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Sample records for mass casualty event

  1. Assessment of Hospital Pharmacy Preparedness for Mass Casualty Events

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Nadia I.; Cocchio, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the preparedness of hospital pharmacies in New Jersey to provide pharmaceutical services in mass casualty scenarios. Methods: An electronic cross-sectional survey was developed to assess the general knowledge of available resources and attitudes toward the preparedness of the pharmacy department. Results: Out of 60 invitations to participate, 18 surveys (30%) were completed. Respondents practiced at community hospitals (12, 66.6%) with no trauma center designation (11, 67.4%) that served more than 500 licensed beds (five, 29.4%). Six respondents (35.3%) indicated that 75,000 to 100,000 patients visited their emergency departments annually. Seventeen sites (94.4%) reported the existence of an institutional disaster preparedness protocol; 10 (55.5%) indicated that there is a specific plan for the pharmacy department. Most respondents (10, 55.5%) were unsure whether their hospitals had an adequate supply of analgesics, rapid sequence intubation agents, vasopressors, antiemetics, respiratory medications, ophthalmics, oral antimicrobials, and chemical-weapon-specific antidotes. Five (27.7%) agreed that the pharmacy disaster plan included processes to ensure care for patients already hospitalized, and four (22.2%) agreed that the quantity of medication was adequate to treat patients and hospital employees if necessary. Medication stock and quantities were determined based on national or international guidelines at three (16.6%) institutions surveyed. Conclusion: This survey demonstrates a lack of general consensus regarding hospital pharmacy preparedness for mass casualty scenarios despite individualized institutional protocols for disaster preparedness. Standardized recommendations from government and/or professional pharmacy organizations should be developed to guide the preparation of hospital pharmacy departments for mass casualty scenarios. PMID:25859121

  2. Carbamate poisoning: treatment recommendations in the setting of a mass casualties event.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Yossi; Makarovsky, Igor; Bentur, Yedidia; Shrot, Shai; Dushnistky, Tsvika; Krivoy, Amir

    2009-11-01

    The threat of using chemical compounds by terrorists as weapons of mass casualties has been a rising concern in recent years. Carbamates, a group of reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, could be potentially involved in such toxic mass casualty events because they can cause cholinergic crisis that could lead to fatality, similar to that of organophosphate poisoning. The medical management of carbamate poisoning consists of supportive measures and specific antidotal treatment, that is, the anticholinergic compound atropine. The administration of oximes, acetylcholinesterase reactivators, in carbamate poisoning is controversial because of the potential toxicity of oximes in conjunction with carbamate especially in the case of the carbamate--"carbaryl" poisoning. However, recent data suggest that this concern may be unwarranted. In this article, we review the current data regarding the pros and cons of using oximes against carbamates poisoning in a mass casualties event scenario. We also propose a new decision-making algorithm for the medical first responders in a mass casualties event suspected to be caused by a cholinergic substance (organophosphate or carbamate). According to this algorithm, treatment should consist of atropine and oxime regardless of the exact toxic compound involved. We speculate that in a mass casualties event, the benefits of using oximes outweigh the low level of potential risk. PMID:19931761

  3. Triage, monitoring, and treatment of mass casualty events involving chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear agents

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Aruna C.; Kumar, S.

    2010-01-01

    In a mass casualty situation due to chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) event, triage is absolutely required for categorizing the casualties in accordance with medical care priorities. Dealing with a CBRN event always starts at the local level. Even before the detection and analysis of agents can be undertaken, zoning, triage, decontamination, and treatment should be initiated promptly. While applying the triage system, the available medical resources and maximal utilization of medical assets should be taken into consideration by experienced triage officers who are most familiar with the natural course of the injury presented and have detailed information on medical assets. There are several triage systems that can be applied to CBRN casualties. With no one standardized system globally or nationally available, it is important for deploying a triage and decontamination system which is easy to follow and flexible to the available medical resources, casualty number, and severity of injury. PMID:21829319

  4. Effect of Hospital Staff Surge Capacity on Preparedness for a Conventional Mass Casualty Event

    PubMed Central

    Welzel, Tyson B.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Bey, Tareg; Visser, Errol

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To assess current medical staffing levels within the Hospital Referral System in the City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality, South Africa, and analyze the surge capacity needs to prepare for the potential of a conventional mass casualty incident during a planned mass gathering. Methods: Query of all available medical databases of both state employees and private medical personnel within the greater Cape Town area to determine current staffing levels and distribution of personnel across public and private domains. Analysis of the adequacy of available staff to manage a mass casualty incident. Results: There are 594 advanced pre-hospital personnel in Cape Town (17/100,000 population) and 142 basic pre-hospital personnel (4.6/100,000). The total number of hospital and clinic-based medical practitioners is 3097 (88.6/100,000), consisting of 1914 general physicians; 54.7/100,000 and 1183 specialist physicians; 33.8/100,000. Vacancy rates for all medical practitioners range from 23.5% to 25.5%. This includes: nursing post vacancies (26%), basic emergency care practitioners (39.3%), advanced emergency care personnel (66.8%), pharmacy assistants (42.6%), and pharmacists (33.1%). Conclusion: There are sufficient numbers and types of personnel to provide the expected ordinary healthcare needs at mass gathering sites in Cape Town; however, qualified staff are likely insufficient to manage a concurrent mass casualty event. Considering that adequate correctly skilled and trained staff form the backbone of disaster surge capacity, it appears that Cape Town is currently under resourced to manage a mass casualty event. With the increasing size and frequency of mass gathering events worldwide, adequate disaster surge capacity is an issue of global relevance. PMID:20823971

  5. MASCAL: RFID Tracking of Patients, Staff and Equipment to Enhance Hospital Response to Mass Casualty Events

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Emory A.; Lenert, Leslie A.

    2005-01-01

    Most medical facilities practice managing the large numbers of seriously injured patients expected during catastrophic events. As the demands on the healthcare team increase, however, the challenges faced by managers escalate, workflow bottlenecks develop and system capacity decreases. This paper describes MASCAL, an integrated software–hardware system designed to enhance management of resources at a hospital during a mass casualty situation. MASCAL uses active 802.11b asset tags to track patients, equipment and staff during the response to a disaster. The system integrates tag position information with data from personnel databases, medical information systems, registration applications and the US Navy’s TACMEDCS triage application in a custom visual disaster management environment. MASCAL includes interfaces for a hospital command center, local area managers (emergency room, operating suites, radiology, etc.) and registration personnel. MASCAL is an operational system undergoing functional evaluation at the Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA. PMID:16779042

  6. Regional Variation in Causes of Injuries among Terrorism Victims for Mass Casualty Events

    PubMed Central

    Regens, James L.; Schultheiss, Amy; Mould, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The efficient allocation of medical resources to prepare for and respond to mass casualty events (MCEs) attributable to intentional acts of terrorism is a major challenge confronting disaster planners and emergency personnel. This research article examines variation in regional patterns in the causes of injures associated with 77,258 successful terrorist attacks that occurred between 1970 and 2013 involving the use of explosives, firearms, and/or incendiaries. The objective of this research is to estimate regional variation in the use of different conventional weapons in successful terrorist attacks in each world region on variation in injury cause distributions. Indeed, we find that the distributions of the number of injuries attributable to specific weapons types (i.e., by cause) vary greatly among the 13 world regions identified within the Global Terrorism Database. PMID:26347857

  7. A burn mass casualty event due to boiler room explosion on a cruise ship: preparedness and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Akin; Namias, Nicholas; O'Keeffe, Terence; Pizano, Louis; Lynn, Mauricio; Prater-Varas, Robin; Quintana, Olga Delia; Borges, Leda; Ishii, Mary; Lee, Seong; Lopez, Peter; Lessner-Eisenberg, Sharon; Alvarez, Angel; Ellison, Tom; Sapnas, Katherine; Lefton, Jennifer; Ward, Charles Gillon

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to review our experience with a mass casualty incident resulting from a boiler room steam explosion aboard a cruise ship. Experience with major, moderate, and minor burns, steam inhalation, mass casualty response systems, and psychological sequelae will be discussed. Fifteen cruise ship employees were brought to the burn center after a boiler room explosion on a cruise ship. Eleven were triaged to the trauma resuscitation area and four to the surgical emergency room. Seven patients were intubated for respiratory distress or airway protection. Six patients had >80 per cent burns with steam inhalation, and all of these died. One of the 6 patients had 99 per cent burns with steam inhalation and died after withdrawal of support within the first several hours. All patients with major burns required escharotomy on arrival to trauma resuscitation. One patient died in the operating room, despite decompression by laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome and pericardiotomy via thoracotomy for cardiac tamponade. Four patients required crystalloid, 20,000 mls/m2-27,000 ml/m2 body surface area (BSA) in the first 48 hours to maintain blood pressure and urine output. Three of these four patients subsequently developed abdominal compartment syndrome and died in the first few days. The fourth patient of this group died after 26 days due to sepsis. Five patients had 13-20 per cent bums and four patients had less than 10 per cent burns. Two of the patients with 20 per cent burns developed edema of the vocal cords with mild hoarseness. They improved and recovered without intubation. The facility was prepared for the mass casualty event; having just completed a mass casualty drill several days earlier. Twenty-six beds were made available in 50 minutes for anticipated casualties. Fifteen physicians reported immediately to the trauma resuscitation area to assist in initial stabilization. The event occurred at shift change; thus, adequate support

  8. [National preparedness for biological mass casualty event: between the devil and the deep blue sea].

    PubMed

    Eldad, Arieh

    2002-05-01

    Species of plants and animals, as well as nations of human beings were extinguished throughout the prehistory and history of this planet. One of the possible explanations for this phenomenon is a large scale epidemic of viral, bacterial or fungal infections. One well-documented example was the smallpox epidemic among native Indians of South America following the European invasion. Deliberate dissemination of disease was used as a weapon during the Middle Ages when corpses of plague casualties were thrown over the walls and into the besieged towns. The Book of Kings II, of the Bible, in chapter 19 recalls the story of 185,000 soldiers of Sennacherib that died in one night, near the walls of Jerusalem. The possibility of causing mass casualty by dissemination of infectious disease has driven countries and terrorist organizations to produce and store large quantities of bacteria or viruses. The death of thousands in the USA on September 11, 2001, demonstrated that terror has no moral prohibitions, only technical limitations. Terror organizations will not hesitate to use weapons for mass destruction to kill many, and if only few will die, it will still serve the purpose of these evil organizations: to strew panic, to destroy normal life and to increase fear and instability. Any government that faces decisions about how to be better prepared against biological warfare is pushed between the devil and the deep blue sea. On the one hand: the better we will be prepared, equipped with antibiotics and vaccines--the more lives of casualties we will be able to save. Better public education will help to reduce the damage, but, on the other hand--in order to cause more people to make the effort to equip themselves or to refresh their protective kit--we will have to increase their level of concern. In order to improve the medical education of all members of the medical teams we will have to start a broad and intense campaign, thereby taking the risk of increasing stress in the

  9. K-plan for patient repatriation after mass casualty events abroad.

    PubMed

    Duchateau, François-Xavier; Verner, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    In addition to requests for individual aeromedical evacuation (AE), medical assistance companies also may respond to mass casualty incidents abroad. The purpose of this report was to evaluate the effectiveness of our primary casualty plan, based on experience involving a January 2010 bus crash in southern Egypt. The main evaluative criterion was time elapsed from the initial call until the return of victims to their home country. Three critically injured patients underwent an initial AE to Cairo for advanced trauma care. After stabilization, they arrived back in their home country 42 hours after the initial call. The remaining group of patients arrived 27 hours later, or a total of 69 hours after the first call. These findings suggest that the "K-Plan" standardized operating process may be effective for rapid and appropriate repatriation of numerous victims. Some specific issues, such as efficiently locating a large-capacity charter aircraft, require further improvement. PMID:22386102

  10. Engaging Active Bystanders in Mass Casualty Events and Other Life-Threatening Emergencies: A Pilot Training Course Demonstration.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracey O; Baker, Susan D; Roberts, Kathryn; Payne, Skip A

    2016-04-01

    Emerging research indicates the critical role members of the public can play in saving lives and reducing morbidity at the scene in the immediate aftermath of a disaster. It is anticipated that with training, more members of the public will be ready and able to assist should they be present at mass casualty events or other circumstances in which there are serious injuries or potential loss of life. This article describes a training course developed by multiple federal and nonfederal partners aimed at preparing the public to become "active bystanders" followed by a pilot demonstration project conducted by Medical Reserve Corps Units. The outcomes of the project indicated that the training was comprehensive and appropriate for members of the public with little or no first aid knowledge. National availability of the "Becoming an Active Bystander" training course is currently being planned. PMID:26841861

  11. The Internet's role in a biodosimetric response to a radiation mass casualty event.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, S L; Livingston, G K; Stricklin, D L; Abbott, M G; Wilkins, R C; Romm, H; Oestreicher, U; Yoshida, M A; Miura, T; Moquet, J E; Di Giorgio, M; Ferrarotto, C; Gross, G A; Christiansen, M E; Hart, C L; Christensen, D M

    2014-05-01

    Response to a large-scale radiological incident could require timely medical interventions to minimize radiation casualties. Proper medical care requires knowing the victim's radiation dose. When physical dosimetry is absent, radiation-specific chromosome aberration analysis can serve to estimate the absorbed dose in order to assist physicians in the medical management of radiation injuries. A mock exercise scenario was presented to six participating biodosimetry laboratories as one individual acutely exposed to Co under conditions suggesting whole-body exposure. The individual was not wearing a dosimeter and within 2-3 h of the incident began vomiting. The individual also had other medical symptoms indicating likelihood of a significant dose. Physicians managing the patient requested a dose estimate in order to develop a treatment plan. Participating laboratories in North and South America, Europe, and Asia were asked to evaluate more than 800 electronic images of metaphase cells from the patient to determine the dicentric yield and calculate a dose estimate with 95% confidence limits. All participants were blind to the physical dose until after submitting their estimates based on the dicentric chromosome assay (DCA). The exercise was successful since the mean biological dose estimate was 1.89 Gy whereas the actual physical dose was 2 Gy. This is well within the requirements for guidance of medical management. The exercise demonstrated that the most labor-intensive step in the entire process (visual evaluation of images) can be accelerated by taking advantage of world-wide expertise available on the Internet. PMID:24667387

  12. Game-based mass casualty burn training.

    PubMed

    Kurenov, Sergei N; Cance, William W; Noel, Ben; Mozingo, David W

    2009-01-01

    An interactive, video game-based training module, Burn Center, was developed to simulate the real-life emergency events of a mass casualty disaster scenario, involving in 40 victims.The game contains two components - triage and resuscitation. The goal of the triage game is to correctly stabilize, sort, tag and transport burn victims during a mass casualty event at a busy theme park. After complete the triage component, the player will then take on the role of a burn care provider, balancing the clinical needs of multiple burn patients through a 36-hour resuscitation period, using familiar computer-simulated hospital devices. Once complete, players of Burn Center will come away with applicable skills and knowledge of burn care, for both field triage and initial resuscitation of the burn patients. PMID:19377134

  13. Oxygen supplies during a mass casualty situation.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Ray H; Previtera, Joseph E

    2008-02-01

    Mass casualty and pandemic events pose a substantial challenge to the resources available in our current health care system. The ability to provide adequate oxygen therapy is one of the systems that could be out-stripped in certain conditions. Natural disasters can disrupt manufacturing or delivery, and pandemic events can increase consumption beyond the available supply. Patients may require manual resuscitation, basic oxygen therapy, or positive-pressure ventilation during these scenarios. Available sources of oxygen include bulk liquid oxygen systems, compressed gas cylinders, portable liquid oxygen (LOX) systems, and oxygen concentrators. The last two are available in a variety of configurations, which include personal and home systems that are suitable for individual patients, and larger systems that can provide oxygen to multiple patients or entire institutions. Bulk oxygen systems are robust and are probably sustainable during periods of high consumption, but are at risk if manufacturing or delivery is disrupted. Compressed gas cylinders offer support during temporary periods of need but are not a solution for extended periods of therapy. Personal oxygen concentrators and LOX systems are limited in their application during mass casualty scenarios. Large-capacity oxygen concentrators and LOX systems may effectively provide support to alternative care sites or larger institutions. They may also be appropriate selections for governmental emergency-response scenarios. Careful consideration of the strengths and limitations of each of these options can reduce the impact of a mass casualty event. PMID:18218152

  14. Mass casualty following unprecedented tornadic events in the Southeast: natural disaster outcomes at a Level I trauma center.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Elizabeth H; Creel, Nathan; Lepard, Jacob; Maxwell, Robert A

    2012-07-01

    On April 27, 2011, an EF4 (enhanced Fujita scale) tornado struck a 48-mile path across northwest Georgia and southeast Tennessee. Traumatic injuries sustained during this tornado and others in one of the largest tornado outbreaks in history presented to the regional Level I trauma center, Erlanger Health System, in Chattanooga, TN. Patients were triaged per mass casualty protocols through an incident command center and triage officer. Medical staffing was increased to anticipate a large patient load. Records of patients admitted as a result of tornado-related injury were retrospectively reviewed and characterized by the injury patterns, demographics, procedures performed, length of stay, and complications. One hundred four adult patients were treated in the emergency department; of these, 28 (27%) patients required admission to the trauma service. Of those admitted, 16 (57%) were male with an age range of 21 to 87 years old and an average length of stay of 10.9 ± 11.8 days. Eleven (39%) patients required intensive care unit admissions. The most common injuries seen were those of soft tissue, bony fractures, and the chest. Interventions included tube thoracostomies, exploratory laparotomies, orthopedic fixations, soft tissue reconstructions, and craniotomy. All 28 patients admitted survived to discharge. Nineteen (68%) patients were discharged home, six (21%) went to a rehabilitation hospital, and three (11%) were transferred to skilled nursing facilities. Emergency preparedness and organization are key elements in effectively treating victims of natural disasters. Those victims who survive the initial tornadic event and present to a Level I trauma center have low mortality. Like in our experience, triage protocols need to be implemented to quickly and effectively manage mass injuries. PMID:22748536

  15. Some considerations for mass casualty management in radiation emergencies.

    PubMed

    Hopmeier, Michael; Abrahams, Jonathan; Carr, Zhanat

    2010-06-01

    Radiation emergencies are rather new to humankind, as compared to other types of emergencies such as earthquakes, floods, or hurricanes. Fortunately, they are rare, but because of that, planning for response to large-scale radiation emergencies is least understood. Along with the specific technical aspects of response to radiation emergencies, there are some general guiding principles of responding to mass casualty events of any nature, as identified by the World Health Organization in its 2007 manual for mass casualty management systems. The paper brings forward such general considerations as applicable to radiation mass casualty events, including (1) clear lines of communication; (2) scalability of approach; (3) whole-of-health approach; (4) knowledge based approach; and (5) multisectoral approach. Additionally, some key considerations of planning for mass casualty management systems are discussed, namely, health systems surge capacity and networking, risk and resources mapping, and others. PMID:20445382

  16. Mass casualty management of a large-scale bioterrorist event: an epidemiological approach that shapes triage decisions.

    PubMed

    Burkle, Frederick M

    2002-05-01

    The threat of a BT event has catalyzed serious reflection on the troublesome issues that come with event management and triage. Such reflection has had the effect of multiplying the efforts to find solutions to what could become a catastrophic public health disaster. Management options are becoming more robust, as are reliable detection devices and rapid access to stockpiled antibiotics and vaccines. There is much to be done, however, especially in the organizing, warehousing, and granting/exercising authority for resource allocations. The introduction of these new options should encourage one to believe that, in time, evolving standards of care will make it possible to rethink the currently unthinkable consequences. Unfortunately the cost of such preparedness is high and out of reach of most governments. Most of the developing world has neither the will nor the means to plan for BT events and remains overwhelmed with basic public health concerns (i.e., water, food, sanitation, shelter) that must take priority. Therefore, developed countries will be expected to respond using international exogenous resources to mitigate the effects of such a disaster. As a result, the state capacity of the effected government will be severely compromised. If triage and management of casualties is further compromised, terrorists will have met their goals. One could argue that health sciences will continue for decades to play catch up with the advanced technology driving potential bioagent weaponry. If one lesson was learned from the review of the former Soviet Union's biological weapons program, it is that the unthinkable remains an option to terrorists who have comparable expertise. It is crucial to develop realistic strategies for a BT event. Triage planning (the process of establishing criteria for health care prioritization) permits society to see cases in the context of diverse moral perspectives, limited resources, and compelling health care demands. This includes a competent

  17. Planning for a Mass Casualty Incident in Arkansas Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Harry; Liggin, Rebecca; Shirm, Steve; Nation, Brian; Dick, Rhonda

    2005-01-01

    School preparedness includes the possibility of a natural disaster, but recent events also confirm a need for preparedness and prevention efforts for intentional mass casualty incidents (MCIs). This survey examined the preparedness for the prevention and response for MCIs at public schools in Arkansas. This survey demonstrated that most school…

  18. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Joseph R.; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing) of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit. PMID:23202768

  19. Mass casualty care in an expeditionary environment: developing local knowledge and expertise in context.

    PubMed

    De Jong, Marla J; Benner, Richard; Benner, Patricia; Richard, Maggie L; Kenny, Deborah J; Kelley, Patricia; Bingham, Mona; Debisette, Annette Tyree

    2010-01-01

    To discover new experience-based clinical and care delivery knowledge learned in the Iraq and Afghanistan combat zones, 107 Air Force, Army, and Navy nurses were interviewed. Eight areas of experiential knowledge were identified in the new care delivery system that featured rapid transport, early trauma and surgical care, and expeditious aeromedical evacuation: (1) organizing for mass casualties, (2) uncertainty about incoming casualties, (3) developing systems to track patients, (4) resource utilization, (5) ripple effects of a mass casualty event, (6) enlarging the scope of nursing practice, (7) operating medical facilities under attack, and (8) nurse emotions related to mass casualties. PMID:20234239

  20. Development and Validation of a Mass Casualty Conceptual Model

    PubMed Central

    Culley, Joan M.; Effken, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and validate a conceptual model that provides a framework for the development and evaluation of information systems for mass casualty events. Design The model was designed based on extant literature and existing theoretical models. A purposeful sample of 18 experts validated the model. Open-ended questions, as well as a 7-point Likert scale, were used to measure expert consensus on the importance of each construct and its relationship in the model and the usefulness of the model to future research. Methods Computer-mediated applications were used to facilitate a modified Delphi technique through which a panel of experts provided validation for the conceptual model. Rounds of questions continued until consensus was reached, as measured by an interquartile range (no more than 1 scale point for each item); stability (change in the distribution of responses less than 15% between rounds); and percent agreement (70% or greater) for indicator questions. Findings Two rounds of the Delphi process were needed to satisfy the criteria for consensus or stability related to the constructs, relationships, and indicators in the model. The panel reached consensus or sufficient stability to retain all 10 constructs, 9 relationships, and 39 of 44 indicators. Experts viewed the model as useful (mean of 5.3 on a 7-point scale). Conclusions Validation of the model provides the first step in understanding the context in which mass casualty events take place and identifying variables that impact outcomes of care. Clinical Relevance This study provides a foundation for understanding the complexity of mass casualty care, the roles that nurses play in mass casualty events, and factors that must be considered in designing and evaluating information-communication systems to support effective triage under these conditions. PMID:20487188

  1. Public experiences of mass casualty decontamination.

    PubMed

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Rubin, G James; Williams, Richard; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-09-01

    In this article, we analyze feedback from simulated casualties who took part in field exercises involving mass decontamination, to gain an understanding of how responder communication can affect people's experiences of and compliance with decontamination. We analyzed questionnaire data gathered from 402 volunteers using the framework approach, to provide an insight into the public's experiences of decontamination and how these experiences are shaped by the actions of emergency responders. Factors that affected casualties' experiences of the decontamination process included the need for greater practical information and better communication from responders, and the need for privacy. Results support previous findings from small-scale incidents that involved decontamination in showing that participants wanted better communication from responders during the process of decontamination, including more practical information, and that the failure of responders to communicate effectively with members of the public led to anxiety about the decontamination process. The similarity between the findings from the exercises described in this article and previous research into real incidents involving decontamination suggests that field exercises provide a useful way to examine the effect of responder communication strategies on the public's experiences of decontamination. Future exercises should examine in more detail the effect of various communication strategies on the public's experiences of decontamination. This will facilitate the development of evidence-based communication strategies intended to reduce anxiety about decontamination and increase compliance among members of the public during real-life incidents that involve mass decontamination. PMID:22823588

  2. Mass casualty incidents - time to engage.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ishay, Offir; Mitaritonno, Michele; Catena, Fausto; Sartelli, Massimo; Ansaloni, Luca; Kluger, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    Mass casualty incident continues to overwhelm medical systems worldwide. Preparedness for an MCI is a crucial requisite for the injured better outcome. The World Society of Emergency Surgery initiated a survey in regard to its senior member's personal and institutional preparedness for MCI. The results here in presented indicate that WSES should engage in a formatted and structured preparedness course for medical institutions and individuals."By all appearances it seems to be just another normal Saturday morning in the emergency department (ED). Patients occupy thirty out of the sixty beds; some awaits discharge, some awaits admission to the hospital. All of a sudden the squeaky voice of the red phone is tearing the air, the hard metal voice on the line is reporting of an explosion in the nearby train station, estimated number of casualties is 80. You ask for their estimated time of arrival, when you hear the first sirens of ambulances parking out of the ED; no answer was needed. PMID:26848306

  3. A mass casualty incident involving children and chemical decontamination.

    PubMed

    Timm, Nathan; Reeves, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Mass casualty incidents involving contaminated children are a rare but ever-present possibility. In this article we outline one such event that resulted in 53 pediatric patients and 3 adults presenting to the emergency department of a children's hospital for decontamination and treatment. We pay special attention to the training that allowed this responses to occur. We also outline the institutional response with emphasis on incident command, communication, and resource utilization. Specific lessons learned are explored in detail. Finally, we set forth a series of recommendations to assist other institutions should they be called upon to care for and decontaminate pediatric patients. PMID:17517363

  4. Medical response of a physician and two nurses to the mass-casualty event resulting in the Phi Phi Islands from the tsunami.

    PubMed

    Ammartyothin, Surasak; Ashkenasi, Issac; Schwartz, Dagan; Leiba, Adi; Nakash, Guy; Pelts, Rami; Goldberg, Avishay; Bar-Dayan, Yaron

    2006-01-01

    The Phi Phi Islands are isolated islands located about one hour by ship from the mainland in Krabi province of Thailand. There is a small medical facility where the director is the one physician that provides care to residents and tourists. This small medical facility faced an enormous mass casualty incident due to the 2004 Tsunami. The hospital was damaged by the Tsunami wave and was not functional, one crew member died and another was injured. Medical care and evacuation posed a unique problem in the Phi Phi Islands due to remoteness, limited medical resources, lack of effective communication with the main land and the large number of victims. An alternative medical facility was located in a nearby hotel. The crew included the medical director, two nurses, two additional staff members, 10 local volunteers, and hotel staff members. The medical crew had to treat 600-700 casualties in 24 hours. Most of the victims were mildly injured, but approximately 100 (15%) of the victims could not walk due to their injuries. The medical director, made a conscious decision to initially treat only circulation ("C") problems, by controlling external hemorrhages. This decision was driven by the lack of equipment and personnel to deal with airway ("A") and breathing ("B") problems. In the post-disaster debriefing, the Phi Phi Island hospital physician noted five major lessons concerning disaster management in such extreme situation in a small facility located in a remote area: (1) effective resistant communication facilities must be ensured; (2) clear, simple "evacuation plans" should be made in advance; (3) plans should be made to ensure automatic reinforcement of remote areas with evacuation vehicles, medical equipment and medical personnel; (4) efficient cooperation with medical volunteers must be planned and drilled; and (5) every team member of such a hospital must participate in an educational program and periodic drills should be done to improve the disaster and emergency

  5. Ultrasound applications in mass casualties and extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Ma, O John; Norvell, Jeffrey G; Subramanian, Srikala

    2007-05-01

    A mass-casualty incident is one in which the number of patients with injuries exceeds the available medical resources to care for them in a timely manner. In such a situation, the numerous advantages of ultrasonography make it an ideal triage tool for helping clinicians rapidly screen patients. Experiences during the 1988 Armenian earthquake and the 1999 Turkish earthquake demonstrated the proficiency of ultrasound in providing rapid clinical data to the physicians caring for the mass-casualty patients. Wireless and satellite transmission of ultrasound images also has been shown to be feasible and may be applied to mass-casualty situations. In addition, ultrasound applications have been demonstrated to aid in the diagnosis of various conditions, including pneumothorax, in the International Space Station. Ultrasound's portability, reproducibility, accuracy, and ease of use will make it an important diagnostic instrument for future space missions. PMID:17446788

  6. Mass Casualty Incident Primary Triage Methods in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Hong; Yang, Jun; Yang, Yu; Zheng, Jing-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the technical characteristics and application of mass casualty incident (MCI) primary triage (PT) methods applied in China. Data Sources: Chinese literature was searched by Chinese Academic Journal Network Publishing Database (founded in June 2014). The English literature was searched by PubMed (MEDLINE) (1950 to June 2014). We also searched Official Websites of Chinese Central Government's (http://www.gov.cn/), National Health and Family Planning Commission of China (http://www.nhfpc.gov.cn/), and China Earthquake Information (http://www.csi.ac.cn/). Study Selection: We included studies associated with mass casualty events related to China, the PT applied in China, guidelines and standards, and application and development of the carding PT method in China. Results: From 3976 potentially relevant articles, 22 met the inclusion criteria, 20 Chinese, and 2 English. These articles included 13 case reports, 3 retrospective analyses of MCI, two methods introductions, three national or sectoral criteria, and one simulated field testing and validation. There were a total of 19 kinds of MCI PT methods that have been reported in China from 1950 to 2014. In addition, there were 15 kinds of PT methods reported in the literature from the instance of the application. Conclusions: The national and sectoral current triage criteria are developed mainly for earthquake relief. Classification is not clear. Vague criteria (especially between moderate and severe injuries) operability are not practical. There are no triage methods and research for children and special populations. There is no data and evidence supported triage method. We should revise our existing classification and criteria so it is clearer and easier to be grasped in order to build a real, practical, and efficient PT method. PMID:26415807

  7. Mass casualty incident response and aeromedical evacuation in antarctica.

    PubMed

    Mills, Christopher N; Mills, Gregory H

    2011-02-01

    Antarctica is one of the most remote regions on Earth. Mass casualty incident (MCI) responses in Antarctica are prone to complications from multiple environmental and operational challenges. This review of the current status of MCI risks and response strategies for Antarctica focuses on aeromedical evacuation, a critical component of many possible MCI scenarios. Extreme cold and weather, a lack of medical resources and a multitude of disparate international bases all exert unique demands on MCI response planning. Increasing cruise ship traffic is also escalating the risk of MCI occurrence. To be successful, MCI response must be well coordinated and undertaken by trained rescuers, especially in the setting of Antarctica. Helicopter rescue or aeromedical evacuation of victims to off-continent facilities may be necessary. Currently, military forces have the greatest capacity for mass air evacuation. Specific risks that are likely to occur include structure collapses, vehicle incapacitations, vehicle crashes and fires. All of these events pose concomitant risks of hypothermia among both victims and rescuers. Antarctica's unique environment requires flexible yet robust MCI response planning among the many entities in operation on the continent. PMID:21691470

  8. Mass Casualty Incident Response and Aeromedical Evacuation in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Christopher N.; Mills, Gregory H.

    2011-01-01

    Antarctica is one of the most remote regions on Earth. Mass casualty incident (MCI) responses in Antarctica are prone to complications from multiple environmental and operational challenges. This review of the current status of MCI risks and response strategies for Antarctica focuses on aeromedical evacuation, a critical component of many possible MCI scenarios. Extreme cold and weather, a lack of medical resources and a multitude of disparate international bases all exert unique demands on MCI response planning. Increasing cruise ship traffic is also escalating the risk of MCI occurrence. To be successful, MCI response must be well coordinated and undertaken by trained rescuers, especially in the setting of Antarctica. Helicopter rescue or aeromedical evacuation of victims to off-continent facilities may be necessary. Currently, military forces have the greatest capacity for mass air evacuation. Specific risks that are likely to occur include structure collapses, vehicle incapacitations, vehicle crashes and fires. All of these events pose concomitant risks of hypothermia among both victims and rescuers. Antarctica’s unique environment requires flexible yet robust MCI response planning among the many entities in operation on the continent. PMID:21691470

  9. Estimating shaking-induced casualties and building damage for global earthquake events: a proposed modelling approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    So, Emily; Spence, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Recent earthquakes such as the Haiti earthquake of 12 January 2010 and the Qinghai earthquake on 14 April 2010 have highlighted the importance of rapid estimation of casualties after the event for humanitarian response. Both of these events resulted in surprisingly high death tolls, casualties and survivors made homeless. In the Mw = 7.0 Haiti earthquake, over 200,000 people perished with more than 300,000 reported injuries and 2 million made homeless. The Mw = 6.9 earthquake in Qinghai resulted in over 2,000 deaths with a further 11,000 people with serious or moderate injuries and 100,000 people have been left homeless in this mountainous region of China. In such events relief efforts can be significantly benefitted by the availability of rapid estimation and mapping of expected casualties. This paper contributes to ongoing global efforts to estimate probable earthquake casualties very rapidly after an earthquake has taken place. The analysis uses the assembled empirical damage and casualty data in the Cambridge Earthquake Impacts Database (CEQID) and explores data by event and across events to test the relationships of building and fatality distributions to the main explanatory variables of building type, building damage level and earthquake intensity. The prototype global casualty estimation model described here uses a semi-empirical approach that estimates damage rates for different classes of buildings present in the local building stock, and then relates fatality rates to the damage rates of each class of buildings. This approach accounts for the effect of the very different types of buildings (by climatic zone, urban or rural location, culture, income level etc), on casualties. The resulting casualty parameters were tested against the overall casualty data from several historical earthquakes in CEQID; a reasonable fit was found.

  10. Resource planning for ambulance services in mass casualty incidents: a DES-based policy model.

    PubMed

    Rauner, Marion S; Schaffhauser-Linzatti, Michaela M; Niessner, Helmut

    2012-09-01

    Due to an increasing number of mass casualty incidents, which are generally complex and unique in nature, we suggest that decision makers consider operations research-based policy models to help prepare emergency staff for improved planning and scheduling at the emergency site. We thus develop a discrete-event simulation policy model, which is currently being applied by disaster-responsive ambulance services in Austria. By evaluating realistic scenarios, our policy model is shown to enhance the scheduling and outcomes at operative and online levels. The proposed scenarios range from small, simple, and urban to rather large, complex, remote mass casualty emergencies. Furthermore, the organization of an advanced medical post can be improved on a strategic level to increase rescue quality, including enhanced survival of injured victims. In particular, we consider a realistic mass casualty incident at a brewery relative to other exemplary disasters. Based on a variety of such situations, we derive general policy implications at both the macro (e.g., strategic rescue policy) and micro (e.g., operative and online scheduling strategies at the emergency site) levels. PMID:22653522

  11. [Mass maritime casualty incidents in German waters: structures and resources].

    PubMed

    Castan, J; Paschen, H-R; Wirtz, S; Dörges, V; Wenderoth, S; Peters, J; Blunk, Y; Bielstein, A; Kerner, T

    2012-07-01

    The Central Command for Maritime Emergencies was founded in Germany in 2003 triggered by the fire on board of the cargo ship "Pallas" in 1998. Its mission is to coordinate and direct measures at or above state level in maritime emergency situations in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. A special task in this case is to provide firefighting and medical care. To face these challenges at sea emergency doctors and firemen have been specially trained. This form of organization provides a concept to counter mass casualty incidents and peril situations at sea. Since the foundation of the Central Command for Maritime Emergencies there have been 5 operations for firefighting units and 4 for medical response teams. Assignments and structure of the Central Command for Maritime Emergencies are unique in Europe. PMID:22699223

  12. Mass Casualty Decontamination in the United States: An Online Survey of Current Practice.

    PubMed

    Power, Sarah; Symons, Charles; Carter, Holly; Jones, Emma; Amlôt, Richard; Larner, Joanne; Matar, Hazem; Chilcott, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Mass casualty decontamination is a public health intervention that would be employed by emergency responders following a chemical, biological, or radiological incident. The decontamination of large numbers of casualties is currently most often performed with water to remove contaminants from the skin surface. An online survey was conducted to explore US fire departments' decontamination practices and their preparedness for responding to incidents involving mass casualty decontamination. Survey respondents were asked to provide details of various aspects of their decontamination procedures, including expected response times to reach casualties, disrobing procedures, approaches to decontamination, characteristics of the decontamination showering process, provision for special populations, and any actions taken following decontamination. The aim of the survey was to identify any differences in the way in which decontamination guidance is implemented across US states. Results revealed that, in line with current guidance, many US fire departments routinely use the "ladder-pipe system" for conducting rapid, gross decontamination of casualties. The survey revealed significant variability in ladder-pipe construction, such as the position and number of fire hoses used. There was also variability in decontamination characteristics, such as water temperature and water pressure, detergent use, and shower duration. The results presented here provide important insights into the ways in which implementation of decontamination guidance can vary between US states. These inconsistencies are thought to reflect established perceived best practices and local adaptation of response plans to address practical and logistical constraints. These outcomes highlight the need for evidence-based national guidelines for conducting mass casualty decontamination. PMID:27442794

  13. Self-care Decontamination within a Chemical Exposure Mass-casualty Incident.

    PubMed

    Monteith, Raymond G; Pearce, Laurie D R

    2015-06-01

    Growing awareness and concern for the increasing frequency of incidents involving hazardous materials (HazMat) across a broad spectrum of contaminants from chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) sources indicates a clear need to refine the capability to respond successfully to mass-casualty contamination incidents. Best results for decontamination from a chemical agent will be achieved if done within minutes following exposure, and delays in decontamination will increase the length of time a casualty is in contact with the contaminate. The findings presented in this report indicate that casualties involved in a HazMat/CBRN mass-casualty incident (MCI) in a typical community would not receive sufficient on-scene care because of operational delays that are integral to a standard HazMat/CBRN first response. This delay in response will mean that casualty care will shift away from the incident scene into already over-tasked health care facilities as casualties seek aid on their own. The self-care decontamination protocols recommended here present a viable option to ensure decontamination is completed in the field, at the incident scene, and that casualties are cared for more quickly and less traumatically than they would be otherwise. Introducing self-care decontamination procedures as a standard first response within the response community will improve the level of care significantly and provide essential, self-care decontamination to casualties. The process involves three distinct stages which should not be delayed; these are summarized by the acronym MADE: Move/Assist, Disrobe/Decontaminate, Evaluate/Evacuate. PMID:25915603

  14. Panel 2.5: mass-casualty management and hospital care.

    PubMed

    Borra, Agostino; Perez, Luis Jorge; Min, Tin; Puavilai, Wilai; Seo, Norimasa; Tipsunthonsak, Nakhon

    2005-01-01

    This is a summary of the presentations and discussion of Panel 2.5, Mass-Casualty Management and Hospital Care of the Conference, Health Aspects of the Tsunami Disaster in Asia, convened by the World Health Organization in Phuket, Thailand, 04-06 May 2005. The topics discussed included issues related to mass-casualty management and hospital care as pertain to the responses to the damage created by the Tsunami. It is presented in the following major sections: (1) key questions; (2) recommendations; and (3) conclusions. Subsections of the conclusion section include: (1) lessons learned; (2) what was done well?; and (3) what could have been done better?. PMID:16496625

  15. Factors influencing injury severity score regarding Thai military personnel injured in mass casualty incident April 10, 2010: lessons learned from armed conflict casualties: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Political conflicts in Bangkok, Thailand have caused mass casualties, especially the latest event April 10, 2010, in which many military personnel were injured. Most of them were transferred to Phramongkutklao Hospital, the largest military hospital in Thailand. The current study aimed to assess factors influencing Injury Severity Score (ISS) regarding Thai military personnel injured in the mass casualty incident (MCI) April 10, 2010. Methods A total of 728 injured soldiers transferred to Phramongkutklao Hospital were reviewed. Descriptive statistics was used to display characteristics of the injuries, relationship between mechanism of injury and injured body regions. Multiple logistic regressions were used to calculate the adjusted odds ratio (adjusted OR) of ISS comparing injured body region categories. Results In all, 153 subjects defined as major data category were enrolled in this study. Blast injury was the most common mechanism of injury (90.2%). These victims displayed 276 injured body regions. The most common injured body region was the extremities (48.5%). A total of 18 patients (11.7%) had an ISS revealing more than 16 points. Three victims who died were expected to die due to high Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS). However, one with high TRISS survived. Factors influencing ISS were age (p = 0.04), abdomen injury (adjusted OR = 29.9; 95% CI, 5.8-153.5; P < 0.01), head & neck injury (adjusted OR = 13.8; 95% CI, 2.4-80.4; P < 0.01) and chest injury (adjusted OR = 9.9; 95% CI, 2.1-47.3; P < 0.01). Conclusions Blast injury was the most common mechanism of injury among Thai military personnel injured in the MCI April 10, 2010. Age and injured body region such as head & neck, chest and abdomen significantly influenced ISS. These factors should be investigated for effective medical treatment and preparing protective equipment to prevent such injuries in the future. PMID:22214518

  16. Clinical review: The role of the intensive care physician in mass casualty incidents: planning, organisation, and leadership

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Peter J; Mandersloot, Gerlinde

    2008-01-01

    There is a long-standing, broad assumption that hospitals will ably receive and efficiently provide comprehensive care to victims following a mass casualty event. Unfortunately, the majority of medical major incident plans are insufficiently focused on strategies and procedures that extend beyond the pre-hospital and early-hospital phases of care. Recent events underscore two important lessons: (a) the role of intensive care specialists extends well beyond the intensive care unit during such events, and (b) non-intensive care hospital personnel must have the ability to provide basic critical care. The bombing of the London transport network, while highlighting some good practices in our major incident planning, also exposed weaknesses already described by others. Whilst this paper uses the events of the 7 July 2005 as its point of reference, the lessons learned and the changes incorporated in our planning have generic applications to mass casualty events. In the UK, the Department of Health convened an expert symposium in June 2007 to identify lessons learned from 7 July 2005 and disseminate them for the benefit of the wider medical community. The experiences of clinicians from critical care units in London made a large contribution to this process and are discussed in this paper. PMID:18492221

  17. Portable ultrasonography in mass casualty incidents: The CAVEAT examination

    PubMed Central

    Stawicki, Stanislaw Peter; Howard, James M; Pryor, John P; Bahner, David P; Whitmill, Melissa L; Dean, Anthony J

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonography used by practicing clinicians has been shown to be of utility in the evaluation of time-sensitive and critical illnesses in a range of environments, including pre-hospital triage, emergency department, and critical care settings. The increasing availability of light-weight, robust, user-friendly, and low-cost portable ultrasound equipment is particularly suited for use in the physically and temporally challenging environment of a multiple casualty incident (MCI). Currently established ultrasound applications used to identify potentially lethal thoracic or abdominal conditions offer a base upon which rapid, focused protocols using hand-carried emergency ultrasonography could be developed. Following a detailed review of the current use of portable ultrasonography in military and civilian MCI settings, we propose a protocol for sonographic evaluation of the chest, abdomen, vena cava, and extremities for acute triage. The protocol is two-tiered, based on the urgency and technical difficulty of the sonographic examination. In addition to utilization of well-established bedside abdominal and thoracic sonography applications, this protocol incorporates extremity assessment for long-bone fractures. Studies of the proposed protocol will need to be conducted to determine its utility in simulated and actual MCI settings. PMID:22474622

  18. Roles of a helicopter emergency medical service in mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Stohler, S A; Jacobs, L M; Gabram, S G

    1991-01-01

    The Connecticut helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) has responded to 12 mass casualty incidents (MCI) in two years. Eight were drills and four were actual events. An MCI response plan was instituted prior to the onset of the HEMS program. All MCIs were reviewed to determine actual victims, knowledge of MCI prior to lift-off, and roles of the HEMS. The actual roles were compared with the pre-established roles. The four actual MCIs (building explosion, hotel fire, bus rollover and plane crash) were reviewed. Sixty-seven victims were involved. Prenotification occurred in one MCI. The roles of the HEMS in each MCI were: triage (n = 4), medical treatment (n = 4), transport (n = 3), augmented response (n = 1), and air surveillance (n = 0). The roles of HEMS response to MCI should be well-defined prior to an event. Air medical benefits include response within a large geographic area, highest level of prehospital medical care, identification of trauma receiving hospitals, and facilitation of transport. PMID:10108935

  19. Mass-casualty victim "surge" management. Preparing for bombings and blast-related injuries with possibility of hazardous materials exposure.

    PubMed

    Severance, Harry W

    2002-01-01

    Bombings and other blast-related events place severe demands on pre-hospital and in-hospital systems. The resulting surge of victims can overwhelm the resources of any facility not prepared for such an event. The September 11 terrorist attacks underscore the urgency of our need for preparedness. The challenges become even more daunting when there is possible hazmat exposure as well; this means that adequate and rapid disposition of victims is even more critical in order to avoid contamination of hospitals systems or whole communities. Federal agencies have been designated and federal mandates have been issued to address mass casualty events, but federal or even regional systems cannot respond in time to address the massive and immediate needs generated by an explosion. Local communities must take the lead in developing incident command systems for initial management of such events. Hospital and pre-hospital providers play a key role in such planning. Ultimate management and disposition of large numbers of casualties, especially if contaminated, cannot follow standard patient management protocols; new protocols are needed. To avoid a total, overwhelming break down of in-hospital resources, hospitals need to assume a lead role in addressing such issues in their local communities. PMID:12970967

  20. Army nurses' knowledge base for determining triage categories in a mass casualty.

    PubMed

    Robison, Jennifer L

    2002-10-01

    The timing, location, and participants in a mass casualty scenario cannot be predicted. Nurses may be involved in performing triage, yet there is no published documentation of military nurses' ability to triage. A prospective design was used to describe 82 Army nurses' knowledge base related to designating triage categories for patients during a mass causality, examining the relationships among their education and experience as evaluated by The Darnall Mass Casualty Triage Test and Demographic Data Form. The most significant areas associated with higher scores on the Triage Test were: completion of Advanced Cardiac Life Support, advanced certification as a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists, Certified Emergency Nurse, or Critical Care Registered Nurse, and attendance to the Medical Management of Nuclear Weapons Course. An improved average score for nurses overall was also noted when compared with previous work with the Darnall MASCAL Triage Test. PMID:12392246

  1. Prehospital triage and communication performance in small mass casualty incidents: a gauge for disaster preparedness.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G A; Calkins, A

    1999-03-01

    Because of their infrequency, disasters are difficult to train for. Emergency prehospital personnel frequently participate in small mass casualty incidents (MCIs) (3 to 50 victims). This study sought to examine prehospital performance in small MCIs in areas that are frequently mismanaged in disasters. Prospective data from the resource physician and retrospective data from tape recorded prehospital conversations were collected for a 9-month period. Clinical patient data, patient demographics, emergency medical services squad characteristics, and triage information were recorded. Forty-five consecutive MCIs were studied. Most of these were motor vehicle accidents. Prehospital providers included paid providers, nonpaid providers, and air and ground transport. The mean number of victims first identified (4.6%) was greatly different than the mean number of victims eventually transported from a scene (7.1%). Most patients were treated at a level 1 trauma center. Frequent errors included having multiple communicators on site (38%), misidentifying the number of victims (56%), and having unclear information for the resource physician (43%). Only 38% of events had prehospital triage information that was deemed appropriate in total. These results show that scene and triage errors are frequent in MCIs of small scale. This information can be used to assay a system's readiness for disasters. PMID:10102314

  2. Expedited electronic entry: a new way to manage mass-casualty radiology order workflow.

    PubMed

    Bookman, Kelly; Zane, Richard

    2013-08-01

    One of the important tenets of emergency preparedness is that planning for disaster response should resemble standard operating procedure whenever possible. Electronic order entry has become part of the standard operating procedures of most institutions but many of these systems are either too cumbersome for use during a surge or can even be rendered non-functional during a sudden patient surge such as a mass-casualty incident (MCI). Presented here is an experience with delayed radiology order entry during a recent MCI and the after action programming of the system based on this real experience. In response to the after action analysis of the MCI, a task force was assigned to solve the MCI radiology order entry problem and a solution to streamline disaster image ordering was devised. A "browse page" was created that lists every x-ray and every CT scan that might be needed in such an event with all required information defaulted to "Disaster." This created a way to order multiple images for any one patient, with 40% time saving over standard electronic order entry. This disaster radiology order entry solution is an example of the surge preparedness needed to promote patient safety and efficient care delivery as the widespread deployment of electronic health records and order entry continues across the United States. PMID:23731567

  3. Adolescent epidemic hysteria presenting as a mass casualty, toxic exposure incident

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, B.S.

    1989-08-01

    Discussed is a case of explosive epidemic hysteria presenting as a mass casualty, toxic inhalation incident. Fifteen adolescent female students were triaged from a school of 700 persons exposed to sewer gas and arrived simultaneously at the emergency department complaining of a variety of nonspecific symptoms without physical findings. These symptoms quickly remitted with reassurance and dispersion of the group. Factors important in the recognition and treatment of epidemic hysteria are presented.

  4. Consensus on items and quantities of clinical equipment required to deal with a mass casualties big bang incident: a national Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Major short-notice or sudden impact incidents, which result in a large number of casualties, are rare events. However health services must be prepared to respond to such events appropriately. In the United Kingdom (UK), a mass casualties incident is when the normal response of several National Health Service organizations to a major incident, has to be supported with extraordinary measures. Having the right type and quantity of clinical equipment is essential, but planning for such emergencies is challenging. To date, the equipment stored for such events has been selected on the basis of local clinical judgment and has evolved without an explicit evidence-base. This has resulted in considerable variations in the types and quantities of clinical equipment being stored in different locations. This study aimed to develop an expert consensus opinion of the essential items and minimum quantities of clinical equipment that is required to treat 100 people at the scene of a big bang mass casualties event. Methods A three round modified Delphi study was conducted with 32 experts using a specifically developed web-based platform. Individuals were invited to participate if they had personal clinical experience of providing a pre-hospital emergency medical response to a mass casualties incident, or had responsibility in health emergency planning for mass casualties incidents and were in a position of authority within the sphere of emergency health planning. Each item’s importance was measured on a 5-point Likert scale. The quantity of items required was measured numerically. Data were analyzed using nonparametric statistics. Results Experts achieved consensus on a total of 134 items (54%) on completion of the study. Experts did not reach consensus on 114 (46%) items. Median quantities and interquartile ranges of the items, and their recommended quantities were identified and are presented. Conclusions This study is the first to produce an expert consensus on the

  5. Scientific framework for research on disaster and mass casualty incident in Korea: building consensus using Delphi method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chu Hyun; Park, Ju Ok; Park, Chang Bae; Kim, Seong Chun; Kim, Soo Jin; Hong, Ki Jeong

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the scientific framework for research on disaster and mass casualty incident (MCI) in Korea, especially Korean terminology, feasible definition, and epidemiologic indices. The two staged policy Delphi method was performed by instructors of National Disaster Life Support (NDLS®) with the constructed questionnaire containing items based on the literature review. The first-stage survey was conducted by 11 experts through two rounds of survey for making issue and option. The second-stage survey was conducted by 35 experts for making a generalized group based consensus. Experts were selected among instructors of National Disaster Life Support Course. Through two staged Delphi survey experts made consensus: 1) the Korean terminology "jaenan" with "disaster" and "dajung-sonsang-sago" with "MCI"; 2) the feasible definition of "disaster" as the events that have an effect on one or more municipal local government area (city-county-district) or results in ≥ 10 of death or ≥ 50 injured victims; 3) the feasible definition of MCI as the events that result in ≥ 6 casualties including death; 4) essential 31 epidemiologic indices. Experts could determine the scientific framework in Korea for research on disaster medicine, considering the distinct characteristics of Korea and current research trends. PMID:24431916

  6. Using baseline data to address the lack of hospital beds during mass-casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Hadef, Hysham; Bartier, Jean-Claude; Delplancq, Herve; Dupeyron, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The management of victims during mass-casualty incidents (MCIs) is improving. In many countries, physicians and paramedics are well-trained to manage these incidents. A problem that has been encountered during MCIs is the lack of adequate numbers of hospital beds to accommodate the injured. In Europe, hospitals are crowded. One solution for the lack of beds is the creation of baseline data systems that could be consulted by medical personnel in all European countries. A MCI never has occurred in northeastern Europe, but such an event remains a possibility. This paper describes how the use of SAGEC 67, a free-access, information database concerning the availability of beds should help the participating countries, initially France, Germany, and Switzerland, respond to a MCI by dispatching each patient to an appropriate hospital and informing their families and physicians using their own language. Baseline data for more than 20 countries, and for hospitals, especially those in Germany, Switzerland, and France, were collected. Information about the number of beds and their availability hour-by-hour was included. In the case of MCIs, the baseline data program is opened and automatically connects to all of the countries. In case of a necessary hospital evacuation, the required beds immediately are occupied in one of these three countries. Questions and conversations among medical staff or family members can be accomplished between hospitals through computer, secured-line chatting that automatically translates into appropriate language. During the patient evacuation phase of a MCI, respondents acknowledged that a combination of local, state, and private resources and international cooperation eventually would be needed to meet the demand. Patient evacuation is optimized through the use of SAGEC 67, a free baseline database. PMID:18935955

  7. Clinical Framework and Medical Countermeasure Use During an Anthrax Mass-Casualty Incident.

    PubMed

    Bower, William A; Hendricks, Katherine; Pillai, Satish; Guarnizo, Julie; Meaney-Delman, Dana

    2015-12-01

    In 2014, CDC published updated guidelines for the prevention and treatment of anthrax (Hendricks KA, Wright ME, Shadomy SV, et al. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expert panel meetings on prevention and treatment of anthrax in adults. Emerg Infect Dis 2014;20[2]. Available at http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/20/2/13-0687_article.htm). These guidelines provided recommended best practices for the diagnosis and treatment of persons with naturally occurring or bioterrorism-related anthrax in conventional medical settings. An aerosolized release of Bacillus anthracis spores over densely populated areas could become a mass-casualty incident. To prepare for this possibility, the U.S. government has stockpiled equipment and therapeutics (known as medical countermeasures [MCMs]) for anthrax prevention and treatment. However, previously developed, publicly available clinical recommendations have not addressed the use of MCMs or clinical management during an anthrax mass-casualty incident, when the number of patients is likely to exceed the ability of the health care infrastructure to provide conventional standards of care and supplies of MCMs might be inadequate to meet the demand required. To address this gap, in 2013, CDC conducted a series of systematic reviews of the scientific literature on anthrax to identify evidence that could help clinicians and public health authorities set guidelines for intravenous antimicrobial and antitoxin use, diagnosis of anthrax meningitis, and management of common anthrax-specific complications in the setting of a mass-casualty incident. Evidence from these reviews was presented to professionals with expertise in anthrax, critical care, and disaster medicine during a series of workgroup meetings that were held from August 2013 through March 2014. In March 2014, a meeting was held at which 102 subject matter experts discussed the evidence and adapted the existing best practices guidance to a clinical use framework for the

  8. Autonomous mobile platform for enhanced situational awareness in Mass Casualty Incidents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongyi; Schafer, James; Wang, Sili; Ganz, Aura

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the efficiency of the search and rescue process of a Mass Casualty Incident, we introduce a low cost autonomous mobile platform. The mobile platform motion is controlled by an Android Smartphone mounted on a robot. The pictures and video captured by the Smartphone camera can significantly enhance the situational awareness of the incident commander leading to a more efficient search and rescue process. Moreover, the active RFID readers mounted on the mobile platform can improve the localization accuracy of victims in the disaster site in areas where the paramedics are not present, reducing the triage and evacuation time. PMID:25570104

  9. The development and features of the Spanish prehospital advanced triage method (META) for mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Cuartas Alvarez, Tatiana; Garijo Gonzalo, Gracia; Martinez Monzon, Carlos; Pelaez Corres, Nieves; Rodriguez Soler, Alberto; Turegano Fuentes, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This text describes the process of development of the new Spanish Prehospital Advanced Triage Method (META) and explain its main features and contribution to prehospital triage systems in mass casualty incidents. The triage META is based in the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols, patient's anatomical injuries and mechanism of injury. It is a triage method with four stages including early identification of patients with severe trauma that would benefit from a rapid evacuation to a surgical facility and introduces a new patient flow by-passing the advanced medical post to improve evacuation. The stages of triage META are: I) Stabilization triage that classifies patients according to severity to set priorities for initial emergency treatment; II) Identifying patients requiring urgent surgical treatment, this is done at the same time than stage I and creates a new flow of patients with high priority for evacuation; III) Implementation of Advanced Trauma Life Support protocols to patients previously classified according to stablished priority; and IV) Evacuation triage, stablishing evacuation priorities in case of lacks of appropriate transport resources. The triage META is to be applied only by prehospital providers with advanced knowledge and training in advanced trauma life support care and has been designed to be implemented as prehospital procedure in mass casualty incidents (MCI). PMID:27130042

  10. Data quality for situational awareness during mass-casualty events.

    PubMed

    Demchak, Barry; Griswold, William G; Lenert, Leslie A

    2007-01-01

    Incident Command systems often achieve situational awareness through manual paper-tracking systems. Such systems often produce high latencies and in-complete data, resulting in inefficient and ineffective resource deployment. WIISARD (Wireless Internet Information System for Medical Response in Disasters) collects much more data than a paper-based system, dramatically reducing latency while increasing the kinds and quality of information available to incident commanders. Yet, the introduction of IT into a disaster setting is not problem-free. Notably, system component failures can delay the delivery of data. The type and extent of a failure can have varying effects on the usefulness of information displays. We describe a small, coherent set of customizble information overlays to address this problem, and we discuss reactions to these displays by medical commanders. PMID:18693821

  11. Hospital management of mass radiological casualties: reassessing exposures from contaminated victims of an exploded radiological dispersal device.

    PubMed

    Smith, James M; Ansari, Armin; Harper, Frederick T

    2005-11-01

    One of the key issues in the aftermath of an exploded radiological dispersal device from a terrorist event is that of the contaminated victim and the concern among healthcare providers for the harmful exposures they may receive in treating patients, especially if the patient has not been thoroughly decontaminated. This is critically important in the event of mass casualties from a nuclear or radiological incident because of the essential rapidity of acute medical decisions and that those who have life- or limb-threatening injuries may have treatment unduly delayed by a decontamination process that may be unnecessary for protecting the health and safety of the patient or the healthcare provider. To estimate potential contamination of those exposed in a radiological dispersal device event, results were used from explosive aerosolization tests of surrogate radionuclides detonated with high explosives at the Sandia National Laboratories. Computer modeling was also used to assess radiation dose rates to surgical personnel treating patients with blast injuries who are contaminated with any of a variety of common radionuclides. It is demonstrated that exceptional but plausible cases may require special precautions by the healthcare provider, even while managing life-threatening injuries of a contaminated victim from a radiological dispersal device event. PMID:16217195

  12. Hospital management of mass radiological casualties : reassessing exposures from contaminated victims of an exploded radiological dispersal device (RDD).

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, Armin; Harper, Frederick Taylor; Smith, James M.

    2005-04-01

    One of the key issues in the aftermath of an exploded radiological dispersal device from a terrorist event is that of the contaminated victim and the concern among healthcare providers for the harmful exposures they may receive in treating patients, especially if the patient has not been thoroughly decontaminated. This is critically important in the event of mass casualties from a nuclear or radiological incident because of the essential rapidity of acute medical decisions and that those who have life- or limb-threatening injuries may have treatment unduly delayed by a decontamination process that may be unnecessary for protecting the health and safety of the patient or the healthcare provider. To estimate potential contamination of those exposed in a radiological dispersal device event, results were used from explosive aerosolization tests of surrogate radionuclides detonated with high explosives at the Sandia National Laboratories. Computer modeling was also used to assess radiation dose rates to surgical personnel treating patients with blast injuries who are contaminated with any of a variety of common radionuclides. It is demonstrated that exceptional but plausible cases may require special precautions by the healthcare provider, even while managing life-threatening injuries of a contaminated victim from a radiological dispersal device event.

  13. A pan-European study of capabilities to manage mass casualties from the release of chemical agents: the MASH project.

    PubMed

    Baker, David J; Murray, Virginia S G; Carli, Pierre A

    2013-01-01

    The European Union (EU) Mass Casualties and Health (MASH) project that ran between 2008 and 2010 was designed to study the management of mass casualties from chemical and radiological releases and associated health implications. One area of study for this project concerned arrangements within EU Member States for the management of mass casualties following a chemical release. This was undertaken via a confidential online questionnaire that was sent to selected points of contact throughout the EU. Responses were obtained from 18 states from respondents holding senior positions in chemical planning and incident response. Information gathered shows a lack of uniformity within the EU about the organization of responses to chemical releases and the provision of medical care. This article presents the overall findings of the study demonstrating differences between countries on planning and organization, decontamination, prehospital emergency medical responses, clinical diagnoses, and therapy and aftercare. Although there may be an understandable reluctance from national respondents to share information on security and other grounds, the findings, nevertheless, revealed substantial differences between current planning and operational responses within the EU states for the management of mass chemical casualties. The existing international networks for response to radiation incidents are not yet matched by equivalent networks for chemical responses yet sufficient information was available from the study to identify potential deficiencies, identify common casualty management pathways, and to make recommendations for future operations within the EU. Improvements in awareness and training and the application of modern information and communications will help to remedy this situation. Specialized advanced life support and other medical care for chemical casualties appear lacking in some countries. A program of specialized training and action are required to apply the findings

  14. Oral and enteral resuscitation of burn shock the historical record and implications for mass casualty care.

    PubMed

    Kramer, George C; Michell, Michael W; Oliveira, Hermes; Brown, Tim La H; Herndon, David; Baker, R David; Muller, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of a mass disaster, standard care methods for treatment of burn injury will often not be available for all victims. A method of fluid resuscitation for burns that has largely been forgotten by contemporary burn experts is enteral resuscitation. We identified 12 studies with over 700 patients treated with enteral resuscitation, defined as drinking or gastric infusion of salt solutions, from the literature. These studies suggest that enteral resuscitation can be an effective treatment for burn shock under conditions in which the standard IV therapy is unavailable or delayed, such as in mass disasters and combat casualties. Enteral resuscitation of burn shock was effective in patients with moderate (10-40% TBSA) and in some patients with more severe injuries. The data suggests that some hypovolemic burn and trauma patients can be treated exclusively with enteral resuscitation, and others might benefit from enteral resuscitation as an initial alternative and a supplement to IV therapy. A complication of enteral resuscitation was vomiting, which occurred less in children and much less when therapy was initiated within the first postburn hour. Enteral resuscitation is contra-indicated when the patient is in "peripheral circulatory collapse". The optimal enteral solution and regimen has not yet been defined, nor has its efficacy been tested against modern IV resuscitation. The oldest studies used glucose-free solutions of buffered isotonic and hypotonic saline. Studies that are more recent show benefit of adding glucose to electrolyte solutions similar to those used in the treatment of cholera. If IV therapy for mass casualty care is delayed due to logistical constraints, enteral resuscitation should be considered. PMID:20827301

  15. Oral and Enteral Resuscitation of Burn Shock The Historical Record and Implications for Mass Casualty Care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, George C.; Michell, Michael W.; Oliveira, Hermes; Brown, Tim La H.; Herndon, David; Baker, R. David; Muller, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of a mass disaster, standard care methods for treatment of burn injury will often not be available for all victims. A method of fluid resuscitation for burns that has largely been forgotten by contemporary burn experts is enteral resuscitation. We identified 12 studies with over 700 patients treated with enteral resuscitation, defined as drinking or gastric infusion of salt solutions, from the literature. These studies suggest that enteral resuscitation can be an effective treatment for burn shock under conditions in which the standard IV therapy is unavailable or delayed, such as in mass disasters and combat casualties. Enteral resuscitation of burn shock was effective in patients with moderate (10–40% TBSA) and in some patients with more severe injuries. The data suggests that some hypovolemic burn and trauma patients can be treated exclusively with enteral resuscitation, and others might benefit from enteral resuscitation as an initial alternative and a supplement to IV therapy. A complication of enteral resuscitation was vomiting, which occurred less in children and much less when therapy was initiated within the first postburn hour. Enteral resuscitation is contra-indicated when the patient is in “peripheral circulatory collapse”. The optimal enteral solution and regimen has not yet been defined, nor has its efficacy been tested against modern IV resuscitation. The oldest studies used glucose-free solutions of buffered isotonic and hypotonic saline. Studies that are more recent show benefit of adding glucose to electrolyte solutions similar to those used in the treatment of cholera. If IV therapy for mass casualty care is delayed due to logistical constraints, enteral resuscitation should be considered. PMID:20827301

  16. Challenges of the management of mass casualty: lessons learned from the Jos crisis of 2001

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Jos has witnessed a series of civil crises which have generated mass casualties that the Jos University Teaching Hospital has had to respond to from time to time. We review the challenges that we encountered in the management of the victims of the 2001 crisis. Methodology We reviewed the findings of our debriefing sessions following the sectarian crisis of September 2001 and identified the challenges and obstacles experienced during these periods. Results Communication was a major challenge, both within and outside the hospital. In the field, there was poor field triage and no prehospital care. Transportation and evacuation was hazardous, for both injured patients and medical personnel. This was worsened by the imposition of a curfew on the city and its environs. In the hospital, supplies such as fluids, emergency drugs, sterile dressings and instruments, splints, and other consumables, blood and food were soon exhausted. Record keeping was erratic. Staff began to show signs of physical and mental exhaustion as well as features of anxiety and stress. Tensions rose between different religious groups in the hospital and an attempt was made by rioters to attack the hospital. Patients suffered poor subsequent care following resuscitation and/or surgery and there was neglect of patients on admission prior to the crisis as well as non trauma medical emergencies. Conclusion Mass casualties from disasters that disrupt organized societal mechanisms for days can pose significant challenges to the best of institutional disaster response plans. In the situation that we experienced, our disaster plan was impractical initially because it failed to factor in such a prolongation of both crisis and response. We recommend that institutional disaster response plans should incorporate provisions for the challenges we have enumerated and factor in peculiarities that would emanate from the need for a prolonged response. PMID:24164778

  17. Mass-casualty Response to the Kiss Nightclub in Santa Maria, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dal Ponte, Silvana T; Dornelles, Carlos F D; Arquilla, Bonnie; Bloem, Christina; Roblin, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    On January 27, 2013, a fire at the Kiss Nightclub in Santa Maria, Brazil led to a mass-casualty incident affecting hundreds of college students. A total of 234 people died on scene, 145 were hospitalized, and another 623 people received treatment throughout the first week following the incident.1 Eight of the hospitalized people later died.1 The Military Police were the first on scene, followed by the state fire department, and then the municipal Mobile Prehospital Assistance (SAMU) ambulances. The number of victims was not communicated clearly to the various units arriving on scene, leading to insufficient rescue personnel and equipment. Incident command was established on scene, but the rescuers and police were still unable to control the chaos of multiple bystanders attempting to assist in the rescue efforts. The Municipal Sports Center (CDM) was designated as the location for dead bodies, where victim identification and communication with families occurred, as well as forensic evaluation, which determined the primary cause of death to be asphyxia. A command center was established at the Hospital de Caridade Astrogildo de Azevedo (HCAA) in Santa Maria to direct where patients should be admitted, recruit staff, and procure additional supplies, as needed. The victims suffered primarily from smoke inhalation and many required endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. There was a shortage of ventilators; therefore, some had to be borrowed from local hospitals, neighboring cities, and distant areas in the state. A total of 54 patients1 were transferred to hospitals in the capital city of Porto Alegre (Brazil). The main issues with the response to the fire were scene control and communication. Areas for improvement were identified, namely the establishment of a disaster-response plan, as well as regularly scheduled training in disaster preparedness/response. These activities are the first steps to improving mass-casualty responses. PMID:25544145

  18. Predeployment mass casualty and clinical trauma training for US Army forward surgical teams.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Bruno M T; Ryan, Mark L; Ogilvie, Michael P; Gomez-Rodriguez, Juan Carlos; McAndrew, Patrick; Garcia, George D; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2010-07-01

    Since the beginning of the program in 2002, 84 Forward Surgical Teams (FSTs) have rotated through the Army Trauma Training Center (ATTC) at the University of Miami/Ryder Trauma Center including all those deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. The purpose of this study was to provide the latest updates of our experience with FSTs at the ATTC. Before deployment, each FST participates in a 2-week training rotation at the ATTC. The rotation is divided into 3 phases. Phase 1 is to refresh FST knowledge regarding the initial evaluation and management of the trauma patient. Phase 2 is the clinical phase and is conducted entirely at the Ryder Trauma Center. The training rotation culminates in phase 3, the Capstone exercise. During the Capstone portion of their training, the entire 20-person FST remains at the Ryder Trauma Center and is primarily responsible for the evaluation and resuscitation of all patients arriving over a 24-hour period. Subject awareness concerning their role within the team improved from 71% to 95%, indicating that functioning as a team in the context of the mass casualty training exercise along with clinical codes was beneficial. The clinical component of the rotation was considered by 47% to be the most valuable aspect of the training. Our experience strongly suggests that a multimodality approach is beneficial for preparing a team of individuals with minimal combat (or trauma) experience for the rigors of medical care and triage on the battlefield. The data provided by participants rotating through the ATTC show that through clinical exposure and simulation over a 2-week period, FST performance is optimized by defining provider roles and improving communication. The mass casualty training exercise is a vital component of predeployment training that participants feel is valuable in preparing them for the challenges that lay ahead. PMID:20613574

  19. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  20. Mass casualties and health care following the release of toxic chemicals or radioactive material--contribution of modern biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Göransson Nyberg, Ann; Stricklin, Daniela; Sellström, Åke

    2011-12-01

    Catastrophic chemical or radiological events can cause thousands of casualties. Such disasters require triage procedures to identify the development of health consequences requiring medical intervention. Our objective is to analyze recent advancements in biotechnology for triage in mass emergency situations. In addition to identifying persons "at risk" of developing health problems, these technologies can aid in securing the unaffected or "worried well". We also highlight the need for public/private partnerships to engage in some of the underpinning sciences, such as patho-physiological mechanisms of chemical and radiological hazards, and for the necessary investment in the development of rapid assessment tools through identification of biochemical, molecular, and genetic biomarkers to predict health effects. For chemical agents, biomarkers of neurotoxicity, lung damage, and clinical and epidemiological databases are needed to assess acute and chronic effects of exposures. For radiological exposures, development of rapid, sensitive biomarkers using advanced biotechnologies are needed to sort exposed persons at risk of life-threatening effects from persons with long-term risk or no risk. The final implementation of rapid and portable diagnostics tools suitable for emergency care providers to guide triage and medical countermeasures use will need public support, since commercial incentives are lacking. PMID:22408587

  1. Mass Casualties and Health Care Following the Release of Toxic Chemicals or Radioactive Material—Contribution of Modern Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Göransson Nyberg, Ann; Stricklin, Daniela; Sellström, Åke

    2011-01-01

    Catastrophic chemical or radiological events can cause thousands of casualties. Such disasters require triage procedures to identify the development of health consequences requiring medical intervention. Our objective is to analyze recent advancements in biotechnology for triage in mass emergency situations. In addition to identifying persons “at risk” of developing health problems, these technologies can aid in securing the unaffected or “worried well”. We also highlight the need for public/private partnerships to engage in some of the underpinning sciences, such as patho-physiological mechanisms of chemical and radiological hazards, and for the necessary investment in the development of rapid assessment tools through identification of biochemical, molecular, and genetic biomarkers to predict health effects. For chemical agents, biomarkers of neurotoxicity, lung damage, and clinical and epidemiological databases are needed to assess acute and chronic effects of exposures. For radiological exposures, development of rapid, sensitive biomarkers using advanced biotechnologies are needed to sort exposed persons at risk of life-threatening effects from persons with long-term risk or no risk. The final implementation of rapid and portable diagnostics tools suitable for emergency care providers to guide triage and medical countermeasures use will need public support, since commercial incentives are lacking. PMID:22408587

  2. Assessment of Biodosimetry Methods for a Mass-Casualty Radiological Incident: Medical Response and Management Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Julie M.; Prasanna, Pataje G. S.; Grace, Marcy B.; Wathen, Lynne; Wallace, Rodney L.; Koerner, John F.; Coleman, C. Norman

    2013-01-01

    Following a mass-casualty nuclear disaster, effective medical triage has the potential to save tens of thousands of lives. In order to best use the available scarce resources, there is an urgent need for biodosimetry tools to determine an individual’s radiation dose. Initial triage for radiation exposure will include location during the incident, symptoms, and physical examination. Stepwise triage will include point of care assessment of less than or greater than 2 Gy, followed by secondary assessment, possibly with high throughput screening, to further define an individual’s dose. Given the multisystem nature of radiation injury, it is unlikely that any single biodosimetry assay can be used as a stand-alone tool to meet the surge in capacity with the timeliness and accuracy needed. As part of the national preparedness and planning for a nuclear or radiological incident, we reviewed the primary literature to determine the capabilities and limitations of a number of biodosimetry assays currently available or under development for use in the initial and secondary triage of patients. Understanding the requirements from a response standpoint and the capability and logistics for the various assays will help inform future biodosimetry technology development and acquisition. Factors considered include: type of sample required, dose detection limit, time interval when the assay is feasible biologically, time for sample preparation and analysis, ease of use, logistical requirements, potential throughput, point-of-care capability, and the ability to support patient diagnosis and treatment within a therapeutically relevant time point. PMID:24162058

  3. Improving emergency medical dispatching with emphasis on mass-casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Kleinoscheg, Gabriel; Burgsteiner, Harald; Bernroider, Martin; Kiechle, Günter; Obermayer, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Dispatching ambulances is a demanding and stressful task for dispatchers. This is especially true in case of mass-casualty incidents. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate if and to what extent the dispatch operation of the Red Cross Salzburg can be optimized on such occasions with a computerized system. The basic problem of a dynamic multi-vehicle Dial-a-Ride Problem with time windows was enhanced according to the requirements of the Red Cross Salzburg. The general objective was to minimize the total mileage covered by ambulances and the waiting time of patients. Furthermore, in case of emergencies suitable adaptions to a plan should be carried out automatically. Consequently, the problem is solved by using the Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search. Evaluation results indicate that the system outperforms a human dispatcher by between 2.5% and 36% within 1 minute of runtime concerning total costs. Moreover, the system's response time in case that a plan has to be updated is less than 1 minute on average. PMID:24825692

  4. Epidemiology of Emergency Medical Services-Assessed Mass Casualty Incidents according to Causes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To effectively mitigate and reduce the burden of mass casualty incidents (MCIs), preparedness measures should be based on MCIs’ epidemiological characteristics. This study aimed to describe the epidemiological characteristics and outcomes of emergency medical services (EMS)-assessed MCIs from multiple areas according to cause. Therefore, we extracted the records of all MCIs that involved ≥ 6 patients from an EMS database. All patients involved in EMS-assessed MCIs from six areas were eligible for this study, and their prehospital and hospital records were reviewed for a 1-year period. The EMS-assessed MCIs were categorized as being caused by fire accidents (FAs), road traffic accidents (RTAs), chemical and biological agents (CBs), and other mechanical causes (MECHs). A total of 362 EMS-assessed MCIs were identified, with a crude incidence rate of 0.6–5.0/100,000 population. Among these MCIs, 322 were caused by RTAs. The MCIs involved 2,578 patients, and 54.3% of these patients were women. We observed that the most common mechanism of injury varied according to MCI cause, and that a higher number of patients per incident was associated with a longer prehospital time. The highest hospital admission rate was observed for CBs (16 patients, 55.2%), and most patients in RTAs and MECHs experienced non-severe injuries. The total number of deaths was 32 (1.2%). An EMS-assessed MCI database was established using the EMS database and medical records review. Our findings indicate that RTA MCIs create a burden on EMS and emergency department resources, although CB MCIs create a burden on hospitals’ resources. PMID:26955248

  5. Epidemiology of Emergency Medical Services-Assessed Mass Casualty Incidents according to Causes.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Ok; Shin, Sang Do; Song, Kyoung Jun; Hong, Ki Jeong; Kim, Jungeun

    2016-03-01

    To effectively mitigate and reduce the burden of mass casualty incidents (MCIs), preparedness measures should be based on MCIs' epidemiological characteristics. This study aimed to describe the epidemiological characteristics and outcomes of emergency medical services (EMS)-assessed MCIs from multiple areas according to cause. Therefore, we extracted the records of all MCIs that involved ≥ 6 patients from an EMS database. All patients involved in EMS-assessed MCIs from six areas were eligible for this study, and their prehospital and hospital records were reviewed for a 1-year period. The EMS-assessed MCIs were categorized as being caused by fire accidents (FAs), road traffic accidents (RTAs), chemical and biological agents (CBs), and other mechanical causes (MECHs). A total of 362 EMS-assessed MCIs were identified, with a crude incidence rate of 0.6-5.0/100,000 population. Among these MCIs, 322 were caused by RTAs. The MCIs involved 2,578 patients, and 54.3% of these patients were women. We observed that the most common mechanism of injury varied according to MCI cause, and that a higher number of patients per incident was associated with a longer prehospital time. The highest hospital admission rate was observed for CBs (16 patients, 55.2%), and most patients in RTAs and MECHs experienced non-severe injuries. The total number of deaths was 32 (1.2%). An EMS-assessed MCI database was established using the EMS database and medical records review. Our findings indicate that RTA MCIs create a burden on EMS and emergency department resources, although CB MCIs create a burden on hospitals' resources. PMID:26955248

  6. Developing and organizing a trauma system and mass casualty management: some useful observations from the israeli trauma model.

    PubMed

    Borgohain, B; Khonglah, T

    2013-01-01

    A trauma system is a chain of arrangements and preparedness to provide quality response to injured from the site of injury to the appropriate hospital for the full range of care. Israel has a unique trauma system developed from the experience gained in peace and in war. The system is designed to fit the state's current health system, which is different from the European and American systems. An effective trauma system may potentially manage mass casualty incidence better. The aim of this paper is to discuss learning points to develop a trauma system based on the Israeli trauma model. After participating in a course on developing a trauma system organized by a top Israeli trauma center, a literature search on the topic on the Internet was done using relevant key words like trauma system and disaster management in Israel using the Google search engine in the pubmed, open access journals and websites of trauma organizations. Israel has a unique trauma system of organizing and managing an emergency event, characterized by a central national organization responsible for management, coordination and ongoing quality control. Because of its unique geopolitical situation, the armed forces has a significant role in the system. Investing adequate resources on continuous education, manpower training, motivation, team-work and creation of public volunteers through advocacy is important for capacity building to develop a trauma system. Wisdom, motivation and pragmatism of the Israeli model may be useful to streamline work in skeletal trauma services of developing countries having fewer resources to bring consistency and acceptable standards in trauma care. PMID:23634336

  7. Dynamic 3D visual analytic tools: a method for maintaining situational awareness during high tempo warfare or mass casualty operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.

    2010-04-01

    Maintaining Situational Awareness (SA) is crucial to the success of high tempo operations, such as war fighting and mass casualty events (bioterrorism, natural disasters). Modern computer and software applications attempt to provide command and control manager's situational awareness via the collection, integration, interrogation and display of vast amounts of analytic data in real-time from a multitude of data sources and formats [1]. At what point does the data volume and displays begin to erode the hierarchical distributive intelligence, command and control structure of the operation taking place? In many cases, people tasked with making decisions, have insufficient experience in SA of high tempo operations and become overwhelmed easily as vast amounts of data begin to be displayed in real-time as an operation unfolds. In these situations, where data is plentiful and the relevance of the data changes rapidly, there is a chance for individuals to target fixate on those data sources they are most familiar. If these individuals fall into this type of pitfall, they will exclude other data that might be just as important to the success of the operation. To counter these issues, it is important that the computer and software applications provide a means for prompting its users to take notice of adverse conditions or trends that are critical to the operation. This paper will discuss a new method of displaying data called a Crisis ViewTM, that monitors critical variables that are dynamically changing and allows preset thresholds to be created to prompt the user when decisions need to be made and when adverse or positive trends are detected. The new method will be explained in basic terms, with examples of its attributes and how it can be implemented.

  8. Developing and Organizing a Trauma System and Mass Casualty Management: Some Useful Observations from the Israeli Trauma Model

    PubMed Central

    Borgohain, B; Khonglah, T

    2013-01-01

    A trauma system is a chain of arrangements and preparedness to provide quality response to injured from the site of injury to the appropriate hospital for the full range of care. Israel has a unique trauma system developed from the experience gained in peace and in war. The system is designed to fit the state's current health system, which is different from the European and American systems. An effective trauma system may potentially manage mass casualty incidence better. The aim of this paper is to discuss learning points to develop a trauma system based on the Israeli trauma model. After participating in a course on developing a trauma system organized by a top Israeli trauma center, a literature search on the topic on the Internet was done using relevant key words like trauma system and disaster management in Israel using the Google search engine in the pubmed, open access journals and websites of trauma organizations. Israel has a unique trauma system of organizing and managing an emergency event, characterized by a central national organization responsible for management, coordination and ongoing quality control. Because of its unique geopolitical situation, the armed forces has a significant role in the system. Investing adequate resources on continuous education, manpower training, motivation, team-work and creation of public volunteers through advocacy is important for capacity building to develop a trauma system. Wisdom, motivation and pragmatism of the Israeli model may be useful to streamline work in skeletal trauma services of developing countries having fewer resources to bring consistency and acceptable standards in trauma care. PMID:23634336

  9. A wireless first responder handheld device for rapid triage, patient assessment and documentation during mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Killeen, James P; Chan, Theodore C; Buono, Colleen; Griswold, William G; Lenert, Leslie A

    2006-01-01

    Medical care at mass casualty incidents and disasters requires rapid patient triage and assessment, acute care and disposition often in the setting of overwhelming numbers of victims, limited time, and little resources. Current systems rely on a paper triage tag on which rescuers and medical providers mark the patient's triage status and record limited information on injuries and treatments administered in the field. In this manuscript, we describe the design, development and deployment of a wireless handheld device with an electronic medical record (EMR) for use by rescuers responding to mass casualty incidents (MCIs) and disasters. The components of this device, the WIISARD First Responder (WFR), includes a personal digital assistant (PDA) with 802.11 wireless transmission capabilities, microprocessor and non-volatile memory, and a unique EMR software that replicates the rapidity and ease of use of the standard paper triage tag. WFR also expands its functionality by recording real-time medical data electronically for simultaneous access by rescuers, mid-level providers and incident commanders on and off the disaster site. WFR is a part of the Wireless Information System for Medical Response in Disasters (WIISARD) architecture. PMID:17238377

  10. Development of the science of mass casualty incident management: reflection on the medical response to the Wenchuan earthquake and Hangzhou bus fire*

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei-feng; Jiang, Li-bing; Jiang, Guan-yu; Zhang, Mao; Ma, Yue-feng; He, Xiao-jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In this paper, we review the previous classic research paradigms of a mass casualty incident (MCI) systematically and reflect the medical response to the Wenchuan earthquake and Hangzhou bus fire, in order to outline and develop an improved research paradigm for MCI management. Methods: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, China Wanfang, and China Biology Medicine (CBM) databases for relevant studies. The following key words and medical subject headings were used: ‘mass casualty incident’, ‘MCI’, ‘research method’, ‘Wenchuan’, ‘earthquake’, ‘research paradigm’, ‘science of surge’, ‘surge’, ‘surge capacity’, and ‘vulnerability’. Searches were performed without year or language restriction. After searching the four literature databases using the above listed key words and medical subject headings, related articles containing research paradigms of MCI, 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, July 5 bus fire, and science of surge and vulnerability were independently included by two authors. Results: The current progresses on MCI management include new golden hour, damage control philosophy, chain of survival, and three links theory. In addition, there are three evaluation methods (medical severity index (MSI), potential injury creating event (PICE) classification, and disaster severity scale (DSS)), which can dynamically assess the MCI situations and decisions for MCI responses and can be made based on the results of such evaluations. However, the three methods only offer a retrospective evaluation of MCI and thus fail to develop a real-time assessment of MCI responses. Therefore, they cannot be used as practical guidance for decision-making during MCI. Although the theory of surge science has made great improvements, we found that a very important factor has been ignored—vulnerability, based on reflecting on the MCI response to the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake and July 5 bus fire in Hangzhou. Conclusions: This new paradigm breaks through the

  11. Book review of "The Ethics of Coercion in Mass Casualty Medicine" by Griffin Trotter MD, PhD

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sonal

    2007-01-01

    Public health ethics is neither taught widely in medical schools or schools of public health in the US or around the world. It is not surprising that health care professionals are particularly challenged when faced with ethical questions which extend beyond safeguarding the interests of their individual patients to matters that affect overall public good. The perceived threat of terror after September 11 2007, the anthrax attacks and the Katrina debacle are recent circumstances which may result in coercion. These have piqued the interest of medical professionals and the general public on public health ethics. The Ethics of Coercion in Mass Casualty Medicine written by Griffin Trotter MD, PhD attempts to fill a timely void in this area by examining the ethics of coercion in times of public health disasters.

  12. The Boston Marathon Bombings Mass Casualty Incident: One Emergency Department's Information Systems Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Landman, Adam; Teich, Jonathan M; Pruitt, Peter; Moore, Samantha E; Theriault, Jennifer; Dorisca, Elizabeth; Harris, Sheila; Crim, Heidi; Lurie, Nicole; Goralnick, Eric

    2015-07-01

    Emergency department (ED) information systems are designed to support efficient and safe emergency care. These same systems often play a critical role in disasters to facilitate real-time situation awareness, information management, and communication. In this article, we describe one ED's experiences with ED information systems during the April 2013 Boston Marathon bombings. During postevent debriefings, staff shared that our ED information systems and workflow did not optimally support this incident; we found challenges with our unidentified patient naming convention, real-time situational awareness of patient location, and documentation of assessments, orders, and procedures. As a result, before our next mass gathering event, we changed our unidentified patient naming convention to more clearly distinguish multiple, simultaneous, unidentified patients. We also made changes to the disaster registration workflow and enhanced roles and responsibilities for updating electronic systems. Health systems should conduct disaster drills using their ED information systems to identify inefficiencies before an actual incident. ED information systems may require enhancements to better support disasters. Newer technologies, such as radiofrequency identification, could further improve disaster information management and communication but require careful evaluation and implementation into daily ED workflow. PMID:24997562

  13. Incidence and Mortality Rates of Disasters and Mass Casualty Incidents in Korea: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study, 2000-2009

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Shin, Sang Do; Lee, Seung Chul; Park, Ju Ok; Sung, Joohon

    2013-01-01

    The objective of study was to evaluate the incidence and mortality rates of disasters and mass casualty incidents (MCIs) over the past 10 yr in the administrative system of Korea administrative system and to examine their relationship with population characteristics. This was a population-based cross-sectional study. We calculated the nationwide incidence, as well as the crude mortality and injury incidence rates, of disasters and MCIs. The data were collected from the administrative database of the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) and from provincial fire departments from January 2000 to December 2009. A total of 47,169 events were collected from the NEMA administrative database. Of these events, 115 and 3,079 cases were defined as disasters and MCIs that occurred in Korea, respectively. The incidence of technical disasters/MCIs was approximately 12.7 times greater than that of natural disasters/MCIs. Over the past 10 yr, the crude mortality rates for disasters and MCIs were 2.36 deaths per 100,000 persons and 6.78 deaths per 100,000 persons, respectively. The crude injury incidence rates for disasters and MCIs were 25.47 injuries per 100,000 persons and 152 injuries per 100,000 persons, respectively. The incidence and mortality of disasters/MCIs in Korea seem to be low compared to that of trend around the world. PMID:23678255

  14. Tsunami Casualty Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, H.

    2007-12-01

    More than 4500 deaths by tsunamis were recorded in the decade of 1990. For example, the 1992 Flores Tsunami in Indonesia took away at least 1712 lives, and more than 2182 people were victimized by the 1998 Papua New Guinea Tsunami. Such staggering death toll has been totally overshadowed by the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami that claimed more than 220,000 lives. Unlike hurricanes that are often evaluated by economic losses, death count is the primary measure for tsunami hazard. It is partly because tsunamis kill more people owing to its short lead- time for warning. Although exact death tallies are not available for most of the tsunami events, there exist gender and age discriminations in tsunami casualties. Significant gender difference in the victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami was attributed to women's social norms and role behavior, as well as cultural bias toward women's inability to swim. Here we develop a rational casualty model based on humans' limit to withstand the tsunami flows. The application to simple tsunami runup cases demonstrates that biological and physiological disadvantages also make a significant difference in casualty rate. It further demonstrates that the gender and age discriminations in casualties become most pronounced when tsunami is marginally strong and the difference tends to diminish as tsunami strength increases.

  15. Radiologic diagnosis of explosion casualties.

    PubMed

    Eastridge, Brian J; Blackbourne, Lorne; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B

    2008-01-01

    The threat of terrorist events on domestic soil remains an ever-present risk. Despite the notoriety of unconventional weapons, the mainstay in the armament of the terrorist organization is the conventional explosive. Conventional explosives are easily weaponized and readily obtainable, and the recipes are widely available over the Internet. According to the US Department of State and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, over one half of the global terrorist events involve explosions, averaging two explosive events per day worldwide in 2005 (Terrorism Research Center. Available at www.terrorism.com. Accessed April 1, 2007). The Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System: Emergency Medical Services at the Crossroads, published by the Institute of Medicine, states that explosions were the most common cause of injuries associated with terrorism (Institute of Medicine Report: The Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System: Emergency Medical Services at the Crossroads. Washington DC: National Academic Press, 2007). Explosive events have the potential to inflict numerous casualties with multiple injuries. The complexity of this scenario is exacerbated by the fact that few providers or medical facilities have experience with mass casualty events in which human and material resources can be rapidly overwhelmed. Care of explosive-related injury is based on same principles as that of standard trauma management paradigms. The basic difference between explosion-related injury and other injury mechanisms are the number of patients and multiplicity of injuries, which require a higher allocation of resources. With this caveat, the appropriate utilization of radiology resources has the potential to impact in-hospital diagnosis and triage and is an essential element in optimizing the management of the explosive-injured patients. PMID:19069034

  16. Clinical guidelines for responding to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and trauma/burn mass casualty incidents: Quick reference guides for emergency department staff.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Joseph; Burich, David; Smith, Deborah; Hayes, Lynn; Paturas, James; Tomassoni, Anthony

    The word 'DISASTER' may be used as a mnemonic for listing the critical elements of emergency response. The National Disaster Life Support Education Foundation's (NDLSEC) DISASTER paradigm emphasises out-of-hospital emergency response and includes the following elements: (1) detect; (2) incident command system; (3) security and safety; (4) assessment; (5) support; (6) triage and treatment; (7) evacuate; and (8) recovery. This paper describes how the DISASTER paradigm was used to create a series of clinical guidelines to assist the preparedness effort of hospitals for mitigating chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear incidents or explosive devices resulting in trauma/burn mass casualty incidents (MCIs) and their initial response to these events. Descriptive information was obtained from observations and records associated with this project. The information contributed by a group of subject matter experts in disaster medicine, at the Yale New Haven Health System Center for Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response was used to author the clinical guidelines. Akin to the paradigm developed by the NDLSEC for conducting on-scene activities, the clinical guidelines use the letters in the word 'disaster' as a mnemonic for recalling the main elements required for mitigating MCIs in the hospital emergency department. PMID:25416374

  17. Design and characterisation of a novel in vitro skin diffusion cell system for assessing mass casualty decontamination systems.

    PubMed

    Matar, H; Larner, J; Kansagra, S; Atkinson, K L; Skamarauskas, J T; Amlot, R; Chilcott, R P

    2014-06-01

    The efficient removal of contaminants from the outer surfaces of the body can provide an effective means of reducing adverse health effects associated with incidents involving the accidental or deliberate release of hazardous materials. Showering with water is frequently used by first responders as a rapid method of mass casualty decontamination (MCD). However, there is a paucity of data on the generic effectiveness and safety of aqueous decontamination systems. To address these issues, we have developed a new in vitro skin diffusion cell system to model the conditions of a common MCD procedure ("ladder pipe system"). The new diffusion cell design incorporates a showering nozzle, an air sampling port for measurement of vapour loss and/aerosolisation, adjustable (horizontal to vertical) skin orientation and a circulating manifold system (to maintain a specified flow rate, temperature and pressure of shower water). The dermal absorption characteristics of several simulants (Invisible Red S, curcumin and methyl salicylate) measured with the new in vitro model were in good agreement with previous in vitro and in vivo studies. Moreover, these initial studies have indicated that whilst flow rate and water temperature are important factors for MCD, the presence of clothing during showering may (under certain circumstances) cause transfer and spreading of contaminants to the skin surface. PMID:24412538

  18. 77 FR 52746 - Medical Countermeasures for a Burn Mass Casualty Incident

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ..., affiliation, address, email, and telephone number. Those without Internet access should contact Suzanne... participants will be sent technical system requirements after registration and will be sent connection access... Internet at http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/NewsEvents/WorkshopsConferences/default.htm . (Select...

  19. Duration and predictors of emergency surgical operations - basis for medical management of mass casualty incidents

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Hospitals have a critically important role in the management of mass causality incidents (MCI), yet there is little information to assist emergency planners. A significantly limiting factor of a hospital's capability to treat those affected is its surgical capacity. We therefore intended to provide data about the duration and predictors of life saving operations. Methods The data of 20,815 predominantly blunt trauma patients recorded in the Trauma Registry of the German-Trauma-Society was retrospectively analyzed to calculate the duration of life-saving operations as well as their predictors. Inclusion criteria were an ISS ≥ 16 and the performance of relevant ICPM-coded procedures within 6 h of admission. Results From 1,228 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria 1,793 operations could be identified as life-saving operations. Acute injuries to the abdomen accounted for 54.1% followed by head injuries (26.3%), pelvic injuries (11.5%), thoracic injuries (5.0%) and major amputations (3.1%). The mean cut to suture time was 130 min (IQR 65-165 min). Logistic regression revealed 8 variables associated with an emergency operation: AIS of abdomen ≥ 3 (OR 4,00), ISS ≥ 35 (OR 2,94), hemoglobin level ≤ 8 mg/dL (OR 1,40), pulse rate on hospital admission < 40 or > 120/min (OR 1,39), blood pressure on hospital admission < 90 mmHg (OR 1,35), prehospital infusion volume ≥ 2000 ml (OR 1,34), GCS ≤ 8 (OR 1,32) and anisocoria (OR 1,28) on-scene. Conclusions The mean operation time of 130 min calculated for emergency life-saving surgical operations provides a realistic guideline for the prospective treatment capacity which can be estimated and projected into an actual incident admission capacity. Knowledge of predictive factors for life-saving emergency operations helps to identify those patients that need most urgent operative treatment in case of blunt MCI. PMID:20149987

  20. Human casualties in earthquakes: modelling and mitigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spence, R.J.S.; So, E.K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Earthquake risk modelling is needed for the planning of post-event emergency operations, for the development of insurance schemes, for the planning of mitigation measures in the existing building stock, and for the development of appropriate building regulations; in all of these applications estimates of casualty numbers are essential. But there are many questions about casualty estimation which are still poorly understood. These questions relate to the causes and nature of the injuries and deaths, and the extent to which they can be quantified. This paper looks at the evidence on these questions from recent studies. It then reviews casualty estimation models available, and finally compares the performance of some casualty models in making rapid post-event casualty estimates in recent earthquakes.

  1. [Organizational problems of disaster victim identification in mass casualties as exemplified by Tu 154-M and Airbus A310 passenger plane crashes].

    PubMed

    Volkov, A V; Kolkutin, V V; Klevno, V A; Shkol'nikov, B V; Kornienko, I V

    2008-01-01

    Managerial experience is described that was gained during the large-scale work on victim identification following mass casualties in the Tu 154-M and Airbus A310 passenger plane crashes. The authors emphasize the necessity to set up a specialized agency of constant readiness meeting modern requirements for the implementation of a system of measures for personality identification. This agency must incorporate relevant departments of the Ministries of Health, Defense, and Emergency Situations as well as investigative authorities and other organizations. PMID:19048869

  2. Evaluation of a Scalable Information Analytics System for Enhanced Situational Awareness in Mass Casualty Events

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhuorui; Ciottone, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the utility of DIORAMA-II system which provides enhanced situational awareness within a disaster scene by using real-time visual analytics tools and a collaboration platform between the incident commander and the emergency responders. Our trials were conducted in different geographical areas (feature-rich and featureless regions) and in different lighting conditions (daytime and nighttime). DIORAMA-II obtained considerable time gain in efficiency compared to conventional paper based systems. DIORAMA-II time gain was reflected in reduction of both average triage time per patient (up to 34.3% average triage time reduction per patient) and average transport time per patient (up to 76.3% average transport time reduction per red patient and up to 66.3% average transport time reduction per yellow patient). In addition, DIORAMA-II ensured that no patients were left behind or transported in the incorrect order compared to the conventional method which resulted in patients being left behind and transported in the incorrect order. PMID:27433161

  3. Mass Casualty Decontamination in a Chemical or Radiological/Nuclear Incident with External Contamination: Guiding Principles and Research Needs

    PubMed Central

    Cibulsky, Susan M; Sokolowski, Danny; Lafontaine, Marc; Gagnon, Christine; Blain, Peter G.; Russell, David; Kreppel, Helmut; Biederbick, Walter; Shimazu, Takeshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Saito, Tomoya; Jourdain, Jean- René; Paquet, Francois; Li, Chunsheng; Akashi, Makoto; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Prosser, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Hazardous chemical, radiological, and nuclear materials threaten public health in scenarios of accidental or intentional release which can lead to external contamination of people.  Without intervention, the contamination could cause severe adverse health effects, through systemic absorption by the contaminated casualties as well as spread of contamination to other people, medical equipment, and facilities.  Timely decontamination can prevent or interrupt absorption into the body and minimize opportunities for spread of the contamination, thereby mitigating the health impact of the incident.  Although the specific physicochemical characteristics of the hazardous material(s) will determine the nature of an incident and its risks, some decontamination and medical challenges and recommended response strategies are common among chemical and radioactive material incidents.  Furthermore, the identity of the hazardous material released may not be known early in an incident.  Therefore, it may be beneficial to compare the evidence and harmonize approaches between chemical and radioactive contamination incidents.  Experts from the Global Health Security Initiative’s Chemical and Radiological/Nuclear Working Groups present here a succinct summary of guiding principles for planning and response based on current best practices, as well as research needs, to address the challenges of managing contaminated casualties in a chemical or radiological/nuclear incident. PMID:26635995

  4. Mass Casualty Decontamination in a Chemical or Radiological/Nuclear Incident with External Contamination: Guiding Principles and Research Needs.

    PubMed

    Cibulsky, Susan M; Sokolowski, Danny; Lafontaine, Marc; Gagnon, Christine; Blain, Peter G; Russell, David; Kreppel, Helmut; Biederbick, Walter; Shimazu, Takeshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Saito, Tomoya; Jourdain, Jean-René; Paquet, Francois; Li, Chunsheng; Akashi, Makoto; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Prosser, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Hazardous chemical, radiological, and nuclear materials threaten public health in scenarios of accidental or intentional release which can lead to external contamination of people.  Without intervention, the contamination could cause severe adverse health effects, through systemic absorption by the contaminated casualties as well as spread of contamination to other people, medical equipment, and facilities.  Timely decontamination can prevent or interrupt absorption into the body and minimize opportunities for spread of the contamination, thereby mitigating the health impact of the incident.  Although the specific physicochemical characteristics of the hazardous material(s) will determine the nature of an incident and its risks, some decontamination and medical challenges and recommended response strategies are common among chemical and radioactive material incidents.  Furthermore, the identity of the hazardous material released may not be known early in an incident.  Therefore, it may be beneficial to compare the evidence and harmonize approaches between chemical and radioactive contamination incidents.  Experts from the Global Health Security Initiative's Chemical and Radiological/Nuclear Working Groups present here a succinct summary of guiding principles for planning and response based on current best practices, as well as research needs, to address the challenges of managing contaminated casualties in a chemical or radiological/nuclear incident. PMID:26635995

  5. The "RTR" medical response system for nuclear and radiological mass-casualty incidents: a functional TRiage-TReatment-TRansport medical response model.

    PubMed

    Hrdina, Chad M; Coleman, C Norman; Bogucki, Sandy; Bader, Judith L; Hayhurst, Robert E; Forsha, Joseph D; Marcozzi, David; Yeskey, Kevin; Knebel, Ann R

    2009-01-01

    Developing a mass-casualty medical response to the detonation of an improvised nuclear device (IND) or large radiological dispersal device (RDD) requires unique advanced planning due to the potential magnitude of the event, lack of warning, and radiation hazards. In order for medical care and resources to be collocated and matched to the requirements, a [US] Federal interagency medical response-planning group has developed a conceptual approach for responding to such nuclear and radiological incidents. The "RTR" system (comprising Radiation-specific TRiage, TReatment, TRansport sites) is designed to support medical care following a nuclear incident. Its purpose is to characterize, organize, and efficiently deploy appropriate materiel and personnel assets as close as physically possible to various categories of victims while preserving the safety of responders. The RTR system is not a medical triage system for individual patients. After an incident is characterized and safe perimeters are established, RTR sites should be determined in real-time that are based on the extent of destruction, environmental factors, residual radiation, available infrastructure, and transportation routes. Such RTR sites are divided into three types depending on their physical/situational relationship to the incident. The RTR1 sites are near the epicenter with residual radiation and include victims with blast injuries and other major traumatic injuries including radiation exposure; RTR2 sites are situated in relationship to the plume with varying amounts of residual radiation present, with most victims being ambulatory; and RTR3 sites are collection and transport sites with minimal or no radiation present or exposure risk and a victim population with a potential variety of injuries or radiation exposures. Medical Care sites are predetermined sites at which definitive medical care is given to those in immediate need of care. They include local/regional hospitals, medical centers, other

  6. Challenges of major incident management when excess resources are allocated: experiences from a mass casualty incident after roof collapse of a military command center.

    PubMed

    Romundstad, Luis; Sundnes, Knut Ole; Pillgram-Larsen, Johan; Røste, Geir K; Gilbert, Mads

    2004-01-01

    During a military exercise in northern Norway in March 2000, the snow-laden roof of a command center collapsed with 76 persons inside. Twenty-five persons were entrapped and/or buried under snow masses. There were three deaths. Seven patients had serious injuries, three had moderate injuries, and 16 had minor injuries. A military Convalescence Camp that had been set up in a Sports Hall 125 meters from the scene was reorganized as a causality clearing station. Officers from the Convalescence Camp initially organized search and rescue. In all, 417 persons took part in the rescue work with 36 ambulances, 17 helicopters, three ambulance airplanes and one transport plane available. Two ambulances, five helicopters and one transport aircraft were used. Four patients were evacuated to a civilian hospital and six to a field hospital. The stretcher and treatment teams initially could have been more effectively organized. As resources were ample, this was a mass casualty, not a disaster. Firm incident command prevented the influx of excess resources. PMID:15506256

  7. Emergency imaging after a mass casualty incident: role of the radiology department during training for and activation of a disaster management plan.

    PubMed

    Berger, Ferco H; Körner, Markus; Bernstein, Mark P; Sodickson, Aaron D; Beenen, Ludo F; McLaughlin, Patrick D; Kool, Digna R; Bilow, Ronald M

    2016-01-01

    In the setting of mass casualty incidents (MCIs), hospitals need to divert from normal routine to delivering the best possible care to the largest number of victims. This should be accomplished by activating an established hospital disaster management plan (DMP) known to all staff through prior training drills. Over the recent decades, imaging has increasingly been used to evaluate critically ill patients. It can also be used to increase the accuracy of triaging MCI victims, since overtriage (falsely higher triage category) and undertriage (falsely lower triage category) can severely impact resource availability and mortality rates, respectively. This article emphasizes the importance of including the radiology department in hospital preparations for a MCI and highlights factors expected to influence performance during hospital DMP activation including issues pertinent to effective simulation, such as establishing proper learning objectives. After-action reviews including performance evaluation and debriefing on issues are invaluable following simulation drills and DMP activation, in order to improve subsequent preparedness. Historically, most hospital DMPs have not adequately included radiology department operations, and they have not or to a little extent been integrated in the DMP activation simulation. This article aims to increase awareness of the need for radiology department engagement in order to increase radiology department preparedness for DMP activation after a MCI occurs. PMID:26781837

  8. Analysis of driver casualty risk for different work zone types.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jinxian; Meng, Qiang

    2011-09-01

    Using driver casualty data from the Fatality Analysis Report System, this study examines driver casualty risk and investigates the risk contributing factors in the construction, maintenance and utility work zones. The multiple t-tests results show that the driver casualty risk is statistically different depending on the work zone type. Moreover, construction work zones have the largest driver casualty risk, followed by maintenance and utility work zones. Three separate logistic regression models are developed to predict driver casualty risk for the three work zone types because of their unique features. Finally, the effects of risk factors on driver casualty risk for each work zone type are examined and compared. For all three work zone types, five significant risk factors including road alignment, truck involvement, most harmful event, vehicle age and notification time are associated with increased driver casualty risk while traffic control devices and restraint use are associated with reduced driver casualty risk. However, one finding is that three risk factors (light condition, gender and day of week) exhibit opposing effects on the driver casualty risk in different types of work zones. This may largely be due to different work zone features and driver behavior in different types of work zones. PMID:21658509

  9. Biomarker Records Associated with Mass Extinction Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteside, Jessica H.; Grice, Kliti

    2016-06-01

    The history of life on Earth is punctuated by a series of mass extinction episodes that vary widely in their magnitude, duration, and cause. Biomarkers are a powerful tool for the reconstruction of historical environmental conditions and can therefore provide insights into the cause and responses to ancient extinction events. In examining the five largest mass extinctions in the geological record, investigators have used biomarkers to elucidate key processes such as eutrophy, euxinia, ocean acidification, changes in hydrological balance, and changes in atmospheric CO2. By using these molecular fossils to understand how Earth and its ecosystems have responded to unusual environmental activity during these extinctions, models can be made to predict how Earth will respond to future changes in its climate.

  10. The end-triassic mass extinction event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, A.

    1988-01-01

    The end-Triassic is the least studied of the five major episodes of mass extinction recognized in the Phanerozoic, and the Triassic-Jurassic boundary is not precisely defined in most parts of the world, with a paucity of good marine sections and an insufficiency of biostratigraphically valuable fossils. Despite these limitations it is clear that there was a significant episode of mass extinction, affecting many groups, in the Late Norian and the existing facts are consistent with it having taken place at the very end of the period. The best record globally comes from marine strata. There was an almost complete turnover of ammonites across the T-J boundary, with perhaps no more than one genus surviving. About half the bivalve genera and most of the species went extinct, as did many archaeogastropods. Many Paleozoic-dominant brachiopods also disappeared, as did the last of the conodonts. There was a major collapse and disappearance of the Alpine calcareous sponge. Among terrestrial biota, a significant extinction event involving tetrapods was recognized. With regard to possible environmental events that may be postulated to account for the extinctions, there is no evidence of any significant global change of climate at this time. The existence of the large Manicouagan crater in Quebec, dated as about late or end-Triassic, has led to the suggestion that an impact event might be implicated, but so far despite intensive search no unequivocal iridium anomaly or shocked quartz was discovered. On the other hand there is strong evidence for significant marine regression in many parts of the world. It is proposed therefore that the likeliest cause of the marine extinctions is severe reduction in habitat area caused either by regression of epicontinental seas, subsequent widespread anoxia during the succeeding transgression, or a combination of the two.

  11. Radiology leadership during a disaster event.

    PubMed

    Stockburger, Wayne T; Hill, Randy J; McCormack, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    The trauma of a mass casualty event in Fort Hood, TX very quickly impacted the imaging departments of 3 healthcare facilities in central Texas. In the aftermath,there was an opportunity to reflect and learn. When a mass casualty event or disaster takes place, radiology administration needs to be visible, lead staff, manage media attention and law enforcement presence,all while maintaining a high level of quality patient care. Issues of particular concern are training, coping mechanisms, and the impact of leadership. Military and civilian healthcare facilities have different capabilities in terms of training and operations when it comes to managing such an event. PMID:22279719

  12. Clinical review: Tokyo - protecting the health care worker during a chemical mass casualty event: an important issue of continuing relevance.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Sumie; Okumura, Tetsu; Ishimatsu, Shinichi; Miura, Kunihisa; Maekawa, Hiroshi; Naito, Toshio

    2005-08-01

    Determine the effectiveness of decontamination, and perform thorough dry or wet decontamination, depending on the circumstances. Always remain cognizant of the fact that, even after decontamination has been completed, contamination may not have been completely eliminated. Perform periodic monitoring to determine whether secondary exposure has occurred in health care workers; if it appears that secondary exposure has occurred, then the PPE level must be increased and attempts must be made to identify and eliminate the source of the contamination. Finally, if the victims were exposed through ingestion, then consider the possibility that secondary exposure will occur during gastric lavage. PMID:16137390

  13. Catastrophic Events and Mass Extinctions: Impacts and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This volume contains extended abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the conference on Catastrophic Events and Mass Extinctions: Impacts and Beyond, July 9-12, 2000, in Vienna, Austria.

  14. Environmental and Health Consideration for Mass Gatherings at Football Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fodero, Severio D.

    1976-01-01

    University health services along with local and state agencies have the responsibility through a coordinated effort to insure that acceptable environmental sanitation standards are maintained during mass gatherings at athletic events. (MB)

  15. Mass gathering medicine: event factors predicting patient presentation rates.

    PubMed

    Locoh-Donou, Samuel; Yan, Guofen; Berry, Thomas; O'Connor, Robert; Sochor, Mark; Charlton, Nathan; Brady, William

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to identify the event characteristics of mass gatherings that predict patient presentation rates held in a southeastern US university community. We conducted a retrospective review of all event-based emergency medical services (EMS) records from mass gathering patient presentations over an approximate 23 month period, from October 24, 2009 to August 27, 2011. All patrons seen by EMS were included. Event characteristics included: crowd size, venue percentage filled seating, venue location (inside/outside), venue boundaries (bounded/unbounded), presence of free water (i.e., without cost), presence of alcohol, average heat index, presence of climate control (i.e., air conditioning), and event category (football, concerts, public exhibitions, non-football athletic events). We identified 79 mass gathering events, for a total of 670 patient presentations. The cumulative patron attendance was 917,307 persons. The patient presentation rate (PPR) for each event was calculated as the number of patient presentations per 10,000 patrons in attendance. Overdispersed Poisson regression was used to relate this rate to the event characteristics while controlling for crowd size. In univariate analyses, increased rates of patient presentations were strongly associated with outside venues [rate ratio (RR) = 3.002, p < 0.001], unbounded venues (RR = 2.839, p = 0.001), absence of free water (RR = 1.708, p = 0.036), absence of climate control (RR = 3.028, p < 0.001), and a higher heat index (RR = 1.211 per 10-unit heat index increase, p = 0.003). The presence of alcohol was not significantly associated with the PPR. Football events had the highest PPR, followed sequentially by public exhibitions, concerts, and non-football athletic events. In multivariate models, the strong predictors from the univariate analyses retained their predictive significance for the PPR, together with heat index and percent seating. In the setting of mass event

  16. Top quark mass measurement from dilepton events at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2005-12-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass using events collected by the CDF II Detector from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We calculate a likelihood function for the top mass in events that are consistent with t{bar t} {yields} {bar b}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}b{ell}{prime}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{prime} decays. The likelihood is formed as the convolution of the leading-order matrix element and detector resolution functions. The joint likelihood is the product of likelihoods for each of 33 events collected in 340 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, yielding a top quark mass M{sub t} = 165.2 {+-} 6.1(stat.) {+-} 3.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. This first application of a matrix-element technique to t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{bar b}{ell}{prime}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}, decays gives the most precise single measurement of M{sub t} in dilepton events. Combined with other CDF Run II measurements using dilepton events, we measure M{sub t} = 167.9 {+-} 5.2(stat.) {+-} 3.7(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  17. Empirical study of crowd behavior during a real mass event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. L.; Weng, W. G.; Yuan, H. Y.

    2012-08-01

    The study of crowd behavior is essential for the safe organization of mass events. However, precise quantitative empirical data are insufficient due to the lack of mass event scenarios suitable for observation. In this paper, crowd behavior during a mass event in which many people go through a door and then pass a bridge is studied by a new method based on a flow field visualization algorithm widely used in fluid experiments. Two important movement phases, laminar flow on a bridge and stop-and-go waves in a bottleneck area, are investigated. The results show that the velocity profile on the bridge is similar to that of fully developed laminar flow in a pipe. Quantitative analysis of the stop-and-go wave in the bottleneck area shows that the dominant fluctuation frequencies are mainly below 0.1 Hz and the peak frequency is around 0.05 Hz the wave propagation speed is about - 0.69 m s-1. The absolute decrease in speed as the wave propagates is also indicated. By a combination of shock wave theory and a fundamental diagram, an analytical model of a shock wave in a crowd is established to theoretically investigate the stop-and-go wave, and the model can be used to explain the measurement results. This study provides a new method and fundamental data for understanding crowd behavior. The results are also expected to be useful for the design of crowd management strategies during mass events.

  18. 33 CFR 146.40 - Diving casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.40 Diving casualties. Diving related casualties are reported in accordance with 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Diving casualties. 146.40...

  19. 33 CFR 146.40 - Diving casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.40 Diving casualties. Diving related casualties are reported in accordance with 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diving casualties. 146.40...

  20. 33 CFR 146.40 - Diving casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.40 Diving casualties. Diving related casualties are reported in accordance with 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Diving casualties. 146.40...

  1. 33 CFR 146.40 - Diving casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.40 Diving casualties. Diving related casualties are reported in accordance with 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Diving casualties. 146.40...

  2. 33 CFR 146.40 - Diving casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.40 Diving casualties. Diving related casualties are reported in accordance with 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Diving casualties. 146.40...

  3. Reconstructing ~2,200 years of mass movement and tsunami events in a deep fjord-type lake, western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Nicolas; Vasskog, Kristian; Simpson, Guy; Hansen, Louise; Ariztegui, Daniel; Chapron, Emmanuel; Nesje, Atle

    2016-04-01

    Rock avalanches are one of the most devastating geohazards in Norway. A recent example can be given by the September 1936 rock fall that released ca. 1 million m3 of gneissic bedrock from the Ramnefjell Mountain, 800 m above Lake Lovatnet in inner Nordfjord, western Norway. The rock fall plunged into the lake causing a tsunami with a maximum run-up of 74 m and causing 74 casualties. This rock failure opened a deep-seated fracture that may serve as a sliding surface threatening for the generation of potential new series of failures. Lake Lovatnet was surveyed combining simultaneously 1 in3 airgun multi-channel and 3.5 kHz (pinger) single-channel systems. The seismic survey was complemented by piston cores. The general seismic stratigraphy of the lake was reconstructed using the 1 in3 airgun multi-channel survey. The seismic data shows an overall succession of glaciomarine sediments deposited during glacier retreat at the termination of the last ice age and a transition to marine and lacustrine sedimentation, as glacio-isostatic rebound turned the fjord into a land-locked lake. Furthermore, a record of ~2200 years of mass wasting events were identified and dated in the sedimentary record and the events were further mapped in the geophysical data. A specially tailored physically-based numerical simulation was carried out on the 1936 rock fall and related tsunami event in Lake Lovatnet. This model allowed us to reconstruct the effects of such an event on a small lacustrine basin. The outcome of the model has been further validated against historical, marine and terrestrial information. Results from this study further permit to extend the record of mass wasting events beyond historical times, providing a data set that can be applied to comparable basins at various temporal and geographical scales.

  4. Innovative Operations Measures and Nutritional Support for Mass Endurance Events.

    PubMed

    Chiampas, George T; Goyal, Anita V

    2015-11-01

    Endurance and sporting events have increased in popularity and participation in recent years worldwide, and with this comes the need for medical directors to apply innovative operational strategies and nutritional support to meet such demands. Mass endurance events include sports such as cycling and running half, full and ultra-marathons with over 1000 participants. Athletes, trainers and health care providers can all agree that both participant outcomes and safety are of the utmost importance for any race or sporting event. While demand has increased, there is relatively less published guidance in this area of sports medicine. This review addresses public safety, operational systems, nutritional support and provision of medical care at endurance events. Significant medical conditions in endurance sports include heat illness, hyponatraemia and cardiac incidents. These conditions can differ from those typically encountered by clinicians or in the setting of low-endurance sports, and best practices in their management are discussed. Hydration and nutrition are critical in preventing these and other race-related morbidities, as they can impact both performance and medical outcomes on race day. Finally, the command and communication structures of an organized endurance event are vital to its safety and success, and such strategies and concepts are reviewed for implementation. The nature of endurance events increasingly relies on medical leaders to balance safety and prevention of morbidity while trying to help optimize athlete performance. PMID:26553491

  5. Power corrections to event shapes with mass-dependent operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.; Thaler, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an operator depending on the “transverse velocity” r that describes the effect of hadron masses on the leading 1/Q power correction to event-shape observables. Here, Q is the scale of the hard collision. This work builds on earlier studies of mass effects by Salam and Wicke [J. High Energy Phys. 05 (2001) 061JHEPFG1029-8479] and of operators by Lee and Sterman [Phys. Rev. D 75, 014022 (2007)PRVDAQ1550-7998]. Despite the fact that different event shapes have different hadron mass dependence, we provide a simple method to identify universality classes of event shapes whose power corrections depend on a common nonperturbative parameter. We also develop an operator basis to show that at a fixed value of Q, the power corrections for many classic observables can be determined by two independent nonperturbative matrix elements at the 10% level. We compute the anomalous dimension of the transverse velocity operator, which is multiplicative in r and causes the power correction to exhibit nontrivial dependence on Q. The existence of universality classes and the relevance of anomalous dimensions are reproduced by the hadronization models in Pythia 8 and Herwig​+​+, though the two programs differ in the values of their low-energy matrix elements.

  6. Child pedestrian casualties and deprivation.

    PubMed

    Green, James; Muir, Helen; Maher, Mike

    2011-05-01

    The existence of an association between child pedestrian accidents and socio-economic deprivation in Great Britain is well established. The factors driving this association are complex and difficult to isolate. This study uses accident prediction models to investigate the links between child pedestrian casualties and a range of environmental and socio-economic factors commonly linked to deprived areas and people. Separate models are constructed relating to the areas in which the children become casualties, and the areas in which the children reside. Significant socio-economic factors include: single-parenthood, reliance on income support, and crime; and environmental factors include domestic garden area, junction density and pedestrian and vehicular flow density. The study found that factors pertaining to the local environment were more prevalent in the models considering accident locations, whilst socio-economic factors were of greater influence in the residency model. PMID:21376859

  7. Eye casualty services in London

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H B; Daniel, C S; Verma, S

    2013-01-01

    The combined pressures of the European Working Time Directive, 4 h waiting time target, and growing rates of unplanned hospital attendances have forced a major consolidation of eye casualty departments across the country, with the remaining units seeing a rapid increase in demand. We examine the effect of these changes on the provision of emergency eye care in Central London, and see what wider lessons can be learned. We surveyed the managers responsible for each of London's 8 out-of-hours eye casualty services, analysed data on attendance numbers, and conducted detailed interviews with lead clinicians. At London's two largest units, Moorfields Eye Hospital and the Western Eye Hospital, annual attendance numbers have been rising at 7.9% per year (to 76 034 patients in 2010/11) and 9.6% per year (to 31 128 patients in 2010/11), respectively. Using Moorfields as a case study, we discuss methods to increase capacity and efficiency in response to this demand, and also examine some of the unintended consequences of service consolidation including patients travelling long distances to geographically inappropriate units, and confusion over responsibility for out-of-hours inpatient cover. We describe a novel ‘referral pathway' developed to minimise unnecessary travelling and delay for patients, and propose a forum for the strategic planning of London's eye casualty services in the future. PMID:23370420

  8. Effects of a mass mortality event on gorgonian reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, C.; Coma, R.; Zabala, M.

    2008-03-01

    The impact of a disturbance is normally measured in terms of its effects on adult mortality, whilst the less obvious impact on reproductive biology is generally ignored. Although previous studies have contributed to understanding the effects of a mass mortality of gorgonians in 1999 at NW Mediterranean Sea, none of them have considered its impact on reproduction. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of mass mortality events on the reproduction of the gorgonian Paramuricea clavata, and examine the effect of the damage 1 year (June 2000) and 2 years (June 2001) after the event. The reproductive parameters of female colonies were more affected than those of males. In female colonies that were moderately or severely damaged, the proportion of fertile polyps decreased by about 22-35%, whilst in the worst affected males there was only a 12% decrease. Female colonies showed a progressive decrease in gonadal biomass with increasing damage to a maximum reduction of 73-75% of oocyte production observed in colonies with >33% injury. In contrast, in males, the gonadal biomass decreased rapidly for colonies with 5% of injured surface, with a reduction in spermary production of 49-64%. The same pattern of decrease in gonadal output compared to the extent of the injury was observed in 2001, two years after the mass mortality event. This indicated that the observed pattern was a response to the extent of the injury rather than a direct effect of the event. These severe effects on the reproduction of the red gorgonian species have implications for the recovery of affected populations in the long-term. This study demonstrated that an evaluation of the impact over different demographic parameters is needed to understand all the consequences of these disturbances.

  9. Surge Capacity and Capability. A Review of the History and Where the Science is Today Regarding Surge Capacity during a Mass Casualty Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Randy D.; Cairns, Bruce A.; Cairns, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    Disasters which include countless killed and many more injured, have occurred throughout recorded history. Many of the same reports of disaster also include numerous accounts of individuals attempting to rescue those in great peril and render aid to the injured and infirmed. The purpose of this paper is to briefly discuss the transition through several periods of time with managing a surge of many patients. This review will focus on the triggering event, injury and illness, location where the care is provided and specifically discuss where the science is today. PMID:24795873

  10. Climate modelling of mass-extinction events: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feulner, Georg

    2009-07-01

    Despite tremendous interest in the topic and decades of research, the origins of the major losses of biodiversity in the history of life on Earth remain elusive. A variety of possible causes for these mass-extinction events have been investigated, including impacts of asteroids or comets, large-scale volcanic eruptions, effects from changes in the distribution of continents caused by plate tectonics, and biological factors, to name but a few. Many of these suggested drivers involve or indeed require changes of Earth's climate, which then affect the biosphere of our planet, causing a global reduction in the diversity of biological species. It can be argued, therefore, that a detailed understanding of these climatic variations and their effects on ecosystems are prerequisites for a solution to the enigma of biological extinctions. Apart from investigations of the paleoclimate data of the time periods of mass extinctions, climate-modelling experiments should be able to shed some light on these dramatic events. Somewhat surprisingly, however, only a few comprehensive modelling studies of the climate changes associated with extinction events have been undertaken. These studies will be reviewed in this paper. Furthermore, the role of modelling in extinction research in general and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  11. Development of coronal mass ejections and association with interplanetary events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pick, M.; Maia, D.; Howard, R.; Thompson, B.; Lanzerotti, L. J. L.; Bothmer, V.; Lamy, P.

    1997-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) obtained by comparing the observations of the large angle spectroscopic coronagraph (LASCO) and the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) instrument onboard the SOHO with those of the Nancay radioheliograph. The radioheliograph provides images at five levels in the corona. An excellent spatial association is found between the position and extent of the type 4 radio sources and the CMEs seen by LASCO. One result is the existence for these two events of discrete successive phases in their development. For these events, Ulysses and SOHO missions measured interplanetary particles of coronal origin. The coronal acceleration site was attempted to be identified, as well as the path of these particles from the corona to the interplanetary medium.

  12. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident means— (a) Any casualty or accident involving...

  13. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident means— (a) Any casualty or accident involving...

  14. 33 CFR 173.55 - Report of casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Report of casualty or accident... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY VESSEL NUMBERING AND CASUALTY AND ACCIDENT REPORTING Casualty and Accident Reporting § 173.55 Report of casualty or accident. (a) The operator of a vessel shall submit the casualty...

  15. An Analysis of the Relationship between Casualty Risk Per Crash and Vehicle Mass and Footprint for Model Year 2000-2007 Light-Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Tom

    2012-08-01

    NHTSA recently completed a logistic regression analysis (Kahane 2012) updating its 2003 and 2010 studies of the relationship between vehicle mass and US fatality risk per vehicle mile traveled (VMT). The new study updates the previous analyses in several ways: updated FARS data for 2002 to 2008 involving MY00 to MY07 vehicles are used; induced exposure data from police reported crashes in several additional states are added; a new vehicle category for car-based crossover utility vehicles (CUVs) and minivans is created; crashes with other light-duty vehicles are divided into two groups based on the crash partner vehicle’s weight, and a category for all other fatal crashes is added; and new control variables for new safety technologies and designs, such as electronic stability controls (ESC), side airbags, and methods to meet voluntary agreement to improve light truck compatibility with cars, are included.

  16. Physiological and medical aspects of strenuous mass sport events.

    PubMed

    Vuori, I

    1982-01-01

    This review summarizes the main features to be considered previous to and during the performance of strenuous, prolonged mass sport events. At the present time the best predictors of one's ability to endure the effort are probably not physiological tests but detailed information of one's health status and exercise habits in relation to the type, duration, and intensity of the event. The preparation for high-intensity events lasting 1 1/2 hours or more should include filling of the glycogen stores of the most taxed muscles by proper supercompensation techniques. During and even immediately prior to prolonged activities, largely irrespectively of their intensity, it is advisable to ingest small amounts of easily absorbable carbohydrate, best as fluid, latest after 1 1/2 hours of exercise, and every 20-30 min thereafter. Fluid loss should be kept in minimum by drinking 150-200 ml at a time 3 to 4 times per hour. This is of ultimate importance in warm and hot weather. In cold especially middle-aged and older persons should pay special attention to avoid excessive intensity of effort during the first 15 min of exercise, and to protect the most cold sensitive parts of the body, like head and neck, in order to avoid reflex increase of circulatory stress. Serious health risks of mass sport events have been shown to be small, when factors causing excessive acute, circulatory load are avoided. Therefore, exercise during or shortly after acute or febrile illness, start of exercise without sufficient warm-up especially in cold, sudden or maximal bursts of activity, exercise loaded with strong emotions, exercise after heavy meal or alcohol intake, and smoking during exercise should be avoided. PMID:7149623

  17. The Frasnian-Famennian mass killing event(s), methods of identification and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geldsetzer, H. H. J.

    1988-01-01

    The absence of an abnormally high number of earlier Devonian taxa from Famennian sediments was repeatedly documented and can hardly be questioned. Primary recognition of the event(s) was based on paleontological data, especially common macrofossils. Most paleontologists place the disappearance of these common forms at the gigas/triangularis contact and this boundary was recently proposed as the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) boundary. Not unexpectedly, alternate F-F positions were suggested caused by temporary Frasnian survivors or sudden post-event radiations of new forms. Secondary supporting evidence for mass killing event(s) is supplied by trace element and stable isotope geochemistry but not with the same success as for the K/T boundary, probably due to additional 300 ma of tectonic and diagenetic overprinting. Another tool is microfacies analysis which is surprisingly rarely used even though it can explain geochemical anomalies or paleontological overlap not detectable by conventional macrofacies analysis. The combination of microfacies analysis and geochemistry was applied at two F-F sections in western Canada and showed how interdependent the two methods are. Additional F-F sections from western Canada, western United States, France, Germany and Australia were sampled or re-sampled and await geochemical/microfacies evaluation.

  18. Contribution of forensic autopsy to scene reconstruction in mass fire casualties: a case of alleged arson on a floor consisting of small compartments in a building.

    PubMed

    Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Oritani, Shigeki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    A fire is an important cause of mass disasters, involving various forensic issues. Before dawn on an early morning, 16 male visitors in their twenties to sixties were killed in a possibly incendiary fire at a 'private video parlor' consisting of small compartments in a building. The main causes of death as determined by forensic autopsy were acute carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication for all of the 15 found-dead victims, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy following acute CO intoxication for a victim who died in hospital. Burns were mild (<20% of body surface) in most victims, except for three victims found between the entrance and the estimated fire-outbreak site; thus, identification was completed without difficulty, supported by DNA analysis. Blood carboxyhemoglobin saturation (COHb) was higher for victims found dead in the inner area. Blood cyanide levels were sublethal, moderately correlated to COHb, but were higher in victims found around the estimated fire-outbreak site. There was no evidence of thinner, alcohol or drug abuse, or an attack of disease as a possible cause of an accidental fire outbreak. These observations contribute to evidence-based reconstruction of the fire disaster, and suggest how deaths could have been prevented by appropriate disaster measures. PMID:25311374

  19. The pre-hospital management of injury following mass toxic release; a comparison of military and civil approaches.

    PubMed

    Baker, D J

    1999-10-01

    Mass release of toxic substances may occur either accidentally or deliberately in both peace and war. Different approaches to the management of casualties from such an event have been developed by civil and military emergency medical teams, and reflect the different circumstances in which they operate. The nature and classification of toxic hazards is considered and the civil and military operational and medical responses compared. Both systems have different aspects that can contribute to early casualty management in a contaminated environment. PMID:10617335

  20. Natural Organic Matter and the Event Horizon of Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertkorn, N.; Frommberger, M.; Witt, M.; Koch, B. P.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Perdue, E. M.

    2009-05-01

    are observed using six different modes of ionization (APCI, APPI, ESI in positive and negative modus) imply considerable selectivity of the ionization process and suggest that the observed mass spectra represent simplified projections of still more complex mixtures. N. Hertkorn, M. Frommberger, M. Witt, B. Koch, Ph. Schmitt-Kopplin, E. M. Perdue, Natural Organic Matter and the Event Horizon of Mass Spectrometry, Anal. Chem., 80 (2008) 8908-8919.

  1. Predicting casualties implied by TIPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafiloski, G.; Wyss, M.; Wyss, B. M.

    2009-12-01

    When an earthquake is predicted, forecast, or expected with a higher than normal probability, losses are implied. We estimated the casualties (fatalities plus injured) that should be expected if earthquakes in TIPs (locations of Temporarily Increased Probability of earthquakes) defined by Kossobokov et al. (2009) should occur. We classified the predictions of losses into the categories red (more than 400 fatalities or more than 1,000 injured), yellow (between 100 and 400 fatalities), green (fewer than 100 fatalities), and gray (undetermined). TIPs in Central Chile, the Philippines, Papua, and Taiwan are in the red class, TIPs in Southern Sumatra, Nicaragua, Vanatu, and Honshu in the yellow class, and TIPs in Tonga, Loyalty Islands, Vanatu, S. Sandwich Islands, Banda Sea, and the Kuriles, are classified as green. TIPs where the losses depend moderately on the assumed point of major energy release were classified as yellow; TIPs such as in the Talaud Islands and in Tonga, where the losses depend very strongly on the location of the epicenter, were classified as gray. The accuracy of loss estimates after earthquakes with known hypocenter and magnitude are affected by uncertainties in transmission and soil properties, the composition of the building stock, the population present, and the method by which the numbers of casualties are calculated. In the case of TIPs, uncertainties in magnitude and location are added, thus we calculate losses for a range of these two parameters. Therefore, our calculations can only be considered order of magnitude estimates. Nevertheless, our predictions can come to within a factor of two of the observed numbers, as in the case of the M7.6 earthquake of October 2005 in Pakistan that resulted in 85,000 fatalities (Wyss, 2005). In subduction zones, the geometrical relationship between the earthquake source capable of a great earthquake and the population is clear because there is only one major fault plane available, thus the epicentral

  2. Coral population dynamics across consecutive mass mortality events.

    PubMed

    Riegl, Bernhard; Purkis, Sam

    2015-11-01

    Annual coral mortality events due to increased atmospheric heat may occur regularly from the middle of the century and are considered apocalyptic for coral reefs. In the Arabian/Persian Gulf, this situation has already occurred and population dynamics of four widespread corals (Acropora downingi, Porites harrisoni, Dipsastrea pallida, Cyphastrea micropthalma) were examined across the first-ever occurrence of four back-to-back mass mortality events (2009-2012). Mortality was driven by diseases in 2009, bleaching and subsequent diseases in 2010/2011/2012. 2009 reduced P. harrisoni cover and size, the other events increasingly reduced overall cover (2009: -10%; 2010: -20%; 2011: -20%; 2012: -15%) and affected all examined species. Regeneration was only observed after the first disturbance. P. harrisoni and A. downingi severely declined from 2010 due to bleaching and subsequent white syndromes, while D. pallida and P. daedalea declined from 2011 due to bleaching and black-band disease. C. microphthalma cover was not affected. In all species, most large corals were lost while fission due to partial tissue mortality bolstered small size classes. This general shrinkage led to a decrease of coral cover and a dramatic reduction of fecundity. Transition matrices for disturbed and undisturbed conditions were evaluated as Life Table Response Experiment and showed that C. microphthalma changed the least in size-class dynamics and fecundity, suggesting they were 'winners'. In an ordered 'degradation cascade', impacts decreased from the most common to the least common species, leading to step-wise removal of previously dominant species. A potentially permanent shift from high- to low-coral cover with different coral community and size structure can be expected due to the demographic dynamics resultant from the disturbances. Similarities to degradation of other Caribbean and Pacific reefs are discussed. As comparable environmental conditions and mortality patterns must be

  3. Flood basalt eruptions, comet showers, and mass extinction events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, Michael R.; Stothers, Richard B.

    1988-01-01

    A chronology of initiation dates of the major continental flood basalt episodes has been established from compilation of published K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages of basaltic flows and related basic intrusions. The dating is therefore independent of the biostratigraphic and paleomagnetic time scales, and the estimated errors of the inititation dates are approximately + or - 4 pct. There are 11 distinct episodes of continental flood basalts known during the past 250 Myr. The data show that flood basalt episodes are generally relatively brief geologic events, with intermittent eruptions during peak output periods lasting ony 2 to 3 Myr or less. Statistical analyses suggest that these episodes may have occurred quasi-periodically with a mean cycle time of 32 + or - 1 Myr. The initiation dates of the flood basalts are close to the estimated dates of marine mass extinctions and impact-crater clusters. Although a purely internal forcing might be argued for the flood basalt volcanism, quasi-periodic comet impacts may be the trigger for both the flood basalts and the extinctions. Impact cratering models suggest that large-body impactors lead to deep initial cratering, and therefore may cause mantle disturbances and initiate mantle plume activity. The flood basalt episodes commonly mark the initiation or jump of a mantle hotspot, and are often followed by continental rifting and separation. Evidence from dynamical studies of impacts, occurrences of craters and hotspots, and the geochemistry of boundary layers is synthesized to provide a possible model of impact-generated volcanism. Flood basalt eruptions may themselves have severe effects on climate, and possibly on life. Impacts might, as a result, have led to mass extinctions through direct atmospheric disturbances, and/or indirectly through prolonged flood basalt volcanism.

  4. 46 CFR 4.05-1 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notice of marine casualty. 4.05-1 Section 4.05-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-1 Notice of marine casualty. (a) Immediately after the addressing of...

  5. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident...

  6. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident...

  7. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident...

  8. 46 CFR 4.05-1 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notice of marine casualty. 4.05-1 Section 4.05-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-1 Notice of marine casualty. (a) Immediately after the addressing of...

  9. 48 CFR 552.270-7 - Fire and Casualty Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire and Casualty Damage... Fire and Casualty Damage. As prescribed in 570.703, insert the following clause: Fire and Casualty Damage (JUN 2011) If the entire premises are destroyed by fire or other casualty, this lease...

  10. 48 CFR 552.270-7 - Fire and Casualty Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire and Casualty Damage... Fire and Casualty Damage. As prescribed in 570.703, insert the following clause: Fire and Casualty Damage (JUN 2011) If the entire premises are destroyed by fire or other casualty, this lease...

  11. 19 CFR 158.27 - Accidental fire or other casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Accidental fire or other casualty. 158.27 Section... Casualty, Loss, or Theft While in Customs Custody § 158.27 Accidental fire or other casualty. In the case of injury or destruction by accidental fire or other casualty, the following evidence shall...

  12. 19 CFR 158.27 - Accidental fire or other casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accidental fire or other casualty. 158.27 Section... Casualty, Loss, or Theft While in Customs Custody § 158.27 Accidental fire or other casualty. In the case of injury or destruction by accidental fire or other casualty, the following evidence shall...

  13. 33 CFR 173.55 - Report of casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Report of casualty or accident. 173.55 Section 173.55 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY VESSEL NUMBERING AND CASUALTY AND ACCIDENT REPORTING Casualty and Accident Reporting § 173.55 Report of casualty or...

  14. 46 CFR 28.80 - Report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... accordance with paragraph (c) of this section, as soon as possible after the casualty, to the underwriter of... involved in the casualty; and (13) The monetary amount paid for an injury or a death. (d) A casualty to a... the casualty involves any of the following. (1) Loss of life. (2) An injury that requires...

  15. 48 CFR 552.270-7 - Fire and Casualty Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire and Casualty Damage... Fire and Casualty Damage. As prescribed in 570.703, insert the following clause: Fire and Casualty Damage (JUN 2011) If the entire premises are destroyed by fire or other casualty, this lease...

  16. Understanding combat casualty care statistics.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, John B; Stansbury, Lynn G; Champion, Howard R; Wade, Charles; Bellamy, Ronald F

    2006-02-01

    Maintaining good hospital records during military conflicts can provide medical personnel and researchers with feedback to rapidly adjust treatment strategies and improve outcomes. But to convert the resulting raw data into meaningful conclusions requires clear terminology and well thought out equations, utilizing consistent numerators and denominators. Our objective was to arrive at terminology and equations that would produce the best insight into the effectiveness of care at different stages of treatment, either pre or post medical treatment facility care. We first clarified three essential terms: 1) the case fatality rate (CFR) as percentage of fatalities among all wounded; 2) killed in action (KIA) as percentage of immediate deaths among all seriously injured (not returning to duty); and 3) died of wounds (DOW) as percentage of deaths following admission to a medical treatment facility among all seriously injured (not returning to duty). These equations were then applied consistently across data from the WWII, Vietnam and the current Global War on Terrorism. Using this clear set of definitions we used the equations to ask two basic questions: What is the overall lethality of the battlefield? How effective is combat casualty care? To answer these questions with current data, the three services have collaboratively created a joint theater trauma registry (JTTR), cataloging all the serious injuries, procedures, and outcomes for the current war. These definitions and equations, consistently applied to the JTTR, will allow meaningful comparisons and help direct future research and appropriate application of personnel. PMID:16508502

  17. A redundant resource: a pre-planned casualty clearing station for a FIFA 2010 Stadium in Durban.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Timothy C; Samlal, Sanjay; Naidoo, Rajen; Hendrikse, Steven; Gloster, Alex; Ramlal, Melvin; Ngema, Sibongiseni; Rowe, Michael

    2012-10-01

    This report details the background, planning, and establishment of a mass-casualty management area for the Durban Moses Mabhida Stadium at the Natal Mounted Rifles base, by the Department of Health and the eThekwini Fire and Rescue Service, for the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) 2010 Soccer World Cup. The report discusses the use of the site during the seven matches played at that stadium, and details the aspects of mass-gathering major incident site planning for football (soccer). The area also was used as a treatment area for other single patient incidents outside of the stadium, but within the exclusion perimeter, and the 22 patients treated by the Casualty Clearing Station (CCS) team are described and briefly discussed. A site-specific patient presentation rate of 0.48 per 10,000 and transport-to-hospital rate (TTHR) of 0.09/10,000 are reported. Lessons learned and implications for future event planning are discussed in the light of the existing literature. PMID:22591650

  18. The hematologist and radiation casualties.

    PubMed

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Waselenko, Jamie K; Armitage, James O; MacVittie, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M

    2003-01-01

    Since the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001, preparation by the health care system for an act of terrorism has been mandated by leaders of governments. Scenarios for terrorist acts involving radioactive material have been identified, and approaches to management (based on past experience from atomic weapons detonations and radiation accidents) have been developed. Because of their experience in managing patients with profound cytopenia and/or marrow aplasia, hematologists will be asked to play a significant role in evaluating and treating victims of mass accidental or deliberate exposure to radiation. This review provides a framework for understanding how radiation levels are quantified, how radiation alters the function of hematopoietic (and nonhematopoietic) cells and tissues, and how victims receiving a significant radiation dose can be identified and managed. In Section I, Dr. Nicholas Dainiak reviews four components of the Acute Radiation Syndrome: the hematopoietic, neurovascular, gastrointestinal and cutaneous subsyndromes. Clinical signs and symptoms are discussed for exposed individuals at the time of initial presentation (the prodromal phase) and during their course of disease (the manifest illness). In Section II, he presents clinical and laboratory methods to assess radiation doses, including time to onset and severity of vomiting, rate of decline in absolute blood lymphocyte count and the appearance of chromosome aberrations such as dicentrics and ring forms. Potential scenarios of a radiation terrorist event are reviewed, and methods for initial clinical assessment, triage, and early management of the acute radiation syndrome and its component subsyndromes are summarized. In Section III, Dr. Jamie Waselenko reviews the hematopoietic syndrome, and presents guidelines for the use of cytokine therapy, antibiotics, and supportive care that have been developed by the Strategic National Pharmaceutical Stockpile Working Group. Results of preclinical and

  19. Simulated casualties and medics for emergency training.

    PubMed

    Chi, D M; Kokkevis, E; Ogunyemi, O; Bindiganavale, R; Hollick, M J; Clarke, J R; Webber, B L; Badler, N I

    1997-01-01

    The MediSim system extends virtual environment technology to allow medical personnel to interact with and train on simulated casualties. The casualty model employs a three-dimensional animated human body that displays appropriate physical and behavioral responses to injury and/or treatment. Medical corpsmen behaviors were developed to allow the actions of simulated medical personnel to conform to both military practice and medical protocols during patient assessment and stabilization. A trainee may initiate medic actions through a mouse and menu interface; a VR interface has also been created by Stansfield's research group at Sandia National Labs. PMID:10168943

  20. 46 CFR 122.260 - Reports of potential vessel casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 122.260 Reports of potential vessel casualty. (a) An owner... district rescue coordination center (RCC) cognizant over the area in which the vessel was last...

  1. Nonconventional terror--the anesthesiologist's role in a nerve agent event.

    PubMed

    Talmor, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    The structure and biologic action of nerve agents is similar to organophosphates, commonly used as insecticides. Acetylcholine accumulation and binding to the cholinergic receptor site stimulates the affected organs producing a predictable set of clinical symptoms. Treatment of the affected patients will include decontamination, respiratory and hemodynamic support, as well as specific antidotes. The multiple casualties that may be expected present additional logistical and organizational problems. The specific skills of anesthesiologists will make them invaluable members of the care team in such a chemical mass casualty event. PMID:17400165

  2. Viewing Events in the Center-of-Mass System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruby, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    In elementary physics, collisions are usually studied by employing the conservation of momentum, and sometimes also the conservation of kinetic energy. However, in nuclear reactions, changes of mass that complicate the situation often occur. To illustrate the latter, we shall cite two examples of endoergic nuclear reactions, i.e., those for which…

  3. 46 CFR 185.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 185.206 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.206 Written report of marine... of any marine casualty. This written report is in addition to the immediate notice required by...

  4. 46 CFR 122.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 122.206 Section 122... MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 122.206 Written report of marine casualty. (a) The owner, master, agent,...

  5. 46 CFR 122.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 122.206 Section 122... MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 122.206 Written report of marine casualty. (a) The owner, master, agent,...

  6. 46 CFR 122.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 122.206 Section 122... MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 122.206 Written report of marine casualty. (a) The owner, master, agent,...

  7. 46 CFR 185.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 185.206 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.206 Written report of marine... of any marine casualty. This written report is in addition to the immediate notice required by...

  8. 46 CFR 185.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 185.206 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.206 Written report of marine... of any marine casualty. This written report is in addition to the immediate notice required by...

  9. 46 CFR 122.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 122.206 Section 122... MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 122.206 Written report of marine casualty. (a) The owner, master, agent,...

  10. 46 CFR 185.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 185.206 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.206 Written report of marine... of any marine casualty. This written report is in addition to the immediate notice required by...

  11. 46 CFR 185.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 185.206 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.206 Written report of marine... of any marine casualty. This written report is in addition to the immediate notice required by...

  12. 46 CFR 122.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 122.206 Section 122... MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 122.206 Written report of marine casualty. (a) The owner, master, agent,...

  13. Building vulnerability and human casualty estimation for a pyroclastic flow: a model and its application to Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Robin J. S.; Baxter, Peter J.; Zuccaro, Giulio

    2004-05-01

    Pyroclastic flows clearly present a serious threat to life for the inhabitants of settlements on the slopes of volcanoes with a history of explosive eruptions; but it is increasingly realised that buildings can provide a measure of protection to occupants trapped by such flows. One important example is Vesuvius, whose eruption history includes many events which were lethal for the inhabitants of the neighbouring Vesuvian villages. Recent computational fluid dynamics computer modelling for Vesuvius [Todesco et al., Bull. Volcanol. 64 (2002) 155-177] has enabled a realistic picture of an explosive eruption to be modelled, tracing the time-dependent development of the physical parameters of a simulated flow at a large three-dimensional mesh of points, based on assumed conditions of temperature, mass-flow rate and particle size distribution at the vent. The output includes mapping of temperature, mixture density and mixture velocity over the whole adjacent terrain. But to date this information has not been used to assess the impacts of such flows on buildings and their occupants. In the project reported in this paper, estimates of the near-ground flow parameters were used to assess the impact of a particular simulated pyroclastic flow (modelled roughly on the 1631 eruption) on the buildings and population in four of the Vesuvian villages considered most at risk. The study had five components. First, a survey of buildings and the urban environment was conducted to identify the incidence of characteristics and elements likely to affect human vulnerability, and to classify the building stock. The survey emphasised particularly the number, location and type of openings characteristic of the major classes of the local building stock. In the second part of the study, this survey formed the basis for estimates of the probable impact of the pyroclastic flow on the envelope and internal air conditions of typical buildings. In the third part, a number of distinct ways in which

  14. Measurement of the top quark mass in lepton+jets events with secondary vertex tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Robert Duane; /Northeastern U.

    2007-02-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the lepton + jets final state in D0 Run II is presented. Events with single isolated energetic charged lepton (electron or muon), exactly four calorimeter jets, and significant missing transverse energy are selected. Probabilities used to discriminate between signal and background are assumed to be proportional to differential cross-sections, calculated using event kinematics and folding in object resolutions and parton distribution functions. The event likelihoods constructed using these probabilities are varied with the top quark mass, m{sub t}, and the jet energy scale, JES, to give the smallest possible combined statistical + JES uncertainty.

  15. Prospective impact of forest fire on Mass Movement events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziade, Rouba; Abdallah, Chadi; Baghdadi, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    Mass Movement (MM) has always been one of the main natural hazards that threatened both the natural and human environments of Lebanon and their occurrence has increased by almost 60% between 1956 and 2008. On the other hand, Forest Fire (FF) has emerged to impose as another natural hazard that has destroyed more than 25 % of Lebanon's forests in less than 40 years. The increased FF occurrence is one of the potential detrimental impacts of anthropogenic climate change where high temperatures and current-year drought are strongly associated with an increase in the number of fires and area burned in a variety of forest types. A simple observation shows the coincident trends between MM and FF. This paper investigates the potential impact of FF on MM occurrence in Damour and Nahr Ibrahim watersheds in Lebanon. Preconditioning factors taken into consideration were topography, soil, geology, mean annual precipitation and land cover maps. MM and FF inventory maps were produced through Remote Sensing (RS) using aerial (1956 and 2008) and satellite images (2005 and 2011) in addition to Google Earth Timeline. Furthermore, FF was introduced as the inducing factor whose impact was assessed by the calculation of FF burn severity. This burn severity was extracted from Landsat images (1986-2011) through the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) index. A field study was carried out in order to substantiate the MM inventory. Furthermore, the burn index maps were validated through the Mini-Disk Infiltrometer (MDI), a device which supplies the soil infiltration rate usually after a fire. Following the standardization of the impact factors into layers using Geographic Information System (GIS), the relative importance of these layers for causing MM has been evaluated using modified InfoVal method and a MM Susceptibility Map (MMSM) was generated. Hence, every factor obtained a weight that shows its impact on MM occurrence. Preceded only by Land Cover change, NBR obtained the highest weight making

  16. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-30

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt events using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 of pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having no identified charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet containing a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons, which are usually not included in the top-quark mass measurements. The measurement uses as kinematic variables the invariant mass of two jets consistent with the mass of the W boson, and the invariant masses of two different three-jet combinations. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of Mtop = 172.3 ± 2.4 (stat) ± 1.0 (syst) GeV/c2.

  17. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-30

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt events using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 of pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having no identified charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet containing a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons, which are usually not included inmore » the top-quark mass measurements. The measurement uses as kinematic variables the invariant mass of two jets consistent with the mass of the W boson, and the invariant masses of two different three-jet combinations. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of Mtop = 172.3 ± 2.4 (stat) ± 1.0 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  18. Social vulnerability and the natural and built environment: a model of flood casualties in Texas.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Sammy; Brody, Samuel D; Peacock, Walter Gillis; Vedlitz, Arnold; Grover, Himanshu

    2008-12-01

    Studies on the impacts of hurricanes, tropical storms, and tornados indicate that poor communities of colour suffer disproportionately in human death and injury.(2) Few quantitative studies have been conducted on the degree to which flood events affect socially vulnerable populations. We address this research void by analysing 832 countywide flood events in Texas from 1997-2001. Specifically, we examine whether geographic localities characterised by high percentages of socially vulnerable populations experience significantly more casualties due to flood events, adjusting for characteristics of the natural and built environment. Zero-inflated negative binomial regression models indicate that the odds of a flood casualty increase with the level of precipitation on the day of a flood event, flood duration, property damage caused by the flood, population density, and the presence of socially vulnerable populations. Odds decrease with the number of dams, the level of precipitation on the day before a recorded flood event, and the extent to which localities have enacted flood mitigation strategies. The study concludes with comments on hazard-resilient communities and protection of casualty-prone populations. PMID:18435768

  19. Hospital preparedness for possible nonconventional casualties: an Israeli experience.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Shaul; Yoeli, Naomi; Paz, Gedalia; Barbash, Gabriel I; Varssano, David; Fertel, Nurit; Hassner, Avi; Drory, Margalit; Halpern, Pinchas

    2004-01-01

    Since 9/11, hospitals and health authorities have been preparing medical response in case of various mass terror attacks. The experience of Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center in treating suicide-bombing mass casualties served, in the time leading up to the war in Iraq, as a platform for launching a preparedness program for possible attacks with biological and chemical agents of mass destruction. Adapting Quarantelli's criteria on disaster mitigation to the "microinfrastructure" of the hospital, and including human behavior experts, we attempted to foster an interactive emergency management process that would deal with contingencies stemming from the potential hazards of chemical and biological (CB) weapons. The main objective of our work was to encourage an organization-wide communication network that could effectively address the contingent hazards unique to this unprecedented situation. A stratified assessment of needs, identification of unique dangers to first responders, and assignment of team-training sessions paved the way for program development. Empowerment through leadership and resilience training was introduced to emergency team leaders of all disciplines. Focal subject matters included proactive planning, problem-solving, informal horizontal and vertical communication, and coping through stress-management techniques. The outcome of this process was manifested in an "operation and people" orientation supporting a more effective and compatible emergency management. The aim of article is to describe this process and to point toward the need for a broad-spectrum view in such circumstances. Unlike military units, the civilian hospital staff at risk, expected to deal with CB casualties, requires adequate personal consideration to enable effective functioning. Issues remain to be addressed in the future. We believe that collaboration and sharing of knowledge, information, and expertise beyond the medical realm is imperative in assisting hospitals to expedite

  20. The Tactical Combat Casualty Care Casualty Card TCCC Guidelines ? Proposed Change 1301.

    PubMed

    Kotwal, Russ S; Butler, Frank K; Montgomery, Harold R; Brunstetter, Tyson J; Diaz, George Y; Kirkpatrick, James W; Summers, Nancy L; Shackelford, Stacy A; Holcomb, John B; Bailey, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing trauma care delivery is paramount to saving lives on the battlefield. During the past decade of conflict, trauma care performance improvement at combat support hospitals and forward surgical teams in Afghanistan and Iraq has increased through Joint Trauma System and DoD Trauma Registry data collection, analysis, and rapid evidence-based adjustments to clinical practice guidelines. Although casualties have benefitted greatly from a trauma system and registry that improves hospital care, still lacking is a comprehensive and integrated system for data collection and analysis to improve performance at the prehospital level of care. Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) based casualty cards, TCCC after action reports, and unit-based prehospital trauma registries need to be implemented globally and linked to the DoD Trauma Registry in a seamless manner that will optimize prehospital trauma care delivery. PMID:23877773

  1. Truth was an early casualty

    SciTech Connect

    Sich, A.R.

    1996-05-01

    At a May 1986 press conference in Moscow-held just 11 days after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station-the cult of high technology was unabashedly preached to an auditorium full of shocked news correspondents and invited guests. When questioned as to the number of fatalities the accident had caused and the impact of the accident on Soviet society and the Soviet nuclear industry, A.M. Petrosyants (then chairman of the Soviet State Committee on the Utilization of Atomic Energy) responded: {open_quotes}Science requires victims.{close_quotes} The Soviet system numbered its victims in the millions. In a sense, the Chernobyl accident was just one of the many misfortunes misrepresented by the Soviet government over the decades in its continuing effort to shape public perceptions of domestic disasters, natural and manmade. And yet, the international character of the Chernobyl accident, the fact that radioactive fallout knows no national boundaries, made it a watershed event. The accident exposed glaring weaknesses in the Soviet system: its backward technology, its sloppy safety standards, its inability to admit failure. And it brought to the surface many of the injustices, inefficiencies, and secrets that the Soviet government had tried to keep hidden. With the world`s spotlight focused on Chernobyl, General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev was left with little choice other than to prove to the West his dedication to reform by more fully implementing his recently announced policy of glasnost or `openness.` In turn, glasnost was a major factor that led to the demise of the Soviet Union, which embodied a system that was fundamentally at odds with freedom of expression and accessibile information. Unfortunately, old habits die hard. Ten years after the accident, many nuclear bureaucrats in the former Soviet Union, partiularly in Russia, are still too secretive and too much given to obfuscation.

  2. Association of Coronal Mass Ejections and Type II Radio Bursts with Impulsive Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Cliver, E. W.; Reames, D. V.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    We report the association of impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and metric type II radio bursts. We identified 38 impulsive SEP events using the WIND/EPACT instrument and their CME association was investigated using white light data from SOHO/LASCO. We found that (1) at least ˜ 28--39 % of impulsive SEP events were associated with CMEs, (2) only 8--13 % were associated with metric type II radio bursts. The statistical properties of the associated CMEs were investigated and compared with those of general CMEs and CMEs associated with large gradual SEP events. The CMEs associated with impulsive SEP events were significantly slower (median speed of 613 kmps) and narrower (49 deg) than those of CMEs associated with large gradual SEP events (1336 kmps, 360 deg), but faster than the general CMEs (408 kmps).

  3. Field deployable EEG monitor for nerve agent casualties.

    PubMed

    McDonnall, Daniel; Hiatt, Scott; Yatsenko, Dimitri; Guillory, K Shane

    2009-01-01

    Early recognition and aggressive management of seizure activity is important in the treatment of patients with nerve agent exposure. However, these patients can experience non-convulsive seizures that are difficult to identify without EEG monitoring. In this paper, we discuss the development and testing of a low-cost, field-deployable device that records and displays patient EEG trends over time. The device is optimized for early levels of care for military and mass casualty patients until they can be relocated to medical facilities with more comprehensive monitoring. The device also records pulse oximetry and acceleration information, and patient data are available for later analysis and improvement of treatment protocols. PMID:19964118

  4. Measurement of the top-quark mass with dilepton events selected using neuroevolution at CDF.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shekhar, R; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Whiteson, S; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-04-17

    We report a measurement of the top-quark mass M_{t} in the dilepton decay channel tt[over ] --> bl;{'+} nu_{l};{'}b[over ]l;{-}nu[over ]_{l}. Events are selected with a neural network which has been directly optimized for statistical precision in top-quark mass using neuroevolution, a technique modeled on biological evolution. The top-quark mass is extracted from per-event probability densities that are formed by the convolution of leading order matrix elements and detector resolution functions. The joint probability is the product of the probability densities from 344 candidate events in 2.0 fb;{-1} of pp[over ] collisions collected with the CDF II detector, yielding a measurement of M_{t} = 171.2 +/- 2.7(stat) +/- 2.9(syst) GeV / c;{2}. PMID:19518620

  5. What would you do? Managing a metro network during mass crowd events.

    PubMed

    Barr, Andy C; Lau, Raymond C M; Ng, Nelson W H; da Silva, Marco Antônio; Baptista, Marcia; Oliveira, Vinícius Floriano; Barbosa, Maria Beatriz; Batistini, Estela; de Toledo Ramos, Nancy

    2010-03-01

    Major public events, such as sporting events, carnivals and festivals, are common occurrences in urban and city environments. They are characterised by the mass movement of people in relatively small areas, far in excess of normal daily activity. This section reviews how different metro systems across the globe respond to such peaks of activity, ensuring that people are moved swiftly, efficiently and safely. To this end, representatives from four major public metro systems (London, Hong Kong, Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo) describe how their respective metro systems respond to the capacity demands of a major annual event. PMID:20494882

  6. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Using the Invariant Mass of Lepton Pairs in Soft Muon b-tagged Events

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-06-01

    We present the first measurement of the mass of the top quark in a sample of t{bar t} {yields} {ell}{bar {nu}}b{bar b}q{bar q} events (where {ell} = e, {mu}) selected by identifying jets containing a muon candidate from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor hadrons (soft muon b-tagging). The p{bar p} collision data used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2 fb{sup -1} and was collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurement is based on a novel technique exploiting the invariant mass of a subset of the decay particles, specifically the lepton from the W boson of the t {yields} Wb decay, and the muon from a semileptonic b decay. We fit template histograms, derived from simulation of t{bar t} events and a modeling of the background, to the mass distribution observed in the data and measure a top quark mass of 180.5 {+-} 12.0(stat.) {+-} 3.6(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, consistent with the current world average.

  7. Cross-section-constrained top-quark mass measurement from dilepton events at the Tevatron.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; DeCecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-02-15

    We report the first top-quark mass measurement that uses a cross-section constraint to improve the mass determination. This measurement is made with a dilepton tt event candidate sample collected with the Collider Detector II at Fermilab. From a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.2 fb(-1), we measure a top-quark mass of 170.7(-3.9)(+4.2)(stat)+/-2.6(syst)+/-2.4(theory) GeV/c(2). The measurement without the cross-section constraint is 169.7(-4.9)(+5.2)(stat)+/-3.1(syst) GeV/c(2). PMID:18352461

  8. Top quark mass measurement from dilepton events at CDF II with the matrix-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-05-01

    We describe a measurement of the top quark mass using events with two charged leptons collected by the CDF II detector from p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The likelihood in top mass is calculated for each event by convoluting the leading order matrix element describing q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}{bar b}{ell}{prime} {nu}{sub {ell}}, with detector resolution functions. The presence of background events in the data sample is modeled using similar calculations involving the matrix elements for major background processes. In a data sample with integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1}, we observe 33 candidate events and measure M{sub top} = 165.2 {+-} 6.1(stat.) {+-} 3.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. This measurement represents the first application of this method to events with two charged leptons and is the most precise single measurement of the top quark mass in this channel.

  9. A Measurement of the Mass of the Top Quark in Lepton + Jets Events at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik Matthews

    2004-12-01

    This document presents a measurement of the top quark mass using the CDF run II detector at Fermilab. Colliding beams of protons and anti-protons at Fermilab's Tevatron ({radical}s = 1.96 TeV) produce top/anti-top pairs, which decay to W{sup +}W{sup -} b{bar b}; events are selected where one W decays hadronically, and one W decays to either e or {mu} plus a neutrino. The data sample was collected between March 2002 and September 2003, and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 162 pb{sup -1}. Thirty-seven candidate t{bar t} events are found with at least one b jet identified by its displaced vertex. In each event, the best fit top quark invariant mass is determined by minimizing a {chi}{sup 2} for the overconstrained kinematic system. A likelihood fit of the reconstructed masses in the data sample to distributions from simulated signal and background events gives a top mass of 174.9{sub -7.7}{sup +7.1}(stat.) {+-} 6.5(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The dominant systematic error is due to uncertainties in the jet energy measurements.

  10. DEFLECTIONS OF FAST CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AND THE PROPERTIES OF ASSOCIATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S. W.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2012-08-01

    The onset times and peak intensities of solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth have long been thought to be influenced by the open magnetic fields of coronal holes (CHs). The original idea was that a CH lying between the solar SEP source region and the magnetic footpoint of the 1 AU observer would result in a delay in onset and/or a decrease in the peak intensity of that SEP event. Recently, Gopalswamy et al. showed that CHs near coronal mass ejection (CME) source regions can deflect fast CMEs from their expected trajectories in space, explaining the appearance of driverless shocks at 1 AU from CMEs ejected near solar central meridian (CM). This suggests that SEP events originating in CME-driven shocks may show variations attributable to CH deflections of the CME trajectories. Here, we use a CH magnetic force parameter to examine possible effects of CHs on the timing and intensities of 41 observed gradual E {approx} 20 MeV SEP events with CME source regions within 20 Degree-Sign of CM. We find no systematic CH effects on SEP event intensity profiles. Furthermore, we find no correlation between the CME leading-edge measured position angles and SEP event properties, suggesting that the widths of CME-driven shock sources of the SEPs are much larger than the CMEs. Independently of the SEP event properties, we do find evidence for significant CME deflections by CH fields in these events.

  11. Deflections of Fast Coronal Mass Ejections and the Properties of Associated Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2012-01-01

    The onset times and peak intensities of solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth have long been thought to be influenced by the open magnetic fields of coronal holes (CHs). The original idea was that a CH lying between the solar SEP source region and the magnetic footpoint of the 1 AU observer would result in a delay in onset and/or a decrease in the peak intensity of that SEP event. Recently, Gopalswamy et al. showed that CHs near coronal mass ejection (CME) source regions can deflect fast CMEs from their expected trajectories in space, explaining the appearance of driverless shocks at 1 AU from CMEs ejected near solar central meridian (CM). This suggests that SEP events originating in CME-driven shocks may show variations attributable to CH deflections of the CME trajectories. Here, we use a CH magnetic force parameter to examine possible effects of CHs on the timing and intensities of 41 observed gradual E approx 20 MeV SEP events with CME source regions within 20 deg. of CM. We find no systematic CH effects on SEP event intensity profiles. Furthermore, we find no correlation between the CME leading-edge measured position angles and SEP event properties, suggesting that the widths of CME-driven shock sources of the SEPs are much larger than the CMEs. Independently of the SEP event properties, we do find evidence for significant CME deflections by CH fields in these events

  12. Daily variation in natural disaster casualties: information flows, safety, and opportunity costs in tornado versus hurricane strikes.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Sammy; Tavani, Daniele; Weiler, Stephan

    2013-07-01

    Casualties from natural disasters may depend on the day of the week they strike. With data from the Spatial Hazard Events and Losses Database for the United States (SHELDUS), daily variation in hurricane and tornado casualties from 5,043 tornado and 2,455 hurricane time/place events is analyzed. Hurricane forecasts provide at-risk populations with considerable lead time. Such lead time allows strategic behavior in choosing protective measures under hurricane threat; opportunity costs in terms of lost income are higher during weekdays than during weekends. On the other hand, the lead time provided by tornadoes is near zero; hence tornados generate no opportunity costs. Tornado casualties are related to risk information flows, which are higher during workdays than during leisure periods, and are related to sheltering-in-place opportunities, which are better in permanent buildings like businesses and schools. Consistent with theoretical expectations, random effects negative binomial regression results indicate that tornado events occurring on the workdays of Monday through Thursday are significantly less lethal than tornados that occur on weekends. In direct contrast, and also consistent with theory, the expected count of hurricane casualties increases significantly with weekday occurrences. The policy implications of observed daily variation in tornado and hurricane events are considered. PMID:23126406

  13. 33 CFR 150.820 - When must a written report of casualty be submitted, and what must it contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must also include the information relating to alcohol and drug involvement specified by 46 CFR 4.05-12... CFR part 16. (c) If filed immediately after the event, the written report required by paragraph (a) of... casualty be submitted, and what must it contain? 150.820 Section 150.820 Navigation and Navigable...

  14. 33 CFR 150.820 - When must a written report of casualty be submitted, and what must it contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... must also include the information relating to alcohol and drug involvement specified by 46 CFR 4.05-12... CFR part 16. (c) If filed immediately after the event, the written report required by paragraph (a) of... casualty be submitted, and what must it contain? 150.820 Section 150.820 Navigation and Navigable...

  15. 46 CFR 197.484 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.484 Notice of casualty. (a) In addition to the requirements of subpart 4.05 of this chapter and 33 CFR 146.30, the person-in-charge shall notify the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, as soon as possible after a diving casualty occurs, if...

  16. 46 CFR 197.484 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.484 Notice of casualty. (a) In addition to the requirements of subpart 4.05 of this chapter and 33 CFR 146.30, the person-in-charge shall notify the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, as soon as possible after a diving casualty occurs, if...

  17. 46 CFR 197.484 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the requirements of subpart 4.05 of this chapter and 33 CFR 146.30, the person-in-charge shall notify... casualty involves any of the following: (1) Loss of life. (2) Diving-related injury to any person causing... casualty including presumed cause. (6) Nature and extent of the injury to persons. (c) The notice...

  18. 33 CFR 146.35 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reporting requirements of 46 CFR 4.05-12. (b) The written report required by paragraph (a) of this section...) Describes the casualty, including the date and time; (3) Describes the nature and extent of injury to...-2692 for casualties resulting in property damage, personnel injury, or loss of life. (c) If filed...

  19. 46 CFR 197.484 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the requirements of subpart 4.05 of this chapter and 33 CFR 146.30, the person-in-charge shall notify... casualty involves any of the following: (1) Loss of life. (2) Diving-related injury to any person causing... casualty including presumed cause. (6) Nature and extent of the injury to persons. (c) The notice...

  20. 46 CFR 197.484 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.484 Notice of casualty. (a) In addition to the requirements of subpart 4.05 of this chapter and 33 CFR 146.30, the person-in-charge shall notify the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, as soon as possible after a diving casualty occurs, if...

  1. The Casualty Actuarial Society: Helping Universities Train Future Actuaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boa, J. Michael; Gorvett, Rick

    2014-01-01

    The Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) believes that the most effective way to advance the actuarial profession is to work in partnership with universities. The CAS stands ready to assist universities in creating or enhancing courses and curricula associated with property/casualty actuarial science. CAS resources for university actuarial science…

  2. 46 CFR 109.415 - Retention of records after casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Retention of records after casualty. 109.415 Section 109.415 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Reports, Notifications, and Records Reports and Notifications § 109.415 Retention of records after casualty. (a) The owner,...

  3. 46 CFR 109.415 - Retention of records after casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....415 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS... casualty. (a) The owner, agent, master, or person in charge of a unit for which a report of casualty is... Charge, Marine Inspection, that records need not be retained on board. (b) The records which must...

  4. 26 CFR 1.165-7 - Casualty losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Casualty losses. 1.165-7 Section 1.165-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.165-7 Casualty...

  5. 26 CFR 1.165-7 - Casualty losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Casualty losses. 1.165-7 Section 1.165-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.165-7 Casualty...

  6. 26 CFR 1.165-7 - Casualty losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Casualty losses. 1.165-7 Section 1.165-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.165-7 Casualty...

  7. 26 CFR 1.165-7 - Casualty losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Casualty losses. 1.165-7 Section 1.165-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.165-7 Casualty...

  8. 26 CFR 1.165-7 - Casualty losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Casualty losses. 1.165-7 Section 1.165-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.165-7 Casualty...

  9. A data-based model to locate mass movements triggered by seismic events in Sichuan, China.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Fabio Teodoro

    2014-01-01

    Earthquakes affect the entire world and have catastrophic consequences. On May 12, 2008, an earthquake of magnitude 7.9 on the Richter scale occurred in the Wenchuan area of Sichuan province in China. This event, together with subsequent aftershocks, caused many avalanches, landslides, debris flows, collapses, and quake lakes and induced numerous unstable slopes. This work proposes a methodology that uses a data mining approach and geographic information systems to predict these mass movements based on their association with the main and aftershock epicenters, geologic faults, riverbeds, and topography. A dataset comprising 3,883 mass movements is analyzed, and some models to predict the location of these mass movements are developed. These predictive models could be used by the Chinese authorities as an important tool for identifying risk areas and rescuing survivors during similar events in the future. PMID:24085622

  10. Neutrino Mass Hierarchy and Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with One Hundred Thousand Reactor Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzi, F.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.

    High-statistics reactor neutrino experiments at medium baselines will probe mass-mixing parameters governing neutrino oscillations at long wavelength, driven by the (δm2, θ12) and at short wavelength, driven by (Δm2, θ13).The interference between these two oscillations will allow to probe the mass hierarchy. The determination of the neutrino mass spectrum hierarchy, however, will require an unprecedented level of detector performance and collected statistics, and the control of several systematics at (sub)percent level. In this work we perform accurate theoretical calculations of reactor event spectra and refined statistical analyses to show that with O(105) reactor events, a typical sensitivity of ∼ 2σ could be achieved by an experiment such as JUNO. We also show the impact of the energy scale and spectrum shape systematics on the determination of the hierarchy.

  11. Solar energetic proton events and coronal mass ejections near solar minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Cliver, E. W.; Cane, H. V.; Mcguire, R. E.; Reames, D. V.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Howard, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the association of coronal mass ejections (CME's) with solar energetic (9-23 MeV) proton (SEP) events during the 1983-1985 approach to solar minimum. Twenty-two of 25 SEP events were associated with CME's, a result comparable to that previously found for the period 1979-1982 around solar maximum. Peak SEP fluxes were correlated with CME speeds but not with CME angular sizes. In addition, many associated CME's lay well out of the ecliptic plane. In a reverse study using all west hemisphere CME's of speeds exceeding 800 km/s and covering the period 1979-1985, we found that 29 of 31 events originating on the solar disk or limb were associated with observed SEP's. However, in contrast to the previous study, we found no cases of SEP events associated with magnetically well connected flares of short duration that lacked CME's.

  12. Diversification events and the effects of mass extinctions on Crocodyliformes evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Bronzati, Mario; Montefeltro, Felipe C; Langer, Max C

    2015-05-01

    The rich fossil record of Crocodyliformes shows a much greater diversity in the past than today in terms of morphological disparity and occupation of niches. We conducted topology-based analyses seeking diversification shifts along the evolutionary history of the group. Our results support previous studies, indicating an initial radiation of the group following the Triassic/Jurassic mass extinction, here assumed to be related to the diversification of terrestrial protosuchians, marine thalattosuchians and semi-aquatic lineages within Neosuchia. During the Cretaceous, notosuchians embodied a second diversification event in terrestrial habitats and eusuchian lineages started diversifying before the end of the Mesozoic. Our results also support previous arguments for a minor impact of the Cretaceous/Palaeogene mass extinction on the evolutionary history of the group. This argument is not only based on the information from the fossil record, which shows basal groups surviving the mass extinction and the decline of other Mesozoic lineages before the event, but also by the diversification event encompassing only the alligatoroids in the earliest period after the extinction. Our results also indicate that, instead of a continuous process through time, Crocodyliformes diversification was patchy, with events restricted to specific subgroups in particular environments and time intervals. PMID:26064649

  13. Impacts of the 1998 and 2010 mass coral bleaching events on the Western Gulf of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutthacheep, Makamas; Yucharoen, Mathinee; Klinthong, Wanlaya; Pengsakun, Sittiporn; Sangmanee, Kanwara; Yeemin, Thamasak

    2013-11-01

    A long-term study of coral reef ecology in the Gulf of Thailand provides a good opportunity to examine the temporal variation on the impact of mass coral bleaching at those reef sites. We compared the bleaching and mortality of corals between the mass bleaching events in 1998 and 2010 at a coral community in the Western Gulf of Thailand. The aim was to identify the coral species which were most likely to suffer from (and to be able to tolerate) changes in seawater temperature. Significant differences in the susceptibility of the coral taxa to bleaching events between the years 1998 and 2010 and among coral species were documented. Bleaching was significantly different between the most dominant corals. Diploastrea heliopora was the most resistant coral to bleaching in both years. Some coral species showed more resistance to bleaching in 2010. The coral mortality following the mass bleaching events in 1998 and 2010 varied significantly between the years and the coral taxa. Mortality of some dominant coral taxa was also lower in 2010. Seven coral species, i.e. Astreopora myriophthalma, Pachyseris rugosa, Turbinaria mesenterina, Goniastrea pectinata, Favia pallida, F. maritima, Favites halicora, Platygyra daedalea and Galaxea fascicularis, were tolerant to the coral bleaching events. An ecosystem-based approach to managing coral reefs in the Gulf of Thailand is needed to identify appropriate marine protected area networks and to strengthen marine and coastal resource policies in order to build coral reef resilience.

  14. Diversification events and the effects of mass extinctions on Crocodyliformes evolutionary history

    PubMed Central

    Bronzati, Mario; Montefeltro, Felipe C.; Langer, Max C.

    2015-01-01

    The rich fossil record of Crocodyliformes shows a much greater diversity in the past than today in terms of morphological disparity and occupation of niches. We conducted topology-based analyses seeking diversification shifts along the evolutionary history of the group. Our results support previous studies, indicating an initial radiation of the group following the Triassic/Jurassic mass extinction, here assumed to be related to the diversification of terrestrial protosuchians, marine thalattosuchians and semi-aquatic lineages within Neosuchia. During the Cretaceous, notosuchians embodied a second diversification event in terrestrial habitats and eusuchian lineages started diversifying before the end of the Mesozoic. Our results also support previous arguments for a minor impact of the Cretaceous/Palaeogene mass extinction on the evolutionary history of the group. This argument is not only based on the information from the fossil record, which shows basal groups surviving the mass extinction and the decline of other Mesozoic lineages before the event, but also by the diversification event encompassing only the alligatoroids in the earliest period after the extinction. Our results also indicate that, instead of a continuous process through time, Crocodyliformes diversification was patchy, with events restricted to specific subgroups in particular environments and time intervals. PMID:26064649

  15. Partnered disaster preparedness: lessons learned from international events.

    PubMed

    Born, Christopher T; Cullison, Thomas R; Dean, Jeffrey A; Hayda, Roman A; McSwain, Norman; Riddles, Lawrence M; Shimkus, Albert J

    2011-01-01

    Military, governmental, and civilian agencies routinely respond to disasters around the world, including large-scale mass casualty events such as the earthquake in Pakistan in 2005, Hurricane Katrina in the United States in 2005, and the earthquake in Haiti in 2010. Potential exists for improved coordination of medical response between civilian and military sectors and for the creation of a planned and practiced interface. Disaster preparedness could be enhanced with more robust disaster education for civilian responders; creation of a database of precredentialed, precertified medical specialists; implementation of a communication bridge; and the establishment of agreements between military and civilian medical/surgical groups in advance of major catastrophic events. PMID:21304048

  16. Mass-gathering Events: The Public Health Challenge of the Kumbh Mela 2013.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Suresh; Cariappa, Mudera P

    2015-12-01

    Mass-gathering (MG) events pose challenges to the most adept of public health practitioners in ensuring the health safety of the population. These MGs can be for sporting events, musical festivals, or more commonly, have religious undertones. The Kumbh Mela 2013 at Allahabad, India may have been the largest gathering of humanity in history with nearly 120 million pilgrims having thronged the venue. The scale of the event posed a challenge to the maintenance of public health security and safety. A snapshot of the experience of managing the hygiene and sanitation aspects of this mega event is presented herein, highlighting the importance of proactive public health planning and preparedness. There having been no outbreaks of disease is vindication of the steps undertaken in planning and preparedness, notwithstanding obvious limitations of unsanitary behaviors and traditional beliefs of those attending the festival. The evident flaw on post-event analyses was the failure to cater adequately for environmental mopping-up operations after the festival. Besides, a system of real-time monitoring of disease and morbidity patterns, harnessing low cost technology alternatives, should be planned for at all such future events. PMID:26490181

  17. Operation Castle Cascade: managing multiple casualties from a simulated chemical weapons attack.

    PubMed

    Siegel, David; Younggren, Bradley N; Ness, Brian; Kvool, Valerie

    2003-05-01

    In the wake of the recent terrorist attack on the United States, there is an ever-increasing need for the defense against weapons of mass destruction. The use of explosive devices in combination with chemical agents could result in a community disaster with multiple traumatic and medical injuries. Military medical personnel may be the first called upon due to their unique training and equipment. Operation Castle Cascade was a large-scale exercise on a military instillation involving the apprehension of hostages and detonation of an explosive device containing dimethyl sulfate. We will provide details on the medical management of 50 patients with simulated chemical and traumatic injuries. Issues relating to on-site chemical identification, triage, decontamination, treatment, casualty collection, and transportation of casualties are addressed in this article. PMID:12775167

  18. Empirical study of a unidirectional dense crowd during a real mass event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. L.; Weng, W. G.; Yuan, H. Y.; Chen, J. G.

    2013-06-01

    Many tragic crowd disasters have happened across the world in recent years, such as the Phnom Penh stampede in Cambodia, crowd disaster in Mina/Makkah, and the Love Parade disaster in Germany, showing that management of mass events is a tough task for organizers. The study of unidirectional flow, one of the most common forms of motion in mass activities, is essential for safe organization of such events. In this paper, the properties of unidirectional flow in a crowded street during a real mass event in China are quantitatively investigated with sophisticated active infrared counters and an image processing method. A complete dataset of flow rates during the whole celebration is recorded, and a time series analysis gives new insight into such activities. The spatial analysis shows that the velocity and density of the crowd are inhomogeneous due to the boundary effect, whereas the flux is uniform. The estimated capacity of the street indicates that the maximum flow rate under normal condition should be between 1.73 and 1.98 /m/s, which is in good agreement with several field studies available in the existing literature. In consideration of the significant deviation among different studies, fundamental diagrams of dense crowds are also re-verified, and the results here are consistent with those from other field studies of unidirectional flow, but different from the bidirectional and experimental results. It is suggested that the data from multidirectional flow and experiments cannot be directly applied to unidirectional dense flow in a real mass event. The results also imply that the density of a similar unidirectional marching crowd should be controlled to be under 5 /m2, which can produce optimal efficiency and have more possibility to ensure safety. The field study data given here provide a good example of a database for crowd studies.

  19. Precision measurement of the top quark mass from dilepton events at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-12-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass, M{sub t}, in the dilepton decay channel of t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{prime}{sup +} {nu}{sub {ell}}, {bar b}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} using an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the CDF II detector. We apply a method that convolutes a leading-order matrix element with detector resolution functions to form event-by-event likelihoods; we have enhanced the leading-order description to describe the effects of initial-state radiation. The joint likelihood is the product of the likelihoods from 78 candidate events in this sample, which yields a measurement of M{sub t} = 164.5 {+-} 3.9(stat.) {+-} 3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, the most precise measurement of M{sub t} in the dilepton channel.

  20. Avian evolution, Gondwana biogeography and the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction event.

    PubMed Central

    Cracraft, J.

    2001-01-01

    The fossil record has been used to support the origin and radiation of modern birds (Neornithes) in Laurasia after the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction event, whereas molecular clocks have suggested a Cretaceous origin for most avian orders. These alternative views of neornithine evolution are examined using an independent set of evidence, namely phylogenetic relationships and historical biogeography. Pylogenetic relationships of basal lineages of neornithines, including ratite birds and their allies (Palaleocognathae), galliforms and anseriforms (Galloanserae), as well as lineages of the more advanced Neoves (Gruiformes, (Capimulgiformes, Passeriformes and others) demonstrate pervasive trans-Antarctic distribution patterns. The temporal history of the neornithines can be inferred from fossil taxa and the ages of vicariance events, and along with their biogeographical patterns, leads to the conclusion that neornithines arose in Gondwana prior to the Cretaceous Tertiary extinction event. PMID:11296857

  1. Solar energetic particle events and coronal mass ejections: New insights from SOHO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothmer, V.; Posner, A.; Kunow, H.; Mueller-Mellin, R.; Heber, B.; Pick, M.; Thompson, B. J.; Delaboudiniere, J.-P.; Brueckner, G. E.; Howard, R. A.; Michels, D. J.; St.Cyr, C.; Szabo, A.; Hudson, H. S.; Mann, G.; Classen, H.-T.; McKenna-Lawlor, S.

    1997-01-01

    The scientific payload of SOHO, launched in December 1995, enables comprehensive studies of the sun from its interior, to the outer corona and solar wind. In its halo orbit around the Lagrangian point of the sun-earth system, the comprehensive suprathermal and energetic particle analyzer (COSTEP) measures in situ energetic partiles in the energy range 44 keV/particle to greater than 53 MeV/n. Although solar activity was at minimum, COSTEP detected from mid December 1995 until the end of July 1997, 30 solar energetic particle (SEP) events, including both gradual and implusive type SEPs. These minimum phase SEP events are unique in the sense that their associated solar source phenomena can be investigated in detail without interference by other simultaneous solar events as is usually the case at times around solar activity maximum. Simultaneous observations of the solar corona are provided by the large angle spectroscopic coronagraph (LASCO) and the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT). From the correlated SOHO observations, a one to one correspondence of SEP events with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) was found. Most of the SEP events were associated with west-limb CMEs, some with halo CMEs that later passed the SOHO spacecraft and with Moreton-like disturbances in the lower solar atmosphere as observed by the EIT. Many SEP events were detected at sector boundaries of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) suggesting a magnetic connection to coronal streamers at the sun as supported by LASCO observations of mass ejections at the base of helmet streamers. Energetic particle and LASCO white-light observations yield evidence that CMEs often lead to large-scale disturbances of the sun's corona, probably affecting at times areas all around the sun.

  2. Late Frasnian mass extinction: Conodont event stratigraphy, global changes, and possible causes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandberg, Charles A.; Ziegler, Willi; Dreesen, Roland; Butler, Jamie L.

    1988-01-01

    Several abrupt changes in conodont biofacies are documented to occur synchronously at six primary control sections across the Frasnian-Famennian boundary in Euramerica. These changes occurred within a time-span of only about 100,000 years near the end of the latest Frasnian linguiformis Zone, which is formally named to replace the Uppermost gigas Zone. The conodont-biofacies changes are interpreted to reflect a eustatic rise followed by an abrupt eustatic fall immediately preceding the late Frasnian mass extinction. Two new conodont species are named and described. Ancyrognathus ubiquitus n.sp. is recorded only just below and above the level of late Frasnian extinction and hence is a global marker for that event. Palmatolepispraetriangularis n.sp. is the long-sought Frasnian ancestor of the formerly cryptogenic species, Pa. triangularis, indicator of the earliest Famennian Lower triangularis Zone. The actual extinction event occurred entirely within the Frasnian and is interpreted to have been of brief duration-from as long as 20,000 years to as short as several days. The eustatic rise-and-fall couplet associated with the late Frasnian mass extinction is similar to eustatic couplets associated with the demise of most Frasnian (F2h) reefs worldwide about 1 m.y. earlier and with a latest Famennian mass extinction about 9.5 m.y. later. All these events may be directly or indirectly attributable to extraterrestrial triggering mechanisms. An impact of a small bolide or a near miss of a larger bolide may have caused the earlier demise of Frasnian reefs. An impact of possibly the same larger bolide in the Southern Hemisphere would explain the late Frasnian mass extinction. Global regression during the Famennian probably resulted from Southern-Hemisphere glaciation triggered by the latest Frasnian impact. Glaciation probably was the indirect cause of the latest Famennian mass extinction.

  3. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-08-09

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; → tt̄ data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of Γ + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, we measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.

  4. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-08-09

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; → tt̄ data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of Γ + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, wemore » measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.« less

  5. A data base approach for prediction of deforestation-induced mass wasting events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    A major topic of concern in timber management is determining the impact of clear-cutting on slope stability. Deforestation treatments on steep mountain slopes have often resulted in a high frequency of major mass wasting events. The Geographic Information System (GIS) is a potentially useful tool for predicting the location of mass wasting sites. With a raster-based GIS, digitally encoded maps of slide hazard parameters can be overlayed and modeled to produce new maps depicting high probability slide areas. The present investigation has the objective to examine the raster-based information system as a tool for predicting the location of the clear-cut mountain slopes which are most likely to experience shallow soil debris avalanches. A literature overview is conducted, taking into account vegetation, roads, precipitation, soil type, slope-angle and aspect, and models predicting mass soil movements. Attention is given to a data base approach and aspects of slide prediction.

  6. Widespread habitat change through paludification as an interactive mechanism in mass extinction events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinger, L. F.

    1988-01-01

    The study of mass extinction events has largely focused on defining an environmental factor or factors that might account for specific patterns of faunal demise. Several hypotheses elaborate on how a given environmental factor might affect fauna directly, but differentially, causing extinction in certain taxa but not others. Yet few studies have considered specific habitat changes that might result from natural vegetation processes or from perturbations of vegetation. The role of large-scale habitat change induced by natural successional change from forest to bog (paludification) is examined and how large perturbations (e.g., volcanism, bolide impacts) might favor increased rates of paludification and consequent mass extinctions is considered. This hypothesis has an advantage over other hypotheses for mass extinctions in that modern day analogs of paludification are common throughout the world, thus allowing for considerable testing.

  7. Coronal mass ejections, magnetic clouds, and relativistic magnetospheric electron events: ISTP

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.N.; Pulkkinen, T.I.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S.G.; Blake, J.B.; Selesnick, R.S.; Henderson, M.G.; Reeves, G.D.; Spence, H.E.

    1998-08-01

    The role of high-speed solar wind streams in driving relativistic electron acceleration within the Earth{close_quote}s magnetosphere during solar activity minimum conditions has been well documented. The rising phase of the new solar activity cycle (cycle 23) commenced in 1996, and there have recently been a number of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and related {open_quotes}magnetic clouds{close_quotes} at 1 AU. As these CME/cloud systems interact with the Earth{close_quote}s magnetosphere, some events produce substantial enhancements in the magnetospheric energetic particle population while others do not. This paper compares and contrasts relativistic electron signatures observed by the POLAR, SAMPEX, Highly Elliptical Orbit, and geostationary orbit spacecraft during two magnetic cloud events: May 27{endash}29, 1996, and January 10{endash}11, 1997. Sequences were observed in each case in which the interplanetary magnetic field was first strongly southward and then rotated northward. In both cases, there were large solar wind density enhancements toward the end of the cloud passage at 1 AU. Strong energetic electron acceleration was observed in the January event, but not in the May event. The relative geoeffectiveness for these two cases is assessed, and it is concluded that large induced electric fields ({partial_derivative}B/{partial_derivative}t) caused in situ acceleration of electrons throughout the outer radiation zone during the January 1997 event. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  8. Propagation of Solar Energetic Particles During Multiple Coronal Mass Ejection Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjolainen, Silja; Al-Hamadani, Firas; Valtonen, Eino

    2016-02-01

    We study solar energetic particle (SEP) events during multiple solar eruptions. The analysed sequences, on 24 - 26 November 2000, 9 - 13 April 2001, and 22 - 25 August 2005, consisted of halo-type coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that originated from the same active region and were associated with intense flares, EUV waves, and interplanetary (IP) radio type II and type III bursts. The first two solar events in each of these sequences showed SEP enhancements near Earth, but the third in the row did not. We observed that in these latter events the type III radio bursts were stopped at much higher frequencies than in the earlier events, indicating that the bursts did not reach the typical plasma density levels near Earth. To explain the missing third SEP event in each sequence, we suggest that the earlier-launched CMEs and the CME-driven shocks either reduced the seed particle population and thus led to inefficient particle acceleration, or that the earlier-launched CMEs and shocks changed the propagation paths or prevented the propagation of both the electron beams and SEPs, so that they were not detected near Earth even when the shock arrivals were recorded.

  9. Variability in the 2MASS calibration fields: a search for transient obscuration events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Ciocca, Marco; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Bell, Cameron P. M.; Meng, Zeyang

    2014-07-01

    We searched the light curves of over 40 000 stars in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) calibration data base, spanning approximately 4 yr, for objects that have significant day-long dimming events. We also searched the multi-colour light curves for red-dimming events that could be due to transient extinction. In the colour-independent sigma-limited search, we found 46 previously unrecognized eclipsing binaries, 6 previously unrecognized periodic variable stars likely to be intrinsic pulsators and 21 young stellar objects in the ρ Ophiuchus star formation region previously studied by Parks et al. An additional 11 objects exhibited dimming events, and most of these are unclassified. The search for red-dimming events primarily reveals a population of low-luminosity active galaxies that become bluer when they are brighter, and variable young stellar objects exhibiting high cross-correlation coefficients between colour and brightness. The young stellar objects primarily exhibit brightness and colour variations in the direction of interstellar extinction whereas the active galaxies can have a bowed distribution in colour and magnitude with reduced variation in colour when the object is brightest. Among the objects that are usually quiescent (not strongly variable), we failed to find any dimming events deeper than 0.2 mag and lasting longer than a day. Two of the young stellar objects, however, dimmed by 0.2 mag for longer than a day without strong colour variation.

  10. The impact of Saharan dust events on long-term glacier mass balance in the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauder, A.; Gabbi, J.; Huss, M.; Schwikowski, M.

    2014-12-01

    Saharan dust falls are frequently observed in the Alpine region and are easily recognized by the unique yellowish coloration of the snow surface. Such Saharan dust events contribute to a large part to the total mineral dust deposited in snow and impact the surface energy budget by reducing the snow and ice albedo. In this study we investigate the long-term effect of such Saharan dust events on the surface albedo and the glacier's mass balance. The analysis is performed over the period 1914-2013 for two field sites on Claridenfirn, Swiss Alps, where an outstanding 100-year record of seasonal mass balance measurements is available. Based on the detailed knowledge about the mass balance, annual melt and accumulation rates are derived. A firn/ice core drilled at the glacier saddle of Colle Gnifetti (Swiss Alps) provides information on the impurity concentration in precipitation over the last century. A mass balance model combined with a parameterization for snow and ice albedo based on the specific surface area of snow and the snow impurity concentration is employed to assess the dust-albedo feedback. In order to track the position and thickness of snow layers a snow density model is implemented. Atmospheric dust enters the system of snow layers by precipitation and remains in the corresponding layer as long as there is no melt. When melt occurs, the water-insoluble part of the dust of the melted snow is supposed to accumulate in the top surface layer. The upper site has experienced only positive net mass balance and dust layers are continuously buried so that the impact of strong Saharan dust events is mainly restricted to the corresponding year. In the case of the lower site, the surface albedo is more strongly influenced by dust events of previous years due to periods with negative mass balances. Model results suggest that the enhanced melting in the 1940s yield even higher dust concentrations in 1947 compared to years with exceptional high Saharan dust deposition

  11. Top Quark Mass in Events with two Charged Leptons at the D0 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boline, Daniel Dooley

    2010-01-01

    The top quark is the most massive observed fundamental subatomic particle, and at the Tevatron accelerator is produced mostly in top-antitop (t$\\bar{t}$) quark pairs from the collisions of protons and anti-protons. Each top quark decays into a bottom quark and a W boson. The W boson can then decay into a pair of quarks, or into a charged lepton and a neutrino. The various decays can be broken up into three different channels based on the number of leptons from the decay of the W bosons: all-jets (with no leptons), lepton+jets (with one lepton), and dilepton (with two leptons). This dissertation will present a measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel. The dilepton channel is characterized by two leptons, two neutrinos and two b-quarks. The neutrinos are not directly observed, but their absence is felt as missing transverse momentum (pT) in the detector. The combination of two leptons and large pT produces an easily isolated signal, giving the dilepton channel a high signal over background ratio. Having two neutrinos means that we cannot know what the transverse momenta of either neutrino is. This means that even if we knew the momenta of the leptons and b-quarks perfectly, we would be unable to reconstruct the mass of the top quark. This measurement gets around this problem by scanning over all possible values of the top mass, finding all consistent t{bar t} combinations, assigning a kinematic weight to each, and then adding the weights for each combination at a given possible top mass. The lepton momenta, jet momenta, and pT are only known to within some finite precision, so for a given top mass, I also vary each of these momenta within their resolutions and add the weights for a given possible top mass. After scanning over possible top masses, I choose the top mass with the largest sum of weights mtmax as an observable for the event. I then perform a template based likelihood fit of m

  12. Top quark mass in events with two charged leptons at the D0 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boline, Daniel

    The top quark is the most massive observed fundamental subatomic particle, and at the Tevatron accelerator is produced mostly in top-antitop ( tt¯) quark pairs from the collisions of protons and anti-protons. Each top quark decays into a bottom quark and a W boson. The W boson can then decay into a pair of quarks, or into a charged lepton and a neutrino. The various decays can be broken up into three different channels based on the number of leptons from the decay of the W bosons: all-jets (with no leptons), lepton+jets (with one lepton), and dilepton (with two leptons). This dissertation will present a measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel. The dilepton channel is characterized by two leptons, two neutrinos and two b-quarks. The neutrinos are not directly observed, but their absence is felt as missing transverse momentum ( pT / ) in the detector. The combination of two leptons and large pT / produces an easily isolated signal, giving the dilepton channel a high signal over background ratio. Having two neutrinos means that we cannot know what the transverse momenta of either neutrino is. This means that even if we knew the momenta of the leptons and b-quarks perfectly, we would be unable to reconstruct the mass of the top quark. This measurement gets around this problem by scanning over all possible values of the top mass, finding all consistent tt¯ combinations, assigning a kinematic weight to each, and then adding the weights for each combination at a given possible top mass. The lepton momenta, jet momenta, and pT / are only known to within some finite precision, so for a given top mass, I also vary each of these momenta within their resolutions and add the weights for a given possible top mass. After scanning over possible top masses, I choose the top mass with the largest sum of weights mmaxt as an observable for the event. I then perform a template based likelihood fit of mt using mmaxt . I analyze 322 candidate events collected by the

  13. Outcome of sports injuries treated in a casualty department.

    PubMed Central

    Sandelin, J; Kiviluoto, O; Santavirta, S; Honkanen, R

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation analyses 2493 patients with a sports injury treated in a casualty department during a one-year period. Of the patients 73% were men, the age of the patients averaging 26 years and the mean follow-up time was 24 months. Soccer and indoor ball games caused 24% and 23% of the injuries respectively, these being followed by injuries in ice hockey in 14%. Track and field injuries scored low with 2% out of all injuries. Injuries to the lower extremity predominated. At follow-up, ligamentous injuries of the lower extremity were the major cause of discomfort. Further, in the group of patients with persistent discomfort 36% had suffered a fracture or a dislocation, 13% a contusion and 10% a wound. The mean period of sports incapacity after a sustained injury was 3 weeks. In track and field events the injury seldom disturbed training for more than one week, but in soccer, indoor ball games, skiing and skating the mean sports incapacity period varied between 6 and 3 weeks. Out of the total injured, 2% had to give up their sports activity completely. An injury of the lower extremity demanded on average 4 weeks' rest, an injury of the upper extremity and the trunk 2 weeks and injuries of the head and neck one week's rest. According to the present investigation sports injuries were in the majority of cases of a relatively benign nature and sick leave from work seldom exceeded 2 weeks. Images p103-a PMID:4027492

  14. 46 CFR 185.260 - Reports of potential vessel casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.260 Reports of potential... imperiled: (1) The Coast Guard district rescue coordination center (RCC) cognizant over the area in...

  15. 46 CFR 197.488 - Retention of records after casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... casualty is made under § 197.484 shall retain all records onboard that are maintained on the vessel or... until advised by the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, that records need not be retained onboard....

  16. 33 CFR 146.35 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reporting requirements of 46 CFR 4.05-12. (b) The written report required by paragraph (a) of this section... casualty; (5) Gives the name, address, and phone number of persons involved in or witnessing the...

  17. 33 CFR 146.35 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reporting requirements of 46 CFR 4.05-12. (b) The written report required by paragraph (a) of this section... casualty; (5) Gives the name, address, and phone number of persons involved in or witnessing the...

  18. 46 CFR 197.488 - Retention of records after casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... casualty is made under § 197.484 shall retain all records onboard that are maintained on the vessel or... until advised by the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, that records need not be retained onboard....

  19. 46 CFR 197.488 - Retention of records after casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... casualty is made under § 197.484 shall retain all records onboard that are maintained on the vessel or... until advised by the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, that records need not be retained onboard....

  20. 46 CFR 197.488 - Retention of records after casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... casualty is made under § 197.484 shall retain all records onboard that are maintained on the vessel or... until advised by the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, that records need not be retained onboard....

  1. 46 CFR 197.488 - Retention of records after casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... casualty is made under § 197.484 shall retain all records onboard that are maintained on the vessel or... until advised by the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, that records need not be retained onboard....

  2. Genetic Diversity and Local Connectivity in the Mediterranean Red Gorgonian Coral after Mass Mortality Events.

    PubMed

    Pilczynska, Joanna; Cocito, Silvia; Boavida, Joana; Serrão, Ester; Queiroga, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the patterns of connectivity in marine taxa with planktonic dispersive stages is a challenging but crucial task because of its conservation implications. The red gorgonian Paramuricea clavata is a habitat forming species, characterized by short larval dispersal and high reproductive output, but low recruitment. In the recent past, the species was impacted by mass mortality events caused by increased water temperatures in summer. In the present study, we used 9 microsatellites to investigate the genetic structure and connectivity in the highly threatened populations from the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean). No evidence for a recent bottleneck neither decreased genetic diversity in sites impacted by mass mortality events were found. Significant IBD pattern and high global FST confirmed low larval dispersal capability in the red gorgonian. The maximum dispersal distance was estimated at 20-60 km. Larval exchange between sites separated by hundreds of meters and between different depths was detected at each site, supporting the hypothesis that deeper subpopulations unaffected by surface warming peaks may provide larvae for shallower ones, enabling recovery after climatically induced mortality events. PMID:26982334

  3. Genetic Diversity and Local Connectivity in the Mediterranean Red Gorgonian Coral after Mass Mortality Events

    PubMed Central

    Pilczynska, Joanna; Cocito, Silvia; Boavida, Joana; Serrão, Ester; Queiroga, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the patterns of connectivity in marine taxa with planktonic dispersive stages is a challenging but crucial task because of its conservation implications. The red gorgonian Paramuricea clavata is a habitat forming species, characterized by short larval dispersal and high reproductive output, but low recruitment. In the recent past, the species was impacted by mass mortality events caused by increased water temperatures in summer. In the present study, we used 9 microsatellites to investigate the genetic structure and connectivity in the highly threatened populations from the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean). No evidence for a recent bottleneck neither decreased genetic diversity in sites impacted by mass mortality events were found. Significant IBD pattern and high global FST confirmed low larval dispersal capability in the red gorgonian. The maximum dispersal distance was estimated at 20–60 km. Larval exchange between sites separated by hundreds of meters and between different depths was detected at each site, supporting the hypothesis that deeper subpopulations unaffected by surface warming peaks may provide larvae for shallower ones, enabling recovery after climatically induced mortality events. PMID:26982334

  4. A comparison of solar energetic particle event timescales with properties of associated coronal mass ejections

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S. W.

    2013-06-01

    The dependence of solar energetic proton (SEP) event peak intensities Ip on properties of associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) has been extensively examined, but the dependence of SEP event timescales is not well known. We define three timescales of 20 MeV SEP events and ask how they are related to speeds v {sub CME} or widths W of their associated CMEs observed by LASCO/SOHO. The timescales of the EPACT/Wind 20 MeV events are TO, the onset time from CME launch to SEP onset; TR, the rise time from onset to half the peak intensity (0.5Ip); and TD, the duration of the SEP intensity above 0.5Ip. This is a statistical study based on 217 SEP-CME events observed during 1996-2008. The large number of SEP events allows us to examine the SEP-CME relationship in five solar-source longitude ranges. In general, we statistically find that TO declines slightly with v {sub CME}, and TR and TD increase with both v {sub CME} and W. TO is inversely correlated with log Ip, as expected from a particle background effect. We discuss the implications of this result and find that a background-independent parameter TO+TR also increases with v {sub CME} and W. The correlations generally fall below the 98% significance level, but there is a significant correlation between v {sub CME} and W which renders interpretation of the timescale results uncertain. We suggest that faster (and wider) CMEs drive shocks and accelerate SEPs over longer times to produce the longer TR and TD SEP timescales.

  5. The Correlation Between Solar Energetic Particle Events and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelitz, A. M.; Pulkkinen, A.

    2012-12-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) events are a wide scale phenomena that are not only an issue for the 2,000+ costly satellites in the sky but also have negative implications on aviation, and even ground based communication. Forecasting the magnitude and duration of strong SEP events based on preceding events that are often associated with them, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, is an important step in future operational space weather as well as research. In order to provide a model connecting SEP and CME characteristics, six specific CMEs between 8/14/2010 and 5/17/12 that met specific qualifications (i.e. earth directed), were chosen and several parameters characterizing the connections were derived. From the derived data, correlations between many of the different parameters were tested. One of the more meaningful correlations that was found is between the peak flux of >10 MeV GOES protons and the speed of the CME. A logarithmic correlation between these two entities is clearly seen with a R^2 value of 0.78 and a fit of y=2.74e.^(003x). For forecasting purposes, the times of the arrival of the SEP event with respect to the evolution of the CME was also recorded. Another possibly meaningful correlation was found between SEP duration and CME speed with R^2 value of 0.56. The identified connections were verified by adding an event that occurred on July 12, 2012. Using the model connecting SEP peak flux and CME speed as produced in this study, space weather forecasters can better predict the magnitude of the SEP event that is a result of an earth directed CME. Doing so will enable precautions to be taken on spacecraft as well as ground based entities that are vulnerable to the high-energy protons. In future work, we plan to perform

  6. A Comparison of Solar Energetic Particle Event Timescales with Properties of Associated Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    2013-06-01

    The dependence of solar energetic proton (SEP) event peak intensities Ip on properties of associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) has been extensively examined, but the dependence of SEP event timescales is not well known. We define three timescales of 20 MeV SEP events and ask how they are related to speeds v CME or widths W of their associated CMEs observed by LASCO/SOHO. The timescales of the EPACT/Wind 20 MeV events are TO, the onset time from CME launch to SEP onset; TR, the rise time from onset to half the peak intensity (0.5Ip); and TD, the duration of the SEP intensity above 0.5Ip. This is a statistical study based on 217 SEP-CME events observed during 1996-2008. The large number of SEP events allows us to examine the SEP-CME relationship in five solar-source longitude ranges. In general, we statistically find that TO declines slightly with v CME, and TR and TD increase with both v CME and W. TO is inversely correlated with log Ip, as expected from a particle background effect. We discuss the implications of this result and find that a background-independent parameter TO+TR also increases with v CME and W. The correlations generally fall below the 98% significance level, but there is a significant correlation between v CME and W which renders interpretation of the timescale results uncertain. We suggest that faster (and wider) CMEs drive shocks and accelerate SEPs over longer times to produce the longer TR and TD SEP timescales.

  7. COMPOUND TWIN CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE 2012 MAY 17 GLE EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, C.; Wang, Yuming; Li, G.; Kong, X.; Hu, J.; Sun, X. D.; Ding, L.; Chen, Y.; Xia, L.

    2013-02-15

    We report a multiple spacecraft observation of the 2012 May 17 GLE event. Using the coronagraph observations by SOHO/LASCO, STEREO-A/COR1, and STEREO-B/COR1, we identify two eruptions resulting in two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that occurred in the same active region and close in time ({approx}2 minutes) in the 2012 May 17 GLE event. Both CMEs were fast. Complicated radio emissions, with multiple type II episodes, were observed from ground-based stations: Learmonth and BIRS, as well as the WAVES instrument on board the Wind spacecraft. High time-resolution SDO/AIA imaging data and SDO/HMI vector magnetic field data were also examined. A complicated pre-eruption magnetic field configuration, consisting of twisted flux-tube structure, is reconstructed. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) up to several hundred MeV nucleon{sup -1} were detected in this event. Although the eruption source region was near the west limb, the event led to ground-level enhancement. The existence of two fast CMEs and the observation of high-energy particles with ground-level enhancement agrees well with a recently proposed 'twin CME' scenario.

  8. Gender Differences in the Impact of Stressful Life Events on Changes in Body-Mass-Index

    PubMed Central

    Udo, Tomoko; Grilo, Carlos M.; McKee, Sherry A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The positive association between stress and weight has been consistently demonstrated, particularly in women. The effect of stress on changes in weight, however, is less clear. Methods A total of 33,425 participants in Wave 1 and Wave 2 surveys of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Condition (NESARC) were included in this study. The study examined the relationship between stressful life events during the 12 months prior to the Wave 2 interview and changes in body-mass-index (BMI) between Wave 1 and Wave 2 interviews. Results Women reported significantly greater increases in BMI than men. Stressful life events, particularly job-related changes, legal problems, and death of family or friends, were associated significantly with increases in BMI among women but not men. Conclusions In a nationally representative sample, stressful life events were associated with greater weight gain in women. Prevention of weight gain in women should focus on the behavioral and physiological mechanisms underlying female-specific effects of stressful life events on weight gain. PMID:25204986

  9. Simultaneous radio and white light observations of the 1984 June 27 coronal mass ejection event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Kundu, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional images of radio bursts in the 25-50-MHz frequency range obtained with the SMM Coronagraph/Polarimeter and Mauna Loa K-coronameter during a coronal mass ejection event on June 27, 1984 are discussed. The present event is shown to be spatially and temporally associated with precursors in the form of meter-decameter type III bursts, soft X-ray emission, and a H-alpha flare spray. The results suggest gyrosychrotron emission from a plasmoid containing a magnetic field of about 2.5 G and nonthermal electrons with a number density of about 100,000/cu cm and energy of greater than about 350 keV.

  10. Initial concepts on energetics and mass releases during nonnuclear explosive events in fuel cycle facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, M.A.; Mishima, J.

    1986-09-01

    Non-nuclear explosions are one of the initiating events (accidents) considered in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission study of formal methods for estimating the airborne release of radionuclides from fuel cycle facilities. Methods currently available to estimate the energetics and mass airborne release from the four types of non-nuclear explosive events (fast and slow physical explosions and fast and slow chemical explosions) are reviewed. The likelihood that fast physical explosions will occur in fuel cycle facilities appears to be remote and this type of explosion is not considered. Methods to estimate the consequences of slow physical and fast chemical explosions are available. Methods to estimate the consequences of slow chemical explosions are less well defined.

  11. On-Ground Casualty Risk Reduction by Structural Design for Demise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, Stijn; Krag, Holger; Funke, Quirin

    In recent years, awareness concerning the risk posed by un-controlled re-entering spacecraft on ground has increased. Some re-entry events such as ESA's GOCE in 2013 and NASA's UARS appeared prominent in international media. Space agencies and nations, in cooperation within the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC), have established a requirements to limited the on-ground risk for future missions. To meet the requirements, the amount of debris falling back on Earth has to be limited in number, mass and size. Design for demise (D4D) refers to all measures taken in the design of a space object to increase the potential for demise of the object and its components during re-entry. SCARAB (Spacecraft Atmospheric Re-entry and Break-Up) is ESA's high-fidelity tool which analyses the thermal and structural effects of atmospheric re-entry on spacecraft in a finite-element approach. For this study, a model of a representative satellite is developed in Scarab to serve as test-bed for D4D analysis on a structural level. The model is used as starting point for different D4D approaches based on increasing the exposure of the satellite components to the aero-thermal environment, as a way to speed up the demise. Statistical bootstrapping is applied to the resulting on-ground fragment lists in order to compare the different re-entry scenarios and to determine the uncertainties of the results. Moreover, the bootstrap results can be used to analyse the casualty risk estimator from a theoretical point of view. The risk reductions for the analysed D4D techniques are presented w.r.t. the reference scenario for the modelled representative satellite.

  12. Mass mortality events in atoll lagoons: environmental control and increased future vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Andréfouët, Serge; Dutheil, Cyril; Menkes, Christophe E; Bador, Margot; Lengaigne, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs and lagoons worldwide are vulnerable environments. However, specific geomorphological reef types (fringing, barrier, atoll, bank for the main ones) can be vulnerable to specific disturbances that will not affect most other reefs. This has implications for local management and science priorities. Several geomorphologically closed atolls of the Pacific Ocean have experienced in recent decades mass benthic and pelagic lagoonal life mortalities, likely triggered by unusually calm weather conditions lasting for several weeks. These events, although poorly known, reported, and characterized, pose a major threat for resource sustainability. Based on a sample of eleven events on eight atolls from the central South Pacific occurring between 1993 and 2012, the conservative environmental thresholds required to trigger such events are identified using sea surface temperature, significant wave height and wind stress satellite data. Using these thresholds, spatial maps of potential risk are produced for the central South Pacific region, with the highest risk zone lying north of Tuamotu Archipelago. A regional climate model, which risk map compares well with observations over the recent period (r=0.97), is then used to downscale the projected future climate. This allows us to estimate the potential change in risk by the end of the 21st century and highlights a relative risk increase of up to 60% for the eastern Tuamotu atolls. However, the small sample size used to train the analysis led to the identification of conservative thresholds that overestimated the observed risk. The results of this study suggest that long-term monitoring of the biophysical conditions of the lagoons at risk would enable more precise identification of the physical thresholds and better understanding of the biological processes involved in these rare, but consequential, mass mortality events. PMID:25088977

  13. Conodont index fossil Hindeodus changxingensis Wang fingers greatest mass extinction event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metcalfe, I.; Nicoll, R.S.; Wardlaw, B.R.

    2007-01-01

    The marine conodont fossil species, Hindeodus changxingensis Wang, that has a distinctive morphology, is restricted to a very narrow stratigraphic interval essentially from the Permian-Triassic extinction event through the internationally recognized boundary and into the very earliest Triassic. The species is geographically widespread in the Tethyan Region, from Italy to South China, and serves as a characteristic index fossil to reliably identify this short but critical interval that encompasses the greatest mass extinction of life on earth and the boundary between the Paleozoic and Mesozoic Eras. ?? 2007 Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS.

  14. Mass dependent isotope fractionation during impacts induced the Archaean mass-independent fractionation of sulphur: Evidence against Great Oxidation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.

    2010-12-01

    A prevailing hypothesis, low-oxygen level of the Archaean atmosphere, relies strongly on the presence of strong mass-independent fractionation (MIF) of the sulfur isotopes in sulfide- and sulfate-bearing minerals older than 2.4 billion years. Actually, there is “a broad overlap between MIF signals observed within Archaean sedimentary sequences and periods of enhanced asteroid impacts represented by impact ejecta/fallout units”(Glikson 2010) (Fig. 1). Moreover, usually MIF- related sulphur occurs in the Archaean sedimentary rocks as pyrite (FeS2) which has been found in the K-T boundary clay beds and in several identified impact craters, which is an independent argument in favor of pyrites could be the product of impact. Impact processes (vaporization and condensation) are sufficient to explain the MIF signals following the principle: the earlier the condensed material, the more enriched in lighter isotopes (Huang 2010). The nature of the MIF of the sulfur isotopes is that the fractionation of isotope is still mass dependent during impacts, which means the measured nonzero Δ33S values of Archean sulfide- and sulfate-bearing minerals indicate that their different condensation sequences. Another important line of evidence that support the impact-generated MIF of the sulfur isotopes comes from the various iron isotope values of the pyrites especially those with iron isotope heterogeneity at grain scale. Thus, it is clear that the signals are the markers of impact rather than O2 poor atmosphere. Furthermore, this can also account for the lack of MIF-S in several Archaean units before 2.4 billion years. Figure 1 Plot of mass-independent fractionation of sulphur and asteroid impact events with age. Modified from Glikson (2010)

  15. Numerical Modeling of Coronal Mass Ejections Based on Various Pre-event Model Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H.; Wu, S. T.; Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.

    1995-01-01

    We examine how the initial state (pre-event corona) affects the numerical MHD simulation for a coronal mass ejection (CME). Earlier simulations based on a pre-event corona with a homogeneous density and temperature distribution, at the lower boundary (i.e., solar surface) have been used to analyze the role of streamer properties in determining the characteristics of loop-like transients. The present paper extends these studies to show how a broader class of global coronal properties leads not only to different types of CME's, but also modifies the adjacent quiet corona and/or coronal holes. We consider four pre-event coronal cases: (1) constant boundary conditions and a polytropic gas with gamma = 1.05; (2) non-constant (latitude dependent) boundary conditions and a polytropic gas with gamma = 1.05; (3) constant boundary conditions with a volumetric energy source and gamma = 1.67; (4) non-constant (latitude dependent) boundary conditions with a volumetric energy source and gamma = 1.67. In all models, the pre-event magnetic fields separate the corona into closed field regions (streamers) and open field regions. The CME's initiation is simulated by introducing at the base of the corona, within the streamer region, a standard pressure pulse and velocity change. Boundary values are determined using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) characteristic theory. The simulations show how different CME's, including loop-like transients, clouds and bright rays, might occur. There are significant new features in comparison to published results. We conclude that the pre-event corona is a crucial factor in dictating CME's properties.

  16. Numerical modeling of coronal mass ejections based on various pre-event model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A. H.; Wu, S. T.; Poletto, G.

    1994-01-01

    We examine how the initial state (pre-event corona) affects the numerical MHD simulation for a coronal mass ejection (CME). Earlier simulations based on a pre-event corona with a homogeneous density and temperature distribution at lower boundary (i.e. solar surface) have been used to analyze the role of streamer properties in determining the characteristics of loop-like transients. The present paper extends these studies to show how a broader class of global coronal properties leads not only to different types of CME's, but also modifies the adjacent quiet corona and/or coronal holes. We consider four pre-event coronal cases: (1) Constant boundary conditions and a polytropic gas with gamma = 1.05; (2) Non-constant (latitude dependent) boundary conditions and a polytropic gas with gamma = 1.05; (3) Constant boundary conditions with a volumetric energy source and gamma = 1.67; (4) Non-constant (latitude dependent) boundary conditions with a volumetric energy source and gamma = 1.67. In all models, the pre-event magnetic fields separate the corona into closed field regions (streamers) and open field regions. The CME's initiation is simulated by introducing at the base of the corona, within the streamer region, a standard pressure pulse and velocity change. Boundary values are determined using MHD characteristic theory. The simulations show how different CME's, including loop-like transients, clouds, and bright rays, might occur. There are significant new features in comparison to published results. We conclude that the pre-event corona is a crucial factor in dictating CME's properties.

  17. Do interacting coronal mass ejections play a role in solar energetic particle events?

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S. W.; Vourlidas, A.

    2014-03-20

    Gradual solar energetic (E > 10 MeV) particle (SEP) events are produced in shocks driven by fast and wide coronal mass ejections (CMEs). With a set of western hemisphere 20 MeV SEP events, we test the possibility that SEP peak intensities, Ip, are enhanced by interactions of their associated CMEs with preceding CMEs (preCMEs) launched during the previous 12 hr. Among SEP events with no, 1, or 2 or more (2+) preCMEs, we find enhanced Ip for the groups with preCMEs, but no differences in TO+TR, the time from CME launch to SEP onset and the time from onset to SEP half-peak Ip. Neither the timings of the preCMEs relative to their associated CMEs nor the preCME widths W {sub pre}, speeds V {sub pre}, or numbers correlate with the SEP Ip values. The 20 MeV Ip of all the preCME groups correlate with the 2 MeV proton background intensities, consistent with a general correlation with possible seed particle populations. Furthermore, the fraction of CMEs with preCMEs also increases with the 2 MeV proton background intensities. This implies that the higher SEP Ip values with preCMEs may not be due primarily to CME interactions, such as the 'twin-CME' scenario, but are explained by a general increase of both background seed particles and more frequent CMEs during times of higher solar activity. This explanation is not supported by our analysis of 2 MeV proton backgrounds in two earlier preCME studies of SEP events, so the relevance of CME interactions for larger SEP event intensities remains unclear.

  18. 'Wellbeing': a collateral casualty of modernity?

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Sandra; Henderson, Gregor; Hanlon, Phil W

    2009-11-01

    In the now vast empirical and theoretical literature on wellbeing knowledge of the subject is provided mainly by psychology and economics, where understanding of the concept are framed in very different ways. We briefly rehearse these, before turning to some important critical points which can be made about this burgeoning research industry, including the tight connections between the meanings of the concept with the moral value systems of particular 'modern' societies. We then argue that both the 'science' of wellbeing and its critique are, despite their diversity, re-connected by and subsumed within the emerging environmental critique of modern consumer society. This places concerns for individual and social wellbeing within the broader context of global human problems and planetary wellbeing. A growing number of thinkers now suggest that Western society and culture are dominated by materialistic and individualistic values, made manifest at the political and social levels through the unending pursuit of economic growth, and at the individual level by the seemingly endless quest for consumer goods, regardless of global implications such as broader environmental harms. The escalating growth of such values is associated with a growing sense of individual alienation, social fragmentation and civic disengagement and with the decline of more spiritual, moral and ethical aspects of life. Taken together, these multiple discourses suggest that wellbeing can be understood as a collateral casualty of the economic, social and cultural changes associated with late modernity. However, increasing concerns for the environment have the potential to counter some of these trends, and in so doing could also contribute to our wellbeing as individuals and as social beings in a finite world. PMID:19765875

  19. Medical planning for very large events: Special Olympics World Games Los Angeles 2015.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Marissa S; Fong, Michael K; Patel, Leena J; Kurose, Brian; Tierney, John; Gardner, Imani; Yazdani-Arazi, Arash; Su, John K

    2015-01-01

    Mass gathering events that involve special populations have challenges that require unique medical planning. The key to a successful mass event is in the preparation, planning, and communication. Concerns in communication such as language barriers, age of participants, and intellectual disability should be addressed early in the planning. In the event of a mass casualty disaster, there should be a clear chain of command and escalation policy. The primary concern of the sports medicine team is to ensure safety for the participation of an athlete. The risk of injury to an athlete varies depending on the event and venue. The sporting venue may require special consideration for access to athletes, crowd control, and ingress/egress of medical personnel and transports. In order to ensure safety and efficient care, it is paramount to have the necessary medical planning and preparedness to manage a large-scale sporting event. PMID:25968846

  20. Common envelope events with low-mass giants: understanding the energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandez, J. L. A.; Ivanova, N.

    2016-08-01

    Common envelope events are important interactions between two binary stars that lead to the formation of close binary systems. We present here a systematic three-dimensional study in which we model common envelope events with low-mass giant donors. The results allow us to revise the energy formalism that is usually used to determine common envelope event outcomes. We show that the energy budget for this type of system should include the recombination energy, and that it also must take into account that a significant fraction of the released orbital energy is taken away by the ejecta. We provide three ways in which our results can be used by binary population synthesis studies: a relation that links the observed post-common envelope binary with the initial binary parameters, a fitting formula for the $\\alpha_{\\rm ce}\\lambda$ parameter of the standard energy formalism, and a revised energy formalism that takes into account both the recombination energy and the energy that is taken away by the ejecta.

  1. Common envelope events with low-mass giants: understanding the energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandez, J. L. A.; Ivanova, N.

    2016-08-01

    Common envelope events are important interactions between two binary stars that lead to the formation of close binary systems. We present here a systematic three-dimensional study in which we model common envelope events with low-mass giant donors. The results allow us to revise the energy formalism that is usually used to determine common envelope event outcomes. We show that the energy budget for this type of system should include the recombination energy, and that it also must take into account that a significant fraction of the released orbital energy is taken away by the ejecta. We provide three ways in which our results can be used by binary population synthesis studies: a relation that links the observed post-common envelope binary with the initial binary parameters, a fitting formula for the αceλ parameter of the standard energy formalism, and a revised energy formalism that takes into account both the recombination energy and the energy that is taken away by the ejecta.

  2. Common envelope events with low-mass giants: understanding the energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandez, J. L. A.; Ivanova, N.

    2016-05-01

    Common envelope events are important interactions between two binary stars that lead to the formation of close binary systems. We present here a systematic three-dimensional study in which we model common envelope events with low-mass giant donors. The results allow us to revise the energy formalism that is usually used to determine common envelope event outcomes. We show that the energy budget for this type of system should include the recombination energy, and that it also must take into account that a significant fraction of the released orbital energy is taken away by the ejecta. We provide three ways in which our results can be used by binary population synthesis studies: a relation that links the observed post-common envelope binary with the initial binary parameters, a fitting formula for the αceλ parameter of the standard energy formalism, and a revised energy formalism that takes into account both the recombination energy and the energy that is taken away by the ejecta.

  3. Neutrino mass hierarchy and electron neutrino oscillation parameters with one hundred thousand reactor events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzi, F.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proposed medium-baseline reactor neutrino experiments offer unprecedented opportunities to probe, at the same time, the mass-mixing parameters which govern νe oscillations both at long wavelength (δm2 and θ12) and at short wavelength (Δm2 and θ13), as well as their tiny interference effects related to the mass hierarchy (i.e., the relative sign of Δm2 and δm2). In order to take full advantage of these opportunities, precision calculations and refined statistical analyses of event spectra are required. In such a context, we revisit several input ingredients, including nucleon recoil in inverse beta decay and its impact on energy reconstruction and resolution, hierarchy and matter effects in the oscillation probability, spread of reactor distances, irreducible backgrounds from geoneutrinos and from far reactors, and degeneracies between energy scale and spectrum shape uncertainties. We also introduce a continuous parameter α, which interpolates smoothly between normal hierarchy (α =+1) and inverted hierarchy (α =-1). The determination of the hierarchy is then transformed from a test of hypothesis to a parameter estimation, with a sensitivity given by the distance of the true case (either α=+1 or α =-1) from the "undecidable" case (α=0). Numerical experiments are performed for the specific setup envisaged for the JUNO project, assuming a realistic sample of O(105) reactor events. We find a typical sensitivity of ˜2σ to the hierarchy in JUNO, which, however, can be challenged by energy scale and spectrum shape systematics, whose possible conspiracy effects are investigated. The prospective accuracy reachable for the other mass-mixing parameters is also discussed.

  4. Recent shifts in the occurrence, cause, and magnitude of animal mass mortality events

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Samuel B.; Siepielski, Adam M.; Nusslé, Sébastien; Cervantes-Yoshida, Kristina; Hwan, Jason L.; Huber, Eric R.; Fey, Maxfield J.; Catenazzi, Alessandro; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Mass mortality events (MMEs) are rapidly occurring catastrophic demographic events that punctuate background mortality levels. Individual MMEs are staggering in their observed magnitude: removing more than 90% of a population, resulting in the death of more than a billion individuals, or producing 700 million tons of dead biomass in a single event. Despite extensive documentation of individual MMEs, we have no understanding of the major features characterizing the occurrence and magnitude of MMEs, their causes, or trends through time. Thus, no framework exists for contextualizing MMEs in the wake of ongoing global and regional perturbations to natural systems. Here we present an analysis of 727 published MMEs from across the globe, affecting 2,407 animal populations. We show that the magnitude of MMEs has been intensifying for birds, fishes, and marine invertebrates; invariant for mammals; and decreasing for reptiles and amphibians. These shifts in magnitude proved robust when we accounted for an increase in the occurrence of MMEs since 1940. However, it remains unclear whether the increase in the occurrence of MMEs represents a true pattern or simply a perceived increase. Regardless, the increase in MMEs appears to be associated with a rise in disease emergence, biotoxicity, and events produced by multiple interacting stressors, yet temporal trends in MME causes varied among taxa and may be associated with increased detectability. In addition, MMEs with the largest magnitudes were those that resulted from multiple stressors, starvation, and disease. These results advance our understanding of rare demographic processes and their relationship to global and regional perturbations to natural systems. PMID:25583498

  5. Recent shifts in the occurrence, cause, and magnitude of animal mass mortality events.

    PubMed

    Fey, Samuel B; Siepielski, Adam M; Nusslé, Sébastien; Cervantes-Yoshida, Kristina; Hwan, Jason L; Huber, Eric R; Fey, Maxfield J; Catenazzi, Alessandro; Carlson, Stephanie M

    2015-01-27

    Mass mortality events (MMEs) are rapidly occurring catastrophic demographic events that punctuate background mortality levels. Individual MMEs are staggering in their observed magnitude: removing more than 90% of a population, resulting in the death of more than a billion individuals, or producing 700 million tons of dead biomass in a single event. Despite extensive documentation of individual MMEs, we have no understanding of the major features characterizing the occurrence and magnitude of MMEs, their causes, or trends through time. Thus, no framework exists for contextualizing MMEs in the wake of ongoing global and regional perturbations to natural systems. Here we present an analysis of 727 published MMEs from across the globe, affecting 2,407 animal populations. We show that the magnitude of MMEs has been intensifying for birds, fishes, and marine invertebrates; invariant for mammals; and decreasing for reptiles and amphibians. These shifts in magnitude proved robust when we accounted for an increase in the occurrence of MMEs since 1940. However, it remains unclear whether the increase in the occurrence of MMEs represents a true pattern or simply a perceived increase. Regardless, the increase in MMEs appears to be associated with a rise in disease emergence, biotoxicity, and events produced by multiple interacting stressors, yet temporal trends in MME causes varied among taxa and may be associated with increased detectability. In addition, MMEs with the largest magnitudes were those that resulted from multiple stressors, starvation, and disease. These results advance our understanding of rare demographic processes and their relationship to global and regional perturbations to natural systems. PMID:25583498

  6. Traffic accidents involving fatigue driving and their extent of casualties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangnan; Yau, Kelvin K W; Zhang, Xun; Li, Yanyan

    2016-02-01

    The rapid progress of motorization has increased the number of traffic-related casualties. Although fatigue driving is a major cause of traffic accidents, the public remains not rather aware of its potential harmfulness. Fatigue driving has been termed as a "silent killer." Thus, a thorough study of traffic accidents and the risk factors associated with fatigue-related casualties is of utmost importance. In this study, we analyze traffic accident data for the period 2006-2010 in Guangdong Province, China. The study data were extracted from the traffic accident database of China's Public Security Department. A logistic regression model is used to assess the effect of driver characteristics, type of vehicles, road conditions, and environmental factors on fatigue-related traffic accident occurrence and severity. On the one hand, male drivers, trucks, driving during midnight to dawn, and morning rush hours are identified as risk factors of fatigue-related crashes but do not necessarily result in severe casualties. Driving at night without street-lights contributes to fatigue-related crashes and severe casualties. On the other hand, while factors such as less experienced drivers, unsafe vehicle status, slippery roads, driving at night with street-lights, and weekends do not have significant effect on fatigue-related crashes, yet accidents associated with these factors are likely to have severe casualties. The empirical results of the present study have important policy implications on the reduction of fatigue-related crashes as well as their severity. PMID:26625173

  7. Implications for modeling casualty sustainment during peacekeeping operations.

    PubMed

    Blood, Christopher G; Zhang, Jinjin; Walker, G Jay

    2002-10-01

    Projections of the casualties expected during peacekeeping operations allow medical planners to assess in advance the medical resources needed to support such operations. Data detailing fatalities incurred in previous peacekeeping operations were extracted from several U.N. sources. From these data, rates of killed-in-action were computed for the deployed forces. One hundred eighty-eight peacekeeping incidents in which casualties were sustained were also examined to derive wounded-in-action rates. The estimated mean wounded-in-action rate for these operations was 3.16 per 1,000 strength per year; the estimated wounded-in-action rate for individual operations ranged from 0.49 to 12.50. There were an average of 3.8 wounded and 0.86 killed in the 188 casualty incidents examined. Thirty-eight percent of the wounds were described as serious. The casualty incidence derived in this study can provide a basis for estimating the casualties likely in future peacekeeping operations. PMID:12392258

  8. [Model and enlightenment from rescue of August 2nd Kunshan explosion casualty].

    PubMed

    Tan, Q; Qiu, H B; Sun, B W; Shen, Y M; Nie, L J; Zhang, H W

    2016-01-01

    On August 2nd, 2014, a massive dust explosion occurred in a factory of Kunshan, resulting in a mass casualty involving 185 burn patients. They were transported to 20 medical institutions in Jiangsu province and Shanghai. More than one thousand of medical personnel of our country participated in this emergency rescue, and satisfactory results were achieved. In this paper, the characteristics of this accident were analyzed, the positive effects of interdisciplinary cooperation were affirmed, and the contingency plan, rescue process and pattern, and reserve, organization and management of talents during this rescue process were reviewed retrospectively. PMID:27426066

  9. Three-dimensional magnetic reconnection and the magnetic topology of coronal mass ejection events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of superthermal electron fluxes in the solar wind indicate that field lines within coronal mass ejections, CMEs, near and beyond 1 AU are normally connected to the Sun at both ends. However, on occasion some field lines embedded deep within CMEs appear to be connected to the Sun at only one end. Here we propose an explanation for how such field lines arise in terms of 3-dimensional reconnection close to the Sun. Such reconnection also provides a natural explanation for the flux rope topology characteristic of many CMEs as well as the coronal loops formed during long-duration, solar X-ray events. Our consideration of the field topologies resulting from 3-dimensional reconnection indicates that field lines within and near CMEs may on occasion be connected to the outer heliosphere at both ends.

  10. Top-quark mass measurement in events with jets and missing transverse energy using the full CDF data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucà, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-07-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass using the full data set of Tevatron s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7fb-1. The analysis uses events with one semileptonic t or t¯ decay, but without detection of the electron or muon. We select events with significant missing transverse energy and multiple jets. We veto events containing identified electrons or muons. We obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of the two jets from W-boson decays from data and compare these to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. A likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the top-quark mass, Mtop=173.93±1.64(stat)±0.87(syst)GeV/c2. This result is the most precise measurement to date of the mass of the top quark in this event topology.

  11. Managing the Earth’s Biggest Mass Gathering Event and WASH Conditions: Maha Kumbh Mela (India)

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Annu; Anand, Ankit; Singh, Ravikant; Deka, Mridul; Paul, Abhishek; Borgohain, Sunny; Roy, Nobhojit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mass gatherings including a large number of people makes the planning and management of the event a difficult task. Kumbh Mela is one such, internationally famous religious mass gathering. It creates the substantial challenge of creating a temporary city in which millions of people can stay for a defined period of time. The arrangements need to allow this very large number of people to reside with proper human waste disposal, medical services, adequate supplies of food and clean water, transportation etc. Methods: We report a case study of Maha Kumbh, 2013 which focuses on the management and planning that went into the preparation of Kumbh Mela and understanding its water, sanitation and hygiene conditions. It was an observational cross-sectional study, the field work was done for 13 days, from 21 January to 2 February 2013. Results: Our findings suggest that the Mela committee and all other agencies involved in Mela management proved to be successful in supervising the event and making it convenient, efficient and safe. Health care services and water sanitation and hygiene conditions were found to be satisfactory. BhuleBhatke Kendra (Center for helping people who got separated from their families) had the major task of finding missing people and helping them to meet their families. Some of the shortfalls identified were that drainage was a major problem and some fire incidents were reported. Therefore, improvement in drainage facilities and reduction in fire incidents are essential to making Mela cleaner and safer. The number of persons per toilet was high and there were no separate toilets for males and females. Special facilities and separate toilets for men and women will improve their stay in Mela. Conclusion: Inculcation of modern methods and technologies are likely to help in supporting crowd management and improving water, sanitation and hygiene conditions in the continuously expanding KumbhMela, in the coming years. PMID:25932345

  12. Interaction between Two Coronal Mass Ejections in the 2013 May 22 Large Solar Energetic Particle Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liu-Guan; Li, Gang; Jiang, Yong; Le, Gui-Ming; Shen, Cheng-Long; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Yao; Xu, Fei; Gu, Bin; Zhang, Ya-Nan

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the eruption and interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the large 2013 May 22 solar energetic particle event using multiple spacecraft observations. Two CMEs, having similar propagation directions, were found to erupt from two nearby active regions (ARs), AR11748 and AR11745, at ~08:48 UT and ~13:25 UT, respectively. The second CME was faster than the first CME. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, we reconstructed the propagation of these two CMEs and found that the leading edge of the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME at a height of ~6 solar radii. After about two hours, the leading edges of the two CMEs merged at a height of ~20 solar radii. Type II solar radio bursts showed strong enhancement during this two hour period. Using the velocity dispersion method, we obtained the solar particle release (SPR) time and the path length for energetic electrons. Further assuming that energetic protons propagated along the same interplanetary magnetic field, we also obtained the SPR time for energetic protons, which were close to that of electrons. These release times agreed with the time when the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME, indicating that the CME-CME interaction (and shock-CME interaction) plays an important role in the process of particle acceleration in this event.

  13. INTERACTION BETWEEN TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE 2013 MAY 22 LARGE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Liu-Guan; Xu, Fei; Gu, Bin; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Li, Gang; Jiang, Yong; Le, Gui-Ming; Shen, Cheng-Long; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Yao

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the eruption and interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the large 2013 May 22 solar energetic particle event using multiple spacecraft observations. Two CMEs, having similar propagation directions, were found to erupt from two nearby active regions (ARs), AR11748 and AR11745, at ∼08:48 UT and ∼13:25 UT, respectively. The second CME was faster than the first CME. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, we reconstructed the propagation of these two CMEs and found that the leading edge of the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME at a height of ∼6 solar radii. After about two hours, the leading edges of the two CMEs merged at a height of ∼20 solar radii. Type II solar radio bursts showed strong enhancement during this two hour period. Using the velocity dispersion method, we obtained the solar particle release (SPR) time and the path length for energetic electrons. Further assuming that energetic protons propagated along the same interplanetary magnetic field, we also obtained the SPR time for energetic protons, which were close to that of electrons. These release times agreed with the time when the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME, indicating that the CME-CME interaction (and shock-CME interaction) plays an important role in the process of particle acceleration in this event.

  14. Coral-Bacterial Communities before and after a Coral Mass Spawning Event on Ningaloo Reef

    PubMed Central

    Ceh, Janja; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Soo, Rochelle M.; van Keulen, Mike; Bourne, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria associated with three coral species, Acropora tenuis, Pocillopora damicornis and Tubastrea faulkneri, were assessed before and after coral mass spawning on Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia. Two colonies of each species were sampled before and after the mass spawning event and two additional samples were collected for P. damicornis after planulation. A variable 470 bp region of the 16 S rRNA gene was selected for pyrosequencing to provide an understanding of potential variations in coral-associated bacterial diversity and community structure. Bacterial diversity increased for all coral species after spawning as assessed by Chao1 diversity indicators. Minimal changes in community structure were observed at the class level and data at the taxonomical level of genus incorporated into a PCA analysis indicated that despite bacterial diversity increasing after spawning, coral-associated community structure did not shift greatly with samples grouped according to species. However, interesting changes could be detected from the dataset; for example, α-Proteobacteria increased in relative abundance after coral spawning and particularly the Roseobacter clade was found to be prominent in all coral species, indicating that this group may be important in coral reproduction. PMID:22629343

  15. Using Confidence Intervals and Recurrence Intervals to Determine Precipitation Delivery Mechanisms Responsible for Mass Wasting Events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulizio, T. P.; Bilbrey, C.; Stoyanoff, N.; Dixon, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Mass wasting events are geologic hazards that impact human life and property across a variety of landscapes. These movements can be triggered by tectonic activity, anomalous precipitation events, or both; acting to decrease the factor of safety ratio on a hillslope to the point of failure. There exists an active hazard landscape in the West Boulder River drainage of Park Co., MT in which the mechanisms of slope failure are unknown. It is known that region has not seen significant tectonic activity within the last decade, leaving anomalous precipitation events as the likely trigger for slope failures in the landscape. Precipitation can be delivered to a landscape via rainfall or snow; it was the aim of this study to determine the precipitation delivery mechanism most likely responsible for movements in the West Boulder drainage following the Jungle Wildfire of 2006. Data was compiled from four SNOTEL sites in the surrounding area, spanning 33 years, focusing on, but not limited to; maximum snow water equivalent (SWE) values in a water year, median SWE values on the date which maximum SWE was recorded in a water year, the total precipitation accumulated in a water year, etc. Means were computed and 99% confidence intervals were constructed around these means. Recurrence intervals and exceedance probabilities were computed for maximum SWE values and total precipitation accumulated in a water year to determine water years with anomalous precipitation. It was determined that the water year 2010-2011 received an anomalously high amount of SWE, and snow melt in the spring of this water year likely triggered recent mass waste movements. This data is further supported by Google Earth imagery, showing movements between 2009 and 2011. Return intervals for the maximum SWE value in 2010-11 for the Placer Basin SNOTEL site was 34 years, while return intervals for the Box Canyon and Monument Peak SNOTEL sites were 17.5 and 17 years respectively. Max SWE values lie outside the

  16. Magnetic Field-Line Lengths in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Inferred from Energetic Electron Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Haggerty, D. K.; Richardson, I. G.

    2011-01-01

    About one quarter of the observed interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are characterized by enhanced magnetic fields that smoothly rotate in direction over timescales of about 10-50 hr. These ICMEs have the appearance of magnetic flux ropes and are known as "magnetic clouds" (MCs). The total lengths of MC field lines can be determined using solar energetic particles of known speeds when the solar release times and the I AU onset times of the particles are known. A recent examination of about 30 near-relativistic (NR) electron events in and near 8 MCs showed no obvious indication that the field-line lengths were longest near the MC boundaries and shortest at the MC axes or outside the MCs, contrary to the expectations for a flux rope. Here we use the impulsive beamed NR electron events observed with the Electron Proton and Alpha Monitor instrument on the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft and type III radio bursts observed on the Wind spacecraft to determine the field-line lengths inside ICMEs included in the catalog of Richardson & Cane. In particular, we extend this technique to ICMEs that are not MCs and compare the field-line lengths inside MCs and non-MC ICMEs with those in the ambient solar wind outside the ICMEs. No significant differences of field-line lengths are found among MCs, ICMEs, and the ambient solar wind. The estimated number of ICME field-line turns is generally smaller than those deduced for flux-rope model fits to MCs. We also find cases in which the electron injections occur in solar active regions CARs) distant from the source ARs of the ICMEs, supporting CME models that require extensive coronal magnetic reconnection with surrounding fields. The field-line lengths are found to be statistically longer for the NR electron events classified as ramps and interpreted as shock injections somewhat delayed from the type III bursts. The path lengths of the remaining spike and pulse electron events are compared with model calculations of

  17. Magnetic Field-line Lengths in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Inferred from Energetic Electron Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Haggerty, D. K.; Richardson, I. G.

    2011-08-01

    About one quarter of the observed interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are characterized by enhanced magnetic fields that smoothly rotate in direction over timescales of about 10-50 hr. These ICMEs have the appearance of magnetic flux ropes and are known as "magnetic clouds" (MCs). The total lengths of MC field lines can be determined using solar energetic particles of known speeds when the solar release times and the 1 AU onset times of the particles are known. A recent examination of about 30 near-relativistic (NR) electron events in and near 8 MCs showed no obvious indication that the field-line lengths were longest near the MC boundaries and shortest at the MC axes or outside the MCs, contrary to the expectations for a flux rope. Here we use the impulsive beamed NR electron events observed with the Electron Proton and Alpha Monitor instrument on the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft and type III radio bursts observed on the Wind spacecraft to determine the field-line lengths inside ICMEs included in the catalog of Richardson & Cane. In particular, we extend this technique to ICMEs that are not MCs and compare the field-line lengths inside MCs and non-MC ICMEs with those in the ambient solar wind outside the ICMEs. No significant differences of field-line lengths are found among MCs, ICMEs, and the ambient solar wind. The estimated number of ICME field-line turns is generally smaller than those deduced for flux-rope model fits to MCs. We also find cases in which the electron injections occur in solar active regions (ARs) distant from the source ARs of the ICMEs, supporting CME models that require extensive coronal magnetic reconnection with surrounding fields. The field-line lengths are found to be statistically longer for the NR electron events classified as ramps and interpreted as shock injections somewhat delayed from the type III bursts. The path lengths of the remaining spike and pulse electron events are compared with model calculations of

  18. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  19. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  20. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine Casualty Investigations § 4.40-25...

  1. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  2. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine Casualty Investigations § 4.40-25...

  3. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  4. 33 CFR 174.107 - Contents of casualty or accident report form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Contents of casualty or accident... System Requirements § 174.107 Contents of casualty or accident report form. Each form for reporting a vessel casualty or accident must contain the information required in § 173.57 of this chapter....

  5. 46 CFR 4.05-10 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 4.05-10 Section 4.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-10 Written report of...

  6. 46 CFR 4.05-5 - Substance of marine casualty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Substance of marine casualty notice. 4.05-5 Section 4.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-5 Substance of...

  7. 33 CFR 174.107 - Contents of casualty or accident report form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contents of casualty or accident... System Requirements § 174.107 Contents of casualty or accident report form. Each form for reporting a vessel casualty or accident must contain the information required in § 173.57 of this chapter....

  8. 46 CFR 196.07-1 - Notice and reporting of casualty and voyage records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RESEARCH VESSELS OPERATIONS Notice and Reporting of Casualty and Voyage Records § 196.07-1 Notice and reporting of casualty and voyage records. The requirements for providing notice and reporting of marine... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice and reporting of casualty and voyage records....

  9. 46 CFR 4.05-10 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 4.05-10 Section 4.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-10 Written report of...

  10. 46 CFR 4.05-5 - Substance of marine casualty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Substance of marine casualty notice. 4.05-5 Section 4.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-5 Substance of...

  11. 46 CFR 4.05-10 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 4.05-10 Section 4.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-10 Written report of...

  12. 46 CFR 4.05-10 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 4.05-10 Section 4.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-10 Written report of...

  13. 46 CFR 4.05-5 - Substance of marine casualty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Substance of marine casualty notice. 4.05-5 Section 4.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-5 Substance of...

  14. 46 CFR 4.05-5 - Substance of marine casualty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Substance of marine casualty notice. 4.05-5 Section 4.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-5 Substance of...

  15. 46 CFR 4.05-5 - Substance of marine casualty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Substance of marine casualty notice. 4.05-5 Section 4.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-5 Substance of...

  16. 46 CFR 4.05-10 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 4.05-10 Section 4.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-10 Written report of...

  17. 46 CFR 185.220 - Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty. 185.220 Section 185.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.220 Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty....

  18. 46 CFR 185.220 - Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty. 185.220 Section 185.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.220 Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty....

  19. 46 CFR 197.486 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.486 Written report of casualty. The... occurs, as follows: (a) On Form CG-2692, when the diving installation is on a vessel. (b) Using a written report, in narrative form, when the diving installation is on a facility. The written report must...

  20. 46 CFR 197.486 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.486 Written report of casualty. The... occurs, as follows: (a) On Form CG-2692, when the diving installation is on a vessel. (b) Using a written report, in narrative form, when the diving installation is on a facility. The written report must...

  1. 46 CFR 122.202 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Administration (OSHA) in 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 1904. (c) Notice given as required by § 122... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notice of marine casualty. 122.202 Section 122.202... THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS...

  2. 46 CFR 4.05-1 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Notice given as required by 33 CFR 160.215 satisfies the requirement of this section if the marine casualty involves a hazardous condition as defined by 33 CFR 160.204. (c) Except as otherwise required... by paragraph (a)(8) of this section, a report made pursuant to 33 CFR 153.203, 40 CFR 117.21, or...

  3. 46 CFR 122.202 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Administration (OSHA) in 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 1904. (c) Notice given as required by § 122... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notice of marine casualty. 122.202 Section 122.202... THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS...

  4. 46 CFR 4.05-1 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Notice given as required by 33 CFR 160.215 satisfies the requirement of this section if the marine casualty involves a hazardous condition as defined by 33 CFR 160.203. (c) Except as otherwise required... by paragraph (a)(8) of this section, a report made pursuant to 33 CFR 153.203, 40 CFR 117.21, or...

  5. 46 CFR 122.202 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Administration (OSHA) in 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 1904. (c) Notice given as required by § 122... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notice of marine casualty. 122.202 Section 122.202... THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS...

  6. 46 CFR 122.202 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Administration (OSHA) in 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 1904. (c) Notice given as required by § 122... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of marine casualty. 122.202 Section 122.202... THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS...

  7. Battlefield Documentation of Tactical Combat Casualty Care in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Robinson, John B; Smith, Michael P; Gross, Kirby R; Sauer, Samual W; Geracci, James J; Day, Charlie D; Kotwal, Russ S

    2016-01-01

    Performance improvement is reliant on information and data, as you cannot improve what you do not measure. The US military went to war in 2001 without an integrated trauma care system to collect and analyze combat casualty care data. By 2006, the conflict in Afghanistan began appreciating the capture and consolidation of hospital care documentation into the Department of Defense Trauma Registry. In contrast, a paucity of documentation has existed for prehospital or tactical combat casualty care (TCCC). Using the 75th Ranger casualty documentation model established in 2005, the Joint Trauma System developed a casualty data collection system for prehospital care using the TCCC Card, the TCCC After Action Report (AAR), and the Prehospital Trauma Registry. In 2013, this system was mandated for use by US forces in Afghanistan. The Joint Trauma System also created and deployed a prehospital team to be an integral part of the Joint Theater Trauma System in Afghanistan. This prehospital team provided prehospital training and facilitated prehospital data capture. Described and analyzed in this report are prehospital data captured in Afghanistan from 2013 to 2014 using the TCCC Card and the TCCC AAR. PMID:27215873

  8. Primary Casualty Reception Ship: the hospital within--Operation Granby.

    PubMed

    Dewar, E P

    1992-01-01

    As the build-up of Operation Granby forces developed in the Gulf, casualty estimates indicated the need for a 100-bed hospital facility to care for the possible maritime casualties. RFA Argus, the Air Training Ship, was identified as the potential Primary Casualty Reception Ship (PCRS) and at the end of September 1990 plans were drawn up to convert the forward hangar into a two-storey 100-bed hospital in collective protection (COLPRO). In the three weeks prior to deployment, the hospital was designed, built, equipped and staffed. Argus arrived in the Gulf in mid-November as the PCRS with, all in COLPRO, a 10-bed intensive care unit (ICU), a 14-bed high dependency unit (HDU), a 76-bed low dependency unit (LDU) plus four operating tables in two theatres with full support services. The hospital was staffed by a medical team of 136 personnel and supported by the Air department with four casualty evacuation helicopters, an RN Party and the staff of the RFA. One hundred and five patients were treated of which 78 were returned to duty. Argu as PCRS spent longer in the northern Persian Gulf than any other ship, UK or US. PMID:1460595

  9. 46 CFR 197.486 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.486 Written report of casualty. The... occurs, as follows: (a) On Form CG-2692, when the diving installation is on a vessel. (b) Using a written report, in narrative form, when the diving installation is on a facility. The written report must...

  10. 46 CFR 197.486 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.486 Written report of casualty. The... occurs, as follows: (a) On Form CG-2692, when the diving installation is on a vessel. (b) Using a written report, in narrative form, when the diving installation is on a facility. The written report must...

  11. 46 CFR 197.486 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.486 Written report of casualty. The... occurs, as follows: (a) On Form CG-2692, when the diving installation is on a vessel. (b) Using a written report, in narrative form, when the diving installation is on a facility. The written report must...

  12. 46 CFR 4.05-1 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Notice given as required by 33 CFR 160.215 satisfies the requirement of this section if the marine casualty involves a hazardous condition as defined by 33 CFR 160.204. (c) Except as otherwise required... by paragraph (a)(8) of this section, a report made pursuant to 33 CFR 153.203, 40 CFR 117.21, or...

  13. 46 CFR 169.807 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of casualty. 169.807 Section 169.807 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... to mariners, radiograms sent and received, the radio log, and crew, sailing school...

  14. 46 CFR 169.807 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notice of casualty. 169.807 Section 169.807 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... to mariners, radiograms sent and received, the radio log, and crew, sailing school...

  15. 46 CFR 169.807 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notice of casualty. 169.807 Section 169.807 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... to mariners, radiograms sent and received, the radio log, and crew, sailing school...

  16. 46 CFR 169.807 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notice of casualty. 169.807 Section 169.807 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... to mariners, radiograms sent and received, the radio log, and crew, sailing school...

  17. 46 CFR 169.807 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notice of casualty. 169.807 Section 169.807 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... to mariners, radiograms sent and received, the radio log, and crew, sailing school...

  18. Event Detection Using Mobile Phone Mass GPS Data and Their Reliavility Verification by Dmsp/ols Night Light Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuki, Akiyama; Satoshi, Ueyama; Ryosuke, Shibasaki; Adachi, Ryuichiro

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we developed a method to detect sudden population concentration on a certain day and area, that is, an "Event," all over Japan in 2012 using mass GPS data provided from mobile phone users. First, stay locations of all phone users were detected using existing methods. Second, areas and days where Events occurred were detected by aggregation of mass stay locations into 1-km-square grid polygons. Finally, the proposed method could detect Events with an especially large number of visitors in the year by removing the influences of Events that occurred continuously throughout the year. In addition, we demonstrated reasonable reliability of the proposed Event detection method by comparing the results of Event detection with light intensities obtained from the night light images from the DMSP/OLS night light images. Our method can detect not only positive events such as festivals but also negative events such as natural disasters and road accidents. These results are expected to support policy development of urban planning, disaster prevention, and transportation management.

  19. What Caused the UK's Largest Common Dolphin (Delphinus delphis) Mass Stranding Event?

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, Paul D.; Deaville, Robert; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina; Barnett, James; Brownlow, Andrew; Brownell Jr., Robert L.; Clare, Frances C.; Davison, Nick; Law, Robin J.; Loveridge, Jan; Macgregor, Shaheed K.; Morris, Steven; Murphy, Sinéad; Penrose, Rod; Perkins, Matthew W.; Pinn, Eunice; Seibel, Henrike; Siebert, Ursula; Sierra, Eva; Simpson, Victor; Tasker, Mark L.; Tregenza, Nick; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    On 9 June 2008, the UK's largest mass stranding event (MSE) of short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) occurred in Falmouth Bay, Cornwall. At least 26 dolphins died, and a similar number was refloated/herded back to sea. On necropsy, all dolphins were in good nutritive status with empty stomachs and no evidence of known infectious disease or acute physical injury. Auditory tissues were grossly normal (26/26) but had microscopic haemorrhages (5/5) and mild otitis media (1/5) in the freshest cases. Five lactating adult dolphins, one immature male, and one immature female tested were free of harmful algal toxins and had low chemical pollutant levels. Pathological evidence of mud/seawater inhalation (11/26), local tide cycle, and the relative lack of renal myoglobinuria (26/26) suggested MSE onset on a rising tide between 06∶30 and 08∶21 hrs (9 June). Potential causes excluded or considered highly unlikely included infectious disease, gas/fat embolism, boat strike, by-catch, predator attack, foraging unusually close to shore, chemical or algal toxin exposure, abnormal weather/climatic conditions, and high-intensity acoustic inputs from seismic airgun arrays or natural sources (e.g., earthquakes). International naval exercises did occur in close proximity to the MSE with the most intense part of the exercises (including mid-frequency sonars) occurring four days before the MSE and resuming with helicopter exercises on the morning of the MSE. The MSE may therefore have been a “two-stage process” where a group of normally pelagic dolphins entered Falmouth Bay and, after 3–4 days in/around the Bay, a second acoustic/disturbance event occurred causing them to strand en masse. This spatial and temporal association with the MSE, previous associations between naval activities and cetacean MSEs, and an absence of other identifiable factors known to cause cetacean MSEs, indicates naval activity to be the most probable cause of the Falmouth Bay MSE. PMID

  20. What caused the UK's largest common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) mass stranding event?

    PubMed

    Jepson, Paul D; Deaville, Robert; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina; Barnett, James; Brownlow, Andrew; Brownell, Robert L; Clare, Frances C; Davison, Nick; Law, Robin J; Loveridge, Jan; Macgregor, Shaheed K; Morris, Steven; Murphy, Sinéad; Penrose, Rod; Perkins, Matthew W; Pinn, Eunice; Seibel, Henrike; Siebert, Ursula; Sierra, Eva; Simpson, Victor; Tasker, Mark L; Tregenza, Nick; Cunningham, Andrew A; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    On 9 June 2008, the UK's largest mass stranding event (MSE) of short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) occurred in Falmouth Bay, Cornwall. At least 26 dolphins died, and a similar number was refloated/herded back to sea. On necropsy, all dolphins were in good nutritive status with empty stomachs and no evidence of known infectious disease or acute physical injury. Auditory tissues were grossly normal (26/26) but had microscopic haemorrhages (5/5) and mild otitis media (1/5) in the freshest cases. Five lactating adult dolphins, one immature male, and one immature female tested were free of harmful algal toxins and had low chemical pollutant levels. Pathological evidence of mud/seawater inhalation (11/26), local tide cycle, and the relative lack of renal myoglobinuria (26/26) suggested MSE onset on a rising tide between 06:30 and 08∶21 hrs (9 June). Potential causes excluded or considered highly unlikely included infectious disease, gas/fat embolism, boat strike, by-catch, predator attack, foraging unusually close to shore, chemical or algal toxin exposure, abnormal weather/climatic conditions, and high-intensity acoustic inputs from seismic airgun arrays or natural sources (e.g., earthquakes). International naval exercises did occur in close proximity to the MSE with the most intense part of the exercises (including mid-frequency sonars) occurring four days before the MSE and resuming with helicopter exercises on the morning of the MSE. The MSE may therefore have been a "two-stage process" where a group of normally pelagic dolphins entered Falmouth Bay and, after 3-4 days in/around the Bay, a second acoustic/disturbance event occurred causing them to strand en masse. This spatial and temporal association with the MSE, previous associations between naval activities and cetacean MSEs, and an absence of other identifiable factors known to cause cetacean MSEs, indicates naval activity to be the most probable cause of the Falmouth Bay MSE. PMID:23646103

  1. Evolutionary Events and Phytoplankton Recovery After the K/T Mass Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuqua, L. M.; Bralower, T. J.

    2004-12-01

    The recovery of the open ocean ecosystem after the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary mass extinction (65 Ma) was extremely slow. The surface to deep carbon isotopic gradient remained below latest Cretaceous levels for more than three million years after the boundary event, suggesting suppressed rates of carbon cycling and low phytoplankton productivity. There is a rapid change in the carbon isotopic gradient between 62 and 61 Ma, indicating the final recovery of surface water production levels (D'Hondt et al., 1998). We are investigating nannoplankton communities in the interval from 61.5 to 62.5 Ma to determine the relationship between the recovery and changes in productivity and carbon cycling. Samples were collected at high resolution from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1209 in the western Pacific, and Deep Sea Drilling Project Sites 384 in the North Atlantic and 528 in the South Atlantic. Results show major diversification of two dominant Cenozoic nannoliths (non-coocolith bearing, calcite-secreting nannoplankton), Fasciculithus and Sphenolithus, occurred shortly after carbon gradients were restored. The first occurrences of these two genera are associated with significant changes in calcareous nannoplankton communities, indicative of abrupt changes in surface water circulation. A rapid evolutionary sequence of early forms of Fasciculithus has been identified at Sites 1209 and 384. Two unidentified taxa were found before the first occurrence of the earliest documented species, F. pileatus. SEM work currently underway is designed to elucidate the evolution of this genus. At the Pacific site, the diversification is associated with an interval of dissolution, presumably resulting from a change in deep water circulation. The significance of this relationship is currently not understood. D'Hondt, S. et al., Organic carbon fluxes and ecological recovery from the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction, Science, 282, 276-279, 1998.

  2. Paleozoic large igneous provinces of Northern Eurasia: Correlation with mass extinction events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchinsky, Vadim A.

    2012-04-01

    This paper assesses data from recently described major Paleozoic large igneous provinces (LIPs), mostly in Northern Eurasia. The 10 LIPs reviewed form a unimodal distribution in terms of volume. Eight LIPs have an initial modal volume greater than 0.1 × 106 km3. The rift associated basalts of 2 LIPs from the end of the Late Cambrian Period and the end of the Late Ordovician Period do not occupy a large volume. Some of the provinces were discovered or rediscovered relatively recently and dating is still approximate, but most provinces fit a simple model in which volcanism persisted on the order of 10-20 Myr, often resulting in continental break-up. Correlation between LIP ages and the ages of geological events in the Paleozoic Era that reflect mass extinctions and oceanic anoxia agrees with correlations suggested by Courtillot (1994) and Courtillot and Renne (2003) for the Cenozoic and Mesozoic eras, considering that the absolute dating of some Paleozoic LIPs needs to be strengthened in the future.

  3. Development of point mass occupant injury criteria using event data recorders.

    PubMed

    Gabauer, Douglas J; Gabler, Hampton C

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an estimate of the probability of serious occupant injury in frontal crashes based on vehicle kinematics information. Occupant injury risk is developed by modeling the human as a point mass and computing the occupant impact velocity (OIV) using the flail space model. Event Data Recorder data provide vehicle kinematics information for real world crashes with known injury outcomes. A data set of 211 cases is used for methodology development and preliminary insight to the injury prediction capability of the metric. Using logistic regression, injury risk curves are generated for all data, a belted occupant subset and an unbelted occupant subset. Based on the models, an occupant restrained by an airbag and safety belt is found to have a lower risk of injury than an occupant only restrained by an airbag. A 50% probability of serious injury is found to correspond to an OIV of 11.2 m/s and 15.9 m/s for unbelted and belted occupants, respectively. PMID:16817603

  4. Functional diversity of marine ecosystems after the Late Permian mass extinction event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, William J.; Twitchett, Richard J.

    2014-03-01

    The Late Permian mass extinction event about 252 million years ago was the most severe biotic crisis of the past 500 million years and occurred during an episode of global warming. The loss of around two-thirds of marine genera is thought to have had substantial ecological effects, but the overall impacts on the functioning of marine ecosystems and the pattern of marine recovery are uncertain. Here we analyse the fossil occurrences of all known benthic marine invertebrate genera from the Permian and Triassic periods, and assign each to a functional group based on their inferred lifestyle. We show that despite the selective extinction of 62-74% of these genera, all but one functional group persisted through the crisis, indicating that there was no significant loss of functional diversity at the global scale. In addition, only one new mode of life originated in the extinction aftermath. We suggest that Early Triassic marine ecosystems were not as ecologically depauperate as widely assumed. Functional diversity was, however, reduced in particular regions and habitats, such as tropical reefs; at these smaller scales, recovery varied spatially and temporally, probably driven by migration of surviving groups. We find that marine ecosystems did not return to their pre-extinction state, and by the Middle Triassic greater functional evenness is recorded, resulting from the radiation of previously subordinate groups such as motile, epifaunal grazers.

  5. Interplanetary Consequences of Coronal Mass Ejection Events Occurred During 18-25 June 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Maia, D.; Johri, A.; Induja, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we review the preliminary results on the propagation effects and interplanetary consequences of fast and wide coronal mass ejection (CME) events, occurred during 18-25 June 2015, in the Sun-Earth distance range. The interplanetary scintillation (IPS) images reveal that the large-scale structures of CME-driven disturbances filled nearly the entire inner heliosphere with a range of speeds, ˜300-1000 km s-1. The comparison of speed data sets, from IPS technique results in the inner heliosphere and in-situ measurements at 1 AU, indicates that the drag force imposed by the low-speed wind dominated heliosphere on the propagation of CMEs may not be effective. The arrival of shocks at 1 AU suggests that a shock can be driven in the interplanetary medium by the central part of the moving CME and also by a different part away from its centre. The increased flux of proton at energies >10 MeV is consistent with the acceleration of particles by the shock ahead of the CME.

  6. Simulations of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection Events with Simple Model of Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Tomoya; den, Mitsue; Watari, Shinichi; Yamashita, Kazuyuki

    Propagation of an interplanetary shock wave depends on a solar wind situation. While a precise solar wind model in numerical simulations will produce good results in prediction of passing time of an interplanetary shock wave caused by a coronal mass ejection (CME), one attempting the prediction with a detail model will face difficulty in inputting parameters, because such quantities will often be estimated only with insufficient precisions. This study aimed to build a model whose parameters are available before a shock wave arrival. We performed simulations of interplanetaly CME events with a simple model of solar wind. The model has slow wind blowing out on a solar geodesic line into global fast wind. Tilt and phase of the plane including the geodesic line are presumed by a previous solar magnetic field. A CME is put into the simulation region. The CME model we use needs two major parameters, position and velocity. Position is assumed at the accompanied X-ray flare and velocity is estimated by LASCO observation. Some other parameters were fixed experientially after trial and error. We compare resulting fluctuation near the Earth with ACE data, and discuss limits and potentialities of the model in space weather prediction.

  7. When terror is routine: how Israeli nurses cope with multi-casualty terror.

    PubMed

    Riba, Shoshana; Reches, Hiba

    2002-01-01

    The wave of terror that has befallen the Israeli civilian population over the past two years, striking deep into the heart of towns and cities all over the country, presents a unique challenge for the health care system in general and nursing in particular. This article has a two-fold purpose: (a) to describe discussions that took place with four focus groups consisting of emergency room nurses who had recently cared for victims of terror, and (b) to delineate recommendations for policy enhancement based upon these discussions. Qualitative analysis of the data collected from focus group discussions revealed four stages of personal and professional involvement, each one eliciting a specific response from the nurses: call up to report for duty, waiting for casualties to arrive, caring for the victims, and closure of the event. Nurses identified numerous hardships and great anxiety along with a strong sense of professional fulfillment. Recommendations for policy include: incorporating stress management and debriefing skills in post-basic ER training, designing workshops and drills in trauma care for non-ER nurses who float into the ER in the wake of a multi-casualty act of terror, and developing leadership seminars for head nurses in the ER departments. PMID:12410636

  8. Bio-Terrorism Threat and Casualty Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    NOEL,WILLIAM P.

    2000-01-01

    The bio-terrorism threat has become the ''poor man's'' nuclear weapon. The ease of manufacture and dissemination has allowed an organization with only rudimentary skills and equipment to pose a significant threat with high consequences. This report will analyze some of the most likely agents that would be used, the ease of manufacture, the ease of dissemination and what characteristics of the public health response that are particularly important to the successful characterization of a high consequence event to prevent excessive causalities.

  9. The global vegetation pattern across the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction interval: A template for other extinction events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajda, Vivi; Bercovici, Antoine

    2014-11-01

    Changes in pollen and spore assemblages across the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary elucidate the vegetation response to a global environmental crisis triggered by an asteroid impact in Mexico 66 Ma. The Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary clay, associated with the Chicxulub asteroid impact event, constitutes a unique, global marker bed enabling comparison of the world-wide palynological signal spanning the mass extinction event. The data from both hemispheres are consistent, revealing diverse latest Cretaceous assemblages of pollen and spores that were affected by a major diversity loss as a consequence of the K-Pg event. Here we combine new results with past studies to provide an integrated global perspective of the terrestrial vegetation record across the K-Pg boundary. We further apply the K-Pg event as a template to asses the causal mechanism behind other major events in Earths history. The end-Permian, end-Triassic, and the K-Pg mass-extinctions were responses to different causal processes that resulted in essentially similar succession of decline and recovery phases, although expressed at different temporal scales. The events share a characteristic pattern of a bloom of opportunistic "crisis" tax followed by a pulse in pioneer communities, and finally a recovery in diversity including evolution of new taxa. Based on their similar extinction and recovery patterns and the fact that the Last and First Appearance Datums associated with the extinctions are separated in time, we recommend using the K-Pg event as a model and to use relative abundance data for the stratigraphic definition of mass-extinction events and the placement of associated chronostratigraphic boundaries.

  10. Coronal mass ejection-related particle acceleration regions during a simple eruptive event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas-Matamoros, Carolina; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Rouillard, Alexis P.

    2016-05-01

    An intriguing feature of many solar energetic particle (SEP) events is the detection of particles over a very extended range of longitudes in the heliosphere. This may be due to peculiarities of the magnetic field in the corona, to a broad accelerator, to cross-field transport of the particles, or to a combination of these processes. The eruptive flare on 26 April 2008 provided an opportunity to study relevant processes under particularly favourable conditions since it occurred in a very quiet solar and interplanetary environment. This enabled us to investigate the physical link between a single well-identified coronal mass ejection (CME), electron acceleration as traced by radio emission, and the production of SEPs. We conduct a detailed analysis, which combines radio observations (Nançay Radio Heliograph and Nançay Decametre Array, Wind/Waves spectrograph) with remote-sensing observations of the corona in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white light, as well as in situ measurements of energetic particles near 1AU (SoHO and STEREO spacecraft). By combining images taken from multiple vantage points, we were able to derive the time-dependent evolution of the 3D pressure front that was developing around the erupting CME. Magnetic reconnection in the post-CME current sheet accelerated electrons, which remained confined in closed magnetic fields in the corona, while the acceleration of escaping particles can be attributed to the pressure front ahead of the expanding CME. The CME accelerated electrons remotely from the parent active region, owing to the interaction of its laterally expanding flank, which was traced by an EUV wave, with the ambient corona. SEPs detected at one STEREO spacecraft and SoHO were accelerated later, when the frontal shock of the CME intercepted the spacecraft-connected interplanetary magnetic field line. The injection regions into the heliosphere inferred from the radio and SEP observations are separated in longitude by about 140°. The

  11. Management of Crush Syndrome Casualties after Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Sever, Mehmet Sukru; Vanholder, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    After direct impact of the trauma, crush syndrome is the second most frequent cause of death after mass disasters. However, since crush syndrome is quite rare in daily practice, mistakes are frequent in the treatment of these cases. This paper summarizes the etiopathogenesis of traumatic rhabdomyolysis and of crush syndrome-based acute kidney injury. The clinical and laboratory features, prophylaxis, and treatment of crush cases are described as well. The importance of early and energetic fluid resuscitation is underlined for prophylaxis of acute kidney injury. Since there is chaos, and an overwhelming number of victims, logistic drawbacks create a specific problem in the treatment of crush victims after mass disasters. Potential solutions for logistic hurdles and disaster preparedness scenarios have also been provided in this review article. PMID:23908797

  12. War casualties on the home front

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda J. Flinn

    2005-11-01

    On May 12, 1942, at Christopher coal mine No. 3 in Osage, West Virginia, a continent away from the frontlines of World War II, Superintendent Ed O'Neil saw the mine ventilation fan suddenly run backwards, propelled by a strong gust of air that tore the belt off the huge blower. The second shift mantrip of 115 coal miners, traversing the drift mouth for the 3:00 p.m. shift, ground to an uneasy halt. The article recounts the tragic consequences of this incident. It also tells of other events affecting coal miners during World War I and World War II.

  13. Integration of Tactical Emergency Casualty Care Into the National Tactical Emergency Medical Support Competency Domains.

    PubMed

    Pennardt, Andre; Kamin, Rich; Llewellyn, Craig; Shapiro, Geoff; Carmona, Philip A; Schwartz, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    Tactical emergency medical support (TEMS) is a critical component of the out-of-hospital response to domestic high-threat incidents such as hostage scenarios, warrant service, active shooter or violent incidents, terrorist attacks, and other intentional mass casualty-producing acts. From its grass-roots inception in the form of medical support of select law enforcement special weapons and tactics (SWAT) units in the 1980s, the TEMS subspecialty of prehospital care has rapidly grown and evolved over the past 40 years. The National TEMS Initiative and Council (NTIC) competencies and training objectives are the only published recommendations of their kind and offer the opportunity for national standardization of TEMS training programs and a future accreditation process. Building on the previous work of the NTIC and the creation of acknowledged competency domains for TEMS and the acknowledged civilian translation of TCCC by the Committee for Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (C-TECC), the Joint Review Committee (JRC) has created an opportunity to bring forward the work in a form that could be operationally useful in an all-hazards and whole of community format. PMID:27450605

  14. Adverse event management in mass drug administration for neglected tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Arthur; Zink, Amanda

    2014-03-01

    The ethical challenges of reporting and managing adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) in the context of mass drug administration (MDA) for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) require reassessment of domestic and international policies on a global scale. Although the World Health Organization has set forth AE/SAE guidelines specifically for NTD MDA that incorporate suspected causality, and recommends that only SAEs get reported in this setting, most regulatory agencies continue to require the reporting of all SAEs exhibiting even a merely temporal relationship to activities associated with an MDA program. This greatly increases the potential for excess "noise" and undue risk aversion and is not only impractical but arguably unethical where huge proportions of populations are being treated for devastating diseases, and no good baseline exists against which to compare possible AE/SAE reports. Other population-specific variables that might change the way drug safety ought to be assessed include differing efficacy rates of a drug, background morbidity/mortality rates of the target disease in question, the growth rate of the incidence of disease, the availability of rescue or salvage therapies, and the willingness of local populations to take risks that other populations might not. The fact that NTDs are controllable and potentially eradicable with well-tolerated, effective, existing drugs might further alter our assessment of MDA safety and AE/SAE tolerability. At the same time, diffuseness of population, communication barriers, lack of resources, and other difficult surveillance challenges may present in NTD-affected settings. These limitations could impair the ability to monitor an MDA program's success, as well as hinder efforts to obtain informed consent or provide rescue therapy. Denying beneficial research interventions and MDA programs intended to benefit millions requires sound ethical justification based on more than the identification of

  15. Slope Failure Prediction and Early Warning Awareness Education for Reducing Landslides Casualty in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, S. P.; Tay, L. T.; Fukuoka, H.; Koyama, T.; Sakai, N.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Lateh, H.

    2015-12-01

    Northeast monsoon causes heavy rain in east coast of Peninsular Malaysia from November to March, every year. During this monsoon period, besides the happening of flood along east coast, landslides also causes millions of Malaysian Ringgit economical losses. Hence, it is essential to study the prediction of slope failure to prevent the casualty of landslides happening. In our study, we introduce prediction method of the accumulated rainfall affecting the stability of the slope. If the curve, in the graph, which is presented by rainfall intensity versus accumulated rainfall, crosses over the critical line, the condition of the slope is considered in high risk where the data are calculated and sent from rain gauge in the site via internet. If the possibility of slope failure is going high, the alert message will be sent out to the authorities for decision making on road block or setting the warning light at the road side. Besides road block and warning light, we propose to disseminate short message, to pre-registered mobile phone user, to notify the public for easing the traffic jam and avoiding unnecessary public panic. Prediction is not enough to prevent the casualty. Early warning awareness of the public is very important to reduce the casualty of landslides happening. IT technology does not only play a main role in disseminating information, early warning awareness education, by using IT technology, should be conducted, in schools, to give early warning awareness on natural hazard since childhood. Knowing the pass history on landslides occurrence will gain experience on the landslides happening. Landslides historical events with coordinate information are stored in database. The public can browse these historical events via internet. By referring to such historical landslides events, the public may know where did landslides happen before and the possibility of slope failure occurrence again is considered high. Simulation of rainfall induced slope failure mechanism

  16. The use of multiple intraosseous catheters in combat casualty resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debjeet; Philbeck, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    During the current military engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan, establishing intravenous (IV) access for resuscitation of critically injured casualties remains a persistent challenge. Intraosseous (IO) access has emerged as a viable alternative in resuscitation. In this case report, a 19 year-old male soldier was severely wounded by a roadside bomb in Iraq. Given the heavy initial blood loss, anatomic location of the injuries and gross wound contamination, peripheral IV access could not be established. Instead, multiple IO catheters were used to initiate fluid resuscitation prior to transfer to a combat support hospital. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such extensive usage of IO catheters. Multiple IO catheters can be placed rapidly and safely and may help solve the challenge of establishing vascular access for resuscitation of critically injured casualties. PMID:19317188

  17. Exercise London: a disaster exercise involving numerous casualties

    PubMed Central

    Theoret, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    A large-scale disaster exercise was conducted to assess how one large community would handle such a situation — particularly, how it would deal with 150 casualties. The planning, undertaken by a subcommittee composed of representatives of all resource groups in the city, took more than a year. The deficiencies of the disaster plan detected during the exercise, which included a lack of trained personnel and various problems of communication, are now being corrected. PMID:1260617

  18. Psychosocial considerations for mass decontamination.

    PubMed

    Lemyre, Louise; Johnson, Colleen; Corneil, Wayne

    2010-11-01

    Mass exposure to explosions, infectious agents, foodborne illnesses, chemicals or radiological materials may require mass decontamination that have critical psychosocial implications for the public and for both traditional and non-traditional responders in terms of impact and of response. Five main issues are common to mass decontamination events: (i) perception, (ii) somatisation, (iii) media role and communication, (iv) information sharing, (v) behavioural guidance and (vi) organisational issues. Empirical evidence is drawn from a number of cases, including Chernobyl; Goiania, Brazil; the sarin gas attack in Tokyo; the anthrax attacks in the USA; Three Mile Island; and by features of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome pandemic. In this paper, a common platform for mass casualty management is explored and suggestions for mass interventions are proposed across the complete event timeline, from pre-event threat and warning stages through to the impact and reconstruction phases. Implication for responders, healthcare and emergency infrastructure, public behaviour, screening processes, risk communication and media management are described. PMID:20924122

  19. Implementing and preserving the advances in combat casualty care from Iraq and Afghanistan throughout the US Military.

    PubMed

    Butler, Frank K; Smith, David J; Carmona, Richard H

    2015-08-01

    Thirteen years of continuous combat operations have enabled the US Military and its coalition partners to make a number of major advances in casualty care. The coalition nations have developed a superb combat trauma system and achieved unprecedented casualty survival rates. There remains, however, a need to accelerate the translation of new battlefield trauma care information, training, and equipment to units and individuals deploying in support of combat operations. In addition, the US Military needs to ensure that these advances are sustained during peace intervals and that we continue to build upon our successes as we prepare for future conflicts. This article contains recommendations designed to accomplish those goals. For the proposed actions to benefit all branches of our armed services, the direction will need to come from the Office of the Secretary of Defense in partnership with the Joint Staff. Effective translation of military advances in prehospital trauma care may also increase survival for law enforcement officers wounded in the line of duty and for civilian victims of Active Shooter or terrorist-related mass-casualty incidents. PMID:26218704

  20. Investigation of work zone crash casualty patterns using association rules.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jinxian; Zhu, Jia-Zheng; Yan, Xuedong; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Investigation of the casualty crash characteristics and contributory factors is one of the high-priority issues in traffic safety analysis. In this paper, we propose a method based on association rules to analyze the characteristics and contributory factors of work zone crash casualties. A case study is conducted using the Michigan M-94/I-94/I-94BL/I-94BR work zone crash data from 2004 to 2008. The obtained association rules are divided into two parts including rules with high-lift, and rules with high-support for the further analysis. The results show that almost all the high-lift rules contain either environmental or occupant characteristics. The majority of association rules are centered on specific characteristics, such as drinking driving, the highway with more than 4 lanes, speed-limit over 40mph and not use of traffic control devices. It should be pointed out that some stronger associated rules were found in the high-support part. With the network visualization, the association rule method can provide more understandable results for investigating the patterns of work zone crash casualties. PMID:27038500

  1. Participation in Mass Gatherings Can Benefit Well-Being: Longitudinal and Control Data from a North Indian Hindu Pilgrimage Event

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Shruti; Khan, Sammyh; Hopkins, Nick; Srinivasan, Narayanan; Reicher, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    How does participation in a long-duration mass gathering (such as a pilgrimage event) impact well-being? There are good reasons to believe such collective events pose risks to health. There are risks associated with communicable diseases. Moreover, the physical conditions at such events (noise, crowding, harsh conditions) are often detrimental to well-being. Yet, at the same time, social psychological research suggests participation in group-related activities can impact well-being positively, and we therefore investigated if participating in a long-duration mass gathering can actually bring such benefits. In our research we studied one of the world's largest collective events – a demanding month-long Hindu religious festival in North India. Participants (comprising 416 pilgrims who attended the gathering for the whole month of its duration, and 127 controls who did not) completed measures of self-assessed well-being and symptoms of ill-health at two time points. The first was a month before the gathering commenced, the second was a month after it finished. We found that those participating in this collective event reported a longitudinal increase in well-being relative to those who did not participate. Our data therefore imply we should reconceptualise how mass gatherings impact individuals. Although such gatherings can entail significant health risks, the benefits for well-being also need recognition. Indeed, an exclusive focus on risk is misleading and limits our understanding of why such events may be so attractive. More importantly, as our research is longitudinal and includes a control group, our work adds robust evidence to the social psychological literature concerning the relationship between participation in social group activities and well-being. PMID:23082155

  2. Participation in mass gatherings can benefit well-being: longitudinal and control data from a North Indian Hindu pilgrimage event.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Shruti; Khan, Sammyh; Hopkins, Nick; Srinivasan, Narayanan; Reicher, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    How does participation in a long-duration mass gathering (such as a pilgrimage event) impact well-being? There are good reasons to believe such collective events pose risks to health. There are risks associated with communicable diseases. Moreover, the physical conditions at such events (noise, crowding, harsh conditions) are often detrimental to well-being. Yet, at the same time, social psychological research suggests participation in group-related activities can impact well-being positively, and we therefore investigated if participating in a long-duration mass gathering can actually bring such benefits. In our research we studied one of the world's largest collective events - a demanding month-long Hindu religious festival in North India. Participants (comprising 416 pilgrims who attended the gathering for the whole month of its duration, and 127 controls who did not) completed measures of self-assessed well-being and symptoms of ill-health at two time points. The first was a month before the gathering commenced, the second was a month after it finished. We found that those participating in this collective event reported a longitudinal increase in well-being relative to those who did not participate. Our data therefore imply we should reconceptualise how mass gatherings impact individuals. Although such gatherings can entail significant health risks, the benefits for well-being also need recognition. Indeed, an exclusive focus on risk is misleading and limits our understanding of why such events may be so attractive. More importantly, as our research is longitudinal and includes a control group, our work adds robust evidence to the social psychological literature concerning the relationship between participation in social group activities and well-being. PMID:23082155

  3. Characteristic Times of Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events and Their Dependence on Associated Coronal Mass Ejection Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    2005-08-01

    We use 20 MeV proton intensities from the EPACT instrument on Wind and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the LASCO coronagraph on SOHO observed during 1998-2002 to statistically determine three characteristic times of gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events as functions of solar source longitude: (1) TO, the time from associated CME launch to SEP onset at 1 AU, (2) TR, the rise time from SEP onset to the time when the SEP intensity is a factor of 2 below peak intensity, and (3) TD, the duration over which the SEP intensity is within a factor of 2 of the peak intensity. Those SEP event times are compared with associated CME speeds, accelerations, and widths to determine whether and how the SEP event times may depend on the formation and dynamics of coronal/interplanetary shocks driven by the CMEs. Solar source longitudinal variations are clearly present in the SEP times, but TR and TD are significantly correlated with CME speeds only for SEP events in the best-connected longitude range. No significant correlations between the SEP times and CME accelerations are found except for TD in one longitude range, but there is a weak correlation of TR and TD with CME widths. We also find no correlation of any SEP times with the solar wind O+7/O+6 values, suggesting no dependence on solar wind stream type. The SEP times of the small subset of events occurring in interplanetary CMEs may be slightly shorter than those of all events.

  4. 3 Echo: concept of operations for early care and evacuation of victims of mass violence.

    PubMed

    Autrey, Allen W; Hick, John L; Bramer, Kurtis; Berndt, Jeremy; Bundt, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    This report describes the successful use of a simple 3-phase approach that guides the initial 30 minutes of a response to blast and active shooter events with casualties: Enter, Evaluate, and Evacuate (3 Echo) in a mass-shooting event occurring in Minneapolis, Minnesota USA, on September 27, 2012. Early coordination between law enforcement (LE) and rescue was emphasized, including establishment of unified command, a common operating picture, determination of evacuation corridors, swift victim evaluation, basic treatment, and rapid evacuation utilizing an approach developed collaboratively over the four years prior to the event. Field implementation of 3 Echo requires multi-disciplinary (Emergency Medical Services (EMS), fire and LE) training to optimize performance. This report details the mass-shooting event, the framework created to support the response, and also describes important aspects of the concepts of operation and curriculum evolved through years of collaboration between multiple disciplines to arrive at unprecedented EMS transport times in response to the event. PMID:24909363

  5. Events and the Ontology of Individuals: Verbs as a Source of Individuating Mass and Count Nouns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barner, David; Wagner, Laura; Snedeker, Jesse

    2008-01-01

    What does mass-count syntax contribute to the interpretation of noun phrases (NPs), and how much of NP meaning is contributed by lexical items alone? Many have argued that count syntax specifies reference to countable individuals (e.g., "cats") while mass syntax specifies reference to unindividuated entities (e.g., "water"). We evaluated this…

  6. CBRNE TC3: A Hybrid Approach to Casualty Care in the CBRNE Environment.

    PubMed

    Strain, John W

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) guidelines for the Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom contingency operations has dramatically reduced preventable combat deaths. A study of these principles and their application to medical treatment in the chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosives (CBRNE), weapons of mass destruction (WMD) environment is presented as a potential readiness and force multiplier for units engaged in this area of operations. Preparing medical operators for support of WMD sampling and mitigation missions requires extensive preventive medicine and post-exposure and downrange trauma threat preparedness. Training and equipping CBRN operators with treatment skills and appropriate interventional material requires pre-implementation planning specific to WMD threats (e.g., anthrax, radiation, organophosphates, and contaminated trauma). A scenario-based study reveals the tactics, techniques, and procedures for training, resourcing, and fielding the CBRN operator of the future. PMID:23817878

  7. LISA-PF radiation monitor performance during the evolution of SEP events for the monitoring of test-mass charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimani, C.; Ao, X.; Fabi, M.; Laurenza, M.; Li, G.; Lobo, A.; Mateos, I.; Storini, M.; Verkhoglyadova, O.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-02-01

    Cosmic rays of solar and galactic origin at energies >100 MeV/n charge and induce spurious forces on free-floating test masses on board interferometers devoted to gravitational wave detection in space. LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF), the technology testing mission for eLISA/NGO, will carry radiation monitors for on board test-mass charging monitoring. We present here the results of a simulation of radiation monitor performance during the evolution of solar energetic particle (SEP) events of different intensity. This simulation was carried out with the Fluka Monte Carlo package by taking into account for the first time both energy and spatial distributions of solar protons for the SEP events of 23 February 1956, 15 November 1960 and 7 May 1978. Input data for the Monte Carlo simulations was inferred from neutron monitor measurements. Conversely, for the SEP event of 13 December 2006 observed by the PAMELA experiment in space, we used the proton pitch angle distribution (PAD) computed from the Particle Acceleration and Transport in the Heliosphere (PATH) code. We plan to adopt this approach at the time of LISA-PF data analysis in order to optimize the correlation between radiation monitor observations and test-mass charging. The results of this work can be extended to the future space interferometers and other space missions carrying instruments for SEP detection.

  8. Tactical combat casualty care in the assault on Punta Paitilla Airfield.

    PubMed

    Mucciarone, James J; Llewellyn, Craig H; Wightman, John M

    2006-08-01

    Casualties incurred during the assault on Punta Paitilla Airfield during Operation Just Cause were evaluated through reviews of records and interviews with the participants. There were eight initial casualties. One-half of all subsequent casualties were wounded trying to move to these men while still under effective hostile fire. Consistent with other studies, the most common cause of death was internal hemorrhage; the second most common was catastrophic brain injury. Rapid control of external exsanguination was the technique most likely to prevent death. Tourniquets were applied to three lower extremities for two casualties, without sequelae. PMID:16933806

  9. Multi-Injury Casualty Stream Simulation in a Shipboard Combat Environment.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Edwin; Wing, Vern; Zouris, James; Vickers, Ross; Lawnick, Mary; Galarneau, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Accurate forecasts of casualty streams are essential for estimating personnel and materiel requirements for future naval combat engagements. The scarcity of recent naval combat data makes accurate forecasting difficult. Furthermore, current forecasts are based on single injuries only, even though empirical evidence indicates most battle casualties suffer multiple injuries. These anticipated single-injury casualty streams underestimate the needed medical resources. This article describes a method of simulating realistic multi-injury casualty streams in a maritime environment by combining available shipboard data with ground combat blast data. The simulations, based on the Military Combat Injury Scale, are expected to provide a better tool for medical logistics planning. PMID:26741479

  10. Utilisation of Rb/Sr as proxy for mass wasting events in peat records from the Romanian Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longman, Jack; Ersek, Vasile; Veres, Daniel; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Mass wasting events, including landslides, avalanches and flooding related to heavy rains can have a major impact on the local environment. Due to their association to extreme precipitation and glacial retreat, their occurrence is likely to increase as the climate changes in the future. As such, understanding their causation, and predicting their future impact is of paramount importance. To make such predictions, understanding of the relationship between the climate and the mass-wasting event is key. For this to happen, we must use historical records of mass wasting and climate to tie the two together. As a result, a reliable, quick and easy method for determining these events in the sedimentological record must be developed. The Rb/Sr ratio has been suggested as one indicator of mass wasting events, particularly based on lake sediment research in glaciated terrain. Our work was initially developed upon the behaviour of the two elements during weathering, considering that Rb commonly substitutes for K in mineral lattices and Sr commonly for Ca, due to similar ionic radii. Minerals containing K are much more resistant than Ca-bearing ones, and so there is enrichment in weathering products of Ca, and therefore Sr. As a result, Sr should be enriched in weathered material, resulting in a lowering of the Rb/Sr ratio. This assumption has been proven as reliable in similar research involving aeolian deposits and lake sediments. Here we present the first Holocene record based on this proxy from a peat archive from a raised mountain bog in the Romanian Carpathians, nested at the foot of an avalanche-prone glacial cirque. Our geochemical assessments are based on complete digestion of samples, and analysis via ICP-OES, rather than based only on core scanning. Initial results look promising, with the peat core below the active layer (acrotelm) and above the minerogenically-influenced zone producing strong correlation to the estimates of the minerogenic input over the bog based

  11. Search for a low-mass neutral Higgs boson with suppressed couplings to fermions using events with multiphoton final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.

    2016-06-01

    A search for a Higgs boson with suppressed couplings to fermions, hf, assumed to be the neutral, lower-mass partner of the Higgs boson discovered at the Large Hadron Collider, is reported. Such a Higgs boson could exist in extensions of the standard model with two Higgs doublets, and could be produced via p p ¯→H±hf→W*hfhf→4 γ +X , where H± is a charged Higgs boson. This analysis uses all events with at least three photons in the final state from proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.2 fb-1. No evidence of a signal is observed in the data. Values of Higgs-boson masses between 10 and 100 GeV /c2 are excluded at 95% Bayesian credibility.

  12. Origination, diversity, and extinction metrics essential for analysis of mass biotic crisis events: An example from cretaceous ammonoidea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collom, Christopher J.

    1988-01-01

    Traditional mass extinction research has predominently concentrated on statistically demonstrating that mass extinction intervals are significantly above background levels of familial and generic extinction in terms of extinction percentage, extinction rate, and per-taxon extinction rate; mass extinction intervals occur on a set periodicity throughout geologic time, which is estimated to be some 30 MYR in duration. The published literature has given little emphasis to equally important considerations and metrics such as origination rate, standing diversity, and rate of generation of new taxa DURING mass extinction intervals. The extent to which a mass extinction affects the regional or global biota, must ultimately be gauged by taking into consideration both the number of taxa which become extinct at or near the event (stage) boundary, and the number of taxa which are either not affected at all by the extinction or actually evolved during or shortly before/after the extinction interval. These effects can be seen in Cretaceous Ammonoidea (at the genus level), and their combined usage allow better insight into paleobiological dynamics and responses to mass extinction and its affect on this dominant Molluscan organism.

  13. Microlensing Event MOA-2007-BLG-400: Exhuming the Buried Signature of a Cool, Jovian-Mass Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Subo; Bond, I. A.; Gould, A.; Kozłowski, Szymon; Miyake, N.; Gaudi, B. S.; Bennett, D. P.; Abe, F.; Gilmore, A. C.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sako, T.; Sato, S.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Sweatman, W.; Tristram, P. J.; Yock, P. C. M.; MOA Collaboration; Bolt, G.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Han, C.; Janczak, J.; Lee, C.-U.; Mallia, F.; McCormick, J.; Monard, B.; Maury, A.; Natusch, T.; Park, B.-G.; Pogge, R. W.; Santallo, R.; Stanek, K. Z.; μFUN Collaboration; Udalski, A.; Kubiak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Szewczyk, O.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Collaboration

    2009-06-01

    We report the detection of the cool, Jovian-mass planet MOA-2007-BLG-400Lb. The planet was detected in a high-magnification microlensing event (with peak magnification A max = 628) in which the primary lens transited the source, resulting in a dramatic smoothing of the peak of the event. The angular extent of the region of perturbation due to the planet is significantly smaller than the angular size of the source, and as a result the planetary signature is also smoothed out by the finite source size. Thus, the deviation from a single-lens fit is broad and relatively weak (approximately few percent). Nevertheless, we demonstrate that the planetary nature of the deviation can be unambiguously ascertained from the gross features of the residuals, and detailed analysis yields a fairly precise planet/star mass ratio of q=(2.5^{+0.5}_{-0.3})× 10^{-3}}, in accord with the large significance (Δ χ^2=1070}) of the detection. The planet/star projected separation is subject to a strong close/wide degeneracy, leading to two indistinguishable solutions that differ in separation by a factor of ~8.5. Upper limits on flux from the lens constrain its mass to be M < 0.75 M sun (assuming that it is a main-sequence star). A Bayesian analysis that includes all available observational constraints indicates a primary in the Galactic bulge with a mass of ~0.2-0.5 M sun and thus a planet mass of ~0.5-1.3 M Jup. The separation and equilibrium temperature are ~5.3-9.7 AU (~0.6-1.1 AU) and ~34 K (~103 K) for the wide (close) solution. If the primary is a main-sequence star, follow-up observations would enable the detection of its light and so a measurement of its mass and distance.

  14. The Properties of Solar Energetic Particle Event-Associated Coronal Mass Ejections Reported in Different CME Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cane, H. V.

    2015-06-01

    We compare estimates of the speed and width of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in several catalogs for the CMEs associated with ˜ 200 solar energetic particle (SEP) events in 2006 - 2013 that included 25 MeV protons. The catalogs used are: CDAW, CACTUS, SEEDS, and CORIMP, all derived from observations by the LASCO coronagraphs on the SOHO spacecraft, the CACTUS catalog derived from the COR2 coronagraphs on the STEREO-A and -B spacecraft, and the DONKI catalog, which uses observations from SOHO and the STEREO spacecraft. We illustrate how, for this set of events, CME parameters can differ considerably in each catalog. The well-known correlation between CME speed and proton event intensity is shown to be similar for most catalogs, but this is largely because it is determined by a few large particle events associated with fast CMEs, and small events associated with slow CMEs. Intermediate particle events "shuffle" in position when speeds from different catalogs are used. Quadrature spacecraft CME speeds do not improve the correlation. CME widths also vary widely between catalogs, and they are influenced by plane-of-the-sky projection and how the width is inferred from the coronagraph images. The high degree of association (˜ 50 %) between the 25 MeV proton events and "full halo" (360∘-width) CMEs as defined in the CDAW catalog is removed when other catalogs are considered. Using CME parameters from the quadrature spacecraft, the SEP intensity is correlated with CME width, which is also correlated with CME speed.

  15. Paper and people: the work of the casualty reception clerk.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D

    1989-12-01

    This paper examines the exercise of discretion by casualty reception staff, focussing on the problems of accountability that arise when their judgements help shape the process of patient categorization that culminates in clinical diagnosis. Rules and guidelines which ostensibly relate to bureaucratic objectives, are applied in ways which reflect situational exigencies of reception work, and values embedded in organisational culture. But reception staff are reluctant to acknowledge the importance of their decisions, and, particularly where judgements relate to patient condition, present rule-use as a straightforward and certain activity in which interpretation plays little part. PMID:10304220

  16. Application of novel hyperspectral imaging technologies in combat casualty care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancio, Leopoldo C.

    2010-02-01

    Novel hyperspectral imaging (HSI) methods may play several important roles in Combat Casualty Care: (1) HSI of the skin may provide spatial data on hemoglobin saturation of oxygen, as a "window" into perfusion during shock. (2) HSI or similar technology could be incorporated into closed-loop, feedback-controlled resuscitation systems. (3) HSI may provide information about tissue viability and/or wound infection. (4) HSI in the near-infrared range may provide information on the tissue water content--greatly affected, e.g., by fluid resuscitation. Thus, further refinements in the speed and size of HSI systems are sought to make these capabilities available on the battlefield.

  17. Terminology-Setting Events and Information Retrieval in Mass Communication Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Kathleen A.

    To explore whether there is a recognizable point (a terminology-setting event, e.g., a scholarly conference, a special issue of a journal, or a particularly influential journal article) in the development of a new branch of knowledge that serves to codify a vocabulary for the researchers of that field, electronic and manual searches were conducted…

  18. Children, Literacy and Mass Trauma Teaching in Times of Catastrophic Events and on Going Emergency Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Denny

    2006-01-01

    This article focuses on children living in areas of armed conflict, catastrophic events and on-going emergencies. Based upon her ethnographic research, the author wants to try to share some insights into the complexities of the world in which children sometimes have to fight to live. Her intent is to create a space in which a discussion can take…

  19. Riding the Wave to Reach the Masses: Natural Events in Early Twentieth Century Portuguese Daily Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoes, Ana; Carneiro, Ana; Diogo, Maria Paula

    2012-01-01

    This paper brings together science communicated in newspapers in Portugal by looking at how news on natural events were communicated in two different newspapers--the capital newspaper "Diario de Noticias" ("Daily News") and the "Diario dos Acores" ("Azores Daily"). In particular, we look at how the 1900 solar eclipse, a hot topic throughout…

  20. Multilingual Analysis of Twitter News in Support of Mass Emergency Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, A.; Bügel, U.; Middleton, L.; Middleton, S. E.; Tokarchuk, L.; Watson, K.; Chaves, F.

    2012-04-01

    Social media are increasingly becoming an additional source of information for event-based early warning systems in the sense that they can help to detect natural crises and support crisis management during or after disasters. Within the European FP7 TRIDEC project we study the problem of analyzing multilingual twitter feeds for emergency events. Specifically, we consider tsunami and earthquakes, as one possible originating cause of tsunami, and propose to analyze twitter messages for capturing testified information at affected points of interest in order to obtain a better picture of the actual situation. For tsunami, these could be the so called Forecast Points, i.e. agreed-upon points chosen by the Regional Tsunami Warning Centers (RTWC) and the potentially affected countries, which must be considered when calculating expected tsunami arrival times. Generally, local civil protection authorities and the population are likely to respond in their native languages. Therefore, the present work focuses on English as "lingua franca" and on under-resourced Mediterranean languages in endangered zones, particularly in Turkey, Greece, and Romania. We investigated ten earthquake events and defined four language-specific classifiers that can be used to detect natural crisis events by filtering out irrelevant messages that do not relate to the event. Preliminary results indicate that such a filter has the potential to support earthquake detection and could be integrated into seismographic sensor networks. One hindrance in our study is the lack of geo-located data for asserting the geographical origin of the tweets and thus to be able to observe correlations of events across languages. One way to overcome this deficit consists in identifying geographic names contained in tweets that correspond to or which are located in the vicinity of specific points-of-interest such as the forecast points of the tsunami scenario. We also intend to use twitter analysis for situation picture

  1. Climatic changes resulting from mass extinctions at the K-T boundary (and other bio-events)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, Michael R.; Volk, Tyler

    1988-01-01

    The mass extinctions at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary include about 90 percent of marine calcareous nannoplankton (coccoliths), and carbon-isotope data show that marine primary productivity was drastically reduced for about 500,000 years after the boundary event, the so-called Strangelove Ocean effect. One result of the elimination of most marine phytoplankton would have been a severe reduction in production of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a biogenic gas that is believed to be the major precursor of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) over the oceans. A drastic reduction in marine CCN should lead to a cloud canopy with significantly lower reflectivity, and hence cause a significant warming at the earth's surface. Calculations suggest that, all other things being held constant, a reduction in CCN of more than 80 percent (a reasonable value for the K-T extinctions) could have produced a rapid global warming of 6 C or more. Oxygen-isotope analyses of marine sediments, and other kinds of paleoclimatic data, have provided for a marked warming, and a general instability of climate coincident with the killoff of marine plankton at the K-T boundary. Similar reductions in phytoplankton abundance at other boundaries, as indicated by marked shifts in carbon-isotope curves, suggest that severe temperature changes may have accompanied other mass extinctions, and raises the intriguing possibility that the extinction events themselves could have contributed to the climatic instabilities at critical bio-events in the geologic record.

  2. BINARY MICROLENSING EVENT OGLE-2009-BLG-020 GIVES VERIFIABLE MASS, DISTANCE, AND ORBIT PREDICTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Skowron, J.; Gould, A.; Nelson, C. R.; Kozlowski, S.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Dong, Subo; Monard, L. A. G.; Han, C.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Thornley, G.; Maury, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Greenhill, J.; Bond, I.; Wyrzykowski, L.

    2011-09-01

    We present the first example of binary microlensing for which the parameter measurements can be verified (or contradicted) by future Doppler observations. This test is made possible by a confluence of two relatively unusual circumstances. First, the binary lens is bright enough (I = 15.6) to permit Doppler measurements. Second, we measure not only the usual seven binary-lens parameters, but also the 'microlens parallax' (which yields the binary mass) and two components of the instantaneous orbital velocity. Thus, we measure, effectively, six 'Kepler+1' parameters (two instantaneous positions, two instantaneous velocities, the binary total mass, and the mass ratio). Since Doppler observations of the brighter binary component determine five Kepler parameters (period, velocity amplitude, eccentricity, phase, and position of periapsis), while the same spectroscopy yields the mass of the primary, the combined Doppler + microlensing observations would be overconstrained by 6 + (5 + 1) - (7 + 1) = 4 degrees of freedom. This makes possible an extremely strong test of the microlensing solution. We also introduce a uniform microlensing notation for single and binary lenses, define conventions, summarize all known microlensing degeneracies, and extend a set of parameters to describe full Keplerian motion of the binary lenses.

  3. A study on the recovery of Tobago's coral reefs following the 2010 mass bleaching event.

    PubMed

    Buglass, Salome; Donner, Simon D; Alemu I, Jahson B

    2016-03-15

    In 2010, severe coral bleaching was observed across the southeastern Caribbean, including the island of Tobago, where coral reefs are subject to sedimentation and high nutrient levels from terrestrial runoff. Here we examine changes in corals' colony size distributions over time (2010-2013), juvenile abundances and sedimentation rates for sites across Tobago following the 2010 bleaching event. The results indicated that since pre-bleaching coral cover was already low due to local factors and past disturbance, the 2010 event affected only particular susceptible species' population size structure and increased the proportion of small sized colonies. The low density of juveniles (mean of 5.4±6.3 juveniles/m(-2)) suggests that Tobago's reefs already experienced limited recruitment, especially of large broadcasting species. The juvenile distribution and the response of individual species to the bleaching event support the notion that Caribbean reefs are becoming dominated by weedy non-framework building taxa which are more resilient to disturbances. PMID:26856646

  4. Correlation Analyses Between the Characteristic Times of Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events and the Properties of Associated Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z. H.; Wang, C. B.; Wang, Yuming; Xue, X. H.

    2011-06-01

    It is generally believed that gradual solar energetic particles (SEPs) are accelerated by shocks associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Using an ice-cream cone model, the radial speed and angular width of 95 CMEs associated with SEP events during 1998 - 2002 are calculated from SOHO/LASCO observations. Then, we investigate the relationships between the kinematic properties of these CMEs and the characteristic times of the intensity-time profile of their accompanied SEP events observed at 1 AU. These characteristic times of SEP are i) the onset time from the accompanying CME eruption at the Sun to the SEP arrival at 1 AU, ii) the rise time from the SEP onset to the time when the SEP intensity is one-half of peak intensity, and iii) the duration over which the SEP intensity is within a factor of two of the peak intensity. It is found that the onset time has neither significant correlation with the radial speed nor with the angular width of the accompanying CME. For events that are poorly connected to the Earth, the SEP rise time and duration have no significant correlation with the radial speed and angular width of the associated CMEs. However, for events that are magnetically well connected to the Earth, the SEP rise time and duration have significantly positive correlations with the radial speed and angular width of the associated CMEs. This indicates that a CME event with wider angular width and higher speed may more easily drive a strong and wide shock near to the Earth-connected interplanetary magnetic field lines, may trap and accelerate particles for a longer time, and may lead to longer rise time and duration of the ensuing SEP event.

  5. Imaging components for a robotic casualty evaluation system.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kenneth H; Lob, Shih-Chung; Lin, Ching-Fang; Lasser, Bob; Mun, Seong K

    2009-01-01

    Combat medics have a vital role in the protection of wounded soldiers in the battlespace. However, their duties expose them to great risks. Furthermore, these medics are a limited resource and must be carefully tasked in order to provide maximum benefit to their units. For these reasons, we are applying the American GNC Corporation's (AGNC) Coremicro(R) Robotic System for autonomous evaluation of battlefield casualties. These robots are intended to navigate to a casualty, determine his/her overall health status, and perform limited diagnostic imaging in order to assess the presence of injuries that would prevent or complicate extraction. In this paper, we describe development work on some of the key components of the proposed robotic system, namely the overall concept of operations (ConOps) and initial testing of infrared and ultrasound imaging cameras. When fully deployed, this system will act as a medical force multiplier, enabling improved care of wounded soldiers and protecting the health and safety of military medical personnel. PMID:19964740

  6. Mass extinction and demise of carbonate factory in the aftermath of the Toarcian oceanic anoxic event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krencker, Francois-Nicolas; Bodin, Stéphane; Hoffmann, René; Suan, Guillaume; Mattioli, Emanuela; Kabiri, Lahcen; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    The Pliensbachian - Toarcian interval is characterized by several events of relatively short-lived carbon cycle perturbation, climate change and faunal turnover. The cause(s) of these biotic and abiotic disturbances remains unclear but probably involves increased magmatic activity in the Karoo-Ferrar flood basalt province. The Toarcian ocean anoxic event (T-OAE) might represent the most extreme of these events, and as such, is becoming increasingly well documented worldwide. As a consequence other critical time periods of the Pliensbachian - Toarcian interval have received considerably less attention. For instance, a second order faunal crisis is recognised near the transition between the Bifrons-Variabilis ammonite zones, but really few is known about this event. Here, the impact of this Bifrons-Variabilis event on the shallow marine realm is investigated using three well-exposed and extended stratigraphic sections in the Central High Atlas, Morocco. The carbon and oxygen isotopic composition, calcium carbonate contents and phosphorus concentrations of micritic mudstones and marls of 132 samples were determined to assess temporal changes in climate, C and P-cycling and carbonate production. The sections, forming a proximal to distal transect extending over 10 km in north-south direction, were correlated using sequence stratigraphy, isotope geochemistry and biostratigraphy. In all studied sections, a major change from carbonate-dominated deposition to siliclastic-dominated deposition is recorded at the Middle-Upper Toarcian transition, pointing to a first-order carbonate production crisis. Our results reveal that these major changes in sedimentology coincide with a marked decrease of carbon and oxygen isotope values and an increase of phosphorous contents. These geochemical perturbations suggest that much like the T-OAE, the Middle-Late Toarcian carbonate-platform crisis was related to an enhanced hydrological cycling. Consequently, the nutrient input increased

  7. 33 CFR 173.81 - Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. 173.81 Section 173.81 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Issue of Certificate of Number § 173.81 Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. (a) In...

  8. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 850.25 Section 850.25 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard...

  9. 33 CFR 173.81 - Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. 173.81 Section 173.81 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Issue of Certificate of Number § 173.81 Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. (a) In...

  10. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety...

  11. 33 CFR 173.81 - Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. 173.81 Section 173.81 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Issue of Certificate of Number § 173.81 Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. (a) In...

  12. 33 CFR 173.81 - Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. 173.81 Section 173.81 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Issue of Certificate of Number § 173.81 Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. (a) In...

  13. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety...

  14. 33 CFR 173.81 - Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. 173.81 Section 173.81 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Issue of Certificate of Number § 173.81 Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. (a) In...

  15. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety...

  16. 33 CFR 174.121 - Forwarding of casualty or accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... accident reports. 174.121 Section 174.121 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... § 174.121 Forwarding of casualty or accident reports. Within 30 days of the receipt of a casualty or accident report, each State that has an approved numbering system must forward a copy of that report to...

  17. 77 FR 8956 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Mutual Casualty Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... Supplement No. 7 to the Treasury Department Circular 570, 2011 Revision, published July 1, 2011, at 76 FR... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Mutual Casualty Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Grange Mutual Casualty Company (NAIC 14060). Business Address: 671...

  18. 49 CFR 850.15 - Marine casualty investigation by the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of practice for transportation accident hearings in 49 CFR part 845 shall apply. (b) The Board shall... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marine casualty investigation by the Board. 850.15... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS §...

  19. 46 CFR 4.40-15 - Marine casualty investigation by the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...'s rules of practice for transportation accident hearings in 49 CFR part 845 shall apply. (b) The... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marine casualty investigation by the Board. 4.40-15... MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  20. 33 CFR 174.121 - Forwarding of casualty or accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accident reports. 174.121 Section 174.121 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... § 174.121 Forwarding of casualty or accident reports. Within 30 days of the receipt of a casualty or accident report, each State that has an approved numbering system must forward a copy of that report to...

  1. 33 CFR 164.61 - Marine casualty reporting and record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR 4.03-1, the master or person in charge of the vessel shall: (a) Ensure compliance with 46 CFR... required by 46 CFR 4.05-15 are retained for: (1) 30 days after the casualty if the vessel remains in the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Marine casualty reporting...

  2. 46 CFR 4.40-15 - Marine casualty investigation by the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...'s rules of practice for transportation accident hearings in 49 CFR part 845 shall apply. (b) The... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marine casualty investigation by the Board. 4.40-15... MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  3. 33 CFR 164.61 - Marine casualty reporting and record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR 4.03-1, the master or person in charge of the vessel shall: (a) Ensure compliance with 46 CFR... required by 46 CFR 4.05-15 are retained for: (1) 30 days after the casualty if the vessel remains in the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marine casualty reporting...

  4. 49 CFR 850.15 - Marine casualty investigation by the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of practice for transportation accident hearings in 49 CFR part 845 shall apply. (b) The Board shall... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marine casualty investigation by the Board. 850.15... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS §...

  5. 33 CFR 164.61 - Marine casualty reporting and record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR 4.03-1, the master or person in charge of the vessel shall: (a) Ensure compliance with 46 CFR... required by 46 CFR 4.05-15 are retained for: (1) 30 days after the casualty if the vessel remains in the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Marine casualty reporting...

  6. 49 CFR 850.15 - Marine casualty investigation by the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of practice for transportation accident hearings in 49 CFR part 845 shall apply. (b) The Board shall... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marine casualty investigation by the Board. 850.15... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS §...

  7. Impact and recovery from a mass mortality event of the gorgonian Paramuricea clavata populations on the french Mediterranean coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonhomme, D.; Garrabou, J.; Perez, T.; Sartoretto, S.; Harmelin, J. G.

    2003-04-01

    An unprecedented mass mortality occurred in the NW Mediterranean in summer 1999. This event affected 30 species of invertebrates from 5 different Phyla (sponges, cnidarians, molluscs, ascidians, bryozoans) on several hundred kilometres of shoreline from the Bay of Genoa in Italy to the Bay of Marseilles in France. The most affected taxa were sponges and cnidarians. This mass mortality took place under an unusual environmental context characterized by high and stable water column temperatures. The impact of the mass mortality and recovery (1999-2002) of populations of the gorgonian Paramuricea clavata from Provence's coasts (France) have been studied. Most surveyed populations displayed 50 % of affected colonies at different degree (dead, severe and low damage), although a great variability in rates of mortality and tissue loss was also evident depending among sites. The mortality impact decreased with depth, a pattern which supports the hypothesis that temperature played a key role in this event. Surveys on populations for which pre-mortality data (density and size structure) was attested that recovery was far from completion three years after the mortality. Considering the growth rate of P. clavata, full recovery of the most affected local populations will take several decades will be necessary to return to pre-mortality values. In the context of the global change and taking into account the correlation with the temperature, one may expect that the frequency of of these kind of events will increase in the next decades. Dramatic consequences can be expected for the conservation of the affected species in shallow habitats, in particular, and for the Mediterranean biodiversity, in general.

  8. New digital technologies for the surveillance of infectious diseases at mass gathering events.

    PubMed

    Nsoesie, E O; Kluberg, S A; Mekaru, S R; Majumder, M S; Khan, K; Hay, S I; Brownstein, J S

    2015-02-01

    Outbreaks of infectious diseases at mass gatherings can strain the health system of the host region and pose a threat to local and global health. In addition to strengthening existing surveillance systems, most host nations also use novel technologies to assess disease risk and augment traditional surveillance approaches. We review novel approaches to disease surveillance using the Internet, mobile phone applications, and wireless sensor networks. These novel approaches to disease surveillance can result in prompt detection. PMID:25636385

  9. New Digital Technologies for the Surveillance of Infectious Diseases at Mass Gathering Events

    PubMed Central

    Nsoesie, Elaine O.; Kluberg, Sheryl A.; Mekaru, Sumiko R.; Majumder, Maimuna S.; Khan, Kamran; Hay, Simon I.; Brownstein, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of infectious diseases at mass gatherings can strain the health system of the host region and pose a threat to local and global health. In addition to strengthening existing surveillance systems, most host nations also utilize novel technologies to assess disease risk and augment traditional surveillance approaches. We review novel approaches to disease surveillance utilizing the Internet, mobile phone applications, and wireless sensor networks. These novel approaches to disease surveillance can result in prompt detection. PMID:25636385

  10. Outbreak and persistence of opportunistic symbiotic dinoflagellates during the 2005 Caribbean mass coral 'bleaching' event.

    PubMed

    LaJeunesse, Todd C; Smith, Robin T; Finney, Jennifer; Oxenford, Hazel

    2009-12-01

    Reef corals are sentinels for the adverse effects of rapid global warming on the planet's ecosystems. Warming sea surface temperatures have led to frequent episodes of bleaching and mortality among corals that depend on endosymbiotic micro-algae (Symbiodinium) for their survival. However, our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary response of corals to episodes of thermal stress remains inadequate. For the first time, we describe how the symbioses of major reef-building species in the Caribbean respond to severe thermal stress before, during and after a severe bleaching event. Evidence suggests that background populations of Symbiodinium trenchi (D1a) increased in prevalence and abundance, especially among corals that exhibited high sensitivity to stress. Contrary to previous hypotheses, which posit that a change in symbiont occurs subsequent to bleaching, S. trenchi increased in the weeks leading up to and during the bleaching episode and disproportionately dominated colonies that did not bleach. During the bleaching event, approximately 20 per cent of colonies surveyed harboured this symbiont at high densities (calculated at less than 1.0% only months before bleaching began). However, competitive displacement by homologous symbionts significantly reduced S. trenchi's prevalence and dominance among colonies after a 2-year period following the bleaching event. While the extended duration of thermal stress in 2005 provided an ecological opportunity for a rare host-generalist symbiont, it remains unclear to what extent the rise and fall of S. trenchi was of ecological benefit or whether its increased prevalence was an indicator of weakening coral health. PMID:19740874

  11. Analyzing Protease Specificity and Detecting in Vivo Proteolytic Events Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Nitin; Hixson, Kim K.; Culley, David E.; Smith, Richard D.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2010-07-01

    While trypsin remains the most commonly used protease in mass spectrometry, other proteases may be employed for increasing peptide-coverage or generating overlapping peptides. Knowledge of the accurate specifcity rules of these proteases is helpful for database search tools to detect peptides, and becomes crucial when mass spectrometry is used to discover in vivo proteolytic cleavages. In this study, we use tandem mass spectrometry to analyze the specifcity rules of selected proteases and describe MS- Proteolysis, a software tool for identifying putative sites of in vivo proteolytic cleavage. Our analysis suggests that the specifcity rules for some commonly used proteases can be improved, e.g., we find that V8 protease cuts not only after Asp and Glu, as currently expected, but also shows a smaller propensity to cleave after Gly for the conditions tested in this study. Finally, we show that comparative analysis of multiple proteases can be used to detect putative in vivo proteolytic sites on a proteome-wide scale.

  12. Zonal and Meridional Mass Redistribution in the Tropical Pacific During El Nino Southern Oscillation Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcroix, Thierry; Gourdeau, Lionel; Rual, Pierre; Murtugudde, Raghuram

    1997-01-01

    This note aims at documenting the ENSO-related sea level changes for the whole tropical Pacific, and for the 1979-1996 period which covers numerous El Nino and La Nina events. For this purpose, we rely on (a) 0/450 dbar surface dynamic height anomaly (an alias for sea level) derived from XBT and TOGA-TAO measurements during 1979-1996, (b) TOPEX/Poseidon derived sea level anomaly during 1993-1996, and (c) Murtugudde et al. [1996] model sea level output during 1979-1995.

  13. Study of the Dijet Mass Spectrum in pp→W+jets Events at s=7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Weber, M.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Costanza, F.; Dammann, D.; Diez Pardos, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Riedl, C.; Ron, E.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Höing, R. S.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Nowak, F.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Röcker, S.; Scheurer, A.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mehta, P.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Fanelli, C.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Sigamani, M.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Heo, S. G.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Son, T.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Cho, Y.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Ansari, M. H.; Asghar, M. I.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Gokieli, R.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Kossov, M.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Popov, A.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Felcini, M.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Graziano, A.; Jorda, C.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron Sanudo, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Coarasa Perez, J. A.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegner, B.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y.-J.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. J.; Mekterovic, D.; Singh, A. P.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, M.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karaman, T.; Karapinar, G.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Cankocak, K.; Levchuk, L.; Bostock, F.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Stoye, M.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; St. John, J.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Traczyk, P.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kilminster, B.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P., Iii; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Krajczar, K.; Li, W.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Safdi, B.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Brownson, E.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Roh, Y.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Johnston, C.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Palmonari, F.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2012-12-01

    We report an investigation of the invariant mass spectrum of the two jets with highest transverse momentum in pp→W+2-jet and W+3-jet events to look for resonant enhancement. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at s=7TeV. We find no evidence for the anomalous structure reported by the CDF Collaboration, and establish an upper limit of 5.0 pb at 95% confidence level on the production cross section for a generic Gaussian signal with mass near 150 GeV. Additionally, we exclude two theoretical models that predict a CDF-like dijet resonance near 150 GeV.

  14. CHARACTERIZING LOW-MASS BINARIES FROM OBSERVATION OF LONG-TIMESCALE CAUSTIC-CROSSING GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y.; Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Sumi, T.; Gould, A.; Skowron, J.; Bozza, V.; Dominik, M.; Horne, K.; Fouque, P.; Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; muFUN Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; and others

    2012-08-20

    Despite the astrophysical importance of binary star systems, detections are limited to those located in small ranges of separations, distances, and masses and thus it is necessary to use a variety of observational techniques for a complete view of stellar multiplicity across a broad range of physical parameters. In this paper, we report the detections and measurements of two binaries discovered from observations of microlensing events MOA-2011-BLG-090 and OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. Determinations of the binary masses are possible by simultaneously measuring the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured masses of the binary components are 0.43 M{sub Sun} and 0.39 M{sub Sun} for MOA-2011-BLG-090 and 0.57 M{sub Sun} and 0.17 M{sub Sun} for OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 and thus both lens components of MOA-2011-BLG-090 and one component of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 are M dwarfs, demonstrating the usefulness of microlensing in detecting binaries composed of low-mass components. From modeling of the light curves considering full Keplerian motion of the lens, we also measure the orbital parameters of the binaries. The blended light of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 comes very likely from the lens itself, making it possible to check the microlensing orbital solution by follow-up radial-velocity observation. For both events, the caustic-crossing parts of the light curves, which are critical for determining the physical lens parameters, were resolved by high-cadence survey observations and thus it is expected that the number of microlensing binaries with measured physical parameters will increase in the future.

  15. The impact of realistic models of mass segregation on the event rate of extreme-mass ratio inspirals and cusp re-growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Preto, Miguel

    2011-05-01

    One of the most interesting sources of gravitational waves (GWs) for LISA is the inspiral of compact objects on to a massive black hole (MBH), commonly referred to as an 'extreme-mass ratio inspiral' (EMRI). The small object, typically a stellar black hole, emits significant amounts of GW along each orbit in the detector bandwidth. The slowly, adiabatic inspiral of these sources will allow us to map spacetime around MBHs in detail, as well as to test our current conception of gravitation in the strong regime. The event rate of this kind of source has been addressed many times in the literature and the numbers reported fluctuate by orders of magnitude. On the other hand, recent observations of the Galactic centre revealed a dearth of giant stars inside the inner parsec relative to the numbers theoretically expected for a fully relaxed stellar cusp. The possibility of unrelaxed nuclei (or, equivalently, with no or only a very shallow cusp, or core) adds substantial uncertainty to the estimates. Having this timely question in mind, we run a significant number of direct-summation N-body simulations with up to half a million particles to calibrate a much faster orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck code. We show that, under quite generic initial conditions, the time required for the growth of a relaxed, mass segregated stellar cusp is shorter than a Hubble time for MBHs with M• <~ 5 × 106 Modot (i.e. nuclei in the range of LISA). We then investigate the regime of strong mass segregation (SMS) for models with two different stellar mass components. Given the most recent stellar mass normalization for the inner parsec of the Galactic centre, SMS has the significant impact of boosting the EMRI rates by a factor of ~10 in comparison to what would result from a 7/4-Bahcall and Wolf cusp resulting in ~250 events per Gyr per Milky Way type galaxy. Such an intrinsic rate should translate roughly into ~102-7 × 102 sbh's (EMRIs detected by LISA over a mission lifetime of 2 or 5 years

  16. Scanning mass spectrometry probe: a scanning probe electrospray ion source for imaging mass spectrometry of submerged interfaces and transient events in solution.

    PubMed

    Kottke, Peter A; Degertekin, F Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2010-01-01

    The scanning mass spectrometry (SMS) probe is a new electrospray ion source. Motivated by the need for untargeted chemical imaging of dynamic events in solution, we have exploited an approach to electrospray ionization (ESI) that allows continuous sampling from a highly localized volume (approximately picoliters) in a liquid environment, softly ionizes molecules in the sample to render them amenable for mass spectrometric analysis, and sends the ions to the mass spectrometer. The key underlying concepts for our approach are (1) treating the electrospray capillary inlet as a chemical scanning probe and (2) locating the electrospray point as close as possible to the sampling point, thus providing the shortest response time possible. This approach enables chemical monitoring or imaging of submerged interfaces, providing access to details of spatial heterogeneity and temporal changes within liquid samples. It also permits direct access to liquid/ liquid interfaces for ESI-MS analysis. In this letter we report the first demonstrations of these capabilities of the SMS probe and describe some of the probe's basic characteristics. PMID:19904914

  17. Multipoint Observations of Coronal Mass Ejection and Solar Energetic Particle Events on Mars and Earth During November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falkenberg, T. V.; Vennerstrom, S.; Brain, D. A.; Delory, G.; Taktakishvili, A.

    2011-01-01

    Multipoint spacecraft observations provide unique opportunities to constrain the propagation and evolution of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) throughout the heliosphere. Using Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data to study both ICME and solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Mars and OMNI and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) data to study ICMEs and SEPs at Earth, we present a detailed study of three CMEs and flares in late November 2001. In this period, Mars trailed Earth by 56deg solar longitude so that the two planets occupied interplanetary magnetic field lines separated by only approx.25deg. We model the interplanetary propagation of CME events using the ENLIL version 2.6 3-D MHD code coupled with the Wang-Sheeley-Arge version 1.6 potential source surface model, using Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) images to determine CME input parameters. We find that multipoint observations are essential to constrain the simulations of ICME propagation, as two very different ICMEs may look very similar in only one observational location. The direction and width of the CME as parameters essential to a correct estimation of arrival time and amplitude of the ICME signal. We find that these are problematic to extract from the analysis of SOHO/LASCO images commonly used for input to ICME propagation models. We further confirm that MGS magnetometer and electron reflectometer data can be used to study not only ICME events but also SEP events at Mars, with good results providing a consistent picture of the events when combined with near-Earth data.

  18. Magnetic topologies of coronal mass ejection events: Effects of 3-dimensional reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1995-09-01

    New magnetic loops formed in the corona following coronal mass ejection, CME, liftoffs provide strong evidence that magnetic reconnection commonly occurs within the magnetic ``legs`` of the departing CMEs. Such reconnection is inherently 3-dimensional and naturally produces CMEs having magnetic flux rope topologies. Sustained reconnection behind CMEs can produce a mixture of open and disconnected field lines threading the CMES. In contrast to the results of 2-dimensional reconnection. the disconnected field lines are attached to the outer heliosphere at both ends. A variety of solar and solar wind observations are consistent with the concept of sustained 3-dimensional reconnection within the magnetic legs of CMEs close to the Sun.

  19. Global Seasonal Forecasting of Thermal Stress Conducive to Mass Coral Bleaching Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G.; Eakin, C.; Matrosova, L.; Penland, M. C.; Webb, R. S.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Lynds, S.; Christensen, T.; Heron, S. F.; Morgan, J.; Parker, B. A.; Skirving, W. J.; Strong, A. E.

    2009-12-01

    As a consequence of climate change, coral bleaching on global and regional scales has been increasing in both frequency and severity over the past decades. In July 2008, NOAA Coral Reef Watch launched a new seasonal prediction tool for coral bleaching conditions to augment its real-time satellite monitoring. A model predicting thermal stress from two weeks to three months in the future was developed collaboratively by our team to provide outlooks of the risk of coral bleaching well in advance of such events. Our predictive system is built on sea surface temperature forecasts provided by NOAA’s Linear Inverse Model (LIM) that has successfully produced experimental predictions of tropical Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperature anomalies for decades. The outlook worked well for the 2008 boreal bleaching season and the 2009 austral bleaching season. The outlook for 2009 boreal bleaching season showed a potential for significant bleaching in the eastern Caribbean region and its evaluation will be conducted as in-situ observations become available. Natural resource managers in the Caribbean have felt sufficient confidence in the outlook that they have taken steps to prepare for the possible bleaching event in 2009. Next steps for improving the outlook system include developing a similar outlook product based on the NOAA National Center for Environmental Predictions’ Climate Forecast System (CFS) operational model, collaborating with Australian colleagues to implement a similar system with the Bureau of Meteorology’s Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA), and then potentially do the same for other climate models. Such forecasting tools provide critical and timely decision support for coral reef managers and scientists worldwide. Preliminary results indicate the forecast compares favorably with satellite observations of actual thermal stress and is thus useful for coral reef management.

  20. Muddy Coastal Clinoforms with Equilibrium Morphology Shaped by Mass Failure Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denommee, K.; Bentley, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    A swath sonar and sediment coring survey was recently conducted on an inner shelf muddy subaqueous clinoform off the Chenier Plain in SW Louisiana, known to be shaped through the combined influences of high sediment supply (from the Atchafalaya River), currents, and waves. Our objective was to determine mechanisms responsible for maintaining clinoform morphology. Swath bathymetry and sidescan sonar images reveal broad areas of scarping, mass-failure, and mud flows across the lower foresets. Present theory on equilibrium bathymetric profiles off river mouths associated with muddy subaqueous clinoforms suggests that when fine-grained sediment supply is high and wave energy low that a relatively steep gradient clinoform morphology can be maintained. As the sediment supply decreases and/or wave energies increase the clinoform morphology must readjust to a lower gradient via some mechanism to maintain equilibrium. In light of present theory and our observations, we explain the clinoform morphology off of the Atchafalaya River as being the product of: (1) the deposition of steep clinoforms under moderate wave stress and high sediment availability during times of high-riverine discharge, when bed shear stress is dampened by mud-wave interactions; and (2), as sediment supply from the Atchafalaya River wanes, continued wave action (including winter cold fronts and tropical systems) reshapes the clinoform to a lower gradient morphology moving large amounts of fine-grained material offshore, at least partially through the action of mass-failure.

  1. Limits to biodiversity cycles from a unified model of mass-extinction events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feulner, Georg

    2011-04-01

    Episodes of species mass extinction dramatically affected the evolution of life on Earth, but their causes remain a source of debate. Even more controversy surrounds the hypothesis of periodicity in the fossil record, with conflicting views still being published in the scientific literature, often even based on the same state-of-the-art datasets. From an empirical point of view, limitations of the currently available data on extinctions and possible causes remain an important issue. From a theoretical point of view, it is likely that a focus on single extinction causes and strong periodic forcings has strongly contributed to this controversy. Here I show that if there is a periodic extinction signal at all, it is much more likely to result from a combination of a comparatively weak periodic cause and various random factors. Tests of this unified model of mass extinctions on the available data show that the model is formally better than a model with random extinction causes only. However, the contribution of the periodic component is small compared to factors such as impacts or volcanic eruptions.

  2. A Tidal Disruption Event in a Nearby Galaxy Hosting an Intermediate Mass Black Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donato, D; Cenko, S. B.; Covino, S.; Troja, E.; Pursimo, T.; Cheung, C. C.; Fox, O.; Kutyrev, A.; Campana, S.; Fugazza, D.; Landt, H.; Butler, N. R.

    2014-01-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a bright point source flare in the Abell cluster A1795 with archival EUVE and Chandra observations. Assuming the EUVE emission is associated with the Chandra source, the X-ray 0.5-7 kiloelectronvolt flux declined by a factor of approximately 2300 over a time span of 6 years, following a power-law decay with index approximately equal to 2.44 plus or minus 0.40. The Chandra data alone vary by a factor of approximately 20. The spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a constant temperature of kiloteslas approximately equal to 0.09 kiloelectronvolts (approximately equal to 10 (sup 6) Kelvin). The flare is spatially coincident with the nuclear region of a faint, inactive galaxy with a photometric redshift consistent at the 1 sigma level with the cluster (redshift = 0.062476).We argue that these properties are indicative of a tidal disruption of a star by a black hole (BH) with log(M (sub BH) / M (sub 1 solar mass)) approximately equal to 5.5 plus or minus 0.5. If so, such a discovery indicates that tidal disruption flares may be used to probe BHs in the intermediate mass range, which are very difficult to study by other means.

  3. Geochemical and palynological records for the end-Triassic Mass-Extinction Event in the NE Paris Basin (Luxemburg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, Natascha; van de Schootbrugge, Bas; Thein, Jean; Fiebig, Jens; Franz, Sven-Oliver; Hanzo, Micheline; Colbach, Robert; Faber, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The End-Triassic mass-extinction event is one of the "big five" mass extinctions in Earth's history. Large scale flood basalt volcanism associated with the break-up of Pangaea, which resulted in the opening of the central Atlantic Ocean, is considered as the leading cause. In addition, an asteroid impact in Rochechouart (France; 201 ± 2 Ma) may have had a local influence on ecosystems and sedimentary settings. The Luxembourg Embayment, in the NE Paris Basin, offers a rare chance to study both effects in a range of settings from deltaic to lagoonal. A multidisciplinary study (sedimentology, geochemistry, palynology) has been carried out on a number of outcrops and cores that span from the Norian to lower Hettangian. Combined geochemical and palynological records from the Boust core drilled in the NE Paris Basin, provide evidence for paleoenvironmental changes associated with the end-Triassic mass-extinction event. The Triassic-Jurassic stratigraphy of the Boust core is well constrained by palynomorphs showing the disappaerance of typical Triassic pollen taxa (e.g. Ricciisporites tuberculates) and the occurrence of the marker species Polypodiisporites polymicroforatus within the uppermost Rhaetian, prior to the Hettangian dominance of Classopollis pollen. The organic carbon stable isotope record (δ13Corg) spanning the Norian to Hettangian, shows a series of prominent negative excursions within the middle Rhaetian, followed by a trend towards more positive values (approx -24 per mille) within the uppermost Rhaetian Argiles de Levallois Member. The lowermost Hettangian is characterized by a major negative excursion, reaching - 30 per mille that occurs in organic-rich sediments. This so-called "main negative excursion" is well-known from other locations, for example from Mariental in Northern Germany and from St Audrie's Bay in England, and Stenlille in Denmark. Based on redox-sensitive trace element records (V, Cr, Ni, Co, Th, U) the lowermost Hettangian in most of

  4. Pain in an era of armed conflicts: Prevention and treatment for warfighters and civilian casualties.

    PubMed

    George, E; Elman, I; Becerra, L; Berg, Sheri; Borsook, D

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain is a common squealae of military- and terror-related injuries. While its pathophysiology has not yet been fully elucidated, it may be potentially related to premorbid neuropsychobiological status, as well as to the type of injury and to the neural alterations that it may evoke. Accordingly, optimized approaches for wounded individuals should integrate primary, secondary and tertiary prevention in the form of thorough evaluation of risk factors along with specific interventions to contravene and mitigate the ensuing chronicity. Thus, Premorbid Events phase may encompass assessments of psychological and neurobiological vulnerability factors in conjunction with fostering preparedness and resilience in both military and civilian populations at risk. Injuries per se phase calls for immediate treatment of acute pain in the field by pharmacological agents that spare and even enhance coping and adaptive capabilities. The key objective of the Post Injury Events is to prevent and/or reverse maladaptive peripheral- and central neural system's processes that mediate transformation of acute to chronic pain and to incorporate timely interventions for concomitant mental health problems including post-traumatic stress disorder and addiction We suggest that the proposed continuum of care may avert more disability and suffering than the currently employed less integrated strategies. While the requirements of the armed forces present a pressing need for this integrated continuum and a framework in which it can be most readily implemented, this approach may be also instrumental for the care of civilian casualties. PMID:27084355

  5. Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejection Event Observed on 2010 November 3: Multi-wavelength Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulay, Sargam; Subramanian, Srividya; Tripathi, Durgesh; Isobe, Hiroaki; Glesener, Lindsay

    2014-10-01

    One of the major unsolved problems in solar physics is that of coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation. In this paper, we have studied the initiation of a flare-associated CME that occurred on 2010 November 3 using multi-wavelength observations recorded by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. We report an observation of an inflow structure initially in the 304 Å and the 1600 Å images a few seconds later. This inflow structure was detected as one of the legs of the CME. We also observed a non-thermal compact source concurrent and near co-spatial with the brightening and movement of the inflow structure. The appearance of this compact non-thermal source, brightening, and movement of the inflow structure and the subsequent outward movement of the CME structure in the corona led us to conclude that the CME initiation was caused by magnetic reconnection.

  6. Initiation of coronal mass ejection event observed on 2010 November 3: multi-wavelength perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Mulay, Sargam; Subramanian, Srividya; Tripathi, Durgesh; Isobe, Hiroaki; Glesener, Lindsay

    2014-10-10

    One of the major unsolved problems in solar physics is that of coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation. In this paper, we have studied the initiation of a flare-associated CME that occurred on 2010 November 3 using multi-wavelength observations recorded by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. We report an observation of an inflow structure initially in the 304 Å and the 1600 Å images a few seconds later. This inflow structure was detected as one of the legs of the CME. We also observed a non-thermal compact source concurrent and near co-spatial with the brightening and movement of the inflow structure. The appearance of this compact non-thermal source, brightening, and movement of the inflow structure and the subsequent outward movement of the CME structure in the corona led us to conclude that the CME initiation was caused by magnetic reconnection.

  7. Frequency, Magnitude, and Possible Causes of Stranding and Mass-Mortality Events of the Beach Clam Tivela mactroides (Bivalvia: Veneridae)

    PubMed Central

    Turra, Alexander; Pombo, Maíra; Petracco, Marcelo; Siegle, Eduardo; Fonseca, Mariana; Denadai, Márcia R.

    2016-01-01

    Stranding combined with mass-mortality events of sandy-beach organisms is a frequent but little-understood phenomenon, which is generally studied based on discrete episodes. The frequency, magnitude, and possible causes of stranding and mass-mortality events of the trigonal clam Tivela mactroides were assessed based on censuses of stranded individuals, every four days from September 2007 through December 2008, in Caraguatatuba Bay, southeastern Brazil. Stranded clams were classified as dying (closed valves did not open when forced) or dead (closed valves were easily opened). Information on wave parameters and the living intertidal clam population was used to assess possible causes of stranding. This fine-scale monitoring showed that stranding occurred widely along the shore and year-round, with peaks interspersed with periods of low or no mortality. Dead clams showed higher mean density than dying individuals, but a lower mean shell length, attributed to a higher tolerance to desiccation of larger individuals. Wave height had a significant negative relationship to the density of dying individuals, presumed to be due to the accretive nature of low-energy waves: when digging out, clams would be more prone to be carried upward and unable to return; while larger waves, breaking farther from the beach and with a stronger backwash, would prevent stranding in the uppermost areas. This ecological finding highlights the need for refined temporal studies on mortality events, in order to understand them more clearly. Last, the similar size structure of stranded clams and the living population indicated that the stranded individuals are from the intertidal or shallow subtidal zone, and reinforces the ecological and behavioral components of this process, which have important ecological and socioeconomic implications for the management of this population. PMID:26745804

  8. Frequency, Magnitude, and Possible Causes of Stranding and Mass-Mortality Events of the Beach Clam Tivela mactroides (Bivalvia: Veneridae).

    PubMed

    Turra, Alexander; Pombo, Maíra; Petracco, Marcelo; Siegle, Eduardo; Fonseca, Mariana; Denadai, Márcia R

    2016-01-01

    Stranding combined with mass-mortality events of sandy-beach organisms is a frequent but little-understood phenomenon, which is generally studied based on discrete episodes. The frequency, magnitude, and possible causes of stranding and mass-mortality events of the trigonal clam Tivela mactroides were assessed based on censuses of stranded individuals, every four days from September 2007 through December 2008, in Caraguatatuba Bay, southeastern Brazil. Stranded clams were classified as dying (closed valves did not open when forced) or dead (closed valves were easily opened). Information on wave parameters and the living intertidal clam population was used to assess possible causes of stranding. This fine-scale monitoring showed that stranding occurred widely along the shore and year-round, with peaks interspersed with periods of low or no mortality. Dead clams showed higher mean density than dying individuals, but a lower mean shell length, attributed to a higher tolerance to desiccation of larger individuals. Wave height had a significant negative relationship to the density of dying individuals, presumed to be due to the accretive nature of low-energy waves: when digging out, clams would be more prone to be carried upward and unable to return; while larger waves, breaking farther from the beach and with a stronger backwash, would prevent stranding in the uppermost areas. This ecological finding highlights the need for refined temporal studies on mortality events, in order to understand them more clearly. Last, the similar size structure of stranded clams and the living population indicated that the stranded individuals are from the intertidal or shallow subtidal zone, and reinforces the ecological and behavioral components of this process, which have important ecological and socioeconomic implications for the management of this population. PMID:26745804

  9. A Casualty in the Class War: Canada's Medicare

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    “There's class warfare, all right, but it's my class, the rich class, that's making war, and we're winning.” (Warren Buffett, five years ago.) Last year's Occupy Wall Street movement suggested that people are finally catching on. Note, making war: Buffett meant that there was deliberate intent and agency behind the huge transfer of wealth, since 1980, from the 99% to the 1%. Nor is the war metaphorical. There are real casualties, even if no body bags. Sadly, much Canadian commentary on inequality is pitiably naïve or deliberately obfuscatory. The 1% have captured national governments. The astronomical cost of American elections excludes the 99%. In Canada, parliamentary government permits one man to rule as a de facto dictator. The 1% don't like medicare. PMID:23372577

  10. A Casualty in the Class War: Canada's Medicare.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert G

    2012-02-01

    "There's class warfare, all right, but it's my class, the rich class, that's making war, and we're winning." (Warren Buffett, five years ago.) Last year's Occupy Wall Street movement suggested that people are finally catching on. Note, making war: Buffett meant that there was deliberate intent and agency behind the huge transfer of wealth, since 1980, from the 99% to the 1%. Nor is the war metaphorical. There are real casualties, even if no body bags. Sadly, much Canadian commentary on inequality is pitiably naïve or deliberately obfuscatory. The 1% have captured national governments. The astronomical cost of American elections excludes the 99%. In Canada, parliamentary government permits one man to rule as a de facto dictator. The 1% don't like medicare. PMID:23372577

  11. Riding the Wave to Reach the Masses: Natural Events in Early Twentieth Century Portuguese Daily Press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, Ana; Carneiro, Ana; Diogo, Maria Paula

    2012-03-01

    This paper brings together science communicated in newspapers in Portugal by looking at how news on natural events were communicated in two different newspapers—the capital newspaper Diário de Notícias ( Daily News) and the Diário dos Açores ( Azores Daily). In particular, we look at how the 1900 solar eclipse, a hot topic throughout Europe, was reported by the capital newspaper, and how news on seismology were conveyed in the period 1907-1910 in the newspaper published in Azores, an archipelago with a significant seismic and volcanic activity. We argue that the importance conceded to these scientific news was related to their overwhelming features, that their dissimilar presentation stemmed from their local relevance allied to their different nature, predictable in the case of eclipses, and unpredictable in the case of earthquakes, and that behind these two instances of science journalism laid an attempt by the scientific and political communities to gain the support of the general public to such an extent that these two specific instances of science journalism transcended their usual features to become successful forms of expository science.

  12. Performances of a large mass ZnSe bolometer to search for rare events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Dafinei, I.; Di Domizio, S.; Ferroni, F.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Nagorny, S.; Orio, F.; Pattavina, L.; Pessina, G.; Piperno, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Rusconi, C.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.

    2013-05-01

    Scintillating bolometers of ZnSe are the baseline choice of the LUCIFER experiment, whose aim is to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay of 82Se. The independent read-out of the heat and scintillation signals allows to identify and reject α particle interactions, the dominant background source for bolometric detectors. In this paper we report the performances of a ZnSe crystal operated within the LUCIFER R&D. We measured the scintillation yield, the energy resolution and the background in the energy region where the signal from 0νDBD decay of 82Se is expected with an exposure of 9.4 kg·days. With a newly developed analysis algorithm we improved the rejection of α events, and we estimated the increase in energy resolution obtained by the combination of the heat and light signals. For the first time we measured the light emitted by nuclear recoils, and found it to be compatible with zero. We conclude that the discrimination of nuclear recoils from β/γ interactions in the WIMPs energy region is possible, but low-noise light detectors are needed.

  13. 2005 Caribbean mass coral bleaching event: A sea surface temperature empirical orthogonal teleconnection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonti, Alicia L.; Eastman, J. Ronald

    2010-11-01

    This study examined the effects of climate teleconnections on the massive Caribbean coral bleaching and mortality event of 2005. A relatively new analytical procedure known as empirical orthogonal teleconnection (EOT) analysis, based on a 26 year monthly time series of observed sea surface temperature (SST), was employed. Multiple regression analysis was then utilized to determine the relative teleconnection contributions to SST variability in the southern Caribbean. The results indicate that three independent climate teleconnections had significant impact on southern Caribbean anomalies in SST and that their interaction was a major contributor to the anomalously high temperatures in 2005. The primary and approximately equal contributors were EOT-5 and EOT-2, which correlate most strongly with the tropical North Atlantic (TNA) and Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO) climate indices, respectively. The third, EOT-9, was most strongly related to the Atlantic meridional mode. However, although statistically significant, the magnitude of its contribution to southern Caribbean variability was small. While there is debate over the degree to which the recent AMO pattern represents natural variability or global ocean warming, the results presented here indicate that natural variability played a strong role in the 2005 coral bleaching conditions. They also argue for a redefinition of the geography of TNA variability.

  14. Public Health Surveillance Strategies for Mass Gatherings: Super Bowl XLIX and Related Events, Maricopa County, Arizona, 2015.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Aurimar; Berisha, Vjollca; Goodin, Kate; Pogreba-Brown, Kristen; Levy, Craig; McKinney, Benita; Koski, Lia; Imholte, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Super Bowl XLIX took place on February 1, 2015, in Glendale, Arizona. In preparation for this event and associated activities, the Maricopa County Department of Public Health (MCDPH) developed methods for enhanced surveillance, situational awareness, and early detection of public health emergencies. Surveillance strategies implemented from January 22 to February 6, 2015, included enhanced surveillance alerts; animal disease surveillance; review of NFL clinic visits; syndromic surveillance for emergency room visits, urgent care facilities, and hotels; real-time onsite syndromic surveillance; all-hazards mortality surveillance; emergency medical services surveillance, review of poison control center reports; media surveillance; and aberration detection algorithms for notifiable diseases. Surveillance results included increased influenzalike illness activity reported from urgent care centers and a few influenza cases reported in the NFL clinic. A cyanide single event exposure was investigated and determined not to be a public health threat. Real-time field syndromic surveillance documented minor injuries at all events and sporadic cases of gastrointestinal and neurological (mostly headaches) disease. Animal surveillance reports included a cat suspected of carrying plague and tularemia and an investigation of highly pathogenic avian influenza in a backyard chicken flock. Laboratory results in both instances were negative. Aberration detection and syndromic surveillance detected an increase in measles reports associated with a Disneyland exposure, and syndromic surveillance was used successfully during this investigation. Coordinated enhanced epidemiologic surveillance during Super Bowl XLIX increased the response capacity and preparedness of MCDPH to make informed decisions and take public health actions in a timely manner during these mass gathering events. PMID:27314657

  15. A tidal disruption event in a nearby galaxy hosting an intermediate mass black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Donato, D.; Troja, E.; Pursimo, T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kutyrev, A.; Landt, H.; Butler, N. R.

    2014-02-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a bright point source flare in the Abell cluster A1795 with archival EUVE and Chandra observations. Assuming the EUVE emission is associated with the Chandra source, the X-ray 0.5-7 keV flux declined by a factor of ∼2300 over a time span of 6 yr, following a power-law decay with index ∼2.44 ± 0.40. The Chandra data alone vary by a factor of ∼20. The spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a constant temperature of kT ∼ 0.09 keV (∼10{sup 6} K). The flare is spatially coincident with the nuclear region of a faint, inactive galaxy with a photometric redshift consistent at the 1σ level with the cluster (z = 0.062476). We argue that these properties are indicative of a tidal disruption of a star by a black hole (BH) with log (M {sub BH}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 5.5 ± 0.5. If so, such a discovery indicates that tidal disruption flares may be used to probe BHs in the intermediate mass range, which are very difficult to study by other means.

  16. Identification of okadaic acid-induced phosphorylation events by a mass spectrometry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Jennifer J. . E-mail: Jennifer.Hill@nrc.gc.ca; Callaghan, Deborah A.; Ding Wen; Kelly, John F.; Chakravarthy, Balu R.

    2006-04-14

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a widely used small-molecule phosphatase inhibitor that is thought to selectively inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Multiple studies have demonstrated that PP2A activity is compromised in Brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Thus, we set out to determine changes in phosphorylation that occur upon OA treatment of neuronal cells. Utilizing isotope-coded affinity tags and mass spectrometry analysis, we determined the relative abundance of proteins in a phosphoprotein enriched fraction from control and OA-treated primary cortical neurons. We identified many proteins whose phosphorylation state is regulated by OA, including glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta}, collapsin-response mediator proteins (DRP-2, DPYSL-5, and CRMP-4), and the B subunit of PP2A itself. Most interestingly, we have found that complexin 2, an important regulator of neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity, is phosphorylated at serine 93 upon OA treatment of neurons. This is First report of a phosphorylation site on complexin 2.

  17. Characterization of fresh and aged biomass burning events using multiwavelength Raman lidar and mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolae, D.; Nemuc, A.; Müller, D.; Talianu, C.; Vasilescu, J.; Belegante, L.; Kolgotin, A.

    2013-04-01

    This paper focuses on optical and microphysical properties of long-range transported biomass burning (BB) aerosols and their variation with atmospheric evolution (ageing), as observed by a multiwavelength Raman lidar, part of EARLINET (European Aerosol LIdar NETwork). Chemical analysis of the atmospheric aerosol was done using a colocated aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). One relevant optical parameter for the ageing process is the Ångström exponent. In our study, we find that it decreases from 2 for fresh to 1.4-0.5 for aged smoke particles. The ratio of lidar (extinction-to-backscatter) ratios (LR532/LR355) changes rapidly from values <1 for fresh to >1 for aged particles. The imaginary part of the refractive index is the most sensitive microphysical parameter. It decreases sharply from 0.05 to less than 0.01 for fresh and aged smoke particles, respectively. Single-scattering albedo (SSA) varies from 0.74 to 0.98 depending on aerosol age and source. The AMS was used to measure the marker ions of wood-burning particles during 2 days of measurements when the meteorological conditions favored the downward mixing of aerosols from lofted layers. Particle size distribution and particle effective radius from both AMS and lidar are similar, i.e., particle effective radii were approximately 0.27 µm for fresh BB aerosol particles. Microphysical aerosol properties from inversion of the lidar data agree with similar studies carried out in different regions on the globe. Our study shows that the Ångström exponent LR532/LR355 and the imaginary part of the refractive index can be used to clearly distinguish between fresh and aged smoke particles.

  18. 1997 May 12 Coronal Mass Ejection Event. I. A Simplified Model of the Preeruptive Magnetic Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Lionello, R.

    2008-01-01

    A simple model of the coronal magnetic field prior to the coronal mass ejection (CME) eruption on 1997 May 12 is developed. First, the magnetic field is constructed by superimposing a large-scale background field and a localized bipolar field to model the active region (AR) in the current-free approximation. Second, this potential configuration is quasi-statically sheared by photospheric vortex motions applied to two flux concentrations of the AR. Third, the resulting force-free field is then evolved by canceling the photospheric magnetic flux with the help of an appropriate tangential electric field applied to the central part of the AR. To understand the structure of the modeled configuration, we use the field line mapping technique by generalizing it to spherical geometry. We demonstrate that the initial potential configuration contains a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) which is a union of two intersecting quasi-separatrix layers. This HFT provides a partition of the closed magnetic flux between the AR and the global solar magnetic field. Such a partition is approximate since the entire flux distribution is perfectly continuous. The vortex motions applied to the AR inter-lock the field lines in the coronal volume to form additionally two new HFTs pinched into thin current layers. Reconnection in these current layers helps to redistribute the magnetic flux and current within the AR in the flux-cancellation phase. In this phase, a magnetic flux rope is formed together with a bald patch separatrix surface wrapping around the rope. Other important implications of the identified structural features of the modeled configuration are also discussed.

  19. The hydrocarbon cycle and its role in hyperthermals, ocean anoxic events and mass extinctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlgren, Torbjørn

    2016-04-01

    ' exists. Based on previously noted similarities between the PETM, the Toarcian OAE and the Triassic-Jurassic and Permian-Triassic events, it is inferred that also these may have been associated with catastrophic leakage of hydrocarbons trapped in sedimentary basins.

  20. Care of the Burn Casualty in the Prolonged Field Care Environment.

    PubMed

    Studer, Nicholas M; Driscoll, Ian R; Daly, Ivonne M; Graybill, John C

    2015-01-01

    Burns are frequently encountered on the modern battlefield, with 5% - 20% of combat casualties expected to sustain some burn injury. Addressing immediate life-threatening conditions in accordance with the MARCH protocol (massive hemorrhage, airway, respirations, circulation, hypothermia/head injury) remains the top priority for burn casualties. Stopping the burning process, total burn surface area (TBSA) calculation, fluid resuscitation, covering the wounds, and hypothermia management are the next steps. If transport to definitive care is delayed and the prolonged field care stage is entered, the provider must be prepared to provide for the complex resuscitation and wound care needs of a critically ill burn casualty. PMID:26360361

  1. Modelling exposure of oceanic higher trophic-level consumers to polychlorinated biphenyls: pollution 'hotspots' in relation to mass mortality events of marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Handoh, Itsuki C; Kawai, Toru

    2014-08-30

    Marine mammals in the past mass mortality events may have been susceptible to infection because their immune systems were suppressed through the bioaccumulation of environmental pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). We compiled mortality event data sets of 33 marine mammal species, and employed a Finely-Advanced Transboundary Environmental model (FATE) to model the exposure of the global fish community to PCB congeners, in order to define critical exposure levels (CELs) of PCBs above which mass mortality events are likely to occur. Our modelling approach enabled us to describe the mass mortality events in the context of exposure of higher-trophic consumers to PCBs and to identify marine pollution 'hotspots' such as the Mediterranean Sea and north-western European coasts. We demonstrated that the CELs can be applied to quantify a chemical pollution Planetary Boundary, under which a safe operating space for marine mammals and humanity can exist. PMID:25016416

  2. HINODE/XRT AND STEREO OBSERVATIONS OF A DIFFUSE CORONAL 'WAVE'-CORONAL MASS EJECTION-DIMMING EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Attrill, Gemma D. R.; Engell, Alexander J.; Wills-Davey, Meredith J.; Grigis, Paolo; Testa, Paola

    2009-10-20

    We report on observations of the first diffuse coronal wave detected by Hinode/XRT. The event occurred near the west solar limb on 2007 May 23, originating from active region (AR) 10956 and was associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) and coronal dimmings. The bright emission forming the coronal wave expanded predominantly to the east and south of the AR. We use X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and STEREO Behind (B) data combined with a potential magnetic field extrapolation to derive an understanding of the global magnetic field connectivity. We attribute the brightening to the east of the AR to compression and channeling of the plasma along large-scale loops. The brightening to the south of the AR expands across the quiet Sun, making the southern component a likely candidate for identification as a diffuse coronal wave. We analyze the bright front in STEREO/EUVI (B) 171, 195, and 284 A images, as well as in XRT data, finding the strongest components to be largely cospatial in all bandpasses. We also exploit the near-limb location of this event by combining STEREO/COR1 and Extreme Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (EUVI) data. Using all the data, we derive a full picture of the low-coronal development of the eruption. The COR1 data show that the southernmost outer edge of the CME is progressively displaced southward during the expansion. EUVI data below the COR1 occulting disk show that the CME is significantly distorted in the low corona as a result of the associated filament eruption. The core coronal dimmings map to the core of the CME; the secondary coronal dimmings map to the CME cavity; and the diffuse coronal wave maps to the outermost edge of the expanding CME shell. The analysis of this near-limb event has important implications for understanding earlier eruptions originating from the same AR on 2007 May 16, 19, and 20.

  3. Microlensing events by Proxima Centauri in 2014 and 2016: Opportunities for mass determination and possible planet detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Kailash C.; Bond, Howard E.; Anderson, Jay; Dominik, Martin E-mail: jayander@stsci.edu E-mail: md35@st-andrews.ac.uk

    2014-02-20

    We have found that Proxima Centauri, the star closest to our Sun, will pass close to a pair of faint background stars in the next few years. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained in 2012 October, we determine that the passage close to a mag 20 star will occur in 2014 October (impact parameter 1.''6), and to a mag 19.5 star in 2016 February (impact parameter 0.''5). As Proxima passes in front of these stars, the relativistic deflection of light will cause shifts in the positions of the background stars of ∼0.5 and 1.5 mas, respectively, readily detectable by HST imaging, and possibly by Gaia and ground-based facilities such as the Very Large Telescope. Measurement of these astrometric shifts offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of Proxima. Moreover, if Proxima has a planetary system, the planets may be detectable through their additional microlensing signals, although the probability of such detections is small. With astrometric accuracies of 0.03 mas (achievable with HST spatial scanning), centroid shifts caused by Jovian planets are detectable at separations of up to 2.''0 (corresponding to 2.6 AU at the distance of Proxima), and centroid shifts by Earth-mass planets are detectable within a small band of 8 mas (corresponding to 0.01 AU) around the source trajectories. Jovian planets within a band of about 28 mas (corresponding to 0.036 AU) around the source trajectories would produce a brightening of the source by >0.01 mag and could hence be detectable. Estimated timescales of the astrometric and photometric microlensing events due to a planet range from a few hours to a few days, and both methods would provide direct measurements of the planetary mass.

  4. Global Earthquake Casualties due to Secondary Effects: A Quantitative Analysis for Improving PAGER Losses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a quantitative and geospatial description of global losses due to earthquake-induced secondary effects, including landslide, liquefaction, tsunami, and fire for events during the past 40 years. These processes are of great importance to the US Geological Survey’s (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, which is currently being developed to deliver rapid earthquake impact and loss assessments following large/significant global earthquakes. An important question is how dominant are losses due to secondary effects (and under what conditions, and in which regions)? Thus, which of these effects should receive higher priority research efforts in order to enhance PAGER’s overall assessment of earthquakes losses and alerting for the likelihood of secondary impacts? We find that while 21.5% of fatal earthquakes have deaths due to secondary (non-shaking) causes, only rarely are secondary effects the main cause of fatalities. The recent 2004 Great Sumatra–Andaman Islands earthquake is a notable exception, with extraordinary losses due to tsunami. The potential for secondary hazards varies greatly, and systematically, due to regional geologic and geomorphic conditions. Based on our findings, we have built country-specific disclaimers for PAGER that address potential for each hazard (Earle et al., Proceedings of the 14th World Conference of the Earthquake Engineering, Beijing, China, 2008). We will now focus on ways to model casualties from secondary effects based on their relative importance as well as their general predictability.

  5. Assessment of the Casualty Risk of Multiple Meteorological Hazards in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Zhuo, Li; Zheng, Jing; Ge, Yi; Gu, Zhihui; Tian, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    A study of the frequency, intensity, and risk of extreme climatic events or natural hazards is important for assessing the impacts of climate change. Many models have been developed to assess the risk of multiple hazards, however, most of the existing approaches can only model the relative levels of risk. This paper reports the development of a method for the quantitative assessment of the risk of multiple hazards based on information diffusion. This method was used to assess the risks of loss of human lives from 11 types of meteorological hazards in China at the prefectural and provincial levels. Risk curves of multiple hazards were obtained for each province and the risks of 10-year, 20-year, 50-year, and 100-year return periods were mapped. The results show that the provinces (municipalities, autonomous regions) in southeastern China are at higher risk of multiple meteorological hazards as a result of their geographical location and topography. The results of this study can be used as references for the management of meteorological disasters in China. The model can be used to quantitatively calculate the risks of casualty, direct economic losses, building collapse, and agricultural losses for any hazards at different spatial scales. PMID:26901210

  6. Global earthquake casualties due to secondary effects: A quantitative analysis for improving rapid loss analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marano, K.D.; Wald, D.J.; Allen, T.I.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a quantitative and geospatial description of global losses due to earthquake-induced secondary effects, including landslide, liquefaction, tsunami, and fire for events during the past 40 years. These processes are of great importance to the US Geological Survey's (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, which is currently being developed to deliver rapid earthquake impact and loss assessments following large/significant global earthquakes. An important question is how dominant are losses due to secondary effects (and under what conditions, and in which regions)? Thus, which of these effects should receive higher priority research efforts in order to enhance PAGER's overall assessment of earthquakes losses and alerting for the likelihood of secondary impacts? We find that while 21.5% of fatal earthquakes have deaths due to secondary (non-shaking) causes, only rarely are secondary effects the main cause of fatalities. The recent 2004 Great Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake is a notable exception, with extraordinary losses due to tsunami. The potential for secondary hazards varies greatly, and systematically, due to regional geologic and geomorphic conditions. Based on our findings, we have built country-specific disclaimers for PAGER that address potential for each hazard (Earle et al., Proceedings of the 14th World Conference of the Earthquake Engineering, Beijing, China, 2008). We will now focus on ways to model casualties from secondary effects based on their relative importance as well as their general predictability. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  7. Assessment of the Casualty Risk of Multiple Meteorological Hazards in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Zhuo, Li; Zheng, Jing; Ge, Yi; Gu, Zhihui; Tian, Yugang

    2016-02-01

    A study of the frequency, intensity, and risk of extreme climatic events or natural hazards is important for assessing the impacts of climate change. Many models have been developed to assess the risk of multiple hazards, however, most of the existing approaches can only model the relative levels of risk. This paper reports the development of a method for the quantitative assessment of the risk of multiple hazards based on information diffusion. This method was used to assess the risks of loss of human lives from 11 types of meteorological hazards in China at the prefectural and provincial levels. Risk curves of multiple hazards were obtained for each province and the risks of 10-year, 20-year, 50-year, and 100-year return periods were mapped. The results show that the provinces (municipalities, autonomous regions) in southeastern China are at higher risk of multiple meteorological hazards as a result of their geographical location and topography. The results of this study can be used as references for the management of meteorological disasters in China. The model can be used to quantitatively calculate the risks of casualty, direct economic losses, building collapse, and agricultural losses for any hazards at different spatial scales. PMID:26901210

  8. Marine casualty and pollution database (raw data only) (on CD-ROM). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Marine Casualty and Pollution Database provides details about marine casualty and pollution incidents investigated by the US Coast Guard Marine Safety Officer. The database is an invaluable source of information to understand particulars and circumstances of marine accidents and pollution incidents. The CD-ROM contains forty data tables derived from marine casualty and pollution investigations conducted by investigators at US Coast Guard Marine Safety Offices throughout the United States. The data collection period began in 1973 and is ongoing. Also included on the CD-ROM are vessel and facility tables with specific information on vessel and facility constitution and operating details. The Coast Guard maintains a comprehensive database on approximately 460,000 US and foreign vessels and 32,000 facilities. Entity and attribute descriptions and suggested solutions to general marine pollution, vessel casualty, and personnel injury and death questions are outlined in the documentation.

  9. Advancing critical care: joint combat casualty research team and joint theater trauma system.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Elizabeth; Biever, Kimberlie

    2010-01-01

    Despite the severity and complexity of injuries, survival rates among combat casualties are equal to or better than those from civilian trauma. This article summarizes the evidence regarding innovations from the battlefield that contribute to these extraordinary survival rates, including preventing hemorrhage with the use of tourniquets and hemostatic dressings, damage control resuscitation, and the rapid evacuation of casualties via MEDEVAC and the US Air Force Critical Care Air Transport Teams. Care in the air for critically injured casualties with pulmonary injuries and traumatic brain injury is discussed to demonstrate the unique considerations required to ensure safe en route care. Innovations being studied to decrease sequelae associated with complex orthopedic and extremity trauma are also presented. The role and contributions of the Joint Combat Casualty Research Team and the Joint Theater Trauma System are also discussed. PMID:20683227

  10. Estimating the human recovery costs of seriously injured road crash casualties.

    PubMed

    Bambach, M R; Mitchell, R J

    2015-12-01

    Road crashes result in substantial trauma and costs to societies around the world. Robust costing methods are an important tool to estimate costs associated with road trauma, and are key inputs into policy development and cost-benefit analysis for road safety programmes and infrastructure projects. With an expanding focus on seriously injured road crash casualties, in addition to the long standing focus on fatalities, methods for costing seriously injured casualties are becoming increasingly important. Some road safety agencies are defining a seriously injured casualty as an individual that was admitted to hospital following a road crash, and as a result, hospital separation data provide substantial potential for estimating the costs associated with seriously injured road crash casualties. The aim of this study is to establish techniques for estimating the human recovery costs of (non-fatal) seriously injured road crash casualties directly from hospital separation data. An individuals' road crash-related hospitalisation record and their personal injury insurance claim were linked for road crashes that occurred in New South Wales, Australia. These records provided the means for estimating all of the costs to the casualty directly related to their recovery from their injuries. A total of 10,897 seriously injured road crash casualties were identified and four methods for estimating their recovery costs were examined, using either unit record or aggregated hospital separation data. The methods are shown to provide robust techniques for estimating the human recovery costs of seriously injured road crash casualties, that may prove useful for identifying, implementing and evaluating safety programmes intended to reduce the incidence of road crash-related serious injuries. PMID:26436488

  11. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  12. Infrared imaging-based combat casualty care system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, James E., Sr.

    1997-08-01

    A Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract was recently awarded to a start up company for the development of an infrared (IR) image based combat casualty care system. The company, Medical Thermal Diagnostics, or MTD, is developing a light weight, hands free, energy efficient uncooled IR imaging system based upon a Texas Instruments design which will allow emergency medical treatment of wounded soldiers in complete darkness without any type of light enhancement equipment. The principal investigator for this effort, Dr. Gene Luther, DVM, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, will conduct the development and testing of this system with support from Thermalscan, Inc., a nondestructive testing company experienced in IR thermography applications. Initial research has been done with surgery on a cat for feasibility of the concept as well as forensic research on pigs as a close representation of human physiology to determine time of death. Further such studies will be done later as well as trauma studies. IR images of trauma injuries will be acquired by imaging emergency room patients to create an archive of emergency medical situations seen with an infrared imaging camera. This archived data will then be used to develop training material for medical personnel using the system. This system has potential beyond military applications. Firefighters and emergency medical technicians could directly benefit from the capability to triage and administer medical care to trauma victims in low or no light conditions.

  13. Ultrasonography in the evaluation of hemoperitoneum in war casualties.

    PubMed

    Miletić, D; Fuckar, Z; Mraović, B; Dimec, D; Mozetic, V

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values of emergent ultrasound examination in the detection of hemoperitoneum among war casualties, and to compare the results of this method in a specific war situation and civil conditions. Ninety-four wounded individuals with suspected blunt or penetrating abdominal trauma were treated at a level I war hospital (group W), and 242 civilians with multiple injuries with suspected blunt abdominal trauma were evaluated at the emergency center of a university hospital (group C). All examinations were performed in less than 5 minutes with a portable ultrasonographic scanner, and typical points were scanned (Morison's pouch, Douglas and perisplenic spaces, paracolic gutter). In group W, hemoperitoneum was identified correctly in 19 patients, with three false-negative and no false-positive findings, whereas group C presented 98 true-positive results, 13 false-negative results, and again no false-positive results. We observed that ultrasonography in specific war conditions showed sensitivity of 86%, specificity of 100%, accuracy as high as 97%, positive predictive value of 100%, and negative predictive value of 96%, whereas in civil conditions the corresponding values were 88%, 100%, 95%, 100%, and 91%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values of emergent ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of hemoperitoneum are approximately equal in war and civil conditions. PMID:10459274

  14. On Sun-to-Earth Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections: II. Slow Events and Comparison with Others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying D.; Hu, Huidong; Wang, Chi; Luhmann, Janet G.; Richardson, John D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui

    2016-02-01

    As a follow-up study on Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of slow CMEs combining heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. Three events of particular interest, the 2010 June 16, 2011 March 25, and 2012 September 25 CMEs, are selected for this study. We compare slow CMEs with fast and intermediate-speed events, and obtain key results complementing the attempt of Liu et al. to create a general picture of CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of a typical slow CME can be approximately described by two phases, a gradual acceleration out to about 20-30 solar radii, followed by a nearly invariant speed around the average solar wind level; (2) comparison between different types of CMEs indicates that faster CMEs tend to accelerate and decelerate more rapidly and have shorter cessation distances for the acceleration and deceleration; (3) both intermediate-speed and slow CMEs would have speeds comparable to the average solar wind level before reaching 1 au; (4) slow CMEs have a high potential to interact with other solar wind structures in the Sun-Earth space due to their slow motion, providing critical ingredients to enhance space weather; and (5) the slow CMEs studied here lack strong magnetic fields at the Earth but tend to preserve a flux-rope structure with an axis generally perpendicular to the radial direction from the Sun. We also suggest a “best” strategy for the application of a triangulation concept in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, which helps to clarify confusions about CME geometry assumptions in the triangulation and to improve CME analysis and observations.

  15. A complete solution classification and unified algorithmic treatment for the one- and two-step asymmetric S-transverse mass event scale statistic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Joel W.

    2014-08-01

    The M T2, or "s-transverse mass", statistic was developed to associate a parent mass scale to a missing transverse energy signature, given that escaping particles are generally expected in pairs, while collider experiments are sensitive to just a single transverse momentum vector sum. This document focuses on the generalized extension of that statistic to asymmetric one- and two-step decay chains, with arbitrary child particle masses and upstream missing transverse momentum. It provides a unified theoretical formulation, complete solution classification, taxonomy of critical points, and technical algorithmic prescription for treatment of the event scale. An implementation of the described algorithm is available for download, and is also a deployable component of the author's selection cut software package AEAC uS (Algorithmic Event Arbiter and C ut Selector). appendices address combinatoric event assembly, algorithm validation, and a complete pseudocode.

  16. Mass Mortality Events in the NW Adriatic Sea: Phase Shift from Slow- to Fast-Growing Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Di Camillo, Cristina Gioia; Cerrano, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Massive outbreaks are increasing all over the world, which are likely related to climate change. The North Adriatic Sea, a sub-basin of the Mediterranean Sea, is a shallow semi-closed sea receiving high nutrients inputs from important rivers. These inputs sustain the highest productive basin of the Mediterranean Sea. Moreover, this area shows a high number of endemisms probably due to the high diversity of environmental conditions and the conspicuous food availability. Here, we documented two massive mortalities (2009 and 2011) and the pattern of recovery of the affected biocoenoses in the next two years. Results show an impressive and fast shift of the benthic assemblage from a biocoenosis mainly composed of slow-growing and long-lived species to a biocoenosis dominated by fast-growing and short-lived species. The sponge Chondrosia reniformis, one of the key species of this assemblage, which had never been involved in previous massive mortality events in the Mediterranean Sea, reduced its coverage by 70%, and only few small specimens survived. All the damaged sponges, together with many associated organisms, were detached by rough-sea conditions, leaving large bare areas on the rocky wall. Almost three years after the disease, the survived specimens of C. reniformis did not increase significantly in size, while the bare areas were colonized by fast-growing species such as stoloniferans, hydrozoans, mussels, algae, serpulids and bryozoans. Cnidarians were more resilient than massive sponges since they quickly recovered in less than one month. In the study area, the last two outbreaks caused a reduction in the filtration efficiency of the local benthic assemblage by over 60%. The analysis of the times series of wave heights and temperature revealed that the conditions in summer 2011 were not so extreme as to justify severe mass mortality, suggesting the occurrence of other factors which triggered the disease. The long-term observations of a benthic assemblage in the

  17. Mass Mortality Events in the NW Adriatic Sea: Phase Shift from Slow- to Fast-Growing Organisms.

    PubMed

    Di Camillo, Cristina Gioia; Cerrano, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Massive outbreaks are increasing all over the world, which are likely related to climate change. The North Adriatic Sea, a sub-basin of the Mediterranean Sea, is a shallow semi-closed sea receiving high nutrients inputs from important rivers. These inputs sustain the highest productive basin of the Mediterranean Sea. Moreover, this area shows a high number of endemisms probably due to the high diversity of environmental conditions and the conspicuous food availability. Here, we documented two massive mortalities (2009 and 2011) and the pattern of recovery of the affected biocoenoses in the next two years. Results show an impressive and fast shift of the benthic assemblage from a biocoenosis mainly composed of slow-growing and long-lived species to a biocoenosis dominated by fast-growing and short-lived species. The sponge Chondrosia reniformis, one of the key species of this assemblage, which had never been involved in previous massive mortality events in the Mediterranean Sea, reduced its coverage by 70%, and only few small specimens survived. All the damaged sponges, together with many associated organisms, were detached by rough-sea conditions, leaving large bare areas on the rocky wall. Almost three years after the disease, the survived specimens of C. reniformis did not increase significantly in size, while the bare areas were colonized by fast-growing species such as stoloniferans, hydrozoans, mussels, algae, serpulids and bryozoans. Cnidarians were more resilient than massive sponges since they quickly recovered in less than one month. In the study area, the last two outbreaks caused a reduction in the filtration efficiency of the local benthic assemblage by over 60%. The analysis of the times series of wave heights and temperature revealed that the conditions in summer 2011 were not so extreme as to justify severe mass mortality, suggesting the occurrence of other factors which triggered the disease. The long-term observations of a benthic assemblage in the

  18. Development of a national sport event risk management training program for college command groups.

    PubMed

    Hall, Stacey A

    2013-01-01

    The US Department of Homeland Security identified college sport venues as terrorist targets due to the potential for mass casualties and catastrophic social and economic impact. Therefore, it is critical for college sport safety and security personnel to implement effective risk management practices. However, deficiencies have been identified in the level of preparedness of college sport event security personnel related to risk management training and effective emergency response capabilities. To address the industry need, the National Center for Spectator Sports Safety and Security designed, developed, and evaluated a national sport event risk management training program for National Collegiate Athletic Association command groups. The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of the design, development, and evaluation process. PMID:24303775

  19. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  20. The end-Cretaceous in the southwestern Tethys (Elles, Tunisia): orbital calibration of paleoenvironmental events before the mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Nicolas; Galbrun, Bruno; Gardin, Silvia; Minoletti, Fabrice; Le Callonnec, Laurence

    2016-04-01

    An integrated study of magnetic mass susceptibility (MS), bulk stable isotopes and calcareous nannofossil paleoecological changes is undertaken on the late Maastrichtian of the Elles section, Tunisia, spanning the last ca. 1 Myr of the Cretaceous. A cyclostratigraphic analysis reveals the presence of Milankovitch frequencies and is used for proposal of two distinct orbital age models and to provide ages of important stratigraphic horizons, relative to the age of the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary (K-PgB). Principal component analysis (PCA) performed on the nannofossil assemblage reveal two main factors, PCA1, mostly representing fluctuations of D. rotatorius, P. stoveri, Lithraphidites spp., Retecapsa spp., Staurolithites spp., Micula spp., and PCA2, mostly representing fluctuations of A. regularis, C. ehrenbergii, Micula spp., Rhagodiscus spp., W. barnesiae and Zeugrhabdotus spp. Variations in PCA1 and PCA2 match changes in bulk δ13C and δ18O, respectively, and suggest changes in surface-water fertility and temperatures and associated stress. The variations in abundances of high-latitude taxa and the warm-water species Micula murus and in bulk δ18O delineate fast changes in sea-surface paleotemperatures. As in many other sites, an end-Maastrichtian greenhouse warming is highlighted, followed by a short cooling and an additional warm pulse in the last 30 kyr of the Maastrichtian which has rarely been documented so far. Orbital tuning of the delineated climatic events is proposed following the two different age models. Calcareous nannofossil assemblages highlight a decrease in surface-water nutriency, but their species richness remains high through the latest Maastrichtian, indicating, in Tunisia, a weak impact of Deccan volcanism on calcareous nannoplankton diversity before the mass extinction.

  1. Measurement of the top-quark mass in all-jets $$t\\bar{t}$$ events in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$=7 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2013-07-17

    The mass of the top quark is measured using a sample ofmore » $$t\\bar{t}$$ candidate events with at least six jets in the final state. The sample is selected from data collected with the CMS detector in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV in 2011 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.54 inverse femtobarns. The mass is reconstructed for each event employing a kinematic fit of the jets to a $$t\\bar{t}$$ hypothesis. The top-quark mass is measured to be 173.49 $$\\pm$$ 0.69 (stat.) $$\\pm$$ 1.21 (syst.) GeV. A combination with previously published measurements in other decay modes by CMS yields a mass of 173.54 $$\\pm$$ 0.33 (stat.) $$\\pm$$ 0.96 (syst.) GeV.« less

  2. Measurement of the top-quark mass in all-jets $t\\bar{t}$ events in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2013-07-17

    The mass of the top quark is measured using a sample of $t\\bar{t}$ candidate events with at least six jets in the final state. The sample is selected from data collected with the CMS detector in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV in 2011 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.54 inverse femtobarns. The mass is reconstructed for each event employing a kinematic fit of the jets to a $t\\bar{t}$ hypothesis. The top-quark mass is measured to be 173.49 $\\pm$ 0.69 (stat.) $\\pm$ 1.21 (syst.) GeV. A combination with previously published measurements in other decay modes by CMS yields a mass of 173.54 $\\pm$ 0.33 (stat.) $\\pm$ 0.96 (syst.) GeV.

  3. Microlensing Events by Proxima Centauri in 2014 and 2016: Opportunities for Mass Determination and Possible Planet Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.; Bond, Howard E.; Anderson, Jay; Dominik, Martin

    2014-02-01

    We have found that Proxima Centauri, the star closest to our Sun, will pass close to a pair of faint background stars in the next few years. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained in 2012 October, we determine that the passage close to a mag 20 star will occur in 2014 October (impact parameter 1.''6), and to a mag 19.5 star in 2016 February (impact parameter 0.''5). As Proxima passes in front of these stars, the relativistic deflection of light will cause shifts in the positions of the background stars of ~0.5 and 1.5 mas, respectively, readily detectable by HST imaging, and possibly by Gaia and ground-based facilities such as the Very Large Telescope. Measurement of these astrometric shifts offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of Proxima. Moreover, if Proxima has a planetary system, the planets may be detectable through their additional microlensing signals, although the probability of such detections is small. With astrometric accuracies of 0.03 mas (achievable with HST spatial scanning), centroid shifts caused by Jovian planets are detectable at separations of up to 2.''0 (corresponding to 2.6 AU at the distance of Proxima), and centroid shifts by Earth-mass planets are detectable within a small band of 8 mas (corresponding to 0.01 AU) around the source trajectories. Jovian planets within a band of about 28 mas (corresponding to 0.036 AU) around the source trajectories would produce a brightening of the source by >0.01 mag and could hence be detectable. Estimated timescales of the astrometric and photometric microlensing events due to a planet range from a few hours to a few days, and both methods would provide direct measurements of the planetary mass. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  4. Characteristics of Kinematics of a Coronal Mass Ejection During the 2010 August 1 CME-CME Interaction Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temmer, Manuela; Vrsnak, Bojan; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; de Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Mostl, Christian; Zic, Tomislav; Veronig, Astrid M.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Flor, Olga; Eastwood, Jonathan; Odstrcil, Dusan; Forsyth, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and HI data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field-of-view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; (is) approximately 1200 km s-1) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; (is) approximately 700 km s-1). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2 suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  5. Evidence of a Plasmoid-Looptop Interaction and Magnetic Inflows During a Solar Flare/Coronal Mass Ejection Eruptive Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, Ryan O.; McAteer, R. T. James; Dennis, Brian R.; Young, C. Alex

    2010-01-01

    Observational evidence is presented for the merging of a downward-propagating plasmoid with a looptop kernel during an occulted limb event on 2007 January 25. RHESSI light curves in the 9-18 keV energy range, as well as that of the 245 MHz channel of the Learmonth Solar Observatory, show enhanced nonthermal emission in the corona at the time of the merging suggesting that additional particle acceleration took place. This was attributed to a secondary episode of reconnection in the current sheet that formed between the two merging sources. RHESSI images were used to establish a mean downward velocity of the plasmoid of 12 km/s. Complementary observations from the SECCHI suite of instruments on board STEREO-B showed that this process occurred during the acceleration phase of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). From wavelet-enhanced EUV Imager, image evidence of inflowing magnetic field lines prior to the CME eruption is also presented. The derived inflow velocity was found to be 1.5 km/s. This combination of observations supports a recent numerical simulation of plasmoid formation, propagation, and subsequent particle acceleration due to the tearing mode instability during current sheet formation.

  6. CHARACTERISTICS OF KINEMATICS OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION DURING THE 2010 AUGUST 1 CME-CME INTERACTION EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; Moestl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M.; Flor, Olga; Vrsnak, Bojan; Zic, Tomislav; De Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Eastwood, Jonathan; Forsyth, Robert; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2012-04-10

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and heliospheric imager (HI) data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field of view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; {approx}1200 km s{sup -1}) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; {approx}700 km s{sup -1}). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2, suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  7. STIDP: A US Department of Homeland Security program for countering explosives attacks at large public events and mass transit facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, Christa K.; Kemp, Michael C.; Lombardo, Nicholas J.

    2009-03-07

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Standoff Technology Integration and Demonstration Program is designed to accelerate the development and integration of technologies, concepts of operations, and training to prevent explosives attacks at large public events and mass transit facilities. The program will address threats posed by suicide bombers, vehicle-borne improvised explosive devices, and leave-behind bombs. The program is focused on developing and testing explosives countermeasure architectures using commercial off-the-shelf and near-commercial standoff and remotely operated detection technologies in prototypic operational environments. An important part of the program is the integration of multiple technologies and systems to protect against a wider range of threats, improve countermeasure performance, increase the distance from the venue at which screening is conducted, and reduce staffing requirements. The program will routinely conduct tests in public venues involving successively more advanced technology, higher levels of system integration, and more complex scenarios. This paper describes the initial field test of an integrated countermeasure system that included infrared, millimeter-wave, and video analytics technologies for detecting person-borne improvised explosive devices at a public arena. The test results are being used to develop a concept for the next generation of integrated countermeasures, to refine technical and operational requirements for architectures and technologies, and engage industry and academia in solution development.

  8. Topological model of the solar event including a flare and coronal mass ejection on October 19, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V. I.; Yazev, S. A.

    2008-08-01

    Based on the analysis of a strong solar flare X1.6/2B on October 19, 2001 in the active region 9661, accompanied by a coronal mass ejection (CME) of the halo type, a topological model of development of this solar event is suggested. The model considers a unified process of development of CME and a chromosphere flare. According to the model, this process has a common source of energy supply: the turbulent current layer lying between the arcade of flare loops and the surface of CME going away. The structures on the ends of flare bands (SEFB) represent in this model chromosphere feet of the system of large-scale coronal magnetic arches at the initial stage of the dynamic processes whose evolution results in CME. Peripheral structures (PS) of the flare (elongated double bright emission strips beyond the limits of the active region) are interpreted as chromosphere bases of magnetic field lines that form an external shell (braid) of the CME at the late stage of the flare.

  9. Reco level Smin and subsystem Smin: improved global inclusive variables for measuring the new physics mass scale in MET events at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Konar, Partha; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun; /Florida U.

    2011-08-11

    The variable {radical}s{sub min} was originally proposed in [1] as a model-independent, global and fully inclusive measure of the new physics mass scale in missing energy events at hadron colliders. In the original incarnation of {radical}s{sub min}, however, the connection to the new physics mass scale was blurred by the effects of the underlying event, most notably initial state radiation and multiple parton interactions. In this paper we advertize two improved variants of the {radical}s{sub min} variable, which overcome this problem. First we show that by evaluating the {radical}s{sub min} variable at the RECO level, in terms of the reconstructed objects in the event, the effects from the underlying event are significantly diminished and the nice correlation between the peak in the {radical}s{sub min}{sup (reco)} distribution and the new physics mass scale is restored. Secondly, the underlying event problem can be avoided altogether when the {radical}s{sub min} concept is applied to a subsystem of the event which does not involve any QCD jets. We supply an analytic formula for the resulting subsystem {radical}s{sub min}{sup (sub)} variable and show that its peak exhibits the usual correlation with the mass scale of the particles produced in the subsystem. Finally, we contrast {radical}s{sub min} to other popular inclusive variables such as H{sub T}, M{sub Tgen} and M{sub TTgen}. We illustrate our discussion with several examples from supersymmetry, and with dilepton events from top quark pair production.

  10. SHORT-DURATION LENSING EVENTS. I. WIDE-ORBIT PLANETS? FREE-FLOATING LOW-MASS OBJECTS? OR HIGH-VELOCITY STARS?

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2012-08-01

    Short-duration lensing events tend to be generated by low-mass lenses or by lenses with high transverse velocities. Furthermore, for any given lens mass and speed, events of short duration are preferentially caused by nearby lenses (mesolenses) that can be studied in detail, or else by lenses so close to the source star that finite-source-size effects may be detected, yielding information about both the Einstein ring radius and the surface of the lensed star. Planets causing short-duration events may be in orbits with any orientation, and may have semimajor axes smaller than 1 AU, or they may reach the outer limits of their planetary systems, in the region corresponding to the solar system's Oort Cloud. They can have masses larger than Jupiter's or smaller than Pluto's. Lensing therefore has a unique potential to expand our understanding of planetary systems. A particular advantage of lensing is that it can provide precision measurements of system parameters, including the masses of and projected separation between star and planet. We demonstrate how the parameters can be extracted and show that a great deal can be learned. For example, it is remarkable that the gravitational mass of nearby free-floating planet-mass lenses can be measured by complementing observations of a photometric event with deep images that detect the planet itself. A fraction of short events may be caused by high-velocity stars located within a kiloparsec. Many high-velocity lenses are likely to be neutron stars that received large natal kicks. Other high-speed stars may be members of the halo population. Still others may be hypervelocity stars that have been ejected from the Galactic center, or runaway stars escaped from close binaries, possibly including the progenitor binaries of Type Ia supernovae.

  11. On-ground casualty risk reduction by structural design for demise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, Stijn; Funke, Quirin; Krag, Holger

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, awareness concerning the on-ground risk posed by un-controlled re-entering space systems has increased. On average over the past decade, an object with mass above 800 kg re-enters every week from which only a few, e.g. ESA's GOCE in 2013 and NASA's UARS in 2011, appeared prominent in international media. Space agencies and nations have discussed requirements to limit the on-ground risk for future missions. To meet the requirements, the amount of debris falling back on Earth has to be limited in number, mass and size. Design for demise (D4D) refers to all measures taken in the design of a space object to increase the potential for demise of the object and its components during re-entry. SCARAB (Spacecraft Atmospheric Re-entry and Break-Up) is ESA's high-fidelity tool which analyses the thermal and structural effects of atmospheric re-entry on spacecraft with a finite-element approach. For this study, a model of a representative satellite is developed in SCARAB to serve as test-bed for D4D analyses on a structural level. The model is used as starting point for different D4D approaches based on increasing the exposure of the satellite components to the aero-thermal environment, as a way to speed up the demise. Statistical bootstrapping is applied to the resulting on-ground fragment lists in order to compare the different re-entry scenarios and to determine the uncertainties of the results. Moreover, the bootstrap results can be used to analyse the casualty risk estimator from a theoretical point of view. The risk reductions for the analysed D4D techniques are presented with respect to the reference scenario for the modelled representative satellite.

  12. Epidemiology of child pedestrian casualty rates: can we assume spatial independence?

    PubMed

    Hewson, Paul J

    2005-07-01

    Child pedestrian injuries are often investigated by means of ecological studies, yet are clearly part of a complex spatial phenomena. Spatial dependence within such ecological analyses have rarely been assessed, yet the validity of basic statistical techniques rely on a number of independence assumptions. Recent work from Canada has highlighted the potential for modelling spatial dependence within data that was aggregated in terms of the number of road casualties who were resident in a given geographical area. Other jurisdictions aggregate data in terms of the number of casualties in the geographical area in which the collision took place. This paper contrasts child pedestrian casualty data from Devon County UK, which has been aggregated by both methods. A simple ecological model, with minimally useful covaraties relating to measures of child deprivation, provides evidence that data aggregated in terms of the casualty's home location cannot be assumed to be spatially independent and that for analysis of these data to be valid there must be some accounting for spatial auto-correlation within the model structure. Conversely, data aggregated in terms of the collision location (as is usual in the UK) was found to be spatially independent. Whilst the spatial model is clearly more complex it provided a superior fit to that seen with either collision aggregated or non-spatial models. Of more importance, the ecological level association between deprivation and casualty rate is much lower once the spatial structure is accounted for, highlighting the importance using appropriately structured models. PMID:15949456

  13. Revisiting the Microlensing Event OGLE 2012-BLG-0026: A Solar Mass Star with Two Cold Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bennett, D. P.; Batista, V.; Fukui, A.; Marquette, J.-B.; Brillant, S.; Cole, A. A.; Rogers, L. A.; Sumi, T.; Abe, F.

    2016-01-01

    Two cold gas giant planets orbiting a G-type main-sequence star in the galactic disk were previously discovered in the high-magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026. Here, we present revised host star flux measurements and a refined model for the two-planet system using additional light curve data. We performed high angular resolution adaptive optics imaging with the Keck and Subaru telescopes at two epochs while the source star was still amplified. We detected the lens flux, H = 16.39 +/- 0.08. The lens, a disk star, is brighter than predicted from the modeling in the original study. We revisited the light curve modeling using additional photometric data from the B and C telescope in New Zealand and CTIO 1.3 m H-band light curve. We then include the Keck and Subaru adaptive optic observation constraints. The system is composed of an approximately 4-9 Gyr lens star of M(sub lens) = 1.06 +/- 0.05 solar mass at a distance of D(sub lens) = 4.0 +/- 0.3 kpc, orbited by two giant planets of 0.145 +/- 0.008 M(sub Jup) and 0.86 +/- 0.06 M(sub Jup), with projected separations of 4.0 +/- 0.5 au and 4.8 +/- 0.7 au, respectively. Because the lens is brighter than the source star by 16 +/- 8% in H, with no other blend within one arcsec, it will be possible to estimate its metallicity using subsequent IR spectroscopy with 8-10 m class telescopes. By adding a constraint on the metallicity it will be possible to refine the age of the system.

  14. The Dynamic Response of Marine Life to Extreme Temperature and Low Oxygen Events Following the End-Permian Mass Extinction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, C.; Bottjer, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The end-Permian mass extinction was the most devastating taxonomic and ecological crisis in the history of life on Earth. The recovery lasted 5 My making it the longest in geologic history, although the cause of the delay is still heavily debated. We find that additional environmental changes during the recovery interval reset the attempts that marine communities made toward ecological complexity, resulting in the overall appearance of a stagnant recovery. The extinction mechanisms during the end-Permian include extreme temperature change and low oxygen environments resulting from the volcanic emission of carbon dioxide and other toxic gasses to the atmosphere. The biotic response to ancient environmental change is a direct analog for the ecological impacts of modern anthropogenic climate change. We applied an ecological recovery rubric to benthic, sea floor dwelling, communities throughout the Early Triassic recovery in two major ocean basins. Newly collected bulk fossil data from the Moenkopi and Thaynes Formations from the Southwest US and the Werfen Formation in Italy were analyzed along with literature data. In Italy, directly following the extinction, low oxygen environments prevented an ecological rebound. Once low oxygen conditions receded, 600 kyr after the extinction, taxonomic diversity, fossil body size, and trace fossil complexity rebounded. A little more than 1 My into the Early Triassic, an extreme temperature event resulted in a reset of community complexity in both Italy and the Southwest US. The body size of gastropods and the repopulation of echinoderms were significantly inhibited as was trace fossil complexity. Low oxygen conditions that developed in the last ~2My of the Early Triassic limited diversity and body size in the Southwest United States. The stagnant recovery is re-interpreted as dynamic resets and rapid rebounds driven by environmental perturbations throughout the Early Triassic.

  15. Occupational safety data and casualty rates for the uranium fuel cycle. [Glossaries

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, F.R.; Hoy, H.C.

    1981-10-01

    Occupational casualty (injuries, illnesses, fatalities, and lost workdays) and production data are presented and used to calculate occupational casualty incidence rates for technologies that make up the uranium fuel cycle, including: mining, milling, conversion, and enrichment of uranium; fabrication of reactor fuel; transportation of uranium and fuel elements; generation of electric power; and transmission of electric power. Each technology is treated in a separate chapter. All data sources are referenced. All steps used to calculate normalized occupational casualty incidence rates from the data are presented. Rates given include fatalities, serious cases, and lost workdays per 100 man-years worked, per 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy output, and per other appropriate units of output.

  16. A novel “correlated ion and neutral time of flight” method: Event-by-event detection of neutral and charged fragments in collision induced dissociation of mass selected ions

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssier, C.; Fillol, R.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.

    2014-01-15

    A new tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method based on time of flight measurements performed on an event-by-event detection technique is presented. This “correlated ion and neutral time of flight” method allows to explore Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) fragmentation processes by directly identifying not only all ions and neutral fragments produced but also their arrival time correlations within each single fragmentation event from a dissociating molecular ion. This constitutes a new step in the characterization of molecular ions. The method will be illustrated here for a prototypical case involving CID of protonated water clusters H{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub n=1–5} upon collisions with argon atoms.

  17. 33 CFR 150.815 - How must casualties be reported?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the following: (1) Loss of life; (2) An injury that requires professional medical treatment beyond..., operator, or person in charge of the port; (3) The nature and circumstances of the event; and (4) The nature and extent of the injury and damage resulting from the event. (c) The operator will ensure...

  18. 33 CFR 150.815 - How must casualties be reported?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the following: (1) Loss of life; (2) An injury that requires professional medical treatment beyond..., operator, or person in charge of the port; (3) The nature and circumstances of the event; and (4) The nature and extent of the injury and damage resulting from the event. (c) The operator will ensure...

  19. 33 CFR 150.815 - How must casualties be reported?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the following: (1) Loss of life; (2) An injury that requires professional medical treatment beyond..., operator, or person in charge of the port; (3) The nature and circumstances of the event; and (4) The nature and extent of the injury and damage resulting from the event. (c) The operator will ensure...

  20. Mobilized progenitor cells as a bridging therapy for radiation casualties: a brief review of tocopherol succinate-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Singh, Pankaj K; Wise, Stephen Y; Seed, Thomas M

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear detonation through either military or terrorist action would most likely lead to a mass-casualty scenario involving victims with varying degrees of exposure to ionizing radiation. As a result of radiation injury to the hematopoietic system, victims would suffer from a lack of red blood cells that deliver oxygen, immune cells that detect and eliminate infectious agents, and blood platelets that promote blood clot formation. In part, these symptoms are generally referred to as acute radiation syndrome (ARS). While some victims of moderate to high levels of radiation will be beyond saving, most will have received enough radiation to injure but not kill their bone marrow cells completely. Such people will recover from their injuries but face a 30-60day period during which they cannot fully fight infections and are prone to uncontrolled bleeding and anemia. To keep them alive until their hematopoietic system recovers, they must receive supportive care. Recently, using experimental animal models of ARS, transfusion of myeloid progenitor cells have been tried as a bridging therapy for radiation-exposed animals. Such cells have been shown to be effective in protecting animals exposed to lethal doses of radiation. These myeloid progenitors (along with of other hematopoietic progenitor cell types) can be mobilized out of the bone marrow into the blood for the reconstitution of hematopoiesis. This review discusses various approaches to the mobilization of progenitors using different mobilizing agents, and their utility as a bridging therapy for radiation casualties. We suggest that α-tocopherol succinate (TS) is an optimal mobilizing agent for progenitors. The extent of progenitor mobilization TS elicits in experimental mice is comparable to clinically used drugs such as recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor rhG-CSF/Neupogen® and the bicyclam AMD3100 (plerixafor/Mozobil); therefore, we propose that TS be considered for further translational development

  1. Quantitative Estimates of the Numbers of Casualties to be Expected due to Major Earthquakes Near Megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyss, M.; Wenzel, F.

    2004-12-01

    Defining casualties as the sum of the fatalities plus injured, we use their mean number, as calculated by QUAKELOSS (developed by Extreme Situations Research Center, Moscow) as a measure of the extent of possible disasters due to earthquakes. Examples of cities we examined include Algiers, Cairo, Istanbul, Mumbai and Teheran, with populations ranging from about 3 to 20 million. With the assumption that the properties of the building stock has not changed with time since 1950, we find that the number of expected casualties will have increased about 5 to 10 fold by the year 2015. This increase is directly proportional to the increase of the population. For the assumed magnitude, we used M7 and M6.5 because shallow earthquakes in this range can occur in the seismogenic layer, without rupturing the surface. This means, they could occur anywhere in a seismically active area, not only along known faults. As a function of epicentral distance the fraction of casualties of the population decrease from about 6% at 20 km, to 3% at 30 km and 0.5% at 50 km, for an earthquake of M7. At 30 km distance, the assumed variation of the properties of the building stock from country to country give rise to variations of 1% to 5% for the estimate of the percent of the population that become casualties. As a function of earthquake size, the expected number of casualties drop by approximately an order of magnitude for an M6.5, compared to an M7, at 30 km distance. Because the computer code and database in QUAKELOSS are calibrated based on about 1000 earthquakes with fatalities, and verified by real-time loss estimates for about 60 cases, these results are probably of the correct order of magnitude. However, the results should not be taken as overly reliable, because (1) the probability calculations of the losses result in uncertainties of about a factor of two, (2) the method has been tested for medium size cities, not for megacities, and (3) many assumptions were made. Nevertheless, it is

  2. Carbon cycle perturbation and stabilization in the wake of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary mass-extinction event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Schootbrugge, B.; Payne, J. L.; Tomasovych, A.; Pross, J.; Fiebig, J.; Benbrahim, M.; FöLlmi, K. B.; Quan, T. M.

    2008-04-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic boundary mass-extinction event (T-J; 199.6 Ma) is associated with major perturbations in the carbon cycle recorded in stable carbon isotopes. Two rapid negative isotope excursions in bulk organic carbon (δ13Corg) occur within the immediate boundary interval at multiple locations and have been linked to the outgassing of 12C-enriched CO2 from the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. In British Columbia, a positive δ13Corg excursion of +5‰ (Vienna Peedee belemnite (V-PDB)) spans part or all of the subsequent Hettangian stage. Here, we examine the significance of these carbon isotope excursions as records of global carbon cycle dynamics across the T-J boundary and test the link between carbon cycle perturbation-stabilization and biotic extinction-recovery patterns. A combination of δ13Corg and palynological analyses from the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in the Mingolsheim core (Germany) suggests that organic carbon isotope variations are best explained as the result of both compositional changes in terrestrial versus marine input and disturbance and recovery patterns of major terrestrial plant groups across the T-J boundary. A new high-resolution δ13Ccarb record from the Val Adrara section in the Southern Alps (Italy) spanning from the uppermost Rhaetian through Lower Sinemurian does not exhibit a negative excursion at the T-J boundary but does record a large positive δ13Ccarb excursion of +4‰ (V-PDB) in bulk carbonate that begins at the T-J boundary and reaches a local maximum at the Early Late Hettangian boundary. Values then gradually decrease reaching +0.5‰ at the Hettangian-Sinemurian boundary and remain relatively constant into the Early Sinemurian. Complementary δ13Ccarb data from 4 more sections that span the Hettangian-Sinemurian boundary support carbon cycle stabilization within the Upper Hettangian. Our analyses suggest that isotope changes in organic carbon reservoirs do not necessarily require a shift in the global

  3. Mass mortality events of the coral Balanophyllia europaea (Scleractinia, Dendrophylliidae) in the Mljet National Park (eastern Adriatic Sea) caused by sea temperature anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kružić, P.; Popijač, A.

    2015-03-01

    Recurrent climate-induced mass mortalities of marine animals have been recorded in the Mediterranean Sea over the past 15 years. These mortality outbreaks have been associated with positive thermal anomalies. In this study, we assessed long-term (from 2003 to 2013) responses of the temperate coral Balanophyllia europaea to increasing seawater temperatures in the Mljet National Park in the Adriatic Sea (Northern Mediterranean Sea) and described the relationship between recurrent mortality events and sea temperature regimes in the southern Adriatic Sea. Our results indicate that polyp bleaching and tissue necrosis caused the observed mortality. The first observations of B. europaea mortality within the study area in the Mljet NP were in early September 2003. The Mediterranean area experienced high temperatures and hydrographic stability over a period of several weeks throughout that summer, which resulted in a mass mortality event. In the Mljet National Park, the highest impact of mass mortality started during the exceptionally hot summer of 2012, representing one of the most severe mass mortality events ever observed in the Adriatic Sea. In 2012, sea temperatures at a 5 m depth during the summer period (from June to September) ranged from 24.44 to 30.16 °C in the Mljet NP. The northern sites in the Mljet NP were highly impacted, with up to 80 % of B. europaea specimens affected by necrosis, while the southern sites displayed the highest impact, with 90-100 % of affected individuals. Without any coral adaptation to warming and under the present climate-warming trend, new mass mortality events may occur in the near future, possibly causing a major coral biodiversity crisis in the Mediterranean Sea.

  4. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 420 - Impact Dispersion Areas and Casualty Expectancy Estimate for an Unguided Suborbital Launch Vehicle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... appendix also provides a method for performing an impact risk analysis that estimates the expected casualty... risk analysis in accordance with paragraph (e). (e) Impact Risk Analysis (1) An applicant shall... following summation of risk: ER19OC00.120 (viii) Alternative casualty expectancy (Ec) analysis. An...

  5. 49 CFR 1242.41 - Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-26-99 and 50-26-00).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-26... RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Equipment § 1242.41 Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-26-99 and... administration (account XX-26-01). freight cars...

  6. 49 CFR 1242.65 - Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-51-99 and 50-51-00).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-51... RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Transportation § 1242.65 Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-51... separation of administration (account XX-51-01). yard operations...

  7. 49 CFR 1242.54 - Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-27-99 and 50-27-00).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-27... RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Equipment § 1242.54 Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-27-99 and... administration (account XX-27-01). Operating Expenses—Transportation train operations...

  8. 49 CFR 1242.82 - Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-55-99 and 50-55-00).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-55... RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Transportation § 1242.82 Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-55... separation of administration (account XX-55-01). Operating Expenses general and administration...

  9. 49 CFR 1242.72 - Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-52-99 and 50-52-00).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-52... RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Transportation § 1242.72 Other and casualties and insurance (accounts XX-52... separation of administration (account XX-52-01). train and yard operations common...

  10. Search for new physics in high-mass electron-positron events in pp[over] collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carrillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-10-26

    We report the results of a search for a narrow resonance in electron-positron events in the invariant mass range of 150-950 GeV/c(2) using 1.3 fb(-1) of pp[over] collision data at square root s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab. No significant evidence of such a resonance is observed and we interpret the results to exclude the standard-model-like Z' with a mass below 923 GeV/c(2) and the Randall-Sundrum graviton with a mass below 807 GeV/c(2) for k/M[over](pl) = 0.1, both at the 95% confidence level. Combining with diphoton data excludes the Randall-Sundrum graviton for masses below 889 GeV/c(2) for k/M[over](pl) = 0.1. PMID:17995318

  11. Sulfur isotope evidence for low and fluctuating sulfate levels in the Late Devonian ocean and the potential link with the mass extinction event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Min Sub; Ono, Shuhei; Hurtgen, Matthew T.

    2015-06-01

    -py values (> 15 ‰) throughout the Upper Kellwasser Event imply higher relative sulfate levels. A larger seawater sulfate reservoir may have promoted the development of sulfidic bottom waters in the eutrophic epicontinental seas, increasing biological stress and potentially contributing to the mass extinction.

  12. Exercise-Associated Collapse in Endurance Events: A Classification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, William O.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a classification system devised for exercise-associated collapse in endurance events based on casualties observed at six Twin Cities Marathons. Major diagnostic criteria are body temperature and mental status. Management protocol includes fluid and fuel replacement, temperature correction, and leg cramp treatment. (Author/SM)

  13. Modeling Effects of Plasma Drag on Low Earth Orbiting Satellites due to Upper Atmospheric Heating by Coronal Mass Ejections and other Solar Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    Influence of solar storms and Earth-directed solar energy induced by coronal mass ejections and other solar events on Earth’s upper atmosphere and satellite’s orbit has been studied. It is known that energetic ultraviolet, X-ray and particles emitted from the sun during solar events collectively heat up and subsequently expand the upper atmosphere. This increases drag on LEO satellites. The extent of impact, however, depends on the phase of the solar 11-year cycle. In this study, we first perform a statistical analysis of the time distribution of space environmental parameters such as F10.7 and Ap indices and events due to solar activity during the past cycle. We compute plasma drag on a model artificial satellite during events and predict, using solar cycle forecast, how the satellite orbit would be affected around the peak of current emerging maximum. We find that depending on orbital and design parameters, a typical satellite orbital radius could experience a mean decay of up to 27.44±5.10km per year (with as much as 5.5km contribution from major solar events) during the emerging solar maximum. We also applied the model on a few isolated cases of reported major solar events. The results of the model compared well with reported results of some exiting LEO satellites.

  14. MAPPING DISSEMINATION OF CHEMICAL AFTER DISPERSIVE EVENTS USING AN AMBIENT-AIR, SURFACE SAMPLING TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemicals are dispersed by numerous accidental, deliberate, or weather-related events. Often, rapid analyses are desired to identify dispersed chemicals and to delineate areas of contamination. Hundreds of wipe samples might be collected from outdoor surfaces or building interi...

  15. 33 CFR 150.825 - Reporting a diving-related casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Reporting a diving-related casualty. Deaths and injuries related to diving within the safety zone of a deepwater port must be reported according to 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486, rather than to §§ 150.815 and 150... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting a...

  16. 33 CFR 150.825 - Reporting a diving-related casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Reporting a diving-related casualty. Deaths and injuries related to diving within the safety zone of a deepwater port must be reported according to 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486, rather than to §§ 150.815 and 150... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting a...

  17. Eating Order: A 13-Week Trust Model Class for Dieting Casualties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Elizabeth G.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic dieting distorts eating behaviors and causes weight escalation. Desperation about losing weight results in pursuit of extreme weight loss measures. Instead of offering yet another diet, nutrition educators can teach chronic dieters (dieting casualties) to develop eating competence. Eating Order, a 13-week class for chronic dieters based on…

  18. Rate of British psychiatric combat casualties compared to recent American wars.

    PubMed

    Price, H H

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines factors leading to the low rate of combat psychiatric casualties in the British recapture of the Falklands compared to the American experience in North Africa, Italy, Europe and South Pacific theatres during World War II, the Korean Conflict and Vietnam. The factors compared are those thought to affect rates seen in these past wars. The factors highlighted are psychiatric screening of evacuees, presence of psychiatric personnel in line units, intensity of combat and use of elite units. Factors also mentioned are presence of possible occult psychiatric casualties such as frostbite and malaria, amount of indirect fire and the offensive or defensive nature of the combat. A unique aspect of the Falklands War examined is the exclusive use of hospital ships to treat psychiatric casualties and the impact of the Geneva Convention rules regarding hospital ships on the classic treatment principles of proximity and expectancy. The types and numbers of various diagnoses are also presented. The British Campaign in the Falklands produced a remarkably low rate of psychiatric casualties. When viewed in light of American experience in recent wars, this low rate represents a concentration of optimal factors leading to healthy function in combat. The results of this war should not be used to predict a similar outcome in future combat as this particular constellation of factors may not recur. PMID:18214088

  19. 46 CFR 4.04-1 - Reports of potential vessel casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reports of potential vessel casualty. 4.04-1 Section 4.04-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE... Guard district rescue coordination center (RCC) cognizant over the area the vessel was last operating...

  20. 26 CFR 20.2054-1 - Deduction for losses from casualties or theft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Deduction for losses from casualties or theft. 20.2054-1 Section 20.2054-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable...

  1. 26 CFR 20.2054-1 - Deduction for losses from casualties or theft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Deduction for losses from casualties or theft. 20.2054-1 Section 20.2054-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable...

  2. 26 CFR 20.2054-1 - Deduction for losses from casualties or theft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deduction for losses from casualties or theft. 20.2054-1 Section 20.2054-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable...

  3. 26 CFR 20.2054-1 - Deduction for losses from casualties or theft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Deduction for losses from casualties or theft. 20.2054-1 Section 20.2054-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable...

  4. 26 CFR 20.2054-1 - Deduction for losses from casualties or theft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Deduction for losses from casualties or theft. 20.2054-1 Section 20.2054-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable...

  5. 33 CFR 150.825 - Reporting a diving-related casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Reporting a diving-related casualty. Deaths and injuries related to diving within the safety zone of a deepwater port must be reported according to 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486, rather than to §§ 150.815 and 150... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting a...

  6. 33 CFR 150.825 - Reporting a diving-related casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Reporting a diving-related casualty. Deaths and injuries related to diving within the safety zone of a deepwater port must be reported according to 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486, rather than to §§ 150.815 and 150... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting a...

  7. 33 CFR 150.825 - Reporting a diving-related casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Reporting a diving-related casualty. Deaths and injuries related to diving within the safety zone of a deepwater port must be reported according to 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486, rather than to §§ 150.815 and 150... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting a...

  8. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Beer lost by fire, theft... TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Refund or Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid...

  9. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Beer lost by fire, theft... TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Refund or Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid...

  10. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Beer lost by fire, theft... TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Refund or Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid...

  11. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Beer lost by fire, theft... TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Refund or Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid...

  12. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Beer lost by fire, theft... TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Refund or Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid...

  13. 76 FR 53364 - Recreational Vessel Propeller Strike and Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Casualty Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). D. Public... Department of Homeland Security ECOS Engine cut-off switches EPA Environmental Protection Agency FR Federal... recreational vessel and propeller strike-related casualties. See 60 FR 25191 (May 11, 1995) (Request...

  14. 46 CFR 122.220 - Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty. 122.220 Section 122.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER... order books, radiograms sent and received, radio logs, crew and passenger lists and counts, articles...

  15. The Battle of Bentonville: Caring for Casualties of the Civil War. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goode, John C.; Beck, Elaine

    At the First Battle of Manassas (Virginia) in 1861 many Union doctors fled the battlefield in fear. Those who remained found themselves without adequate medical supplies or ambulances for their patients. As the U.S. Civil War progressed and casualties mounted, military surgeons became more adept at caring for the wounded. By the Battle of…

  16. A Tool for Empirical Forecasting of Major Flares, Coronal Mass Ejections, and Solar Particle Events from a Proxy of Active-Region Free Magnetic Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Falconer, D. A.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation describes a new forecasting tool developed for and is currently being tested by NASA s Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) at JSC, which is responsible for the monitoring and forecasting of radiation exposure levels of astronauts. The new software tool is designed for the empirical forecasting of M and X-class flares, coronal mass ejections, as well as solar energetic particle events. Its algorithm is based on an empirical relationship between the various types of events rates and a proxy of the active region s free magnetic energy, determined from a data set of approx.40,000 active-region magnetograms from approx.1,300 active regions observed by SOHO/MDI that have known histories of flare, coronal mass ejection, and solar energetic particle event production. The new tool automatically extracts each strong-field magnetic areas from an MDI full-disk magnetogram, identifies each as an NOAA active region, and measures a proxy of the active region s free magnetic energy from the extracted magnetogram. For each active region, the empirical relationship is then used to convert the free magnetic energy proxy into an expected event rate. The expected event rate in turn can be readily converted into the probability that the active region will produce such an event in a given forward time window. Descriptions of the datasets, algorithm, and software in addition to sample applications and a validation test are presented. Further development and transition of the new tool in anticipation of SDO/HMI is briefly discussed.

  17. Systematic Charge-to-Mass-Dependence of Heavy Ion Spectral Breaks in Large Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir; Mason, Glenn; Ebert, Robert; Dayeh, Maher; McComas, David; Li, Gang; Mewaldt, Richard; Cohen, Christina; Schwadron, Nathan; Snith, Charles

    2016-04-01

    We fit the ˜0.1-500 MeV nucleon‑1 H-Fe spectra in 46 large SEP events surveyed by Desai et al. (2015) with the double power-law Band function to obtain a normalization constant, low- and high-energy Band parameters γaand γb; and spectral break energy EB. We also calculate the low-energy power-law spectral slope γ1. Our results are: 1) γa, γ1, andγb are species-independent and the spectra steepen with increasing energy; 2) the low-energy power-law spectral slopes γ1are consistent with diffusive acceleration at shocks with compression ratios between ˜2 - 4 as predicted by Schwadron et al. (2015); 3) the spectral breaks EB's are well ordered by Q/M ratio, and decrease systematically with decreasing Q/M, scaling as (Q/M)α with α in most events varying between ˜0.2-2, as predicted by Li et al (2009); 4) α is well correlated with Fe/O at ˜0.16-0.23 MeV nucleon‑1, but not with the ˜15-21 MeV nucleon‑1 Fe/O and the ˜0.5-2.0 MeV nucleon‑1 3He/4He ratios; 5) In most events: α <1.4, the spectra steepen significantly at higher energy with γb-γa >3, and O EB increases with γb-γa; and 6) Many extreme events (associated with faster CMEs and GLEs) are Fe-rich and 3He-rich, have large α ≥1.4, flatter spectra at low and high energies with γb-γa <3, and EB that anti-correlates with γb-γa. In most events, the Q/M-dependence of EB is consistent with the equal diffusion coefficient condition, while the event-to-event variations in α may be driven by differences in the near-shock wave intensity spectra, which are flatter than the Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum but weaker when compared to extreme events. We interpret these results as being due to weaker turbulence that allows the SEPs to easily escape, resulting in weaker Q/M-dependence of EB, lower α values, and spectral steepening at higher energies. In contrast for extreme events, the stronger Q/M-dependence of EB, larger α values, and harder spectra at high and low energy occur because enhanced

  18. Determination of the top-quark pole mass using tt¯ + 1-jet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 7TeV pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.

    2015-10-19

    In this study, the normalized differential cross section for top-quark pair production in association with at least one jet is studied as a function of the inverse of the invariant mass of the tt¯ + 1-jet system. This distribution can be used for a precise determination of the top-quark mass since gluon radiation depends on the mass of the quarks. The experimental analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 . The selected events were identified using the lepton+jets top-quark-pair decay channel, where lepton refers to either an electron or a muon. The observed distribution is compared to a theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics using the pole-mass scheme. With this method, the measured value of the top-quark pole mass, mpolet , is: mpolet = 173.7 ± 1.5(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.)+1.0–0.5(theory) GeV.

  19. Determination of the top-quark pole mass using tt¯ + 1-jet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 7TeV pp collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-10-19

    In this study, the normalized differential cross section for top-quark pair production in association with at least one jet is studied as a function of the inverse of the invariant mass of the tt¯ + 1-jet system. This distribution can be used for a precise determination of the top-quark mass since gluon radiation depends on the mass of the quarks. The experimental analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 . The selected events were identified using themore » lepton+jets top-quark-pair decay channel, where lepton refers to either an electron or a muon. The observed distribution is compared to a theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics using the pole-mass scheme. With this method, the measured value of the top-quark pole mass, mpolet , is: mpolet = 173.7 ± 1.5(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.)+1.0–0.5(theory) GeV.« less

  20. [Treating accident or chemical attack casualties in hospital].

    PubMed

    Bastide, Théophile; Auguet, Vanessa; Dupille, Stéphanie; Rivière, Sébastien; Wilk, Anaëlle; Chemouny, Myriam; Egido, Antoine; Boncourt, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    It is mandatory for all hospitals to be prepared for the occurrence of a chemical biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) event. This preparation requires specific investment on the part of the hospital management, as well as from the nursing teams on the frontline. Teams from Lariboisière hospital in Paris have been working on these risks for several years. PMID:26144831

  1. A prospective population based study of changes in alcohol use and binge drinking after a mass traumatic event*

    PubMed Central

    Cerdá, Magdalena; Tracy, Melissa; Galea, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have assessed changes in alcohol use before and after a massive disaster. We investigated the contribution of exposure to traumatic events and stressors related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita to alcohol use and binge drinking. We used data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics collected in Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama on adults aged 18–85 (n=439): 1) data from 1968–2005 on household income; 2) data from 2005 and 2007 on total number of drinks per year and number of days the respondent binged; and 3) data from 2007 on exposure to hurricane-related traumatic events and post-hurricane stressors. Exposure to each additional hurricane-related traumatic event was associated with 79.2 more drinks and 2.46 times higher odds of binge drinking for more days in the past year (95% CI: 1.09, 5.55), while more post-disaster stressors were associated with 16.5 more drinks and 1.23 times higher odds of binge drinking for more days in the past year (95% CI: 0.99, 1.51). Respondents who had followed a lower lifetime income trajectory and were exposed to more lifetime traumatic events experienced the highest risk of reporting increased alcohol use given exposure to hurricane-related traumatic events and post-hurricane stressors. Disaster-related traumatic events and the proliferation of post-disaster stressors may result in increased post-disaster alcohol use and abuse. Disaster-related exposures may have a particularly strong impact among individuals with a history of social and economic adversity, widening preexisting health disparities. PMID:20977977

  2. Observational study of rock mass response to mining induced seismic events and controlled blasting experiments at deep level gold mines in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milev, A.; Durrheim, R. J.; Nakatani, M.; Yabe, Y.; Naoi, M. M.; Ogasawara, H.

    2012-12-01

    The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied to characterize the rock mass response and to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instruments, especially designed for recording strong ground motions, were installed underground at a number of deep level gold mines in South Africa. The instruments were recording data at the surface of the stope hangingwalls. A maximum value of 3 m/s was measured. Therefore data were compared to the data recorded in the solid rock by the mine seismic networks to determine the site response. The site response was defined as the ratio of the peak ground velocity measured at the surface of the excavations to the peak ground velocity inferred from the mine seismic data measured in the solid rocks. The site response measured at all mines studied was found to be 9 ± 3 times larger on average. In addition a number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to strong ground motion. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of peak particle velocity was found to be proportional to R-1.7. In order to improve the understanding of the rock mass behaviour around deep level mining the rate of tilt was monitor and then compare to the seismic ground motion. A good correspondence between the rate of tilt and seismic ground motion was found. The rate of coseismic and aseismic tilt, as well as seismicity recorded by the mine seismic network, are approximately constant until the daily blasting time

  3. New insights into PM2.5 chemical composition and sources in two major cities in China during extreme haze events using aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elser, Miriam; Huang, Ru-Jin; Wolf, Robert; Slowik, Jay G.; Wang, Qiyuan; Canonaco, Francesco; Li, Guohui; Bozzetti, Carlo; Daellenbach, Kaspar R.; Huang, Yu; Zhang, Renjian; Li, Zhengqiang; Cao, Junji; Baltensperger, Urs; El-Haddad, Imad; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2016-03-01

    During winter 2013-2014 aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements were conducted for the first time with a novel PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 µm) lens in two major cities of China: Xi'an and Beijing. We denote the periods with visibility below 2 km as extreme haze and refer to the rest as reference periods. During the measurements in Xi'an an extreme haze covered the city for about a week and the total non-refractory (NR)-PM2.5 mass fraction reached peak concentrations of over 1000 µg m-3. During the measurements in Beijing two extreme haze events occurred, but the temporal extent and the total concentrations reached during these events were lower than in Xi'an. Average PM2.5 concentrations of 537 ± 146 and 243 ± 47 µg m-3 (including NR species and equivalent black carbon, eBC) were recorded during the extreme haze events in Xi'an and Beijing, respectively. During the reference periods the measured average concentrations were 140 ± 99 µg m-3 in Xi'an and 75 ± 61 µg m-3 in Beijing. The relative composition of the NR-PM2.5 evolved substantially during the extreme haze periods, with increased contributions of the inorganic components (mostly sulfate and nitrate). Our results suggest that the high relative humidity present during the extreme haze events had a strong effect on the increase of sulfate mass (via aqueous phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide). Another relevant characteristic of the extreme haze is the size of the measured particles. During the extreme haze events, the AMS showed much larger particles, with a volume weighted mode at about 800 to 1000 nm, in contrast to about 400 nm during reference periods. These large particle sizes made the use of the PM2.5 inlet crucial, especially during the severe haze events, where 39 ± 5 % of the mass would have been lost in the conventional PM1 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 1 µm) inlet. A novel positive matrix factorization procedure was developed to

  4. New insights into PM2.5 chemical composition and sources in two major cities in China during extreme haze events using aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elser, M.; Huang, R.-J.; Wolf, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Wang, Q.-Y.; Canonaco, F.; Li, G. H.; Bozzetti, C.; Daellenbach, K. R.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, R.-J.; Li, Z.-Q.; Cao, J. J.; Baltensperger, U.; El-Haddad, I.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-11-01

    During winter 2013-2014 aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements were conducted for the first time with a novel PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) lens in two major cities of China: Xi'an and Beijing. We denote the periods with visibility below 2 km as extreme haze and refer to the rest as reference periods. During the measurements in Xi'an an extreme haze covered the city for about a week and the total non-refractory (NR)-PM2.5 mass fraction reached peak concentrations of over 1000 μg m-3. During the measurements in Beijing two extreme haze events occurred, but the temporal extent and the total concentrations reached during these events were lower than in Xi'an. Average PM2.5 concentrations of 537 ± 146 μg m-3 and 243 ± 47 μg m-3 (including NR species and equivalent black carbon, eBC) were recorded during the extreme haze events in Xi'an and Beijing, respectively. During the reference periods the measured average concentrations were 140 ± 99 μg m-3 in Xi'an and 75 ± 61 μg m-3 in Beijing. The relative composition of the NR-PM2.5 evolved substantially during the extreme haze periods, with increased contributions of the inorganic components (mostly sulfate and nitrate). Our results suggest that the high relative humidity present during the extreme haze events had a strong effect on the increase of sulfate mass (via aqueous phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide). Another relevant characteristic of the extreme haze is the size of the measured particles. During the extreme haze events, the AMS showed much larger particles, with a volume weighted mode at about 800 to 1000 nm, in contrast to about 400 nm during reference periods. These large particle sizes made the use of the PM2.5 inlet crucial, especially during the severe haze events, where 39 ± 5 % of the mass would have been lost in the conventional PM1 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 1 μm) inlet. A novel positive matrix factorization procedure was developed

  5. The bio-terrorism threat and casualty prevention.

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, William P.

    1999-10-01

    The bio-terrorism threat has become the 'poor man's' nuclear weapon. The ease of manufacture and dissemination has allowed an organization with only rudimentary skills and equipment to pose a significant threat with high consequences. This report will analyze some of the most likely agents that would be used, the ease of manufacture, the ease of dissemination and what characteristics of the public health response that are particularly important to the successful characterization of a high consequence event to prevent excessive causalities.

  6. Systematic Charge-to-Mass-Dependence of Heavy Ion Spectral Breaks in Large Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir; Mason, Glenn; McComas, David; Cohen, Christina; Smith, Charles; Ebert, Robert; Schwadron, Nathan; Li, Gang; Mewaldt, Richard; Dayeh, Maher A.

    2016-07-01

    We fit the ˜0.1-500 MeV/nucleon H-Fe spectra in 46 large SEP events surveyed by Desai et al. (2015) with the double power-law Band function to obtain a normalization constant, low- and high-energy Band parameters γ_a and γ_b; and spectral break energy E_B. We also calculate the low-energy power-law spectral slope γ_1. Our results are: 1) γ_a, γ_1, and γ_b are species-independent and the spectra steepen with increasing energy; 2) the low-energy power-law spectral slopes γ_1 are consistent with diffusive acceleration at shocks with compression ratios between ˜2-4 as predicted by Schwadron et al. (2015); 3) the spectral breaks E_B's are well ordered by Q/M ratio, and decrease systematically with decreasing Q/M, scaling as (Q/M)^α with α in most events varying between ˜0.2-2, as predicted by Li et al (2009); 4) α is well correlated with Fe/O at ˜0.16-0.23 MeV/nucleon, but not with the ˜15-21 MeV/nucleon Fe/O and the ˜0.5-2.0 MeV/nucleon ^3He/^4He ratios; 5) In most events: α<1.4, the spectra steepen significantly at higher energy with γ_b - γ_a >3, and O E_B increases with γ_b - γ_a; and 6) Many extreme events (associated with faster CMEs and GLEs) are Fe-rich and ^3He-rich, have α≳1.4, flatter spectra at low and high energies with γ_b - γ_a <3, and E_B that anti-correlates with γ_b - γ_a. In most events, the Q/M-dependence of E_B is consistent with the equal diffusion coefficient condition, while the event-to-event variations in α may be driven by differences in the near-shock wave intensity spectra, which are flatter than the Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum but weaker when than extreme events. We interpret these results as being due to weaker turbulence that allows the SEPs to easily escape, resulting in weaker Q/M-dependence of E_B, lower α values, and spectral steepening at higher energies. In contrast for extreme events, the stronger Q/M-dependence of E_B, larger α values, and harder spectra at high and low energy occur because

  7. A Comparison of the Intensities and Energies of Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events with the Dynamical Properties of Associated Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Vourlidas, A.

    2013-06-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events observed at 1 AU are produced by shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Characterizations of the remotely imaged CMEs and of their associated SEP events observed in situ can be used to increase our ability to forecast SEP events and to understand better the physical connections between the two phenomena. We carry out a statistical comparison of the peak intensities Ip20, of 120 western-hemisphere 20 MeV SEP events with those of their associated CMEs observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph over the past solar cycle. For a subset of 96 events observed with the EPACT instrument on the Wind spacecraft we also compare the SEP 2 MeV peak intensities Ip2, power-law energy spectral exponents γ, total SEP energies Esep, and 2 MeV nuc-1 H/He ratios with CME properties. New analyses of white-light CME images enable us to improve calculations of the CME masses and potential energies and then to determine two values of their kinetic energies based on frontal V (fr) and center-of-mass V (cm) speeds. Despite considerable scatter in the SEP and CME data, the large dynamical ranges of both the SEP and CME parameters allow us to determine statistical trends in the comparisons of the logs of the parameters. Ip2, Ip20, and Esep are significantly correlated with CME kinetic energies, masses, and speeds, while γ trends lower (harder). Those correlations are higher with V (fr) than with V (cm) parameters, indicating a less significant role for the body of the CME than for the CME front in SEP production. The high ratios (>=10%) of Esep to CME energies found by Mewaldt et al. are confirmed, and the fits are consistent with a linear relationship between the two energies. The 2 MeV nuc-1 H/He ratios decrease with increasing CME speeds, which may be an effect of shock geometry. We discuss several factors that limit the estimates of both the SEP and CME energies.

  8. A COMPARISON OF THE INTENSITIES AND ENERGIES OF GRADUAL SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS WITH THE DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF ASSOCIATED CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S. W.; Vourlidas, A.

    2013-06-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events observed at 1 AU are produced by shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Characterizations of the remotely imaged CMEs and of their associated SEP events observed in situ can be used to increase our ability to forecast SEP events and to understand better the physical connections between the two phenomena. We carry out a statistical comparison of the peak intensities Ip20, of 120 western-hemisphere 20 MeV SEP events with those of their associated CMEs observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph over the past solar cycle. For a subset of 96 events observed with the EPACT instrument on the Wind spacecraft we also compare the SEP 2 MeV peak intensities Ip2, power-law energy spectral exponents {gamma}, total SEP energies Esep, and 2 MeV nuc{sup -1} H/He ratios with CME properties. New analyses of white-light CME images enable us to improve calculations of the CME masses and potential energies and then to determine two values of their kinetic energies based on frontal V (fr) and center-of-mass V (cm) speeds. Despite considerable scatter in the SEP and CME data, the large dynamical ranges of both the SEP and CME parameters allow us to determine statistical trends in the comparisons of the logs of the parameters. Ip2, Ip20, and Esep are significantly correlated with CME kinetic energies, masses, and speeds, while {gamma} trends lower (harder). Those correlations are higher with V (fr) than with V (cm) parameters, indicating a less significant role for the body of the CME than for the CME front in SEP production. The high ratios ({>=}10%) of Esep to CME energies found by Mewaldt et al. are confirmed, and the fits are consistent with a linear relationship between the two energies. The 2 MeV nuc{sup -1} H/He ratios decrease with increasing CME speeds, which may be an effect of shock geometry. We discuss several factors that limit the estimates of both the SEP and CME

  9. What is the experience from previous mass gathering events? Lessons for Zika virus and the Olympics 2016.

    PubMed

    Zumla, A; McCloskey, B; Bin Saeed, A A; Dar, O; Al Otabi, B; Perlmann, S; Gautret, P; Roy, N; Blumberg, L; Azhar, E I; Barbeschi, M; Memish, Z; Petersen, E

    2016-06-01

    All previous experiences from different mass gathering show that vaccine preventable diseases is the most important infections like influemza, hepatitis A, polio and meningitis. Three mass gathering held in Africa during the Ebola outbreak accepted participants from West Africa and was able to handle the theoretical risk without any incident. Therefore we believe that the Olympc games in Rio de Janeiro should not be canceled. The number of visitors to the games is a tine fraction (1%) of other visitors to Zika endemic con tries and it will have no measurable effect on the risk of spreading Zika virus, if the games was cancelled. PMID:27321962

  10. Arterial stiffness from monitoring of timing of korotkoff sounds predicts the occurrence of cardiovascular events independently of left ventricular mass in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Gosse, Philippe; Cremer, Antoine; Papaioannou, Georgios; Yeim, Sunthareth

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have established that the increase in arterial stiffness (AS) is a cardiovascular risk factor but to date no studies have evaluated in hypertensive patients its prognostic value in comparison with another powerful risk factor, left ventricular mass (LVM) as measured by echocardiography. We prospectively evaluated the prognostic value of AS and LVM in patients with essential hypertension. The population studied comprised 793 patients (56% men) aged 54±14 years. For 519 patients, baseline measurements were made before any antihypertensive treatment, for 274 patients, the measurement were obtained during the follow-up period under antihypertensive treatment. AS was assessed from ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure and timing of Korottkoff sounds. Left ventricular mass was measured in 523 patients. After a mean follow-up of 97 months, 122 cardiovascular events were recorded in the whole population and 74 in the group with LVM determination. AS as continuous or discontinuous variable was independently related to cardiovascular events. The existence or not of antihypertensive treatment at the time of its measurement did not affect its prognostic value. When LVM was forced in the model, AS remained significantly related to cardiovascular events. Thus, AS has an independent prognostic value in the hypertensive, whether measured before or after the administration of antihypertensive treatment. This prognostic value persists after taking LVM into account. PMID:23690349

  11. The effect of species and colony size on the bleaching response of reef-building corals in the Florida Keys during the 2005 mass bleaching event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the variation in coral bleaching response is necessary for making accurate predictions of population changes and the future state of reefs in a climate of increasing thermal stress events. Individual coral colonies, belonging to inshore patch reef communities of the Florida Keys, were followed through the 2005 mass bleaching event. Overall, coral bleaching patterns followed an index of accumulated thermal stress more closely than in situ temperature measurements. Eight coral species ( Colpophyllia natans, Diploria strigosa, Montastraea cavernosa, M. faveolata, Porites astreoides, P. porites, Siderastrea siderea, and Stephanocoenia intersepta), representing >90% of the coral colonies studied, experienced intense levels of bleaching, but responses varied. Bleaching differed significantly among species: Colpophyllia natans and Diploria strigosa were most susceptible to thermal stress, while Stephanocoenia intersepta was the most tolerant. For colonies of C. natans, M. faveolata, and S. siderea, larger colonies experienced more extensive bleaching than smaller colonies. The inshore patch reef communities of the Florida Keys have historically been dominated by large colonies of Montastraea sp. and Colpophyllia natans. These results provide evidence that colony-level differences can affect bleaching susceptibility in this habitat and suggest that the impact of future thermal stress events may be biased toward larger colonies of dominant reef-building species. Predicted increases in the frequency of mass bleaching and subsequent mortality may therefore result in significant structural shifts of these ecologically important communities.

  12. Emergency mental health management in bioterrorism events.

    PubMed

    Benedek, David M; Holloway, Harry C; Becker, Steven M

    2002-05-01

    The United States has not suffered significant psychosocial or medical consequences from the use of biological weapons within its territories. This has contributed to a "natural" state of denial at the community level. This denial could amplify the sense of crisis, anxiety, fear, chaos, and disorder that would accompany such a bioterrorist event. A key part of primary prevention involves counteracting this possibility before an incident occurs. Doing so will require realistic information regarding the bioterrorism threat followed by the development of a planned response and regular practice of that response. Unlike in natural disasters or other situations resulting in mass casualties, emergency department physicians or nurses and primary care physicians (working in concert with epidemiologic agencies), rather than police, firemen, or ambulance personnel, will be most likely to first identify the unfolding disaster associated with a biological attack. Like community leaders, this group of medical responders must be aware of its own susceptibility to mental health sequelae and performance decrement as the increasing demands of disaster response outpace the availability of necessary resources. A bioterrorist attack will necessitate treatment of casualties who experience neuropsychiatric symptoms and syndromes. Although symptoms may result from exposure to infection with specific biological agents, similar symptoms may result from the mere perception of exposure or arousal precipitated by fear of infection, disease, suffering, and death. Conservative use of psychotropic medications may reduce symptoms in exposed and uninfected individuals, as may cognitive-behavioral interventions. Clear, consistent, accessible, reliable, and redundant information (received from trusted sources) will diminish public uncertainty about the cause of symptoms that might otherwise prompt persons to seek unnecessary treatment. Training and preparation for contingencies experienced in an

  13. What do we need for airway management of adult casualties on the Primary Casualty Receiving Facility? A review of airway management on Role 3 Afloat.

    PubMed

    Mercer, S; Read, J; Sudheer, S; Risdall, J E; Connor, D

    2015-01-01

    The Primary Casualty Receiving Facility (PCRF) of the Royal Navy (RN) is currently based on Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) ARGUS and provides a functioning hospital with surgical teams and a CT scanner (Role 3) within the maritime environment. The case mix could include complex trauma, critically ill patients returning to theatre several times, as well as non-battle injury procedures. This paper describes how we have used national guidelines, evidence from recent military experience, and the Clinical Guidelines for Operations (CGOs) to review and rationalise the airway equipment that is available and that would be required for the PCRF in its current configuration, whilst maintaining capability in a deployed setting. PMID:26867417

  14. Search for Supersymmetry Using Diphoton Events in p anti-p Collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Sin

    2010-05-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a search for supersymmetry in protonantiproton collisions with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV studied with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Our strategy is to select collisions with two photons in the nal state that have the properties of being the decays of very massive supersymmetric particles. This includes looking for large total energy from the decayed particles as well as for the presence of particles that leave the detector without interacting. We nd no events using 2.6 fb-1 of data collected during the 2004-2008 collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron which is consistent with the background estimate of 1.4 0.4 events. Since there is no evidence of new particles we set cross section limits in a gaugemediated supersymmetry model with X$\\tilde{o}$1→ eG, where the X$\\tilde{o}$1 and eG are the lightest neutralino and the gravitino (the lightest supersymmetric particle), respectively. We set limits on models as a function of the X$\\tilde{o}$1 mass and lifetime, producing the world's most sensitive search for X$\\tilde{o}$1 by excluding masses up to 149 GeV=c2 for X$\\tilde{o}$1 lifetimes much less than 1 ns.

  15. The psychological impact of mass casualty incidents on first responders: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Paula M

    2016-01-01

    First responders are exposed to various types of disasters throughout their career. Because of their roles, they are often regarded as stronger people than individuals from other occupations. A systematic review of literature was conducted to determine if distinct characteristics exist that make first responders more susceptible to psychological trauma. Five categories of traits were found to put first responders at risk for psychological problems: personal, predisposing, peridisposing, postdisposing, and protective. To counteract the impact of psychological trauma, first responders need additional preincident psychological and resiliency training. Preparedness and awareness will help combat psychological impact from disasters and compassion fatigue. PMID:27438963

  16. Radiation Injury Treatment Network (RITN): Healthcare professionals preparing for a mass casualty radiological or nuclear incident

    PubMed Central

    ROSS, JOEL R.; CASE, CULLEN; CONFER, DENNIS; WEISDORF, DANIEL J.; WEINSTOCK, DAVID; KRAWISZ, ROBERT; CHUTE, JOHN; WILHAUK, JULIE; NAVARRO, WILLIS; HARTZMAN, ROBERT; COLEMAN, C. NORMAN; HATCHETT, RICHARD; CHAO, NELSON

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the history, composition, and activities of the Radiation Injury Treatment Network (RITN). The Radiation Injury Treatment Network® is a cooperative effort of the National Marrow Donor Program and the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. The goals of RITN are to educate hematologists, oncologists, and stem cell transplant practitioners about their potential involvement in the response to a radiation incident and provide treatment expertise. Injuries to the marrow system readily occur when a victim is exposed to ionising radiation. This focus therefore leverages the expertise of these specialists who are accustomed to providing the intensive supportive care required by patients with a suppressed marrow function. Following a radiological incident, RITN centres may be asked to: Accept patient transfers to their institutions; provide treatment expertise to practitioners caring for victims at other centres; travel to other centres to provide medical expertise; or provide data on victims treated at their centres. Moving forward, it is crucial that we develop a coordinated interdisciplinary approach in planning for and responding to radiological and nuclear incidents. The ongoing efforts of radiation biologists, radiation oncologists, and health physicists can and should complement the efforts of RITN and government agencies. Conclusion RITN serves as a vital partner in preparedness and response efforts for potential radiological and nuclear incidents. PMID:21801106

  17. China eastern MD-11 mass casualty--expect the unexpected: a case report.

    PubMed

    Towne, L E

    1995-10-01

    On April 5, 1993, a China Eastern MD-11 underwent three violent pitch-up maneuvers, injuring over 100 passengers. The pilot made an emergency landing at 3:20 a.m. at Shemya, a tiny Aleutian Island with minimal medical facilities and personnel. The author describes their medical response, problems encountered and lessons learned. PMID:8526838

  18. Redefining the outcomes to resources ratio for burn patient triage in a mass casualty.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sandra; Jeng, James; Saffle, Jeffrey R; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2014-01-01

    Recent disasters highlight the need for predisaster planning, including the need for accurate triage. Data-driven triage tables, such as that generated from the 2002 National Burn Repository, are vital to optimize resource use during a disaster. The study purpose was to generate a burn resource disaster triage table based on current burn-treatment outcomes. Data from the NBR after the year 2000 were audited. Records that missed age, burn size, or survival status were excluded from analysis. Duplicate records, readmissions, transfers, and nonburn injuries were eliminated. Resource use was divided into expectant (predicted mortality >90%), low (mortality 50-90%), medium (mortality 10-50%), high (mortality <10%, admission 14-21 days), very high (mortality <10%, admission <14 days), and outpatient. Tables were created for all patient admissions and with/without inhalation injury. Of the 286,293 records, 210,683 were from the year 2000 or later. Expectant status for those aged >70 years began at 50% burn; a 20- to 29-year-old never reached expectant status. Inhalation injury lowered the expectant category to a burn size of 40% in >70-year-olds, and at >90% in 20- to 29-year-olds. The 0- to 1.9-year old group without inhalation injury never reached expectant status; with inhalation injury, expectant status was reached at >80% burn. Changes in the triage tables suggest that burn care has changed in the past 10 years. Inhalation injury significantly alters triage in a burn disaster. Use of these updated tables for triage in a disaster may improve our ability to allocate resources. PMID:24270085

  19. Bomb blast mass casualty incidents: initial triage and management of injuries.

    PubMed

    Goh, S H

    2009-01-01

    Bomb blast injuries are no longer confined to battlefields. With the ever present threat of terrorism, we should always be prepared for bomb blasts. Bomb blast injuries tend to affect air-containing organs more, as the blast wave tends to exert a shearing force on air-tissue interfaces. Commonly-injured organs include the tympanic membranes, the sinuses, the lungs and the bowel. Of these, blast lung injury is the most challenging to treat. The clinical picture is a mix of acute respiratory distress syndrome and air embolism, and the institution of positive pressure ventilation in the presence of low venous pressures could cause systemic arterial air embolism. The presence of a tympanic membrane perforation is not a reliable indicator of the presence of a blast injury in the other air-containing organs elsewhere. Radiological imaging of the head, chest and abdomen help with the early identification of blast lung injury, head injury, abdominal injury, eye and sinus injuries, as well as any penetration by foreign bodies. In addition, it must be borne in mind that bomb blasts could also be used to disperse radiological and chemical agents. PMID:19224092

  20. Acute incident rapid response at a mass-gathering event through comprehensive planning systems: a case report from the 2013 Shamrock Shuffle.

    PubMed

    Başdere, Mehmet; Ross, Colleen; Chan, Jennifer L; Mehrotra, Sanjay; Smilowitz, Karen; Chiampas, George

    2014-06-01

    Planning and execution of mass-gathering events involves various challenges. In this case report, the Chicago Model (CM), which was designed to organize and operate such events and to maintain the health and wellbeing of both runners and the public in a more effective way, is described. The Chicago Model also was designed to prepare for unexpected incidents, including disasters, during the marathon event. The model has been used successfully in the planning and execution stages of the Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle and the Bank of America Chicago Marathon since 2008. The key components of the CM are organizational structure, information systems, and communication. This case report describes how the organizers at the 2013 Shamrock Shuffle used the key components of the CM approach in order to respond to an acute incident caused by a man who was threatening to jump off the State Street Bridge. The course route was changed to accommodate this unexpected event, while maintaining access to key health care facilities. The lessons learned from the incident are presented and further improvements to the existing model are proposed. PMID:24820906