls (more hydroxyl clay minerals) from listwaenite (hydrothermally altered rock) due to the presence of altered minerals and the ASTER band 4 detects carbonatites (ultramafic intrusive alkaline rocks) which contain relatively more silicates. The study on the intensity of the total absorptions against the reflections of these rocks shows that the limestones and marls have low intensity in absorptions (and high reflection values) due to the presence of carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite) occurred in different proportions. The listwaenites and carbonatites have high intensity of absorptions (low reflection values) due to the occurrence of Mn-oxide in listwaenites and carbonates

  20. Sensitivity study of explosive nucleosynthesis in type Ia supernovae: Modification of individual thermonuclear reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Eduardo; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2012-05-01

    Background: Type Ia supernovae contribute significantly to the nucleosynthesis of many Fe-group and intermediate-mass elements. However, the robustness of nucleosynthesis obtained via models of this class of explosions has not been studied in depth until now.Purpose: We explore the sensitivity of the nucleosynthesis resulting from thermonuclear explosions of massive white dwarfs with respect to uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates. We put particular emphasis on indentifying the individual reactions rates that most strongly affect the isotopic products of these supernovae.Method: We have adopted a standard one-dimensional delayed detonation model of the explosion of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf and have postprocessed the thermodynamic trajectories of every mass shell with a nucleosynthetic code to obtain the chemical composition of the ejected matter. We have considered increases (decreases) by a factor of 10 on the rates of 1196 nuclear reactions (simultaneously with their inverse reactions), repeating the nucleosynthesis calculations after modification of each reaction rate pair. We have computed as well hydrodynamic models for different rates of the fusion reactions of 12C and of 16O. From the calculations we have selected the reactions that have the largest impact on the supernova yields, and we have computed again the nucleosynthesis using two or three alternative prescriptions for their rates, taken from the JINA REACLIB database. For the three reactions with the largest sensitivity we have analyzed as well the temperature ranges where a modification of their rates has the strongest effect on nucleosynthesis.Results: The nucleosynthesis resulting from the type Ia supernova models is quite robust with respect to variations of nuclear reaction rates, with the exception of the reaction of fusion of two 12C nuclei. The energy of the explosion changes by less than ˜4% when the rates of the reactions 12C+12C or 16O+16O are multiplied by a factor of ×10 or

  1. Ethical Sensitivity, Cognitive Mapping, and Organizational Communication: A Different Approach to Studying Ethics in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lepper, Tammy Swenson

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development of the concept of ethical sensitivity in the field of cognitive moral psychology. Discusses significance of ethical sensitivity for the field of organizational communication; weaknesses of empirical and theoretical research about moral decision making in the field of business ethics; and questions from organizational…

  2. Representing icebergs in the iLOVECLIM model (version 1.0) - a sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bügelmayer, M.; Roche, D. M.; Renssen, H.

    2015-07-01

    Recent modelling studies have indicated that icebergs play an active role in the climate system as they interact with the ocean and the atmosphere. The icebergs' impact is due to their slowly released meltwater, which freshens and cools the ocean and consequently alters the ocean stratification and the sea-ice conditions. The spatial distribution of the icebergs and their meltwater depends on the atmospheric and oceanic forces acting on them as well as on the initial icebergs' size. The studies conducted so far have in common that the icebergs were moved by reconstructed or modelled forcing fields and that the initial size distribution of the icebergs was prescribed according to present-day observations. To study the sensitivity of the modelled iceberg distribution to initial and boundary conditions, we performed 15 sensitivity experiments using the iLOVECLIM climate model that includes actively coupled ice sheet and iceberg modules, to analyse (1) the impact of the atmospheric and oceanic forces on the iceberg transport, mass and melt flux distribution, and (2) the effect of the initial iceberg size on the resulting Northern Hemisphere climate including the Greenland ice sheet, due to feedback mechanisms such as altered atmospheric temperatures, under different climate conditions (pre-industrial, high/low radiative forcing). Our results show that, under equilibrated pre-industrial conditions, the oceanic currents cause the icebergs to stay close to the Greenland and North American coast, whereas the atmospheric forcing quickly distributes them further away from their calving site. Icebergs remaining close to Greenland last up to 2 years longer as they reside in generally cooler waters. Moreover, we find that local variations in the spatial distribution due to different iceberg sizes do not result in different climate states and Greenland ice sheet volume, independent of the prevailing climate conditions (pre-industrial, warming or cooling climate). Therefore, we

  3. Studies on sensitivity of zebrafish as a model organism for Parkinson's disease: Comparison with rat model

    PubMed Central

    Makhija, Dinesh T.; Jagtap, Aarti G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the utility of zebra fish as an animal model for Parkinson's disease (PD) in comparison with rat model. Materials and Methods: MTT assay was performed on rat and zebrafish brain synaptosomal fractions using rotenone as a neurotoxic agent. Quercetin and resveratrol were used as standards to compare anti-apoptotic activity in both organisms. Catalepsy was induced in zebrafish by exposing them to haloperidol (9 μM) solution. Drug-treated groups were exposed to bromocriptine and pramipexole, 30 min prior to haloperidol exposure at the dose of 2, 5, and 10 μg/mL. Swimming speed, time spent in the bottom of the tank, and complete cataleptic time were evaluated to assess behavioral changes. In rats, catalepsy was induced using haloperidol (1.25 mg/kg i.p.). Drug-treated groups received bromocriptine (2.5 mg/kg.) and pramipexole (1 mg/kg) orally. Bar test, block test, and locomotor activity were carried out to assess behavioral changes. Results: Resveratrol and quercetin showed comparable inhibition of apoptosis in rats and zebrafish. In anti-cataleptic study, bromocriptine and pramipexole-treated groups showed significant difference (P < 0.05) in behavioral parameters as compared to haloperidol control group in both the experimental organisms. Results obtained from fish model were in correlation with rat model. Conclusion: Findings of the present study revealed that zebrafish model is highly sensitive and can be used for basic screening of drugs against PD. PMID:24554909

  4. Computational study of diketopyrrolopyrrole-based organic dyes for dye sensitized solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenjie; Tan, Dazhi; Zhang, Qijian; Wang, Huaxing

    2015-04-01

    Four diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based organic dyes utilizing the donor-π-acceptor motif were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) approaches. The four dyes were composed of different donor groups, i.e. indoline, carbazole, triphenylamine, and coumarin. We investigated the effects of the DPP unit and different donors on the spectra and electrochemical properties of the dyes, respectively. In comparison with the model dye which adopts a phenylene unit as the π-spacer, the DPP dyes all display remarkably enhanced spectral responses in the visible region of the solar spectrum. The key to this increase was the incorporation of electron-deficient DPP moieties to the molecular core, which significantly lowers LUMO levels and therefore reduces the band gap. The dye/(TiO2)46 anatase nanoparticle systems were also simulated to show the electronic structures at the interface. We studied some key properties including absorption spectra, light-harvesting efficiency, molecular orbital distributions, and injection time of electrons from the excited state of dye to the conduction band of TiO2. The dye DPP-I with indoline moiety as the electron donor demonstrates desirable energetic, electronic, and spectroscopic parameters for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications. Our theoretical study is expected to provide valuable insights into the molecular design of novel DPP-based organic dyes for the optimizations of DSSCs. PMID:25662565

  5. Mathematical modelling and study of the encoding readout scheme for position sensitive detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xiaoguang; Zeng, Ming; Zeng, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Xuewu; Zhao, Ziran; Cheng, Jianping; Kang, Kejun

    2016-04-01

    Encoding readout methods based on different schemes have been successfully developed and tested with different types of position-sensitive detectors with strip-readout structures. However, how to construct an encoding scheme in a more general and systematic way is still under study. In this paper, we present a graph model for the encoding scheme. With this model, encoding schemes can be studied in a more systematic way. It is shown that by using an encoding readout method, a maximum of n (n - 1)/2 + 1 strips can be processed with n channels if n is odd, while a maximum of n (n - 2)/2 + 2 strips can be processed with n channels if n is even. Furthermore, based on the model, the encoding scheme construction problem can be translated into a problem in graph theory, the aim of which is to construct an Eulerian trail such that the length of the shortest subcycle is as long as possible. A more general approach to constructing the encoding scheme is found by solving the associated mathematical problem. In addition, an encoding scheme prototype has been constructed, and verified with MRPC detectors.

  6. Seismic hazard analysis application of methodology, results, and sensitivity studies. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Bernreuter, D. L

    1981-08-08

    As part of the Site Specific Spectra Project, this report seeks to identify the sources of and minimize uncertainty in estimates of seismic hazards in the Eastern United States. Findings are being used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to develop a synthesis among various methods that can be used in evaluating seismic hazard at the various plants in the Eastern United States. In this volume, one of a five-volume series, we discuss the application of the probabilistic approach using expert opinion. The seismic hazard is developed at nine sites in the Central and Northeastern United States, and both individual experts' and synthesis results are obtained. We also discuss and evaluate the ground motion models used to develop the seismic hazard at the various sites, analyzing extensive sensitivity studies to determine the important parameters and the significance of uncertainty in them. Comparisons are made between probabilistic and real spectral for a number of Eastern earthquakes. The uncertainty in the real spectra is examined as a function of the key earthquake source parameters. In our opinion, the single most important conclusion of this study is that the use of expert opinion to supplement the sparse data available on Eastern United States earthquakes is a viable approach for determining estimted seismic hazard in this region of the country. 29 refs., 15 tabs.

  7. Do group responses mask the effects of air pollutants on potentially sensitive individuals in controlled human exposure studies?

    PubMed

    Goodman, Julie E; Seeley, Mara; Mattuck, Rosemary; Thakali, Sagar

    2015-04-01

    To establish primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for criteria air pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), US EPA relies in part on controlled human exposure studies. It has been suggested that evaluating average responses for all participants in these studies may not reflect the responses of sensitive participants in these studies. To evaluate this, we identified controlled exposure studies with multiple exposure concentrations or durations that provided individual-level lung function data. Based on individual lung function responses at specific exposure concentrations and the slope of individual concentration-response curves, we identified 12 participants out of a total of 208 participants in 12 studies who were potentially sensitive to O3, SO2, or sulfuric acid (H2SO4). We did not identify any participants sensitive to NO2. All of these participants were found to be potentially sensitive only at concentrations that were well above the NAAQS (SO2), above likely ambient concentrations (H2SO4), or at concentrations at which the study reported significant lung function effects for all participants (O3). Based on our analysis, average responses for all participants combined adequately reflect lung function responses for potentially sensitive study participants at concentrations in the range of the current NAAQS. PMID:25667955

  8. A Sensitivity Study for the Wavelength Calibration of GeoTASO for KORUS-AQ Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Ahn, M. H.; Liu, X.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Park, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    The cooperative field campaign for KOREA-US Air Quality (KORUS-AQ) study is under preparation. For the success of campaign, Megacity Air Pollution Studies-SEOUL (MAPS-SEOUL) as a preliminary study is now going on. The major objective of MAPS is the trial run of the laboratory and airborne measurement and the preparation for the sensor calibration. From these campaigns, it is possible to increase the accuracy of air quality model and also to assess the retrieval algorithm for Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS). The Geostationary Trace-gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GEO-TASO) instrument which will be onboard aircraft utilizes Offner spectrometer with a 4 mirror telescope. For the data processing, we plan to develop the wavelength calibration algorithm for the raw measurements from this airborne hyperspectral sensor. The important parameters considered in spectral calibration of radiance spectra are absorption of ozone and ring effect. We would adapt the similar process with the heritage programs such as OMI, GOME and OMPS and so on. However, the airborne flying environment in troposphere would be different compared to GEMS's geostationary orbit. Therefore, the parameters which cause wavelength change could be different. For example, the variation of aircraft altitude would bring additional uncertainties in wavelength change. Here, the GEMS prototype algorithm is applied to Geo-TASO measurement to derive slit functions and check wavelength shift. And the algorithm sensitivity to each parameter will be examined. Through these tests, the characteristics of each parameter and their correlation will be used to refine the GEMS algorithm and to futher KORUS-AQ study.

  9. A Sensitivity Study on the Effectiveness of Active Debris Removal in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J. C.; Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-01-01

    The near-Earth orbital debris population will continue to increase in the future due to ongoing space activities, on-orbit explosions, and accidental collisions among resident space objects. Commonly adopted mitigation measures, such as limiting postmission orbital lifetimes of satellites to less than 25 years, will slow down the population growth, but may be insufficient to stabilize the environment. The nature of the growth, in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region, is further demonstrated by a recent study where no future space launches were conducted in the environment projection simulations. The results indicate that, even with no new launches, the LEO debris population would remain relatively constant for only the next 50 years. Beyond that, the debris population would begin to increase noticeably, due to the production of collisional debris. Therefore, to better limit the growth of future debris population to protect the environment, remediation option, i.e., removing existing large and massive objects from orbit, needs to be considered. This paper does not intend to address the technical or economical issues for active debris removal. Rather, the objective is to provide a sensitivity study to quantify the effectiveness of various remediation options. A removal criterion based upon mass and collision probability is developed to rank objects at the beginning of each projection year. This study includes simulations with removal rates ranging from 2 to 20 objects per year, starting in the year 2020. The outcome of each simulation is analyzed, and compared with others. The summary of the study serves as a general guideline for future debris removal consideration.

  10. Sensitive periods differentiate processing of open- and closed-class words: an ERP study of bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Weber-Fox, C; Neville, H J

    2001-12-01

    The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that neural processes for language are heterogeneous in their adaptations to maturation and experience. This study examined whether the neural processes for open- and closed-class words are differentially affected by delays in second-language immersion. In English, open-class words primarily convey referential meaning, whereas closed-class words are primarily related to grammatical information in sentence processing. Previous studies indicate that event-related brain potentials (ERPs) elicited by these word classes display nonidentical distributions and latencies, show different developmental time courses, and are differentially affected by early language experience in Deaf individuals. In this study, ERPs were recorded from 10 monolingual English speakers and 53 Chinese-English bilingual speakers who were grouped according to their age of immersion in English: 1-3, 4-6, 7-10, 11-13, and >15 years of age. Closed-class words elicited an N280 that was largest over left anterior electrode sites for all groups. However, the peak latency was later (>35 ms) in bilingual speakers immersed in English after 7 years of age. In contrast, the latencies and distributions of the N350 elicited by open-class words were similar in all groups. In addition, the N400, elicited by semantic anomalies (open-class words that violated semantic expectation), displayed increased peak latencies for only the later-learning bilingual speakers (>11 years). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that language subprocesses are differentially sensitive to the timing of second-language experience. PMID:11776369

  11. WRF model sensitivity to choice of parameterization: a study of the `York Flood 1999'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remesan, Renji; Bellerby, Tim; Holman, Ian; Frostick, Lynne

    2015-10-01

    Numerical weather modelling has gained considerable attention in the field of hydrology especially in un-gauged catchments and in conjunction with distributed models. As a consequence, the accuracy with which these models represent precipitation, sub-grid-scale processes and exceptional events has become of considerable concern to the hydrological community. This paper presents sensitivity analyses for the Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model with respect to the choice of physical parameterization schemes (both cumulus parameterisation (CPSs) and microphysics parameterization schemes (MPSs)) used to represent the `1999 York Flood' event, which occurred over North Yorkshire, UK, 1st-14th March 1999. The study assessed four CPSs (Kain-Fritsch (KF2), Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ), Grell-Devenyi ensemble (GD) and the old Kain-Fritsch (KF1)) and four MPSs (Kessler, Lin et al., WRF single-moment 3-class (WSM3) and WRF single-moment 5-class (WSM5)] with respect to their influence on modelled rainfall. The study suggests that the BMJ scheme may be a better cumulus parameterization choice for the study region, giving a consistently better performance than other three CPSs, though there are suggestions of underestimation. The WSM3 was identified as the best MPSs and a combined WSM3/BMJ model setup produced realistic estimates of precipitation quantities for this exceptional flood event. This study analysed spatial variability in WRF performance through categorical indices, including POD, FBI, FAR and CSI during York Flood 1999 under various model settings. Moreover, the WRF model was good at predicting high-intensity rare events over the Yorkshire region, suggesting it has potential for operational use.

  12. Comparative study on pyrido[3,4-b]pyrazine-based sensitizers by tuning bulky donors for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Mao, Jiangyi; Wang, Dan; Li, Xin; Yang, Jiabao; Shen, Zhongjin; Wu, Wenjun; Li, Jing; Ågren, Hans; Hua, Jianli

    2015-02-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with cobalt electrolytes have gained increasing attention. In this Research Article, two new pyrido[3,4-b]pyrazine-based sensitizers with different cores of bulky donors (indoline for DT-1 and triphenylamine for DT-2) were designed and synthesized for a comparative study of their photophysical and electrochemical properties and device performance and were also analyzed through density functional theory calculations. The results of density function theory calculations reveal the limited electronic communication between the biphenyl branch at the cis-position of N-phenylindoline and the indoline core, which could act as an insulating blocking group and inhibit the dye aggregation and charge recombination at the interface of TiO2/dye/electrolyte. As expected, DSSCs based on DT-1 with cobalt redox electrolyte gained a higher photoelectric conversion efficiency of 8.57% under standard AM 1.5 G simulated sunlight, with Jsc = 16.08 mA cm(-2), Voc = 802 mV, and FF = 0.66. Both electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and intensity-modulated photovoltage spectroscopy (IMVS) suggest that charge recombination in DSSCs based on DT-1 is much less than that in their counterparts of DT-2, owing to the bigger donor size and the insulating blocking branch in the donor of DT-1. PMID:25580622

  13. Effects of noise-disturbed sleep—A laboratory study on habituation and subjective noise sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhström, E.; Björkman, M.

    1988-04-01

    The effect of road traffic noise from heavy vehicles during the night was investigated in a two week laboratory experiment. Body movements, heart rate, subjective sleep quality, mood and performance was evaluated among two different groups of subjects, non-sensitive and sensitive to noise. Acute physiological effects, increased heart rate and an increased number of body movements, in connection with noise events were found and neither of these reactions decreased towards the end of the noise period. A significant effect on subjective sleep quality was found only among the sensitive subjects. No habititation was seen for the negative influence of noise on sleep quality, mood and performance.

  14. Sensitivity studies of loss-of-coolant accidents in the Savannah River production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.N.; Motley, F.E.; Morgan, M.M.; Knight, T.D.; Fischer, S.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) analyses were completed using the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to support the U.S. Department of Energy efforts to restart the production reactors located at the Savannah River Site. The break location and pump operation after the LOCA were the parameters varied for these sensitivity studies. Three location of double-ended guillotine break were studied: plenum inlet, pump suction, and pump discharge. Three pump operation scenarios were also studied: continued operation of both ac and dc pumps, tripping of the ac motor at 2 s after the LOCA, and tripping of the ac motor at 200 s after the LOCA. The production reactors use low pressure and temperature heavy water as the process fluid. The reactor has a moderator tank that contains the fuel channels. Above the moderator tank is an upper plenum that distributes the heavy water to each fuel assembly. The heavy water flows down through the fuel channels and into the moderator tank. From the tank, the water is pumped back to the upper plenum through six loops. Each loop contains a pump and two heat exchangers. Four of the loops have an emergency core coolant system (ECCS) connection. This TRAC model has been benchmarked extensively against data taken in the actual reactors or in prototypical models of the components of the reactors. The calculations were completed using a version of TRAC-PF1/MOD 2 that was updated to include heavy water properties and other changes that are specific to the production reactors.

  15. Impact of urban growth-driven landuse change on microclimate and extreme precipitation - A sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathirana, Assela; Denekew, Hailu B.; Veerbeek, William; Zevenbergen, Chris; Banda, Allan T.

    2014-03-01

    More than half of the humanity lives in cities and many cities are growing in size at a phenomenal rate. Urbanisation-driven landuse change influences the local hydrometeorological processes, changes the urban micro-climate and sometimes affects the precipitation significantly. Understanding the feedback of urbanisation driven micro-climatic changes on the rainfall process is a timely challenge. In this study we attempt to investigate the impact of urban growth driven landuse change on the changes in the extreme rainfall in and around cities, by means of sensitivity studies. We conduct three sets of controlled numerical experiments using a mesoscale atmospheric model coupled with a land surface model to investigate the hypothesis that the increasing urbanisation causes a significant increase of extreme rainfall values. First we conduct an ensemble of purely idealised simulations where we show that there is a significant increase of high intensity rainfall with the increase of urban landuse. Then four selected extreme rainfall events of different tropical cities were simulated with first current level of urbanisation and then (ideally) expanded urban areas. Three out of the four cases show a significant increase of local extreme rainfall when the urban area is increased. Finally, we conducted a focused study on the city of Mumbai, India: A landscape dynamics model Dinamica-EGO was used to develop a future urban growth scenario based on past trends. The predicted future landuse changes, with current landuse as control, were used as an input to the atmospheric model. The model was integrated for four historical cases which showed that, had these events occurred with the future landuse, the extreme rainfall outcome would have been significantly more severe. An analysis of extreme rainfall showed that hourly 10-year and 50-year rainfall would increase in frequency to 3-year and 22-year respectively.

  16. The collagen structure of bovine intervertebral disc studied using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matcher, Stephen J.; Winlove, C. Peter; Gangnus, Sergei V.

    2004-04-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is used to measure the birefringence properties of bovine intervertebral disc and equine flexor tendon. For equine tendon the birefringence Dgrn is (6.0 ± 0.2) × 10-3 at a wavelength of 1.3 µm. This is somewhat larger than the values reported for bovine tendon. The surface region of the annulus fibrosus of a freshly excised intact bovine intervertebral disc displays an identical value of birefringence, Dgrn = (6.0 ± 0.6) × 10-3 at 1.3 µm. The nucleus pulposus does not display birefringence, the measured apparent value of Dgrn = (0.39 ± 0.01) × 10-3 being indistinguishable from the effects of depolarization due to multiple scattering. A clear difference is found between the depth-resolved retardance of equine tendon and that of bovine intervertebral disc. This apparently relates to the lamellar structure of the latter tissue, in which the collagen fibre orientation alternates between successive lamellae. A semi-empirical model based on Jones calculus shows that the measurements are in reasonable agreement with previous optical and x-ray data. These results imply that PS-OCT could be a useful tool to study collagen organization within the intervertebral disc in vitro and possibly in vivo and its variation with applied load and disease.

  17. Healthcare workers' perceptions of lean: a context-sensitive, mixed methods study in three Swedish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Holden, Richard J; Eriksson, Andrea; Andreasson, Jörgen; Williamsson, Anna; Dellve, Lotta

    2015-03-01

    As the application of lean in healthcare expands, further research is needed in at least two areas: first, on the role of context in shaping lean and its consequences and second, on how healthcare workers perceive lean. Accordingly, this context-sensitive, mixed methods study addressed how hospital workers' perceptions of lean varied across contexts in three Swedish hospitals. Registered nurses and physicians at the hospitals and across units differing in acuity completed standardized surveys (N = 236, 57% response rate) about their perceptions of hospital-wide lean implementation. Perceptions varied by: hospital context, with one hospital's employees reporting the least favorable perceptions; unit acuity, with higher-acuity units reporting more favorable perceptions; and professional role, with nurses reporting more favorable perceptions than physicians. Individual interviews, group interviews, and observations provided insight about these dissimilar contexts and possible explanations for context-specific variability. Findings are discussed with respect to strategies for implementing lean in healthcare; the importance of attending to levels, context, and worker consequences of lean; and directions for future research. PMID:25479987

  18. Chronic beryllium disease and beryllium sensitization at Rocky Flats: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Viet, S M; Torma-Krajewski, J; Rogers, J

    2000-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to evaluate the risk of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) and beryllium sensitization (SENS) associated with various levels of historical beryllium exposure at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons facility. Fifty CBD and 74 SENS cases were matched to controls of the same age group, race, gender, and smoking status. A job exposure matrix was developed from job history data and fixed airhead (FAH) exposure data available from 1960 to 1988. Job titles and building areas were assigned factors based on exposure relative to a machinist in the Building 444 Beryllium Shop. Concurrence on these factors was obtained from past and present Rocky Flats industrial hygienists. Using the matrix, long-term mean and cumulative exposures were estimated for each subject. Both exposure estimates (p < 0.0001) and years of employment (p = 0.010) were found to be significantly higher for CBD cases as compared with their controls, but not so for the SENS cases as compared with their controls. Logistic regression analyses showed statistically significant relationships between both cumulative and mean exposure and CBD, but not for SENS. These findings suggest that reduced worker exposures might lower the future incidence of CBD, but may not necessarily lower the incidence of SENS. PMID:10782196

  19. Comparative study of inversion methods of three-dimensional NMR and sensitivity to fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Wang, Peng; Mao, Keyu

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (3D NMR) logging can simultaneously measure transverse relaxation time (T2), longitudinal relaxation time (T1), and diffusion coefficient (D). These parameters can be used to distinguish fluids in the porous reservoirs. For 3D NMR logging, the relaxation mechanism and mathematical model, Fredholm equation, are introduced, and the inversion methods including Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD), and Global Inversion (GI) methods are studied in detail, respectively. During one simulation test, multi-echo CPMG sequence activation is designed firstly, echo trains of the ideal fluid models are synthesized, then an inversion algorithm is carried on these synthetic echo trains, and finally T2-T1-D map is built. Futhermore, SVD, BRD, and GI methods are respectively applied into a same fluid model, and the computing speed and inversion accuracy are compared and analyzed. When the optimal inversion method and matrix dimention are applied, the inversion results are in good aggreement with the supposed fluid model, which indicates that the inversion method of 3D NMR is applieable for fluid typing of oil and gas reservoirs. Additionally, the forward modeling and inversion tests are made in oil-water and gas-water models, respectively, the sensitivity to the fluids in different magnetic field gradients is also examined in detail. The effect of magnetic gradient on fluid typing in 3D NMR logging is stuied and the optimal manetic gradient is choosen.

  20. Composition of the Jupiter troposphere from JIRAM/Juno data: updated sensitivity study and observation planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, D.; Adriani, A.; Mura, A.; Filacchione, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Jupiter InfraRed Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) on board of the Juno spacecraft is a spectro-imager operating in the 2-5 micrometers range with a spectral resolution of 9 nm. Grassi et al. (2010, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2010.05.003) provided a quantitative assessment of the retrieval capabilities of the instrument in measuring water vapor, ammonia and phosphine contents in hot-spot conditions. The present study extends the previous investigations considering a. actual instrument radiometric performances derived from flight-model on-ground calibrations b. further uncertainties sources related to off-nadir measurements and aerosol loads >> 1, to achieve complete figures of actual retrieval errors. An end-to-end Bayesian retrieval code has been developed and tested on simulated data. These numerical tests confirmed that JIRAM data have a peak sensitivity around the 5 bar level in typical hot spot conditions, where even an assumed a priori uncertainity of one order of magnitude on mixing ratios can be reduced to a factor 0.2. The current assumptions on Juno orbit and attitude are eventually considered to optimize the JIRAM atmospheric science return. This research is funded through an ASI grant.

  1. Neural correlates of individual differences in anxiety sensitivity: an fMRI study using semantic priming.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunbo; Lueken, Ulrike; Wittmann, André; Holtz, Katharina; Kleint, Nina Isabel; Herrmann, Martin J; Sass, Katharina; Jansen, Andreas; Konrad, Carsten; Ströhle, Andreas; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Lotze, Martin; Hamm, Alfons; Deckert, Jürgen; Arolt, Volker; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Kircher, Tilo; Straube, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Individuals with high anxiety sensitivity (AS) have an increased risk of developing anxiety disorders and are more biased in how they process fear-related stimuli. This study investigates the neural correlates of fear-related words and word associations in high- and low-AS individuals. We used a semantic priming paradigm during functional magnetic resonance imaging in which three types of target words (fear symptoms, e.g. 'dizziness'; neutral, e.g. 'drink'; and pseudowords, e.g. 'salkom') were preceded by two types of prime words (fear-triggers, e.g. 'elevator'; and neutral, e.g. 'bottle'). Subjects with high AS rated fear-symptom words (vs neutral words) as more unpleasant than low-AS individuals; they also related these words more strongly to fear-triggers and showed prolonged reaction times. During the processing of fear-symptom words, greater activation in the left anterior insula was observed in high-AS subjects than in low-AS subjects. Lower activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus, angular gyrus, fusiform gyrus and bilateral amygdalae was found in high-AS subjects when fear-symptom words were preceded by fear-trigger words. The findings suggest that cognitive biases and the anterior insula play a crucial role in high-AS individuals. Furthermore, semantic processes may contribute to high AS and the risk of developing anxiety disorders. PMID:26969863

  2. A WRF sensitivity study for summer ozone and winter PM events in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Chen, J.; Mahmud, A.; Di, P.; Avise, J.; DaMassa, J.; Kaduwela, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated summer ozone and winter PM frequently occur in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) and the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) in California. Meteorological conditions, such as wind, temperature and planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) play crucial roles in these air pollution events. Therefore, accurate representation of these fields from a meteorological model is necessary to successfully reproduce these air pollution events in subsequent air quality model simulations. California's complex terrain and land-sea interface can make it challenging for meteorological models to replicate the atmospheric conditions over the SJV and SCAB during extreme pollution events. In this study, the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) over these two regions for a summer month (July 2012) and a winter month (January 2013) is evaluated with different model configurations and forcing. Different land surface schemes (Pleim-Xiu vs. hybrid scheme), the application of observational and soil nudging, two SST datasets (the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE) SST vs. the default SST from North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) reanalysis), and two land use datasets (the National Land Cover Data (NLCD) 2006 40-category vs. USGS 24-category land use data) have been tested. Model evaluation will focus on both surface and vertical profiles for wind, temperature, relative humidity, as well as PBLH. Sensitivity of the Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) results to different WRF configurations will also be presented and discussed.

  3. Mesh sensitivity study and optimization of fixed support for ITER torus and cryostat cryoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badgujar, S.; Vaghela, H.; Shah, N.; Bhattacharya, R.; Sarkar, B.

    2010-02-01

    The torus & cryostat cryoline of ITER cryodistribution system has been designed as per the process specifications. The cryoline is an ensemble of six process pipes, thermal shield, fixed, sliding support and outer jacket. The fixed support (FS), which also acts as the anchor for the bellows, is one of the most important part of the cryoline. The FS has to withstand the static weight of pipes as well as the spring and thrust forces arising from the bellows. The FS design has been optimized for the thermal, structural and for combined loads with thermal optimization criteria; less than 8 Watt at 100 K and less than 1.5 Watt at 4.5 K. ANSYS 10.0 has been used for the analysis and CATIA V5 R16 has been used for the modelling as well as geometry optimization. In order to bring the Von-Mises stress within the acceptable limit of 115 MPa, a detailed mesh sensitivity study has been carried out along with design optimization. The iterative process of mesh refinement continued till stress convergence is achieved. The stress analysis has been carried out for optimized mesh size. The paper will present the design methodology, construction details and the results of the analysis.

  4. Study on the characteristics of magneto-sensitive electromagnetic wave-absorbing properties of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Yang, Pingan; Fu, Jie; Liu, Shuzhi; Qi, Song

    2016-08-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) materials are a class of materials whose mechanical and electrical properties can be reversible controlled by the magnetic field. In this study, we pioneered research on the effect of a uniform magnetic field with different strengths and directions on the microwave-absorbing properties of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs), in which the ferromagnetic particles are flower-like carbonyl iron powders (CIPs) prepared by an in situ reduction method. The electromagnetic (EM) absorbing properties of the composites have been analyzed by vector network analysis with the coaxial reflection/transmission technique. Under the magnetic field, the columnar or chainlike structures were formed, which allows EM waves to penetrate. Meanwhile, stronger Debye dipolar relaxation and attenuation constant have been obtained when changing the direction of the applied magnetic field. Compared with untreated MREs, not only have the minimum reflection loss (RL) and the effective absorption bandwidth (below ‑20 dB) greatly increased, the frequencies of the absorbing peaks shift about 15%. This suggests that MREs are a magnetic-field-sensitive electromagnetic wave-absorbing material and have great potential in applications such as in anti-radar camouflage, due to the fact that radar can continuously conduct detection at many electromagnetic frequencies, while the MR materials can adjust the microwave-absorption peak according to the radar frequency.

  5. Sensitivity Study of The Sulfate Aerosol Indirect Radiative Forcing To The Dms Source Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, O.; Aumont, O.; Belviso, S.; Cosme, E.; Moulin, C.; Pham, M.

    We use a global sulfur cycle model (LMD-ZT) to study the sensitivity of the dimethyl- sulfide (DMS) atmospheric concentrations and sulfur cycle to the representation of the DMS oceanic source. We test four different distributions of the oceanic DMS concen- trations: the Kettle et al. DMS dataset, two datasets built from Seawifs measurements of the ocean color (but with different , and one distribution from a coupled oceanic bi- ological model. There is a convergence for 3 out of 4 DMS datasets to produce a global DMS flux of 18-20 TgS/yr. There are however significant disagreements on the spa- tial and seasonal distribution of the DMS flux. A comparison of the DMS atmospheric concentrations with observations will be presented. The sulfate aerosol indirect radia- tive forcing depends strongly on the concentration of pre-industrial aerosols, which itself depends on the DMS sea-air flux. The subsequent uncertainty on the aerosol in- direct radiative forcing and the implication for climate-chemistry interactions will be discussed.

  6. Sensitivity Modeling Study for an Ozone Occurrence during the 1996 Paso Del Norte Ozone Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Duanjun; Reddy, Remata S.; Fitzgerald, Rosa; Stockwell, William R.; Williams, Quinton L.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2008-01-01

    Surface ozone pollution has been a persistent environmental problem in the US and Europe as well as the developing countries. A key prerequisite to find effective alternatives to meeting an ozone air quality standard is to understand the importance of local anthropogenic emissions, the significance of biogenic emissions, and the contribution of long-range transport. In this study, an air quality modeling system that includes chemistry and transport, CMAQ, an emission processing model, SMOKE, and a mesoscale numerical meteorological model, WRF, has been applied to investigate an ozone event occurring during the period of the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Campaign. The results show that the modeling system exhibits the capability to simulate this high ozone occurrence by providing a comparable temporal variation of surface ozone concentration at one station and to capture the spatial evolution of the event. Several sensitivity tests were also conducted to identify the contributions to high surface ozone concentration from eight VOC subspecies, biogenic VOCs, anthropogenic VOCs and long-range transportation of ozone and its precursors. It is found that the reductions of ETH, ISOP, PAR, OLE and FORM help to mitigate the surface ozone concentration, and like anthropogenic VOCs, biogenic VOC plays a nonnegligible role in ozone formation. But for this case, long-range transport of ozone and its precursors appears to produce an insignificant contribution. PMID:19190351

  7. Optical Near Field Studies of Plasmonic and Optical Antennas For Sensitive and Selective Biosensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, Ryan M.

    For biosensing applications a useful device needs at least two properties: high sensitivity and high selectivity. Optical spectroscopy offers unique advantages over other sensing techniques however one big challenge to overcome is the mismatch between wavelength and the size of biologically relevant molecules. In order to have high enough sensitivity to approach the single-molecule limit, the interaction between the light and the molecule should be strong. However, the diffraction limit of light is approximately half the incidence wavelength, on the order of 100 nm for the smallest nondestructive wavelengths. This presents a significant mismatch between the size of the molecule and the smallest focus spot of the light. The photo-excitation should be compressed more than 100 fold to interact strongly. We must use metallic antennas that convert the incidence radiation into plasmonic modes which can then be compressed well below the wavelength diffraction limit. Studying the near field characteristics of these metallic nanostructures will help us gain insight into this emerging field and allow us to better use them in developing next generation devices. We have developed different geometries of these antennas and simulated their performance using Finite Difference Time Domain software. We have concentrated our efforts in the mid-infrared because that is the natural molecular vibration frequency region and also the near infrared because at these frequencies there exists a mature industry for compact sources, detectors, and fiber optic components. Our simulations show a 6,000 fold mode compression for a bowtie antenna and a million fold compression for a plasmonic photonic crystal (ppc) antenna. The bull's-eye antenna does not have as a high a mode compression but it has a natural geometry for molecular sensing due to the central metallic disc. Experimentally, we have measured the near field of these antennas with a custom back reflection apertureless NSOM setup in both

  8. Comparative sensitivity study and reading correction of various albedo dosimeters in neutron fields on the U-400M accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozov, S. V.; Shchegolev, V. Yu.

    2013-03-01

    The sensitivities of three types of albedo dosimeters are experimentally studied in U-400M accelerator radiation fields in the experimental hall (one point) and behind its shielding (three points). It is shown that the ratios of the sensitivity of the albedo dosimeter (AD) and the combined personal dosimeter (CPD) used earlier at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) to the sensitivity of the DVGN-01 dosimeter are constant within 25%. This allows the AD and CPD sensitivities obtained earlier at the JINR facilities to be used for correcting readings of the DVGN-01 now used at JINR for personal radiation monitoring. Correction coefficients are found for DVGN-01 readings behind the U-400M shielding. This has allowed a more reliable correction coefficient to be established for the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR).

  9. An experimental correlation study between field-target overlap and sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance biosensors based on sandwiched immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yeonsoo; Moon, Seyoung; Oh, Youngjin; Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Donghyun

    2012-10-01

    In this report, we have studied the effectiveness of field-target overlap to evaluate detection sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors. The investigation used theoretical analysis based on the transfer matrix method, which was experimentally confirmed by thin film-based detection in sandwich and reverse sandwich immunoglobulin G (IgG) assays. Both theoretical and experimental results show that strong correlation exists between the overlap and the sensitivity with the coefficient of correlation higher than 95% in all the cases that we have considered. We have also confirmed the correlation in diffraction grating-based SPR measurement of IgG/anti-IgG interactions. The correlation elucidates the mechanism behind the far-field detection sensitivity of SPR biosensors and can lead to the enhancement of SPR biosensing with molecular scale sensitivity.

  10. Sensitivity studies of the new Coastal Surge and Inundation Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, A. J.; Veeramony, J.

    2012-12-01

    This paper details the sensitivity studies involved in the validation of a coastal storm surge and inundation prediction system for operational use by the United States Navy. The system consists of the Delft3D-FLOW model coupled with the Delft3D-WAVE model. This dynamically coupled system will replace the current operational system, PC-Tides which does not include waves or other global ocean circulation. The Delft3D modeling system uses multiple nests to capture large, basin-scale circulation as well as coastal circulation and tightly couples waves and circulation at all scales. An additional benefit in using the presented system is that the Delft Dashboard, a graphical user interface product, can be used to simplify the set-up of Delft3D features such as the grid, elevation data, boundary forcing, and nesting. In this way less man-hours and training will be needed to perform inundation forecasts. The new coupled system is used to model storm surge and inundation produced by Hurricane Ike (2008) along the Gulf of Mexico coast. Due to the time constraints in an operational forecasting environment, storm simulations must be as streamlined as possible. Many factors such as model resolution, elevation data sets, parametrization of bottom friction, frequency of coupling between hydrodynamic and wave components, and atmospheric forcing among others can influence the run times and results of the simulations. To assess the sensitivity of the modeling system to these various components a "best" simulation was first developed. The best simulation consists of reanalysis atmospheric forcing in the form of Oceanweather wind and pressure fields. Further the wind field is modified by applying a directional land-masking to account for changes in land-roughness in the coastal zone. A number of air-sea drag coefficient formulations were tested to find the best match with observed results. An analysis of sea-level trends for the region reveals a seasonal trend of elevated sea level

  11. Anisotropic shock sensitivity in a single crystal δ-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine: a reactive molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting-Ting; Lou, Jian-Feng; Song, Hua-Jie; Huang, Feng-Lei

    2015-03-28

    The anisotropic shock sensitivity in a single crystal δ-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (δ-HMX) was investigated using the compress-shear reactive dynamics (CS-RD) computational protocol. Significant anisotropies in the thermo-mechanical and chemical responses were found by measuring the shear stress, energy, temperature, and chemical reactions during the dynamical process for the shock directions perpendicular to the (100), (010), (001), (110), (101), (011), and (111) planes. We predict that δ-HMX is sensitive for the shocks perpendicular to the (111), (011), (110), and (101) planes, which is intermediate to the (100) and (010) plane and is insensitive to the (001) plane. The internal energy accumulated within the duration of the surmounting shear stress barrier is a useful criterion to distinguish the sensitive directions from the less sensitive ones. The molecular origin of the anisotropic sensitivity is suggested to be the intermolecular steric arrangements across a slip plane induced by shock compression. The shear deformation induced by the shock along the sensitive direction encounters strong intermolecular contacts and has small intermolecular free space for geometry relaxation when the molecules collide, leading to high shear stress barriers and energy accumulation, which benefits the temperature increase and initial chemical bond breaking that trigger further reactions. PMID:25721038

  12. A sensitivity study of s-process: the impact of uncertainties from nuclear reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinyoles, N.; Serenelli, A.

    2016-01-01

    The slow neutron capture process (s-process) is responsible for the production of about half the elements beyond the Fe-peak. The production sites and the conditions under which the different components of s-process occur are relatively well established. A detailed quantitative understanding of s-process nucleosynthesis may yield light in physical processes, e.g. convection and mixing, taking place in the production sites. For this, it is important that the impact of uncertainties in the nuclear physics is well understood. In this work we perform a study of the sensitivity of s-process nucleosynthesis, with particular emphasis in the main component, on the nuclear reaction rates. Our aims are: to quantify the current uncertainties in the production factors of s-process elements originating from nuclear physics and, to identify key nuclear reactions that require more precise experimental determinations. In this work we studied two different production sites in which s-process occurs with very different neutron exposures: 1) a low-mass extremely metal-poor star during the He-core flash (nn reaching up to values of ∼ 1014cm-3); 2) the TP-AGB phase of a M⊙, Z=0.01 model, the typical site of the main s-process component (nn up to 108 — 109cm-3). In the first case, the main variation in the production of s-process elements comes from the neutron poisons and with relative variations around 30%-50%. In the second, the neutron poison are not as important because of the higher metallicity of the star that actually acts as a seed and therefore, the final error of the abundances are much lower around 10%-25%.

  13. Sensitivity study of the wet deposition schemes in the modelling of the Fukushima accident.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quérel, Arnaud; Quélo, Denis; Roustan, Yelva; Mathieu, Anne; Kajino, Mizuo; Sekiyama, Thomas; Adachi, Kouji; Didier, Damien; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2016-04-01

    The Fukushima-Daiichi release of radioactivity is a relevant event to study the atmospheric dispersion modelling of radionuclides. Actually, the atmospheric deposition onto the ground may be studied through the map of measured Cs-137 established consecutively to the accident. The limits of detection were low enough to make the measurements possible as far as 250km from the nuclear power plant. This large scale deposition has been modelled with the Eulerian model ldX. However, several weeks of emissions in multiple weather conditions make it a real challenge. Besides, these measurements are accumulated deposition of Cs-137 over the whole period and do not inform of deposition mechanisms involved: in-cloud, below-cloud, dry deposition. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis is performed in order to understand wet deposition mechanisms. It has been shown in a previous study (Quérel et al, 2016) that the choice of the wet deposition scheme has a strong impact on the assessment of the deposition patterns. Nevertheless, a "best" scheme could not be highlighted as it depends on the selected criteria: the ranking differs according to the statistical indicators considered (correlation, figure of merit in space and factor 2). A possibility to explain the difficulty to discriminate between several schemes was the uncertainties in the modelling, resulting from the meteorological data for instance. Since the move of the plume is not properly modelled, the deposition processes are applied with an inaccurate activity in the air. In the framework of the SAKURA project, an MRI-IRSN collaboration, new meteorological fields at higher resolution (Sekiyama et al., 2013) were provided and allows to reconsider the previous study. An updated study including these new meteorology data is presented. In addition, a focus on several releases causing deposition in located areas during known period was done. This helps to better understand the mechanisms of deposition involved following the

  14. Exploring Emotional Sensitivity and Counseling-Related Services: A Needs Assessment Study for Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Donald S., Jr.; Jamshidi, Ray; Perkins, Michele

    2007-01-01

    This study explored emotional sensitivity and counseling-related needs of 114 African American college students at a historically black college located in the southwestern region of the United States. Despite previous studies, the results suggested that African American college students who attended a historically black college needed similar…

  15. The Effect of Study Abroad on the Development of Intercultural Sensitivity among Mainland Chinese High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hao, Chenfang

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examined the effect of year-long study abroad program on the development of intercultural sensitivity among the Mainland Chinese high school students. The sample consisted of 50 study abroad participants and 50 students on home campus. The instrument Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI) was employed to assess the…

  16. A retrospective evaluation of species-specific sensitivity for neurological signs in toxicological studies: Is the dog more sensitive than the non-human primate?

    PubMed

    Backes, Kathrin; Lorenz, Helga; Laplanche, Loic; Hudzik, Thomas J; Potschka, Heidrun; Hempel, Katja

    2016-01-22

    Selection of the appropriate non-rodent species in preclinical programs is crucial for good translatability and human safety. There is no data available in the literature which provides exact comparison of dog and non-human primate (NHP) sensitivity regarding neurological signs in toxicological studies. We performed a retrospective analysis of 174 toxicity studies with 15 neuroscience substances. Neurological signs in dogs and NHPs were evaluated in correlation to exposure data. Overall incidence of substance induced convulsions was similar in both species and no gender differences were observed. The reported liability of beagles to spontaneous convulsions was not confirmed in our studies. The symptom tremor showed the best inter-species translatability. The current toxicological study design does not include exposure assessment at the time-point of neurological signs, therefore, we propose to include additional toxicokinetic samples. Our analysis revealed factors including housing, handling, and behavior, which prevents direct species comparison. In addition only one non-rodent species is routinely tested in development programs, therefore data for both species is rare. We however, had sufficient data which enabled comparison for one compound. In the spirit of 3Rs further examples should be evaluated. PMID:26732424

  17. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: Evaluation of SNL-SWAN and Sensitivity Studies in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool was evaluated, optimized, and utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters a nd wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deployment scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that wave direction and WEC device type we r e most sensitive to the variation in the model parameters examined in this study . Generally, the changes in wave height we re the primary alteration caused by the presence of a WEC array. Specifically, W EC device type and subsequently their size directly re sult ed in wave height variations; however, it is important to utilize ongoing laboratory studies and future field tests to determine the most appropriate power matrix values for a particular WEC device and configuration in order to improve modeling results .

  18. PGSE, OGSE, and sensitivity to axon diameter in diffusion MRI: Insight from a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Ianuş, Andrada; Kaden, Enrico; Alexander, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify optimal pulsed gradient spin‐echo (PGSE) and oscillating gradient spin‐echo (OGSE) sequence settings for maximizing sensitivity to axon diameter in idealized and practical conditions. Methods Simulations on a simple two‐compartment white matter model (with nonpermeable cylinders) are used to investigate a wide space of clinically plausible PGSE and OGSE sequence parameters with trapezoidal diffusion gradient waveforms. Signal sensitivity is measured as a derivative of the signal with respect to axon diameter. Models of parallel and dispersed fibers are investigated separately to represent idealized and practical conditions. Results Simulations show that, for the simple case of gradients perfectly perpendicular to straight parallel fibers, PGSE always gives maximum sensitivity. However, in real‐world scenarios where fibers have unknown and dispersed orientation, low‐frequency OGSE provides higher sensitivity. Maximum sensitivity results show that on current clinical scanners (G max = 60 mT/m, signal to noise ratio (SNR) = 20) axon diameters below 6 µm are indistinguishable from zero. Scanners with stronger gradient systems such as the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Connectom scanner (G max = 300 mT/m) can extend this sensitivity limit down to 2–3 µm, probing a much greater proportion of the underlying axon diameter distribution. Conclusion Low‐frequency OGSE provides additional sensitivity to PGSE in practical situations. OGSE is particularly advantageous for systems with high performance gradients. Magn Reson Med 75:688–700, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:25809657

  19. Defining a Conformational Consensus Motif in Cotransin-Sensitive Signal Sequences: A Proteomic and Site-Directed Mutagenesis Study

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Wolfgang; Westendorf, Carolin; Schmidt, Antje; Conill-Cortés, Mercè; Rutz, Claudia; Blohs, Marcus; Beyermann, Michael; Protze, Jonas; Krause, Gerd; Krause, Eberhard; Schülein, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The cyclodepsipeptide cotransin was described to inhibit the biosynthesis of a small subset of proteins by a signal sequence-discriminatory mechanism at the Sec61 protein-conducting channel. However, it was not clear how selective cotransin is, i.e. how many proteins are sensitive. Moreover, a consensus motif in signal sequences mediating cotransin sensitivity has yet not been described. To address these questions, we performed a proteomic study using cotransin-treated human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and the stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture technique in combination with quantitative mass spectrometry. We used a saturating concentration of cotransin (30 micromolar) to identify also less-sensitive proteins and to discriminate the latter from completely resistant proteins. We found that the biosynthesis of almost all secreted proteins was cotransin-sensitive under these conditions. In contrast, biosynthesis of the majority of the integral membrane proteins was cotransin-resistant. Cotransin sensitivity of signal sequences was neither related to their length nor to their hydrophobicity. Instead, in the case of signal anchor sequences, we identified for the first time a conformational consensus motif mediating cotransin sensitivity. PMID:25806945

  20. Lack of contralateral suppression in transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions in multiple chemical sensitivity: a clinical correlation study

    PubMed Central

    Micarelli, Alessandro; Viziano, Andrea; Genovesi, Giuseppe; Bruno, Ernesto; Ottaviani, Fabrizio; Alessandrini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic disorder characterized by a variety of symptoms associated with the exposure to chemicals at a concentration below the toxic level. Previous studies have demonstrated peculiar responses in brain activity in these patients with respect to sensory stimuli while the association between chemical sensitivity and other environmental intolerances such as noise sensitivity has been questioned by researchers. In this study, a cohort of 18 MCS patients underwent transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) testing with and without contralateral suppression to evaluate the functionality of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex involved in speech-in-noise sensitivity. Results were compared with an age- and gender-matched control group (n = 20) and correlation analysis with disease onset and quick environmental exposure sensitivity inventory (qEESI) symptom severity scale was performed. Subjects affected by MCS showed statistically significant impairment of MOC reflex, and the onset of the disease and several symptom subscales showed to be correlated to such reduction in some of the frequencies tested. These data suggest that alterations of MOC reflex could be part of the complex features of this disease although more studies are needed to further explore auditory perception disorders in environmental intolerances. PMID:27157687

  1. Lack of contralateral suppression in transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions in multiple chemical sensitivity: a clinical correlation study.

    PubMed

    Micarelli, Alessandro; Viziano, Andrea; Genovesi, Giuseppe; Bruno, Ernesto; Ottaviani, Fabrizio; Alessandrini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic disorder characterized by a variety of symptoms associated with the exposure to chemicals at a concentration below the toxic level. Previous studies have demonstrated peculiar responses in brain activity in these patients with respect to sensory stimuli while the association between chemical sensitivity and other environmental intolerances such as noise sensitivity has been questioned by researchers. In this study, a cohort of 18 MCS patients underwent transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) testing with and without contralateral suppression to evaluate the functionality of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex involved in speech-in-noise sensitivity. Results were compared with an age- and gender-matched control group (n = 20) and correlation analysis with disease onset and quick environmental exposure sensitivity inventory (qEESI) symptom severity scale was performed. Subjects affected by MCS showed statistically significant impairment of MOC reflex, and the onset of the disease and several symptom subscales showed to be correlated to such reduction in some of the frequencies tested. These data suggest that alterations of MOC reflex could be part of the complex features of this disease although more studies are needed to further explore auditory perception disorders in environmental intolerances. PMID:27157687

  2. Sensitivity study of a large-scale air pollution model by using high-performance computations and Monte Carlo algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostromsky, Tz.; Dimov, I.; Georgieva, R.; Marinov, P.; Zlatev, Z.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present some new results of our work on sensitivity analysis of a large-scale air pollution model, more specificly the Danish Eulerian Model (DEM). The main purpose of this study is to analyse the sensitivity of ozone concentrations with respect to the rates of some chemical reactions. The current sensitivity study considers the rates of six important chemical reactions and is done for the areas of several European cities with different geographical locations, climate, industrialization and population density. One of the most widely used variance-based techniques for sensitivity analysis, such as Sobol estimates and their modifications, have been used in this study. A vast number of numerical experiments with a specially adapted for the purpose version of the Danish Eulerian Model (SA-DEM) were carried out to compute global Sobol sensitivity measures. SA-DEM was implemented and run on two powerful cluster supercomputers: IBM Blue Gene/P, the most powerful parallel supercomputer in Bulgaria and IBM MareNostrum III, the most powerful parallel supercomputer in Spain. The refined (480 × 480) mesh version of the model was used in the experiments on MareNostrum III, which is a challenging computational problem even on such a powerful machine. Some optimizations of the code with respect to the parallel efficiency and the memory use were performed. Tables with performance results of a number of numerical experiments on IBM BlueGene/P and on IBM MareNostrum III are presented and analysed.

  3. Pre-study feasibility and identifying sensitivity analyses for protocol pre-specification in comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Girman, Cynthia J; Faries, Douglas; Ryan, Patrick; Rotelli, Matt; Belger, Mark; Binkowitz, Bruce; O'Neill, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The use of healthcare databases for comparative effectiveness research (CER) is increasing exponentially despite its challenges. Researchers must understand their data source and whether outcomes, exposures and confounding factors are captured sufficiently to address the research question. They must also assess whether bias and confounding can be adequately minimized. Many study design characteristics may impact on the results; however, minimal if any sensitivity analyses are typically conducted, and those performed are post hoc. We propose pre-study steps for CER feasibility assessment and to identify sensitivity analyses that might be most important to pre-specify to help ensure that CER produces valid interpretable results. PMID:24969153

  4. Gene-Vitamin D Interactions on Food Sensitization: A prospective birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Guoying; Hong, Xiumei; Wang, Deli; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Zhang, Shanchun; Arguelles, Lester; Kumar, Rajesh; Wang, Hongjian; Liu, Rong; Zhou, Ying; Pearson, Colleen; Ortiz, Kathryn; Schleimer, Robert; Holt, Patrick; Pongracic, Jacqueline; Price, Heather E; Langman, Craig; Wang, Xiaobin

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that vitamin D deficiency (VDD) contributes to the development of food sensitization (FS) and then food allergy. However, the epidemiological evidence is conflicting. We aim to examine if cord blood VDD is associated with FS and if such association can be modified by genetic variants in a prospective birth cohort. Methods This study included 649 children who were enrolled at birth and followed from birth onward at the Boston Medical Center. We defined VDD as cord blood 25(OH)D < 11ng/ml, and FS as specific IgE ≥ 0.35kUA/L to any of eight common food allergens in early childhood. We genotyped potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 11 genes known to be involved in regulating IgE and 25(OH)D concentrations. Logistic regressions were used to test the effects of VDD on FS individually and jointly with SNPs. Results Among the 649 children, 44% had VDD and 37% had FS. When examined alone, VDD was not associated with FS. When examined jointly with SNPs, a significant interaction between IL4 gene polymorphism (rs2243250) and VDD (pinteraction=0.003, pFDR=0.10) was found: VDD increased the risk of FS among children carrying CC/CT genotypes (OR=1.79, 95%CI: 1.15–2.77). Similar but weaker interactions were observed for SNPs in MS4A2 (rs512555), FCER1G (rs2070901), and CYP24A1 (rs2762934). When all four SNPs were simultaneously considered, a strong gene-VDD interaction was evident (pinteraction=9×10−6). Conclusions Our data demonstrate that VDD may increase the risk of FS among individuals with certain genotypes, providing evidence of gene-vitamin D interaction on FS. PMID:21819409

  5. Effects of soil moisture on the temperature sensitivity of soil heterotrophic respiration: a laboratory incubation study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiping; Hui, Dafeng; Shen, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    The temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil heterotrophic respiration (Rh) is an important ecological model parameter and may vary with temperature and moisture. While Q10 generally decreases with increasing temperature, the moisture effects on Q10 have been controversial. To address this, we conducted a 90-day laboratory incubation experiment using a subtropical forest soil with a full factorial combination of five moisture levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% water holding capacity--WHC) and five temperature levels (10, 17, 24, 31, and 38°C). Under each moisture treatment, Rh was measured several times for each temperature treatment to derive Q10 based on the exponential relationships between Rh and temperature. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial community structure and soil nutrients were also measured several times to detect their potential contributions to the moisture-induced Q10 variation. We found that Q10 was significantly lower at lower moisture levels (60%, 40% and 20% WHC) than at higher moisture level (80% WHC) during the early stage of the incubation, but became significantly higher at 20%WHC than at 60% WHC and not significantly different from the other three moisture levels during the late stage of incubation. In contrast, soil Rh had the highest value at 60% WHC and the lowest at 20% WHC throughout the whole incubation period. Variations of Q10 were significantly associated with MBC during the early stages of incubation, but with the fungi-to-bacteria ratio during the later stages, suggesting that changes in microbial biomass and community structure are related to the moisture-induced Q10 changes. This study implies that global warming's impacts on soil CO2 emission may depend upon soil moisture conditions. With the same temperature rise, wetter soils may emit more CO2 into the atmosphere via heterotrophic respiration. PMID:24647610

  6. A comparative study of glycoproteomes in androgen-sensitive and -independent prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Drabik, Anna; Ciołczyk-Wierzbicka, Dorota; Dulińska-Litewka, Joanna; Bodzoń-Kułakowska, Anna; Suder, Piotr; Silberring, Jerzy; Laidler, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies in men and is predicted to be the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. After 6-18 months, hormone ablation treatment results in androgen-independent growth of cancer cells, metastasis and progression. The mechanism of androgen-independent growth of prostatic carcinoma cells is still unknown. Identification of factors that facilitate the transition from androgen-dependent to independent states is crucial in designing future diagnostics and medication strategies. To understand the biochemical meaning of hormone dependency deprivation, glycoproteins enriched profiles were compared between DU145 (hormone non-responding) and LNCaP (hormone responding) prostate cancer cells. These results allow for anticipation on the important role of glycosylation in malignant transformation. Both Tn antigen and complex antennary N-oligosaccharides were recognized. Their occurrence might be involved in the development and progression of tumor, and failure of hormone ablation therapy. Among identified proteins in androgen-sensitive cells nucleolin (P19338) was found that is widely described as apoptosis inhibitor, and also transporter of molecules from the membrane to the cytoplasm or nucleus. In addition, 14-3-3 protein family (P27348, P31946, P61981, P63104, P62258, Q04917, and P31947) was investigated across available databases as it forms stable complexes with glycoproteins. Our studies indicate that isoforms: sigma and eta were found in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells, while other isoforms were present in androgen non-responding cells. 14-3-3 binding partners are involved in cancer pathogenesis. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of prostate cancer tumorigenesis and to a more efficient prognosis and individual therapy in a future. However, it still remains to be revealed how important those changes are for androgen dependency loss in prostate cancer patients carried out on clinically

  7. Exhaled Aerosol Pattern Discloses Lung Structural Abnormality: A Sensitivity Study Using Computational Modeling and Fractal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Si, Xiuhua A.; Kim, JongWon; Mckee, Edward; Lin, En-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Background Exhaled aerosol patterns, also called aerosol fingerprints, provide clues to the health of the lung and can be used to detect disease-modified airway structures. The key is how to decode the exhaled aerosol fingerprints and retrieve the lung structural information for a non-invasive identification of respiratory diseases. Objective and Methods In this study, a CFD-fractal analysis method was developed to quantify exhaled aerosol fingerprints and applied it to one benign and three malign conditions: a tracheal carina tumor, a bronchial tumor, and asthma. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 30 L/min were simulated, with exhaled distributions recorded at the mouth. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to simulate respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Aerosol morphometric measures such as concentration disparity, spatial distributions, and fractal analysis were applied to distinguish various exhaled aerosol patterns. Findings Utilizing physiology-based modeling, we demonstrated substantial differences in exhaled aerosol distributions among normal and pathological airways, which were suggestive of the disease location and extent. With fractal analysis, we also demonstrated that exhaled aerosol patterns exhibited fractal behavior in both the entire image and selected regions of interest. Each exhaled aerosol fingerprint exhibited distinct pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, lacunarity, and multifractal spectrum. Furthermore, a correlation of the diseased location and exhaled aerosol spatial distribution was established for asthma. Conclusion Aerosol-fingerprint-based breath tests disclose clues about the site and severity of lung diseases and appear to be sensitive enough to be a practical tool for diagnosis and prognosis of respiratory diseases with structural abnormalities. PMID:25105680

  8. Particle scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients: An in situ closure and sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike; Neusüß, Christian; Wendisch, Manfred; Stratmann, Frank; Koziar, Christian; Keil, Andreas; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Ebert, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Comparisons between measured and calculated aerosol scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients were made based on in situ, ground-based measurements during the Melpitz INTensive (MINT) and Lindenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment 1998 (LACE 98) field studies. Furthermore, airborne measurements made with the same type of instruments are reviewed and compared with the ground-based measurements. Agreement between measured and calculated values is on the order of ±20% for scattering and backscattering coefficients. A sensitivity analysis showed a large influence on the calculated particle scattering and backscattering coefficients resulting from sizing uncertainties in the measured number size distributions. Measured absorption coefficients were significantly smaller than the corresponding calculated values. The largest uncertainty for the calculated absorption coefficients resulted from the size-dependent fraction of elemental carbon (EC) of the aerosol. A correction for the measured fractions of EC could significantly improve the agreement between measured and calculated absorption coefficients. The overall uncertainty of the calculated values was investigated with a Monte Carlo method by simultaneously and randomly varying the input parameters of the calculations, where the variation of each parameter was bounded by its uncertainty. The measurements were mostly found to be within the range of uncertainties of the calculations, with uncertainties for the calculated scattering and backscattering coefficients of about ±20% and for the absorption coefficients of about ±30%. Thus, to increase the accuracy of calculated scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients, it is crucial to further reduce the error in particle number size distribution measurement techniques. In addition, further improvement of the techniques for measuring absorption coefficients and further investigation of the measurement of the fraction of EC of the aerosol is

  9. Climate engineering of vegetated land for hot extremes mitigation: An Earth system model sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Micah; Davin, Edouard L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2015-04-01

    Various climate engineering schemes have been proposed as a way to curb anthropogenic climate change. Land climate engineering schemes aiming to reduce the amount of solar radiation absorbed at the surface by changes in land surface albedo have been considered in a limited number of investigations. However, global studies on this topic have generally focused on the impacts on mean climate rather than extremes. Here we present the results of a series of transient global climate engineering sensitivity experiments performed with the Community Earth System Model over the time period 1950-2100 under historical and Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 scenarios. Four sets of experiments are performed in which the surface albedo over snow-free vegetated grid points is increased respectively by 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20. The simulations show a preferential cooling of hot extremes relative to mean temperatures throughout the Northern midlatitudes during boreal summer under the late twentieth century conditions. Two main mechanisms drive this response: On the one hand, a stronger efficacy of the albedo-induced radiative forcing on days with high incoming shortwave radiation and, on the other hand, enhanced soil moisture-induced evaporative cooling during the warmest days relative to the control simulation due to accumulated soil moisture storage and reduced drying. The latter effect is dominant in summer in midlatitude regions and also implies a reduction of summer drought conditions. It thus constitutes another important benefit of surface albedo modifications in reducing climate change impacts. The simulated response for the end of the 21st century conditions is of the same sign as that for the end of the twentieth century conditions but indicates an increasing absolute impact of land surface albedo increases in reducing mean and extreme temperatures under enhanced greenhouse gas forcing.

  10. Motion analysis study on sensitivity of finite element model of the cervical spine to geometry.

    PubMed

    Zafarparandeh, Iman; Erbulut, Deniz U; Ozer, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Numerous finite element models of the cervical spine have been proposed, with exact geometry or with symmetric approximation in the geometry. However, few researches have investigated the sensitivity of predicted motion responses to the geometry of the cervical spine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of symmetric assumption on the predicted motion by finite element model of the cervical spine. We developed two finite element models of the cervical spine C2-C7. One model was based on the exact geometry of the cervical spine (asymmetric model), whereas the other was symmetric (symmetric model) about the mid-sagittal plane. The predicted range of motion of both models-main and coupled motions-was compared with published experimental data for all motion planes under a full range of loads. The maximum differences between the asymmetric model and symmetric model predictions for the principal motion were 31%, 78%, and 126% for flexion-extension, right-left lateral bending, and right-left axial rotation, respectively. For flexion-extension and lateral bending, the minimum difference was 0%, whereas it was 2% for axial rotation. The maximum coupled motions predicted by the symmetric model were 1.5° axial rotation and 3.6° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. Those coupled motions predicted by the asymmetric model were 1.6° axial rotation and 4° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. In general, the predicted motion response of the cervical spine by the symmetric model was in the acceptable range and nonlinearity of the moment-rotation curve for the cervical spine was properly predicted. PMID:27107032

  11. Impact of aerosol and freezing level on orographic clouds: A sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hui; Yin, Yan; Chen, Qian; Zhao, Pengguo

    2016-07-01

    The response of clouds and precipitation to changes in aerosol properties is variable with the ambient meteorological conditions, which is important for the distribution of water resources, especially in mountain regions. In this study, a detailed bin microphysics scheme is coupled into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to investigate how orographic clouds and precipitation respond to changes in aerosols under different thermodynamic profiles. The model results suggest that when the initial aerosol number concentration changes from a clean continental background (4679 cm- 3) to a polluted urban environment (23,600 cm- 3), the accumulated surface precipitation amount can be increased up to 14% mainly due to the enhanced riming process which results from more droplets of 10-30 μm in diameter. When the freezing level is lowered from 2.85 km to 0.9 km (above 1000 hPa level), the growth of ice-phase particles via riming process is enhanced, leading to more precipitation. However, the response of surface precipitation amount to increase in aerosol particle concentration is not linear with lowering freezing level, and there is a maximum precipitation enhancement caused by aerosols (about 14%) as the freezing level is at 1.4 km. Further sensitivity tests show that, the response of riming growth to increase in aerosol particle concentration becomes more significant with lowering the freezing level, but this effect becomes less significant as the freezing level is further lowered due to the limited liquid water. Moreover, the growth of raindrops through collision and coalescence is suppressed with lowering freezing level, due to the shorter distance between the melting level and the ground.

  12. A Study of Position-Sensitive Solid-State Photomultiplier Signal Properties

    PubMed Central

    Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Du, Junwei; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Dokhale, Purushottam; Christian, James; McClish, Mickel; Shah, Kanai S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the signal properties of a position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) that has an integrated resistive network for position sensing. Attractive features of PS-SSPMs are their large area and ability to resolve small scintillator crystals. However, the large area leads to a high detector capacitance, and in order to achieve high spatial resolution a large network resistor value is required. These inevitably create a low-pass filter that drastically slows what would be a fast micro-cell discharge pulse. Significant changes in the signal shape of the PS-SSPM cathode output as a function of position are observed, which result in a position-dependent time delay when using traditional time pick-off methods such as leading edge discrimination and constant fraction discrimination. The timing resolution and time delay, as a function of position, were characterized for two different PS-SSPM designs, a continuous 10 mm × 10 mm PS-SSPM and a tiled 2 × 2 array of 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPMs. After time delay correction, the block timing resolution, measured with a 6 × 6 array of 1.3 × 1.3 × 20 mm3 LSO crystals, was 8.6 ns and 8.5 ns, with the 10 mm PS-SSPM and 5 mm PS-SSPM respectively. The effect of crystal size on timing resolution was also studied, and contrary to expectation, a small improvement was measured when reducing the crystal size from 1.3 mm to 0.5 mm. Digital timing methods were studied and showed great promise for allowing accurate timing by implementation of a leading edge time pick-off. Position-dependent changes in signal shape on the anode side also are present, which complicates peak height data acquisition methods used for positioning. We studied the effect of trigger position on signal amplitude, flood histogram quality, and depth-of-interaction resolution in a dual-ended readout detector configuration. We conclude that detector timing and positioning can be significantly improved by implementation of digital timing

  13. A Study of Position-Sensitive Solid-State Photomultiplier Signal Properties.

    PubMed

    Schmall, Jeffrey P; Du, Junwei; Judenhofer, Martin S; Dokhale, Purushottam; Christian, James; McClish, Mickel; Shah, Kanai S; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-06-12

    We present an analysis of the signal properties of a position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) that has an integrated resistive network for position sensing. Attractive features of PS-SSPMs are their large area and ability to resolve small scintillator crystals. However, the large area leads to a high detector capacitance, and in order to achieve high spatial resolution a large network resistor value is required. These inevitably create a low-pass filter that drastically slows what would be a fast micro-cell discharge pulse. Significant changes in the signal shape of the PS-SSPM cathode output as a function of position are observed, which result in a position-dependent time delay when using traditional time pick-off methods such as leading edge discrimination and constant fraction discrimination. The timing resolution and time delay, as a function of position, were characterized for two different PS-SSPM designs, a continuous 10 mm × 10 mm PS-SSPM and a tiled 2 × 2 array of 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPMs. After time delay correction, the block timing resolution, measured with a 6 × 6 array of 1.3 × 1.3 × 20 mm(3) LSO crystals, was 8.6 ns and 8.5 ns, with the 10 mm PS-SSPM and 5 mm PS-SSPM respectively. The effect of crystal size on timing resolution was also studied, and contrary to expectation, a small improvement was measured when reducing the crystal size from 1.3 mm to 0.5 mm. Digital timing methods were studied and showed great promise for allowing accurate timing by implementation of a leading edge time pick-off. Position-dependent changes in signal shape on the anode side also are present, which complicates peak height data acquisition methods used for positioning. We studied the effect of trigger position on signal amplitude, flood histogram quality, and depth-of-interaction resolution in a dual-ended readout detector configuration. We conclude that detector timing and positioning can be significantly improved by implementation of digital timing

  14. Does traffic exhaust contribute to the development of asthma and allergic sensitization in children: findings from recent cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the evidence from recent prospective studies that long-term traffic pollution could contribute to the development of asthma-like symptoms and allergic sensitization in children. We have reviewed cohort studies published since 2002 and found in PubMed in Oct 2008. In all, 13 papers based on data from 9 cohorts have evaluated the relationship between traffic exposure and respiratory health. All surveys reported associations with at least some of the studied respiratory symptoms. The outcome varied, however, according to the age of the child. Nevertheless, the consistency in the results indicates that traffic exhaust contributes to the development of respiratory symptoms in healthy children. Potential effects of traffic exhaust on the development of allergic sensitization were only assessed in the four European birth cohorts. Long-term exposure to outdoor air pollutants had no association with sensitization in ten-year-old schoolchildren in Norway. In contrast, German, Dutch and Swedish preschool children had an increased risk of sensitization related to traffic exhaust despite fairly similar levels of outdoor air pollution as in Norway. Traffic-related effects on sensitization could be restricted to individuals with a specific genetic polymorphism. Assessment of gene-environment interactions on sensitization has so far only been carried out in a subgroup of the Swedish birth cohort. Further genetic association studies are required and may identify individuals vulnerable to adverse effects from traffic-related pollutants. Future studies should also evaluate effects of traffic exhaust on the development and long term outcome of different phenotypes of asthma and wheezing symptoms. PMID:19371435

  15. Comparative study of the sensitivity of spores and amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum to ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Y.; Wada, M.

    1980-09-01

    We report the sensitivity change of plaque formation to ultraviolet light (uv) irradiation in several stages of the cellular slime mold from spore to stationary phase, under the special condition which we have obtained - a plating efficiency of 100%. For NC-4 (haploid) and H-1 (diploid), uv sensitivity of cells just after germination was almost equal to that of spores; then the sensitivity decreased with development, reached a minimum just before the first cell division, and remained at that level during logarithmic growth. As to the difference between NC-4 and H-1, NC-4 was more resistant than H-1 at low doses, and H-1 was more resistant than NC-4 at high doses for both spores and amoebae. We also report a pipetting effect which assured reproducible data for amoebae.

  16. Determination of noise equivalent reflectance for a multispectral scanner: A scanner sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, D. E.; Richard, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    The methods used to calculate the sensitivity parameter noise equivalent reflectance of a remote-sensing scanner are explored, and the results are compared with values measured over calibrated test sites. Data were acquired on four occasions covering a span of 4 years and providing various atmospheric conditions. One of the calculated values was based on assumed atmospheric conditions, whereas two others were based on atmospheric models. Results indicate that the assumed atmospheric conditions provide useful answers adequate for many purposes. A nomograph was developed to indicate sensitivity variations due to geographic location, time of day, and season.

  17. Temperature sensitivity of the paw of the cat: a behavioural study

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Stanley; Norrsell, Ulf

    1974-01-01

    1. Cats were trained to respond to differences between the temperatures of the floors of two corridors of a modified T-maze for a food reward. 2. The cats were able to respond to differences between warm temperatures or differences between cool temperatures in the range of 1° C. 3. Both warm and cool discriminations were mediated by receptors located in or near the footpads. 4. The paw of the cat thus appears to be more sensitive to temperature changes than was believed previously, and its temperature sensitivity may be comparable to that of the hand of the primate. PMID:4854615

  18. In vivo dosimetry for gynaecological brachytherapy using a novel position sensitive radiation detector: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Reniers, B.; Landry, G.; Eichner, R.; Hallil, A.; Verhaegen, F.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: In gynecological radiotherapy with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir brachytherapy, the treatment complexity has increased due to improved optimization techniques and dose constraints. As a consequence, it has become more important to verify the dose delivery to the target and also to the organs at risk (e.g., the bladder). In vivo dosimetry, where dosimeters are placed in or on the patient, is one way of verifying the dose but until recently this was hampered by motion of the radiation detectors with respect to the source. The authors present a novel dosimetry method using a position sensitive radiation detector. Methods: The prototype RADPOS system (Best Medical Canada) consists of a metal oxide field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter coupled to a position-sensor, which deduces its 3D position in a magnetic field. To assess the feasibility of in vivo dosimetry based on the RADPOS system, different characteristics of the detector need to be investigated. Using a PMMA phantom, the positioning accuracy of the RADPOS system was quantified by comparing position readouts with the known position of the detector along the x and y-axes. RADPOS dose measurements were performed at various distances from a Nucletron{sup 192}Ir source in a PMMA phantom to evaluate the energy dependence of the MOSFET. A sensitivity analysis was performed by calculating the dose after varying (1) the position of the RADPOS detector to simulate organ motion and (2) the position of the first dwell position to simulate errors in delivery. The authors also performed an uncertainty analysis to determine the action level (AL) that should be used during in vivo dosimetry. Results: Positioning accuracy is found to be within 1 mm in the 1-10 cm range from the origin along the x-axis (away from the transmitter), meeting the requirements for in vivo dosimetry. Similar results are obtained for the other axes. The ALs are chosen to take into account the total uncertainty on the measurements. As a

  19. Representing icebergs in the iLOVECLIM model (version 1.0) - a sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bügelmayer, M.; Roche, D. M.; Renssen, H.

    2014-07-01

    Recent modelling studies have indicated that icebergs alter the ocean's state, the thickness of sea ice and the prevailing atmospheric conditions, in short play an active role in the climate system. The icebergs' impact is due to their slowly released melt water which freshens and cools the ocean. The spatial distribution of the icebergs and thus their melt water depends on the forces (atmospheric and oceanic) acting on them as well as on the icebergs' size. The studies conducted so far have in common that the icebergs were moved by reconstructed or modelled forcing fields and that the initial size distribution of the icebergs was prescribed according to present day observations. To address these shortcomings, we used the climate model iLOVECLIM that includes actively coupled ice-sheet and iceberg modules, to conduct 15 sensitivity experiments to analyse (1) the impact of the forcing fields (atmospheric vs. oceanic) on the icebergs' distribution and melt flux, and (2) the effect of the used initial iceberg size on the resulting Northern Hemisphere climate and ice sheet under different climate conditions (pre-industrial, strong/weak radiative forcing). Our results show that, under equilibrated pre-industrial conditions, the oceanic currents cause the bergs to stay close to the Greenland and North American coast, whereas the atmospheric forcing quickly distributes them further away from their calving site. These different characteristics strongly affect the lifetime of icebergs, since the wind-driven icebergs melt up to two years faster as they are quickly distributed into the relatively warm North Atlantic waters. Moreover, we find that local variations in the spatial distribution due to different iceberg sizes do not result in different climate states and Greenland ice sheet volume, independent of the prevailing climate conditions (pre-industrial, warming or cooling climate). Therefore, we conclude that local differences in the distribution of their melt flux do

  20. A material sensitivity study on the accuracy of deformable organ registration using linear biomechanical models

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Yan, D.

    2006-02-15

    Model-based deformable organ registration techniques using the finite element method (FEM) have recently been investigated intensively and applied to image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART). These techniques assume that human organs are linearly elastic material, and their mechanical properties are predetermined. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the tissue material properties is challenging and the properties usually vary between patients. A common issue is therefore the achievable accuracy of the calculation due to the limited access to tissue elastic material constants. In this study, we performed a systematic investigation on this subject based on tissue biomechanics and computer simulations to establish the relationships between achievable registration accuracy and tissue mechanical and organ geometrical properties. Primarily we focused on image registration for three organs: rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate. The tissue anisotropy due to orientation preference in tissue fiber alignment is captured by using an orthotropic or a transversely isotropic elastic model. First we developed biomechanical models for the rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate using simplified geometries and investigated the effect of varying material parameters on the resulting organ deformation. Then computer models based on patient image data were constructed, and image registrations were performed. The sensitivity of registration errors was studied by perturbating the tissue material properties from their mean values while fixing the boundary conditions. The simulation results demonstrated that registration error for a subvolume increases as its distance from the boundary increases. Also, a variable associated with material stability was found to be a dominant factor in registration accuracy in the context of material uncertainty. For hollow thin organs such as rectal walls and bladder walls, the registration errors are limited. Given 30% in material uncertainty

  1. Sensitivity studies of SREM instrument response and spectral unfolding to particle environment anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdas, Wojtek; Xiao, Hualin; Marcinkowski, Radoslaw

    2016-04-01

    The Standard Radiation Environment Monitor (SREM) is installed on several ESA satellites to monitor space radiation environment of protons and electrons [1]. With its 15 spectroscopy channels the monitor can distinguish between particle species and provide information on their energy spectra. Measurements are based on three sensors located behind different shielding materials. Two of them are arranged into a telescope. All SREM instruments have been carefully calibrated and modelled during laboratory preparation phase. Space data are unfolded using a wide range of methods ranging from simple fit functions to response matrix inversions [2]. Cross comparisons often show discrepancies reaching even an order of magnitude. They are usually attributed to the particle environment anisotropy. Due to various thicknesses of the shielding given by SREM itself and the spacecraft mass distributions the response functions show directional sensitivity. Knowing the spacecraft orientation with respect to the magnetic field allows for more accurate spectral measurements [3]. It is not always possible as only some spacecraft with SREM on board provide such information. This study utilizes pitch angle distributions of particles in the radiation belts for improved unfolding of the SREM energy spectra. Both, random and known SREM orientations with respect to the magnetic field are investigated. Results are given for wide range of numerical studies and for space measurements based on the PROBA1 mission [4]. They contribute to improved accuracy of SREM spectral measurements and give valuable inputs to design of new spacecraft radiation instruments. Literature [1 A. Hajdas, P. Bühler, C. Eggel, P. Favre, A. Mchedlishvili, and A. Zehnder, "Radiation environment along the INTEGRAL orbit measured with the IREM monitor," Astro. Astrophys., vol. 411, pp. L43-L47, 2003. [2] I. Sandberg, I. A. Daglis, A. Anastasiadis, P. Bühler, P. Nieminen, and H. Evans, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. vol. 59, no. 4

  2. A microstructure sensitive study of rolling contact fatigue in bearing steels: A numerical and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandkar, Anup Surendra

    Bearings are an integral part of machine components that transmit rotary power such as cars, motors, engines etc. Safe bearing operation is essential to avoid serious failures and accidents, which necessitates their timely replacement. This calls for an accurate bearing life prediction methods. Based on the Lundberg-Palmgen (LP) model, current life models consistently under predict bearings lives. Improvement in life prediction requires understanding of the bearing failure mechanism i.e. Rolling Contact Fatigue (RCF). The goal of this research is to develop a mechanistic framework required for an improved bearing life prediction model. Such model should account for metal plasticity, influence of microstructural features and cyclically evolving stressstrain fields induced during RCF. To achieve this, elastic-plastic finite element (FE) study is undertaken to investigate the response of M50-NiL bearing steel during RCF. Specifically, a microstructure sensitive study of the influence of non-metallic inclusions on RCF response of bearings is presented. M50-NiL microstructure consists of carbides which are orders of magnitude smaller than bearing dimensions. To account for this size difference, a multi-scale FE modeling approach is employed. The FE results reveal that hard carbide particles act as local stress risers, alter surrounding stressstrain fields and cause micro-scale yielding of steel matrix. Moreover, they introduce a shear stress cycle with non-zero mean stress, which promotes micro-plastic strain accumulation via ratcheting mechanism. Localized ratcheting is primarily responsible for cyclic hardening within the RCF affected region. Such evolution of subsurface hardness can be used to quantify RCF induced damage. To investigate this further, cyclic hardening response of the RCF affected region is simulated. The results show good agreement with the experimental observations. The cyclic stress-strain fields obtained from these simulations and the knowledge of

  3. A Pilot Study of Maternal Sensitivity in the Context of Emergent Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Jason K.; Messinger, Daniel S.; Lyons, Kara K.; Grantz, Caroline J.

    2010-01-01

    Unstructured mother-toddler interactions were examined in 18-month-old high- and low-risk children subsequently diagnosed (n = 12) or not diagnosed (n = 21) with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) at 36 months. Differences in maternal sensitivity were not found as a function of emergent ASD status. A differential-susceptibility moderation model of…

  4. Description of a Sensitive Seebeck Calorimeter Used for Cold Fusion Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Edmund

    A sensitive and stable Seebeck calorimeter is described and used to determine the heat of formation of PdD. This determination can be used to show that such calorimeters are sufficiently accurate to measure the LENR effect and give support to the claims.

  5. Direction-dependent spectral sensitivity and interaural spectral difference in a dolphin: evoked potential study.

    PubMed

    Supin AYa; Popov, V V

    1993-06-01

    Sensitivity and interaural intensity difference (IID) dependence on sound frequency and direction was measured in an Amazon river dolphin Inia geoffrensis by recording the auditory nerve evoked response from the body surface. The maximal sensitivity in the horizontal plane was found when the sound direction was 5 degrees to 10 degrees ipsilateral to the recorded ear; the direction dependence of sensitivity was more pronounced at higher frequencies than at lower ones. The IID reached its peak at small azimuthal angles (7.5 degrees to 15 degrees) and higher sound frequencies (100 kHz), or at large azimuthal angles (30 degrees to 45 degrees) and lower sound frequencies (20 to 30 kHz). Each sound direction featured its specific pattern of spectral sensitivity and of interaural spectral difference. The interaural spectral difference fluctuated within a range of more than 20 dB depending on sound direction. The data indicate that interaural intensity as well as spectral difference may be cues for binaural localization of sound direction by dolphins. PMID:8326074

  6. Using Technology to Support Discussions on Sensitive Topics in the Study of Business Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    There is a dearth of research into teaching strategies and learning approaches for units involving sensitive topics that can provoke an emotional response in students. In a business ethics unit, attempts to strike a balance between conceptual knowledge and theory and skills training can be challenging because the unit can involve personal,…

  7. APPLICATION OF AUTOMATIC DIFFERENTIATION FOR STUDYING THE SENSITIVITY OF NUMERICAL ADVECTION SCHEMES IN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In any simulation model, knowing the sensitivity of the system to the model parameters is of utmost importance. s part of an effort to build a multiscale air quality modeling system for a high performance computing and communication (HPCC) environment, we are exploring an automat...

  8. A Genome Wide Genotyping Study To Find Candidate Genes That Influence Varroa-Sensitive Hygiene (VSH)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Varroa parasitism of honey bees is widely considered by apicultural researchers to be the greatest threat to beekeeping. Varroa-sensitive hygiene (VSH) is one of two identified behaviors that are highly important for controlling the growth of Varroa mite populations in bee hives. Bees exhibiting th...

  9. VISA-II sensitivity study of code calculations: Input and analytical model parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, E.P.; Johnson, K.I.; Simonen, F.A.; Liebetrau, A.M.

    1986-11-01

    The Vessel Integrity Simulation Analysis (VISA-II) code was developed to allow calculations of the failure probability of a reactor pressure vessel subject to defined pressure/temperature transients. A version of the code, revised by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, was used to evaluate the sensitivities of calculated through-wall flaw probability to material, flaw and calculational assumptions. Probabilities were more sensitive to flaw assumptions than to material or calculational assumptions. Alternative flaw assumptions changed the probabilities by one to two orders of magnitude, whereas alternative material assumptions typically changed the probabilities by a factor of two or less. Flaw shape, flaw through-wall position and flaw inspection were sensitivities examined. Material property sensitivities included the assumed distributions in copper content and fracture toughness. Methods of modeling flaw propagation that were evaluated included arrest/reinitiation toughness correlations, multiple toughness values along the length of a flaw, flaw jump distance for each computer simulation and added error in estimating irradiated properties caused by the trend curve correlation error.

  10. Children with a History of SLI Show Reduced Sensitivity to Audiovisual Temporal Asynchrony: An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaganovich, Natalya; Schumaker, Jennifer; Leonard, Laurence B.; Gustafson, Dana; Macias, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors examined whether school-age children with a history of specific language impairment (H-SLI), their peers with typical development (TD), and adults differ in sensitivity to audiovisual temporal asynchrony and whether such difference stems from the sensory encoding of audiovisual information. Method: Fifteen H-SLI children, 15…

  11. Biochemical and Functional Studies of Cortical Vesicle Fusion: The SNARE Complex and Ca2+ Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Coorssen, Jens R.; Blank, Paul S.; Tahara, Masahiro; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    1998-01-01

    Cortical vesicles (CV) possess components critical to the mechanism of exocytosis. The homotypic fusion of CV centrifuged or settled into contact has a sigmoidal Ca2+ activity curve comparable to exocytosis (CV–PM fusion). Here we show that Sr2+ and Ba2+ also trigger CV–CV fusion, and agents affecting different steps of exocytotic fusion block Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+-triggered CV–CV fusion. The maximal number of active fusion complexes per vesicle, Max, was quantified by NEM inhibition of fusion, showing that CV–CV fusion satisfies many criteria of a mathematical analysis developed for exocytosis. Both Max and the Ca2+ sensitivity of fusion complex activation were comparable to that determined for CV–PM fusion. Using Ca2+-induced SNARE complex disruption, we have analyzed the relationship between membrane fusion (CV–CV and CV–PM) and the SNARE complex. Fusion and complex disruption have different sensitivities to Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+, the complex remains Ca2+- sensitive on fusion-incompetent CV, and disruption does not correlate with the quantified activation of fusion complexes. Under conditions which disrupt the SNARE complex, CV on the PM remain docked and fusion competent, and isolated CV still dock and fuse, but with a markedly reduced Ca2+ sensitivity. Thus, in this system, neither the formation, presence, nor disruption of the SNARE complex is essential to the Ca2+-triggered fusion of exocytotic membranes. Therefore the SNARE complex alone cannot be the universal minimal fusion machine for intracellular fusion. We suggest that this complex modulates the Ca2+ sensitivity of fusion. PMID:9864359

  12. Stress Sensitivity, Aberrant Salience, and Threat Anticipation in Early Psychosis: An Experience Sampling Study.

    PubMed

    Reininghaus, Ulrich; Kempton, Matthew J; Valmaggia, Lucia; Craig, Tom K J; Garety, Philippa; Onyejiaka, Adanna; Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; So, Suzanne H; Hubbard, Kathryn; Beards, Stephanie; Dazzan, Paola; Pariante, Carmine; Mondelli, Valeria; Fisher, Helen L; Mills, John G; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; McGuire, Philip; van Os, Jim; Murray, Robin M; Wykes, Til; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Morgan, Craig

    2016-05-01

    While contemporary models of psychosis have proposed a number of putative psychological mechanisms, how these impact on individuals to increase intensity of psychotic experiences in real life, outside the research laboratory, remains unclear. We aimed to investigate whether elevated stress sensitivity, experiences of aberrant novelty and salience, and enhanced anticipation of threat contribute to the development of psychotic experiences in daily life. We used the experience sampling method (ESM) to assess stress, negative affect, aberrant salience, threat anticipation, and psychotic experiences in 51 individuals with first-episode psychosis (FEP), 46 individuals with an at-risk mental state (ARMS) for psychosis, and 53 controls with no personal or family history of psychosis. Linear mixed models were used to account for the multilevel structure of ESM data. In all 3 groups, elevated stress sensitivity, aberrant salience, and enhanced threat anticipation were associated with an increased intensity of psychotic experiences. However, elevated sensitivity to minor stressful events (χ(2)= 6.3,P= 0.044), activities (χ(2)= 6.7,P= 0.036), and areas (χ(2)= 9.4,P= 0.009) and enhanced threat anticipation (χ(2)= 9.3,P= 0.009) were associated with more intense psychotic experiences in FEP individuals than controls. Sensitivity to outsider status (χ(2)= 5.7,P= 0.058) and aberrantly salient experiences (χ(2)= 12.3,P= 0.002) were more strongly associated with psychotic experiences in ARMS individuals than controls. Our findings suggest that stress sensitivity, aberrant salience, and threat anticipation are important psychological processes in the development of psychotic experiences in daily life in the early stages of the disorder. PMID:26834027

  13. Stress Sensitivity, Aberrant Salience, and Threat Anticipation in Early Psychosis: An Experience Sampling Study

    PubMed Central

    Reininghaus, Ulrich; Kempton, Matthew J.; Valmaggia, Lucia; Craig, Tom K. J.; Garety, Philippa; Onyejiaka, Adanna; Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; So, Suzanne H.; Hubbard, Kathryn; Beards, Stephanie; Dazzan, Paola; Pariante, Carmine; Mondelli, Valeria; Fisher, Helen L.; Mills, John G.; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; McGuire, Philip; van Os, Jim; Murray, Robin M.; Wykes, Til; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Morgan, Craig

    2016-01-01

    While contemporary models of psychosis have proposed a number of putative psychological mechanisms, how these impact on individuals to increase intensity of psychotic experiences in real life, outside the research laboratory, remains unclear. We aimed to investigate whether elevated stress sensitivity, experiences of aberrant novelty and salience, and enhanced anticipation of threat contribute to the development of psychotic experiences in daily life. We used the experience sampling method (ESM) to assess stress, negative affect, aberrant salience, threat anticipation, and psychotic experiences in 51 individuals with first-episode psychosis (FEP), 46 individuals with an at-risk mental state (ARMS) for psychosis, and 53 controls with no personal or family history of psychosis. Linear mixed models were used to account for the multilevel structure of ESM data. In all 3 groups, elevated stress sensitivity, aberrant salience, and enhanced threat anticipation were associated with an increased intensity of psychotic experiences. However, elevated sensitivity to minor stressful events (χ2 = 6.3, P = 0.044), activities (χ2 = 6.7, P = 0.036), and areas (χ2 = 9.4, P = 0.009) and enhanced threat anticipation (χ2 = 9.3, P = 0.009) were associated with more intense psychotic experiences in FEP individuals than controls. Sensitivity to outsider status (χ2 = 5.7, P = 0.058) and aberrantly salient experiences (χ2 = 12.3, P = 0.002) were more strongly associated with psychotic experiences in ARMS individuals than controls. Our findings suggest that stress sensitivity, aberrant salience, and threat anticipation are important psychological processes in the development of psychotic experiences in daily life in the early stages of the disorder. PMID:26834027

  14. Environmental and spray mixture effects on droplet size represented by water sensitive paper used in spray studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water sensitive paper (WSP) cards are frequently used to provide visual representation of droplet size and density for spray drift and deposition studies. Droplets collected on WSP spread out on the surface of the paper, and standard “spread factor” equations are used to compensate for spread to cha...

  15. Sensitivity and Specificity of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED): A Community-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSousa, Diogo Araujo; Salum, Giovanni Abrahao; Isolan, Luciano Rassier; Manfro, Gisele Gus

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional community-based study was to examine the sensitivity and specificity of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) to the diagnosis of anxiety disorders (AD). Participants were 119 students aged 9-18. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed by a psychiatrist throughout a structural clinical…

  16. Test Problems for Reactive Flow HE Model in the ALE3D Code and Limited Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gerassimenko, M.

    2000-03-01

    We document quick running test problems for a reactive flow model of HE initiation incorporated into ALE3D. A quarter percent change in projectile velocity changes the outcome from detonation to HE burn that dies down. We study the sensitivity of calculated HE behavior to several parameters of practical interest where modeling HE initiation with ALE3D.

  17. A Study to Assess the Achievement Motivation of Higher Secondary Students in Relation to Their Noise Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latha, Prema

    2014-01-01

    Disturbing sounds are often referred to as noise, and if extreme enough in degree, intensity or frequency, it is referred to as noise pollution. Achievement refers to a change in study behavior in relation to their noise sensitivity and learning in the educational sense by achieving results in changed responses to certain types of stimuli like…

  18. Sensitivity to Speaker Control in the Online Comprehension of Conditional Tips and Promises: An Eye-Tracking Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Andrew J.; Haigh, Matthew; Ferguson, Heather J.

    2013-01-01

    Statements of the form if… then… can be used to communicate conditional speech acts such as tips and promises. Conditional promises require the speaker to have perceived control over the outcome event, whereas conditional tips do not. In an eye-tracking study, we examined whether readers are sensitive to information about perceived speaker control…

  19. Dispersion modeling of accidental releases of toxic gases - Sensitivity study and optimization of the meteorological input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann-Stanzer, K.; Stenzel, S.

    2009-04-01

    Several air dispersion models are available for prediction and simulation of the hazard areas associated with accidental releases of toxic gases. The most model packages (commercial or free of charge) include a chemical database, an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI) and automated graphical output for effective presentation of results. The models are designed especially for analyzing different accidental toxic release scenarios ("worst-case scenarios"), preparing emergency response plans and optimal countermeasures as well as for real-time risk assessment and management. Uncertainties in the meteorological input together with incorrect estimates of the source play a critical role for the model results. The research project RETOMOD (reference scenarios calculations for toxic gas releases - model systems and their utility for the fire brigade) was conducted by the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in cooperation with the Vienna fire brigade, OMV Refining & Marketing GmbH and Synex Ries & Greßlehner GmbH. RETOMOD was funded by the KIRAS safety research program at the Austrian Ministry of Transport, Innovation and Technology (www.kiras.at). The main tasks of this project were 1. Sensitivity study and optimization of the meteorological input for modeling of the hazard areas (human exposure) during the accidental toxic releases. 2. Comparison of several model packages (based on reference scenarios) in order to estimate the utility for the fire brigades. This presentation gives a short introduction to the project and presents the results of task 1 (meteorological input). The results of task 2 are presented by Stenzel and Baumann-Stanzer in this session. For the aim of this project, the observation-based analysis and forecasting system INCA, developed in the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) was used. INCA (Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis) data were calculated with 1 km horizontal resolution and

  20. Climate engineering of vegetated land for hot extremes mitigation: an ESM sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Micah; Davin, Edouard; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    Mitigation efforts to reduce anthropogenic climate forcing have thus far proven inadequate, as evident from accelerating greenhouse gas emissions. Many subtropical and mid-latitude regions are expected to experience longer and more frequent heat waves and droughts within the next century. This increased occurrence of weather extremes has important implications for human health, mortality and for socio-economic factors including forest fires, water availability and agricultural production. Various solar radiation management (SRM) schemes that attempt to homogeneously counter the anthropogenic forcing have been examined with different Earth System Models (ESM). Land climate engineering schemes have also been investigated which reduces the amount of solar radiation that is absorbed at the surface. However, few studies have investigated their effects on extremes but rather on mean climate response. Here we present the results of a series of climate engineering sensitivity experiments performed with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) version 1.0.2 at 2°-resolution. This configuration entails 5 fully coupled model components responsible for simulating the Earth's atmosphere, land, land-ice, ocean and sea-ice that interact through a central coupler. Historical and RCP8.5 scenarios were performed with transient land-cover changes and prognostic terrestrial Carbon/Nitrogen cycles. Four sets of experiments are performed in which surface albedo over snow-free vegetated grid points is increased by 0.5, 0.10, 0.15 and 0.20. The simulations show a strong preferential cooling of hot extremes throughout the Northern mid-latitudes during boreal summer. A strong linear scaling between the cooling of extremes and additional surface albedo applied to the land model is observed. The strongest preferential cooling is found in southeastern Europe and the central United States, where increases of soil moisture and evaporative fraction are the largest relative to the control

  1. A world ocean model for greenhouse sensitivity studies: resolution intercomparison and the role of diagnostic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Warren M.; Meehl, Gerald A.; Verplank, Lynda; Bettge, Thomas W.

    1994-05-01

    We have developed an improved version of a world ocean model with the intention of coupling to an atmospheric model. This article documents the simulation capability of this 1° global ocean model, shows improvements over our earlier 5° version, and compares it to features simulated with a 0.5° model. These experiments use a model spin-up methodology whereby the ocean model can subsequently be coupled to an atmospheric model and used for order 100-year coupled model integrations. With present-day computers, 1° is a reasonable compromise in resolution that allows for century-long coupled experiments. The 1° ocean model is derived from a 0.5°-resolution model developed by A. Semtner (Naval Postgraduate School) and R. Chervin (National Center for Atmospheric Research) for studies of the global eddy-resolving world ocean circulation. The 0.5° bottom topography and continental outlines have been altered to be compatible with the 1° resolution, and the Arctic Ocean has been added. We describe the ocean simulation characteristics of the 1° version and compare the result of weakly constraining (three-year time scale) the three-dimensional temperature and salinity fields to the observations below the thermocline (710 m) with the model forced only at the top of the ocean by observed annual mean wind stress, temperature, and salinity. The 1° simulations indicate that major ocean circulation patterns are greatly improved compared to the 5° version and are qualitatively reproduced in comparison to the 0.5° version. Using the annual mean top forcing alone in a 100-year simulation with the 1° version preserves the general features of the major observed temperature and salinity structure with most climate drift occurring mainly beneath the thermocline in the first 50 75 years. Because the thermohaline circulation in the 1° version is relatively weak with annual mean forcing, we demonstrate the importance of the seasonal cycle by performing two sensitivity experiments

  2. Sensitivity study with respect to the domain size with ALADIN-Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boros-Törék, Orsolya; Krüzselyi, Ilona; Szépszó, Gabriella

    2015-04-01

    The ALADIN-Climate regional climate model was adapted by the Hungarian Meteorological Service (HMS) in 2005, and it has been used to estimate climate change impacts over the territory of the Carpathian Basin. During these experiments it was proved that the applied 10 km-resolution integration domain was too small, and near its boundary artificial noises arose because the edges cross mountainous areas. Therefore, two new areas were tested in a sensitivity study to find a more appropriate domain for the future runs. Although the size of new integration area is limited by the computational capacity of HMS, both test domains cover the Central-European region containing the whole Danube catchment, with their boundaries far from highly elevated orographic features. The bigger domain includes the smaller one and is extended towards South, West and East. As test period, 1971-1980 years were selected. Lateral boundary conditions were supplied by the 0.44-degree (~50 km) resolution ALADIN simulation (conducted in EURO-CORDEX) driven with global ARPEGE fields. Basically three meteorological variables were examined: sea level pressure, 2-m temperature and rainfall. The evaluation was concentrating on their seasonal and annual means, while in case of precipitation daily data was also used: due to high spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, its modelling is difficult task, therefore, additional indices were calculated. During the validation the model results were compared to two different observational gridded datasets: for the Carpathian Basin the homogenized CARPATCLIM is applied and for continent-scale investigations E-OBS is considered as reference. The obtained results suggest: (1) ALADIN works acceptably over both domains, and although it provides some similar results (e.g., temperature underestimation and precipitation overestimation over major part of the domain and year) as in the earlier experiments, the largest errors derived from the boundary conditions

  3. A parametric sensitivity and optimization study for the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model flutter characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    1991-01-01

    In this paper an effort is made to improve the analytical open-loop flutter predictions for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model using a sensitivity based optimization approach. The sensitivity derivatives of the flutter frequency and dynamic pressure of the model with respect to the lag terms appearing in the Roger's unsteady aerodynamics approximations are evaluated both analytical and by finite differences. Then, the Levenberg-Marquardt method is used to find the optimum values for these lag-terms. The results obtained here agree much better with the experimental (wind tunnel) results than those found in the previous studies.

  4. A Sensitivity Study of Liric Algorithm to User-defined Input Parameters, Using Selected Cases from Thessaloniki's Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filioglou, M.; Balis, D.; Siomos, N.; Poupkou, A.; Dimopoulos, S.; Chaikovsky, A.

    2016-06-01

    A targeted sensitivity study of the LIRIC algorithm was considered necessary to estimate the uncertainty introduced to the volume concentration profiles, due to the arbitrary selection of user-defined input parameters. For this purpose three different tests were performed using Thessaloniki's Lidar data. Overall, tests in the selection of the regularization parameters, an upper and a lower limit test were performed. The different sensitivity tests were applied on two cases with different predominant aerosol types, a dust episode and a typical urban case.

  5. Identification of seismically risk-sensitive systems and components in nuclear power plants: feasibility study. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Azarm, M; Boccio, J; Farahzad, P

    1983-06-01

    An approach for the identification of risk-sensitive components in a nuclear power plant during and after a seismic event is described. Application of the methodology to two hypothetical power plants - a Boiling Water Reactor and a Pressurized Water Reactor - are presented and the results are given in tabular and graphical form. Conclusions drawn and lessons learned through the course of this study, based on the relative importance of various accident scenarios and sensitivity analyses, are discussed. In addition, the areas that may need further investigation are identified.

  6. Numerical studies of the thermal design sensitivity calculation for a reaction-diffusion system with discontinuous derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Jean W.; Sheen, Jeen S.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find a reliable numerical algorithm to calculate thermal design sensitivities of a transient problem with discontinuous derivatives. The thermal system of interest is a transient heat conduction problem related to the curing process of a composite laminate. A logical function which can smoothly approximate the discontinuity is introduced to modify the system equation. Two commonly used methods, the adjoint variable method and the direct differentiation method, are then applied to find the design derivatives of the modified system. The comparisons of numerical results obtained by these two methods demonstrate that the direct differentiation method is a better choice to be used in calculating thermal design sensitivity.

  7. Effects of LED-laser hybrid light on bleaching effectiveness and tooth sensitivity: a randomized clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolatto, Janaina F.; Pretel, Hermes; Neto, Carolina S.; Andrade, Marcelo F.; Moncada, Gustavo; Oliveira Junior, Osmir B.

    2013-08-01

    The study evaluated the effectiveness and the sensitivity of in-office tooth bleaching with the use of a hybrid photo-activation system composed by LEDs and lasers. 40 patients, both genders, aged 18 through 25 years, were randomly distributed into two treatment groups: group I, 35% hydrogen peroxide, with a total bleaching time of 135 min divided into three sessions, and group II, 35% hydrogen peroxide and photo-thermal catalysis by an LED-laser system (300 mW cm-2), for a total bleaching time of 72 min divided into three sessions. The treatment efficiency was measured by reflectance spectroscopy and sensitivity by a visual analog scale (VAS). The final luminosity value (ΔL), color variation (ΔE) and sensitivity (S) resulting from the treatments were analyzed by the generalized estimating equations method (GEEs), and Bonferroni post hoc multiple comparisons at 5% significance. The two groups presented similar colors (ΔE) and luminosities (ΔL) after treatment. Group I presented a greater sensitivity index (37.6 ± 5.9%) compared to group II (11.1 ± 3.3%), statistically significant at p < 0.05. The use of LED-laser hybrid light, as a catalyst of the bleaching agents, showed a significant decrease of provoked tooth sensitivity and a treatment time reduced by 53%, with the same aesthetic results as without a light source.

  8. The cross-cut statistic and its sensitivity to bias in observational studies with ordered doses of treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Paul R

    2016-03-01

    A common practice with ordered doses of treatment and ordered responses, perhaps recorded in a contingency table with ordered rows and columns, is to cut or remove a cross from the table, leaving the outer corners-that is, the high-versus-low dose, high-versus-low response corners-and from these corners to compute a risk or odds ratio. This little remarked but common practice seems to be motivated by the oldest and most familiar method of sensitivity analysis in observational studies, proposed by Cornfield et al. (1959), which says that to explain a population risk ratio purely as bias from an unobserved binary covariate, the prevalence ratio of the covariate must exceed the risk ratio. Quite often, the largest risk ratio, hence the one least sensitive to bias by this standard, is derived from the corners of the ordered table with the central cross removed. Obviously, the corners use only a portion of the data, so a focus on the corners has consequences for the standard error as well as for bias, but sampling variability was not a consideration in this early and familiar form of sensitivity analysis, where point estimates replaced population parameters. Here, this cross-cut analysis is examined with the aid of design sensitivity and the power of a sensitivity analysis. PMID:26295693

  9. Improved insulin sensitivity and body fat distribution in HIV-infected patients treated with rosiglitazone: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gelato, Marie C; Mynarcik, Dennis C; Quick, Joyce L; Steigbigel, Roy T; Fuhrer, Jack; Brathwaite, Collin E M; Brebbia, John S; Wax, Mark R; McNurlan, Margaret A

    2002-10-01

    The insulin-sensitizing drugs thiazolidinediones (TZDs), such as rosiglitazone, improve insulin sensitivity and also promote adipocyte differentiation in vitro. The authors hypothesized that TZDs might be beneficial to patients with HIV disease to improve insulin sensitivity and the distribution of body fat by increasing peripheral fat. The ability of rosiglitazone (8 mg/d) to improve insulin sensitivity (from hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp) and to improve body fat distribution (determined from computed tomography measurements of visceral adipose tissue [VAT] and subcutaneous adipose tissue [SAT]) was determined in 8 HIV-positive patients. Before treatment, the insulin sensitivity of the patients was reduced to approximately 34% of that in control subjects. The rate of glucose disposal during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (Rd) was 3.8 +/-.4 (SEM) mg glucose/kg lean body mass/min compared with 11.08 +/- 1.1 (p<.001) in healthy age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched control subjects. After rosiglitazone treatment of 6 to 12 weeks, Rd increased to 5.99 +/-.9 (p=.02), an improvement of 59 +/- 22%. SAT increased by 23 +/- 10% (p=.05), and, surprisingly, VAT was decreased by 21 +/- 8% (p=.04) with a trend for increased SAT/VAT that failed to reach statistical significance. There were no significant changes in blood counts, viral loads, or CD4 counts with rosiglitazone treatment. The study demonstrates that rosiglitazone therapy improves insulin resistance and body fat distribution in some patients with HIV disease. PMID:12394794

  10. Sensitivity study for a remotely piloted microwave-powered sailplane used as a high-altitude observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turriziani, R. V.

    1979-01-01

    The sensitivity of several performance characteristics of a proposed design for a microwave-powered, remotely piloted, high-altitude sailplane to changes in independently varied design parameters was investigated. Results were expressed as variations from baseline values of range, final climb altitude and onboard storage of radiated energy. Calculated range decreased with increases in either gross weight or parasite drag coefficient; it also decreased with decreases in lift coefficient, propeller efficiency, or microwave beam density. The sensitivity trends for range and final climb altitude were very similar. The sensitivity trends for stored energy were reversed from those for range, except for decreasing microwave beam density. Some study results for single parameter variations were combined to estimate the effect of the simultaneous variation of several parameters: for two parameters, this appeared to give reasonably accurate results.

  11. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-08-01

    A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

  12. Internal focus of attention in anxiety-sensitive females up-regulates amygdale activity: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Pfleiderer, Bettina; Berse, Timo; Stroux, Daniel; Ewert, Adrianna; Konrad, Carsten; Gerlach, Alexander L

    2014-11-01

    Cognitive behavioral models of panic disorder (PD) stress the importance of an increased attentional focus towards bodily symptoms in the onset and maintenance of this debilitating anxiety disorder. In this fMRI mental tracking paradigm, we looked at the effects of focusing one's attention internally (interoception) vs. externally (exteroception) in a well-studied group at risk for PD-that is anxiety-sensitive females (AS-high). We hypothesized that AS-high subjects compared to control subjects will present higher arousal and decreased valence scores during interoception and parallel higher activity in brain areas which are associated with fear and interoception. 24 healthy female students with high levels of anxiety sensitivity and 24 healthy female students with normal levels of anxiety sensitivity serving as control group were investigated by 3 T fMRI. Subjects either focused their attention on their heartbeats (internal condition) or on neutral tones (external condition). Task performance was monitored by reporting the number of heartbeats or tones after each block. State of arousal and emotional valence were also assessed. The high anxiety-sensitive group reported higher arousal scores compared to controls during the course of the experiment. Simultaneously, fMRI results indicated higher activation in anxiety-sensitive participants than in controls during interoception in a network of cortical and subcortical brain regions (thalamus, amygdala, parahippocampus) that overlaps with known fear circuitry structures. In particular, the activity of the right amygdala was up-regulated. Future prospective-longitudinal studies are needed to validate the role of the amygdala for transition to disorder. Attention to internal body functions up-regulates the activity of interoceptive and fear-relevant brain regions in anxiety-sensitive females, a high-risk group for the development of anxiety disorders. PMID:24898851

  13. Association of cardiorespiratory fitness with insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese postmenopausal women: a Montreal Ottawa New Emerging Team study.

    PubMed

    Messier, Virginie; Malita, Florin M; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Brochu, Martin; Karelis, Antony D

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between insulin sensitivity and cardiorespiratory fitness in overweight and obese postmenopausal women. The study population consisted of 127 overweight and obese postmenopausal women (age, 57.7 +/- 4.8 years; body mass index, 32.7 +/- 4.7 kg/m(2)). Subjects were classified by dividing the entire cohort into tertiles (T) based on insulin sensitivity expressed per kilograms of lean body mass (LBM) (T1, <10.9; T2, 10.9-12.9, T3, >12.9 mg/min per kilogram of LBM, respectively). Outcome measures were body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), visceral adipose tissue (computed tomography), insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp), cardiorespiratory fitness (indirect calorimetry), lower-body muscle strength (1 maximal repetition), physical activity energy expenditure (doubly labeled water), fasting lipids, and inflammatory profile. We found a significant positive relationship between insulin sensitivity and cardiorespiratory fitness (r = 0.25, P = .005). Moreover, cardiorespiratory fitness was higher in the T3 group compared to the T1 group (36.2 +/- 6.1 vs 33.1 +/- 5.0 mL/kg LBM per minute, respectively; P = .028). However, the difference was no longer significant after controlling for visceral adipose tissue or muscle strength. Finally, cardiorespiratory fitness was an independent predictor of insulin sensitivity. High levels of cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with higher levels of insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese postmenopausal women. Moreover, visceral adipose tissue accumulation or muscle strength may be potential mediators of this relationship. PMID:18702957

  14. Comparison of sensitivity analysis methods for pollutant degradation modelling: a case study from drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Marc B

    2012-09-01

    Five sensitivity analysis methods based on derivatives, screening, regression, variance decomposition and entropy are introduced, applied and compared for a model predicting micropollutant degradation in drinking water treatment. The sensitivity analysis objectives considered are factors prioritisation (detecting important factors), factors fixing (detecting non-influential factors) and factors mapping (detecting which factors are responsible for causing pollutant limit exceedances). It is shown how the applicability of methods changes in view of increasing interactions between model factors and increasing non-linearity between the model output and the model factors. A high correlation is observed between the indices obtained for the objectives factors prioritisation and factors mapping due to the positive skewness of the probability distributions of the predicted residual pollutant concentrations. The entropy-based method which uses the Kullback-Leibler divergence is found to be particularly suited when assessing pollutant limit exceedances. PMID:22842753

  15. Low-Speed Flow Studies Using the Pressure Sensitive Paint Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, O. C.; Mehta, R. D.; Cantwell, B. J.

    1998-01-01

    Optical pressure measurements have been made on a NACA 0012 airfoil coated with Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) at very low flow speeds (less than 50 m/s). Angle of attack was limited to 5 deg. for most measurements. Effects of temperature gradients and mis-registration errors on PSP response have been established and minimized. By reducing measurement error caused by these effects. PSP sensitivity has been enhanced. Acceptable aerodynamic data at flow speeds down to 20 m/s have been obtained and valid pressure paint response was observed down to 10 m/s. Measurement errors (in terms of pressure and pressure coefficient) using PSP with pressure taps as a reference are provided for the range of flow speeds from 50 m/s to 10 m/s.

  16. Gamma response study of radiation sensitive MOSFETs for their use as gamma radiation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Aggarwal, Bharti; Singh, Arvind; Kumar, A. Vinod; Topkar, Anita

    2016-05-01

    Continuous monitoring of gamma dose is important in various fields like radiation therapy, space-related research, nuclear energy programs and high energy physics experiment facilities. The present work is focused on utilization of radiation-sensitive Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) to monitor gamma radiation doses. Static characterization of these detectors was performed to check their expected current-voltage relationship. Threshold voltage and transconductance per unit gate to source voltage (K factor) were calculated from the experimental data. The detector was exposed to gamma radiation in both, with and without gate bias voltage conditions, and change in threshold voltage was monitored at different gamma doses. The experimental data was fitted to obtain equation for dependence of threshold voltage on gamma dose. More than ten times increase in sensitivity was observed in biased condition (+3 V) compared to the unbiased case.

  17. Near Infrared Emission of Highly Electronically Excited CO: A Sensitive Probe to Study the Interstellar Medium??

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.

    2002-01-01

    Among the various spectroscopic features of the second most abundant molecule in the space, CO, "the triplet - triplet transitions involving the lowest triplet state a(sup 3)II and the higher-lying a(sup 1)3 SIGMA (sup +), d(sup 3) (DELTA), e (sup 3) SIGMA (sup -) states spanning near-UV to mid-IR spectral range" have so far not been explored in astrophysical observations. The energies of these transitions are highly sensitive to the surroundings in which CO exists, i.e. gas-phase, polar or non-polar condensed phase. It is proposed here that these triplet-triplet emission/absorption bands can be used as a sensitive probe to investigate the local environments of CO, whether in the planetary atmosphere, stellar atmosphere or interstellar medium.

  18. Spectroscopic studies on the lanthanide sensitized luminescence and chemiluminescence properties of fluoroquinolone with different structure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunyan; Ping, Hong; Zhang, Minwei; Li, Hongkun; Guan, Fengrui

    2011-11-01

    Lanthanide sensitized luminescence and chemiluminescence (CL) are of great importance because of the unique spectral properties, such as long lifetime, large Stokes shifts, and narrow emission bands characteristic to lanthanide ions (Ln(3+)). With the fluoroquinolone (FQ) compounds including enoxacin (ENX), norfloxacin (NFLX), lomefloxacin (LMFX), fleroxacin (FLRX), ofloxacin (OFLX), rufloxacin (RFX), gatifloxacin (GFLX) and sparfloxacin (SPFX), the luminescence and CL properties of Tb(3+)-FQ and Eu(3+)-FQ complexes have been investigated in this contribution. Ce(4+)-SO(3)(2-) in acidic conditions was taken as the CL system and sensitized CL intensities of Tb(3+)-FQ and Eu(3+)-FQ complexes were determined by flow-injection analysis. The luminescence and CL spectra of Tb(3+)-FQ complexes show characteristic peaks of Tb(3+) at 490 nm, 545 nm, 585 nm and 620 nm. Complexes of Tb(3+)-ENX, Tb(3+)-NFLX, Tb(3+)-LMFX and Tb(3+)-FLRX display relatively strong emission intensity compared with Tb(3+)-OFLX, Tb(3+)-RFX, Tb(3+)-GFLX and Tb(3+)-SPFX. Quite weak peaks with unique characters of Eu(3+) at 590 nm and 617 nm appear in the luminescence and CL spectra of Eu(3+)-ENX, but no notable sensitized luminescence and CL of Eu(3+) could be observed when Eu(3+) is added into other FQ. The distinct differences on emission intensity of Tb(3+)-FQ and Eu(3+)-FQ might originate from the different energy gap between the triplet levels of FQ and the excited levels of the Ln(3+). The different sensitized luminescence and CL signals among Tb(3+)-FQ complexes could be attributed to different optical properties and substituents of these FQ compounds. The detailed mechanism involved in the luminescence and CL properties of Tb(3+)-FQ and Eu(3+)-FQ complexes has been investigated by analyzing the luminescence and CL spectra, quantum yields, and theoretical calculation results. PMID:21821467

  19. Spectroscopic studies on the lanthanide sensitized luminescence and chemiluminescence properties of fluoroquinolone with different structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chunyan; Ping, Hong; Zhang, Minwei; Li, Hongkun; Guan, Fengrui

    2011-11-01

    Lanthanide sensitized luminescence and chemiluminescence (CL) are of great importance because of the unique spectral properties, such as long lifetime, large Stokes shifts, and narrow emission bands characteristic to lanthanide ions (Ln 3+). With the fluoroquinolone (FQ) compounds including enoxacin (ENX), norfloxacin (NFLX), lomefloxacin (LMFX), fleroxacin (FLRX), ofloxacin (OFLX), rufloxacin (RFX), gatifloxacin (GFLX) and sparfloxacin (SPFX), the luminescence and CL properties of Tb 3+-FQ and Eu 3+-FQ complexes have been investigated in this contribution. Ce 4+-SO 32- in acidic conditions was taken as the CL system and sensitized CL intensities of Tb 3+-FQ and Eu 3+-FQ complexes were determined by flow-injection analysis. The luminescence and CL spectra of Tb 3+-FQ complexes show characteristic peaks of Tb 3+ at 490 nm, 545 nm, 585 nm and 620 nm. Complexes of Tb 3+-ENX, Tb 3+-NFLX, Tb 3+-LMFX and Tb 3+-FLRX display relatively strong emission intensity compared with Tb 3+-OFLX, Tb 3+-RFX, Tb 3+-GFLX and Tb 3+-SPFX. Quite weak peaks with unique characters of Eu 3+ at 590 nm and 617 nm appear in the luminescence and CL spectra of Eu 3+-ENX, but no notable sensitized luminescence and CL of Eu 3+ could be observed when Eu 3+ is added into other FQ. The distinct differences on emission intensity of Tb 3+-FQ and Eu 3+-FQ might originate from the different energy gap between the triplet levels of FQ and the excited levels of the Ln 3+. The different sensitized luminescence and CL signals among Tb 3+-FQ complexes could be attributed to different optical properties and substituents of these FQ compounds. The detailed mechanism involved in the luminescence and CL properties of Tb 3+-FQ and Eu 3+-FQ complexes has been investigated by analyzing the luminescence and CL spectra, quantum yields, and theoretical calculation results.

  20. Sensitivity study and parameter optimization of OCD tool for 14nm finFET process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhensheng; Chen, Huiping; Cheng, Shiqiu; Zhan, Yunkun; Huang, Kun; Shi, Yaoming; Xu, Yiping

    2016-03-01

    Optical critical dimension (OCD) measurement has been widely demonstrated as an essential metrology method for monitoring advanced IC process in the technology node of 90 nm and beyond. However, the rapidly shrunk critical dimensions of the semiconductor devices and the increasing complexity of the manufacturing process bring more challenges to OCD. The measurement precision of OCD technology highly relies on the optical hardware configuration, spectral types, and inherently interactions between the incidence of light and various materials with various topological structures, therefore sensitivity analysis and parameter optimization are very critical in the OCD applications. This paper presents a method for seeking the optimum sensitive measurement configuration to enhance the metrology precision and reduce the noise impact to the greatest extent. In this work, the sensitivity of different types of spectra with a series of hardware configurations of incidence angles and azimuth angles were investigated. The optimum hardware measurement configuration and spectrum parameter can be identified. The FinFET structures in the technology node of 14 nm were constructed to validate the algorithm. This method provides guidance to estimate the measurement precision before measuring actual device features and will be beneficial for OCD hardware configuration.

  1. Sensitivity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to small targeted therapeutic molecules: An in vitro comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sylvan, Sandra Eketorp; Skribek, Henriette; Norin, Stefan; Muhari, Orsolya; Österborg, Anders; Szekely, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    New drugs targeting important cellular signaling pathways are currently being developed for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It is therefore of interest to analyze their in vitro killing capacity in manufacturer-independent, comparative experiments. We here report on the sensitivity of CLL cells to a panel of emerging targeted therapeutics using high-throughput screening based on an automated fluorescence digital scanning system. Fresh CLL cells from 42 patients with indolent or progressive CLL were cultured for 72 hours on microtiter plates in a unique primary cell culture medium. Antitumor effects of 31 small therapeutic molecules (and, as controls, 29 cytostatic agents) at equimolar concentration were compared in a fluorescence survival assay. In vitro sensitivity to each drug exhibited considerable interpatient variability. The highest mean direct killing was observed for one survivin inhibitor (YM-155), two bcl-2 inhibitors (ABT-199, ABT-737), and one selective CDK inhibitor (dinaciclib). Their killing capacity was, in contrast to most cytostatic agents, similarly high in refractory versus untreated CLL patients and was significantly higher on cells with the 17p deletion/TP53 mutation than on cells with other cytogenetic abnormalities (p = 0.02). Sensitivity of bone marrow and lymph node cells was highly correlated with that of blood cells. Even though direct killing may not be the only therapeutic effector function in vivo, results from this head-to-head comparison may help to identify drugs of particular interest for intensified clinical development. PMID:26325331

  2. Kinetic and sensitive analysis of tyrosinase activity using electron transfer complexes: in vitro and intracellular study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xianglong; Hu, Juan; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Sun, Mingjun; Chi, Xiaoqin; Wang, Xiaomin; Gao, Jinhao

    2015-02-18

    Tyrosinase is an important marker of human diseases such as the neurodegeneration associated with Parkinson's disease and melanoma. Sensitive detection of tyrosinase activity in vitro and inside cells is of great significance to medical diagnostics and skin disorder treatments. With unique photophysical properties, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are employed as photoluminescent platforms for various biosensing, in particular for the detection of enzyme activities. In this work, QDs are functionalized with tyrosine and zwitterionic molecules to construct a nanometer-scale scaffold (QD-Tyr conjugate), and this is used to test tyrosinase activity in vitro and inside cells. Tyrosinase oxidizes tyrosine to dopachrome and switches on the electron-transfer access, which relates to fluorescence quenching. High quenching efficiency is achieved by shortening the distance between the electron donors and acceptors, which is attributed to the small size of the conjugated tyrosine. Enzymatic process curves reveal the enhanced enzymatic activity on the conjugated nanoparticle substrate, which leads to highly sensitive detection of tyrosinase (as low as 1 nM). It is also demonstrated that QD-Tyr conjugates can sensitively probe intracellular tyrosinase in melanoma cells, which promises great potential in disease monitoring and medical diagnostics. PMID:25285706

  3. Using a stochastic hydrological model to study the sensitivity of flood frequency to climate change (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantet, Philippe; Arnaud, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The great interest in climate change during the past 20 years has led to a quasi unanimous conclusion for scientists: the Earth's climate is changing (IPCC 2013). It is important to know if this global change could lead to an increase in extreme events in order to prevent hydrological risks. In this work, the analysis of the climate change impact on flood was studied by a chain formed by projections (provided by climate models under SRES scenarios) and a stochastic hydrological model. The National Research Institute of Science and Technology for Environment and Agriculture (Irstea) has developed an original method for flood frequency analysis applied on the whole French territory: the SHYREG method (Arnaud et al., 2008). It generates sequentially a lot of rainfall events at an hourly time step for which a rainfall-runoff transformation is performed. The stochastic rainfall generator has three parameters which are estimated by average, not by extreme, values of daily climatic characteristics. Few parameters enable to run the rainfall-runoff model. These parameters have been regionalized on the whole French territory in order to estimate rainfall/flood quantiles at the spatial resolution of 1 km². The rainfall model shows a good skill in reproducing extreme rainfall frequency (Carreau et al., 2013) and has been already used in a climate change context to detect trends in extreme rainfall (Cantet et al., 2011). (Boé at al., 2006) propose climate projections on France at a 8km horizontal spatial resolution with daily rainfall available for two periods: reference period (1981-2000) and the end of the 21th century (2081-2100) under three SRES scenarios (B1, A1B, A2). The parameters of the rainfall model can be easily estimated for the different periods and scenarios and so, the sensitivity of flood frequency to the climate change can be studied under some hypothesis. First, the performance of the climatic model to reproduce extreme rainfall has been tested throughout

  4. Sensitivity study of voxel-based PET image comparison to image registration algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Stephen Chen, Aileen B.; Berbeco, Ross; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Accurate deformable registration is essential for voxel-based comparison of sequential positron emission tomography (PET) images for proper adaptation of treatment plan and treatment response assessment. The comparison may be sensitive to the method of deformable registration as the optimal algorithm is unknown. This study investigated the impact of registration algorithm choice on therapy response evaluation. Methods: Sixteen patients with 20 lung tumors underwent a pre- and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) and 4D FDG-PET scans before and after chemoradiotherapy. All CT images were coregistered using a rigid and ten deformable registration algorithms. The resulting transformations were then applied to the respective PET images. Moreover, the tumor region defined by a physician on the registered PET images was classified into progressor, stable-disease, and responder subvolumes. Particularly, voxels with standardized uptake value (SUV) decreases >30% were classified as responder, while voxels with SUV increases >30% were progressor. All other voxels were considered stable-disease. The agreement of the subvolumes resulting from difference registration algorithms was assessed by Dice similarity index (DSI). Coefficient of variation (CV) was computed to assess variability of DSI between individual tumors. Root mean square difference (RMS{sub rigid}) of the rigidly registered CT images was used to measure the degree of tumor deformation. RMS{sub rigid} and DSI were correlated by Spearman correlation coefficient (R) to investigate the effect of tumor deformation on DSI. Results: Median DSI{sub rigid} was found to be 72%, 66%, and 80%, for progressor, stable-disease, and responder, respectively. Median DSI{sub deformable} was 63%–84%, 65%–81%, and 82%–89%. Variability of DSI was substantial and similar for both rigid and deformable algorithms with CV > 10% for all subvolumes. Tumor deformation had moderate to significant impact on DSI for progressor

  5. Sensitivity enhancement of chemically amplified resists and performance study using EUV interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago, Elizabeth; Nagahara, Seiji; Yildirim, Oktay; Nakagawa, Hisashi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Meeuwissen, Marieke; Nagai, Tomoki; Naruoka, Takehiko; Verspaget, Coen; Hoefnagels, Rik; Rispens, Gijsbert; Shiraishi, Gosuke; Terashita, Yuichi; Minekawa, Yukie; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Oshima, Akihiro; Vockenhuber, Michaela; Ekinci, Yasin

    2016-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL, λ = 13.5 nm) is the most promising candidate to manufacture electronic devices for future technology nodes in the semiconductor industry. Nonetheless, EUVL still faces many technological challenges as it moves toward high-volume manufacturing (HVM). A key bottleneck from the tool design and performance point of view has been the development of an efficient, high power EUV light source for high throughput production. Consequently, there has been extensive research on different methodologies to enhance EUV resist sensitivity. Resist performance is measured in terms of its ultimate printing resolution, line width roughness (LWR), sensitivity (S or best energy BE) and exposure latitude (EL). However, there are well-known fundamental trade-off relationships (LRS trade-off) among these parameters for chemically amplified resists (CARs). Here we present early proof-of-principle results for a multi-exposure lithography process that has the potential for high sensitivity enhancement without compromising other important performance characteristics by the use of a Photosensitized Chemically Amplified Resist (PSCAR). With this method, we seek to increase the sensitivity by combining a first EUV pattern exposure with a second UV flood exposure (λ = 365 nm) and the use of a PSCAR. In addition, we have evaluated over 50 different state-of-the-art EUV CARs. Among these, we have identified several promising candidates that simultaneously meet sensitivity, LWR and EL high performance requirements with the aim of resolving line space (L/S) features for the 7 and 5 nm logic node (16 nm and 13 nm half-pitch HP, respectively) for HVM. Several CARs were additionally found to be well resolved down to 12 nm and 11 nm HP with minimal pattern collapse and bridging, a remarkable feat for CARs. Finally, the performance of two negative tone state-of-the-art alternative resist platforms previously investigated was compared to the CAR performance at and

  6. Improved Titanium Billet Inspection Sensitivity through Optimized Phased Array Design, Part II: Experimental Validation and Comparative Study with Multizone

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, W.; Vensel, F.; Knowles, B.

    2006-03-06

    The inspection of critical rotating components of aircraft engines has made important advances over the last decade. The development of Phased Array (PA) inspection capability for billet and forging materials used in the manufacturing of critical engine rotating components has been a priority for Honeywell Aerospace. The demonstration of improved PA inspection system sensitivity over what is currently used at the inspection houses is a critical step in the development of this technology and its introduction to the supply base as a production inspection. As described in Part I (in these proceedings), a new phased array transducer was designed and manufactured for optimal inspection of eight inch diameter Ti-6Al-4V billets. After confirming that the transducer was manufactured in accordance with the design specifications a validation study was conducted to assess the sensitivity improvement of the PAI over the current capability of Multi-zone (MZ) inspection. The results of this study confirm the significant ({approx_equal} 6 dB in FBH number sign sensitivity) improvement of the PAI sensitivity over that of MZI.

  7. Improving sensitivity of cervical cytology by removal of cervical secretions before sampling: a prospective study in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Curiel-Valdés, JJ; Briones-Pimentel, J; Bandala, C

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity of cervical cytology is suboptimal, especially in developing countries such as Mexico, despite available guidelines aimed at improving this. When obtaining cervical samples, whether the samples are taken from the transformation zone and whether abnormal cells are missing must be considered. Cervical secretions (CS) are always present in variable proportions, and when cleaning the cervix, better samples may be obtained. In this study, we analyzed samples obtained with or without cleaning the cervix, and compared their contents in order to determine the sensitivity and specificity of these two methods. Methods: Of 500 patients who underwent cytology and colposcopy, 271 (54.2%) required a second opinion due to a diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). CS was removed and compared with the clean, second sample (SS) using in both liquid-based cytology. The quality of samples according to the Bethesda System, the presence of CIN, and inflammatory reactions were recorded. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated using biopsy as the gold standard. Results: The SS resulted in a higher proportion of adequate samples being obtained (97.6% vs. 44.8%), and in increased sensitivity (88.2% vs. 58.8%). CIN was detected in the SS 26% more often than in the CS (34 vs. 27 samples), whereas inflammatory reactions were noted more often in the CS (91.4% vs. 74%). Conclusion: Cervical sampling including CS results in lower sensitivity and CIN detection rates, and in more inflammatory reactions. By excluding CS from cervical samples, the sensitivity could be improved and the false negative rate could be reduced. PMID:25337232

  8. Towards the Seismic Hazard Reassessment of Paks NPP (Hungary) Site: Seismicity and Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Laszlo; Monus, Peter; Gyori, Erzsebet; Grenerczy, Gyula; Janos Katona, Tamas; Kiszely, Marta

    2015-04-01

    In context of extension of Paks Nuclear Power Plant by new units, a comprehensive site seismic hazard evaluation program has been developed that is already approved by the Hungarian Authorities. This includes a 3D seismic survey, drilling of several deep boreholes, extensive geological mapping, and geophysical investigations at the site and its vicinity, as well as on near regional, and regional scale. Furthermore, all relevant techniques of modern space geodesy (GPS, PSInSAR) will be also utilized to construct a new seismotectonic model. The implementation of the project is still in progress. In the presentation, some important elements of the new seismic hazard assessment are highlighted, and some results obtained in the preliminary phase of the program are presented and discussed. The first and most important component of the program is the compilation of the seismological database that is developed on different time scale zooming on different event recurrence rates such as paleo-earthquakes (10-1/a). In 1995, Paks NPP installed and started to operate a sensitive microseismic monitoring network capable for locating earthquakes as small as magnitude 2.0 within about 100 km of the NPP site. During the two decades of operation, the microseismic monitoring network located some 2,000 earthquakes within the region of latitude 45.5 - 49 N and longitude 16 - 23 E. Out of the total number of events, 130 earthquakes were reported as 'felt events'. The largest earthquake was an event of ML 4.8, causing significant damage in the epicenter area. The results of microseismic monitoring provide valuable data for seismotectonic modelling and results in more accurate earthquake recurrence equations. The first modern PSHA of Paks NPP site was carried out in 1995. Complex site characterization project was implemented and hazard curves had been evaluated for 10-3 - 10-5 annual frequency. As a follow-up, PSHA results have been reviewed and updated in the frame of periodic safety

  9. Vascular autorescaling of fMRI (VasA fMRI) improves sensitivity of population studies: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Samira M; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Callaghan, Martina F; Flandin, Guillaume; Huber, Laurentius; Leech, Robert; Kennerley, Aneurin; Windischberger, Christian; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal is widely used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of brain function in health and disease. The statistical power of fMRI group studies is significantly hampered by high inter-subject variance due to differences in baseline vascular physiology. Several methods have been proposed to account for physiological vascularization differences between subjects and hence improve the sensitivity in group studies. However, these methods require the acquisition of additional reference scans (such as a full resting-state fMRI session or ASL-based calibrated BOLD). We present a vascular autorescaling (VasA) method, which does not require any additional reference scans. VasA is based on the observation that slow oscillations (<0.1Hz) in arterial blood CO2 levels occur naturally due to changes in respiration patterns. These oscillations yield fMRI signal changes whose amplitudes reflect the blood oxygenation levels and underlying local vascularization and vascular responsivity. VasA estimates proxies of the amplitude of these CO2-driven oscillations directly from the residuals of task-related fMRI data without the need for reference scans. The estimates are used to scale the amplitude of task-related fMRI responses, to account for vascular differences. The VasA maps compared well to cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) maps and cerebral blood volume maps based on vascular space occupancy (VASO) measurements in four volunteers, speaking to the physiological vascular basis of VasA. VasA was validated in a wide variety of tasks in 138 volunteers. VasA increased t-scores by up to 30% in specific brain areas such as the visual cortex. The number of activated voxels was increased by up to 200% in brain areas such as the orbital frontal cortex while still controlling the nominal false-positive rate. VasA fMRI outperformed previously proposed rescaling approaches based on resting-state fMRI data and can be readily applied to any

  10. Vascular autorescaling of fMRI (VasA fMRI) improves sensitivity of population studies: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kazan, Samira M.; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Callaghan, Martina F.; Flandin, Guillaume; Huber, Laurentius; Leech, Robert; Kennerley, Aneurin; Windischberger, Christian; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal is widely used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of brain function in health and disease. The statistical power of fMRI group studies is significantly hampered by high inter-subject variance due to differences in baseline vascular physiology. Several methods have been proposed to account for physiological vascularization differences between subjects and hence improve the sensitivity in group studies. However, these methods require the acquisition of additional reference scans (such as a full resting-state fMRI session or ASL-based calibrated BOLD). We present a vascular autorescaling (VasA) method, which does not require any additional reference scans. VasA is based on the observation that slow oscillations (< 0.1 Hz) in arterial blood CO2 levels occur naturally due to changes in respiration patterns. These oscillations yield fMRI signal changes whose amplitudes reflect the blood oxygenation levels and underlying local vascularization and vascular responsivity. VasA estimates proxies of the amplitude of these CO2-driven oscillations directly from the residuals of task-related fMRI data without the need for reference scans. The estimates are used to scale the amplitude of task-related fMRI responses, to account for vascular differences. The VasA maps compared well to cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) maps and cerebral blood volume maps based on vascular space occupancy (VASO) measurements in four volunteers, speaking to the physiological vascular basis of VasA. VasA was validated in a wide variety of tasks in 138 volunteers. VasA increased t-scores by up to 30% in specific brain areas such as the visual cortex. The number of activated voxels was increased by up to 200% in brain areas such as the orbital frontal cortex while still controlling the nominal false-positive rate. VasA fMRI outperformed previously proposed rescaling approaches based on resting-state fMRI data and can be readily applied to

  11. Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) gas to methanol and MTG-gasoline: An economic and sensitivity study, task B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    The technical and economic aspects of the production of methanol and gasoline using gas from an underground coal gasification (UCG) facility are discussed. The economics of producing gasoline is studied as well as a number of other aspects of the economics of upgrading UCG gas. Capital and operating costs for three different capacities of gasoline plants are presented. These are 1600 barrels per day (BPD), 4800 BPD, and 9600 BPD. These capacities are equivalent to fuel grade methanol plants having capacities of 4000 BPD, 12,000 BPD, and 24,000 BPD - the methanol capacities considered in the previous studies. The economics of the gasoline plant were developed using published information and the best estimate of the processing steps in the gasoline process. Several sensitivity studies were undertaken to examine the sensitivity of both methanol and gasoline product costs to changes in technical and economic parameters.

  12. The Coda of the Transient Response in a Sensitive Cochlea: A Computational Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl

    2016-01-01

    In a sensitive cochlea, the basilar membrane response to transient excitation of any kind–normal acoustic or artificial intracochlear excitation–consists of not only a primary impulse but also a coda of delayed secondary responses with varying amplitudes but similar spectral content around the characteristic frequency of the measurement location. The coda, sometimes referred to as echoes or ringing, has been described as a form of local, short term memory which may influence the ability of the auditory system to detect gaps in an acoustic stimulus such as speech. Depending on the individual cochlea, the temporal gap between the primary impulse and the following coda ranges from once to thrice the group delay of the primary impulse (the group delay of the primary impulse is on the order of a few hundred microseconds). The coda is physiologically vulnerable, disappearing when the cochlea is compromised even slightly. The multicomponent sensitive response is not yet completely understood. We use a physiologically-based, mathematical model to investigate (i) the generation of the primary impulse response and the dependence of the group delay on the various stimulation methods, (ii) the effect of spatial perturbations in the properties of mechanically sensitive ion channels on the generation and separation of delayed secondary responses. The model suggests that the presence of the secondary responses depends on the wavenumber content of a perturbation and the activity level of the cochlea. In addition, the model shows that the varying temporal gaps between adjacent coda seen in experiments depend on the individual profiles of perturbations. Implications for non-invasive cochlear diagnosis are also discussed. PMID:27380177

  13. A comprehensive study of sensitivity in measuring oscillatory magnetic fields using rotary saturation pulse sequences.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jingwei; Liu, Yun; Chai, Yuhui; Tang, Weinan; Wu, Bing; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2016-04-01

    Detecting the oscillatory currents with a specific frequency distribution may have the potential to make neuronal current MRI (ncMRI) come true. The phase shift or dephasing induced by both positive and negative episodes of oscillatory neuronal currents is likely to be canceled out over the echo time in typical BOLD-contrast fMRI experiments. Based on the contrast of rotary saturation, both of the recently developed spin-locked oscillatory excitation (SLOE) and stimulus-induced rotary saturation (SIRS) pulse sequences have been demonstrated to be able to detect weak oscillatory magnetic fields in phantoms with 3T MR scanners. In this report, through Bloch equation simulation as well as water phantom and anesthetic rats experiments, we comprehensively evaluate and compare the sensitivities of these two methods (SLOE and SIRS) in detecting the oscillatory magnetic fields for both high (100Hz) and low (10Hz) oscillation frequencies, while using their respective optimal imaging parameters. In agreement with the theoretical predications, both the simulated and experimental results showed that the SLOE method features a much higher detection sensitivity of weak magnetic fields than that of the SIRS method. SLOE was able to detect applied oscillatory magnetic fields as low as 0.1nT in a water phantom and 0.5nT in rat brains and the deteriorated noise levels in rat data may account for the reduced sensitivity in vivo. These promising results form the foundation for direct detection of in vivo neuronal currents using MRI. PMID:26616004

  14. Experimental Study of Unshrouded Impeller Pump Stage Sensitivity to Tip Clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Zoladz, Thomas; Storey, Anne K.; Skelley, Stephen E.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on an experiment. Its objective is to experimentally determine unshrouded impeller performance sensitivity to tip clearance. The experiment included: Determining impeller efficiency at scaled operating conditions in water at MSFC's Pump Test Equipment (PTE) Facility; Testing unshrouded impeller at three different tip clearances; Testing each tip clearance configuration at on- and off-design conditions, and collecting unsteady- and steady-state data in each configuration; Determining impeller efficiency directly using drive line torquemeter and pump inlet and exit total pressure measurements.

  15. Linkages between ocean circulation, heat uptake and transient warming: a sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Patrik; Stocker, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Transient global warming due to greenhouse gas radiative forcing is substantially reduced by ocean heat uptake (OHU). However, the fraction of equilibrium warming that is realized in transient climate model simulations differs strongly between models (Frölicher and Paynter 2015). It has been shown that this difference is not only related to the magnitude of OHU, but also to the radiative response the OHU causes, measured by the OHU efficacy (Winton et al., 2010). This efficacy is strongly influenced by the spatial pattern of the OHU and its changes (Rose et al. 2014, Winton et al. 2013), predominantly caused by changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Even in absence of external greenhouse gas forcing, an AMOC weakening causes a radiative imbalance at the top of the atmosphere (Peltier and Vettoretti, 2014), inducing in a net warming of the Earth System. We investigate linkages between those findings by performing both freshwater and greenhouse gas experiments in an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity. To assess the sensitivity of the results to ocean and atmospheric transport as well as climate sensitivity, we use an ensemble of model versions, systematically varying key parameters. We analyze circulation changes and radiative adjustments in conjunction with traditional warming metrics such as the transient climate response and the equilibrium climate sensitivity. This aims to improve the understanding of the influence of ocean circulation and OHU on transient climate change, and of the relevance of different metrics for describing this influence. References: Frölicher, T. L. and D.J. Paynter (2015), Extending the relationship between global warming and cumulative carbon emissions to multi-millennial timescales, Environ. Res. Lett., 10, 075022 Peltier, W. R., and G. Vettoretti (2014), Dansgaard-Oeschger oscillations predicted in a comprehensive model of glacial climate: A "kicked" salt oscillator in the Atlantic, Geophys. Res

  16. A high-throughput contact-hole resolution metric for photoresists:Full-process sensitivity study

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher N.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2008-01-22

    The ability to accurately quantify the intrinsic resolution of chemically amplified photoresists is critical for the optimization of resists for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Iithography. We have recently reported on two resolution metrics that have been shown to extract resolution numbers consistent with direct observation. In this paper we examine the previously reported contact-hole resolution metric and explore the sensitivity of the metric to potential error sources associated with the experimental side of the resolution extraction process. For EUV exposures at the SEMATECH Berkeley microfield exposure tool, we report a full-process error-bar in extracted resolution of 1.75 nm RMS and verify this result experimentally.

  17. n,. pi. /sup */ state of jet-cooled benzophenone as studied by sensitized phosphorescence excitation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, S.; Sato, T.; Mikami, N.; Ito, M.

    1986-10-23

    The sensitized phosphorescence excitation spectrum of jet-cooled benzophenone due to the S/sub 1/(n,..pi../sup */) produced from S/sub 0/ transition has been measured. It was found that the spectrum consists exclusively of several long progressions of 60 cm/sup -1/ which is the in-phase torsional mode of the phenyl rings. The vibrational analysis and the potential calculation shows that the in the S/sub 1/(n,..pi../sup */) state great geometry changes occur in the dihedral angle between the phenyl rings, the C=O bond distance, and the C-C bonds adjacent to the C=O bond.

  18. Atmospheric model development in support of SEASAT. Volume 4: Forecast model sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewit, H. L.

    1977-01-01

    Atmospheric analysis and prediction models of varying (grid) resolution were developed. The models were tested using real observational data for the purpose of assessing the impact of grid resolution on short range numerical weather prediction. The work statement was amended to include the performance of sensitivity tests using a coarse mesh (63 x 63 x 5 level) prediction model in order to identify and order factors which might mask or impair the utility of SEASAT data on short range weather prediction. Such factors included: initial conditions; topography; surface friction; latent heating; diffusion of momentum and temperature; and computational devices such as tendency truncators, pressure smoothers, and temporal filters.

  19. Quantitative Study of Green Area for Climate Sensitive Terraced Housing Area Design in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, O. T. S.; Saito, K.; Said, I.

    2014-02-01

    Neighbourhood plays a significant role in peoples' daily lives. Nowadays, terraced housing is common in Malaysia, and green areas in the neighborhood are not used to their maximum. The aim of the research is to quantify the types of green area that are most efficient for cooling the environment for thermal comfort and mitigation of Urban Heat Island. Spatial and environmental inputs are manipulated for the simulation using Geographic Information System (GIS) integrated with computational microclimate simulation. The outcome of this research is a climate sensitive housing environment model framework on the green area to solve the problem of Urban Heat Island.

  20. Telomere Shortening Sensitizes Cancer Cells to Selected Cytotoxic Agents: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies and Putative Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Uziel, Orit; Beery, Einat; Dronichev, Vladimir; Samocha, Katty; Gryaznov, Sergei; Weiss, Lola; Slavin, Shimon; Kushnir, Michal; Nordenberg, Yardena; Rabinowitz, Claudette; Rinkevich, Baruch; Zehavi, Tania; Lahav, Meir

    2010-01-01

    Background Telomere/telomerase system has been recently recognized as an attractive target for anticancer therapy. Telomerase inhibition results in tumor regression and increased sensitivity to various cytotoxic drugs. However, it has not been fully established yet whether the mediator of these effects is telomerase inhibition per se or telomere shortening resulting from inhibition of telomerase activity. In addition, the characteristics and mechanisms of sensitization to cytotoxic drugs caused by telomerase inhibition has not been elucidated in a systematic manner. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we characterized the relative importance of telomerase inhibition versus telomere shortening in cancer cells. Sensitization of cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs was achieved by telomere shortening in a length dependent manner and not by telomerase inhibition per se. In our system this sensitization was related to the mechanism of action of the cytotoxic drug. In addition, telomere shortening affected also other cancer cell functions such as migration. Telomere shortening induced DNA damage whose repair was impaired after administration of cisplatinum while doxorubicin or vincristine did not affect the DNA repair. These findings were verified also in in vivo mouse model. The putative explanation underlying the phenotype induced by telomere shortening may be related to changes in expression of various microRNAs triggered by telomere shortening. Conclusions/Significance To our best knowledge this is the first study characterizing the relative impact of telomerase inhibition and telomere shortening on several aspects of cancer cell phenotype, especially related to sensitivity to cytotoxic drugs and its putative mechanisms. The microRNA changes in cancer cells upon telomere shortening are novel information. These findings may facilitate the development of telomere based approaches in treatment of cancer. PMID:20161752

  1. NEXAFS Sensitivity to Bond Lengths in Complex Molecular Materials: A Study of Crystalline Saccharides.

    PubMed

    Gainar, Adrian; Stevens, Joanna S; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A; Schroeder, Sven L M

    2015-11-12

    Detailed analysis of the C K near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of a series of saccharides (fructose, xylose, glucose, galactose, maltose monohydrate, α-lactose monohydrate, anhydrous β-lactose, cellulose) indicates that the precise determination of IPs and σ* shape resonance energies is sensitive enough to distinguish different crystalline saccharides through the variations in their average C-OH bond lengths. Experimental data as well as FEFF8 calculations confirm that bond length variations in the organic solid state of 10(-2) Å can be experimentally detected, opening up the possibility to use NEXAFS for obtaining incisive structural information for molecular materials, including noncrystalline systems without long-range order such as dissolved species in solutions, colloids, melts, and similar amorphous phases. The observed bond length sensitivity is as good as that originally reported for gas-phase and adsorbed molecular species. NEXAFS-derived molecular structure data for the condensed phase may therefore be used to guide molecular modeling as well as to validate computationally derived structure models for such systems. Some results indicate further analytical value in that the σ* shape resonance analysis may distinguish hemiketals from hemiacetals (i.e., derived from ketoses and aldoses) as well as α from β forms of otherwise identical saccharides. PMID:26459024

  2. Some Sensitivity Studies of Chemical Transport Simulated in Models of the Soil-Plant-Litter System

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, C.L.

    2002-10-28

    Fifteen parameters in a set of five coupled models describing carbon, water, and chemical dynamics in the soil-plant-litter system were varied in a sensitivity analysis of model response. Results are presented for chemical distribution in the components of soil, plants, and litter along with selected responses of biomass, internal chemical transport (xylem and phloem pathways), and chemical uptake. Response and sensitivity coefficients are presented for up to 102 model outputs in an appendix. Two soil properties (chemical distribution coefficient and chemical solubility) and three plant properties (leaf chemical permeability, cuticle thickness, and root chemical conductivity) had the greatest influence on chemical transport in the soil-plant-litter system under the conditions examined. Pollutant gas uptake (SO{sub 2}) increased with change in plant properties that increased plant growth. Heavy metal dynamics in litter responded to plant properties (phloem resistance, respiration characteristics) which induced changes in the chemical cycling to the litter system. Some of the SO{sub 2} and heavy metal responses were not expected but became apparent through the modeling analysis.

  3. Highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence displacement method for the study of DNA/small molecule binding interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rongfu; Wang, Li-Rong; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2010-08-31

    Non-covalent binding interactions of small molecules with DNA play important roles in regulating gene expression and gene function. In this work, a highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) displacement method has been developed to investigate such interactions, particularly for weak DNA binders. This ECL method relies on a double-stranded DNA film deposited on an indium tin oxide electrode (ITO) surface by layer-by-layer self-assembly. A DNA intercalator, [Ru(bpy)(2)(dppz)](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2'3'-c]phenazine), is employed as the ECL signal indicator. If a test compound competes with the indicator for the same binding sites in DNA, it would displace the indicator from the film and reduce ECL signal. The new method was validated by measuring five well-known DNA-binding organic molecules including quinacrine, H33258, thiazole orange, ethidium bromide and 4,6-diamidine-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride. Due to high ECL sensitivity, only 0.4 micromol L(-1) [Ru(bpy)(2)(dppz)](2+) was needed in the ECL displacement measurement, which is about 75-fold less than the concentration in the voltammetric measurement. The lowered concentration permitted direct measurement of IC(50) values of eight hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in their ECL displacement curves and subsequent calculation of their binding constants with DNA. The ECL displacement method is particularly useful for investigating weak DNA binders with limited aqueous solubility. PMID:20800740

  4. Numerical Simulations of Stratus Clouds and Their Sensitivity to Radiation--A RACE Case Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Hong; Tremblay, André; Isaac, George A.; Strawbridge, Kevin B.; Banic, Catharine M.

    2000-11-01

    The three-dimensional Canadian Mesoscale Compressible Community model has been run at high resolution (x = 2 km, z = 50 m) to simulate stratus clouds observed on 1 September 1995 during the Radiation, Aerosol and Cloud Experiment (RACE) conducted near the Bay of Fundy, Canada. A new explicit cloud scheme and the Canadian operational radiation scheme were validated at this resolution for the first time. The simulations show a reasonable agreement between the observed and modeled stratus cloud system. The cloud structure, position, cloud water content, temperature, and the qualitative properties of longwave and shortwave radiative fluxes were verified against the satellite imagery, lidar, and aircraft measurements taken during RACE. The simulated cloud thickness (150 m) was thinner than the observed one (200-250 m). The differences in the simulated and observed radiative fluxes were mainly due to errors in the simulation of cloud thickness. Sensitivity experiments demonstrate that the simulated cloud is extremely sensitive to longwave and shortwave radiation. Longwave (shortwave) radiation substantially increased (decreased) the total water path.

  5. Pain sensitivity and pericranial tenderness in children with tension-type headache: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Soee, Ann-Britt L; Skov, Liselotte; Kreiner, Svend; Tornoe, Birte; Thomsen, Lise L

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare tenderness and pain sensitivity in children (aged 7–17 years) with tension-type headache (TTH) and healthy controls using total tenderness score (TTS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and pain perceived at suprapressure pain threshold (supraPPT). Patients and methods Twenty-three children with frequent episodic TTH, 36 with chronic TTH, and 57 healthy controls were included. TTS was measured bilaterally at seven pericranial myofascial structures. PPT and supraPPT were assessed in the finger, m. temporalis, and m. trapezius by a Somedic® algometer. SupraPPT was defined as the pain perceived at a stimulus calculated as the individual site-specific PPT + 50%. Statistics The effect of group, sex, age, headache frequency, intensity, and years on TTS, PPT, and supraPPT was analyzed by general linear models. Confirmatory factor analysis was analyzed for mutual relations between measurements. Results and conclusion Tenderness increased uniformly in both frequent episodic TTH (median 14; interquartile range [IQR] 10–18; P < 0.001) and chronic TTH (median 13; IQR 9–20; P < 0.001) compared to controls (median 5, IQR 3–11). However, the children with frequent episodic TTH and chronic TTH did not show significantly increased sensitivity when measured by PPT or supraPPT. Factor analysis confirmed that the site-specific measurements depended on general latent variables. Consequently, the PPT and supraPPT tests can be assumed to measure central pain-processing levels. PMID:23785242

  6. Sensitivity of volcanic aerosol dispersion to meteorological conditions: A Pinatubo case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anthony C.; Haywood, James M.; Jones, Andy; Aquila, Valentina

    2016-06-01

    Using a global climate model (Hadley Centre Global Environment Model version 2-Carbon Cycle Stratosphere ) with a well-resolved stratosphere, we test the sensitivity of volcanic aerosol plume dispersion to meteorological conditions by simulating 1 day Mount Pinatubo-like eruptions on 10 consecutive days. The dispersion of the volcanic aerosol is found to be highly sensitive to the ambient meteorology for low-altitude eruptions (16-18 km), with this variability related to anomalous anticyclonic activity along the subtropical jet, which affects the permeability of the tropical pipe and controls the amount of aerosol that is retained by the tropical reservoir. Conversely, a high-altitude eruption scenario (19-29 km) exhibits low meteorological variability. Overcoming day-to-day meteorological variability by spreading the emission over 10 days is shown to produce insufficient radiative heating to loft the aerosol into the stratospheric tropical aerosol reservoir for the low eruption scenario. This results in limited penetration of aerosol into the southern hemisphere (SH) in contrast to the SH transport observed after the Pinatubo eruption. Our results have direct implications for the accurate simulation of past/future volcanic eruptions and volcanically forced climate changes, such as Intertropical Convergence Zone displacement.

  7. Fluid sensitivity study of elastic parameters in low-medium porosity and permeability reservoir rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Fa-Gen; Zou, Chang-Chun; He, Tao; Shi, Ge; Qiu, Gen-Gen; Ren, Ke-Ying

    2010-03-01

    In this article, based on the acoustic measurements of core samples obtained from the low to medium porosity and permeability reservoirs in the WXS Depression, the densities and P and S wave velocities of these core samples were obtained. Then based on these data, a series of elastic parameters were computed. From the basic theory and previous pore fluid research results, we derived a new fluid identification factor (F). Using the relative variations, Ag/w and Ao/w, of the elastic parameters between gas and water saturated samples and between oil and water saturated samples, λρ, σ HSFIF, Kρ, λρ - 2µ ρ, and F as quantitative indicators, we evaluate the sensitivity of the different fluid identification factors to identify reservoir fluids and validate the effects by crossplots. These confirm that the new fluid identification factor (F) is more sensitive for distinguishing oil and water than the traditional method and is more favorable for fliud identification in low to medium porosity and permeability reservoirs.

  8. A highly sensitive method for analysis of 7-dehydrocholesterol for the study of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome[S

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Libin; Lamberson, Connor; Haas, Dorothea; Korade, Zeljka; Porter, Ned A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a highly sensitive method for the detection of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC), the biosynthetic precursor of cholesterol, based on its reactivity with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) in a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. Samples of biological tissues and fluids with added deuterium-labeled internal standards were derivatized with PTAD and analyzed by LC-MS. This protocol permits fast processing of samples, short chromatography times, and high sensitivity. We applied this method to the analysis of cells, blood, and tissues from several sources, including human plasma. Another innovative aspect of this study is that it provides a reliable and highly reproducible measurement of 7-DHC in 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (Dhcr7)-HET mouse (a model for Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome) samples, showing regional differences in the brain tissue. We found that the levels of 7-DHC are consistently higher in Dhcr7-HET mice than in controls, with the spinal cord and peripheral nerve showing the biggest differences. In addition to 7-DHC, sensitive analysis of desmosterol in tissues and blood was also accomplished with this PTAD method by assaying adducts formed from the PTAD “ene” reaction. The method reported here may provide a highly sensitive and high throughput way to identify at-risk populations having errors in cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:24259532

  9. Binding of human interferon alpha to cells of different sensitivities: studies with internally radiolabeled interferon retaining full biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Yonehara, S; Yonehara-Takahashi, M; Ishii, A

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of interferon binding to various cells with different interferon sensitivity were studied by using [3H]leucine-labeled, pure human interferon alpha from Namalwa cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding data on cells sensitive to interferon alpha (human FL and fibroblasts and bovine MDBK) indicated the presence of two kinds of binding sites with high and low affinities. The binding constants of the high-affinity sites in these cells were similar (4 X 10(10) to 11 X 10(10) M-1). Cells insensitive to human interferon alpha (human HEC-1 and mouse L cells) were shown to have only low-affinity sites, suggesting that high-affinity binding sites are indispensable for interferon sensitivity and represent interferon receptors. However, the number of sites in three human diploid fibroblast strains and one strain trisomic for chromosome 21 were not proportionally correlated to the interferon sensitivity of the cells. The high-affinity binding to human cells was completely inhibited by both nonradioactive human interferons alpha and beta in a similar manner, but binding to bovine MDBK cells, on which human interferon beta is practically inactive, was inhibited effectively only by interferon alpha and not by beta. These results suggest that the receptor for human interferon alpha is common to human interferon beta in human cells, whereas the receptor on bovine cells binds only human interferon alpha. PMID:6300453

  10. Comparison of the sensitivity of the UKCAT and A Levels to sociodemographic characteristics: a national study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) was introduced to facilitate widening participation in medical and dental education in the UK by providing universities with a continuous variable to aid selection; one that might be less sensitive to the sociodemographic background of candidates compared to traditional measures of educational attainment. Initial research suggested that males, candidates from more advantaged socioeconomic backgrounds and those who attended independent or grammar schools performed better on the test. The introduction of the A* grade at A level permits more detailed analysis of the relationship between UKCAT scores, secondary educational attainment and sociodemographic variables. Thus, our aim was to further assess whether the UKCAT is likely to add incremental value over A level (predicted or actual) attainment in the selection process. Methods Data relating to UKCAT and A level performance from 8,180 candidates applying to medicine in 2009 who had complete information relating to six key sociodemographic variables were analysed. A series of regression analyses were conducted in order to evaluate the ability of sociodemographic status to predict performance on two outcome measures: A level ‘best of three’ tariff score; and the UKCAT scores. Results In this sample A level attainment was independently and positively predicted by four sociodemographic variables (independent/grammar schooling, White ethnicity, age and professional social class background). These variables also independently and positively predicted UKCAT scores. There was a suggestion that UKCAT scores were less sensitive to educational background compared to A level attainment. In contrast to A level attainment, UKCAT score was independently and positively predicted by having English as a first language and male sex. Conclusions Our findings are consistent with a previous report; most of the sociodemographic factors that predict A level attainment also predict UKCAT

  11. Experimental study of variations in background radiation and the effect on Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J; Slaughter, D; Norman, E; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P

    2007-02-07

    Error rates in a cargo screening system such as the Nuclear Car Wash [1-7] depend on the standard deviation of the background radiation count rate. Because the Nuclear Car Wash is an active interrogation technique, the radiation signal for fissile material must be detected above a background count rate consisting of cosmic, ambient, and neutron-activated radiations. It was suggested previously [1,6] that the Corresponding negative repercussions for the sensitivity of the system were shown. Therefore, to assure the most accurate estimation of the variation, experiments have been performed to quantify components of the actual variance in the background count rate, including variations in generator power, irradiation time, and container contents. The background variance is determined by these experiments to be a factor of 2 smaller than values assumed in previous analyses, resulting in substantially improved projections of system performance for the Nuclear Car Wash.

  12. a Computational Study of Microstructure Effects on Shock Ignition Sensitivity of Pressed Rdx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamate, Y.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents a computational experiment of microstructure effects on shock sensitivity of solid explosives, using a recently developed HE burn model [1]. This model includes specific surface area and the hot spot evolution that is based on an exponential size distribution. Experimentally, Khasainov et al. [2] summarized the effects of specific surface area, and showed that both the run distance to detonation and critical diameter have a linear relationship with the reciprocal of specific surface area. Computational experiments are carried out using a pressed RDX model with various initial specific surface areas that are determined by the average explosive particle size. The results show that both Pop-plots and critical diameters follow the linear relationship observed by Khasainov.

  13. Study of the effects of stress sensitivity on the permeability and porosity of fractal porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiao-Hua; Li, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Jian-Yi; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Fan, Zhou

    2015-10-01

    Flow in porous media under stress is very important in various scientific and engineering fields. It has been shown that stress plays an important role in effect of permeability and porosity of porous media. In this work, novel predictive models for permeability and porosity of porous media considering stress sensitivity are developed based on the fractal theory and mechanics of materials. Every parameter in the proposed models has clear physical meaning. The proposed models are evaluated using previously published data for permeability and porosity measured in various natural materials. The predictions of permeability and porosity show good agreement with those obtained by the available experimental data and illustrate that the proposed models can be used to characterize the flow in porous media under stress accurately.

  14. Efficient Flowline Simulations of Ice Shelf-Ocean Interactions: Sensitivity Studies with a Fully Coupled Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Ryan Thomas; Holland, David; Parizek, Byron R.; Alley, Richard B.; Nowicki, Sophie M. J.; Jenkins, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamic flowline and plume models for the ice shelf-ocean system simplify the ice and ocean dynamics sufficiently to allow extensive exploration of parameters affecting ice-sheet stability while including key physical processes. Comparison between geophysically and laboratory-based treatments of ice-ocean interface thermodynamics shows reasonable agreement between calculated melt rates, except where steep basal slopes and relatively high ocean temperatures are present. Results are especially sensitive to the poorly known drag coefficient, highlighting the need for additional field experiments to constrain its value. These experiments also suggest that if the ice-ocean interface near the grounding line is steeper than some threshold, further steepening of the slope may drive higher entrainment that limits buoyancy, slowing the plume and reducing melting; if confirmed, this will provide a stabilizing feedback on ice sheets under some circumstances.

  15. Preliminary Structural Sensitivity Study of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Using Probabilistic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Acceptance of new spacecraft structural architectures and concepts requires validated design methods to minimize the expense involved with technology validation via flighttesting. This paper explores the implementation of probabilistic methods in the sensitivity analysis of the structural response of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD). HIAD architectures are attractive for spacecraft deceleration because they are lightweight, store compactly, and utilize the atmosphere to decelerate a spacecraft during re-entry. However, designers are hesitant to include these inflatable approaches for large payloads or spacecraft because of the lack of flight validation. In the example presented here, the structural parameters of an existing HIAD model have been varied to illustrate the design approach utilizing uncertainty-based methods. Surrogate models have been used to reduce computational expense several orders of magnitude. The suitability of the design is based on assessing variation in the resulting cone angle. The acceptable cone angle variation would rely on the aerodynamic requirements.

  16. CO2 DIAL sensitivity studies for measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockman, P.; Hess, R. V.; Bair, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the accuracy of infrared differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of trace constituents in the atmosphere. Expressions are derived for the signal-to-noise ratios applicable in the detection of a signal from a scattering cell for the cases of single-detection heterodyne detection and direct detection. Results of computer simulations of the expectation value of the measured return for various measurement conditions are presented which illustrate the sensitivities of plume measurements for horizontal range-resolved and vertical content measurements of NH3 in heterodyne and direct detection. Advantages for long-range measurements of the use of rare isotope laser frequencies, tuning by collision broadening, and closely spaced on and off frequencies are pointed out.

  17. Thermal hydraulic simulations, error estimation and parameter sensitivity studies in Drekar::CFD

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Thomas Michael; Shadid, John N.; Pawlowski, Roger P.; Cyr, Eric C.; Wildey, Timothy Michael

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work directed towards completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) CFD Level 3 Milestone THM.CFD.P7.05 for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Nuclear Hub effort. The focus of this milestone was to demonstrate the thermal hydraulics and adjoint based error estimation and parameter sensitivity capabilities in the CFD code called Drekar::CFD. This milestone builds upon the capabilities demonstrated in three earlier milestones; THM.CFD.P4.02 [12], completed March, 31, 2012, THM.CFD.P5.01 [15] completed June 30, 2012 and THM.CFD.P5.01 [11] completed on October 31, 2012.

  18. The NASA-Ames Research Center stratospheric aerosol model. 2. Sensitivity studies and comparison with observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Hamill, P.; Kiang, C. S.; Whitten, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Sensitivity tests were performed on a one-dimensional, physical-chemical model of the unperturbed stratospheric aerosols, and model calculations were compared with observations. The tests and comparisons suggest that coagulation controls the particle number mixing ratio, although the number of condensation nuclei at the tropopause and the diffusion coefficient at high altitudes are also important. The sulfur gas source strength and the aerosol residence time are much more important than the supply of condensation nuclei in establishing mass and large particle concentrations. The particle size is also controlled mainly by gas supply and residence time. In situ observations of the aerosols and laboratory measurements of aerosols, parameters that can provide further information about the physics and chemistry of the stratosphere and the aerosols found there are provided.

  19. Highly sensitive vertically standing Ag nanorod arrays substrates for surface enhanced fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dhruv P.; Singh, J. P.

    2013-06-01

    The nanorods length dependence of surface enhanced fluorescence (SEF) has been investigated for Rhodamine 6G films adsorbed onto Ag nanorods array substrates grown by glancing angle deposition technique. It is found that the substrate enhancement efficiency increases with increase in the length (l) of nanorods from 450 nm to 1.7 μm. The silver nanorod arrays substrate with l =1.6 μm exhibited a remarkable enhancement factor (EF) of 72. However, the rate of increment in EF did not remain same. It varies faster for the values of l up to ˜1 μm and after that it increases at comparatively slower rate. The understanding of the effect of nanorods morphology on EF and the identification of high sensitivity SEF substrates is the novelty of this work. These SEF substrates can be used for sensing and trace detection of the fluorescent biological and chemical compounds.

  20. A rat toxicogenomics study with the calcium sensitizer EMD82571 reveals a pleiotropic cause of teratogenicity.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Philip G; Singh, Prafull Kumar; Kumar, Arun; Gnewuch, Carsten; Liebisch, Gerhard; Schmitz, Gerd; Borlak, Juergen

    2014-08-01

    The calcium sensitizer and PDEIII inhibitor EMD82571 caused exencephaly, micrognathia, agnathia and facial cleft in 58% of fetuses. In pursue of mechanisms and to define adverse outcome pathways pregnant Wistar rats were dosed daily with either EMD82571 (50 or 150mg/kg/day) or retinoic acid (12mg/kg/day) on gestational days 6-11 and 6-17, respectively. Hypothesis driven and whole genome microarray experiments were performed with whole embryo, maternal liver, embryonic liver and malformed bone at gestational days 12 and 20. This revealed regulation of genes critically involved in osteogenesis, odontogenesis, differentiation and development and extracellular matrix. Importantly, repression of osteocalcin and members of TGF-β/BMP signaling hampered osteo- and odontogenesis. Furthermore, EMD82571 impaired neurulation by inhibiting mid hinge point formation to cause neural tube defects. Taken collectively, a molecular rationale for the observed teratogenicity induced by EMD82571 is presented that links molecular initiating events with AOPs. PMID:24977338

  1. PEM-West trajectory climatology and photochemical model sensitivity study prepared using retrospective meteorological data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, John T.; Rodriguez, Jose M.

    1991-01-01

    Trajectory and photochemical model calculations based on retrospective meteorological data for the operations areas of the NASA Pacific Exploratory Mission (PEM)-West mission are summarized. The trajectory climatology discussed here is intended to provide guidance for flight planning and initial data interpretation during the field phase of the expedition by indicating the most probable path air parcels are likely to take to reach various points in the area. The photochemical model calculations which are discussed indicate the sensitivity of the chemical environment to various initial chemical concentrations and to conditions along the trajectory. In the post-expedition analysis these calculations will be used to provide a climatological context for the meteorological conditions which are encountered in the field.

  2. 6D phase space electron beam analysis and machine sensitivity studies for ELI-NP GBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giribono, A.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Drebot, I.; Palumbo, L.; Petrillo, V.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Vaccarezza, C.; Vannozzi, A.; Variola, A.

    2016-09-01

    The ELI-NP Gamma Beam Source (GBS) is now under construction in Magurele-Bucharest (RO). Here an advanced source of gamma photons with unprecedented specifications of brilliance (>1021), monochromaticity (0.5%) and energy tunability (0.2-19.5 MeV) is being built, based on Inverse Compton Scattering in the head-on configuration between an electron beam of maximum energy 750 MeV and a high quality high power ps laser beam. These requirements make the ELI-NP GBS an advanced and challenging gamma ray source. The electron beam dynamics analysis and control regarding the machine sensitivity to the possible jitter and misalignments are presented. The effects on the beam quality are illustrated providing the basis for the alignment procedure and jitter tolerances.

  3. Study on the Sensitivity of Landmine Electrical Fuse Circuit Under the Interference of Natural Electromagnetic Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dechun

    Landmine electrical fuse circuits on the battlefield will be interfered by natural electromagnetic pulse such as electrostatic discharge and lightning, which will undermine the circuit performance and trigger the early burst or mistaken burst of the landmines. In this paper, numerically simulation analysis is conducted on the electrostatic and lightning effects received by the landmine fuse circuit by means of building simulation model of the fuse circuit and analyzing the electric and magnetic field changes of the observation The mechanism of the influence of electrostatic discharge and lightning on the sensitivity of the fuse circuit is explored. The conclusion is that electrostatic effect cause the mistaken burst of the landmines by enabling the interference voltage to reach the components turn-on threshold and cause the circuit malfunction, and lighting effect by long period accumulation of energy.

  4. Study of interfacial area transport and sensitivity analysis for air-water bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Sun, X.; Ishii, M.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-09-01

    The interfacial area transport equation applicable to the bubbly flow is presented. The model is evaluated against the data acquired by the state-of-the-art miniaturized double-sensor conductivity probe in an adiabatic air-water co-current vertical test loop under atmospheric pressure condition. In general, a good agreement, within the measurement error of plus/minus 10%, is observed for a wide range in the bubbly flow regime. The sensitivity analysis on the individual particle interaction mechanisms demonstrates the active interactions between the bubbles and highlights the mechanisms playing the dominant role in interfacial area transport. The analysis employing the drift flux model is also performed for the data acquired. Under the given flow conditions, the distribution parameter of 1.076 yields the best fit to the data.

  5. A case study of the sensitivity of forecast skill to data and data analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. E.; Atlas, R.; Halem, M.; Susskind, J.

    1983-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted to examine the sensitivity of forecast skill to various data and data analysis techniques for the 0000 GMT case of January 21, 1979. These include the individual components of the FGGE observing system, the temperatures obtained with different satellite retrieval methods, and the method of vertical interpolation between the mandatory pressure analysis levels and the model sigma levels. It is found that NESS TIROS-N infrared retrievals seriously degrade a rawinsonde-only analysis over land, resulting in a poorer forecast over North America. Less degradation in the 72-hr forecast skill at sea level and some improvement at 500 mb is noted, relative to the control with TIROS-N retrievals produced with a physical inversion method which utilizes a 6-hr forecast first guess. NESS VTPR oceanic retrievals lead to an improved forecast over North America when added to the control.

  6. Base Heating Sensitivity Study for a 4-Cluster Rocket Motor Configuration in Supersonic Freestream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Manish; Canabal, Francisco; Tashakkor, Scott B.; Smith, Sheldon D.

    2011-01-01

    In support of launch vehicle base heating and pressure prediction efforts using the Loci-CHEM Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics solver, 35 numerical simulations of the NASA TND-1093 wind tunnel test have been modeled and analyzed. This test article is composed of four JP-4/LOX 500 lbf rocket motors exhausting into a Mach 2 - 3.5 wind tunnel at various ambient pressure conditions. These water-cooled motors are attached to a base plate of a standard missile forebody. We explore the base heating profiles for fully coupled finite-rate chemistry simulations, one-way coupled RAMP (Reacting And Multiphase Program using Method of Characteristics)-BLIMPJ (Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Program - Jet Version) derived solutions and variable and constant specific heat ratio frozen flow simulations. Variations in turbulence models, temperature boundary conditions and thermodynamic properties of the plume have been investigated at two ambient pressure conditions: 255 lb/sq ft (simulated low altitude) and 35 lb/sq ft (simulated high altitude). It is observed that the convective base heat flux and base temperature are most sensitive to the nozzle inner wall thermal boundary layer profile which is dependent on the wall temperature, boundary layer s specific energy and chemical reactions. Recovery shock dynamics and afterburning significantly influences convective base heating. Turbulence models and external nozzle wall thermal boundary layer profiles show less sensitivity to base heating characteristics. Base heating rates are validated for the highest fidelity solutions which show an agreement within +/-10% with respect to test data.

  7. High-sensitivity Raman spectrometer to study pristine and irradiated interstellar ice analogs.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Chris J; Brotton, Stephen J; Jones, Brant M; Misra, Anupam K; Sharma, Shiv K; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2013-06-18

    We discuss the novel design of a sensitive, normal-Raman spectrometer interfaced to an ultra-high vacuum chamber (5 × 10(-11) Torr) utilized to investigate the interaction of ionizing radiation with low temperature ices relevant to the solar system and interstellar medium. The design is based on a pulsed Nd:YAG laser which takes advantage of gating techniques to isolate the scattered Raman signal from the competing fluorescence signal. The setup incorporates innovations to achieve maximum sensitivity without detectable heating of the sample. Thin films of carbon dioxide (CO2) ices of 10 to 396 nm thickness were prepared and characterized using both Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and HeNe interference techniques. The ν+ and ν- Fermi resonance bands of CO2 ices were observed by Raman spectroscopy at 1385 and 1278 cm(-1), respectively, and the band areas showed a linear dependence on ice thickness. Preliminary irradiation experiments are conducted on a 450 nm thick sample of CO2 ice using energetic electrons. Both carbon monoxide (CO) and the infrared inactive molecular oxygen (O2) products are readily detected from their characteristic Raman bands at 2145 and 1545 cm(-1), respectively. Detection limits of 4 ± 3 and 6 ± 4 monolayers of CO and O2 were derived, demonstrating the unique power to detect newly formed molecules in irradiated ices in situ. The setup is universally applicable to the detection of low-abundance species, since no Raman signal enhancement is required, demonstrating Raman spectroscopy as a reliable alternative, or complement, to FT-IR spectroscopy in space science applications. PMID:23662702

  8. A Prototype Fringing Spectrograph for Sensitive Extra-solar Planet Searches and Astroseismology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erskine, D.; Ge, J.

    1999-05-01

    We have developed a prototype fringing spectrograph optimized for sensitive stellar radial velocity measurements, aimed at detecting small extra-solar planet velocity perturbation and stellar seismology on an amplitude of ~ 1 m s(-1) or less. It is a combination of an angle-independent interferometer and a high throughput intermediate resolution spectrograph. The interferometer is used for measuring phase shifts caused by radial velocity variations of star light, while the spectrograph is applied for dispersing broad-band white fringes into different color channels to increase fringe visibility for precision phase measurements. A much simplified instrument response function (PSF), determined only by phase, amplitude and offset, compared to much more complicated ones in conventional echelle spectrographs, provides unprecedented sensitivity for radial velocity measurements. Preliminary lab-based experiments with this prototype instrument demonstrate 0.7 m s(-1) accuracy for short term radial velocity measurements. The zero point drift over 11 days was within 4 m s(-1) and may be due to the lack of interferometer stabilization during these runs. Stabilization is now being implemented through a close-loop electronics. This is expected to improve long term velocity measurement accuracy and make the instrument ready for first-light stellar observations. The instrument is also being tested with sunlight. The diurnal velocity variation caused by the Earth's rotation has been observed. Work to measure solar P-mode 5 minute oscillations is underway. This work is supported by the LLNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) grant through track 98-ERD-054.

  9. Radar Detectability Studies of Slow and Small Zodiacal Dust Cloud Particles: II. A Study of Three Radars with Different Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, D.; Swarnalingam, N.; Plane, J. M. C.; Nesvorný, D.; Feng, W.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2015-07-01

    The sensitivity of radar systems to detect different velocity populations of the incoming micrometeoroid flux is often the first argument considered to explain disagreements between models of the Near-Earth dust environment and observations. Recently, this was argued by Nesvorný et al. to support the main conclusions of a Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model which predicts a flux of meteoric material into the Earth’s upper atmosphere mostly composed of small and very slow particles. In this paper, we expand on a new methodology developed by Janches et al. to test the ability of powerful radars to detect the meteoroid populations in question. In our previous work, we focused on Arecibo 430 MHz observations since it is the most sensitive radar that has been used for this type of observation to date. In this paper, we apply our methodology to two other systems, the 440 MHz Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar and the 46.5 Middle and Upper Atmosphere radar. We show that even with the less sensitive radars, the current ZDC model over-predicts radar observations. We discuss our results in light of new measurements by the Planck satellite which suggest that the ZDC particle population may be characterized by smaller sizes than previously believed. We conclude that the solution to finding agreement between the ZDC model and sensitive high power and large aperture meteor observations must be a combination of a re-examination not only of our knowledge of radar detection biases, but also the physical assumptions of the ZDC model itself.

  10. Aerosol indirect effects from shipping emissions: sensitivity studies with the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, K.; Stier, P.; Quaas, J.; Graßl, H.

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we employ the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAM to globally assess aerosol indirect effects (AIEs) resulting from shipping emissions of aerosols and aerosol precursor gases. We implement shipping emissions of sulphur dioxide (SO2), black carbon (BC) and particulate organic matter (POM) for the year 2000 into the model and quantify the model's sensitivity towards uncertainties associated with the emission parameterisation as well as with the shipping emissions themselves. Sensitivity experiments are designed to investigate (i) the uncertainty in the size distribution of emitted particles, (ii) the uncertainty associated with the total amount of emissions, and (iii) the impact of reducing carbonaceous emissions from ships. We use the results from one sensitivity experiment for a detailed discussion of shipping-induced changes in the global aerosol system as well as the resulting impact on cloud properties. From all sensitivity experiments, we find AIEs from shipping emissions to range from -0.32 ± 0.01 W m-2 to -0.07 ± 0.01 W m-2 (global mean value and inter-annual variability as a standard deviation). The magnitude of the AIEs depends much more on the assumed emission size distribution and subsequent aerosol microphysical interactions than on the magnitude of the emissions themselves. It is important to note that although the strongest estimate of AIEs from shipping emissions in this study is relatively large, still much larger estimates have been reported in the literature before on the basis of modelling studies. We find that omitting just carbonaceous particle emissions from ships favours new particle formation in the boundary layer. These newly formed particles contribute just about as much to the CCN budget as the carbonaceous particles would, leaving the globally averaged AIEs nearly unaltered compared to a simulation including carbonaceous particle emissions from ships.

  11. Aerosol indirect effects from shipping emissions: sensitivity studies with the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, K.; Stier, P.; Quaas, J.; Graßl, H.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we employ the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAM to globally assess aerosol indirect effects (AIEs) resulting from shipping emissions of aerosols and aerosol precursor gases. We implement shipping emissions of sulphur dioxide (SO2), black carbon (BC) and particulate organic matter (POM) for the year 2000 into the model and quantify the model's sensitivity towards uncertainties associated with the emission parameterisation as well as with the shipping emissions themselves. Sensitivity experiments are designed to investigate (i) the uncertainty in the size distribution of emitted particles, (ii) the uncertainty associated with the total amount of emissions, and (iii) the impact of reducing carbonaceous emissions from ships. We use the results from one sensitivity experiment for a detailed discussion of shipping-induced changes in the global aerosol system as well as the resulting impact on cloud properties. From all sensitivity experiments, we find AIEs from shipping emissions to range from -0.07 ± 0.01 W m-2 to -0.32 ± 0.01 W m-2 (global mean value and inter-annual variability as a standard deviation). The magnitude of the AIEs depends much more on the assumed emission size distribution and subsequent aerosol microphysical interactions than on the magnitude of the emissions themselves. It is important to note that although the strongest estimate of AIEs from shipping emissions in this study is relatively large, still much larger estimates have been reported in the literature before on the basis of modelling studies. We find that omitting just carbonaceous particle emissions from ships favours new particle formation in the boundary layer. These newly formed particles contribute just about as much to the CCN budget as the carbonaceous particles would, leaving the globally averaged AIEs nearly unaltered compared to a simulation including carbonaceous particle emissions from ships.

  12. Potential of coculture in vitro models to study inflammatory and sensitizing effects of particles on the lung.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sebastian G; Hennen, Jenny; Serchi, Tommaso; Blömeke, Brunhilde; Gutleb, Arno C

    2011-12-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) like nanoparticles (NPs) has increased in the last century due to increased combustion processes, road traffic, etc. In addition, the progress in chemical and cosmetic industry led to many new compounds, e.g. fragrances, which humans are exposed to every day. Many chemicals are known to act as contact and some as respiratory sensitizers, causing allergic reactions. Exposure to small particles of less than 100 nm in diameter is linked with an increased risk of respiratory diseases, such as asthma or rhinitis. To date already more than 1000 customer products contain eNPs without knowing much about the health effects. In comparison to chemicals, the mechanisms by which PM and eNPs can cause sensitization are still not fully understood. Validated and regulatory accepted in vitro models to assess this hazard in its full range are still missing. While a huge number of animal studies contributed to our knowledge about sensitization processes, knowledge on involved cellular mechanisms is still limited. In this review relevant in vitro models to study and elucidate these mechanisms in more detail are presented and their potential to serve as part of a tiered testing strategy is discussed. PMID:21963807

  13. Value and limitations of a highly sensitive immunoradiometric assay for thyrotropin in the study of thyrotroph function

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, G.; Gow, S.M.; Sweeting, V.M.; Beckett, G.J.; Seth, J.; Toft, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    Using a highly sensitive and specific immunoradiometric assay for thyrotropin, we studied thyrotroph function in 232 new patients referred to a thyroid clinic and in 13 patients after treatment for hyperthyroidism. Significant thyrotroph responsiveness to thyroliberin (thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH) was found in all patients with values for basal thyrotropin greater than 0.1 milli-int unit/L. In no overtly hyperthyroid patient was any increment in thyrotropin recorded at 20 min after thyroliberin administration. In seven patients, four subclinically hyperthyroid and three who had received treatment, increments in thyrotropin from undetectable basal values were recorded, consistent with incomplete thyrotroph suppression. By use of assays with even higher sensitivity, one may be able to distinguish these patients from overtly hyperthyroid patients.

  14. Detection of Critical LUCC Indices and Sensitive Watershed Regions Related to Lake Algal Blooms: A Case Study of Taihu Lake

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; Su, Zhihu; Zhu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Taihu Lake in China has suffered from severe eutrophication over the past 20 years which is partly due to significant land use/cover change (LUCC). There is an increasing need to detect the critical watershed region that significantly affects lake water degradation, which has great significance for environmental protection. However, previous studies have obtained conflicting results because of non–uniform lake indicators and inadequate time periods. To identify the sensitive LUCC indices and buffer distance regions, three lake divisions (Meiliang Lake, Zhushan Lake and Western Coastal region) and their watershed region within the Taihu Lake basin were chosen as study sites, the algal area was used as a uniform lake quality indicator and modeled with LUCC indices over the whole time series. Results showed that wetland (WL) and landscape index such as Shannon diversity index (SHDI) appeared to be sensitive LUCC indices when the buffer distance was less than 5 km, while agricultural land (AL) and landscape fragmentation (Ci) gradually became sensitive indices as buffer distances increased to more than 5 km. For the relationship between LUCC and lake algal area, LUCC of the WC region seems to have no significant effect on lake water quality. Conversely, LUCC within ML and ZS region influenced algal area of corresponding lake divisions greatly, while the most sensitive regions were found in 3 km to 5 km, rather than the whole catchment. These results will be beneficial for the further understanding of the relationship between LUCC and lake water quality, and will provide a practical basis for the identification of critical regions for lake. PMID:25642691

  15. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxygglucose-guided breast cancer surgery with a positron-sensitive probe: Validation in preclinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Raylman, R.R.; Fisher, S.J.; Brown, R.S.; Ethier, S.P.; Wahl, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, the feasibility of utilizing 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) in conjunction with a positron-sensitive intraoperative probe to guide breast tumor excision was investigated. The probe was constructed with a plastic scintillator tip coupled to a photomultiplier tube with fiber optic cable. Anticipated resolution degradation was evaluated by measurement of line spread functions in the presence of background radiation. Realistic photon background distributions were simulated with a human torso phantom and a cardiac insert. The relationship between resolution and energy threshold was measured to find the optimal discriminator settings. In addition, probe sensitivity as a function of energy threshold was determined for various size-simulated tumors. Finally, the ability to localize breast cancers in vivo was tested in a rodent model. Mammary rat tumors implanted in Lewis rats were examined after injection with FDG; these results were correlated with those of histologic analyses. Measurements of line spread functions indicated that resolution could be maximized in a realistic background photon environment by increasing the energy threshold to levels at or above the Compton continuum edge (340 keV). At this setting, the probe`s sensitivity was determined to be 58 and 11 cps/{mu}Ci for 3.18- and 6.35-mm diameter simulated tumors, respectively. Probe readings correlated well with histologic results; the probe was generally able to discriminate between tumor and normal tissue. This study indicates that breast cancer surgery guided by a positron-sensitive probe warrants future evaluation in breast-conserving surgery of patients with breast cancer. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Detection of critical LUCC indices and sensitive watershed regions related to lake algal blooms: a case study of Taihu Lake.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; Su, Zhihu; Zhu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Taihu Lake in China has suffered from severe eutrophication over the past 20 years which is partly due to significant land use/cover change (LUCC). There is an increasing need to detect the critical watershed region that significantly affects lake water degradation, which has great significance for environmental protection. However, previous studies have obtained conflicting results because of non-uniform lake indicators and inadequate time periods. To identify the sensitive LUCC indices and buffer distance regions, three lake divisions (Meiliang Lake, Zhushan Lake and Western Coastal region) and their watershed region within the Taihu Lake basin were chosen as study sites, the algal area was used as a uniform lake quality indicator and modeled with LUCC indices over the whole time series. Results showed that wetland (WL) and landscape index such as Shannon diversity index (SHDI) appeared to be sensitive LUCC indices when the buffer distance was less than 5 km, while agricultural land (AL) and landscape fragmentation (Ci) gradually became sensitive indices as buffer distances increased to more than 5 km. For the relationship between LUCC and lake algal area, LUCC of the WC region seems to have no significant effect on lake water quality. Conversely, LUCC within ML and ZS region influenced algal area of corresponding lake divisions greatly, while the most sensitive regions were found in 3 km to 5 km, rather than the whole catchment. These results will be beneficial for the further understanding of the relationship between LUCC and lake water quality, and will provide a practical basis for the identification of critical regions for lake. PMID:25642691

  17. A computational study of microstructure effects on shock ignition sensitivity of pressed RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamate, Yuichiro; Lu, Ruth; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-01

    There are many experimental measurements of microstructure effects on shock sensitivity and performance of solid explosives. But comparatively speaking, there are very few numerical models of these effects. This paper presents a computational experiment of microstructure effects using a recently developed model (Y. Hamate and Y. Horie, Shock Waves, V. 16, 125 (2006)). The model has been developed aiming at expanding predictive capability and applicability. To increase model capability, it is important to focus on physics-based approach, rather than parameter-fitting approach where non-physical parameter(s) needs to be re-calibrated for different set of conditions. Our model explicitly treats specific surface area with an assumption of exponential size distribution of hot-spots. Experimentally, Khasainov et al. discussed effects of specific surface area and found that both run distance to detonation and critical diameter have linear relation with reciprocal of specific surface area of HE. Computational experiments are carried out using pressed RDX model with various initial specific surface areas that are determined by average explosives particle size. The results demonstrate that both Pop-plots and critical diameter show the linear relation as observed by Khasainov et. al.

  18. Interoceptive sensitivity, body weight and eating behavior in children: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Anne; Pollatos, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Previous research indicates that interindividual differences in the ability to perceive one's own bodily signals (interoceptive sensitivity, IS) are associated with disordered eating behavior and weight problems. But representative and prospective data in children are lacking and therefore, the exact nature of these observed associations remains unclear. Data on IS measured by heartbeat perception ability in 1657 children between 6 and 11 years of age were collected on the basis of two measurement points with a year distance in time. Stability of the construct and its prospective association with different food approach behaviors [assessed via parent questionnaires (Children's Eating Behavior Questionnaire and Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire)] as well as with weight status were analyzed via structural equation modeling. Main results were that only in overweight children external and emotional eating behavior were predictive for later IS, whereas no such relation was found in normal weight children. There was no direct relation between IS and body mass index. For the first time, we could show that eating behavior and IS in middle childhood are prospectively related to each other. But surprisingly, our data indicate that altered interoceptive processes rather follow than precede non-adaptive eating behavior patterns in overweight children. This suggests a possible crucial role of faulty learning mechanisms in eating behavior early in life, undermining the later confidence in one's body. PMID:25250006

  19. A case study of morphometry as a more sensitive paleoceanographic tool in Globigerinoides ruber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, F. S.; de Lima Toledo, F. A.; Badaraco Costa, K.

    2013-12-01

    There are a number of paleoceanographic tools that take advantage from the wide geographic and temporal occurrence of planktic foraminifers in marine sediments. These tools comprises since simple visual identification and counting to geochemical analysis. Globigerinoides ruber is specially employed due to its high abundance in addition to the advantages mentioned above. That has been attributed to its broad tolerance to most of ecological factors and due to this fact, for this reason, its abundance fluctuation does not provide a significant paleocenographic data like other species do. Globigerinoides ruber has been largely employed in geochemical analysis which demands a higher number of individuals. However, Globigerinoides ruber from brazilian continental margin core tops sediments presents no significant fluctuation either in its abundance and on two of the main paleoceanographic proxies, oxygen and carbon isotope signals, indicating there is no significant environmental difference along brazilian continental margin. Nevertheless, Globigerinoides ruber specimens morphometry does show a significant change between brazilian continental margin core tops. This indicates that morphometry may be a more sensitive tool, enabling a more detailed exploration of paleoceanographical data than other tools do in this species.

  20. Comparative study of TiO2 nanoparticles applied to dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacoubi, Besma; Bennaceur, Jamila; Ben Taieb, S.; Chtourou, Rathowan

    2014-02-01

    Microcrystalline titanium oxide (TiO2) particles of anatase crystal phase were prepared by the sol-gel route, varying thermal treatment conditions (400 °C and 600 °C), for a comparison purpose with commercial TiO2 (P25). Structural, optical and electrical properties were investigated for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) application. Both microcrystalline TiO2 particles, synthesized by the sol-gel method and obtained from the P25 powder were used to prepare a light scattering layer of the working electrode. The obtained electrodes were then immersed in a solution of N-719 (ruthenium) dye, at the ambient temperature, during 24 h. Finally, the DSSCs were assembled, the short circuit photocurrent, the open circuit photovoltage, and the power conversion efficiency were measured using an I-V measurement system. The overall conversion efficiencies for all elaborated DSSCs were proximate. A maximum efficiency of 2.3% was achieved for the sol-gel TiO2 thin film annealed at 400 °C, under one sun irradiation, with an open circuit voltage of 0.61 V and a current density of 6.54 mA/cm2. The higher efficiency value of the sol-gel TiO2 sample, annealed at 400 °C, was attributed to the uniformity of the prepared titanium oxide substrate, which provides a better surface for the dye absorption.

  1. Ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometer for studying magnetization fields produced by hyperpolarized helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Xi-yuan; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi; Hu, Zhao-hui; Shan, Guang-cun; Quan, Wei; Fang, Jian-cheng

    2016-04-01

    An ingenious approach to acquire the absolute magnetization fields produced by polarized atoms has been presented in this paper. The method was based on detection of spin precession signal of the hyperpolarized helium-3 with ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometer of potassium by referring to time-domain analysis. At first, dynamic responses of the mixed spin ensembles in the presence of variant external magnetic fields have been analyzed by referring to the Bloch equation. Subsequently, the relevant equipment was established to achieve the functions of hyperpolarizing helium-3 and detecting the precession of spin-polarized noble gas. By analyzing the transient response of the magnetometer in time domain, we obtained the relevant damping ratio and natural frequency. When the value of damping ratio reached the maximum value of 0.0917, the combined atomic magnetometer was in equilibrium. We draw a conclusion from the steady response: the magnetization fields of the polarized electrons and the hyperpolarized nuclei were corresponding 16.12 nT and 90.74 nT. Under this situation, the nuclear magnetization field could offset disturbing magnetic fields perpendicular to the orientation of the electronic polarization, and it preserved the electronic spin staying in a stable axis. Therefore, the combined magnetometer was particularly attractive for inertial measurements.

  2. Highly selective and sensitized spectrophotometric determination of iron (III) following potentiometric study.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, Ardeshir; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Rajabi, Hamid Reza

    2007-09-01

    A simple, selective and sensitized spectrophotometric method for determination of trace amounts of Fe3+ ion in tap and waste water solutions has been described. The spectrophotometric determination of Fe3+ ion using Ferron in the presence of N,N-Dodecytrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) has been carried out. The Beer's law is obeyed over the concentration range of 0.05-2.6 microg mL(-1) of Fe3+ ion with the relative standard deviation (RSD %) <0.2% and the molar absorptivity of complexes in pH 3.5 is 3.8 x 10(3) L mol(-1) cm(-1). Potentiometric pH titration has been used for prediction of protonation constants of ferron, and evaluating its stoichiometry and respective stability constant with Fe3+ ion. As it is obvious the most likely species of ferron alone and its complexes are LH (log = 7.64), LH2 (logK = 10.52), LH3 (logK = 11.74) and ML2 (logbeta = 23.68), ML3 (logbeta = 23.68), ML3H (logbeta = 23.68), ML3H2 (logbta = 23.68) and ML(OH)2 (logbeta = 23.68) respectively. PMID:17970298

  3. A study of the sensitivity of long-range passive ranging techniques to atmospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Villiers, Jason; Wilson, Fintan; Nicolls, Fred

    2012-05-01

    This work aims to quantify and improve the sensitivity of monocular passive ranging techniques in sequences that are degraded by the the quasi-periodic inter frame motion and localised blurring associated with atmospheric scintillation. Ranges from tens of meters up to 1km in uncontrolled outdoor conditions were investigated. This work has application in surveillance, border control, artillery, and the autonomous navigation of ground vehicles. A field trial with long focal length, large aperture cameras was held. The targets were placed at known distances and a scintillometer was used to measure the turbulence between the cameras and each target. A variety of depth from defocus and depth from focus algorithms were applied to a the video sequences to determine range to the targets. Increasing levels of atmospheric turbulence were observed ranging from no turbulence to mild, moderate and severe turbulence. Algorithms for the mitigation of atmospheric turbulence were applied to the recorded video sequences. The passive ranging techniques were then applied to the turbulence-mitigated video sequences and the results compared to that of the raw sequences. Finally, findings regarding the best performing combination of ranging and mitigation techniques to use under different scintillation conditions are presented.

  4. Magnetite biomineralization and geomagnetic sensitivity in higher animals: an update and recommendations for future study.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, J L

    1989-01-01

    Magnetite, the only known biogenic material with ferromagnetic properties, has been identified as a biochemical precipitate in three of the five kingdoms of living organisms, with a fossil record that now extends back nearly 2 billion years. In the magnetotactic bacteria, protoctists, and fish, single-domain crystals of magnetite are arranged in membrane-bound linear structures called magnetosomes, which function as biological bar magnets. Magnetosomes in all three of these groups bear an overall structural similarity to each other, which includes alignment of the individual crystallographic [111] directions parallel to the long axis. Although the magnetosomes represent only a small volume fraction in higher organisms, enough of these highly energetic structures are present to provide sensitivity to extremely small fluctuations and gradients in the background geomagnetic field. Previous experiments with elasmobranch fish are reexamined to test the hypothesis that gradients played a role in their successful geomagnetic conditioning, and a variety of four-turn coil designs are considered that could be used to test the various hypotheses proposed for them. PMID:2665750

  5. Sensitivity of global ocean heat content from reanalyses to the atmospheric reanalysis forcing: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storto, Andrea; Yang, Chunxue; Masina, Simona

    2016-05-01

    The global ocean heat content evolution is a key component of the Earth's energy budget and can be consistently determined by ocean reanalyses that assimilate hydrographic profiles. This work investigates the impact of the atmospheric reanalysis forcing through a multiforcing ensemble ocean reanalysis, where the ensemble members are forced by five state-of-the-art atmospheric reanalyses during the meteorological satellite era (1979-2013). Data assimilation leads the ensemble to converge toward robust estimates of ocean warming rates and significantly reduces the spread (1.48 ± 0.18 W/m2, per unit area of the World Ocean); hence, the impact of the atmospheric forcing appears only marginal for the global heat content estimates in both upper and deeper oceans. A sensitivity assessment performed through realistic perturbation of the main sources of uncertainty in ocean reanalyses highlights that bias correction and preprocessing of in situ observations represent the most crucial component of the reanalysis, whose perturbation accounts for up to 60% of the ocean heat content anomaly variability in the pre-Argo period. Although these results may depend on the single reanalysis system used, they reveal useful information for the ocean observation community and for the optimal generation of perturbations in ocean ensemble systems.

  6. Sensitivity to the temporal structure of rapid sound sequences — An MEG study

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Lefkothea-Vasiliki; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Chait, Maria

    2015-01-01

    To probe sensitivity to the time structure of ongoing sound sequences, we measured MEG responses, in human listeners, to the offset of long tone-pip sequences containing various forms of temporal regularity. If listeners learn sequence temporal properties and form expectancies about the arrival time of an upcoming tone, sequence offset should be detectable as soon as an expected tone fails to arrive. Therefore, latencies of offset responses are indicative of the extent to which the temporal pattern has been acquired. In Exp1, sequences were isochronous with tone inter-onset-interval (IOI) set to 75, 125 or 225 ms. Exp2 comprised of non-isochronous, temporally regular sequences, comprised of the IOIs above. Exp3 used the same sequences as Exp2 but listeners were required to monitor them for occasional frequency deviants. Analysis of the latency of offset responses revealed that the temporal structure of (even rather simple) regular sequences is not learnt precisely when the sequences are ignored. Pattern coding, supported by a network of temporal, parietal and frontal sources, improved considerably when the signals were made behaviourally pertinent. Thus, contrary to what might be expected in the context of an ‘early warning system’ framework, learning of temporal structure is not automatic, but affected by the signal's behavioural relevance. PMID:25659464

  7. COHb Level and High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T in 2012 in Bursa, Turkey: A Retrospective Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Huysal, Kagan; Ustundag Budak, Yasemin; Aydin, Ufuk; Demirci, Hakan; Turk, Tamer; Karadag, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Background Intoxication due to carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the most common types of poisoning. Cardiac effects of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) range from simple arrhythmias to myocardial infarction. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between blood carboxyhemoglobin and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) level with a highly sensitive assay in patients with acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Patients and Methods This retrospective study was conducted on 141 (54 males and 87 females) patients, with acute CO intoxication, admitted to the Sevket Yilmaz research and education hospital emergency unit during a one-year period (January 2012 - January 2013). The patients were divided into three groups based on COHb levels: Group I, mild COHb level < 15%; Group II, COHb between 15% and 25%; Group III, severe acute CO intoxication COHb levels > 25%. COHb, hs-cTnT (Stat), creatine kinase (CK) and creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB) levels were measured on admission. Results The mean age of the patients was 38 ± 16 years. COHb levels ranged from 8 to 35. hs-cTnT levels on inclusion in this study were slightly different between the groups (P = 0.05). COHb levels with hs-cTnT values were weakly correlated (r = 0.173, P = 0.041); on the other hand, CK-MB levels were not correlated with COHb (r = 0.013, P = 0.883). Conclusions In patients without clear signs of myocardial infarction, even mild CO poisoning was associated with quantifiable circulating levels of hs-cTnT when TnT was measured using a highly sensitive assay in the current study patients. Plasma levels of the hs-TnT and CK-MB assays were not correlated with the COHb levels in the current study patients.

  8. Emotional sensitivity, emotion regulation and impulsivity in borderline personality disorder: a critical review of fMRI studies.

    PubMed

    van Zutphen, Linda; Siep, Nicolette; Jacob, Gitta A; Goebel, Rainer; Arntz, Arnoud

    2015-04-01

    Emotional sensitivity, emotion regulation and impulsivity are fundamental topics in research of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Studies using fMRI examining the neural correlates concerning these topics is growing and has just begun understanding the underlying neural correlates in BPD. However, there are strong similarities but also important differences in results of different studies. It is therefore important to know in more detail what these differences are and how we should interpret these. In present review a critical light is shed on the fMRI studies examining emotional sensitivity, emotion regulation and impulsivity in BPD patients. First an outline of the methodology and the results of the studies will be given. Thereafter important issues that remained unanswered and topics to improve future research are discussed. Future research should take into account the limited power of previous studies and focus more on BPD specificity with regard to time course responses, different regulation strategies, manipulation of self-regulation, medication use, a wider range of stimuli, gender effects and the inclusion of a clinical control group. PMID:25616185

  9. Aerosol emissions and dimming/brightening in Europe: Sensitivity studies with ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, D.; Wild, M.

    2011-11-01

    Observational data indicate a decrease of surface solar radiation (SSR) in Europe from about 1950 to the mid-1980s, followed by a renewed increase. Changing aerosol emissions have been suggested as a likely cause for this observed dimming and brightening. To quantify this hypothesis, we performed ensembles of transient sensitivity experiments with the global climate model ECHAM5-HAM, which includes interactive treatment of aerosols. The simulations cover the period 1950-2005 and use transient aerosol emissions (National Institute of Environmental Science, Japan) and prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the Hadley Centre. The simulated clear-sky dimming and brightening can be attributed to changing aerosol emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Ensemble means of modeled SSR trends are in agreement with observed values. Dimming ceases too early in the model, around 1970. Potential causes are discussed. Brightening sets in at about the right time. Regional differences of modeled SSR are substantial, with clear-sky dimming trends ranging from -6.1 (eastern Europe) to -0.4 W m-2 decade-1 (British Isles) and brightening trends ranging from +1.3 to +6.3 W m-2 decade-1 (Scandinavia and eastern Europe). All-sky conditions show similar trends in the ensemble mean, but the spread among ensemble members is considerable, emphasizing the importance of clouds. Surface temperatures are found to depend mostly on the prescribed SSTs, with an additional aerosol component in some regions like eastern Europe. For precipitation, internal variability is too large to allow for any firm conclusions.

  10. Study of capillary tracking detectors with position-sensitive photomultiplier readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardini, A.; Cavasinni, V.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dolinsky, S. I.; Flaminio, V.; Golovkin, S. V.; Gorin, A. M.; Medvedkov, A. M.; Pyshev, A. I.; Tyukov, V. E.; Vasilchenko, V. G.; Zymin, K. V.

    1995-02-01

    Measurements have been carried out on light yield and attenuation length in glass capillaries filled with new liquid scintillators (LS) and compared with analogous measurements made on 0.5 mm diameter plastic fibres Kuraray SCSF-38 and 3HF. It is found that, at a distance of 1 m, the light output in the capillary filled with green LS based on 1-methylnaphthalene doped with a new dye 3M15 is greater by a factor of 2 to 3 than for plastic fibres. A tracking detector consisting of a capillary bundle read out by a 100 channel position-sensitive microchannel plate photomultiplier (2MCP-100) has been built and tested in the laboratory using a cosmic ray trigger. A comparison has been made between the performance of such a detector and that of a similar one, read out by a 96 channel Philips XP1724/A photomultiplier. It was found that a bundle made of 20 μm diameter capillaries with a tapered end giving a magnification of 2.56, filled with the new IPN+3M15 liquid scintillator, read out by the 2MCP-100, provides a space resolution of σ = 170 μm, a two-track resolution of the same value and a hit density of n = 1.9/mm for tracks crossing the detector at a distance of 20 cm from the photocathode. If the same detector is read out by the Philips XP1724/A, the space resolution becomes 200 μm, the two-track resolution 600 μm and the hit density n = 1.7/mm. The worse performance in the latter case is caused by the larger crosstalk compared with that of the 2MCP-100 PSPM. The results indicate that a LS-filled capillary detector is a very promising device for fast fibre tracking.

  11. Situationally-sensitive knowledge translation and relational decision making in hyperacute stroke: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Murtagh, Madeleine J; Burges Watson, Duika L; Jenkings, K Neil; Lie, Mabel L S; Mackintosh, Joan E; Ford, Gary A; Thomson, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    decision making about rtPA in hyperacute stroke were relational decision support and situationally-sensitive knowledge translation. PMID:22675477

  12. The Brief Kinesthesia test is feasible and sensitive: a study in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Borstad, Alexandra; Nichols-Larsen, Deborah S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinicians lack a quantitative measure of kinesthetic sense, an important contributor to sensorimotor control of the hand and arm. OBJECTIVES: The objective here was to determine the feasibility of administering the Brief Kinesthesia Test (BKT) and begin to validate it by 1) reporting BKT scores from persons with chronic stroke and a healthy comparison group and 2) examining the relationship between the BKT scores and other valid sensory and motor measures. METHOD: Adults with stroke and mild to moderate hemiparesis (N=12) and an age-, gender-, and handedness-matched healthy comparison group (N=12) completed the BKT by reproducing three targeted reaching movements per hand with vision occluded. OTHER MEASURES: the Hand Active Sensation Test (HASTe), Touch-Test(tm) monofilament aesthesiometer, 6-item Wolf Motor Function Test (Wolf), the Motor Activity Log (MAL), and the Box and Blocks Test (BBT). A paired t-test compared BKT scores between groups. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients assessed the relationship between BKT scores and other measures. RESULTS: Post-stroke participants performed more poorly on the BKT than comparison participants with their contralesional and ipsilesional upper extremity. The mean difference for the contralesional upper extremity was 3.7 cm (SE=1.1, t=3.34; p<0.008). The BKT score for the contralesional limb was strongly correlated with the MAL-how much (r=0.84, p=0.001), the MAL-how well (r=0.76, p=0.007), Wolf (r=0.69, p=0.02), and the BBT (r=0.77, p=0.006). CONCLUSIONS: The BKT was feasible to administer and sensitive to differences in reaching accuracy between persons with stroke and a comparison group. With further refinement, The BKT may become a valuable clinical measure of post-stroke kinesthetic impairment. PMID:26786083

  13. Biomass burning related ozone damage on vegetation over the Amazon forest: a model sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacifico, F.; Folberth, G. A.; Sitch, S.; Haywood, J. M.; Rizzo, L. V.; Malavelle, F. F.; Artaxo, P.

    2015-03-01

    The HadGEM2 earth system climate model was used to assess the impact of biomass burning on surface ozone concentrations over the Amazon forest and its impact on vegetation, under present-day climate conditions. Here we consider biomass burning emissions from wildfires, deforestation fires, agricultural forest burning, and residential and commercial combustion. Simulated surface ozone concentration is evaluated against observations taken at two sites in the Brazilian Amazon forest for years 2010 to 2012. The model is able to reproduce the observed diurnal cycle of surface ozone mixing ratio at the two sites, but overestimates the magnitude of the monthly averaged hourly measurements by 5-15 ppb for each available month at one of the sites. We vary biomass burning emissions over South America by ±20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% to quantify the modelled impact of biomass burning on surface ozone concentrations and ozone damage on vegetation productivity over the Amazon forest. We used the ozone damage scheme in the "high" sensitivity mode to give an upper limit for this effect. Decreasing South American biomass burning emissions by 100% (i.e. to zero) reduces surface ozone concentrations (by about 15 ppb during the biomass burning season) and suggests a 15% increase in monthly mean net primary productivity averaged over the Amazon forest, with local increases up to 60%. The simulated impact of ozone damage from present-day biomass burning on vegetation productivity is about 230 TgC yr-1. Taking into account that uncertainty in these estimates is substantial, this ozone damage impact over the Amazon forest is of the same order of magnitude as the release of carbon dioxide due to fire in South America; in effect it potentially doubles the impact of biomass burning on the carbon cycle.

  14. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth Above Clouds from OMI Observations: Sensitivity Analysis, Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol load reaching the free troposphere is frequently located above low clouds. Most commonly observed aerosols above clouds are carbonaceous particles generally associated with biomass burning and boreal forest fires, and mineral aerosols originated in arid and semi-arid regions and transported across large distances, often above clouds. Because these aerosols absorb solar radiation, their role in the radiative transfer balance of the earth atmosphere system is especially important. The generally negative (cooling) top of the atmosphere direct effect of absorbing aerosols, may turn into warming when the light-absorbing particles are located above clouds. The actual effect depends on the aerosol load and the single scattering albedo, and on the geometric cloud fraction. In spite of its potential significance, the role of aerosols above clouds is not adequately accounted for in the assessment of aerosol radiative forcing effects due to the lack of measurements. In this paper we discuss the basis of a simple technique that uses near-UV observations to simultaneously derive the optical depth of both the aerosol layer and the underlying cloud for overcast conditions. The two-parameter retrieval method described here makes use of the UV aerosol index and reflectance measurements at 388 nm. A detailed sensitivity analysis indicates that the measured radiances depend mainly on the aerosol absorption exponent and aerosol-cloud separation. The technique was applied to above-cloud aerosol events over the Southern Atlantic Ocean yielding realistic results as indicated by indirect evaluation methods. An error analysis indicates that for typical overcast cloudy conditions and aerosol loads, the aerosol optical depth can be retrieved with an accuracy of approximately 54% whereas the cloud optical depth can be derived within 17% of the true value.

  15. Improving sensitivity in proteome studies by analysis of false discovery rates for multiple search engines

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Andrew R.; Siepen, Jennifer A.; Hubbard, Simon J.; Paton, Norman W.

    2010-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry, run in combination with liquid chromatography (LC-MS/MS), can generate large numbers of peptide and protein identifications, for which a variety of database search engines are available. Distinguishing correct identifications from false positives is far from trivial because all data sets are noisy, and tend to be too large for manual inspection, therefore probabilistic methods must be employed to balance the trade-off between sensitivity and specificity. Decoy databases are becoming widely used to place statistical confidence in results sets, allowing the false discovery rate (FDR) to be estimated. It has previously been demonstrated that different MS search engines produce different peptide identification sets, and as such, employing more than one search engine could result in an increased number of peptides being identified. However, such efforts are hindered by the lack of a single scoring framework employed by all search engines. We have developed a search engine independent scoring framework based on FDR which allows peptide identifications from different search engines to be combined, called the FDRScore. We observe that peptide identifications made by three search engines are infrequently false positives, and identifications made by only a single search engine, even with a strong score from the source search engine, are significantly more likely to be false positives. We have developed a second score based on the FDR within peptide identifications grouped according to the set of search engines that have made the identification, called the combined FDRScore. We demonstrate by searching large publicly available data sets that the combined FDRScore can differentiate between between correct and incorrect peptide identifications with high accuracy, allowing on average 35% more peptide identifications to be made at a fixed FDR than using a single search engine. PMID:19253293

  16. Species sensitivity weighted distribution for ecological risk assessment of engineered nanomaterials: the n-TiO2 case study.

    PubMed

    Semenzin, Elena; Lanzellotto, Elisa; Hristozov, Danail; Critto, Andrea; Zabeo, Alex; Giubilato, Elisa; Marcomini, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Societal concerns about the environmental risks of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have recently increased, but nano-ecological risk assessments are constrained by significant gaps in basic information on long-term effects and exposures, for example. An approach to the ecological risk assessment of ENMs is proposed that can operate in the context of high uncertainty. This approach further develops species sensitivity weighted distribution (SSWD) by including 3 weighting criteria (species relevance, trophic level abundance, and nanotoxicity data quality) to address nano-specific needs (n-SSWD). The application of n-SSWD is illustrated for nanoscale titanium dioxide (n-TiO2 ), which is available in different crystal forms; it was selected because of its widespread use in consumer products (e.g., cosmetics) and the ample availability of data from ecotoxicological studies in the literature (including endpoints for algae, invertebrates, bacteria, and vertebrates in freshwater, saltwater, and terrestrial compartments). The n-SSWD application resulted in estimation of environmental quality criteria (hazard concentration affecting 5% and 50% of the species) and ecological risk (potentially affected fraction of species), which were then compared with similar results obtained by applying the traditional species sensitivity distribution (SSD) approach to the same dataset. The n-SSWDs were also built for specific trophic levels (e.g., primary producers) and taxonomic groups (e.g., algae), which helped to identify the most sensitive organisms. These results showd that n-SSWD is a valuable risk tool, although further testing is suggested. PMID:26058704

  17. Multiple testing in fMRI: an empirical case study on the balance between sensitivity, specificity, and stability.

    PubMed

    Durnez, Joke; Roels, Sanne P; Moerkerke, Beatrijs

    2014-07-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a widespread technique in cognitive psychology that allows visualizing brain activation. The data analysis encompasses an enormous number of simultaneous statistical tests. Procedures that either control the familywise error rate or the false discovery rate have been applied to these data. These methods are mostly validated in terms of average sensitivity and specificity. However, procedures are not comparable if requirements on their error rates differ. Moreover, less attention has been given to the instability or variability of results. In a simulation study in the context of imaging, we first compare the Bonferroni and Benjamini-Hochberg procedures. Considering Bonferroni as a way to control the expected number of type I errors enables more lenient thresholding compared to familywise error rate control and a direct comparison between both procedures. We point out that while the same balance is obtained between average sensitivity and specificity, the Benjamini-Hochberg procedure appears less stable. Secondly, we have implemented the procedure of Gordon et al. () (originally proposed for gene selection) that includes stability, measured through bootstrapping, in the decision criterion. Simulations indicate that the method attains the same balance between sensitivity and specificity. It improves the stability of Benjamini-Hochberg but does not outperform Bonferroni, making this computationally heavy bootstrap procedure less appealing. Third, we show how stability of thresholding procedures can be assessed using real data. In a dataset on face recognition, we again find that Bonferroni renders more stable results. PMID:24804953

  18. Polarization sensitivity in Collembola: an experimental study of polarotaxis in the water-surface-inhabiting springtail Podura aquatica.

    PubMed

    Egri, Ádám; Farkas, Alexandra; Kriska, György; Horváth, Gábor

    2016-08-15

    The ventral eye of the water-surface-inhabiting springtail Podura aquatica has six ommatidia with horizontal and vertical microvilli and perceives light from the ventral, frontal and frontodorsal regions, whereas the dorsal eye possesses two upward-looking ommatidia with vertical microvilli. The ventral eye may detect water by its polarization sensitivity, even if the insect is resting with its head slightly tipped down on a raised surface. The polarization sensitivity and polarotaxis in springtails (Collembola) have not been investigated. Therefore, we performed behavioural choice experiments to study them in P. aquatica We found that the strength of phototaxis in P. aquatica depends on the polarization characteristics of stimulating light. Horizontally and vertically polarized light were the most and least attractive, respectively, while unpolarized stimulus elicited moderate attraction. We show that horizontally polarized light attracts more springtails than unpolarized, even if the polarized stimulus was 10 times dimmer. Thus, besides phototaxis, P. aquatica also performs polarotaxis with the ability to measure or at least estimate the degree of polarization. Our results indicate that the threshold d* of polarization sensitivity in P. aquatica is between 10.1 and 25.5%. PMID:27312471

  19. Sensitivity of computed tomography performed within six hours of onset of headache for diagnosis of subarachnoid haemorrhage: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stiell, Ian G; Sivilotti, Marco L A; Bullard, Michael J; Émond, Marcel; Symington, Cheryl; Sutherland, Jane; Worster, Andrew; Hohl, Corinne; Lee, Jacques S; Eisenhauer, Mary A; Mortensen, Melodie; Mackey, Duncan; Pauls, Merril; Lesiuk, Howard; Wells, George A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To measure the sensitivity of modern third generation computed tomography in emergency patients being evaluated for possible subarachnoid haemorrhage, especially when carried out within six hours of headache onset. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 11 tertiary care emergency departments across Canada, 2000-9. Participants Neurologically intact adults with a new acute headache peaking in intensity within one hour of onset in whom a computed tomography was ordered by the treating physician to rule out subarachnoid haemorrhage. Main outcome measures Subarachnoid haemorrhage was defined by any of subarachnoid blood on computed tomography, xanthochromia in cerebrospinal fluid, or any red blood cells in final tube of cerebrospinal fluid collected with positive results on cerebral angiography. Results Of the 3132 patients enrolled (mean age 45.1, 2571 (82.1%) with worst headache ever), 240 had subarachnoid haemorrhage (7.7%). The sensitivity of computed tomography overall for subarachnoid haemorrhage was 92.9% (95% confidence interval 89.0% to 95.5%), the specificity was 100% (99.9% to 100%), the negative predictive value was 99.4% (99.1% to 99.6%), and the positive predictive value was 100% (98.3% to 100%). For the 953 patients scanned within six hours of headache onset, all 121 patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage were identified by computed tomography, yielding a sensitivity of 100% (97.0% to 100.0%), specificity of 100% (99.5% to 100%), negative predictive value of 100% (99.5% to 100%), and positive predictive value of 100% (96.9% to 100%). Conclusion Modern third generation computed tomography is extremely sensitive in identifying subarachnoid haemorrhage when it is carried out within six hours of headache onset and interpreted by a qualified radiologist. PMID:21768192

  20. High sensitivity cardiac troponin and the under-diagnosis of myocardial infarction in women: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Anoop S V; Griffiths, Megan; Lee, Kuan Ken; McAllister, David A; Hunter, Amanda L; Ferry, Amy V; Cruikshank, Anne; Reid, Alan; Stoddart, Mary; Strachan, Fiona; Walker, Simon; Collinson, Paul O; Apple, Fred S; Gray, Alasdair J; Fox, Keith A A; Newby, David E

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnosis of myocardial infarction using a high sensitivity troponin I assay and sex specific diagnostic thresholds in men and women with suspected acute coronary syndrome. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Regional cardiac centre, United Kingdom. Participants Consecutive patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (n=1126, 46% women). Two cardiologists independently adjudicated the diagnosis of myocardial infarction by using a high sensitivity troponin I assay with sex specific diagnostic thresholds (men 34 ng/L, women 16 ng/L) and compared with current practice where a contemporary assay (50 ng/L, single threshold) was used to guide care. Main outcome measure Diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Results The high sensitivity troponin I assay noticeably increased the diagnosis of myocardial infarction in women (from 11% to 22%; P<0.001) but had a minimal effect in men (from 19% to 21%, P=0.002). Women were less likely than men to be referred to a cardiologist or undergo coronary revascularisation (P<0.05 for both). At 12 months, women with undisclosed increases in troponin concentration (17-49 ng/L) and those with myocardial infarction (≥50 ng/L) had the highest rate of death or reinfarction compared with women without (≤16 ng/L) myocardial infarction (25%, 24%, and 4%, respectively; P<0.001). Conclusions Although having little effect in men, a high sensitivity troponin assay with sex specific diagnostic thresholds may double the diagnosis of myocardial infarction in women and identify those at high risk of reinfarction and death. Whether use of sex specific diagnostic thresholds will improve outcomes and tackle inequalities in the treatment of women with suspected acute coronary syndrome requires urgent attention. PMID:25609052

  1. Sensitive Subjects: Research Choices and Presentational Challenges in Studying Immigrant Children and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capps, Randy; Fix, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We write from our own experience as researchers on the integration of immigrants and their children, describing several ethical and research considerations that we addressed. In one study we examined the use of public benefits among immigrant families. This study posed issues regarding the selection of which "benefits" should be…

  2. Two Studies of Musical Style Sensitivity with Children in Early Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Nigel; Shibazaki, Kagari

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we report on two studies carried out to further explore the level of listening and discriminatory abilities present in very young children through the development of an age appropriate methodology. Working with children aged between 3 and 4 years of age, our first study explored the level of performance achieved on a matching task…

  3. Sensitivity Studies For Cirrus Effective Ice Crystal Size Retrieval In The Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radel, G.; Stubenrauch, C.; Holz, R.; Mitchell, D.

    surface properties by the Improved Initialization Inversion (3I) algorithm within the framework of the NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Program. Recently, the MODIS instrument started to take data. For the TOVS ice crystal size retrieval, cirrus emissivities at 8 micron and 11 micron are computed from the measured bright- ness temperatures, the cloud-top temperature and the surface temperature, and then compared to look-up tables which relate these emissivity pairs to the mean effective ice crystal diameter from simulations with a radiative transfer model using the differ- ent single scattering properties. We present the sensitivity of ice crystal size retrieval 1 to uncertainties in single scattering properties, hypotheses on size distributions and vertical heterogeneities. 2

  4. Multi-Scale Thermohydrologic Model Sensitivity-Study Calculations in Support of the SSPA

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, L G; Buscheck, T A; Loosmore, G A; Sun, Y

    2001-12-20

    The purpose of this calculation report is to document the thermohydrologic (TH) model calculations performed for the Supplemental Science and Performance Analysis (SSPA), Volume 1, Section 5 and Volume 2 (BSC 2001d [DIRS 155950], BSC 2001e [DIRS 154659]). The calculations are documented here in accordance with AP-3.12Q REV0 ICN4 [DIRS 154418]. The Technical Working Plan (Twp) for this document is TWP-NGRM-MD-000015 Real. These TH calculations were primarily conducted using three model types: (1) the Multiscale Thermohydrologic (MSTH) model, (2) the line-averaged-heat-source, drift-scale thermohydrologic (LDTH) model, and (3) the discrete-heat-source, drift-scale thermal (DDT) model. These TH-model calculations were conducted to improve the implementation of the scientific conceptual model, quantify previously unquantified uncertainties, and evaluate how a lower-temperature operating mode (LTOM) would affect the in-drift TH environment. Simulations for the higher-temperature operating mode (HTOM), which is similar to the base case analyzed for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) (CRWMS M&O 2000j [DIRS 153246]), were also conducted for comparison with the LTOM. This Calculation Report describes (1) the improvements to the MSTH model that were implemented to reduce model uncertainty and to facilitate model validation, and (2) the sensitivity analyses conducted to better understand the influence of parameter and process uncertainty. The METHOD Section (Section 2) describes the improvements to the MSTH-model methodology and submodels. The ASSUMPTIONS Section (Section 3) lists the assumptions made (e.g., boundaries, material properties) for this methodology. The USE OF SOFTWARE Section (Section 4) lists the software, routines and macros used for the MSTH model and submodels supporting the SSPA. The CALCULATION Section (Section 5) lists the data used in the model and the manner in which the MSTH model is prepared and executed. And

  5. A parametric sensitivity study of entropy production and kinetic energy dissipation using the FAMOUS AOGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascale, Salvatore; Gregory, Jonathan M.; Ambaum, Maarten H. P.; Tailleux, Rémi

    2012-03-01

    The possibility of applying either the maximum entropy production conjecture of Paltridge (Q J R Meteorol Soc 101:475-484, 1975) or the conjecture of Lorenz (Generation of available potential energy and the intensity of the general circulation. Pergamon, Tarrytown, 1960) of maximum generation of available potential energy (APE) in FAMOUS, a complex but low-resolution AOGCM, is explored by varying some model parameters to which the simulated climate is highly sensitive, particularly the convective entrainment rate, ɛ, and cloud droplet-to-rain-conversion rate, c T . The climate response is analysed in terms of its entropy production and the strength of the Lorenz energy cycle. If either conjecture is true, the parameter values which yield the most realistic climate will also maximise the relevant quantity. No maximum is found in the total material entropy production, which is dominated by the hydrological cycle and tends to increase monotonically with global-mean temperature, which is not constant because the parameter variations affect the net input of solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In contrast, there is a non-monotonic, peaked behaviour in the generation of APE and entropy production associated with kinetic energy dissipation, with the standard FAMOUS values for ɛ and c T occurring nearly at the maximising ones. The maximum states are shown to be states of vigorous baroclinic activity. The peak in the generation of APE appears to be related to a trade-off between the mean vertical stability and horizontal stratification. Experiments are repeated for a simplified setup in which the net solar input at TOA is fixed. Again a peak in the generation of APE is found in association with the maximum baroclinic activity, but no trade-off of the kind shown by simple climate models is found between meridional heat transport and the meridional temperature gradient. We conclude that the maximum entropy production conjecture does not hold within the

  6. INTRAUTERINE EXPOSURE TO LEAD MAY ENHANCE SENSITIZATION TO COMMON INHALANT ALLERGENS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD. A PROSPECTIVE PREBIRTH COHORT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Perera, Frederica; Maugeri, Umberto; Miller, Rachel L.; Rembiasz, Maria; Flak, Elzbieta; Mroz, Elzbieta; Majewska, Renata; Zembala, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Background Several in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that metal-rich particles may enhance allergic responses to house dust mites and induce an increased release of allergy-related cytokines. Objectives The main goal of this analysis is to define the possible association of intrauterine exposure to lead and mercury with the occurrence of skin sensitization to common aeroallergens in early childhood. Material and Methods The present study refers to a sample of 224 women in the second trimester of pregnancy recruited from Krakow inner city area who had full term pregnancies and whose children underwent skin prick testing (SPT) at the age of 5. Lead and mercury levels were assessed in cord blood and retested in children at age of 5 years. Aeroallergen concentrations in house dust were measured at the age of 3 years. The main health outcome (atopic status) was defined as the positive SPT to at least one common aeroallergen (Der f1, Der p1, Can f1 and Fel d1) at the age of 5 years. In the statistical analysis of the association between atopic status of children and exposure to metals, the study considered a set of covariates such as maternal characteristics (age, education, atopy), child’s gender, number of older siblings, prenatal (measured via cord blood cotinine) and postnatal environmental tobacco smoke together with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) as measured by PAH-DNA adducts. Results and conclusion In the binary regression analysis, which controlled for the confounders, the risk ratio (RR) estimate for atopic sensitization was significantly associated with the lead exposure (RR =2.25, 95%CI: 1.21–4.19). In conclusion, the data suggest that even very low-level of prenatal lead exposure may be implicated in enhancing sensitization to common aeroallergens in early childhood. PMID:21094490

  7. Distributions of inorganic nitrogen and biological production in the equatorial Pacific: a basin-scale model sensitivity study of nitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiujun; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that there is stronger nitrification in the euphotic zone than previously thought. We employ a physical-biogeochemical model to study the implications of nitrification for basin-scale distributions of nitrate, ammonium, and biological production in the equatorial Pacific. The model can faithfully reproduce observed features in nitrate distribution, with or without photoinhibition of nitrification in the euphotic zone. In addition, new production, net community production and export production are not very sensitive to the parameterization of nitrification in this model. However, simulated ammonium distribution, nitrate uptake and ammonium uptake are sensitive to this parameterization. High nitrification results in low ammonium concentration, low ammonium uptake rate, and high nitrate uptake rate in the euphotic zone. This study suggests that nitrification may be responsible for up to 40% of nitrate uptake in the equatorial Pacific. This modeling study also demonstrates large differences (in terms of the magnitude and spatial distribution) between nitrate uptake, new production and export production, reflecting decoupling of upward nutrient supply, biological uptake and downward export.

  8. Bacterial cellulose/acrylamide pH-sensitive smart hydrogel: development, characterization, and toxicity studies in ICR mice model.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manisha; Mohamad, Najwa; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study is to synthesize and evaluate acute toxicity of the bacterial cellulose (BC)/acrylamide (Am) hydrogels as noncytotoxic and biocompatible oral drug delivery vehicles. A novel series of solubilized BC/Am hydrogels were synthesized using a microwave irradiation method. The hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), swelling ratio, porosity, drug release, and in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility experiments. FTIR spectra revealed that the BC crystallinity and gel fraction decreased as the NaOH concentration increased from 2% to 10% w/v, whereas the optical transparency, pH sensitivity, and porosity were enhanced with increasing alkali concentration. Theophylline was used as a model drug for drug loading and release studies. The percentage of drug released was higher at pH 7.4 compared to pH 1.5. In vitro cytotoxicity and hemolytic tests indicated that the BC/Am hydrogel is noncytotoxic and hemocompatible. Results of acute oral toxicity tests on ICR mice suggested that the hydrogels are nontoxic up to 2000 mg/kg when administered orally, as no toxic response or histopathological changes were observed in comparison to control mice. The results of this study demonstrated that the pH-sensitive smart hydrogel makes it a possible safe carrier for oral drug delivery. PMID:25157890

  9. Synthesis of solar cells sensitized using natural photosynthetic pigments & study for the cell performance under different synthesis parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Simon; Radhakrishnan, Sivakumar; Manidurai, Paulraj

    2016-05-01

    In this study we used photosynthetic pigments extracted from spinach and purple cabbage for their potential application in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC). Pigments were extracted by dissolving small amounts of each one of these plant products in methanol and distilled water. The extraction was also done at two different temperatures (70° C and 80° C respectively). This was to assess for the solvent that promotes better extraction of the pigments. A parallel study was also carried out using a mixture of both these dyes in 1:1 ratio. Good absorption, about 60% to 80% was obtained for spinach pigments diluted in methanol in the visible range between 400-480nm, and between 9% to 15% for purple cabbage pigments in the wavelength range between 480-630 nm when extracted using distilled water at 80°C. In contrast, the diluted mixture in methanol shows good absorption of 20% and 32% for wavelengths in the range 400-480nm. Solar cells sensitized using these natural dyes were studied for their photovoltaic properties by measuring current-voltage behavior. Efficiencies ranging from 0.011% to 0.0719% were observed. Mixture of spinach & purple cabbage pigments extracted using methanol was found to have the highest efficiency of 0.0719%.

  10. A sensitive LC-MS/MS method to quantify methylergonovine in human plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanhui; Sun, Qichao; Liu, Dongming; Ma, Bowen; Zhao, Hengli; Fang, Zengjun; Wang, Haisheng; Lou, Hongxiang

    2016-02-01

    Methylergonovine (ME) is a semisynthetic ergot alkaloid that is used for the treatment and prophylaxis of postpartum hemorrhage. In recent years, methylergonovine has been effective in the control of refractory headaches and is likely to be employed as chemosensitizers for cancer. However, this alkaloid sometimes causes elevated blood pressure. Therefore, a sensitive and accurate method for the quantification of this drug in biological matrices is necessary. In this study, ME was extracted from 500μL plasma samples by a liquid-liquid extraction under alkaline conditions and detected using positive multi-reaction-monitoring mode (+MRM) mass spectrometry. The method was validated according to US FDA guidelines and covered a working range from 0.025 to 10ng/mL with a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 0.025ng/mL. In conclusion, a rapid, sensitive, selective and accurate quantification by an LC-MS/MS method was developed and successfully applied to a clinical pharmacokinetics study in female volunteers after a single intramuscular injection or oral administration of a 0.2mg dose of ME maleate. It is suitable for both preclinical and clinical studies on ME. PMID:26760224

  11. Comparative study of the photopic spectral sensitivity of domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus), turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo gallopavo) and humans.

    PubMed

    Barber, C L; Prescott, N B; Jarvis, J R; Le Sueur, C; Perry, G C; Wathes, C M

    2006-06-01

    1. The photopic spectral sensitivity of domestic ducks and turkeys was determined using an operant psychophysical technique. Spectral sensitivity was determined over a range of specified wavelengths, including UVA, between 326 < lambda < 694 nm and the results were directly compared with human spectral sensitivity measured under similar experimental conditions. 2. Domestic ducks and turkeys had similar spectral sensitivities to each other, and could perceive UVA radiation, although turkeys were more sensitive to UVA than ducks. For both species, peak sensitivity was between 544 < lambda < 577 nm, with reduced sensitivity at lambda = 508 and 600 nm. Both ducks and turkeys had a very different and broader range of spectral sensitivity than the human subjects tested. 3. Spectral sensitivity and UVA perception in these avian species are discussed in relation to their visual ecology and the mechanisms controlling neural processing of colour information. PMID:16787862

  12. Aquatic risk assessment of a novel strobilurin fungicide: A microcosm study compared with the species sensitivity distribution approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lang; Song, Yufang; Tang, Baohua; Song, Xueying; Yang, Hairong; Li, Baiyu; Zhao, Yu; Huang, Chengtian; Han, Xue; Wang, Shaoye; Li, Zhaoli

    2015-10-01

    The ecotoxicological effects of pyraoxystrobin, a novel strobilurin fungicide, were studied using outdoor freshwater microcosms and the species sensitivity distribution approach. The microcosms were treated with pyraoxystrobin at concentrations of 0, 1.0, 3.0, 10, 30 and 100µg/L. Species sensitivity distribution (SSD) curves were constructed by means of acute toxicity data using the BurrliOZ model for fourteen representatives of sensitive invertebrates, algae and fish and eleven taxa of invertebrates and algae, respectively. The responses of zooplankton, phytoplankton and physical and chemical endpoints in microcosms were studied. Zooplankton, especially Sinodiaptomus sarsi was the most sensitive to pyraoxystrobin exposure in the microcosms. Short-term toxic effects (<8 weeks) on zooplankton occurred in 1µg/L treatment group. The duration of toxic effects on S. sarsi could not be evaluated within the initial 56 days. Significant long-term toxic effects were observed at 10, 30 and 100µg/L (>281 days) for S. sarsi and the zooplankton community. Based on the results obtained from the organisms in the microcosm system, 1µg/L was recommended as the NOEAEC (no observed ecologically adverse effect concentration). Also, 0.33µg/L was derived as the Regulatory Acceptable Concentration based on the ecological recovery option (ERO-RAC) of pyraoxystrobin. For all fourteen tested species, the median HC5 (hazardous concentration affecting 5% of species) was 0.86µg/L, and the lower limit HC5 (LL-HC5) was 0.39µg/L. For the eleven taxa of invertebrates and algae tested, the median HC5 was 1.1µg/L, and the LL-HC5 was 0.26µg/L. The present study positively contributes to the suggestion of adequately using acute L(E)C50-based HC5/ LL-HC5 for deriving protective concentrations for strobilurin fungicides, and it should be valuable for full comprehension of the potential toxicity of pyraoxystrobin in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26122735

  13. Using Culturally Sensitive Frameworks to Study Asian American Leaders in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilson, Patricia A.; Suyemoto, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer a brief discussion of the challenges posed by traditional approaches and the need for race- and culture-specific methods in the study of Asian American administrators. The authors discuss a research project, conducted by the first author, that focused on exploring the experiences of Asian American senior…

  14. APPLYING DATA ASSIMILATION AND ADJOINT SENSITIVITY TO EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND POLICY STUDIES OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source-resolved fine particulate matter (PM) concentrations are needed at high spatial and temporal resolutions for epidemiological studies aimed at identifying more- and less-harmful types of PM. Building on recent advances in air quality modeling, data assimilation, and s...

  15. A Randomized Controlled Exercise Training Trial on Insulin Sensitivity in African American Men: The ARTIIS study

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Robert L.; Johnson, William D.; Hendrick, Chelsea; Harris, Melissa; Andrews, Emanuel; Johannsen, Neil; Rodarte, Ruben Q.; Hsia, Daniel S.; Church, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lack of regular physical activity at prescribed intensity levels is a modifiable risk factor for insulin resistance and the development of diabetes. African American men are at increased risk for developing diabetes and most African American men are not meeting the current recommended levels of physical activity. The primary objective of the Aerobic Plus Resistance Training and Insulin Resistance in African American Men (ARTIIS) study is to determine the effectiveness of an exercise training intervention aimed at reducing diabetes risk factors in African American men at risk for developing diabetes. Methods Insufficiently active 35–70 year old African American men with a family history of diabetes were eligible for the study. The 5-month randomized controlled trial assigns 116 men to an exercise training or healthy living control arm. The exercise training arm combines aerobic and resistance training according to the current national physical activity recommendations and is conducted in community (YMCA) facilities. The healthy living arm receives information promoting healthy lifestyle changes. Outcomes Insulin response to an oral glucose load is the primary outcome measure, and changes in physiological parameters, cardiorespiratory fitness, strength, body composition, and psychological well-being comprise the secondary outcomes. Conclusions The ARTIIS study is one of the first adequately powered, rigorously designed studies to investigate the effects of an aerobic plus resistance exercise training program and to assess adherence to exercise training in community facilities, in African American men. PMID:25979318

  16. Assessing Sensitivity of Early Head Start Study Findings to Manipulated Randomization Threats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Sheridan

    2013-01-01

    Increasing demands for design rigor and an emphasis on evidence-based practice on a national level indicated a need for further guidance related to successful implementation of randomized studies in education. Rigorous and meaningful experimental research and its conclusions help establish a valid theoretical and evidence base for educational…

  17. Sensitivities of statistical distribution model and diffusion kurtosis model in varying microstructural environments: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chu-Yu; Bennett, Kevin M.; Debbins, Josef P.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the microstructural sensitivity of the statistical distribution and diffusion kurtosis (DKI) models of non-monoexponential signal attenuation in the brain using diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI). We first developed a simulation of 2-D water diffusion inside simulated tissue consisting of semi-permeable cells and a variable cell size. We simulated a DWI acquisition of the signal in a volume using a pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) pulse sequence, and fitted the models to the simulated DWI signals using b-values up to 2500 s/mm2. For comparison, we calculated the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the monoexponential model (b-value = 1000 s/mm2). In separate experiments, we varied the cell size (5-10-15 μm), cell volume fraction (0.50-0.65-0.80), and membrane permeability (0.001-0.01-0.1 mm/s) to study how the fitted parameters tracked simulated microstructural changes. The ADC was sensitive to all the simulated microstructural changes except the decrease in membrane permeability. The ADC increased with larger cell size, smaller cell volume fraction, and larger membrane permeability. The σstat of the statistical distribution model increased exclusively with a decrease in cell volume fraction. The Kapp of the DKI model was exclusively increased with decreased cell size and decreased with increasing membrane permeability. These results suggest that the non-monoexponential models of water diffusion have different, specific microstructural sensitivity, and a combination of the models may give insights into the microstructural underpinning of tissue pathology.

  18. Asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) micro-viscometer for rapid, sensitive and label-free studies of bacterial growth and drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Irene; Albertson, Theodore; Kinnunen, Paivo; Breslauer, David N.; McNaughton, Brandon H.; Burns, Mark A.; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-01-01

    The long turnaround time in antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) endangers patients and encourages the administration of wide spectrum antibiotics, thus resulting in alarming increases of multi-drug resistant pathogens. A method for faster detection of bacterial proliferation presents one avenue towards addressing this global concern. We report on a label-free asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) based viscometry method that rapidly detects bacterial growth and determines drug sensitivity by measuring changes in the suspension’s viscosity. With this platform, we observed the growth of a uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolate, with an initial concentration of 50 cells per drop, within 20 minutes; in addition, we determined the gentamicin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the E. coli isolate within 100 minutes. We thus demonstrated a label-free, micro-viscometer platform that can measure bacterial growth and drug susceptibility more rapidly, with lower initial bacterial counts than existing commercial systems, and potentially with any microbial strains. PMID:22507307

  19. A confirmatory study of the Combined Index of Severity of Fibromyalgia (ICAF*): factorial structure, reliability and sensitivity to change

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a complex syndrome that affects many aspects of the patients life and it is very difficult to evaluate in clinical practice. A recent study has de