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Sample records for mass casualty triage

  1. Model uniform core criteria for mass casualty triage.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    There is a need for model uniform core criteria for mass casualty triage because disasters frequently cross jurisdictional lines and involve responders from multiple agencies who may be using different triage tools. These criteria (Tables 1-4) reflect the available science, but it is acknowledged that there are significant research gaps. When no science was available, decisions were formed by expert consensus derived from the available triage systems. The intent is to ensure that providers at a mass-casualty incident use triage methodologies that incorporate these core principles in an effort to promote interoperability and standardization. At a minimum, each triage system must incorporate the criteria that are listed below. Mass casualty triage systems in use can be modified using these criteria to ensure interoperability. The criteria include general considerations, global sorting, lifesaving interventions, and assignment of triage categories. The criteria apply only to providers who are organizing multiple victims in a discrete geographic location or locations, regardless of the size of the incident. They are classified by whether they were derived through available direct scientific evidence, indirect scientific evidence, expert consensus, and/or are used in multiple existing triage systems. These criteria address only primary triage and do not consider secondary triage. For the purposes of this document the term triage refers to mass-casualty triage and provider refers to any person who assigns primary triage categories to victims of a mass-casualty incident. PMID:21685308

  2. Mass Casualty Incident Primary Triage Methods in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Hong; Yang, Jun; Yang, Yu; Zheng, Jing-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the technical characteristics and application of mass casualty incident (MCI) primary triage (PT) methods applied in China. Data Sources: Chinese literature was searched by Chinese Academic Journal Network Publishing Database (founded in June 2014). The English literature was searched by PubMed (MEDLINE) (1950 to June 2014). We also searched Official Websites of Chinese Central Government's (http://www.gov.cn/), National Health and Family Planning Commission of China (http://www.nhfpc.gov.cn/), and China Earthquake Information (http://www.csi.ac.cn/). Study Selection: We included studies associated with mass casualty events related to China, the PT applied in China, guidelines and standards, and application and development of the carding PT method in China. Results: From 3976 potentially relevant articles, 22 met the inclusion criteria, 20 Chinese, and 2 English. These articles included 13 case reports, 3 retrospective analyses of MCI, two methods introductions, three national or sectoral criteria, and one simulated field testing and validation. There were a total of 19 kinds of MCI PT methods that have been reported in China from 1950 to 2014. In addition, there were 15 kinds of PT methods reported in the literature from the instance of the application. Conclusions: The national and sectoral current triage criteria are developed mainly for earthquake relief. Classification is not clear. Vague criteria (especially between moderate and severe injuries) operability are not practical. There are no triage methods and research for children and special populations. There is no data and evidence supported triage method. We should revise our existing classification and criteria so it is clearer and easier to be grasped in order to build a real, practical, and efficient PT method. PMID:26415807

  3. Mass casualty triage: an evaluation of the science and refinement of a national guideline.

    PubMed

    Lerner, E Brooke; Cone, David C; Weinstein, Eric S; Schwartz, Richard B; Coule, Phillip L; Cronin, Michael; Wedmore, Ian S; Bulger, Eileen M; Mulligan, Deborah Ann; Swienton, Raymond E; Sasser, Scott M; Shah, Umair A; Weireter, Leonard J; Sanddal, Teri L; Lairet, Julio; Markenson, David; Romig, Lou; Lord, Gregg; Salomone, Jeffrey; O'Connor, Robert; Hunt, Richard C

    2011-06-01

    Mass casualty triage is the process of prioritizing multiple victims when resources are not sufficient to treat everyone immediately. No national guideline for mass casualty triage exists in the United States. The lack of a national guideline has resulted in variability in triage processes, tags, and nomenclature. This variability has the potential to inject confusion and miscommunication into the disaster incident, particularly when multiple jurisdictions are involved. The Model Uniform Core Criteria for Mass Casualty Triage were developed to be a national guideline for mass casualty triage to ensure interoperability and standardization when responding to a mass casualty incident. The Core Criteria consist of 4 categories: general considerations, global sorting, lifesaving interventions, and individual assessment of triage category. The criteria within each of these categories were developed by a workgroup of experts representing national stakeholder organizations who used the best available science and, when necessary, consensus opinion. This article describes how the Model Uniform Core Criteria for Mass Casualty Triage were developed. PMID:21685309

  4. Implementing RFID technology in a novel triage system during a simulated mass casualty situation.

    PubMed

    Jokela, Jorma; Simons, Tomi; Kuronen, Pentti; Tammela, Juha; Jalasvirta, Pertti; Nurmi, Jouni; Harkke, Ville; Castrén, Maaret

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the applicability of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and commercial cellular networks to provide an online triage system for handling mass casualty situations. This was tested by a using a pilot system for a simulated mass casualty situation during a military field exercise. The system proved to be usable. Compared to the currently used system, it also dramatically improves the general view of mass casualty situations and enhances medical emergency readiness in a military medical setting. The system can also be adapted without any difficulties by the civilian sector for the management of mass casualty disasters. PMID:18583298

  5. A Consensus-Based Gold Standard for the Evaluation of Mass Casualty Triage Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, E. Brooke; McKee, Courtney H.; Cady, Charles E.; Cone, David C.; Colella, M. Riccardo; Cooper, Arthur; Coule, Phillip L.; Lairet, Julio R.; Liu, J. Marc; Pirrallo, Ronald; Sasser, Scott M.; Schwartz, Richard; Shepherd, Greene; Swienton, Raymond E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Accuracy and effectiveness analyses of mass casualty triage systems are limited because there are no gold standard definitions for each of the triage categories. Until there is agreement on which patients should be identified by each triage category, it will be impossible to calculate sensitivity and specificity or to compare accuracy between triage systems. Objective To develop a consensus-based, functional gold standard definition for each mass casualty triage category. Methods National experts were recruited through the lead investigators’ contacts and their suggested contacts. Key informant interviews were conducted to develop a list of potential criteria for defining each triage category. Panelists were interviewed in order of their availability until redundancy of themes was achieved. Panelists were blinded to each other’s responses during the interviews. A modified Delphi survey was developed with the potential criteria identified during the interview and delivered to all recruited experts. In the early rounds, panelists could add, remove, or modify criteria. In the final rounds edits were made to the criteria until at least 80% agreement was achieved. Results Thirteen national and local experts were recruited to participate in the project. Six interviews were conducted. Three rounds of voting were performed, with 12 panelists participating in the first round, 12 in the second round, and 13 in the third round. After the first two rounds, the criteria were modified according to respondent suggestions. In the final round, over 90% agreement was achieved for all but one criterion. A single e-mail vote was conducted on edits to the final criterion and consensus was achieved. Conclusion A consensus-based, functional gold standard definition for each mass casualty triage category was been developed. These gold standard definitions can be used to evaluate the accuracy of mass casualty triage systems after an actual incident, during training, or for research. PMID:25290529

  6. The development and features of the Spanish prehospital advanced triage method (META) for mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Cuartas Alvarez, Tatiana; Garijo Gonzalo, Gracia; Martinez Monzon, Carlos; Pelaez Corres, Nieves; Rodriguez Soler, Alberto; Turegano Fuentes, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This text describes the process of development of the new Spanish Prehospital Advanced Triage Method (META) and explain its main features and contribution to prehospital triage systems in mass casualty incidents. The triage META is based in the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols, patient's anatomical injuries and mechanism of injury. It is a triage method with four stages including early identification of patients with severe trauma that would benefit from a rapid evacuation to a surgical facility and introduces a new patient flow by-passing the advanced medical post to improve evacuation. The stages of triage META are: I) Stabilization triage that classifies patients according to severity to set priorities for initial emergency treatment; II) Identifying patients requiring urgent surgical treatment, this is done at the same time than stage I and creates a new flow of patients with high priority for evacuation; III) Implementation of Advanced Trauma Life Support protocols to patients previously classified according to stablished priority; and IV) Evacuation triage, stablishing evacuation priorities in case of lacks of appropriate transport resources. The triage META is to be applied only by prehospital providers with advanced knowledge and training in advanced trauma life support care and has been designed to be implemented as prehospital procedure in mass casualty incidents (MCI). PMID:27130042

  7. Orthopaedic triage during natural disasters and mass casualties: do scoring systems matter?

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Nikolaj

    2013-08-01

    Mass casualty events, either natural disasters or man-made, are associated with extremities injuries. The treating surgeon often faces a challenging decision: can the affected extremity be saved or amputated? The following article will present the author's view on the subject of triage and the use of scoring systems in the decision-making process whether to salvage or amputate an affected extremity. The author will analyse the existing scoring systems and emphasise significance of the regional factors: geographical, cultural and level of health care, as factors playing roles in this process. PMID:23827955

  8. Primary triage of mass burn casualties with associated severe traumatic injuries

    PubMed Central

    Atiyeh, B.; Gunn, S. William A.; Dibo, S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A key aim in any mass disaster event is to avoid diverting resources by overwhelming specialized tertiary centers with minor casualties. The most crucial aspect of an effective disaster response is pre-hospital triage at the scene. Unfortunately, many triage systems have serious shortcomings in their methodologies and no existing triage system has enough scientific evidence to justify its universal adoption. Moreover, it is observed that the optimal approach to planning is by no means clear-cut and that each new incident involving burns appears to produce its own unique problems not all of which were predictable. In most major burns disasters, victims mostly have combined trauma burn injuries and form a heterogeneous group with a broad range of devastating injuries. Are these victims primarily burn patients or trauma patients? Should they be taken care of in a burn center or in a trauma center or only in a combined burns-trauma center? Who makes the decision? The present review is aimed at answering some of these questions. PMID:23966900

  9. Mass casualty modelling: a spatial tool to support triage decision making

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During a mass casualty incident, evacuation of patients to the appropriate health care facility is critical to survival. Despite this, no existing system provides the evidence required to make informed evacuation decisions from the scene of the incident. To mitigate this absence and enable more informed decision making, a web based spatial decision support system (SDSS) was developed. This system supports decision making by providing data regarding hospital proximity, capacity, and treatment specializations to decision makers at the scene of the incident. Methods This web-based SDSS utilizes pre-calculated driving times to estimate the actual driving time to each hospital within the inclusive trauma system of the large metropolitan region within which it is situated. In calculating and displaying its results, the model incorporates both road network and hospital data (e.g. capacity, treatment specialties, etc.), and produces results in a matter of seconds, as is required in a MCI situation. In addition, its application interface allows the user to map the incident location and assists in the execution of triage decisions. Results Upon running the model, driving time from the MCI location to the surrounding hospitals is quickly displayed alongside information regarding hospital capacity and capability, thereby assisting the user in the decision-making process. Conclusions The use of SDSS in the prioritization of MCI evacuation decision making is potentially valuable in cases of mass casualty. The key to this model is the utilization of pre-calculated driving times from each hospital in the region to each point on the road network. The incorporation of real-time traffic and hospital capacity data would further improve this model. PMID:21663636

  10. Development and application of triage and medical evacuation system for casualties at sea.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tai; Liu, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Guo-Liang; Qi, Liang; Xu, Zhi-Yin; Liu, Xu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Traditional triage could not meet the needs of battlefield casualties' care in modern warfare. This paper designs of triage and medical evacuation system for casualties at sea that can quickly address mass-casualty triage, and store and transmit medical information during battlefield treatment and medical evacuation. This system consists of a high-capacity medical information card, a simulated patient generator, a triage classifier and a multifunctional airbag triage vest. PMID:25722870

  11. MiRTE: Mixed Reality Triage and Evacuation game for Mass Casualty information systems design, testing and training.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xunyi; Ganz, Aura

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a Mixed Reality Triage and Evacuation game, MiRTE, that is used in the development, testing and training of Mass Casualty Incident (MCI) information systems for first responders. Using the Source game engine from Valve software, MiRTE creates immersive virtual environments to simulate various incident scenarios, and enables interactions between multiple players/first responders. What distinguishes it from a pure computer simulation game is that it can interface with external mass casualty incident management systems, such as DIORAMA. The game will enable system developers to specify technical requirements of underlying technology, and test different alternatives of design. After the information system hardware and software are completed, the game can simulate various algorithms such as localization technologies, and interface with an actual user interface on PCs and Smartphones. We implemented and tested the game with the DIORAMA system. PMID:22256245

  12. Redefining the outcomes to resources ratio for burn patient triage in a mass casualty.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sandra; Jeng, James; Saffle, Jeffrey R; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2014-01-01

    Recent disasters highlight the need for predisaster planning, including the need for accurate triage. Data-driven triage tables, such as that generated from the 2002 National Burn Repository, are vital to optimize resource use during a disaster. The study purpose was to generate a burn resource disaster triage table based on current burn-treatment outcomes. Data from the NBR after the year 2000 were audited. Records that missed age, burn size, or survival status were excluded from analysis. Duplicate records, readmissions, transfers, and nonburn injuries were eliminated. Resource use was divided into expectant (predicted mortality >90%), low (mortality 50-90%), medium (mortality 10-50%), high (mortality <10%, admission 14-21 days), very high (mortality <10%, admission <14 days), and outpatient. Tables were created for all patient admissions and with/without inhalation injury. Of the 286,293 records, 210,683 were from the year 2000 or later. Expectant status for those aged >70 years began at 50% burn; a 20- to 29-year-old never reached expectant status. Inhalation injury lowered the expectant category to a burn size of 40% in >70-year-olds, and at >90% in 20- to 29-year-olds. The 0- to 1.9-year old group without inhalation injury never reached expectant status; with inhalation injury, expectant status was reached at >80% burn. Changes in the triage tables suggest that burn care has changed in the past 10 years. Inhalation injury significantly alters triage in a burn disaster. Use of these updated tables for triage in a disaster may improve our ability to allocate resources. PMID:24270085

  13. Mass casualty management of a large-scale bioterrorist event: an epidemiological approach that shapes triage decisions.

    PubMed

    Burkle, Frederick M

    2002-05-01

    The threat of a BT event has catalyzed serious reflection on the troublesome issues that come with event management and triage. Such reflection has had the effect of multiplying the efforts to find solutions to what could become a catastrophic public health disaster. Management options are becoming more robust, as are reliable detection devices and rapid access to stockpiled antibiotics and vaccines. There is much to be done, however, especially in the organizing, warehousing, and granting/exercising authority for resource allocations. The introduction of these new options should encourage one to believe that, in time, evolving standards of care will make it possible to rethink the currently unthinkable consequences. Unfortunately the cost of such preparedness is high and out of reach of most governments. Most of the developing world has neither the will nor the means to plan for BT events and remains overwhelmed with basic public health concerns (i.e., water, food, sanitation, shelter) that must take priority. Therefore, developed countries will be expected to respond using international exogenous resources to mitigate the effects of such a disaster. As a result, the state capacity of the effected government will be severely compromised. If triage and management of casualties is further compromised, terrorists will have met their goals. One could argue that health sciences will continue for decades to play catch up with the advanced technology driving potential bioagent weaponry. If one lesson was learned from the review of the former Soviet Union's biological weapons program, it is that the unthinkable remains an option to terrorists who have comparable expertise. It is crucial to develop realistic strategies for a BT event. Triage planning (the process of establishing criteria for health care prioritization) permits society to see cases in the context of diverse moral perspectives, limited resources, and compelling health care demands. This includes a competent and compassionate management and triage system and an in-depth and accurate health information system that appropriately addresses every level of threat or consequence. In a PICE stage I to III BT event resources will be compromised. Triage and management will be one process requiring multiple levels of cooperation, coordination, and decision-making. An immediate challenge to existing emergency medical services systems (EMSS) is the recognition that locally there will be a shift of emphasis and decision-making from prehospital first responders to community public health authorities. The author suggests that a working relationship, in most areas, between EMSS and the public health system is lacking. As priorities shift in a BT event to hospitals and public health care systems, they need to: 1. Improve their capabilities and capacities in surveillance, discovery, and in the consequences of different triage and management decisions and interventions in a BT environment, starting at the local level. 2. Develop triage and management systems (with clear lines of authority) based on public health and epidemiologic requirements, capability, and capacity (triage teams, categories, tags, rapid response, established operational priorities, resource-driven responsible management process), and link local level surveillance systems with those at the national or regional level. 3. Use a triage and management system that reflects the population (cohort) at risk, such as the epidemiologic based SEIRV triage framework. 4. Develop an organizational capacity that uses lateral decision-making skills, pre-hospital outpatient centers for triage-specific treatments, health information systems, and resource-driven hospital level pre-designated protocols appropriate for a surge of unprecedented proportions. Such standards of care, it is recommended, should be set at the local to federal levels and spelled out in existing incident-management system protocols. PMID:12132490

  14. Creating order from chaos: part I: triage, initial care, and tactical considerations in mass casualty and disaster response.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael S

    2007-03-01

    How do we train for the entire spectrum of potential emergency and crisis scenarios? Will we suddenly face large numbers of combat casualties, an earthquake, a plane crash, an industrial explosion, or a terrorist bombing? The daily routine can suddenly be complicated by large numbers of patients, exceeding the ability to treat in a routine fashion. Disaster events can result in patients with penetrating wounds, burns, blast injuries, chemical contamination, or all of these at once. Some events may disrupt infrastructure or result in loss of essential equipment or key personnel. The chaos of a catastrophic event impedes decision-making and effective treatment of patients. Disasters require a paradigm shift from the application of unlimited resources for the greatest good of each individual patient to the allocation of care, with limited resources, for the greatest good for the greatest number of patients. Training and preparation are essential to remain effective during crises and major catastrophic events. Disaster triage and crisis management represent a tactical art that incorporates clinical skills, didactic information, communication ability, leadership, and decision-making. Planning, rehearsing, and exercising various scenarios encourage the flexibility, adaptability, and innovation required in disaster settings. These skills can bring order to the chaos of overwhelming disaster events. PMID:17436764

  15. A Triage Model for Chemical Warfare Casualties

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnevis, Mohammad Ali; Panahi, Yunes; Ghanei, Mostafa; Borna, Hojat; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Aslani, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    Context: The main objectives of triage are securing patient safety during the process of emergency diagnosis and treatment, and reduction of waiting time for medical services and transport. To date, there is no triage system for nerve agent victims. Evidence Acquisition: This systematic review proposes a new triage system for patients exposed to nerve agents. Information regarding clinical signs and symptoms of intoxication with nerve agents, primary treatments, and classification of patients were extracted from the literature. All related articles were reviewed. Subsequently, specialists from different disciplines were invited to discuss and draft protocols. Results: Finalized triage tables summarizing the classification methods and required protocols in the field were designed after several meetings. Conclusions: The proposed triage protocol encompasses aspects from most of the existing triage systems to create a single overarching guide for unifying the triage process. The proposed protocol can serve as a base for the designing future guidelines. PMID:26543836

  16. Game-based mass casualty burn training.

    PubMed

    Kurenov, Sergei N; Cance, William W; Noel, Ben; Mozingo, David W

    2009-01-01

    An interactive, video game-based training module, Burn Center, was developed to simulate the real-life emergency events of a mass casualty disaster scenario, involving in 40 victims.The game contains two components - triage and resuscitation. The goal of the triage game is to correctly stabilize, sort, tag and transport burn victims during a mass casualty event at a busy theme park. After complete the triage component, the player will then take on the role of a burn care provider, balancing the clinical needs of multiple burn patients through a 36-hour resuscitation period, using familiar computer-simulated hospital devices. Once complete, players of Burn Center will come away with applicable skills and knowledge of burn care, for both field triage and initial resuscitation of the burn patients. PMID:19377134

  17. Nuclear terrorism: triage and medical management of radiation and combined-injury casualties.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Daniel F; Goans, Ronald E

    2006-06-01

    This article addresses the medical effects of nuclear explosions and other forms of radiation exposure, assessment of radiation dose, triage of victims, definitive treatment of radiation and combined-injury casualties, and planning for emergency services after a terrorist attack involving a nuclear device. It reviews historical events of mass radiation-induced casualties and fatalities at Hiroshima, Chernobyl, and Goiania, and discusses various scenarios for nuclear terrorism. PMID:16781272

  18. Evaluation of a novel algorithm for primary mass casualty triage by paramedics in a physician manned EMS system: a dummy based trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Amberg-Schwandorf Algorithm for Primary Triage (ASAV) is a novel primary triage concept specifically for physician manned emergency medical services (EMS) systems. In this study, we determined the diagnostic reliability and the time requirements of ASAV triage. Methods Seven hundred eighty triage runs performed by 76 trained EMS providers of varying professional qualification were included into the study. Patients were simulated using human dummies with written vital signs sheets. Triage results were compared to a standard solution, which was developed in a modified Delphi procedure. Test performance parameters (e.g. sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios (LR), under-triage, and over-triage) were calculated. Time measurements comprised the complete triage and tagging process and included the time span for walking to the subsequent patient. Results were compared to those published for mSTaRT. Additionally, a subgroup analysis was performed for employment status (career/volunteer), team qualification, and previous triage training. Results For red patients, ASAV sensitivity was 87%, specificity 91%, positive LR 9.7, negative LR 0.139, over-triage 6%, and under-triage 10%. There were no significant differences related to mSTaRT. Per patient, ASAV triage required a mean of 35.4 sec (75th percentile 46 sec, 90th percentile 58 sec). Volunteers needed slightly more time to perform triage than EMS professionals. Previous mSTaRT training of the provider reduced under-triage significantly. There were significant differences in time requirements for triage depending on the expected triage category. Conclusions The ASAV is a specific concept for primary triage in physician governed EMS systems. It may detect red patients reliably. The test performance criteria are comparable to that of mSTaRT, whereas ASAV triage might be accomplished slightly faster. From the data, there was no evidence for a clinically significant reliability difference between typical staffing of mobile intensive care units, patient transport ambulances, or disaster response volunteers. Up to now, there is no clinical validation of either triage concept. Therefore, reality based evaluation studies are needed. PMID:25214310

  19. Ultrasound applications in mass casualties and extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Ma, O John; Norvell, Jeffrey G; Subramanian, Srikala

    2007-05-01

    A mass-casualty incident is one in which the number of patients with injuries exceeds the available medical resources to care for them in a timely manner. In such a situation, the numerous advantages of ultrasonography make it an ideal triage tool for helping clinicians rapidly screen patients. Experiences during the 1988 Armenian earthquake and the 1999 Turkish earthquake demonstrated the proficiency of ultrasound in providing rapid clinical data to the physicians caring for the mass-casualty patients. Wireless and satellite transmission of ultrasound images also has been shown to be feasible and may be applied to mass-casualty situations. In addition, ultrasound applications have been demonstrated to aid in the diagnosis of various conditions, including pneumothorax, in the International Space Station. Ultrasound's portability, reproducibility, accuracy, and ease of use will make it an important diagnostic instrument for future space missions. PMID:17446788

  20. Development and Validation of a Mass Casualty Conceptual Model

    PubMed Central

    Culley, Joan M.; Effken, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and validate a conceptual model that provides a framework for the development and evaluation of information systems for mass casualty events. Design The model was designed based on extant literature and existing theoretical models. A purposeful sample of 18 experts validated the model. Open-ended questions, as well as a 7-point Likert scale, were used to measure expert consensus on the importance of each construct and its relationship in the model and the usefulness of the model to future research. Methods Computer-mediated applications were used to facilitate a modified Delphi technique through which a panel of experts provided validation for the conceptual model. Rounds of questions continued until consensus was reached, as measured by an interquartile range (no more than 1 scale point for each item); stability (change in the distribution of responses less than 15% between rounds); and percent agreement (70% or greater) for indicator questions. Findings Two rounds of the Delphi process were needed to satisfy the criteria for consensus or stability related to the constructs, relationships, and indicators in the model. The panel reached consensus or sufficient stability to retain all 10 constructs, 9 relationships, and 39 of 44 indicators. Experts viewed the model as useful (mean of 5.3 on a 7-point scale). Conclusions Validation of the model provides the first step in understanding the context in which mass casualty events take place and identifying variables that impact outcomes of care. Clinical Relevance This study provides a foundation for understanding the complexity of mass casualty care, the roles that nurses play in mass casualty events, and factors that must be considered in designing and evaluating information-communication systems to support effective triage under these conditions. PMID:20487188

  1. Adolescent epidemic hysteria presenting as a mass casualty, toxic exposure incident

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, B.S.

    1989-08-01

    Discussed is a case of explosive epidemic hysteria presenting as a mass casualty, toxic inhalation incident. Fifteen adolescent female students were triaged from a school of 700 persons exposed to sewer gas and arrived simultaneously at the emergency department complaining of a variety of nonspecific symptoms without physical findings. These symptoms quickly remitted with reassurance and dispersion of the group. Factors important in the recognition and treatment of epidemic hysteria are presented.

  2. Oxygen supplies during a mass casualty situation.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Ray H; Previtera, Joseph E

    2008-02-01

    Mass casualty and pandemic events pose a substantial challenge to the resources available in our current health care system. The ability to provide adequate oxygen therapy is one of the systems that could be out-stripped in certain conditions. Natural disasters can disrupt manufacturing or delivery, and pandemic events can increase consumption beyond the available supply. Patients may require manual resuscitation, basic oxygen therapy, or positive-pressure ventilation during these scenarios. Available sources of oxygen include bulk liquid oxygen systems, compressed gas cylinders, portable liquid oxygen (LOX) systems, and oxygen concentrators. The last two are available in a variety of configurations, which include personal and home systems that are suitable for individual patients, and larger systems that can provide oxygen to multiple patients or entire institutions. Bulk oxygen systems are robust and are probably sustainable during periods of high consumption, but are at risk if manufacturing or delivery is disrupted. Compressed gas cylinders offer support during temporary periods of need but are not a solution for extended periods of therapy. Personal oxygen concentrators and LOX systems are limited in their application during mass casualty scenarios. Large-capacity oxygen concentrators and LOX systems may effectively provide support to alternative care sites or larger institutions. They may also be appropriate selections for governmental emergency-response scenarios. Careful consideration of the strengths and limitations of each of these options can reduce the impact of a mass casualty event. PMID:18218152

  3. Assessment of Biodosimetry Methods for a Mass-Casualty Radiological Incident: Medical Response and Management Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Julie M.; Prasanna, Pataje G. S.; Grace, Marcy B.; Wathen, Lynne; Wallace, Rodney L.; Koerner, John F.; Coleman, C. Norman

    2013-01-01

    Following a mass-casualty nuclear disaster, effective medical triage has the potential to save tens of thousands of lives. In order to best use the available scarce resources, there is an urgent need for biodosimetry tools to determine an individual’s radiation dose. Initial triage for radiation exposure will include location during the incident, symptoms, and physical examination. Stepwise triage will include point of care assessment of less than or greater than 2 Gy, followed by secondary assessment, possibly with high throughput screening, to further define an individual’s dose. Given the multisystem nature of radiation injury, it is unlikely that any single biodosimetry assay can be used as a stand-alone tool to meet the surge in capacity with the timeliness and accuracy needed. As part of the national preparedness and planning for a nuclear or radiological incident, we reviewed the primary literature to determine the capabilities and limitations of a number of biodosimetry assays currently available or under development for use in the initial and secondary triage of patients. Understanding the requirements from a response standpoint and the capability and logistics for the various assays will help inform future biodosimetry technology development and acquisition. Factors considered include: type of sample required, dose detection limit, time interval when the assay is feasible biologically, time for sample preparation and analysis, ease of use, logistical requirements, potential throughput, point-of-care capability, and the ability to support patient diagnosis and treatment within a therapeutically relevant time point. PMID:24162058

  4. Some considerations for mass casualty management in radiation emergencies.

    PubMed

    Hopmeier, Michael; Abrahams, Jonathan; Carr, Zhanat

    2010-06-01

    Radiation emergencies are rather new to humankind, as compared to other types of emergencies such as earthquakes, floods, or hurricanes. Fortunately, they are rare, but because of that, planning for response to large-scale radiation emergencies is least understood. Along with the specific technical aspects of response to radiation emergencies, there are some general guiding principles of responding to mass casualty events of any nature, as identified by the World Health Organization in its 2007 manual for mass casualty management systems. The paper brings forward such general considerations as applicable to radiation mass casualty events, including (1) clear lines of communication; (2) scalability of approach; (3) whole-of-health approach; (4) knowledge based approach; and (5) multisectoral approach. Additionally, some key considerations of planning for mass casualty management systems are discussed, namely, health systems surge capacity and networking, risk and resources mapping, and others. PMID:20445382

  5. Disaster planning: the basics of creating a burn mass casualty disaster plan for a burn center.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Randy D; Conlon, Kathe M; Valenta, Andrea L; Lord, Graydon C; Cairns, Charles B; Holmes, James H; Johnson, Daryhl D; Matherly, Annette F; Sawyer, Dalton; Skarote, Mary Beth; Siler, Sean M; Helminiak, Radm Clare; Cairns, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    In 2005, the American Burn Association published burn disaster guidelines. This work recognized that local and state assets are the most important resources in the initial 24- to 48-hour management of a burn disaster. Historical experiences suggest there is ample opportunity to improve local and state preparedness for a major burn disaster. This review will focus on the basics of developing a burn surge disaster plan for a mass casualty event. In the event of a disaster, burn centers must recognize their place in the context of local and state disaster plan activation. Planning for a burn center takes on three forms; institutional/intrafacility, interfacility/intrastate, and interstate/regional. Priorities for a burn disaster plan include: coordination, communication, triage, plan activation (trigger point), surge, and regional capacity. Capacity and capability of the plan should be modeled and exercised to determine limitations and identify breaking points. When there is more than one burn center in a given state or jurisdiction, close coordination and communication between the burn centers are essential for a successful response. Burn surge mass casualty planning at the facility and specialty planning levels, including a state burn surge disaster plan, must have interface points with governmental plans. Local, state, and federal governmental agencies have key roles and responsibilities in a burn mass casualty disaster. This work will include a framework and critical concepts any burn disaster planning effort should consider when developing future plans. PMID:23877135

  6. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Joseph R.; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing) of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit. PMID:23202768

  7. Hepatitis B outbreak following a mass-casualty incident, Australia.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Claire M; Speers, David J; Chidlow, Glenys R; Dowse, Gary K; Robertson, Andrew G; Flexman, James P

    2011-08-01

    On 16 April 2009, a boat carrying 47 Afghan asylum seekers and 2 Indonesian crew exploded in Australian waters, resulting in mass casualties. Of these casualties, 23 persons who suffered significant burns were transferred to Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia. One patient was subsequently shown to be a hepatitis B virus (HBV) carrier at the time of the explosion. Over the following months, 3 other patients received a diagnosis of acute hepatitis B, and an additional 4 patients showed serological evidence of recent HBV infection, including 1 patient who was transferred to another Australian city. Molecular typing determined that the strains from the HBV carrier and the acute and recent case patients formed a closely related cluster, and the investigation suggested that transmission occurred at or around the time of the boat explosion. This is the first report of confirmed transmission of HBV following a disaster, and it reinforces the importance of postexposure prophylaxis for HBV in mass casualty situations. PMID:21742838

  8. Portable ultrasonography in mass casualty incidents: The CAVEAT examination.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Stanislaw Peter; Howard, James M; Pryor, John P; Bahner, David P; Whitmill, Melissa L; Dean, Anthony J

    2010-11-18

    Ultrasonography used by practicing clinicians has been shown to be of utility in the evaluation of time-sensitive and critical illnesses in a range of environments, including pre-hospital triage, emergency department, and critical care settings. The increasing availability of light-weight, robust, user-friendly, and low-cost portable ultrasound equipment is particularly suited for use in the physically and temporally challenging environment of a multiple casualty incident (MCI). Currently established ultrasound applications used to identify potentially lethal thoracic or abdominal conditions offer a base upon which rapid, focused protocols using hand-carried emergency ultrasonography could be developed. Following a detailed review of the current use of portable ultrasonography in military and civilian MCI settings, we propose a protocol for sonographic evaluation of the chest, abdomen, vena cava, and extremities for acute triage. The protocol is two-tiered, based on the urgency and technical difficulty of the sonographic examination. In addition to utilization of well-established bedside abdominal and thoracic sonography applications, this protocol incorporates extremity assessment for long-bone fractures. Studies of the proposed protocol will need to be conducted to determine its utility in simulated and actual MCI settings. PMID:22474622

  9. Portable ultrasonography in mass casualty incidents: The CAVEAT examination

    PubMed Central

    Stawicki, Stanislaw Peter; Howard, James M; Pryor, John P; Bahner, David P; Whitmill, Melissa L; Dean, Anthony J

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonography used by practicing clinicians has been shown to be of utility in the evaluation of time-sensitive and critical illnesses in a range of environments, including pre-hospital triage, emergency department, and critical care settings. The increasing availability of light-weight, robust, user-friendly, and low-cost portable ultrasound equipment is particularly suited for use in the physically and temporally challenging environment of a multiple casualty incident (MCI). Currently established ultrasound applications used to identify potentially lethal thoracic or abdominal conditions offer a base upon which rapid, focused protocols using hand-carried emergency ultrasonography could be developed. Following a detailed review of the current use of portable ultrasonography in military and civilian MCI settings, we propose a protocol for sonographic evaluation of the chest, abdomen, vena cava, and extremities for acute triage. The protocol is two-tiered, based on the urgency and technical difficulty of the sonographic examination. In addition to utilization of well-established bedside abdominal and thoracic sonography applications, this protocol incorporates extremity assessment for long-bone fractures. Studies of the proposed protocol will need to be conducted to determine its utility in simulated and actual MCI settings. PMID:22474622

  10. Planning for a Mass Casualty Incident in Arkansas Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Harry; Liggin, Rebecca; Shirm, Steve; Nation, Brian; Dick, Rhonda

    2005-01-01

    School preparedness includes the possibility of a natural disaster, but recent events also confirm a need for preparedness and prevention efforts for intentional mass casualty incidents (MCIs). This survey examined the preparedness for the prevention and response for MCIs at public schools in Arkansas. This survey demonstrated that most school

  11. Planning for a Mass Casualty Incident in Arkansas Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Harry; Liggin, Rebecca; Shirm, Steve; Nation, Brian; Dick, Rhonda

    2005-01-01

    School preparedness includes the possibility of a natural disaster, but recent events also confirm a need for preparedness and prevention efforts for intentional mass casualty incidents (MCIs). This survey examined the preparedness for the prevention and response for MCIs at public schools in Arkansas. This survey demonstrated that most school…

  12. Loss of cabin pressure in a military transport: a mass casualty with decompression illnesses.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Mickaila J

    2008-04-01

    Presented here is the sudden cabin depressurization of a military C-130 aircraft carrying 66 personnel. They suffered a depressurization from 2134 to 7317 m, resulting in a potential 66-person mass casualty. The aircrew were able to descend to below 3049 m in less than 5 min. They landed in the Kingdom of Bahrain--the nearest hyperbaric recompression facility. Three cases of peripheral neurologic DCS and one case of spinal DCS were identified. Limited manning, unique host nation concerns, and limited available assets led to difficulties in triage, patient transport, and asset allocation. These led to difficult decisions regarding when and for whom to initiate ground level oxygen or hyperbaric recompression therapy. PMID:18457302

  13. MASCAL: RFID Tracking of Patients, Staff and Equipment to Enhance Hospital Response to Mass Casualty Events

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Emory A.; Lenert, Leslie A.

    2005-01-01

    Most medical facilities practice managing the large numbers of seriously injured patients expected during catastrophic events. As the demands on the healthcare team increase, however, the challenges faced by managers escalate, workflow bottlenecks develop and system capacity decreases. This paper describes MASCAL, an integrated software–hardware system designed to enhance management of resources at a hospital during a mass casualty situation. MASCAL uses active 802.11b asset tags to track patients, equipment and staff during the response to a disaster. The system integrates tag position information with data from personnel databases, medical information systems, registration applications and the US Navy’s TACMEDCS triage application in a custom visual disaster management environment. MASCAL includes interfaces for a hospital command center, local area managers (emergency room, operating suites, radiology, etc.) and registration personnel. MASCAL is an operational system undergoing functional evaluation at the Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA. PMID:16779042

  14. Mass casualty events: blood transfusion emergency preparedness across the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Heidi; Glasgow, Simon; Kristoffersen, Einar

    2016-04-01

    Transfusion support is a key enabler to the response to mass casualty events (MCEs). Transfusion demand and capability planning should be an integrated part of the medical planning process for emergency system preparedness. Historical reviews have recently supported demand planning for MCEs and mass gatherings; however, computer modeling offers greater insights for resource management. The challenge remains balancing demand and supply especially the demand for universal components such as group O red blood cells. The current prehospital and hospital capability has benefited from investment in the management of massive hemorrhage. The management of massive hemorrhage should address both hemorrhage control and hemostatic support. Labile blood components cannot be stockpiled and a large surge in demand is a challenge for transfusion providers. The use of blood components may need to be triaged and demand managed. Two contrasting models of transfusion planning for MCEs are described. Both illustrate an integrated approach to preparedness where blood transfusion services work closely with health care providers and the donor community. Preparedness includes appropriate stock management and resupply from other centers. However, the introduction of alternative transfusion products, transfusion triage, and the greater use of an emergency donor panel to provide whole blood may permit greater resilience. PMID:27100758

  15. Allocation of scarce resources during mass casualty events.

    PubMed Central

    Timbie, Justin W; Ringel, Jeanne S; Fox, D Steven; Waxman, Daniel A; Pillemer, Francesca; Carey, Christine; Moore, Melinda; Karir, Veena; Johnson, Tiffani J; Iyer, Neema; Hu, Jianhui; Shanman, Roberta; Larkin, Jody Wozar; Timmer, Martha; Motala, Aneesa; Perry, Tanja R; Newberry, Sydne; Kellermann, Arthur L

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This systematic review sought to identify the best available evidence regarding strategies for allocating scarce resources during mass casualty events (MCEs). Specifically, the review addresses the following questions: (1) What strategies are available to policymakers to optimize the allocation of scarce resources during MCEs? (2) What strategies are available to providers to optimize the allocation of scarce resources during MCEs? (3) What are the public's key perceptions and concerns regarding the implementation of strategies to allocate scarce resources during MCEs? (4) What methods are available to engage providers in discussions regarding the development and implementation of strategies to allocate scarce resources during MCEs? DATA SOURCES We searched Medline, Scopus, Embase, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Global Health, Web of Science®, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from 1990 through 2011. To identify relevant non-peer-reviewed reports, we searched the New York Academy of Medicine's Grey Literature Report. We also reviewed relevant State and Federal plans, peer-reviewed reports and papers by nongovernmental organizations, and consensus statements published by professional societies. We included both English- and foreign-language studies. REVIEW METHODS Our review included studies that evaluated tested strategies in real-world MCEs as well as strategies tested in drills, exercises, or computer simulations, all of which included a comparison group. We reviewed separately studies that lacked a comparison group but nonetheless evaluated promising strategies. We also identified consensus recommendations developed by professional societies or government panels. We reviewed existing State plans to examine the current state of planning for scarce resource allocation during MCEs. Two investigators independently reviewed each article, abstracted data, and assessed study quality. RESULTS We considered 5,716 reports for this comparative effectiveness review (CER); we ultimately included 170 in the review. Twenty-seven studies focus on strategies for policymakers. Among this group were studies that examined various ways to distribute biological countermeasures more efficiently during a bioterror attack or influenza pandemic. They provided modest evidence that the way these systems are organized influences the speed of distribution. The review includes 119 studies that address strategies for providers. A number of these studies provided evidence suggesting that commonly used triage systems do not perform consistently in actual MCEs. The number of high-quality studies addressing other specific strategies was insufficient to support firm conclusions about their effectiveness. Only 10 studies included strategies that consider the public's perspective. However, these studies were consistent in their findings. In particular, the public believes that resource allocation guidelines should be simple and consistent across health care facilities but should allow facilities some flexibility to make allocation decisions based on the specific demand and supply situation. The public also believes that a successful allocation system should balance the goals of ensuring the functioning of society, saving the greatest number of people, protecting the most vulnerable people, reducing deaths and hospitalizations, and treating people fairly and equitably. The remaining 14 studies provided strategies for engaging providers in discussions about allocating and managing scarce medical resources. These studies did not identify one engagement approach as clearly superior; however, they consistently noted the importance of a broad, inclusive, and systematic engagement process. CONCLUSIONS Scientific research to identify the most effective adaptive strategies to implement during MCEs is an emerging area. While it remains unclear which of the many options available to policymakers and providers will be most effective, ongoing efforts to develop a focused, well-organized program of applied research should help to identify the optimal methods, techniques, and technologies to strengthen our nation's capacity to respond to MCEs. PMID:24422904

  16. Clinical Framework and Medical Countermeasure Use During an Anthrax Mass-Casualty Incident.

    PubMed

    Bower, William A; Hendricks, Katherine; Pillai, Satish; Guarnizo, Julie; Meaney-Delman, Dana

    2015-12-01

    In 2014, CDC published updated guidelines for the prevention and treatment of anthrax (Hendricks KA, Wright ME, Shadomy SV, et al. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expert panel meetings on prevention and treatment of anthrax in adults. Emerg Infect Dis 2014;20[2]. Available at http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/20/2/13-0687_article.htm). These guidelines provided recommended best practices for the diagnosis and treatment of persons with naturally occurring or bioterrorism-related anthrax in conventional medical settings. An aerosolized release of Bacillus anthracis spores over densely populated areas could become a mass-casualty incident. To prepare for this possibility, the U.S. government has stockpiled equipment and therapeutics (known as medical countermeasures [MCMs]) for anthrax prevention and treatment. However, previously developed, publicly available clinical recommendations have not addressed the use of MCMs or clinical management during an anthrax mass-casualty incident, when the number of patients is likely to exceed the ability of the health care infrastructure to provide conventional standards of care and supplies of MCMs might be inadequate to meet the demand required. To address this gap, in 2013, CDC conducted a series of systematic reviews of the scientific literature on anthrax to identify evidence that could help clinicians and public health authorities set guidelines for intravenous antimicrobial and antitoxin use, diagnosis of anthrax meningitis, and management of common anthrax-specific complications in the setting of a mass-casualty incident. Evidence from these reviews was presented to professionals with expertise in anthrax, critical care, and disaster medicine during a series of workgroup meetings that were held from August 2013 through March 2014. In March 2014, a meeting was held at which 102 subject matter experts discussed the evidence and adapted the existing best practices guidance to a clinical use framework for the judicious, efficient, and rational use of stockpiled MCMs for the treatment of anthrax during a mass-casualty incident, which is described in this report. This report addresses elements of hospital-based acute care, specifically antitoxins and intravenous antimicrobial use, and the diagnosis and management of common anthrax-specific complications during a mass-casualty incident. The recommendations in this report should be implemented only after predefined triggers have been met for shifting from conventional to contingency or crisis standards of care, such as when the magnitude of cases might lead to impending shortages of intravenous antimicrobials, antitoxins, critical care resources (e.g., chest tubes and chest drainage systems), or diagnostic capability. This guidance does not address primary triage decisions, anthrax postexposure prophylaxis, hospital bed or workforce surge capacity, or the logistics of dispensing MCMs. Clinicians, hospital administrators, state and local health officials, and planners can use these recommendations to assist in the development of crisis protocols that will ensure national preparedness for an anthrax mass-casualty incident. PMID:26632963

  17. Assessment of Hospital Pharmacy Preparedness for Mass Casualty Events

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Nadia I.; Cocchio, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the preparedness of hospital pharmacies in New Jersey to provide pharmaceutical services in mass casualty scenarios. Methods: An electronic cross-sectional survey was developed to assess the general knowledge of available resources and attitudes toward the preparedness of the pharmacy department. Results: Out of 60 invitations to participate, 18 surveys (30%) were completed. Respondents practiced at community hospitals (12, 66.6%) with no trauma center designation (11, 67.4%) that served more than 500 licensed beds (five, 29.4%). Six respondents (35.3%) indicated that 75,000 to 100,000 patients visited their emergency departments annually. Seventeen sites (94.4%) reported the existence of an institutional disaster preparedness protocol; 10 (55.5%) indicated that there is a specific plan for the pharmacy department. Most respondents (10, 55.5%) were unsure whether their hospitals had an adequate supply of analgesics, rapid sequence intubation agents, vasopressors, antiemetics, respiratory medications, ophthalmics, oral antimicrobials, and chemical-weapon-specific antidotes. Five (27.7%) agreed that the pharmacy disaster plan included processes to ensure care for patients already hospitalized, and four (22.2%) agreed that the quantity of medication was adequate to treat patients and hospital employees if necessary. Medication stock and quantities were determined based on national or international guidelines at three (16.6%) institutions surveyed. Conclusion: This survey demonstrates a lack of general consensus regarding hospital pharmacy preparedness for mass casualty scenarios despite individualized institutional protocols for disaster preparedness. Standardized recommendations from government and/or professional pharmacy organizations should be developed to guide the preparation of hospital pharmacy departments for mass casualty scenarios. PMID:25859121

  18. Mass Casualties and Health Care Following the Release of Toxic Chemicals or Radioactive Material—Contribution of Modern Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Göransson Nyberg, Ann; Stricklin, Daniela; Sellström, Åke

    2011-01-01

    Catastrophic chemical or radiological events can cause thousands of casualties. Such disasters require triage procedures to identify the development of health consequences requiring medical intervention. Our objective is to analyze recent advancements in biotechnology for triage in mass emergency situations. In addition to identifying persons “at risk” of developing health problems, these technologies can aid in securing the unaffected or “worried well”. We also highlight the need for public/private partnerships to engage in some of the underpinning sciences, such as patho-physiological mechanisms of chemical and radiological hazards, and for the necessary investment in the development of rapid assessment tools through identification of biochemical, molecular, and genetic biomarkers to predict health effects. For chemical agents, biomarkers of neurotoxicity, lung damage, and clinical and epidemiological databases are needed to assess acute and chronic effects of exposures. For radiological exposures, development of rapid, sensitive biomarkers using advanced biotechnologies are needed to sort exposed persons at risk of life-threatening effects from persons with long-term risk or no risk. The final implementation of rapid and portable diagnostics tools suitable for emergency care providers to guide triage and medical countermeasures use will need public support, since commercial incentives are lacking. PMID:22408587

  19. Challenges of the management of mass casualty: lessons learned from the Jos crisis of 2001

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Jos has witnessed a series of civil crises which have generated mass casualties that the Jos University Teaching Hospital has had to respond to from time to time. We review the challenges that we encountered in the management of the victims of the 2001 crisis. Methodology We reviewed the findings of our debriefing sessions following the sectarian crisis of September 2001 and identified the challenges and obstacles experienced during these periods. Results Communication was a major challenge, both within and outside the hospital. In the field, there was poor field triage and no prehospital care. Transportation and evacuation was hazardous, for both injured patients and medical personnel. This was worsened by the imposition of a curfew on the city and its environs. In the hospital, supplies such as fluids, emergency drugs, sterile dressings and instruments, splints, and other consumables, blood and food were soon exhausted. Record keeping was erratic. Staff began to show signs of physical and mental exhaustion as well as features of anxiety and stress. Tensions rose between different religious groups in the hospital and an attempt was made by rioters to attack the hospital. Patients suffered poor subsequent care following resuscitation and/or surgery and there was neglect of patients on admission prior to the crisis as well as non trauma medical emergencies. Conclusion Mass casualties from disasters that disrupt organized societal mechanisms for days can pose significant challenges to the best of institutional disaster response plans. In the situation that we experienced, our disaster plan was impractical initially because it failed to factor in such a prolongation of both crisis and response. We recommend that institutional disaster response plans should incorporate provisions for the challenges we have enumerated and factor in peculiarities that would emanate from the need for a prolonged response. PMID:24164778

  20. High-fidelity human patient simulators compared with human actors in an unannounced mass-casualty exercise.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Christian M; Skrzypczak, Matthias; Raith, Stefan; Hinzmann, Dominik; Krautheim, Veronika; Heuser, Fabian; Mayer, Valentin; Kreuzer, Christoph; Himsl, Meike; Holl, Michael; Lipp, Christina; Kochs, Eberhard F; Wagner, Klaus J

    2014-04-01

    High-fidelity simulators (HFSs) have been shown to prompt critical actions at a level equal to that of trained human actors (HAs) and increase perceived realism in intrahospital mass-casualty incident (MCI) exercises. For unannounced prehospital MCI exercises, however, no data are available about the feasibility of incorporating HFSs. This case report describes the integration of HFSs in such an unannounced prehospital MCI drill with HAs and provides data about the differences concerning triage, treatment, and transport of HFSs and HAs with identical injury patterns. For this purpose, 75 actors and four high-fidelity simulators were subdivided into nine groups defined by a specific injury pattern. Four HFSs and six HAs comprised a group suffering from traumatic brain injury and blunt abdominal trauma. Triage results, times for transport, and number of diagnostic and therapeutic tasks were recorded. Means were compared by t test or one-way ANOVA. Triage times and results did not differ between actors and simulators. The number of diagnostic (1.25, SD = 0.5 in simulators vs 3.5, SD = 1.05 in HAs; P = .010) and therapeutic tasks (2.0, SD = 1.6 in simulators vs 4.8, SD = 0.4 in HAs; P = .019) were significantly lower in simulators. Due to difficulties in treating and evacuating the casualties from the site of the accident in a timely manner, all simulators died. Possible causal factors and strategies are discussed, with the aim of increasing the utility of simulators in emergency medicine training. PMID:24650543

  1. Comparative analysis of showering protocols for mass-casualty decontamination.

    PubMed

    Amlot, Richard; Larner, Joanne; Matar, Hazem; Jones, David R; Carter, Holly; Turner, Elizabeth A; Price, Shirley C; Chilcott, Robert P

    2010-01-01

    A well-established provision for mass-casualty decontamination that incorporates the use of mobile showering units has been developed in the UK. The effectiveness of such decontamination procedures will be critical in minimizing or preventing the contamination of emergency responders and hospital infrastructure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three empirical strategies designed to optimize existing decontamination procedures: (1) instructions in the form of a pictorial aid prior to decontamination; (2) provision of a washcloth within the showering facility; and (3) an extended showering period. The study was a three-factor, between-participants (or "independent") design with 90 volunteers. The three factors each had two levels: use of washcloths (washcloth/no washcloth), washing instructions (instructions/no instructions), and shower cycle duration (three minutes/six minutes). The effectiveness of these strategies was quantified by whole-body fluorescence imaging following application of a red fluorophore to multiple, discrete areas of the skin. All five showering procedures were relatively effective in removing the fluorophore "contaminant", but the use of a cloth (in the absence of instructions) led to a significant ( appox. 20%) improvement in the effectiveness of decontamination over the standard protocol (p <0.05). Current mass-casualty decontamination effectiveness, especially in children, can be optimized by the provision of a washcloth. This simple but effective approach indicates the value of performing controlled volunteer trials for optimizing existing decontamination procedures. PMID:21053192

  2. [Mass maritime casualty incidents in German waters: structures and resources].

    PubMed

    Castan, J; Paschen, H-R; Wirtz, S; Dörges, V; Wenderoth, S; Peters, J; Blunk, Y; Bielstein, A; Kerner, T

    2012-07-01

    The Central Command for Maritime Emergencies was founded in Germany in 2003 triggered by the fire on board of the cargo ship "Pallas" in 1998. Its mission is to coordinate and direct measures at or above state level in maritime emergency situations in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. A special task in this case is to provide firefighting and medical care. To face these challenges at sea emergency doctors and firemen have been specially trained. This form of organization provides a concept to counter mass casualty incidents and peril situations at sea. Since the foundation of the Central Command for Maritime Emergencies there have been 5 operations for firefighting units and 4 for medical response teams. Assignments and structure of the Central Command for Maritime Emergencies are unique in Europe. PMID:22699223

  3. Mass casualty following unprecedented tornadic events in the Southeast: natural disaster outcomes at a Level I trauma center.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Elizabeth H; Creel, Nathan; Lepard, Jacob; Maxwell, Robert A

    2012-07-01

    On April 27, 2011, an EF4 (enhanced Fujita scale) tornado struck a 48-mile path across northwest Georgia and southeast Tennessee. Traumatic injuries sustained during this tornado and others in one of the largest tornado outbreaks in history presented to the regional Level I trauma center, Erlanger Health System, in Chattanooga, TN. Patients were triaged per mass casualty protocols through an incident command center and triage officer. Medical staffing was increased to anticipate a large patient load. Records of patients admitted as a result of tornado-related injury were retrospectively reviewed and characterized by the injury patterns, demographics, procedures performed, length of stay, and complications. One hundred four adult patients were treated in the emergency department; of these, 28 (27%) patients required admission to the trauma service. Of those admitted, 16 (57%) were male with an age range of 21 to 87 years old and an average length of stay of 10.9 ± 11.8 days. Eleven (39%) patients required intensive care unit admissions. The most common injuries seen were those of soft tissue, bony fractures, and the chest. Interventions included tube thoracostomies, exploratory laparotomies, orthopedic fixations, soft tissue reconstructions, and craniotomy. All 28 patients admitted survived to discharge. Nineteen (68%) patients were discharged home, six (21%) went to a rehabilitation hospital, and three (11%) were transferred to skilled nursing facilities. Emergency preparedness and organization are key elements in effectively treating victims of natural disasters. Those victims who survive the initial tornadic event and present to a Level I trauma center have low mortality. Like in our experience, triage protocols need to be implemented to quickly and effectively manage mass injuries. PMID:22748536

  4. Mass Casualty Incident Response and Aeromedical Evacuation in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Christopher N.; Mills, Gregory H.

    2011-01-01

    Antarctica is one of the most remote regions on Earth. Mass casualty incident (MCI) responses in Antarctica are prone to complications from multiple environmental and operational challenges. This review of the current status of MCI risks and response strategies for Antarctica focuses on aeromedical evacuation, a critical component of many possible MCI scenarios. Extreme cold and weather, a lack of medical resources and a multitude of disparate international bases all exert unique demands on MCI response planning. Increasing cruise ship traffic is also escalating the risk of MCI occurrence. To be successful, MCI response must be well coordinated and undertaken by trained rescuers, especially in the setting of Antarctica. Helicopter rescue or aeromedical evacuation of victims to off-continent facilities may be necessary. Currently, military forces have the greatest capacity for mass air evacuation. Specific risks that are likely to occur include structure collapses, vehicle incapacitations, vehicle crashes and fires. All of these events pose concomitant risks of hypothermia among both victims and rescuers. Antarctica’s unique environment requires flexible yet robust MCI response planning among the many entities in operation on the continent. PMID:21691470

  5. Mass casualty incident response and aeromedical evacuation in antarctica.

    PubMed

    Mills, Christopher N; Mills, Gregory H

    2011-02-01

    Antarctica is one of the most remote regions on Earth. Mass casualty incident (MCI) responses in Antarctica are prone to complications from multiple environmental and operational challenges. This review of the current status of MCI risks and response strategies for Antarctica focuses on aeromedical evacuation, a critical component of many possible MCI scenarios. Extreme cold and weather, a lack of medical resources and a multitude of disparate international bases all exert unique demands on MCI response planning. Increasing cruise ship traffic is also escalating the risk of MCI occurrence. To be successful, MCI response must be well coordinated and undertaken by trained rescuers, especially in the setting of Antarctica. Helicopter rescue or aeromedical evacuation of victims to off-continent facilities may be necessary. Currently, military forces have the greatest capacity for mass air evacuation. Specific risks that are likely to occur include structure collapses, vehicle incapacitations, vehicle crashes and fires. All of these events pose concomitant risks of hypothermia among both victims and rescuers. Antarctica's unique environment requires flexible yet robust MCI response planning among the many entities in operation on the continent. PMID:21691470

  6. Valley triage: an approach to mass casuality care.

    PubMed

    Gierson, E D; Richman, L S

    1975-03-01

    Organizations prepared to respond to war, fire, flood, earthquake, or attack are essential for effective disaster control. "Valley Triage" the San Fernando Valley Medical Triage Team in Los Angeles, was formed to meet this need. The team is a mobile medical unit staffed by physicians and coordinated with civilian and military emergency services. It incorporates innovative means of communication, transportation, equipment, and training. The primary aim of Valley Triage is to provide on-site medical attention to disaster victims, and to coordinate their transfer to adequately staffed and equipped hospitals. Valley Triage offers a new approach to disaster management and can serve as a model for the development of other teams throughout the nation. PMID:1127742

  7. [Simplified schema of action of the ambulance rescue services during mass casualty].

    PubMed

    Guła, Przemysław; Hładki, Waldemar; Górski, Krzysztof; Popławska, Małgorzata

    2008-01-01

    Authors represented problems relating mass - casualty accidents and manner of segregation of victims. Lifesaving activities in mass - casualty usually leads to increased emotional stress. It is the result of event specificity, and also of external threats in the zone of activity. Authors presented schema prepared for needs of Cracow's - Ambulance Rescue Services, being the adaptation of universally accepted in western countries algorithm (SAD CHALETS). PMID:18669100

  8. Self-care Decontamination within a Chemical Exposure Mass-casualty Incident.

    PubMed

    Monteith, Raymond G; Pearce, Laurie D R

    2015-06-01

    Growing awareness and concern for the increasing frequency of incidents involving hazardous materials (HazMat) across a broad spectrum of contaminants from chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) sources indicates a clear need to refine the capability to respond successfully to mass-casualty contamination incidents. Best results for decontamination from a chemical agent will be achieved if done within minutes following exposure, and delays in decontamination will increase the length of time a casualty is in contact with the contaminate. The findings presented in this report indicate that casualties involved in a HazMat/CBRN mass-casualty incident (MCI) in a typical community would not receive sufficient on-scene care because of operational delays that are integral to a standard HazMat/CBRN first response. This delay in response will mean that casualty care will shift away from the incident scene into already over-tasked health care facilities as casualties seek aid on their own. The self-care decontamination protocols recommended here present a viable option to ensure decontamination is completed in the field, at the incident scene, and that casualties are cared for more quickly and less traumatically than they would be otherwise. Introducing self-care decontamination procedures as a standard first response within the response community will improve the level of care significantly and provide essential, self-care decontamination to casualties. The process involves three distinct stages which should not be delayed; these are summarized by the acronym MADE: Move/Assist, Disrobe/Decontaminate, Evaluate/Evacuate. PMID:25915603

  9. Emergency imaging after a mass casualty incident: role of the radiology department during training for and activation of a disaster management plan.

    PubMed

    Berger, Ferco H; Körner, Markus; Bernstein, Mark P; Sodickson, Aaron D; Beenen, Ludo F; McLaughlin, Patrick D; Kool, Digna R; Bilow, Ronald M

    2016-05-01

    In the setting of mass casualty incidents (MCIs), hospitals need to divert from normal routine to delivering the best possible care to the largest number of victims. This should be accomplished by activating an established hospital disaster management plan (DMP) known to all staff through prior training drills. Over the recent decades, imaging has increasingly been used to evaluate critically ill patients. It can also be used to increase the accuracy of triaging MCI victims, since overtriage (falsely higher triage category) and undertriage (falsely lower triage category) can severely impact resource availability and mortality rates, respectively. This article emphasizes the importance of including the radiology department in hospital preparations for a MCI and highlights factors expected to influence performance during hospital DMP activation including issues pertinent to effective simulation, such as establishing proper learning objectives. After-action reviews including performance evaluation and debriefing on issues are invaluable following simulation drills and DMP activation, in order to improve subsequent preparedness. Historically, most hospital DMPs have not adequately included radiology department operations, and they have not or to a little extent been integrated in the DMP activation simulation. This article aims to increase awareness of the need for radiology department engagement in order to increase radiology department preparedness for DMP activation after a MCI occurs. PMID:26781837

  10. [The role of patient flow and surge capacity for in-hospital response in mass casualty events].

    PubMed

    Sefrin, Peter; Kuhnigk, Herbert

    2008-03-01

    Mass casualty events make demands on emergency services and disaster control. However, optimized in- hospital response defines the quality of definitive care. Therefore, German federal law governs the role of hospitals in mass casualty incidents. In hospital casualty surge is depending on resources that have to be expanded with a practicable alarm plan. Thus, in-hospital mass casualty management planning is recommended to be organized by specialized persons. To minimise inhospital patient overflow casualty surge principles have to be implemented in both, pre-hospital and in-hospital disaster planning. World soccer championship 2006 facilitated the initiation of surge and damage control principles in in-hospital disaster planning strategies for German hospitals. The presented concept of strict control of in-hospital patient flow using surge principles minimises the risk of in-hospital breakdown and increases definitive hospital treatment capacity in mass casualty incidents. PMID:18350477

  11. Panel 2.5: mass-casualty management and hospital care.

    PubMed

    Borra, Agostino; Perez, Luis Jorge; Min, Tin; Puavilai, Wilai; Seo, Norimasa; Tipsunthonsak, Nakhon

    2005-01-01

    This is a summary of the presentations and discussion of Panel 2.5, Mass-Casualty Management and Hospital Care of the Conference, Health Aspects of the Tsunami Disaster in Asia, convened by the World Health Organization in Phuket, Thailand, 04-06 May 2005. The topics discussed included issues related to mass-casualty management and hospital care as pertain to the responses to the damage created by the Tsunami. It is presented in the following major sections: (1) key questions; (2) recommendations; and (3) conclusions. Subsections of the conclusion section include: (1) lessons learned; (2) what was done well?; and (3) what could have been done better?. PMID:16496625

  12. Mass casualty chemical exposure and implications for respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Muskat, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to chemical agents, both deliberate and accidental, over the past 100 years has resulted in the deaths of thousands and a significant number of casualties requiring hospitalization. The respiratory system is an important portal of entry into the human body for many of these agents, and pulmonary symptoms are a hallmark of many chemical exposures. The 4 major chemical warfare agents are: lung-damaging, blood, blister, and nerve compounds. The review will cover historical exposures, signs and symptoms, treatment, and long-term consequences. There are numerous examples of deliberate (as well as accidental) exposure to harmful chemicals, and each incident requires the provider to understand the signs and symptoms of the particular chemical so that the correct treatment is provided. The respiratory implications of these agents appear to be dose and timing dependent, with full recovery often seen if supportive measures and appropriate antidotes are administered in a timely fashion. PMID:18173860

  13. An Intelligent 802.11 Triage Tag For Medical Response to Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Lenert, Leslie A.; Palmer, Douglas A.; Chan, Theodore C; Rao, Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    When medical care is initiated at a mass casualty event, the first activity is the triage of victims, which is the grouping by victims severity of injury. Paper triage tags are often used to mark victims’ triage status and to record information on injuries and treatments administered in the field. In this paper we describe the design and development of an“Intelligent Triage Tag” (ITT), an electronic device to coordinate patient field care. ITTs combine the basic functionality of a paper triage tag with sensors, nonvolatile memory, a microprocessor and 802.11 wireless transmission capabilities. ITTs not only display victims' triage status but also signal alerts, and mark patients for transport or immediate medical attention. ITTs record medical data for later access offsite and help organize care by relaying information on the location of the victims during field treatment. ITTs are a part of the Wireless Information System for Medical Response in Disasters (WIISARD) architecture. PMID:16779078

  14. The development of intelligent, triage-based, mass-gathering emergency medical service PDA support systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Polun; Hsu, Yueh-Shuang; Tzeng, Yuann-Meei; Sang, Yiing-Yiing; Hou, I-Ching; Kao, Wei-Fong

    2004-09-01

    The support systems for the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) at mass gatherings, such as the local marathon or large international baseball games, are underdeveloped. The purposes of this study were to extend well-developed, triage-based, EMS Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) support systems to cover pre-hospital emergency medical services and onsite evaluation forms for the mass gatherings, and to evaluate users ' perceived ease of use and usefulness of the systems in terms of Davis ' Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The systems were developed based on an established intelligent triage PDA support system and two other forms the general EMS form from the Taipei EMT and the customer-made Mass Gathering Medical form used by a medical center. Twenty-three nurses and six physicians in the medical center, who had served at mass gatherings, were invited to examine the new systems and answer the TAM questionnaire. The PDA systems were composed of 450 information items within 42 screens in 6 categories. The results supported the potential for using triage-based PDA systems at mass gatherings. Overall, most of the subjects agreed that the systems were easy to use and useful for mass gatherings, and they were willing to accept the systems. PMID:15362014

  15. K-plan for patient repatriation after mass casualty events abroad.

    PubMed

    Duchateau, François-Xavier; Verner, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    In addition to requests for individual aeromedical evacuation (AE), medical assistance companies also may respond to mass casualty incidents abroad. The purpose of this report was to evaluate the effectiveness of our primary casualty plan, based on experience involving a January 2010 bus crash in southern Egypt. The main evaluative criterion was time elapsed from the initial call until the return of victims to their home country. Three critically injured patients underwent an initial AE to Cairo for advanced trauma care. After stabilization, they arrived back in their home country 42 hours after the initial call. The remaining group of patients arrived 27 hours later, or a total of 69 hours after the first call. These findings suggest that the "K-Plan" standardized operating process may be effective for rapid and appropriate repatriation of numerous victims. Some specific issues, such as efficiently locating a large-capacity charter aircraft, require further improvement. PMID:22386102

  16. Health care worker protection in mass casualty respiratory failure: infection control, decontamination, and personal protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Elizabeth L

    2008-02-01

    Maintenance of a safe and stable health care infrastructure is critical to an effective mass casualty disaster response. Both secondary contamination during chemical disasters and hospital-associated infections during epidemic illness can pose substantial threats to achieving this goal. Understanding basic principles of decontamination and infection control during responses to chemical and biologic disasters can help minimize the risks to patients and health care workers. Effective decontamination following toxic chemical exposure should include both removal of contaminated clothing and decontamination of the victim's skin. Wet decontamination is the most feasible strategy in a mass casualty situation and should be performed promptly by trained personnel. In the event of an epidemic, infection prevention and control measures are based on essential principles of hand hygiene and standard precautions. Expanded precautions should be instituted as needed to target contact, droplet, and airborne routes of infectious disease transmission. Specific equipment and measures for critical care delivery may serve to decrease risk to health care workers in the event of an epidemic. Their use should be considered in developing comprehensive disaster response plans. PMID:18218151

  17. On constant alert: lessons to be learned from Israel's emergency response to mass-casualty terrorism incidents.

    PubMed

    Adini, Bruria; Peleg, Kobi

    2013-12-01

    In its short modern history, Israel has had to contend with numerous mass-casualty incidents caused by terrorism. As a result, it has developed practical national preparedness policies for responding to such events. Israel's Supreme Health Authority, a committee of the Ministry of Health, coordinates emergency management nationwide. All emergency personnel, health care providers, and medical facilities operate under national policies designed to ensure a swift and coordinated response to any incident, based on an "all hazards" approach that emphasizes core elements commonly encountered in mass-casualty incidents. Israel's emergency management system includes contingency planning, command and control, centrally coordinated response, cooperation, and capacity building. Although every nation is unique, many of the lessons that Israel has learned may be broadly applicable to preparation for mass-casualty incidents in the United States and other countries. PMID:24301403

  18. A pan-European study of capabilities to manage mass casualties from the release of chemical agents: the MASH project.

    PubMed

    Baker, David J; Murray, Virginia S G; Carli, Pierre A

    2013-01-01

    The European Union (EU) Mass Casualties and Health (MASH) project that ran between 2008 and 2010 was designed to study the management of mass casualties from chemical and radiological releases and associated health implications. One area of study for this project concerned arrangements within EU Member States for the management of mass casualties following a chemical release. This was undertaken via a confidential online questionnaire that was sent to selected points of contact throughout the EU. Responses were obtained from 18 states from respondents holding senior positions in chemical planning and incident response. Information gathered shows a lack of uniformity within the EU about the organization of responses to chemical releases and the provision of medical care. This article presents the overall findings of the study demonstrating differences between countries on planning and organization, decontamination, prehospital emergency medical responses, clinical diagnoses, and therapy and aftercare. Although there may be an understandable reluctance from national respondents to share information on security and other grounds, the findings, nevertheless, revealed substantial differences between current planning and operational responses within the EU states for the management of mass chemical casualties. The existing international networks for response to radiation incidents are not yet matched by equivalent networks for chemical responses yet sufficient information was available from the study to identify potential deficiencies, identify common casualty management pathways, and to make recommendations for future operations within the EU. Improvements in awareness and training and the application of modern information and communications will help to remedy this situation. Specialized advanced life support and other medical care for chemical casualties appear lacking in some countries. A program of specialized training and action are required to apply the findings revealed by the MASH study into a unified cross-border emergency medical response. PMID:23716370

  19. Oral and Enteral Resuscitation of Burn Shock The Historical Record and Implications for Mass Casualty Care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, George C.; Michell, Michael W.; Oliveira, Hermes; Brown, Tim La H.; Herndon, David; Baker, R. David; Muller, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of a mass disaster, standard care methods for treatment of burn injury will often not be available for all victims. A method of fluid resuscitation for burns that has largely been forgotten by contemporary burn experts is enteral resuscitation. We identified 12 studies with over 700 patients treated with enteral resuscitation, defined as drinking or gastric infusion of salt solutions, from the literature. These studies suggest that enteral resuscitation can be an effective treatment for burn shock under conditions in which the standard IV therapy is unavailable or delayed, such as in mass disasters and combat casualties. Enteral resuscitation of burn shock was effective in patients with moderate (10–40% TBSA) and in some patients with more severe injuries. The data suggests that some hypovolemic burn and trauma patients can be treated exclusively with enteral resuscitation, and others might benefit from enteral resuscitation as an initial alternative and a supplement to IV therapy. A complication of enteral resuscitation was vomiting, which occurred less in children and much less when therapy was initiated within the first postburn hour. Enteral resuscitation is contra-indicated when the patient is in “peripheral circulatory collapse”. The optimal enteral solution and regimen has not yet been defined, nor has its efficacy been tested against modern IV resuscitation. The oldest studies used glucose-free solutions of buffered isotonic and hypotonic saline. Studies that are more recent show benefit of adding glucose to electrolyte solutions similar to those used in the treatment of cholera. If IV therapy for mass casualty care is delayed due to logistical constraints, enteral resuscitation should be considered. PMID:20827301

  20. Clinical guidelines for responding to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and trauma/burn mass casualty incidents: Quick reference guides for emergency department staff.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Joseph; Burich, David; Smith, Deborah; Hayes, Lynn; Paturas, James; Tomassoni, Anthony

    The word 'DISASTER' may be used as a mnemonic for listing the critical elements of emergency response. The National Disaster Life Support Education Foundation's (NDLSEC) DISASTER paradigm emphasises out-of-hospital emergency response and includes the following elements: (1) detect; (2) incident command system; (3) security and safety; (4) assessment; (5) support; (6) triage and treatment; (7) evacuate; and (8) recovery. This paper describes how the DISASTER paradigm was used to create a series of clinical guidelines to assist the preparedness effort of hospitals for mitigating chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear incidents or explosive devices resulting in trauma/burn mass casualty incidents (MCIs) and their initial response to these events. Descriptive information was obtained from observations and records associated with this project. The information contributed by a group of subject matter experts in disaster medicine, at the Yale New Haven Health System Center for Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response was used to author the clinical guidelines. Akin to the paradigm developed by the NDLSEC for conducting on-scene activities, the clinical guidelines use the letters in the word 'disaster' as a mnemonic for recalling the main elements required for mitigating MCIs in the hospital emergency department. PMID:25416374

  1. Regional Variation in Causes of Injuries among Terrorism Victims for Mass Casualty Events

    PubMed Central

    Regens, James L.; Schultheiss, Amy; Mould, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The efficient allocation of medical resources to prepare for and respond to mass casualty events (MCEs) attributable to intentional acts of terrorism is a major challenge confronting disaster planners and emergency personnel. This research article examines variation in regional patterns in the causes of injures associated with 77,258 successful terrorist attacks that occurred between 1970 and 2013 involving the use of explosives, firearms, and/or incendiaries. The objective of this research is to estimate regional variation in the use of different conventional weapons in successful terrorist attacks in each world region on variation in injury cause distributions. Indeed, we find that the distributions of the number of injuries attributable to specific weapons types (i.e., by cause) vary greatly among the 13 world regions identified within the Global Terrorism Database. PMID:26347857

  2. Regional Variation in Causes of Injuries among Terrorism Victims for Mass Casualty Events.

    PubMed

    Regens, James L; Schultheiss, Amy; Mould, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The efficient allocation of medical resources to prepare for and respond to mass casualty events (MCEs) attributable to intentional acts of terrorism is a major challenge confronting disaster planners and emergency personnel. This research article examines variation in regional patterns in the causes of injures associated with 77,258 successful terrorist attacks that occurred between 1970 and 2013 involving the use of explosives, firearms, and/or incendiaries. The objective of this research is to estimate regional variation in the use of different conventional weapons in successful terrorist attacks in each world region on variation in injury cause distributions. Indeed, we find that the distributions of the number of injuries attributable to specific weapons types (i.e., by cause) vary greatly among the 13 world regions identified within the Global Terrorism Database. PMID:26347857

  3. Truth hurts--hard lessons from Australia's largest mass casualty exercise with contaminated patients.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Nicholas A; Caldicott, David G E; Eliseo, Tony; Pearce, Andrew

    2006-04-01

    In response to the increasing threat of a mass casualty incident involving chemical, biological or radiological agents, and concern over the preparedness of our hospital system to cope with patients from such an incident, we conducted the largest hospital-based field exercise involving contaminated patients that has been held in Australia. In the present paper, we outline the background to, and methodology of, Exercise Supreme Truth, and the efforts made to increase its realism. We focus our discussion on three issues highlighted by the exercise, which we believe have enormous implications for the development of hospital chemical, biological or radiological plans and the likelihood of their success--hospital security, crowd control and decontamination. PMID:16669945

  4. Mass-casualty Response to the Kiss Nightclub in Santa Maria, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dal Ponte, Silvana T; Dornelles, Carlos F D; Arquilla, Bonnie; Bloem, Christina; Roblin, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    On January 27, 2013, a fire at the Kiss Nightclub in Santa Maria, Brazil led to a mass-casualty incident affecting hundreds of college students. A total of 234 people died on scene, 145 were hospitalized, and another 623 people received treatment throughout the first week following the incident.1 Eight of the hospitalized people later died.1 The Military Police were the first on scene, followed by the state fire department, and then the municipal Mobile Prehospital Assistance (SAMU) ambulances. The number of victims was not communicated clearly to the various units arriving on scene, leading to insufficient rescue personnel and equipment. Incident command was established on scene, but the rescuers and police were still unable to control the chaos of multiple bystanders attempting to assist in the rescue efforts. The Municipal Sports Center (CDM) was designated as the location for dead bodies, where victim identification and communication with families occurred, as well as forensic evaluation, which determined the primary cause of death to be asphyxia. A command center was established at the Hospital de Caridade Astrogildo de Azevedo (HCAA) in Santa Maria to direct where patients should be admitted, recruit staff, and procure additional supplies, as needed. The victims suffered primarily from smoke inhalation and many required endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. There was a shortage of ventilators; therefore, some had to be borrowed from local hospitals, neighboring cities, and distant areas in the state. A total of 54 patients1 were transferred to hospitals in the capital city of Porto Alegre (Brazil). The main issues with the response to the fire were scene control and communication. Areas for improvement were identified, namely the establishment of a disaster-response plan, as well as regularly scheduled training in disaster preparedness/response. These activities are the first steps to improving mass-casualty responses. PMID:25544145

  5. Cyanide antidotes for mass casualties: water-soluble salts of the dithiane (sulfanegen) from 3-mercaptopyruvate for intramuscular administration.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Steven E; Monteil, Alexandre R; Cohen, Jonathan F; Crankshaw, Daune L; Vince, Robert; Nagasawa, Herbert T

    2013-02-14

    Current cyanide antidotes are administered by IV infusion, which is suboptimal for mass casualties. Therefore, in a cyanide disaster, intramuscular (IM) injectable antidotes would be more appropriate. We report the discovery of the highly water-soluble sulfanegen triethanolamine as a promising lead for development as an IM injectable cyanide antidote. PMID:23301495

  6. Design and development of a mobile-based system for supporting emergency triage decision making.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Zhou, Tian-Shu; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Mao; Li, Jing-Song

    2014-06-01

    Emergency care for mass casualty incidents is a sophisticated multi-participant process. To manage this process effectively, many information systems have been proposed. However, their performance in improving the efficiency and accuracy of patient triage is not satisfactory. This paper is concerned with the development of a mobile-based system for supporting emergency triage in the emergency care process for mass casualty incidents. This system collects the patient's emergency data throughout the whole emergency care process through a mobile application and data transfer mechanism. Using a Cox proportional hazard model, the system has the capacity to present the survival curve to the triage officer, helping him/her to make triage and transportation decisions. This system offers an alternative injury assessment tool based on the vital signs data of the injury patient. With the help of this system, the triage officer can more directly and comprehensively learn about each patient's situation and deterioration without additional operations at the incident site. PMID:24898115

  7. Family support and victim identification in mass casualty terrorist attacks: an integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Gagin, Roni; Cohen, Miri; Peled-Avram, Maya

    2005-01-01

    Terrorist bombing attacks in Israel between 2000 and 2004 caused mass casualties. After each attack in the north of Israel, Rambam Medical Center, the largest hospital in the region, absorbs the majority of injured, especially the more severely injured and unidentified victims. Immediately with the media reports of a terrorist attack, tens of relatives come to the hospital, looking for missing family members. This paper describes an assistance unit for families of unidentified victims. It is staffed by the hospital's social work department, and its tasks are to identify the unidentified victims, help relatives find and be united with them, and assist other relatives in the identification of bodies of deceased family members. The process involves gathering information from relatives and cross-checking it with data and pictures from the hospitals' emergency and operating rooms; and providing crisis intervention and psychological first aid to victims' relatives. The family assistance unit works with several other professional units in the hospital and in the community, and always adjusts its operations to the features of each event. Clearer guidelines for dynamic training of social workers and research-based interventions to prevent compassion fatigue among the workers must be further developed. PMID:16107044

  8. Portable ultrasound in disaster triage: a focused review.

    PubMed

    Wydo, S M; Seamon, M J; Melanson, S W; Thomas, P; Bahner, D P; Stawicki, S P

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound technology has become ubiquitous in modern medicine. Its applications span the assessment of life-threatening trauma or hemodynamic conditions, to elective procedures such as image-guided peripheral nerve blocks. Sonographers have utilized ultrasound techniques in the pre-hospital setting, emergency departments, operating rooms, intensive care units, outpatient clinics, as well as during mass casualty and disaster management. Currently available ultrasound devices are more affordable, portable, and feature user-friendly interfaces, making them well suited for use in the demanding situation of a mass casualty incident (MCI) or disaster triage. We have reviewed the existing literature regarding the application of sonology in MCI and disaster scenarios, focusing on the most promising and practical ultrasound-based paradigms applicable in these settings. PMID:26038019

  9. Epidemiology of Emergency Medical Services-Assessed Mass Casualty Incidents according to Causes.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Ok; Shin, Sang Do; Song, Kyoung Jun; Hong, Ki Jeong; Kim, Jungeun

    2016-03-01

    To effectively mitigate and reduce the burden of mass casualty incidents (MCIs), preparedness measures should be based on MCIs' epidemiological characteristics. This study aimed to describe the epidemiological characteristics and outcomes of emergency medical services (EMS)-assessed MCIs from multiple areas according to cause. Therefore, we extracted the records of all MCIs that involved ≥ 6 patients from an EMS database. All patients involved in EMS-assessed MCIs from six areas were eligible for this study, and their prehospital and hospital records were reviewed for a 1-year period. The EMS-assessed MCIs were categorized as being caused by fire accidents (FAs), road traffic accidents (RTAs), chemical and biological agents (CBs), and other mechanical causes (MECHs). A total of 362 EMS-assessed MCIs were identified, with a crude incidence rate of 0.6-5.0/100,000 population. Among these MCIs, 322 were caused by RTAs. The MCIs involved 2,578 patients, and 54.3% of these patients were women. We observed that the most common mechanism of injury varied according to MCI cause, and that a higher number of patients per incident was associated with a longer prehospital time. The highest hospital admission rate was observed for CBs (16 patients, 55.2%), and most patients in RTAs and MECHs experienced non-severe injuries. The total number of deaths was 32 (1.2%). An EMS-assessed MCI database was established using the EMS database and medical records review. Our findings indicate that RTA MCIs create a burden on EMS and emergency department resources, although CB MCIs create a burden on hospitals' resources. PMID:26955248

  10. Epidemiology of Emergency Medical Services-Assessed Mass Casualty Incidents according to Causes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To effectively mitigate and reduce the burden of mass casualty incidents (MCIs), preparedness measures should be based on MCIs’ epidemiological characteristics. This study aimed to describe the epidemiological characteristics and outcomes of emergency medical services (EMS)-assessed MCIs from multiple areas according to cause. Therefore, we extracted the records of all MCIs that involved ≥ 6 patients from an EMS database. All patients involved in EMS-assessed MCIs from six areas were eligible for this study, and their prehospital and hospital records were reviewed for a 1-year period. The EMS-assessed MCIs were categorized as being caused by fire accidents (FAs), road traffic accidents (RTAs), chemical and biological agents (CBs), and other mechanical causes (MECHs). A total of 362 EMS-assessed MCIs were identified, with a crude incidence rate of 0.6–5.0/100,000 population. Among these MCIs, 322 were caused by RTAs. The MCIs involved 2,578 patients, and 54.3% of these patients were women. We observed that the most common mechanism of injury varied according to MCI cause, and that a higher number of patients per incident was associated with a longer prehospital time. The highest hospital admission rate was observed for CBs (16 patients, 55.2%), and most patients in RTAs and MECHs experienced non-severe injuries. The total number of deaths was 32 (1.2%). An EMS-assessed MCI database was established using the EMS database and medical records review. Our findings indicate that RTA MCIs create a burden on EMS and emergency department resources, although CB MCIs create a burden on hospitals’ resources. PMID:26955248

  11. Radiologic diagnosis of explosion casualties.

    PubMed

    Eastridge, Brian J; Blackbourne, Lorne; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B

    2008-01-01

    The threat of terrorist events on domestic soil remains an ever-present risk. Despite the notoriety of unconventional weapons, the mainstay in the armament of the terrorist organization is the conventional explosive. Conventional explosives are easily weaponized and readily obtainable, and the recipes are widely available over the Internet. According to the US Department of State and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, over one half of the global terrorist events involve explosions, averaging two explosive events per day worldwide in 2005 (Terrorism Research Center. Available at www.terrorism.com. Accessed April 1, 2007). The Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System: Emergency Medical Services at the Crossroads, published by the Institute of Medicine, states that explosions were the most common cause of injuries associated with terrorism (Institute of Medicine Report: The Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System: Emergency Medical Services at the Crossroads. Washington DC: National Academic Press, 2007). Explosive events have the potential to inflict numerous casualties with multiple injuries. The complexity of this scenario is exacerbated by the fact that few providers or medical facilities have experience with mass casualty events in which human and material resources can be rapidly overwhelmed. Care of explosive-related injury is based on same principles as that of standard trauma management paradigms. The basic difference between explosion-related injury and other injury mechanisms are the number of patients and multiplicity of injuries, which require a higher allocation of resources. With this caveat, the appropriate utilization of radiology resources has the potential to impact in-hospital diagnosis and triage and is an essential element in optimizing the management of the explosive-injured patients. PMID:19069034

  12. Death of an infant after contacting a telephone triage call centre: is telephone triage really safe?

    PubMed

    Nocera, Antony

    2010-01-01

    The death of a previously well 13-month-old infant approximately 5 h after his mother contacted the Queensland Nurse led telephone triage call centre '13Health' for advice is the first Australian casualty of telephone triage. Experience from this case and another 'near miss' incident Australia highlight the potential of this model of care to harm patients using the service when it attempts to provide health advice compared with health information. PMID:22802265

  13. Repeat triage in disaster relief: questions from haiti.

    PubMed

    Eyal, Nir; Firth, Paul

    2012-01-01

    During a mass casualty disaster, the acute imbalance between need for treatment and capacity to supply care poses difficult rationing problems. It is common to assume that such disasters call for "utilitarian" procedures that deliberately prioritize saving the most lives over other considerations. A group of medical responders to the 2010 Haitian earthquake faced particular challenges in determining how to allocate limited treatment, time and other resources between existing patients and potential patients not yet under care. We identified that rationing dilemmas points occurred at three points: when care had to be limited, when care had to be completed prematurely, and when care had to be withdrawn. "Repeat triage" refers to rationing challenges occurring at all these points, where the allocation of care is between existing and potential patients. By contrast, "initial triage" designates the allocation of access to treatment among new arrivals, all of whom are potential patients. Repeat and initial triage differ significantly. Several considerations make repeat triage special by supporting limited priority to existing patients, in transgression of pure "utilitarian" procedures: (1) Pragmatically, often it is more efficient to complete treatment on existing patients, for whom prognosis can be established with greater certainty and without added time, than to attempt to save new patients; (2) A fiduciary trust relationship has been formed between care-giver and existing patients, which may make the moral obligation towards them somewhat stronger than the one to potential patients; (3) Existing patients will have often arrived earlier, so when needs are equal, the "first come, first served" principle prioritizes them for care; (4) Withdrawal of care during repeat triage may constitute active rather than passive harm, and more often a serious transgression of patient autonomy; (5) Health providers should normally not be asked to behave in ways that profoundly violate their personal and professional integrity, and abandoning existing patients may do so. For these reasons, responders can permissibly give a degree of priority to existing patients over newcomers in disaster. PMID:23145352

  14. Scientific framework for research on disaster and mass casualty incident in Korea: building consensus using Delphi method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chu Hyun; Park, Ju Ok; Park, Chang Bae; Kim, Seong Chun; Kim, Soo Jin; Hong, Ki Jeong

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the scientific framework for research on disaster and mass casualty incident (MCI) in Korea, especially Korean terminology, feasible definition, and epidemiologic indices. The two staged policy Delphi method was performed by instructors of National Disaster Life Support (NDLS®) with the constructed questionnaire containing items based on the literature review. The first-stage survey was conducted by 11 experts through two rounds of survey for making issue and option. The second-stage survey was conducted by 35 experts for making a generalized group based consensus. Experts were selected among instructors of National Disaster Life Support Course. Through two staged Delphi survey experts made consensus: 1) the Korean terminology "jaenan" with "disaster" and "dajung-sonsang-sago" with "MCI"; 2) the feasible definition of "disaster" as the events that have an effect on one or more municipal local government area (city-county-district) or results in ≥ 10 of death or ≥ 50 injured victims; 3) the feasible definition of MCI as the events that result in ≥ 6 casualties including death; 4) essential 31 epidemiologic indices. Experts could determine the scientific framework in Korea for research on disaster medicine, considering the distinct characteristics of Korea and current research trends. PMID:24431916

  15. [Surgical activity in a mass casualty situation: humanitarian relief mission in Pakistan].

    PubMed

    Petek, D; Hagon, O; Hoffmeyer, P

    2007-02-28

    On October 8th 2005, a violent earthquake struck the northern region of Pakistan resulting in a large number of injuries and deaths. In response to this catastrophe, the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) offered logistic support, including material and medical staff. After evaluating the needs, the SDC sent two surgeons to the city of Mansehra for a short term mission. At that site a college had been transformed into a field hospital by a multidisciplinary Pakistani team, already busy at work. Up to 200 casualties per day were brought to that center for a first surgical procedure consisting in debridement, application of traction, or external fixation. In total, more than 2000 people were treated during this two week mission. PMID:17410942

  16. [Current state of medical care of polytrauma and mass casualty incidents in Germany. Are we well-prepared?].

    PubMed

    Brodauf, L; Heßing, K; Hoffmann, R; Friemert, B

    2015-10-01

    The white paper on the medical care of the severely injured published in 2006 is a collection of proposals and recommendations concerning structure, organization and equipment for the medical care of severely injured patients. Since its publication 50 networks ( http://www.dgu-traumanetzwerk.de/index ) have been established as part of the trauma network. This and the trauma register have helped to continuously improve the medical care of severely injured patients since 1993 [26]. Numerous studies have documented the progress made in measures required by the trauma network [4, 6]. For example, the mortality rate of severely injured patients has dropped from 25 % to approximately 10 % in the past 15 years. From the register and network data it is difficult to tell how each of these measures is implemented in the participating hospitals, who provides medical treatment to patients when, and how medical care is organized in detail. This is why a survey on medical care for polytrauma and in mass casualty situations was conducted among medical directors in German surgical hospitals who are members of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU). Thanks to the 211 participants (most of whom specialize in orthopedic and trauma surgery) a detailed description of how medical treatment is currently organized and performed could be acquired. The survey showed that care of patients with polytrauma (i.e. medical treatment and management) is important irrespective of the level of training of physicians and of the level of patient treatment in hospitals. The central role of traumatologists was emphasized not only in terms of actual treatment but also as an administrator for organizational and management matters. Almost all hospitals have plans for a mass casualty situation; however, the levels of preparedness show considerable variation. A highly critical view is taken of the new surgical specialists with respect to interdisciplinary and comprehensive emergency medical treatment and casualty care. The survey also revealed the continual conflict between managing costs and maintaining quality and resources. It gives an overview of patient treatment in the transition from preclinical to clinical care and provides insights into the targets achieved, current problems and conflicts. PMID:26324317

  17. Engaging Active Bystanders in Mass Casualty Events and Other Life-Threatening Emergencies: A Pilot Training Course Demonstration.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracey O; Baker, Susan D; Roberts, Kathryn; Payne, Skip A

    2016-04-01

    Emerging research indicates the critical role members of the public can play in saving lives and reducing morbidity at the scene in the immediate aftermath of a disaster. It is anticipated that with training, more members of the public will be ready and able to assist should they be present at mass casualty events or other circumstances in which there are serious injuries or potential loss of life. This article describes a training course developed by multiple federal and nonfederal partners aimed at preparing the public to become "active bystanders" followed by a pilot demonstration project conducted by Medical Reserve Corps Units. The outcomes of the project indicated that the training was comprehensive and appropriate for members of the public with little or no first aid knowledge. National availability of the "Becoming an Active Bystander" training course is currently being planned. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:286-292). PMID:26841861

  18. Risk Analysis for Environmental Health Triage

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, K T

    2005-11-18

    The Homeland Security Act mandates development of a national, risk-based system to support planning for, response to and recovery from emergency situations involving large-scale toxic exposures. To prepare for and manage consequences effectively, planners and responders need not only to identify zones of potentially elevated individual risk, but also to predict expected casualties. Emergency response support systems now define ''consequences'' by mapping areas in which toxic chemical concentrations do or may exceed Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs) or similar guidelines. However, because AEGLs do not estimate expected risks, current unqualified claims that such maps support consequence management are misleading. Intentionally protective, AEGLs incorporate various safety/uncertainty factors depending on scope and quality of chemical-specific toxicity data. Some of these factors are irrelevant, and others need to be modified, whenever resource constraints or exposure-scenario complexities require responders to make critical trade-off (triage) decisions in order to minimize expected casualties. AEGL-exceedance zones cannot consistently be aggregated, compared, or used to calculate expected casualties, and so may seriously misguide emergency response triage decisions. Methods and tools well established and readily available to support environmental health protection are not yet developed for chemically related environmental health triage. Effective triage decisions involving chemical risks require a new assessment approach that focuses on best estimates of likely casualties, rather than on upper plausible bounds of individual risk. If risk-based consequence management is to become a reality, federal agencies tasked with supporting emergency response must actively coordinate to foster new methods that can support effective environmental health triage.

  19. Population-based triage management in response to surge-capacity requirements during a large-scale bioevent disaster.

    PubMed

    Burkle, Frederick M

    2006-11-01

    Both the naturally occurring and deliberate release of a biological agent in a population can bring catastrophic consequences. Although these bioevents have similarities with other disasters, there also are major differences, especially in the approach to triage management of surge capacity resources. Conventional mass-casualty events use uniform methods for triage on the basis of severity of presentation and do not consider exposure, duration, or infectiousness, thereby impeding control of transmission and delaying recognition of victims requiring immediate care. Bioevent triage management must be population based, with the goal of preventing secondary transmission, beginning at the point of contact, to control the epidemic outbreak. Whatever triage system is used, it must first recognize the requirements of those Susceptible but not exposed, those Exposed but not yet infectious, those Infectious, those Removed by death or recovery, and those protected by Vaccination or prophylactic medication (SEIRV methodology). Everyone in the population falls into one of these five categories. This article addresses a population approach to SEIRV-based triage in which decision making falls under a two-phase system with specific measures of effectiveness to increase likelihood of medical success, epidemic control, and conservation of scarce resources. PMID:17015415

  20. Consensus on items and quantities of clinical equipment required to deal with a mass casualties big bang incident: a national Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Major short-notice or sudden impact incidents, which result in a large number of casualties, are rare events. However health services must be prepared to respond to such events appropriately. In the United Kingdom (UK), a mass casualties incident is when the normal response of several National Health Service organizations to a major incident, has to be supported with extraordinary measures. Having the right type and quantity of clinical equipment is essential, but planning for such emergencies is challenging. To date, the equipment stored for such events has been selected on the basis of local clinical judgment and has evolved without an explicit evidence-base. This has resulted in considerable variations in the types and quantities of clinical equipment being stored in different locations. This study aimed to develop an expert consensus opinion of the essential items and minimum quantities of clinical equipment that is required to treat 100 people at the scene of a big bang mass casualties event. Methods A three round modified Delphi study was conducted with 32 experts using a specifically developed web-based platform. Individuals were invited to participate if they had personal clinical experience of providing a pre-hospital emergency medical response to a mass casualties incident, or had responsibility in health emergency planning for mass casualties incidents and were in a position of authority within the sphere of emergency health planning. Each item’s importance was measured on a 5-point Likert scale. The quantity of items required was measured numerically. Data were analyzed using nonparametric statistics. Results Experts achieved consensus on a total of 134 items (54%) on completion of the study. Experts did not reach consensus on 114 (46%) items. Median quantities and interquartile ranges of the items, and their recommended quantities were identified and are presented. Conclusions This study is the first to produce an expert consensus on the items and quantities of clinical equipment that are required to treat 100 people at the scene of a big bang mass casualties event. The findings can be used, both in the UK and internationally, to support decision makers in the planning of equipment for such incidents. PMID:24559111

  1. Hospital management of mass radiological casualties : reassessing exposures from contaminated victims of an exploded radiological dispersal device (RDD).

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, Armin; Harper, Frederick Taylor; Smith, James M.

    2005-04-01

    One of the key issues in the aftermath of an exploded radiological dispersal device from a terrorist event is that of the contaminated victim and the concern among healthcare providers for the harmful exposures they may receive in treating patients, especially if the patient has not been thoroughly decontaminated. This is critically important in the event of mass casualties from a nuclear or radiological incident because of the essential rapidity of acute medical decisions and that those who have life- or limb-threatening injuries may have treatment unduly delayed by a decontamination process that may be unnecessary for protecting the health and safety of the patient or the healthcare provider. To estimate potential contamination of those exposed in a radiological dispersal device event, results were used from explosive aerosolization tests of surrogate radionuclides detonated with high explosives at the Sandia National Laboratories. Computer modeling was also used to assess radiation dose rates to surgical personnel treating patients with blast injuries who are contaminated with any of a variety of common radionuclides. It is demonstrated that exceptional but plausible cases may require special precautions by the healthcare provider, even while managing life-threatening injuries of a contaminated victim from a radiological dispersal device event.

  2. Design and characterisation of a novel in vitro skin diffusion cell system for assessing mass casualty decontamination systems.

    PubMed

    Matar, H; Larner, J; Kansagra, S; Atkinson, K L; Skamarauskas, J T; Amlot, R; Chilcott, R P

    2014-06-01

    The efficient removal of contaminants from the outer surfaces of the body can provide an effective means of reducing adverse health effects associated with incidents involving the accidental or deliberate release of hazardous materials. Showering with water is frequently used by first responders as a rapid method of mass casualty decontamination (MCD). However, there is a paucity of data on the generic effectiveness and safety of aqueous decontamination systems. To address these issues, we have developed a new in vitro skin diffusion cell system to model the conditions of a common MCD procedure ("ladder pipe system"). The new diffusion cell design incorporates a showering nozzle, an air sampling port for measurement of vapour loss and/aerosolisation, adjustable (horizontal to vertical) skin orientation and a circulating manifold system (to maintain a specified flow rate, temperature and pressure of shower water). The dermal absorption characteristics of several simulants (Invisible Red S, curcumin and methyl salicylate) measured with the new in vitro model were in good agreement with previous in vitro and in vivo studies. Moreover, these initial studies have indicated that whilst flow rate and water temperature are important factors for MCD, the presence of clothing during showering may (under certain circumstances) cause transfer and spreading of contaminants to the skin surface. PMID:24412538

  3. Blurred front lines: triage and initial management of blast injuries.

    PubMed

    Balazs, George C; Blais, Micah B; Bluman, Eric M; Andersen, Romney C; Potter, Benjamin K

    2015-09-01

    Recent armed conflicts and the expanded reach of international terror groups has resulted in an increased incidence of blast-related injuries in both military and civilian populations. Mass-casualty incidents may require both on-scene and in-hospital triage to maximize survival rates and conserve limited resources. Initial evaluation should focus on the identification and control of potentially life-threatening conditions, especially life-threatening hemorrhage. Early operative priorities for musculoskeletal injuries focus on the principles of damage-control orthopaedics, with early and aggressive debridement of soft-tissue wounds, vascular shunting or grafting to restore limb perfusion, and long-bone fracture stabilization via external fixation. Special considerations such as patient transport, infection control and prevention, and amputation management are also discussed. All orthopedic surgeons, regardless of practice setting, should be familiar with the basic principles of evaluation, resuscitation, and initial management of explosive blast injuries. PMID:26088796

  4. Developing and organizing a trauma system and mass casualty management: some useful observations from the israeli trauma model.

    PubMed

    Borgohain, B; Khonglah, T

    2013-01-01

    A trauma system is a chain of arrangements and preparedness to provide quality response to injured from the site of injury to the appropriate hospital for the full range of care. Israel has a unique trauma system developed from the experience gained in peace and in war. The system is designed to fit the state's current health system, which is different from the European and American systems. An effective trauma system may potentially manage mass casualty incidence better. The aim of this paper is to discuss learning points to develop a trauma system based on the Israeli trauma model. After participating in a course on developing a trauma system organized by a top Israeli trauma center, a literature search on the topic on the Internet was done using relevant key words like trauma system and disaster management in Israel using the Google search engine in the pubmed, open access journals and websites of trauma organizations. Israel has a unique trauma system of organizing and managing an emergency event, characterized by a central national organization responsible for management, coordination and ongoing quality control. Because of its unique geopolitical situation, the armed forces has a significant role in the system. Investing adequate resources on continuous education, manpower training, motivation, team-work and creation of public volunteers through advocacy is important for capacity building to develop a trauma system. Wisdom, motivation and pragmatism of the Israeli model may be useful to streamline work in skeletal trauma services of developing countries having fewer resources to bring consistency and acceptable standards in trauma care. PMID:23634336

  5. Developing and Organizing a Trauma System and Mass Casualty Management: Some Useful Observations from the Israeli Trauma Model

    PubMed Central

    Borgohain, B; Khonglah, T

    2013-01-01

    A trauma system is a chain of arrangements and preparedness to provide quality response to injured from the site of injury to the appropriate hospital for the full range of care. Israel has a unique trauma system developed from the experience gained in peace and in war. The system is designed to fit the state's current health system, which is different from the European and American systems. An effective trauma system may potentially manage mass casualty incidence better. The aim of this paper is to discuss learning points to develop a trauma system based on the Israeli trauma model. After participating in a course on developing a trauma system organized by a top Israeli trauma center, a literature search on the topic on the Internet was done using relevant key words like trauma system and disaster management in Israel using the Google search engine in the pubmed, open access journals and websites of trauma organizations. Israel has a unique trauma system of organizing and managing an emergency event, characterized by a central national organization responsible for management, coordination and ongoing quality control. Because of its unique geopolitical situation, the armed forces has a significant role in the system. Investing adequate resources on continuous education, manpower training, motivation, team-work and creation of public volunteers through advocacy is important for capacity building to develop a trauma system. Wisdom, motivation and pragmatism of the Israeli model may be useful to streamline work in skeletal trauma services of developing countries having fewer resources to bring consistency and acceptable standards in trauma care. PMID:23634336

  6. The Boston Marathon Bombings Mass Casualty Incident: One Emergency Department's Information Systems Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Landman, Adam; Teich, Jonathan M; Pruitt, Peter; Moore, Samantha E; Theriault, Jennifer; Dorisca, Elizabeth; Harris, Sheila; Crim, Heidi; Lurie, Nicole; Goralnick, Eric

    2015-07-01

    Emergency department (ED) information systems are designed to support efficient and safe emergency care. These same systems often play a critical role in disasters to facilitate real-time situation awareness, information management, and communication. In this article, we describe one ED's experiences with ED information systems during the April 2013 Boston Marathon bombings. During postevent debriefings, staff shared that our ED information systems and workflow did not optimally support this incident; we found challenges with our unidentified patient naming convention, real-time situational awareness of patient location, and documentation of assessments, orders, and procedures. As a result, before our next mass gathering event, we changed our unidentified patient naming convention to more clearly distinguish multiple, simultaneous, unidentified patients. We also made changes to the disaster registration workflow and enhanced roles and responsibilities for updating electronic systems. Health systems should conduct disaster drills using their ED information systems to identify inefficiencies before an actual incident. ED information systems may require enhancements to better support disasters. Newer technologies, such as radiofrequency identification, could further improve disaster information management and communication but require careful evaluation and implementation into daily ED workflow. PMID:24997562

  7. Duration and predictors of emergency surgical operations - basis for medical management of mass casualty incidents

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Hospitals have a critically important role in the management of mass causality incidents (MCI), yet there is little information to assist emergency planners. A significantly limiting factor of a hospital's capability to treat those affected is its surgical capacity. We therefore intended to provide data about the duration and predictors of life saving operations. Methods The data of 20,815 predominantly blunt trauma patients recorded in the Trauma Registry of the German-Trauma-Society was retrospectively analyzed to calculate the duration of life-saving operations as well as their predictors. Inclusion criteria were an ISS ≥ 16 and the performance of relevant ICPM-coded procedures within 6 h of admission. Results From 1,228 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria 1,793 operations could be identified as life-saving operations. Acute injuries to the abdomen accounted for 54.1% followed by head injuries (26.3%), pelvic injuries (11.5%), thoracic injuries (5.0%) and major amputations (3.1%). The mean cut to suture time was 130 min (IQR 65-165 min). Logistic regression revealed 8 variables associated with an emergency operation: AIS of abdomen ≥ 3 (OR 4,00), ISS ≥ 35 (OR 2,94), hemoglobin level ≤ 8 mg/dL (OR 1,40), pulse rate on hospital admission < 40 or > 120/min (OR 1,39), blood pressure on hospital admission < 90 mmHg (OR 1,35), prehospital infusion volume ≥ 2000 ml (OR 1,34), GCS ≤ 8 (OR 1,32) and anisocoria (OR 1,28) on-scene. Conclusions The mean operation time of 130 min calculated for emergency life-saving surgical operations provides a realistic guideline for the prospective treatment capacity which can be estimated and projected into an actual incident admission capacity. Knowledge of predictive factors for life-saving emergency operations helps to identify those patients that need most urgent operative treatment in case of blunt MCI. PMID:20149987

  8. Chapter 7. Critical care triage

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Michael D.; Joynt, Gavin M.; Hick, John L.; Colvin, John; Danis, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations and standard operating procedures for intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital preparations for an influenza pandemic or mass disaster with a specific focus on critical care triage. Methods Based on a literature review and expert opinion, a Delphi process was used to define the essential topics including critical care triage. Results Key recommendations include: (1) establish an Incident Management System with Emergency Executive Control Groups at facility, local, regional/state or national levels to exercise authority and direction over resources; (2) developing fair and equitable policies may require restricting ICU services to patients most likely to benefit; (3) usual treatments and standards of practice may be impossible to deliver; (4) ICU care and treatments may have to be withheld from patients likely to die even with ICU care and withdrawn after a trial in patients who do not improve or deteriorate; (5) triage criteria should be objective, ethical, transparent, applied equitably and be publically disclosed; (6) trigger triage protocols for pandemic influenza only when critical care resources across a broad geographic area are or will be overwhelmed despite all reasonable efforts to extend resources or obtain additional resources; (7) triage of patients for ICU should be based on those who are likely to benefit most or a ‘first come, first served’ basis; (8) a triage officer should apply inclusion and exclusion criteria to determine patient qualification for ICU admission. Conclusions Judicious planning and adoption of protocols for critical care triage are necessary to optimize outcomes during a pandemic. PMID:20213422

  9. TRIAGE DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR PARTIAL-BODY EXPOSURE: DICENTRIC ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Maria; Pellmar, Terry C.

    2009-01-01

    Partial-body biodosimetry is likely to be required after a radiological or nuclear exposure. Clinical signs and symptoms, distribution of dicentrics in circulating blood cells, organ-specific biomarkers, physical signals in teeth and nails all can provide indications of non-homogeneous exposures. Organ specific biomarkers may provide early warning regarding physiological systems at risk after radiation injury. Use of a combination of markers and symptoms will be needed for clinical insights for therapeutic approaches. Analysis of dicentrics, a marker specific for radiation injury, is the “Gold standard” of biodosimetry and can reveal partial-body exposures. Automation of sample processing for dicentric analysis can increase throughput with customization of off-the-shelf technologies for cytogenetic sample processing and information management. Automated analysis of the metaphase spreads is currently limited but improvements are in development. Our efforts bridge the technological gaps to allow the use of dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) for risk-based stratification of mass casualties. This article summarizes current knowledge on partial-body cytogenetic dose assessment synthesizing information leading to the proposal of an approach to triage dose prediction in radiation mass casualties, based on equivalent whole-body doses under partial-body exposure conditions and assesses the validity of using this model. An initial screening using only 20 metaphase spreads per subject can confirm irradiation above 2-Gy. A subsequent increase to 50 metaphases improves dose determination to allow risk stratification for clinical triage. Metaphases evaluated for inhomogeneous distribution of dicentrics can reveal partial-body exposures. We tested the validity of this approach in an in vitro model that simulates partial-body irradiation by mixing irradiated and un-irradiated lymphocytes in various proportions. Our preliminary results support the notion that this approach will be effective under a range of conditions including some partial-body exposures, but may have limitations with low doses or small proportions of irradiated body. Our studies address an important problem in the diagnosis of partial-body irradiation and dose assessment in mass casualties and propose a solution. However, additional work is needed to fully develop and validate the application of DCA to partial-body exposures. PMID:20065689

  10. Electronic Mass Casualty Assessment and Planning Scenarios (EMCAPS): development and application of computer modeling to selected National Planning Scenarios for high-consequence events.

    PubMed

    Scheulen, James J; Thanner, Meridith H; Hsu, Edbert B; Latimer, Christian K; Brown, Jeffrey; Kelen, Gabor D

    2009-02-01

    Few tools exist that are sufficiently robust to allow manipulation of key input variables to produce casualty estimates resulting from high-consequence events reflecting local or specific regions of concern. This article describes the design and utility of a computerized modeling simulation tool, Electronic Mass Casualty Assessment and Planning Scenarios (EMCAPS), developed to have broad application across emergency management and public health fields as part of a catastrophic events preparedness planning process. As a scalable, flexible tool, EMCAPS is intended to support emergency preparedness planning efforts at multiple levels ranging from local health systems to regional and state public health departments to Metropolitan Medical Response System jurisdictions. Designed around the subset of the National Planning Scenarios with health effects, advanced by the US Department of Homeland Security, the tool's platform is supported by the detailed descriptions and readily retrievable evidence-based assumptions of each scenario. The EMCAPS program allows the user to manipulate key scenario-based input variables that would best reflect the region or locale of interest. Inputs include population density, vulnerabilities, event size, and potency, as applicable. Using these inputs, EMCAPS generates the anticipated population-based health surge influence of the hazard scenario. Casualty estimates are stratified by injury severity/types where appropriate. Outputs are graph and table tabulations of surge estimates. The data can then be used to assess and tailor response capabilities for specific jurisdictions, organizations, and health care systems. EMCAPS may be downloaded without cost from http://www.hopkins-cepar.org/EMCAPS/EMCAPS.html as shareware. PMID:18986730

  11. Mass Casualty Decontamination in a Chemical or Radiological/Nuclear Incident with External Contamination: Guiding Principles and Research Needs.

    PubMed

    Cibulsky, Susan M; Sokolowski, Danny; Lafontaine, Marc; Gagnon, Christine; Blain, Peter G; Russell, David; Kreppel, Helmut; Biederbick, Walter; Shimazu, Takeshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Saito, Tomoya; Jourdain, Jean-René; Paquet, Francois; Li, Chunsheng; Akashi, Makoto; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Prosser, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Hazardous chemical, radiological, and nuclear materials threaten public health in scenarios of accidental or intentional release which can lead to external contamination of people.  Without intervention, the contamination could cause severe adverse health effects, through systemic absorption by the contaminated casualties as well as spread of contamination to other people, medical equipment, and facilities.  Timely decontamination can prevent or interrupt absorption into the body and minimize opportunities for spread of the contamination, thereby mitigating the health impact of the incident.  Although the specific physicochemical characteristics of the hazardous material(s) will determine the nature of an incident and its risks, some decontamination and medical challenges and recommended response strategies are common among chemical and radioactive material incidents.  Furthermore, the identity of the hazardous material released may not be known early in an incident.  Therefore, it may be beneficial to compare the evidence and harmonize approaches between chemical and radioactive contamination incidents.  Experts from the Global Health Security Initiative's Chemical and Radiological/Nuclear Working Groups present here a succinct summary of guiding principles for planning and response based on current best practices, as well as research needs, to address the challenges of managing contaminated casualties in a chemical or radiological/nuclear incident. PMID:26635995

  12. Mass Casualty Decontamination in a Chemical or Radiological/Nuclear Incident with External Contamination: Guiding Principles and Research Needs

    PubMed Central

    Cibulsky, Susan M; Sokolowski, Danny; Lafontaine, Marc; Gagnon, Christine; Blain, Peter G.; Russell, David; Kreppel, Helmut; Biederbick, Walter; Shimazu, Takeshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Saito, Tomoya; Jourdain, Jean- René; Paquet, Francois; Li, Chunsheng; Akashi, Makoto; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Prosser, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Hazardous chemical, radiological, and nuclear materials threaten public health in scenarios of accidental or intentional release which can lead to external contamination of people.  Without intervention, the contamination could cause severe adverse health effects, through systemic absorption by the contaminated casualties as well as spread of contamination to other people, medical equipment, and facilities.  Timely decontamination can prevent or interrupt absorption into the body and minimize opportunities for spread of the contamination, thereby mitigating the health impact of the incident.  Although the specific physicochemical characteristics of the hazardous material(s) will determine the nature of an incident and its risks, some decontamination and medical challenges and recommended response strategies are common among chemical and radioactive material incidents.  Furthermore, the identity of the hazardous material released may not be known early in an incident.  Therefore, it may be beneficial to compare the evidence and harmonize approaches between chemical and radioactive contamination incidents.  Experts from the Global Health Security Initiative’s Chemical and Radiological/Nuclear Working Groups present here a succinct summary of guiding principles for planning and response based on current best practices, as well as research needs, to address the challenges of managing contaminated casualties in a chemical or radiological/nuclear incident. PMID:26635995

  13. Design and evaluation of a wireless electronic health records system for field care in mass casualty settings

    PubMed Central

    Kirsh, D; Griswold, W G; Buono, C; Lyon, J; Rao, R; Chan, T C

    2011-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the use of technology to enhance the tracking and quality of clinical information available for patients in disaster settings. This paper describes the design and evaluation of the Wireless Internet Information System for Medical Response in Disasters (WIISARD). Materials and methods WIISARD combined advanced networking technology with electronic triage tags that reported victims' position and recorded medical information, with wireless pulse-oximeters that monitored patient vital signs, and a wireless electronic medical record (EMR) for disaster care. The EMR system included WiFi handheld devices with barcode scanners (used by front-line responders) and computer tablets with role-tailored software (used by managers of the triage, treatment, transport and medical communications teams). An additional software system provided situational awareness for the incident commander. The WIISARD system was evaluated in a large-scale simulation exercise designed for training first responders. A randomized trial was overlaid on this exercise with 100 simulated victims, 50 in a control pathway (paper-based), and 50 in completely electronic WIISARD pathway. All patients in the electronic pathway were cared for within the WIISARD system without paper-based workarounds. Results WIISARD reduced the rate of the missing and/or duplicated patient identifiers (0% vs 47%, p<0.001). The total time of the field was nearly identical (38:20 vs 38:23, IQR 26:53–1:05:32 vs 18:55–57:22). Conclusion Overall, the results of WIISARD show that wireless EMR systems for care of the victims of disasters would be complex to develop but potentially feasible to build and deploy, and likely to improve the quality of information available for the delivery of care during disasters. PMID:21709162

  14. Development of a High-Throughput and Miniaturized Cytokinesis-Block Micronucleus Assay for Use as a Biological Dosimetry Population Triage Tool

    PubMed Central

    Lue, Stanley W.; Repin, Mikhail; Mahnke, Ryan; Brenner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Biodosimetry is an essential tool for providing timely assessments of radiation exposure. For a large mass-casualty event involving exposure to ionizing radiation, it is of utmost importance to rapidly provide dose information for medical treatment. The well-established cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay is a validated method for biodosimetry. However, the need for an accelerated sample processing is required for the CBMN assay to be a suitable population triage tool. We report here on the development of a high-throughput and miniaturized version of the CMBN assay for accelerated sample processing. PMID:26230078

  15. Development of the science of mass casualty incident management: reflection on the medical response to the Wenchuan earthquake and Hangzhou bus fire*

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei-feng; Jiang, Li-bing; Jiang, Guan-yu; Zhang, Mao; Ma, Yue-feng; He, Xiao-jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In this paper, we review the previous classic research paradigms of a mass casualty incident (MCI) systematically and reflect the medical response to the Wenchuan earthquake and Hangzhou bus fire, in order to outline and develop an improved research paradigm for MCI management. Methods: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, China Wanfang, and China Biology Medicine (CBM) databases for relevant studies. The following key words and medical subject headings were used: ‘mass casualty incident’, ‘MCI’, ‘research method’, ‘Wenchuan’, ‘earthquake’, ‘research paradigm’, ‘science of surge’, ‘surge’, ‘surge capacity’, and ‘vulnerability’. Searches were performed without year or language restriction. After searching the four literature databases using the above listed key words and medical subject headings, related articles containing research paradigms of MCI, 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, July 5 bus fire, and science of surge and vulnerability were independently included by two authors. Results: The current progresses on MCI management include new golden hour, damage control philosophy, chain of survival, and three links theory. In addition, there are three evaluation methods (medical severity index (MSI), potential injury creating event (PICE) classification, and disaster severity scale (DSS)), which can dynamically assess the MCI situations and decisions for MCI responses and can be made based on the results of such evaluations. However, the three methods only offer a retrospective evaluation of MCI and thus fail to develop a real-time assessment of MCI responses. Therefore, they cannot be used as practical guidance for decision-making during MCI. Although the theory of surge science has made great improvements, we found that a very important factor has been ignored—vulnerability, based on reflecting on the MCI response to the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake and July 5 bus fire in Hangzhou. Conclusions: This new paradigm breaks through the limitation of traditional research paradigms and will contribute to the development of a methodology for disaster research. PMID:25471837

  16. [Emergency Triage. An Overview].

    PubMed

    Christ, Michael; Bingisser, Roland; Nickel, Christian Hans

    2016-03-01

    In emergency departments, patients present with different severities of diseases and traumatic injuries. However, patients with severe and life-threatening conditions compete for the same resources such as personal and structure. As a general rule, each patient should receive immediate diagnostic and treatment, independent of his or her severity of disease or traumatic injury. However, an unexpected number of patients presenting to the emergency department at the same time may exceed available resources. Thus, waiting times will occur and management of patients may be impeded. As a consequence, patients with diseases or traumatic injuries with a need for time-critical management, have to be detected at the time of presentation. After categorization, patients have to be prioritized and guided to the correct place of treatment ("triage"). Starting in Australia and the United States, nurse-driven triage systems have been introduced in the emergency departments. Aim of triage is to correctly identify at increased risk of death and guide them to rapid and correct treatment. In Germany, two five-level triage systems have been introduced: Manchester Triage System (MTS) and Emergency Severity Index (ESI). We give an overview of these risk assessment tools and discuss pros and cons. In addition, new options such as "team triage" and a combination with "Early Warning Scores" are reported. In summary, nurse-driven triage is an instrument to improve patient safety in emergency medicine. A structured and systematic triage of patients using validated triage assessment tools are recommended from national and international societies of emergency medicine. Therefore, nurse-driven triage is also a must in Germany. PMID:26939102

  17. REPEAT TRIAGE IN DISASTER RELIEF: QUESTIONS FROM HAITI

    PubMed Central

    Eyal, Nir; Firth, Paul; Black, L; Cist, AFM; Curran, M; Dalal, AN; Goodman, AK; Le Roy, A; Sunder, N; Wilson, MC

    2012-01-01

    During a mass casualty disaster, the acute imbalance between need for treatment and capacity to supply care poses difficult rationing problems. It is common to assume that such disasters call for “utilitarian” procedures that deliberately prioritize saving the most lives over other considerations. A group of medical responders to the 2010 Haitian earthquake faced particular challenges in determining how to allocate limited treatment, time and other resources between existing patients and potential patients not yet under care. We identified that rationing dilemmas points occurred at three points: when care had to be limited, when care had to be completed prematurely, and when care had to be withdrawn. “Repeat triage” refers to rationing challenges occurring at all these points, where the allocation of care is between existing and potential patients. By contrast, “initial triage” designates the allocation of access to treatment among new arrivals, all of whom are potential patients. Repeat and initial triage differ significantly. Several considerations make repeat triage special by supporting limited priority to existing patients, in transgression of pure “utilitarian” procedures: (1) Pragmatically, often it is more efficient to complete treatment on existing patients, for whom prognosis can be established with greater certainty and without added time, than to attempt to save new patients; (2) A fiduciary trust relationship has been formed between care-giver and existing patients, which may make the moral obligation towards them somewhat stronger than the one to potential patients; (3) Existing patients will have often arrived earlier, so when needs are equal, the “first come, first served” principle prioritizes them for care; (4) Withdrawal of care during repeat triage may constitute active rather than passive harm, and more often a serious transgression of patient autonomy; (5) Health providers should normally not be asked to behave in ways that profoundly violate their personal and professional integrity, and abandoning existing patients may do so. For these reasons, responders can permissibly give a degree of priority to existing patients over newcomers in disaster. PMID:23145352

  18. Challenges of major incident management when excess resources are allocated: experiences from a mass casualty incident after roof collapse of a military command center.

    PubMed

    Romundstad, Luis; Sundnes, Knut Ole; Pillgram-Larsen, Johan; Røste, Geir K; Gilbert, Mads

    2004-01-01

    During a military exercise in northern Norway in March 2000, the snow-laden roof of a command center collapsed with 76 persons inside. Twenty-five persons were entrapped and/or buried under snow masses. There were three deaths. Seven patients had serious injuries, three had moderate injuries, and 16 had minor injuries. A military Convalescence Camp that had been set up in a Sports Hall 125 meters from the scene was reorganized as a causality clearing station. Officers from the Convalescence Camp initially organized search and rescue. In all, 417 persons took part in the rescue work with 36 ambulances, 17 helicopters, three ambulance airplanes and one transport plane available. Two ambulances, five helicopters and one transport aircraft were used. Four patients were evacuated to a civilian hospital and six to a field hospital. The stretcher and treatment teams initially could have been more effectively organized. As resources were ample, this was a mass casualty, not a disaster. Firm incident command prevented the influx of excess resources. PMID:15506256

  19. Medical response of a physician and two nurses to the mass-casualty event resulting in the Phi Phi Islands from the tsunami.

    PubMed

    Ammartyothin, Surasak; Ashkenasi, Issac; Schwartz, Dagan; Leiba, Adi; Nakash, Guy; Pelts, Rami; Goldberg, Avishay; Bar-Dayan, Yaron

    2006-01-01

    The Phi Phi Islands are isolated islands located about one hour by ship from the mainland in Krabi province of Thailand. There is a small medical facility where the director is the one physician that provides care to residents and tourists. This small medical facility faced an enormous mass casualty incident due to the 2004 Tsunami. The hospital was damaged by the Tsunami wave and was not functional, one crew member died and another was injured. Medical care and evacuation posed a unique problem in the Phi Phi Islands due to remoteness, limited medical resources, lack of effective communication with the main land and the large number of victims. An alternative medical facility was located in a nearby hotel. The crew included the medical director, two nurses, two additional staff members, 10 local volunteers, and hotel staff members. The medical crew had to treat 600-700 casualties in 24 hours. Most of the victims were mildly injured, but approximately 100 (15%) of the victims could not walk due to their injuries. The medical director, made a conscious decision to initially treat only circulation ("C") problems, by controlling external hemorrhages. This decision was driven by the lack of equipment and personnel to deal with airway ("A") and breathing ("B") problems. In the post-disaster debriefing, the Phi Phi Island hospital physician noted five major lessons concerning disaster management in such extreme situation in a small facility located in a remote area: (1) effective resistant communication facilities must be ensured; (2) clear, simple "evacuation plans" should be made in advance; (3) plans should be made to ensure automatic reinforcement of remote areas with evacuation vehicles, medical equipment and medical personnel; (4) efficient cooperation with medical volunteers must be planned and drilled; and (5) every team member of such a hospital must participate in an educational program and periodic drills should be done to improve the disaster and emergency medicine capabilities. This case report is an example for caregivers all over the world, of an amazing lesson of leadership and courage. PMID:16892887

  20. Incidence and Mortality Rates of Disasters and Mass Casualty Incidents in Korea: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study, 2000-2009

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Shin, Sang Do; Lee, Seung Chul; Park, Ju Ok; Sung, Joohon

    2013-01-01

    The objective of study was to evaluate the incidence and mortality rates of disasters and mass casualty incidents (MCIs) over the past 10 yr in the administrative system of Korea administrative system and to examine their relationship with population characteristics. This was a population-based cross-sectional study. We calculated the nationwide incidence, as well as the crude mortality and injury incidence rates, of disasters and MCIs. The data were collected from the administrative database of the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) and from provincial fire departments from January 2000 to December 2009. A total of 47,169 events were collected from the NEMA administrative database. Of these events, 115 and 3,079 cases were defined as disasters and MCIs that occurred in Korea, respectively. The incidence of technical disasters/MCIs was approximately 12.7 times greater than that of natural disasters/MCIs. Over the past 10 yr, the crude mortality rates for disasters and MCIs were 2.36 deaths per 100,000 persons and 6.78 deaths per 100,000 persons, respectively. The crude injury incidence rates for disasters and MCIs were 25.47 injuries per 100,000 persons and 152 injuries per 100,000 persons, respectively. The incidence and mortality of disasters/MCIs in Korea seem to be low compared to that of trend around the world. PMID:23678255

  1. Tsunami Casualty Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, H.

    2007-12-01

    More than 4500 deaths by tsunamis were recorded in the decade of 1990. For example, the 1992 Flores Tsunami in Indonesia took away at least 1712 lives, and more than 2182 people were victimized by the 1998 Papua New Guinea Tsunami. Such staggering death toll has been totally overshadowed by the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami that claimed more than 220,000 lives. Unlike hurricanes that are often evaluated by economic losses, death count is the primary measure for tsunami hazard. It is partly because tsunamis kill more people owing to its short lead- time for warning. Although exact death tallies are not available for most of the tsunami events, there exist gender and age discriminations in tsunami casualties. Significant gender difference in the victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami was attributed to women's social norms and role behavior, as well as cultural bias toward women's inability to swim. Here we develop a rational casualty model based on humans' limit to withstand the tsunami flows. The application to simple tsunami runup cases demonstrates that biological and physiological disadvantages also make a significant difference in casualty rate. It further demonstrates that the gender and age discriminations in casualties become most pronounced when tsunami is marginally strong and the difference tends to diminish as tsunami strength increases.

  2. The Haiti earthquake: the provision of wound care for mass casualties utilizing negative-pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Allen; Gialich, Shelby; Kirk, Julie; Edwards, Sheriden; Beck, Brooke; Sorocéanu, Alexandra; Nelson, Scott; Gabriel, Cassie; Gupta, Subhas

    2011-10-01

    Many months after the devastating earthquake in January 2010, wounds remain a major disease burden in Haiti. Since January 2010, through the efforts of corporations, nonprofit charitable organizations, and medical professionals, advanced wound care techniques, including negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT), have been introduced into the wound care regimens of various hospitals in Haiti. In June 2010, the authors completed their second volunteer trip at a Haitian hospital specializing in orthopedic wounds. The medical team was composed of a plastic surgeon, orthopedic surgeon, anesthesiologist, medical assistant, scrub technician, and registered nurse (specializing in plastic surgery and orthopedics). The authors' team supplied NPWT devices, reticulated open-cell foam dressings, and canisters donated by Kinetic Concepts, Inc, San Antonio, Texas, for use at the hospital. This report describes the medical challenges in postearthquake Haiti (including limb salvage and infection), benefits of adjunctive use of NPWT/reticulated open-cell foam, and current wound care status in a Haitian orthopedic hospital. The future role of NPWT in Haiti and during mass catastrophe in a least-developed country is also discussed. PMID:21926673

  3. Triage as Urban Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcuse, Peter; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Triage policy is the exclusion of severely declining urban areas from services and programs on the grounds that the intensity of their needs cannot be met and the provision of services is therefore inefficient. Community groups must insist that severity of need, human benefits, and community protection be the priorities for allocation of funds.…

  4. Recent advances in medical device triage technologies for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Lansdowne, Krystal; Scully, Christopher G; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne; Marcozzi, David; Strauss, David G

    2015-06-01

    In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (Silver Spring, Maryland USA) created the Medical Countermeasures Initiative with the mission of development and promoting medical countermeasures that would be needed to protect the nation from identified, high-priority chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) threats and emerging infectious diseases. The aim of this review was to promote regulatory science research of medical devices and to analyze how the devices can be employed in different CBRN scenarios. Triage in CBRN scenarios presents unique challenges for first responders because the effects of CBRN agents and the clinical presentations of casualties at each triage stage can vary. The uniqueness of a CBRN event can render standard patient monitoring medical device and conventional triage algorithms ineffective. Despite the challenges, there have been recent advances in CBRN triage technology that include: novel technologies; mobile medical applications ("medical apps") for CBRN disasters; electronic triage tags, such as eTriage; diagnostic field devices, such as the Joint Biological Agent Identification System; and decision support systems, such as the Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST). Further research and medical device validation can help to advance prehospital triage technology for CBRN events. PMID:25868677

  5. Assessing injury severity during general war. Will the Military Triage system meet future needs?

    PubMed

    Ryan, J M; Sibson, J; Howell, G

    1990-02-01

    The injuries likely to occur during a future general war will differ in severity and number from those experienced during recent short campaigns, terrorist incidents and natural disasters. If general war should break out in Europe, casualty numbers will lean towards the First World War rather than the Second in scale. Medical assets can expect, at least temporarily, to be overwhelmed with casualties. To deal with this problem, casualty management will be staged through five echelons or lines of medical support. The principal problem that will face medical attendants at the forward lines will be the sorting of casualties by priority so that those unable to tolerate delay in treatment will be evacuated rapidly before the less severely injured. Sorting will be achieved by the application of a crude scoring system known as Military Triage. We examine this concept and discuss its likely effectiveness in a scenario characterised by limited medical resources and a high flow of casualties. With the widespread introduction of modern and complex injury severity scoring systems into civilian trauma practice it is timely to examine their potential role in augmenting or replacing the current Military Triage system. PMID:2319500

  6. An artificial neural network derived trauma outcome prediction score as an aid to triage for non-clinicians.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Adrian; Bar-Or, Raphael; Bar-Or, David

    2008-01-01

    In mass casualty events Emergency Medical Service Providers (EMS) choose treatment at Scene or a "scoop and run" approach. The latter requires clinically trained personnel at the reception site to triage patients. Current methodology based on Revised Trauma Score (tRTS) requires use of Glasgow Coma Scale, a method reliant on experience and clinical knowledge. This makes the system subjective and often inadequate for non-clinicians. This project attempts to develop a simplified outcome prediction score using an artificial neural network for use by a non-clinically trained EMS to aid triage. The project uses National Trauma Data Bank, Version 6.1. Tiberius Data Mining Software created Neural Network models. Variables considered were values that could easily be obtained during an event. Binary values were used for low SBP and low Respiratory Rate, coded using the RTS scoring table as a basis, and age indicators. A modified motor component of Glasgow Coma Score was created to negate the need for clinical knowledge. Best performing models, identified by Gini coefficient and ability to predict mortality, were with 8 and 10 neurons. On mortality prediction all even numbers of hidden neurons have similar performances. Training sets were compared to test sets, and found to be identical in Gini coefficient and performance. Models performed well in predicting mortality compared to standard outcome predictors. Possible additional variables such as gender or ethnicity might improve the Neural Network predictive ability. Pulse appears an essential variable not recorded by the NTDB. PMID:18487740

  7. Prehospital reflections: diagnosing apnoea at a multiple casualty chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear incident.

    PubMed

    Malpas, Michael

    2011-12-01

    During a multiple casualty chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear incident it is imperative that triage is accurately undertaken to use resources effectively and give the greatest chance of survival to those who need it. This reflection explores an option to assist in this matter by proposing a colorimetric breathing detection system, while remembering that this it is untested, may be a useful aid. PMID:21346259

  8. Battlefield triage life signs detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lin, Jenshan; Park, Byung-Kwon; Li, Changzhi; Massagram, Wansuree; Lubecke, Victor M.; Host-Madsen, Anders

    2008-04-01

    Getting to wounded soldiers on the battlefield is a precarious task, and medics have a very high casualty rate. It is therefore a vital importance to prioritize which soldiers to attend to first. The first step is to detect life signs - if a soldier is dead or alive, and prioritize recovery of live soldiers. The second step is to obtain vital signs from live soldiers, and use this to prioritize which are in most urgent need of attention. Our team at Kai Sensors, University of Hawaii and University of Florida is developing Doppler radar heart sensing technology that provides the means to detect life signs, respiration and/or heart beat, at a distance, even for subjects lying motionless, e.g., unconscious subjects, wearing body armor, and hidden from direct view. Since this technology can deliver heart rate information with high accuracy, it may also enable the assessment of a subject's physiological and psychological state based on heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Thus, the degree of a subject's injury may also be determined. The software and hardware developments and challenges for life signs detection and monitoring for battlefield triage will be discussed, including heart signal detection from all four sides of the human body, detection in the presence of body armor, and the feasibility of HRV parameter extraction.

  9. Operation Desert Shield: Medical aspects of weapons of mass destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, G.B. )

    1991-06-01

    The authors concern over possible use of weapons of mass destruction against U.S. forces in the Middle East has increased because Iraq has violated the Geneva Protocol of 1925 and the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention, attempted to acquire nuclear capability and delivery systems, and is reported to be developing biological weapons. The Army Medical Department has had no experience, since World War I, in the management and treatment of mass casualties contaminated by chemical agents, and has never treated casualties resulting from the use of nuclear or biological weapons used against our soldiers. Management and diagnosis of casualties will be complicated by their possible exposure to a mixture of chemical warfare and biological warfare agents. Triage is an essential aspect in the management of mass casualties since the number of injured patients will exceed the maximum medical capability to treat each patient on arrival. All levels of medical support must be prepared to protect themselves, their equipment and supplies, and their patients from contamination. In contaminated operations on the integrated battlefield, it will be of utmost importance to incorporate flexibility and innovation to match the medical and tactical situation.

  10. An Arm Mounted "Scratch and Sniff" Sample Triage Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrach, M. R.; Kidd, R.; Shiraishi, L.

    2012-06-01

    A sample triage system based on the detection of volatiles released by mechanical abrasion is proposed. The instrument will be capable of detecting trace compounds found in Mars rock and soils. The instrument mass will be approximately 2.8 kg.

  11. Garden Path Repair: Diagnosis and Triage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fodor, Janet Dean; Inoue, Atsu

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether triage--which determines the probable revisability of a structure--is a feature of human parsing, its scope must be established. This study compares four hypotheses about how much work triage can do. Identifies empirical predictions that differentiate diagnosis with triage from simple basic diagnosis. What little evidence…

  12. Diagnostic performance of Triage for benzodiazepines: urine analysis of the dose of therapeutic cases.

    PubMed

    Kurisaki, Emiko; Hayashida, Makiko; Nihira, Makoto; Ohno, Youkichi; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Okano, Takaaki; Niwa, Shin-ichi; Hiraiwa, Kouichi

    2005-09-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic performance of Triage for benzodiazepines in 74 urine specimens from outpatients given therapeutic doses of benzodiazepines and compared the results of EMIT assays. Results obtained in all urine samples were confirmed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Overall agreement between results of Triage and EMIT assays was 73%. All of the Triage-positive samples were also positive by EMIT assays. Results of Triage and EMIT assays were different for 20 samples obtained from patients given thienodiazepines (etizolam, brotizolam, and clotiazepam) and nitrobenzodiazepines (nitrazepam, flunitrazepam, and clonazepam). LC-MS confirmed parent drugs in urine specimens, consistent with the prescriptions of drugs. The low agreement between Triage and EMIT results in this study might be due to low sensitivity of Triage for thienodiazepines. Thienodiazines are frequently prescribed benzodiazepines, and Triage panel is the most frequently used screening kit in Japan. It should be noted that negative results obtained by a Triage test might not mean the absence of thienodiazepines. PMID:16168176

  13. 33 CFR 146.40 - Diving casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.40 Diving casualties. Diving related casualties are reported in accordance with 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Diving casualties. 146.40...

  14. 33 CFR 146.40 - Diving casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.40 Diving casualties. Diving related casualties are reported in accordance with 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Diving casualties. 146.40...

  15. 33 CFR 146.40 - Diving casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.40 Diving casualties. Diving related casualties are reported in accordance with 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Diving casualties. 146.40...

  16. 33 CFR 146.40 - Diving casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.40 Diving casualties. Diving related casualties are reported in accordance with 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diving casualties. 146.40...

  17. 33 CFR 146.40 - Diving casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.40 Diving casualties. Diving related casualties are reported in accordance with 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Diving casualties. 146.40...

  18. Development of the triage, monitoring and treatment Handbook for Members of the Public Affected by Radiological Terrorism - A European Response

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, P.; Rojas-Palma, C.

    2007-07-01

    European national emergency response plans have long been focused on accidents at nuclear power plants. Recently, the possible threats by disaffected groups have shifted the focus to being prepared also for malevolent use of radiation that are aimed at creating disruption and panic in the society. The casualties will most likely be members of the public. According to the scenario, the number of affected people can vary from a few to mass casualties. The radiation exposure can range from very low to substantial, possibly combined with conventional injuries. There is a need to develop practicable tools for the adequate response to such acts and more specifically to address European guidelines for triage, monitoring and treatment of exposed people. Although European countries have developed emergency response plans for nuclear accidents they have not all made plans for handling malevolent use of radioactive material. Indeed, there is a need to develop practical guidance on emergency response and medical treatment of the public affected by malevolent acts. Generic guidance on this topic has been published by international organisations. They are, however, not operational documents to be used in emergency situations. The Triage, Monitoring and Treatment (TMT) Handbook aims to strengthen the European ability to efficiently respond to malevolent acts in terms of protecting and treating exposed people. Part of the Handbook is also devoted to public information and communication issues which would contribute to public reassurance in emergency situations. The Handbook will be drafted by European and international experts before it is circulated to all emergency response institutions in Europe that would be a part of the handling of malevolent acts using radioactive material. The institutions would be given a 6 months consultation time with encouragement to test the draft Handbook in national exercises. A workshop will allow feedback from these end users on the content, structure and usefulness of the Handbook before a final version is produced. In order to achieve the project's objectives a consortium has been drawn together including, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland, the UK Health Protection Agency, the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection of Poland and the World Health Organisation. Enviros Consulting is acting as the technical secretariat for the project. The Handbook will aim to harmonise the approaches to handling malevolent acts across Europe. This harmonisation will have an added value on the public confidence in authorities since differing approaches in neighbouring countries could lead to public confusion and mistrust. (authors)

  19. Challenges in presenting high dimensional data to aid in triage in the DARPA virtual soldier project.

    PubMed

    Boyd, A D; Wright, Z C; Ade, A S; Bookstein, F; Ogden, J C; Meixner, W; Athey, B D; Morris, T

    2005-01-01

    One of the goals of the DARPA Virtual Soldier Project is to aid the field medic in the triage of a casualty. In Phase I, we are currently collecting 12 baseline experimental physiological variables and a cardiac gated Computed Tomography (CT) imagery for use in an prototyping a futuristic electronic medical record, the "Holomer". We are using physiological models and Kalman filtering to aid in diagnosis and predict outcomes in relation to cardiac injury. The physiological modeling introduces another few hundred variables. Reducing the complexity of the above into easy-to-read text to aid in the triage by the field medic is the challenge with multiple display solutions. A description of the possible techniques follows. PMID:15718701

  20. Eye casualty services in London

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H B; Daniel, C S; Verma, S

    2013-01-01

    The combined pressures of the European Working Time Directive, 4 h waiting time target, and growing rates of unplanned hospital attendances have forced a major consolidation of eye casualty departments across the country, with the remaining units seeing a rapid increase in demand. We examine the effect of these changes on the provision of emergency eye care in Central London, and see what wider lessons can be learned. We surveyed the managers responsible for each of London's 8 out-of-hours eye casualty services, analysed data on attendance numbers, and conducted detailed interviews with lead clinicians. At London's two largest units, Moorfields Eye Hospital and the Western Eye Hospital, annual attendance numbers have been rising at 7.9% per year (to 76 034 patients in 2010/11) and 9.6% per year (to 31 128 patients in 2010/11), respectively. Using Moorfields as a case study, we discuss methods to increase capacity and efficiency in response to this demand, and also examine some of the unintended consequences of service consolidation including patients travelling long distances to geographically inappropriate units, and confusion over responsibility for out-of-hours inpatient cover. We describe a novel ‘referral pathway' developed to minimise unnecessary travelling and delay for patients, and propose a forum for the strategic planning of London's eye casualty services in the future. PMID:23370420

  1. An assessment of telemedicine possibilities in massive casualties situations.

    PubMed

    Paunksnis, A; Barzdziukas, V; Kurapkiene, S; Vaicaitiene, R; Sereika, V

    2005-01-01

    The use of existing possibilities of Telemedicine Center of Kaunas University of Medicine allows the live distant consultations from high-level medical specialised centers to rural areas. On July 2004 the Telemedicine Center took part in the RESCUER/MEDCEUR project exercise. A special objective was the use of telemedicine facilities for distant consultations and sorting of victims directly at the event place. Telemedicine Center used appropriate telecommunication devices for joint activities of civil and multinational military services in critical situations such as mass casualty events. There were used ISDN lines and IP radio-connection. On the final and most intensive day of the anti-terrorism drills, the multinational force of medics at the Kairiu Training Range in Lithuania reacted to a large mass casualty event--treating hundreds of victims from a simulated train crash. Using on-line telemedicine facilities from Kaunas Medical University Hospital there were corrected the tactics of giving the first help and sorting of casualties. The most complicated initiated cases of eye trauma, neurosurgical trauma, maxilloface trauma and traumatic amputation of limbs evaluated and selected for emergent evacuation to the third level hospitals. All those cases transported to Kaunas and Vilnius Universities Hospitals by helicopters (200 and 300 km from the event place). The common use of existing military and civil telemedicine infrastructure showed the possibilities of interaction in management, giving the first help and sorting of casualties between military and civil medical services during the rescue operations. PMID:16358966

  2. [Triage systems in the emergency department].

    PubMed

    Weyrich, P; Christ, M; Celebi, N; Riessen, R

    2012-02-01

    Emergency department (ED) triage systems facilitate the categorization of emergency patients according to their disease severity and determine both treatment priority and treatment location. Four different five-level triage systems are internationally accepted. The Australasian Triage Scale (ATS, Australasia) allows categorization based on symptoms using specific descriptors. The Manchester Triage System (MTS, UK) uses defined presentational flow charts combined with indicators. The Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS, Canada) is based on the ATS, but also includes diagnoses. The Emergency Severity Index (ESI, USA) first excludes life-threatening and severe disease before stratification according to estimated resource utilization. The goal of all triage systems is to reduce the in-hospital mortality and to minimize time to treatment, length of stay, and resource utilization. PMID:22349480

  3. 33 CFR 173.55 - Report of casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Report of casualty or accident... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY VESSEL NUMBERING AND CASUALTY AND ACCIDENT REPORTING Casualty and Accident Reporting § 173.55 Report of casualty or accident. (a) The operator of a vessel shall submit the casualty...

  4. 33 CFR 173.55 - Report of casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Report of casualty or accident... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY VESSEL NUMBERING AND CASUALTY AND ACCIDENT REPORTING Casualty and Accident Reporting § 173.55 Report of casualty or accident. (a) The operator of a vessel shall submit the casualty...

  5. 33 CFR 173.55 - Report of casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Report of casualty or accident... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY VESSEL NUMBERING AND CASUALTY AND ACCIDENT REPORTING Casualty and Accident Reporting § 173.55 Report of casualty or accident. (a) The operator of a vessel shall submit the casualty...

  6. 33 CFR 173.55 - Report of casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Report of casualty or accident... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY VESSEL NUMBERING AND CASUALTY AND ACCIDENT REPORTING Casualty and Accident Reporting § 173.55 Report of casualty or accident. (a) The operator of a vessel shall submit the casualty...

  7. 33 CFR 173.55 - Report of casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Report of casualty or accident... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY VESSEL NUMBERING AND CASUALTY AND ACCIDENT REPORTING Casualty and Accident Reporting § 173.55 Report of casualty or accident. (a) The operator of a vessel shall submit the casualty...

  8. Contribution of forensic autopsy to scene reconstruction in mass fire casualties: a case of alleged arson on a floor consisting of small compartments in a building.

    PubMed

    Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Oritani, Shigeki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    A fire is an important cause of mass disasters, involving various forensic issues. Before dawn on an early morning, 16 male visitors in their twenties to sixties were killed in a possibly incendiary fire at a 'private video parlor' consisting of small compartments in a building. The main causes of death as determined by forensic autopsy were acute carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication for all of the 15 found-dead victims, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy following acute CO intoxication for a victim who died in hospital. Burns were mild (<20% of body surface) in most victims, except for three victims found between the entrance and the estimated fire-outbreak site; thus, identification was completed without difficulty, supported by DNA analysis. Blood carboxyhemoglobin saturation (COHb) was higher for victims found dead in the inner area. Blood cyanide levels were sublethal, moderately correlated to COHb, but were higher in victims found around the estimated fire-outbreak site. There was no evidence of thinner, alcohol or drug abuse, or an attack of disease as a possible cause of an accidental fire outbreak. These observations contribute to evidence-based reconstruction of the fire disaster, and suggest how deaths could have been prevented by appropriate disaster measures. PMID:25311374

  9. Emergency department triage: an ethical analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Emergency departments across the globe follow a triage system in order to cope with overcrowding. The intention behind triage is to improve the emergency care and to prioritize cases in terms of clinical urgency. Discussion In emergency department triage, medical care might lead to adverse consequences like delay in providing care, compromise in privacy and confidentiality, poor physician-patient communication, failing to provide the necessary care altogether, or even having to decide whose life to save when not everyone can be saved. These consequences challenge the ethical quality of emergency care. This article provides an ethical analysis of "routine" emergency department triage. The four principles of biomedical ethics - viz. respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice provide the starting point and help us to identify the ethical challenges of emergency department triage. However, they do not offer a comprehensive ethical view. To address the ethical issues of emergency department triage from a more comprehensive ethical view, the care ethics perspective offers additional insights. Summary We integrate the results from the analysis using four principles of biomedical ethics into care ethics perspective on triage and propose an integrated clinically and ethically based framework of emergency department triage planning, as seen from a comprehensive ethics perspective that incorporates both the principles-based and care-oriented approach. PMID:21982119

  10. Accountability Pressure, Academic Standards, and Educational Triage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauen, Douglas Lee; Gaddis, S. Michael

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether educational accountability promotes educational triage. This study exploits a natural experiment in North Carolina in which standards increased first in math in 2006 and second in reading in 2008 to determine whether an increase in educational standards caused an increase in educational triage at the expense of…

  11. Nursing Software for Emergency Triage (NSET).

    PubMed

    Mandirola Brieux, H F; Guillen, S; La Rosa, F; Moreno, C; Benitez, S

    2015-01-01

    Determining the priority of attention in an Emergency Room (ER) has always been a difficult issue. Priority is determined with a simple triage system as people arrive at the hospital. It is important to establish how long they can wait for treatment. In order to obtain the best assessment of patients' conditions, we built a Nursing Software for Emergency Triage (NSET). The objective of this work was to assess the efficacy of the NSET versus the triage process without any software (TWS). Results showed that the NSET we built was a substantial help. With this software, we decreased significantly:1) the length of the triage system process, 2) the waiting time of patients in the waiting room, 3) the number of complaints and 4) the number of patients who walk away. In conclusion, the NSET improves and helps to define more accurately a patient's risk. NSET helps in the emergency department triage. PMID:26262244

  12. Human casualties in earthquakes: modelling and mitigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spence, R.J.S.; So, E.K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Earthquake risk modelling is needed for the planning of post-event emergency operations, for the development of insurance schemes, for the planning of mitigation measures in the existing building stock, and for the development of appropriate building regulations; in all of these applications estimates of casualty numbers are essential. But there are many questions about casualty estimation which are still poorly understood. These questions relate to the causes and nature of the injuries and deaths, and the extent to which they can be quantified. This paper looks at the evidence on these questions from recent studies. It then reviews casualty estimation models available, and finally compares the performance of some casualty models in making rapid post-event casualty estimates in recent earthquakes.

  13. Predicting casualties implied by TIPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafiloski, G.; Wyss, M.; Wyss, B. M.

    2009-12-01

    When an earthquake is predicted, forecast, or expected with a higher than normal probability, losses are implied. We estimated the casualties (fatalities plus injured) that should be expected if earthquakes in TIPs (locations of Temporarily Increased Probability of earthquakes) defined by Kossobokov et al. (2009) should occur. We classified the predictions of losses into the categories red (more than 400 fatalities or more than 1,000 injured), yellow (between 100 and 400 fatalities), green (fewer than 100 fatalities), and gray (undetermined). TIPs in Central Chile, the Philippines, Papua, and Taiwan are in the red class, TIPs in Southern Sumatra, Nicaragua, Vanatu, and Honshu in the yellow class, and TIPs in Tonga, Loyalty Islands, Vanatu, S. Sandwich Islands, Banda Sea, and the Kuriles, are classified as green. TIPs where the losses depend moderately on the assumed point of major energy release were classified as yellow; TIPs such as in the Talaud Islands and in Tonga, where the losses depend very strongly on the location of the epicenter, were classified as gray. The accuracy of loss estimates after earthquakes with known hypocenter and magnitude are affected by uncertainties in transmission and soil properties, the composition of the building stock, the population present, and the method by which the numbers of casualties are calculated. In the case of TIPs, uncertainties in magnitude and location are added, thus we calculate losses for a range of these two parameters. Therefore, our calculations can only be considered order of magnitude estimates. Nevertheless, our predictions can come to within a factor of two of the observed numbers, as in the case of the M7.6 earthquake of October 2005 in Pakistan that resulted in 85,000 fatalities (Wyss, 2005). In subduction zones, the geometrical relationship between the earthquake source capable of a great earthquake and the population is clear because there is only one major fault plane available, thus the epicentral position is uncertain in one direction only: Along the strike of the plate boundary. However, in a case like the Philippines, where several faults capable of very large and great earthquakes exist, we have calculated losses for a number of scenarios that differ strongly. Among those, scenarios with 7.5≤M≤7.7 along the Marikina Valley Fault system stand out as likely to cause the most significant disasters because they are near the densely populated area around Manila. Our estimates include only casualties due to collapsing buildings. Victims due to tsunamis, landslides, and other auxiliary disasters, such as fires, are not considered.

  14. Infrared imaging-based combat casualty care system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, James E., Sr.

    1997-08-01

    A Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract was recently awarded to a start up company for the development of an infrared (IR) image based combat casualty care system. The company, Medical Thermal Diagnostics, or MTD, is developing a light weight, hands free, energy efficient uncooled IR imaging system based upon a Texas Instruments design which will allow emergency medical treatment of wounded soldiers in complete darkness without any type of light enhancement equipment. The principal investigator for this effort, Dr. Gene Luther, DVM, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, will conduct the development and testing of this system with support from Thermalscan, Inc., a nondestructive testing company experienced in IR thermography applications. Initial research has been done with surgery on a cat for feasibility of the concept as well as forensic research on pigs as a close representation of human physiology to determine time of death. Further such studies will be done later as well as trauma studies. IR images of trauma injuries will be acquired by imaging emergency room patients to create an archive of emergency medical situations seen with an infrared imaging camera. This archived data will then be used to develop training material for medical personnel using the system. This system has potential beyond military applications. Firefighters and emergency medical technicians could directly benefit from the capability to triage and administer medical care to trauma victims in low or no light conditions.

  15. What is orthopaedic triage? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Joanne H; James, Rebecca E; Davey, Rachel; Waddington, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Complex and chronic disease is placing significant pressure on hospital outpatient departments. Novel ways of delivering care have been developed recently and are often described as ‘triage’ services. This paper reviews the literature pertaining to definitions and descriptions of orthopaedic/musculoskeletal triage processes, in order to provide information on ‘best practice’ to assist health care facilities. Method A comprehensive open-ended search was conducted using electronic databases to identify studies describing models of triage clinics for patients with a musculoskeletal/orthopaedic complaint, who have been referred to hospital outpatient clinics for a surgical consultation. Studies were critically appraised using the McMaster quality appraisal tool and ranked using the National Health and Medical Research Council hierarchy of evidence. A thematic analysis of the definitions, processes and procedures of triage described within the literature was undertaken. Results 1930 studies were identified and 45 were included in the review (including diagnostic and evaluative research). The hierarchy of evidence ranged from I to IV; however, the majority were at low levels of evidence and scored poorly on the critical appraisal tool. Three broad themes of triage were identified: presence of a referral, configuration of the triage (who, how and where) and the aim of triage. However, there were significant inconsistencies across these themes. Conclusions This systematic review highlighted the need for standardization of the definition of triage, the procedures of assessment and management and measures of outcome used in orthopaedic/musculoskeletal triage to ensure best-practice processes, procedures and outcomes for triage clinics. PMID:25410703

  16. Triage in medical practices: an unacceptable model?

    PubMed

    Bell, Nora K

    1981-12-01

    Two basic presuppositions of triage are challenged: the utilitarian notion that it is morally preferable to save the greater number, and the extension of the salvageability concept as a model for macroallocation of scarce medical resources. The 'more is better' principle lacks the status of a universal moral obligation and leads to an impersonal view of the valuing of life. In the allocation of scarce resources, triage is suspect since life-saving decisions involve medical, social, economic, and political criteria. Triage thus perpetuates existing injustices. PMID:11649361

  17. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident...

  18. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident...

  19. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident...

  20. 48 CFR 552.270-7 - Fire and Casualty Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire and Casualty Damage... Fire and Casualty Damage. As prescribed in 570.703, insert the following clause: Fire and Casualty Damage (JUN 2011) If the entire premises are destroyed by fire or other casualty, this lease...

  1. 46 CFR 28.80 - Report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... accordance with paragraph (c) of this section, as soon as possible after the casualty, to the underwriter of... involved in the casualty; and (13) The monetary amount paid for an injury or a death. (d) A casualty to a... the casualty involves any of the following. (1) Loss of life. (2) An injury that requires...

  2. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident...

  3. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident...

  4. Inter-rater Reliability of Triages Performed by the Electronic Triage System

    PubMed Central

    Pourasghar, Faramarz; Daemi, Amin; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Ala, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the inter-rater reliability of triages performed by the Electronic Triage System (ETS) which has recently developed and used in hospital emergency department (ED). Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted prospectively and studied 408 visitors of Tabriz Imam Reza hospital’s ED. The variables of interest were age, sex, nurse-assigned triage category, physician-assigned triage category, disease type (trauma, non-trauma), and the referred room within the ED. Cohen’s un-weighted kappa, linear weighted kappa, and quadratic weighted kappa were used to describe the reliability. Results: Un-weighted kappa observed to be 0.186 (95% CI: 0.123-0.249). Linear weighted kappa observed as 0.317 (95% CI: 0.251-0.384) and quadratic weighted kappa as 0.462 (95% CI: 0.336-0.589). In general, low agreement was seen between the triage nurses and ED physicians. For trauma patients and for those who were referred to the cardiopulmonary resuscitation room (CPR), all three types of kappa were higher than other visitors of the ED. Conclusion: Inter-rater reliability of the triages performed by the ETS observed as ranging from poor to moderate. Implementing interventions that would create a common language between nurses and physicians about the triage of the ED visitors seems necessary. The more agreement on the triage of trauma and CPR patients might be due to their condition and the more attention to them. PMID:27162918

  5. A pivot nurse at triage.

    PubMed

    Martin, Marie

    2012-01-01

    According to Drs Thom Mayer and Kirk Jensen, widely recognized experts in leadership, management, and customer service, "Improving patient flow essentially means patients spend exactly the right amount of time at every juncture in their journey through an organization, when you improve flow, you can serve more patients, with less effort and you can serve them better." 2 Recognizing that backups in the emergency department are a result of broken processes throughout the hospital is the first step in solving these problems. The most significant challenges are the prevailing attitudes that team triage and immediate bedding could not be done. Another challenge is the broad reaching nature of the issue. ED throughput is truly a system problem. As ED crowding worsens, it is important for departments to improve operations to promote patient throughput. No doubt, operational bottlenecks at the back end of the emergency department will ultimately lead to front-end delays. However, proficient patient processing at the ED front end can minimize the time to physician evaluation, increase patient satisfaction, and decrease totalED length of stay. PMID:22137757

  6. Orbital Paraganglioma and Succinate Dehydrogenase Staining for Genetic Testing Triage and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-La Rosa, Cesar M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study To describe the rare occurrence of a paraganglioma in the orbit and how to triage for genetic testing and assess the prognosis with succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) immunohistochemical staining. Method Case report. Procedures A 47-year-old ‘healthy’ male presented with painless exophthalmos and diplopia secondary to an infraorbital tumour mass. Results The orbital biopsy was diagnosed as paraganglioma with positive staining with SDHB. Conclusion The rarity of an orbital paraganglioma was followed by the clinical search for a possible occult extraorbital primary paraganglioma. SDHB staining helped in the triage for genetic testing and gave an idea about the prognosis for this tumour.

  7. Evaluating Age in the Field Triage of Injured Persons

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yoko; Daya, Mohamud; Bulger, Eileen M.; Schreiber, Martin; Mackersie, Robert; Hsia, Renee Y.; Mann, N. Clay; Holmes, James F.; Staudenmayer, Kristan; Sturges, Zachary; Liao, Michael; Haukoos, Jason; Kuppermann, Nathan; Barton, Erik D.; Newgard, Craig D.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective In this study, we evaluated (1) trauma under-triage by age group; (2) the association between age and serious injury after accounting for other field triage criteria and confounders; and (3) the potential impact of a mandatory age triage criterion for field triage. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of injured children and adults transported by 48 EMS agencies to 105 hospitals in 6 regions of the Western U.S. from 2006 through 2008. We used probabilistic linkage to match EMS records to hospital records, including: trauma registries, state discharge databases and emergency department databases. The primary outcome measure was serious injury, as measured by an Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥ 16. We assessed under-triage (ISS ≥ 16 and triage-negative or transport to a non-trauma center) by age decile and used multivariable logistic regression models to estimate the association (linear and non-linear) between age and ISS ≥ 16, adjusted for important confounders. We also evaluated the potential impact of age on triage efficiency and trauma center volume. Results 260,027 injured patients were evaluated and transported by EMS over the 3-year study period. Under-triage increased for patients over 60 years of age, reaching approximately 60% for those older than 90 years. There was a strong non-linear association between age and ISS ≥ 16. For patients not meeting other triage criteria, the probability of serious injury was most notable after 60 years. A mandatory age triage criterion would have decreased under-triage at the expense of over-triage, with one ISS ≥ 16 patient identified for every 60–65 additional patients transported to major trauma centers. Conclusion Trauma under-triage increases in patients older than 60 years. While the probability of serious injury increases among triage-negative patients with increasing age, the use of a mandatory age triage criterion appears inefficient for improving field triage. PMID:22633339

  8. Simulated casualties and medics for emergency training.

    PubMed

    Chi, D M; Kokkevis, E; Ogunyemi, O; Bindiganavale, R; Hollick, M J; Clarke, J R; Webber, B L; Badler, N I

    1997-01-01

    The MediSim system extends virtual environment technology to allow medical personnel to interact with and train on simulated casualties. The casualty model employs a three-dimensional animated human body that displays appropriate physical and behavioral responses to injury and/or treatment. Medical corpsmen behaviors were developed to allow the actions of simulated medical personnel to conform to both military practice and medical protocols during patient assessment and stabilization. A trainee may initiate medic actions through a mouse and menu interface; a VR interface has also been created by Stansfield's research group at Sandia National Labs. PMID:10168943

  9. Adaption of the Cytokinesis-Block Micronucleus Cytome Assay for Improved Triage Biodosimetry.

    PubMed

    Beinke, C; Port, M; Riecke, A; Ruf, C G; Abend, M

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to adapt a more advanced form of the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) cytome assay for triage biodosimetry in the event of a mass casualty radiation incident. We modified scoring procedures for the CBMN cytome assay to optimize field deployability, dose range, accuracy, speed, economy, simplicity and stability. Peripheral blood of 20 donors was irradiated in vitro (0-6 Gy X ray, maximum photon energy 240 keV) and processed for CBMN. Initially, we assessed two manual scoring strategies for accuracy: 1. Conventional scoring, comprised of micronucleus (MN) frequency per 1,000 binucleated (BN) cells (MN/1,000 BN cells); and 2. Evaluation of 1,000, 2,000 and 3,000 cells in total and different cellular subsets based on MN formation and proliferation (e.g., BN cells with and without MN, mononucleated cells). We used linear and logistic regression models to identify the cellular subsets related closest to dose with the best discrimination ability among different doses/dose categories. We validated the most promising subsets and their combinations with 16 blind samples covering a dose range of 0-8.3 Gy. Linear dose-response relationships comparable to the conventional CBMN assay (r(2) = 0.86) were found for BN cells with MN (r(2) = 0.84) and BN cells without MN (r(2) = 0.84). Models of combined cell counts (CCC) of BN cells with and without MN (BN(+MN) and BN(-MN)) with mononucleated cells (Mono) improved this relationship (r(2) = 0.92). Conventional CBMN discriminated dose categories up to 3 Gy with a concordance between 0.96-1.0 upon scoring 1,000 total cells. In 1,000 BN cells, concordances were observed for conventional CBMN up to 4 Gy as well as BN(+MN) or BN(-MN) (about 0.85). At doses of 4-6 Gy, the concordance of conventional CBMN, BN(+MN) and BN(-MN) declined (about 0.55). We found about 20% higher concordance and more precise dose estimates of irradiated and blinded samples for CCC (Mono + BN(+MN)) after scoring 1,000 total cells. Blinded sample analysis revealed that the mean absolute difference (MAD) of dose estimates and the number of dose estimates outside the ±0.5 Gy interval based on CCC (Mono + BN(+MN)) was comparable to conventional CBMN for doses ≤4 Gy when scoring 3,000 total cells or more. At doses >4-8.3 Gy, the MAD of CCC (Mono + BN(+MN)) declined to half of the MADs observed for conventional CBMN, suggesting that the combined cell counts approach improved the discrimination ability. Conventional CBMN at 1,000 total-cell counts performed as efficiently as counting 1,000 BN cells. Discriminating and counting only BN cells with and without MN after 1,000 BN cells at ≤4 Gy revealed performances similar to conventional CBMN. After 3,000 total cells were scored, CCC (Mono + BN(+MN)) was superior to conventional CBMN at >4 Gy up to about 8 Gy. Our modification of CBMN evaluations saved time compared to the widely established semiautomated MN scoring and extended the dose range up to approximately 6 Gy for triage biodosimetry. PMID:27092766

  10. Machine Learning for Biomedical Literature Triage

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Hayda; Meurs, Marie-Jean; Kosseim, Leila; Butler, Greg; Tsang, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a machine learning system for supporting the first task of the biological literature manual curation process, called triage. We compare the performance of various classification models, by experimenting with dataset sampling factors and a set of features, as well as three different machine learning algorithms (Naive Bayes, Support Vector Machine and Logistic Model Trees). The results show that the most fitting model to handle the imbalanced datasets of the triage classification task is obtained by using domain relevant features, an under-sampling technique, and the Logistic Model Trees algorithm. PMID:25551575

  11. Nurses’ Requirements for Relief and Casualty Support in Disasters: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Nekooei Moghaddam, Mahmoud; Saeed, Sara; Khanjani, Narges; Arab, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nurses are among the most important groups engaged in casualty support, regardless of the cause, and they are one of the largest care groups involved in disasters. Consequently, these workers should gain proper support and skills to enable effective, timely, responsible and ethical emergency responses. Objectives: In this study, we investigated the needs of nurses for proper casualty support in disasters, to facilitate better planning for disaster management. Materials and Methods: This was a qualitative content analysis study. Interviews were performed with 23 nurses, at educational hospitals and the Faculty of Nursing at Kerman Medical University, who had a minimum of five years working experience and assisted in an earthquake disaster. Intensity and snowball sampling were performed. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews. Interviews were transcribed and coded into main themes and subthemes. Results: Four major themes emerged from the data; 1) psychological support, 2) appropriate clinical skills education, 3) appropriate disaster management, supervision and programming, and 4) the establishment of ready for action groups and emergency sites. The participants’ comments highlighted the necessity of training nurses for special skills including emotion management, triage and crush syndrome, and to support nurses' families, provide security, and act according to predefined programs in disasters. Conclusions: There are a wide range of requirements for disaster aid. Proper aid worker selection, frequent and continuous administration of workshops and drills, and cooperation and alignment of different governmental and private organizations are among the suggested initiatives. PMID:25414897

  12. 46 CFR 122.260 - Reports of potential vessel casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 122.260 Reports of potential vessel casualty. (a) An owner... district rescue coordination center (RCC) cognizant over the area in which the vessel was last...

  13. 46 CFR 185.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 185.206 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.206 Written report of marine... of any marine casualty. This written report is in addition to the immediate notice required by...

  14. 46 CFR 122.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 122.206 Section 122... MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 122.206 Written report of marine casualty. (a) The owner, master, agent,...

  15. 46 CFR 185.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 185.206 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.206 Written report of marine... of any marine casualty. This written report is in addition to the immediate notice required by...

  16. 46 CFR 122.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 122.206 Section 122... MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 122.206 Written report of marine casualty. (a) The owner, master, agent,...

  17. 46 CFR 122.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 122.206 Section 122... MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 122.206 Written report of marine casualty. (a) The owner, master, agent,...

  18. 46 CFR 185.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 185.206 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.206 Written report of marine... of any marine casualty. This written report is in addition to the immediate notice required by...

  19. 46 CFR 185.202 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notice of casualty. 185.202 Section 185.202 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.202 Notice of casualty. (a) Immediately after the addressing of resultant safety concerns,...

  20. 46 CFR 122.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 122.206 Section 122... MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 122.206 Written report of marine casualty. (a) The owner, master, agent,...

  1. 46 CFR 122.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 122.206 Section 122... MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 122.206 Written report of marine casualty. (a) The owner, master, agent,...

  2. 46 CFR 185.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 185.206 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.206 Written report of marine... of any marine casualty. This written report is in addition to the immediate notice required by...

  3. 46 CFR 185.206 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 185.206 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.206 Written report of marine... of any marine casualty. This written report is in addition to the immediate notice required by...

  4. Accountability Incentives: Do Schools Practice Educational Triage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Matthew G.

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly frequent journalistic accounts report that schools are responding to No Child Left Behind (NCLB) by engaging in what has come to be known as "educational triage." Although these accounts rely almost entirely on anecdotal evidence, the prospect is of real concern. The NCLB accountability system divides schools into those in which a…

  5. Accountability Incentives: Do Schools Practice Educational Triage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Matthew G.

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly frequent journalistic accounts report that schools are responding to No Child Left Behind (NCLB) by engaging in what has come to be known as "educational triage." Although these accounts rely almost entirely on anecdotal evidence, the prospect is of real concern. The NCLB accountability system divides schools into those in which a

  6. The fate of triaged and rejected manuscripts.

    PubMed

    Zoccali, Carmine; Amodeo, Daniela; Argiles, Angel; Arici, Mustafa; D'arrigo, Graziella; Evenepoel, Pieter; Fliser, Danilo; Fox, Jonathan; Gesualdo, Loreto; Jadoul, Michel; Ketteler, Markus; Malyszko, Jolanta; Massy, Ziad; Mayer, Gert; Ortiz, Alberto; Sever, Mehmet; Vanholder, Raymond; Vinck, Caroline; Wanner, Christopher; Więcek, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    In 2011, Nephrology Dialysis and Transplantation (NDT) established a more restrictive selection process for manuscripts submitted to the journal, reducing the acceptance rate from 25% (2008-2009) to currently about 12-15%. To achieve this goal, we decided to score the priority of manuscripts submitted to NDT and to reject more papers at triage than in the past. This new scoring system allows a rapid decision for the authors without external review. However, the risk of such a restrictive policy may be that the journal might fail to capture important studies that are eventually published in higher-ranked journals. To look into this problem, we analysed random samples of papers (∼10%) rejected by NDT in 2012. Of the papers rejected at triage and those rejected after regular peer review, 59 and 61%, respectively, were accepted in other journals. A detailed analysis of these papers showed that only 4 out of 104 and 7 out of 93 of the triaged and rejected papers, respectively, were published in journals with an impact factor higher than that of NDT. Furthermore, for all these papers, independent assessors confirmed the evaluation made by the original reviewers. The number of citations of these papers was similar to that typically obtained by publications in the corresponding journals. Even though the analyses seem reassuring, previous observations made by leading journals warn that the risk of 'big misses', resulting from selective editorial policies, remains a real possibility. We will therefore continue to maintain a high degree of alertness and will periodically track the history of manuscripts rejected by NDT, particularly papers that are rejected at triage by our journal. PMID:26597920

  7. Boston bombings: a surgical view of lessons learned from combat casualty care and the applicability to Boston's terrorist attack.

    PubMed

    Caterson, E J; Carty, Matthew J; Weaver, Michael J; Holt, Eric F

    2013-07-01

    The Boston bombing incident was a recent civilian mass casualty terrorist event that demonstrated effective transfer of the lessons of combat casualty care to inform effective civilian medical care. Thirty-nine patients were seen at Brigham and Women's Hospital and thirteen patients received emergency surgery in the first few hours after the event. The subsequent management, total hospital days 181, total number of operative procedures 72, and discharging service listing of these thirteen patients illustrate the intensive surgical resources necessary after a civilian bomb attack. Plastic surgery played a role in the multidisciplinary collaboration of the limb salvage efforts and this role can inform the importance of other plastic surgery contributions within mass casualty surgical management. We believe that prepositioned collaborative relationships of plastic surgery, vascular surgery, trauma surgery and orthopedic surgery may offer a model of collaboration for limb salvage that can be applied in military and mass casualty medical care if resources permit. In this attack, effective use of tourniquets was implemented by prehospital medical providers that saved lives and limbs and these actions reaffirm the important lessons learned from combat casualty care. Unfortunately, it is likely that more centers will deal with similar events in the future and it is imperative that we as a community of providers take what lessons we can from battlefield medicine and that we collectively prepare for and engage this future. PMID:23851738

  8. Availability of a pediatric trauma center in a disaster surge decreases triage time of the pediatric surge population: a population kinetics model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The concept of disaster surge has arisen in recent years to describe the phenomenon of severely increased demands on healthcare systems resulting from catastrophic mass casualty events (MCEs) such as natural disasters and terrorist attacks. The major challenge in dealing with a disaster surge is the efficient triage and utilization of the healthcare resources appropriate to the magnitude and character of the affected population in terms of its demographics and the types of injuries that have been sustained. Results In this paper a deterministic population kinetics model is used to predict the effect of the availability of a pediatric trauma center (PTC) upon the response to an arbitrary disaster surge as a function of the rates of pediatric patients' admission to adult and pediatric centers and the corresponding discharge rates of these centers. We find that adding a hypothetical pediatric trauma center to the response documented in an historical example (the Israeli Defense Forces field hospital that responded to the Haiti earthquake of 2010) would have allowed for a significant increase in the overall rate of admission of the pediatric surge cohort. This would have reduced the time to treatment in this example by approximately half. The time needed to completely treat all children affected by the disaster would have decreased by slightly more than a third, with the caveat that the PTC would have to have been approximately as fast as the adult center in discharging its patients. Lastly, if disaster death rates from other events reported in the literature are included in the model, availability of a PTC would result in a relative mortality risk reduction of 37%. Conclusions Our model provides a mathematical justification for aggressive inclusion of PTCs in planning for disasters by public health agencies. PMID:21992575

  9. Technology Staff Development: Triage Using Three Mastery Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guffey, J. Stephen; Rampp, Lary C.; Bradley, Mary Jane

    The technology triage is a workable paradigm for straightforward school-site/school-district implementation of technology resources. Development of a triage system of participant involvement and in-service staff development can help address the tendency to ineffectively allocate funds within the total picture of the school commitment to…

  10. Social Distribution, Ghettoization, and Educational Triage: A Marxist Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Jeanne

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how many urban students are written off as unworthy of scant educational resources, using Weber and Marx to discuss how educational triage is best understood theoretically, exploring how broader processes of social distribution and triage link up with daily practices and policies in urban classrooms, and highlighting the need for a…

  11. No Child Overlooked: Mental Health Triage in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, F. Robert; Tang, Mei; Schiller, Kelly; Sebera, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    Mental health problems among children in schools are on the increase. To exercise due diligence in their responsibility to monitor and promote mental health among our nation's children, school counselors may learn from triage systems employed in hospitals, clinics, and mental health centers. The School Counselor's Triage Model provides school…

  12. Obstetric triage: models and trends in resident education by midwives.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Diane J; Stevens, Elizabeth; MacDonald, Amy; Wiener, Sharon; Wieczorek, Bridget

    2009-01-01

    Four models of resident education in obstetric triage with midwifery faculty consultants are presented. Common trends in the structure and function of these models are reviewed. The four models represent diverse settings where midwives serve as clinical teachers primarily for first-year obstetric residents and residents from other subspecialties. Each model supports a growing number of midwives working in the triage setting, functioning as both teacher and consultant for new residents. This expanded midwifery teaching role extends beyond labor assessment to include a wide range of common obstetric and gynecologic conditions in the triage setting. Additional advantages include the ability of the midwife to bill for triage services and to provide a safety net to decrease medical errors which, in a busy triage unit, occur most often during patient transfers. PMID:19555912

  13. The Casualty Actuarial Society: Helping Universities Train Future Actuaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boa, J. Michael; Gorvett, Rick

    2014-01-01

    The Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) believes that the most effective way to advance the actuarial profession is to work in partnership with universities. The CAS stands ready to assist universities in creating or enhancing courses and curricula associated with property/casualty actuarial science. CAS resources for university actuarial science…

  14. 26 CFR 1.165-7 - Casualty losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Casualty losses. 1.165-7 Section 1.165-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.165-7 Casualty...

  15. 26 CFR 1.165-7 - Casualty losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Casualty losses. 1.165-7 Section 1.165-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.165-7 Casualty...

  16. 26 CFR 1.165-7 - Casualty losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Casualty losses. 1.165-7 Section 1.165-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.165-7 Casualty...

  17. 26 CFR 1.165-7 - Casualty losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Casualty losses. 1.165-7 Section 1.165-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.165-7 Casualty...

  18. 26 CFR 1.165-7 - Casualty losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Casualty losses. 1.165-7 Section 1.165-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.165-7 Casualty...

  19. 19 CFR 158.27 - Accidental fire or other casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Casualty, Loss, or Theft While in Customs Custody § 158.27 Accidental fire or other casualty. In the case... submitted: (a) A declaration of the master of the vessel, the conductor or driver of the vehicle, the... merchandise was on board the vessel or vehicle, in the warehouse, or otherwise in his charge, as the case...

  20. 46 CFR 197.484 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.484 Notice of casualty. (a) In addition to the requirements of subpart 4.05 of this chapter and 33 CFR 146.30, the person-in-charge shall notify the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, as soon as possible after a diving casualty occurs, if...

  1. 46 CFR 197.484 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.484 Notice of casualty. (a) In addition to the requirements of subpart 4.05 of this chapter and 33 CFR 146.30, the person-in-charge shall notify the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, as soon as possible after a diving casualty occurs, if...

  2. 46 CFR 197.484 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.484 Notice of casualty. (a) In addition to the requirements of subpart 4.05 of this chapter and 33 CFR 146.30, the person-in-charge shall notify the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, as soon as possible after a diving casualty occurs, if...

  3. 46 CFR 197.484 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.484 Notice of casualty. (a) In addition to the requirements of subpart 4.05 of this chapter and 33 CFR 146.30, the person-in-charge shall notify the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, as soon as possible after a diving casualty occurs, if...

  4. 19 CFR 158.27 - Accidental fire or other casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Accidental fire or other casualty. 158.27 Section 158.27 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RELIEF FROM DUTIES ON MERCHANDISE LOST, DAMAGED, ABANDONED, OR EXPORTED Casualty, Loss, or Theft While in...

  5. 19 CFR 158.27 - Accidental fire or other casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Accidental fire or other casualty. 158.27 Section 158.27 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RELIEF FROM DUTIES ON MERCHANDISE LOST, DAMAGED, ABANDONED, OR EXPORTED Casualty, Loss, or Theft While in...

  6. 19 CFR 158.27 - Accidental fire or other casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Accidental fire or other casualty. 158.27 Section 158.27 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RELIEF FROM DUTIES ON MERCHANDISE LOST, DAMAGED, ABANDONED, OR EXPORTED Casualty, Loss, or Theft While in...

  7. Multilocation teleradiology system for emergency triage consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herron, John M.; Yonas, Howard

    1996-05-01

    A remote consultation system is available at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) which links four outlying hospitals in Western Pennsylvania and Eastern Ohio. This system has the potential to improve short and long term clinical outcomes and to reduce overall medical care cost by establishing improved emergency triage capability. An EMED, Inc. teleradiology system permits rapid, high-quality transfer of digitized film and CT images from the remote sites to the tertiary care center (UPMC). The images are sent over dial-on- demand ISDN and SW56 lines from the remote hospitals to a central server where they are transmitted to a dual 2K monitor workstation in the Emergency Department, thirteen Eastman Kodak PDS workstations within UPMC, and to three physician homes. Transmission to a workstation at each of the physician homes over ISDN lines enables `after hours' consultation. The radiographic images along with voice and fax communications provide a technique where physicians in outlying hospitals will be able to consult with specialists at any time. A study is in progress to evaluate the effectiveness of this system in terms of perception of utility and its potential to improve emergency triage capability, as well as selection of the appropriate transportation mode (helicopter versus ambulance).

  8. Development of a lightweight portable ventilator for far-forward battlefield combat casualty support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Smith, Dexter G.; Ko, Harvey W.; Wiesmann, William P.; Pranger, L. Alex

    1999-07-01

    Immediate medical provision substantially reduces the number of fatalities sustained during military operations. However, the shift from large-scale regional conflicts to smaller peacekeeping and humanitarian missions has reduced the military medical support infrastructure. Civilian emergency medical services have long emphasized the 'golden hour' during which a patient must receive definitive medical attention. Without on-scene medical support, injured soldiers must be transported significant distances before receiving advanced medical care, and rapid transport to a medical facility is not always a viable option. Technological solutions enable military medics to deliver advanced medical care on the battlefield. We report here on the development of a small lightweight portable respirator for the treatment of far- forward battlefield casualties. The Far Forward Life Support System (FFLSS) utilizes a combination of COTS (commercial off the shelf) components and custom designed systems to provide ventilatory support to injured combatants. It also incorporates a small IV fluid pump and IV fluids for resuscitation. A microcompressor control system monitors both system performance and patient parameters for system control. Telemetry to a pager-like device worn by the front line medic alerts of any anomalies in ventilator or patient parameters, which will add greatly to triage decisions and resource management. Novel elements of the FLSS design include oxygen generation, low-pressure air generation, available patient suction, and the absence of any high pressure air cylinders. A prototype developed for animal testing will be described in detail as well as further design requirements for the human rated prototype.

  9. A lightning multiple casualty incident in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

    PubMed

    Spano, Susanne J; Campagne, Danielle; Stroh, Geoff; Shalit, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Multiple casualty incidents (MCIs) are uncommon in remote wilderness settings. This is a case report of a lightning strike on a Boy Scout troop hiking through Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (SEKI), in which the lightning storm hindered rescue efforts. The purpose of this study was to review the response to a lightning-caused MCI in a wilderness setting, address lightning injury as it relates to field management, and discuss evacuation options in inclement weather incidents occurring in remote locations. An analysis of SEKI search and rescue data and a review of current literature were performed. A lightning strike at 10,600 feet elevation in the Sierra Nevada Mountains affected a party of 5 adults and 7 Boy Scouts (age range 12 to 17 years old). Resources mobilized for the rescue included 5 helicopters, 2 ambulances, 2 hospitals, and 15 field and 14 logistical support personnel. The incident was managed from strike to scene clearance in 4 hours and 20 minutes. There were 2 fatalities, 1 on scene and 1 in the hospital. Storm conditions complicated on-scene communication and evacuation efforts. Exposure to ongoing lightning and a remote wilderness location affected both victims and rescuers in a lightning MCI. Helicopters, the main vehicles of wilderness rescue in SEKI, can be limited by weather, daylight, and terrain. Redundancies in communication systems are vital for episodes of radio failure. Reverse triage should be implemented in lightning injury MCIs. Education of both wilderness travelers and rescuers regarding these issues should be pursued. PMID:25281586

  10. Holter triage ambulatory ECG analysis. Accuracy and time efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D H; Kennedy, H L; Lyyski, D S; Sprague, M K

    1996-01-01

    Triage ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) analysis permits relatively unskilled office workers to submit 24-hour ambulatory ECG Holter tapes to an automatic instrument (model 563, Del Mar Avionics, Irvine, CA) for interpretation. The instrument system "triages" what it is capable of automatically interpreting and rejects those tapes (with high ventricular arrhythmia density) requiring thorough analysis. Nevertheless, a trained cardiovascular technician ultimately edits what is accepted for analysis. This study examined the clinical validity of one manufacturer's triage instrumentation with regard to accuracy and time efficiency for interpreting ventricular arrhythmia. A database of 50 Holter tapes stratified for frequency of ventricular ectopic beats (VEBs) was examined by triage, conventional, and full-disclosure hand-count Holter analysis. Half of the tapes were found to be automatically analyzable by the triage method. Comparison of the VEB accuracy of triage versus conventional analysis using the full-disclosure hand count as the standard showed that triage analysis overall appeared as accurate as conventional Holter analysis but had limitations in detecting ventricular tachycardia (VT) runs. Overall sensitivity, positive predictive accuracy, and false positive rate for the triage ambulatory ECG analysis were 96, 99, and 0.9%, respectively, for isolated VEBs, 92, 93, and 7%, respectively, for ventricular couplets, and 48, 93, and 7%, respectively, for VT. Error in VT detection by triage analysis occurred on a single tape. Of the remaining 11 tapes containing VT runs, accuracy was significantly increased, with a sensitivity of 86%, positive predictive accuracy of 90%, and false positive rate of 10%. Stopwatch-recorded time efficiency was carefully logged during both triage and conventional ambulatory ECG analysis and divided into five time phases: secretarial, machine, analysis, editing, and total time. Triage analysis was significantly (P < .05) more time efficient for the machine, analysis, and total time phases and required significantly more time in the editing phases. The triage analysis was limited by the inability of the automatic methodology to detect a specific VT waveform contained on one tape. This result which caused substantial loss of sensitivity for VT, emphasizes the necessity for careful quality control and editing of all automatic Holter analysis methods. PMID:8808523

  11. HIPAA privacy and security implications for field triage.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Roslyne

    2006-01-01

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 addresses insurance reforms, medical savings accounts, fraud and abuse provisions, and health information standards. This report discusses HIPAA issues that could impact field triage and emergency medical services. PMID:16801275

  12. Web-Based Triage in a College Health Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sole, Mary Lou; Stuart, Patricia L.; Deichen, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The authors describe the initiation and use of a Web-based triage system in a college health setting. During the first 4 months of implementation, the system recorded 1,290 encounters. More women accessed the system (70%); the average age was 21.8 years. The Web-based triage system advised the majority of students to seek care within 24 hours;…

  13. 46 CFR 28.80 - Report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the casualty involves any of the following. (1) Loss of life. (2) An injury that requires professional medical treatment (treatment beyond first aid) and that renders the individual unfit to perform his or...

  14. 46 CFR 185.260 - Reports of potential vessel casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.260 Reports of potential... imperiled: (1) The Coast Guard district rescue coordination center (RCC) cognizant over the area in...

  15. 33 CFR 146.35 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reporting requirements of 46 CFR 4.05-12. (b) The written report required by paragraph (a) of this section... casualty; (5) Gives the name, address, and phone number of persons involved in or witnessing the...

  16. 33 CFR 146.35 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reporting requirements of 46 CFR 4.05-12. (b) The written report required by paragraph (a) of this section... casualty; (5) Gives the name, address, and phone number of persons involved in or witnessing the...

  17. 33 CFR 146.35 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reporting requirements of 46 CFR 4.05-12. (b) The written report required by paragraph (a) of this section... casualty; (5) Gives the name, address, and phone number of persons involved in or witnessing the...

  18. 33 CFR 146.35 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reporting requirements of 46 CFR 4.05-12. (b) The written report required by paragraph (a) of this section... casualty; (5) Gives the name, address, and phone number of persons involved in or witnessing the...

  19. 46 CFR 197.488 - Retention of records after casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... casualty is made under § 197.484 shall retain all records onboard that are maintained on the vessel or... until advised by the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, that records need not be retained onboard....

  20. 46 CFR 197.488 - Retention of records after casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... casualty is made under § 197.484 shall retain all records onboard that are maintained on the vessel or... until advised by the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, that records need not be retained onboard....

  1. 46 CFR 197.488 - Retention of records after casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... casualty is made under § 197.484 shall retain all records onboard that are maintained on the vessel or... until advised by the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, that records need not be retained onboard....

  2. 46 CFR 197.488 - Retention of records after casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... casualty is made under § 197.484 shall retain all records onboard that are maintained on the vessel or... until advised by the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, that records need not be retained onboard....

  3. 46 CFR 197.488 - Retention of records after casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... casualty is made under § 197.484 shall retain all records onboard that are maintained on the vessel or... until advised by the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, that records need not be retained onboard....

  4. Surge and Surge Capacity in Labor and Delivery Triage Volumes.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kavita Shah; Mercer, Brian M

    2016-05-01

    Objective To understand the variation in Labor and Delivery triage and delivery volumes in an urban tertiary care center and the types of visits associated with this variability. Study Design Retrospective descriptive study from the electronic medical record of 7,678 women presenting to Labor and Delivery Triage. Results Overall, there was a sixfold variation in Labor and Delivery triage visits (mean: 21, SD: 5.7, range: 6-36), with the least and most busy days having 28.6% and 171.4% of mean volume. Volumes varied 3.8- to 17-fold on weekdays and 4- to 11-fold on weekends. Significant variation in volume and triage evaluation type also occurred through the day, with admission for delivery as the predominate reason between 2 to 10 am, and outpatient assessments predominating thereafter (p < 0.001). Conclusion There is substantial variation in daily and hourly Labor and Delivery triage activity. If not planned for, this variability could strain available resources and negatively impact care. Further study of the effect of surges in Labor and Delivery triage and delivery volumes on pregnancy outcomes and of optimal methods to improve surge capacity in the Labor and Delivery setting are needed. PMID:26731177

  5. The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in retrospect.

    PubMed

    Putnam, F W

    1998-05-12

    For 50 years, the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), have conducted epidemiological and genetic studies of the survivors of the atomic bombs and of their children. This research program has provided the primary basis for radiation health standards. Both ABCC (1947-1975) and RERF (1975 to date) have been a joint enterprise of the United States (through the National Academy of Sciences) and of Japan. ABCC began in devastated, occupied Japan. Its mission had to be defined and refined. Early research revealed the urgent need for long term study. In 1946, a Directive of President Truman enjoined the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences to develop the program. By 1950, ABCC staff exceeded 1,000, and clinical and genetic studies were underway. Budgetary difficulties and other problems almost forced closure in 1953. In 1955, the Francis Report led to a unified epidemiological study. Much progress was made in the next decade, but changing times required founding of a binational nonprofit organization (RERF) with equal participation by Japan and the United States. New programs have been developed and existing ones have been extended in what is the longest continuing health survey ever undertaken. PMID:9576898

  6. Emergency slaughter of casualty cattle increases the prevalence of anthelmintic drug residues in muscle.

    PubMed

    Cooper, K M; Whyte, M; Danaher, M; Kennedy, D G

    2012-08-01

    The ProSafeBeef project studied the prevalence of residues of anthelmintic drugs used to control parasitic worms and fluke in beef cattle in Ireland. Injured (casualty) cattle may enter the human food chain under certain conditions, verified by an attending veterinarian and the livestock keeper. An analytical survey was conducted to determine if muscle from casualty cattle contained a higher prevalence of anthelmintic drug residues than healthy (full slaughter weight) cattle as a result of possible non-observance of complete drug withdrawal periods. A validated analytical method based on matrix solid-phase dispersive extraction (QuEChERS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify 37 anthelmintic drugs and metabolites in muscle (assay decision limits, CCα, 0.15-10.2 µg kg⁻¹). Of 199 control samples of beef purchased in Irish shops, 7% contained detectable anthelmintic drug residues but all were compliant with European Union Maximum Residue Limits (MRL). Of 305 muscle samples from injured cattle submitted to abattoirs in Northern Ireland, 17% contained detectable residues and 2% were non-compliant (containing either residues at concentrations above the MRL or residues of a compound unlicensed for use in cattle). Closantel and ivermectin were the most common residues, but a wider range of drugs was detected in muscle of casualty cattle than in retail beef. These data suggest that specific targeting of casualty cattle for testing for anthelmintic residues may be warranted in a manner similar to the targeted testing for antimicrobial compounds often applied in European National Residues Surveillance Schemes. PMID:22632575

  7. Multibiodose radiation emergency triage categorization software.

    PubMed

    Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Barnard, Stephen; Barrios, Lleonard; Fattibene, Paola; de Gelder, Virginie; Gregoire, Eric; Lindholm, Carita; Lloyd, David; Nergaard, Inger; Rothkamm, Kai; Romm, Horst; Scherthan, Harry; Thierens, Hubert; Vandevoorde, Charlot; Woda, Clemens; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2014-07-01

    In this note, the authors describe the MULTIBIODOSE software, which has been created as part of the MULTIBIODOSE project. The software enables doses estimated by networks of laboratories, using up to five retrospective (biological and physical) assays, to be combined to give a single estimate of triage category for each individual potentially exposed to ionizing radiation in a large scale radiation accident or incident. The MULTIBIODOSE software has been created in Java. The usage of the software is based on the MULTIBIODOSE Guidance: the program creates a link to a single SQLite database for each incident, and the database is administered by the lead laboratory. The software has been tested with Java runtime environment 6 and 7 on a number of different Windows, Mac, and Linux systems, using data from a recent intercomparison exercise. The Java program MULTIBIODOSE_1.0.jar is freely available to download from http://www.multibiodose.eu/software or by contacting the software administrator: MULTIBIODOSE-software@gmx.com. PMID:24849907

  8. [The false positive reaction of the Triage panel drug-of-abuse by herbal drugs ma-huang (Ephedra sinica (Ephedraceae))].

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, M; Kinoshita, H; Higasa, K; Taniguchi, T; Ouchi, H; Minami, T; Marukawa, S; Yoshinaga, K; Yamauchi, J; Aoki, S; Hishida, S

    2001-11-01

    We investigated false-positive reactions obtained from a drug screening test using a Triage panel. We detected 2 cases giving false-positive reaction for AMP (amphetamine, methamphetamine) during the screening of 187 normal subjects. Subsequent follow up testing by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), showed both to be false-positive reactions. As both cases have a history of ingesting the herbal drug, Ma-huang (Ephedra sinica (Ephedraceae)), containing ephedrine, we examined the relationship between false-positive reactions on Triage and Ma-huang. All urine samples collected from 7 healthy volunteers following administration of Ma-huang indicated AMP positive on Triage. Also a high ratio of AMP positives was observed in the patients who were administered Ma-huang-containing drugs at the hospital. However, none of them were identified as true-positives by HPLC or gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The extract of Ma-huang contained in herbal drugs, which otherwise contain neither amphetamine nor its derivatives, gives (AMP) positive indications on Triage. We speculate that unidentified components of Ma-huang cause the false-positive reactions. We suggest that follow-up tests by GC/MS or HPLC are needed wherever a positive result is obtained from a screening test by Triage. Furthermore, it will be established to continue collecting information on prescribed and non-prescribed drugs. PMID:11905042

  9. Triage screening for osteoporosis in dental clinics using panoramic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, A

    2010-05-01

    Many patients with osteoporosis go undiagnosed because typically no symptoms are present before a fracture. Triage screening to refer patients to appropriate medical professionals for further investigation would be useful to address the increase in the incidence of osteoporotic fractures. Dental clinics may offer a new triage screening pathway because dentists frequently take radiographs of bones in the course of dental treatment. A major premise for such triage screening in dental clinics is that dentists can readily use a screening tool in their dental practice. For example, cortical width and shape of the mandible detected on panoramic radiographs may be appropriate indices for triaging individuals with osteoporosis. To date, several investigators have demonstrated significant associations between cortical indices on panoramic radiographs and bone mineral density of the skeleton generally, such as the spine and femur, biochemical markers of bone turnover and risk of osteoporotic fractures. Further, in two recent Japanese clinical trials, approximately 95% of women who were identified by trained dentists in their clinics using cortical shape findings did have osteopenia or osteoporosis. These findings support the possibility that dental clinics may offer a new triage platform to identify individuals with otherwise undetected osteoporosis. PMID:19671082

  10. Situational Awareness During Mass-Casualty Events: Command and Control

    PubMed Central

    Demchak, Barry; Chan, Theordore C.; Griswold, William G.; Lenert, Leslie

    2006-01-01

    In existing Incident Command systems1, situational awareness is achieved manually through paper tracking systems. Such systems often produce high latencies and incomplete data, resulting in inefficient and ineffective resource deployment. The WIISARD2 system collects much more data than a paper-based system, dramatically reducing latency while increasing the kinds and quality of information available to Incident Commanders. The WIISARD Command Center solves the problem of data overload and uncertainty through the careful use of limited screen area and novel visualization techniques. PMID:17238524

  11. Data Quality for Situational Awareness during Mass-Casualty Events

    PubMed Central

    Demchak, Barry; Griswold, William G.; Lenert, Leslie A.

    2007-01-01

    Incident Command systems often achieve situational awareness through manual paper-tracking systems. Such systems often produce high latencies and incomplete data, resulting in inefficient and ineffective resource deployment. WIISARD (Wireless Internet Information System for Medical Response in Disasters) collects much more data than a paper-based system, dramatically reducing latency while increasing the kinds and quality of information available to incident commanders. Yet, the introduction of IT into a disaster setting is not problem-free. Notably, system component failures can delay the delivery of data. The type and extent of a failure can have varying effects on the usefulness of information displays. We describe a small, coherent set of customizble information overlays to address this problem, and we discuss reactions to these displays by medical commanders. PMID:18693821

  12. Traffic accidents involving fatigue driving and their extent of casualties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangnan; Yau, Kelvin K W; Zhang, Xun; Li, Yanyan

    2016-02-01

    The rapid progress of motorization has increased the number of traffic-related casualties. Although fatigue driving is a major cause of traffic accidents, the public remains not rather aware of its potential harmfulness. Fatigue driving has been termed as a "silent killer." Thus, a thorough study of traffic accidents and the risk factors associated with fatigue-related casualties is of utmost importance. In this study, we analyze traffic accident data for the period 2006-2010 in Guangdong Province, China. The study data were extracted from the traffic accident database of China's Public Security Department. A logistic regression model is used to assess the effect of driver characteristics, type of vehicles, road conditions, and environmental factors on fatigue-related traffic accident occurrence and severity. On the one hand, male drivers, trucks, driving during midnight to dawn, and morning rush hours are identified as risk factors of fatigue-related crashes but do not necessarily result in severe casualties. Driving at night without street-lights contributes to fatigue-related crashes and severe casualties. On the other hand, while factors such as less experienced drivers, unsafe vehicle status, slippery roads, driving at night with street-lights, and weekends do not have significant effect on fatigue-related crashes, yet accidents associated with these factors are likely to have severe casualties. The empirical results of the present study have important policy implications on the reduction of fatigue-related crashes as well as their severity. PMID:26625173

  13. The relationship between transfusion and hypoxemia in combat casualties.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J A; James, P M; Bredenberg, C E; Anderson, R W; Heisterkamp, C A; Simmons, R L

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between transfusion and subsequent hypoxemia was examined retrospectively in the records of combat casualties studied by the first three U.S. Army Surgical Research Teams in Vietnam. There was no evident relationship in 425 casualties studied before anesthesia and operation. In 199 casualties studied preoperatively and on at least two of the first three postoperative days, there was no evident relationship in those with injuries not involving the chest or abdomen. Eighteen such casualties received over ten units of blood each (average 24.5) and exhibited subsequent changes in arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) which were indistinguishable from those transfused lesser amounts or not all. Similar observations were made in casualties with injuries to the abdomen, although there was a tendency to lower PaO2 two days after injury in those heavily transfused. In those with thoracic injury, there was statistically significantly lower PaO2 on the first two postoperative days in those heavily transfused. Two possible interpretations are considered, one that blood transfusion contributed to hypoxemia, and alternatively, that a greater magnitude of the injuries accounted for both the worsened hypoxemia and the need for more transfusions. The latter was thought more likely. The differences in PaO2 related to the type of injury exceeded the differences associated with transfusion. PMID:697435

  14. Higher Education: A Time for Triage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1995-10-01

    Higher education faces unprecedented challenges. The confluence of changing economic and demographic tends; new patterns of federal and state spending; more explicit expectations by students and their families for affordable, accessible education; and heightened scrutiny by those who claim a legitimate interest in higher education is inescapably altering the environment in which this system operates. Higher education will never again be as it was before. Further, many believe that tinkering around the margins is no longer an adequate response to the new demands. Fundamental change is deemed necessary to meet the challenge of this melange of pressures. A number of commentators have observed that political and corporate America have responded to their challenges by instituting a fundamental restructuring of those institutions. The medical community is also in the midst of a similar basic restructuring of the health care delivery system in this country. Now its education's turn. People are questioning the historically expressed mission of higher education. They make the claim that we cost too much, spend carelessly, teach poorly, plan myopically, and when questioned, act defensively. Educational administrators, from department chairs up, are confronted with the task of simultaneously reforming and cutting back. They have no choice. They must establish politically sophisticated priority settings and effect a hard-nosed reallocation of resources in a social environment where competing public needs have equivalent--or stronger--emotional pulls. Triage in a medical context involves confronting an emergency in which the demand for attention far outstrips available assistance by establishing a sequence of care in which one key individual orchestrates the application of harsh priorities which have been designed to maximize the number of survivors. In recent years, the decisions that have been made in some centers of higher education bear a striking similarity. The literature is replete with descriptions of budget cuts and the resultant reallocation of monies. For example, as the budget cuts of the last decade accumulated, maintenance was deferred, and the funds saved were used to shore-up key existing parts of the educational process, such as faculty salaries. State budgets are generally smaller now than they were when the cuts were made, which means that preventive maintenance will continue to be deferred and other resources must be found for capital improvements. Triage often operates in an environment that does not permit promising possibilities to develop. For example, the promise of interactive digital technologies on the learning process may never be fully realized in many institutions if the associated capital and operating costs cannot be accommodated within the cost containment measures being adopted. In an effort to offset part of the lost state support, tuition and fees have been increased at public institutions at a rate that far exceeds growth of the cost of living index. All this is occurring in the face of an increasingly diverse student body and the beginning of "Tidal Wave II," as the surge of new students who are the children of the baby boomers has been called. These demands, along with the expectations for an historically, good American education, will have to be met with fewer dollars. Our ability to fund public higher education by the conventional mechanisms has been affected by a variety of tax reform initiatives. Although the details may vary locally, various kinds of initiatives, propositions, and referenda have severely limited the amount of revenue states can raise. Thus, caps on property taxes have transformed support patterns at the city and county levels. Initiatives, many of which have built-in escalators, that fix the percentages of state spending for various programs have created new kinds of budgetary entitlement groups. These mandates conspire to give government, i.e., governors and legislatures, less discretionary control over a dwindling portion of the state budget. Unfortunately, higher education often finds itself included in that ever-shrinking part of the budget. To keep businesses globally competitive there will be great pressure against raising corporate taxes. These pressures combined with the federal deficit and the growth in entitlements leave little hope for an infusion of the kinds of new public funds that have fueled previous changes in higher education. Some institutions have succeeded in deriving new resources through the establishment of public-private partnerships and vigorous fund raising, activities that have not played a significant role in funding public education in the past. Monies from private sources now account for more than 50% of the budget components in the case of some of the more successful state university initiatives. Successes of this kind raise some interesting questions. For example, how will the evolution of fiscal interactions with the state be affected? How will faculty work loads and compensation patterns be affected? It has become increasingly clear that a number of major issues need attention if we are to engage effectively in triage as a process to maximize what can--and should--be saved in higher education. The following list summarizes discussions that have appeared in a variety of disparate publications. Establish and prioritize the institution's educational goals. Establish value and reward systems for students and faculty that are consistent with the priority goals. Develop leverage and constraint mechanisms to effect change and improve student orientation to the new priorities. Establish a relationship between the price and cost of education and access to it, perhaps incorporating some sort of internal subsidy system. Develop a relationship between the demonstration of public accountability through the reallocation of resources and the measurement of tangible outcomes that justifies enhanced public and private investment. Devise a use of technology that improves productivity, which in turn requires the definition of productivity in an academic setting. Serious discussion of these issues and attempts to address them will undoubtedly prove uncomfortable, perhaps even threatening, to many in academia. Some may question whether the institutions of higher education that we now know as universities will still be "universities." But then, what is a university?

  15. Physiologic Field Triage Criteria for Identifying Seriously Injured Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Newgard, Craig D.; Richardson, Derek; Holmes, James F.; Rea, Thomas D.; Hsia, Renee Y.; Mann, N. Clay; Staudenmayer, Kristan; Barton, Erik D.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Haukoos, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the ability of out-of-hospital physiologic measures to predict serious injury for field triage purposes among older adults and potentially reduce the under-triage of seriously injured elders to non-trauma hospitals. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study involving injured adults 55 years and older transported by 94 emergency medical services (EMS) agencies to 122 hospitals (trauma and non-trauma) in 7 regions of the western United States from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2008. We evaluated initial out-of-hospital Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate, heart rate, shock index (SBP heart rate), out-of-hospital procedures, mechanism of injury, and patient demographics. The primary outcome was serious injury, defined as Injury Severity Score (ISS) ? 16, as a measure of trauma center need. We used multivariable regression models, fractional polynomials and binary recursive partitioning to evaluate appropriate physiologic cut-points and the value of different physiologic triage criteria. Results A total of 44,890 injured older adults were evaluated and transported by EMS, of whom 2,328 (5.2%) had ISS ? 16. Nonlinear associations existed between all physiologic measures and ISS ? 16 (unadjusted and adjusted p ? 0.001 for all,), except for heart rate (adjusted p = 0.48). Revised physiologic triage criteria included GCS score ? 14; respiratory rate < 10 or > 24 breaths per minute or assisted ventilation; and SBP < 110 or > 200 mmHg. Compared to current triage practices, the revised criteria would increase triage sensitivity from 78.6 to 86.3% (difference 7.7%, 95% CI 6.19.6%), reduce specificity from 75.5 to 60.7% (difference 14.8%, 95% CI 14.315.3%), and increase the proportion of patients without serious injuries transported to major trauma centers by 60%. Conclusions Existing out-of-hospital physiologic triage criteria could be revised to better identify seriously injured older adults at the expense of increasing over-triage to major trauma centers. PMID:24933614

  16. A concept for major incident triage: full-scaled simulation feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Efficient management of major incidents involves triage, treatment and transport. In the absence of a standardised interdisciplinary major incident management approach, the Norwegian Air Ambulance Foundation developed Interdisciplinary Emergency Service Cooperation Course (TAS). The TAS-program was established in 1998 and by 2009, approximately 15 500 emergency service professionals have participated in one of more than 500 no-cost courses. The TAS-triage concept is based on the established triage Sieve and Paediatric Triage Tape models but modified with slap-wrap reflective triage tags and paediatric triage stretchers. We evaluated the feasibility and accuracy of the TAS-triage concept in full-scale simulated major incidents. Methods The learners participated in two standardised bus crash simulations: without and with competence of TAS-triage and access to TAS-triage equipment. The instructors calculated triage accuracy and measured time consumption while the learners participated in a self-reported before-after study. Each question was scored on a 7-point Likert scale with points labelled "Did not work" (1) through "Worked excellent" (7). Results Among the 93 (85%) participating emergency service professionals, 48% confirmed the existence of a major incident triage system in their service, whereas 27% had access to triage tags. The simulations without TAS-triage resulted in a mean over- and undertriage of 12%. When TAS-Triage was used, no mistriage was found. The average time from "scene secured to all patients triaged" was 22 minutes (range 15-32) without TAS-triage vs. 10 minutes (range 5-21) with TAS-triage. The participants replied to "How did interdisciplinary cooperation of triage work?" with mean 4,9 (95% CI 4,7-5,2) before the course vs. mean 5,8 (95% CI 5,6-6,0) after the course, p < 0,001. Conclusions Our modified triage Sieve tool is feasible, time-efficient and accurate in allocating priority during simulated bus accidents and may serve as a candidate for a future national standard for major incident triage. PMID:20701802

  17. 33 CFR 174.107 - Contents of casualty or accident report form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Contents of casualty or accident... System Requirements § 174.107 Contents of casualty or accident report form. Each form for reporting a vessel casualty or accident must contain the information required in § 173.57 of this chapter....

  18. 33 CFR 174.107 - Contents of casualty or accident report form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contents of casualty or accident... System Requirements § 174.107 Contents of casualty or accident report form. Each form for reporting a vessel casualty or accident must contain the information required in § 173.57 of this chapter....

  19. 33 CFR 174.107 - Contents of casualty or accident report form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Contents of casualty or accident... System Requirements § 174.107 Contents of casualty or accident report form. Each form for reporting a vessel casualty or accident must contain the information required in § 173.57 of this chapter....

  20. 33 CFR 174.107 - Contents of casualty or accident report form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Contents of casualty or accident... System Requirements § 174.107 Contents of casualty or accident report form. Each form for reporting a vessel casualty or accident must contain the information required in § 173.57 of this chapter....

  1. 33 CFR 174.107 - Contents of casualty or accident report form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Contents of casualty or accident... System Requirements § 174.107 Contents of casualty or accident report form. Each form for reporting a vessel casualty or accident must contain the information required in § 173.57 of this chapter....

  2. 46 CFR 4.05-10 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 4.05-10 Section 4.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-10 Written report of...

  3. 46 CFR 4.05-10 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 4.05-10 Section 4.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-10 Written report of...

  4. 46 CFR 4.05-10 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 4.05-10 Section 4.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-10 Written report of...

  5. 46 CFR 4.05-5 - Substance of marine casualty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Substance of marine casualty notice. 4.05-5 Section 4.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-5 Substance of...

  6. 46 CFR 4.05-5 - Substance of marine casualty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Substance of marine casualty notice. 4.05-5 Section 4.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-5 Substance of...

  7. 46 CFR 4.05-5 - Substance of marine casualty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Substance of marine casualty notice. 4.05-5 Section 4.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-5 Substance of...

  8. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  9. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  10. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  11. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  12. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  13. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  14. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  15. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  16. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine Casualty Investigations § 4.40-25...

  17. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  18. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  19. 46 CFR 4.05-5 - Substance of marine casualty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Substance of marine casualty notice. 4.05-5 Section 4.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-5 Substance of...

  20. 46 CFR 4.05-5 - Substance of marine casualty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Substance of marine casualty notice. 4.05-5 Section 4.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-5 Substance of...

  1. 46 CFR 4.05-10 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 4.05-10 Section 4.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-10 Written report of...

  2. 46 CFR 4.05-10 - Written report of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Written report of marine casualty. 4.05-10 Section 4.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Notice of Marine Casualty and Voyage Records § 4.05-10 Written report of...

  3. 33 CFR 146.30 - Notice of casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary lifesaving or firefighting equipment; (2) Injury causing any person to be incapacitated for more... involving the facility which results in: (1) Death; or (2) Injury to 5 or more persons in a single incident... and describe, insofar as practicable, the nature of the casualty and the extent of injury to...

  4. 33 CFR 146.30 - Notice of casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary lifesaving or firefighting equipment; (2) Injury causing any person to be incapacitated for more... involving the facility which results in: (1) Death; or (2) Injury to 5 or more persons in a single incident... and describe, insofar as practicable, the nature of the casualty and the extent of injury to...

  5. 33 CFR 146.30 - Notice of casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary lifesaving or firefighting equipment; (2) Injury causing any person to be incapacitated for more... involving the facility which results in: (1) Death; or (2) Injury to 5 or more persons in a single incident... and describe, insofar as practicable, the nature of the casualty and the extent of injury to...

  6. 33 CFR 146.30 - Notice of casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary lifesaving or firefighting equipment; (2) Injury causing any person to be incapacitated for more... involving the facility which results in: (1) Death; or (2) Injury to 5 or more persons in a single incident... and describe, insofar as practicable, the nature of the casualty and the extent of injury to...

  7. 33 CFR 146.30 - Notice of casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary lifesaving or firefighting equipment; (2) Injury causing any person to be incapacitated for more... involving the facility which results in: (1) Death; or (2) Injury to 5 or more persons in a single incident... and describe, insofar as practicable, the nature of the casualty and the extent of injury to...

  8. 46 CFR 4.05-1 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Notice given as required by 33 CFR 160.215 satisfies the requirement of this section if the marine casualty involves a hazardous condition as defined by 33 CFR 160.204. (c) Except as otherwise required... by paragraph (a)(8) of this section, a report made pursuant to 33 CFR 153.203, 40 CFR 117.21, or...

  9. 46 CFR 122.202 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Administration (OSHA) in 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 1904. (c) Notice given as required by § 122... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notice of marine casualty. 122.202 Section 122.202... THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS...

  10. 46 CFR 4.05-1 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Notice given as required by 33 CFR 160.215 satisfies the requirement of this section if the marine casualty involves a hazardous condition as defined by 33 CFR 160.204. (c) Except as otherwise required... by paragraph (a)(8) of this section, a report made pursuant to 33 CFR 153.203, 40 CFR 117.21, or...

  11. 46 CFR 185.202 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations (CFR) part 1904. (c) Notice given as required by § 185.203 satisfies the requirement of this... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS... (e.g., collision) or a vessel equipment casualty (e.g., cargo boom failure) and are subject to...

  12. 46 CFR 197.486 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.486 Written report of casualty. The... occurs, as follows: (a) On Form CG-2692, when the diving installation is on a vessel. (b) Using a written report, in narrative form, when the diving installation is on a facility. The written report must...

  13. 46 CFR 197.486 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.486 Written report of casualty. The... occurs, as follows: (a) On Form CG-2692, when the diving installation is on a vessel. (b) Using a written report, in narrative form, when the diving installation is on a facility. The written report must...

  14. 46 CFR 197.486 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.486 Written report of casualty. The... occurs, as follows: (a) On Form CG-2692, when the diving installation is on a vessel. (b) Using a written report, in narrative form, when the diving installation is on a facility. The written report must...

  15. 46 CFR 197.486 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.486 Written report of casualty. The... occurs, as follows: (a) On Form CG-2692, when the diving installation is on a vessel. (b) Using a written report, in narrative form, when the diving installation is on a facility. The written report must...

  16. 46 CFR 197.486 - Written report of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.486 Written report of casualty. The... occurs, as follows: (a) On Form CG-2692, when the diving installation is on a vessel. (b) Using a written report, in narrative form, when the diving installation is on a facility. The written report must...

  17. 46 CFR 4.05-1 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Notice given as required by 33 CFR 160.215 satisfies the requirement of this section if the marine casualty involves a hazardous condition as defined by 33 CFR 160.204. (c) Except as otherwise required... by paragraph (a)(8) of this section, a report made pursuant to 33 CFR 153.203, 40 CFR 117.21, or...

  18. 46 CFR 169.807 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notice of casualty. 169.807 Section 169.807 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... to mariners, radiograms sent and received, the radio log, and crew, sailing school...

  19. 46 CFR 169.807 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notice of casualty. 169.807 Section 169.807 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... to mariners, radiograms sent and received, the radio log, and crew, sailing school...

  20. 46 CFR 169.807 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notice of casualty. 169.807 Section 169.807 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... to mariners, radiograms sent and received, the radio log, and crew, sailing school...

  1. 46 CFR 169.807 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of casualty. 169.807 Section 169.807 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... to mariners, radiograms sent and received, the radio log, and crew, sailing school...

  2. 46 CFR 169.807 - Notice of casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notice of casualty. 169.807 Section 169.807 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... to mariners, radiograms sent and received, the radio log, and crew, sailing school...

  3. 33 CFR 150.815 - How must casualties be reported?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must casualties be reported? 150.815 Section 150.815 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Reports and Records Reports § 150.815 How...

  4. 46 CFR 4.05-1 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Notice given as required by 33 CFR 160.215 satisfies the requirement of this section if the marine casualty involves a hazardous condition as defined by 33 CFR 160.204. (c) Except as otherwise required... by paragraph (a)(8) of this section, a report made pursuant to 33 CFR 153.203, 40 CFR 117.21, or...

  5. 46 CFR 122.202 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Administration (OSHA) in 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 1904. (c) Notice given as required by § 122... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notice of marine casualty. 122.202 Section 122.202... THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS...

  6. 46 CFR 122.202 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Administration (OSHA) in 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 1904. (c) Notice given as required by § 122... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of marine casualty. 122.202 Section 122.202... THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS...

  7. 46 CFR 4.05-1 - Notice of marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Notice given as required by 33 CFR 160.215 satisfies the requirement of this section if the marine casualty involves a hazardous condition as defined by 33 CFR 160.203. (c) Except as otherwise required... by paragraph (a)(8) of this section, a report made pursuant to 33 CFR 153.203, 40 CFR 117.21, or...

  8. Therapeutic Assessment in Psychological Triage Using the PAI.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joshua D; Morey, Leslie C

    2016-01-01

    This case illustrates the utility of incorporating therapeutic assessment in a triage context that typically involves a focus on gathering information. A man referred to our clinic by a local mental health center was seen by our assessment team for a triage that includes the administration of a single psychological test, the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI). Although this triage must rapidly gather information to determine client suitability and treatment assignment, we still attempt to work with clients to collaboratively develop goals for this assessment that include addressing questions that are central concerns for the clients. In this case, the test results suggested a severe disorder that accounted for many phenomena that he had been experiencing but had apparently been reluctant to share. The information gathered led to a referral to a different treatment program that could provide pharmacological and more intensive forms of treatment. However, the collaborative bond formed between the assessor and the client during this triage was sufficiently strong that it was our assessor to whom the client turned in a subsequent crisis precipitated by a symptomatic exacerbation. This case illustrates complementary information gathering and therapeutic goals of assessment even in the context of a brief assessment. PMID:26730992

  9. Postsecondary Education as Triage: Returns to Academic and Technical Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    Examines labor market outcomes of individuals with various types of postsecondary educational experiences, highlighting differences between students who have pursued technical programs, those who have pursued academic programs and those who have not pursued postsecondary education. Employs a triage model suggesting that employer-employee matches…

  10. Children's Cognitive Triage: Optimal Retrieval or Effortful Processing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainerd, C. J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Cognitive triage is the nonmonotonic relationship between the order in which children read words out of long-term memory and the strength of the memory of the words read. Two experiments with 7 and 12 year olds compared the fuzzy-trace theory with an effortful processing explanation. Findings consistently favored the fuzzy-trace theory's…

  11. Factors Influencing Digital Reference Triage: A Think-Aloud Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomerantz, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a think-aloud study conducted to identify factors that influence the decisions made by digital reference "triagers" when performing triage on questions received by digital reference services. This study follows and expands on a Delphi study that identified factors that triagers agreed on after the fact of their performance…

  12. Crisis Assessment: A Three-Dimensional Model for Triage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myer, Rick A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents triage assessment model for crisis intervention that enables mental health counselors to initiate appropriate crisis interventions in variety of situations. Model guides assessment of clients in crisis on three domains: affective, cognitive, and behavioral. Describes assessment and rating of severity of impairment for each of the three…

  13. The effects of technology on triage in A & E.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J

    1998-04-01

    Within the specialty of Accident and Emergency (A & E) nursing, triage is a term meaning to classify or sort patients according to their need for care (Blythin 1988). Burgess (1992) views this process as a means of prioritizing patients in order, so that the more seriously ill or injured are seen first (Table 1). Triage performance is measured in the author's department by computer. This technological source is used to record the patient's arrival time and the time at which the patient is triaged. Technology is defined by the Oxford Dictionary (1996) as 'the study of mechanical arts and science, their application in industry'. This paper explores the impact of this technology and the related issues on the A & E triage nurse, and will focus on issues related to the Patients' Charter (1991), resource implications, safety and staff training. In conclusion, the quality of a patient's total care, in which the author participated, is discussed with reference to the related issues and implications for future practice. PMID:9677876

  14. Using Triage Figuratively to Describe Effective Teaching in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkel, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents critical outcomes for physical education in a "triage" framework by comparing the process of determining the severity of injuries at the scene of an accident to the process of prioritizing decisions in the classroom. The intent is to reduce all possible outcomes of effective teaching to six nonnegotiable outcomes

  15. Using Triage Figuratively to Describe Effective Teaching in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkel, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents critical outcomes for physical education in a "triage" framework by comparing the process of determining the severity of injuries at the scene of an accident to the process of prioritizing decisions in the classroom. The intent is to reduce all possible outcomes of effective teaching to six nonnegotiable outcomes…

  16. High-accuracy Decision of Call-triage by Using Bayesian Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunoki, Shota; Hamagami, Tomoki; Oshige, Kenji; Kawakami, Chihiro; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    A new call-triage system, a key part of emergency support system with stochastic network model is examined. The call-triage is an operation allowing the efficient decision of service grade and dispatching of suitable rescue team service from phone call information. Nowadays, the call-triage is being trialed on a few cities and is achieving an effect. However, there is the issue that if under-triage in which the condition of sick person is estimated more lightly is eliminated, the efficiency is degraded (over-triage). In this report, in order to overcome the issue, the Bayesian network scheme is examined to the call-triage system. The experiments with real call-triage data set results show the Bayesian network achieves precision enhancement.

  17. Triage of HPV positive women in cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Schiffman, Mark; Palmer, Timothy; Arbyn, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Despite HPV vaccines, screening will remain central for decades to control cervical cancer. Recently, HPV testing alone or with cytology was introduced as an alternative to cytology screening. However, most HPV infections are harmless and additional tests are required to identify women with progressing infections or precancer. With three options for primary screening, and without clear strategies for triage of screen-positive women, there is great confusion about the best approach. Also, increasing HPV vaccination coverage will lead to lower disease prevalence, and force new screening approaches. Currently recommended triage strategies for primary HPV screening include HPV genotyping for HPV16 and HPV18 and cytology. Other alternatives that are currently evaluated include p16/Ki-67 dual stain cytology, host methylation, and viral methylation testing. Clinical management of women with cervical cancer screening results is moving to use risk thresholds rather than individual test results. Specific risk thresholds have been defined for return to primary screening, repeat testing, referral to colposcopy, and immediate treatment. Choice of test algorithms is based on comparison of absolute risk estimates from triage tests with established clinical thresholds. Importantly, triage tests need to be evaluated together with the primary screening test and the downstream clinical management. An optimal integrated screening and triage strategy should reassure the vast majority of women that they are at very low risk of cervical cancer, send the women at highest risk to colposcopy at the right time, when disease can be colposcopically detected, and minimize the intermediate risk group that requires continued surveillance. PMID:26643050

  18. eTriage--a novel, web-based triage and booking service: enabling timely access to sexual health clinics.

    PubMed

    Jones, R; Menon-Johansson, A; Waters, A M; Sullivan, A K

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the sexual health of the nation has risen in profile. We face increasing demands and targets, in particular the 48-hour waiting time directive, and as a result clinic access has become a priority. eTriage is a novel, secure, web-based service designed specifically to increase access to our clinics. It has proved a popular booking method, providing access to 10% of all appointments across the Directorate within six months of introduction. KC60 analyses revealed that the majority of users (58%) underwent asymptomatic screening with the remainder having some degree of pathology. There was a greater percentage prevalence of human papilloma virus, chlamydia, non-specific urethritis, gonorrhoea, herpes and trichomonas in the eTriage population when compared with the general clinic population. A notes review illustrated a high degree of concordance between data entered on eTriage registration and clinical review (97%). A patient survey revealed high levels of patient satisfaction with the service. As an adjunct to our existing booking services, eTriage has served to increase patient choice and has proved itself to be a safe, efficient and effective means of improving patient access. PMID:19884355

  19. Management of Crush Syndrome Casualties after Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Sever, Mehmet Sukru; Vanholder, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    After direct impact of the trauma, crush syndrome is the second most frequent cause of death after mass disasters. However, since crush syndrome is quite rare in daily practice, mistakes are frequent in the treatment of these cases. This paper summarizes the etiopathogenesis of traumatic rhabdomyolysis and of crush syndrome-based acute kidney injury. The clinical and laboratory features, prophylaxis, and treatment of crush cases are described as well. The importance of early and energetic fluid resuscitation is underlined for prophylaxis of acute kidney injury. Since there is chaos, and an overwhelming number of victims, logistic drawbacks create a specific problem in the treatment of crush victims after mass disasters. Potential solutions for logistic hurdles and disaster preparedness scenarios have also been provided in this review article. PMID:23908797

  20. Demonstration of the Tele-Triage System: A Microcomputer-Based Telephone Triage Program for Use by R.N.'s in Ambulatory Care Settings or Physicians' Offices

    PubMed Central

    Moreland, H.; Johnston, M.; Sharp, D.

    1982-01-01

    The Tele-Triage System (C) is a tool designed to provide standardized telephone triage to people who call a health care facility for assistance or information. Tele-Triage is designed to systematize symptomatologic interviewing, data collection, and patient care management. It is used interactively by a Triage R.N. during telephone interviews to structure and record the interview. A summary of each interview is immediately printed and a record is stored on disk for archival and research purposes. The Tele-Triage System is in its first year of development and currently runs on an Apple II microcomputer. Future plans for the system include research to validate its effectiveness, commercial distribution, and conversion to other computer systems.

  1. Registered nurses integrate traditional Chinese medicine into the triage process.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Sharon W

    2012-02-01

    People in the United States often consult registered nurses (nurses) for advice when they want to explore alternatives to Western medicine, such as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Nurses find themselves confronting dilemmas when they are caught between these radically different worlds of medical cultures and thinking. Twenty Minnesota nurses were interviewed to learn how they integrate TCM into their triage process. Symbolic interactionism was the research framework used, and mixed coding methods facilitated data analysis. Several sociological theories explain the findings. The major finding is that nurses use a four-step triage process that begins from the Western medical perspective and includes consideration of TCM use. Nurses' recommendations are influenced by their situational roles and relationships, and by the cues they read from the person who is asking their advice. The results point to nurses being natural disseminators of TCM information and education in their resource role for others making health care decisions. PMID:21890709

  2. Investigation of work zone crash casualty patterns using association rules.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jinxian; Zhu, Jia-Zheng; Yan, Xuedong; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Investigation of the casualty crash characteristics and contributory factors is one of the high-priority issues in traffic safety analysis. In this paper, we propose a method based on association rules to analyze the characteristics and contributory factors of work zone crash casualties. A case study is conducted using the Michigan M-94/I-94/I-94BL/I-94BR work zone crash data from 2004 to 2008. The obtained association rules are divided into two parts including rules with high-lift, and rules with high-support for the further analysis. The results show that almost all the high-lift rules contain either environmental or occupant characteristics. The majority of association rules are centered on specific characteristics, such as drinking driving, the highway with more than 4 lanes, speed-limit over 40mph and not use of traffic control devices. It should be pointed out that some stronger associated rules were found in the high-support part. With the network visualization, the association rule method can provide more understandable results for investigating the patterns of work zone crash casualties. PMID:27038500

  3. Tactical combat casualty care 2007: evolving concepts and battlefield experience.

    PubMed

    Butler, Frank K; Holcomb, John B; Giebner, Stephen D; McSwain, Norman E; Bagian, James

    2007-11-01

    The Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) project begun by the Naval Special Warfare Command and continued by the U.S. Special Operations Command developed a set of tactically appropriate battlefield trauma care guidelines that were initially published in 1996. Transition of these guidelines into use throughout the Department of Defense has been ongoing since that time. The need for updates to the TCCC guidelines was recognized early on and has been carried out by the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care established and operated by the Naval Operational Medicine Institute. The evolution of these guidelines from the 1996 recommendations to the present is described. Numerous reports in the medical literature and collected from combat first responders have documented that TCCC is saving lives on the battlefield and improving the tactical flow of missions on which casualties have occurred. Present challenges to the optimized implementation of TCCC in U.S. combat units include the need to expedite transition of new TCCC techniques and technologies to deploying units, to provide TCCC training for all U.S. combatants, and to ensure adequate funding for the Committee on TCCC. PMID:18154234

  4. Triaging self-referred patients attending ophthalmic emergency room

    PubMed Central

    AlSamnan, Mazen S.; Mousa, Ahmed; Al-Kuwaileet, Safa; AlSuhaibani, Adel H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To introduce an effective and safe ophthalmic triaging system to be used by non-ophthalmologists. Methods: A modified scoring triage system with more relevant clinical symptoms and signs from a previously published Rome Eye Scoring System for Urgency and Emergency (RESCUE) was evaluated over a 2-month period. The study was conducted following a prospective cohort design between March and September 2014 at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Only self-referred patients were included. Its reliability in differentiating urgent and semi-urgent conditions from non-urgent conditions, identifying patients who need immediate intervention, and decreasing the waiting time were tested using Mann Whitney U test. Results: A total of 531 patients were included in the validation phase to evaluate the triaging system reliability, and 824 patients were included in the implementation phase (applying the system in the ophthalmology emergency room). The sensitivity to differentiate urgent and semi-urgent conditions from non-urgent conditions improved from 90.7 to 98.7%, while the specificity decreased from 97.2 to 87% compared with RESCUE. The sensitivity in differentiating urgent conditions from semi-urgent and non-urgent conditions was 99%, and the specificity was 90%. Mean waiting time reduced from 58.23 minutes to 46 minutes (p=0.014), and the median waiting time reduced from 46 minutes to 33 minutes (p=0.009). Conclusion: This triage system appears to be safe and effective in recognizing the urgency of different ophthalmic conditions, reducing unnecessary ophthalmic emergency load and waiting time significantly. PMID:25987109

  5. Implementing and preserving the advances in combat casualty care from Iraq and Afghanistan throughout the US Military.

    PubMed

    Butler, Frank K; Smith, David J; Carmona, Richard H

    2015-08-01

    Thirteen years of continuous combat operations have enabled the US Military and its coalition partners to make a number of major advances in casualty care. The coalition nations have developed a superb combat trauma system and achieved unprecedented casualty survival rates. There remains, however, a need to accelerate the translation of new battlefield trauma care information, training, and equipment to units and individuals deploying in support of combat operations. In addition, the US Military needs to ensure that these advances are sustained during peace intervals and that we continue to build upon our successes as we prepare for future conflicts. This article contains recommendations designed to accomplish those goals. For the proposed actions to benefit all branches of our armed services, the direction will need to come from the Office of the Secretary of Defense in partnership with the Joint Staff. Effective translation of military advances in prehospital trauma care may also increase survival for law enforcement officers wounded in the line of duty and for civilian victims of Active Shooter or terrorist-related mass-casualty incidents. PMID:26218704

  6. Bombings specific triage (Bost Tool) tool and its application by healthcare professionals

    PubMed Central

    Sanjay, Jaiswal; Ankur, Verma; Tamorish, Kole

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bombing is a unique incident which produces unique patterns, multiple and occult injuries. Death often is a result of combined blast, ballistic and thermal effect injuries. Various natures of injury, self referrals and arrival by private transportation may lead to “wrong triage” in the emergency department. In India there has been an increase in incidence of bombing in the last 15 years. There is no documented triage tool from the National Disaster Management Authority of India for Bombings. We have tried to develop an ideal bombing specific triage tool which will guide the right patients to the right place at the right time and save more lives. METHODS: There are three methods of studying the triage tool: 1) real disaster; 2) mock drill; 3) table top exercise. In this study, a table top exercise method was selected. There are two groups, each consisting of an emergency physician, a nurse and a paramedic. RESULTS: By using the proportion test, we found that correct triaging was significantly different (P=0.005) in proportion between the two groups: group B (80%) with triage tool performed better in triaging the bomb blast victims than group A (50%) without the bombing specific triage tool performed. CONCLUSION: Development of bombing specific triage tool can reduce under triaging. PMID:26693264

  7. Ambulatory oncology nurses making the right call: assessment and education in telephone triage practices.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Karen; O'Neill, Eileen Brennan; Goldschmitt, Jennifer; Horigan, Jennifer; Moriarty, Linda

    2013-06-01

    Nurses in a hematology/oncology practice are responsible for the triage and management of phone calls from a diverse oncology population. An initiative was developed at the authors' institution to identify the educational needs of RNs while designing strategies to educate and improve telephone triage skills. The goal was to standardize triage practice and ultimately improve the effectiveness of telephone triage management. It was felt that these improvements could enhance the nurse-patient relationship, resulting in continuity of care to the patient, as well as reducing inappropriate appointments and hospitalizations, enhancing education, and lessening the risk of medical complications related to delays in care. PMID:23715712

  8. French pre-hospital trauma triage criteria: Does the “pre-hospital resuscitation” criterion provide additional benefit in triage?

    PubMed Central

    Hornez, Emmanuel; Maurin, Olga; Mayet, Aurélie; Monchal, Tristan; Gonzalez, Federico; Kerebel, Delphine

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance of the specific French Vittel “Pre-Hospital (PH) resuscitation” criteria in selecting polytrauma patients during the pre-hospital stage and its potential to increase the positive predictive value (PPV) of pre-hospital trauma triage. METHODS: This was a monocentric prospective cohort study of injured adults transported by emergency medical service to a trauma center. Patients who met any of the field trauma triage criteria were considered “triage positive”. Hospital data was statistically linked to pre-hospital records. The primary outcome of defining a “major trauma patient” was Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 16. RESULTS: There were a total of 200 injured patients evaluated over a 2 years period who met at least 1 triage criterion. The number of false positives was 64 patients (ISS < 16). The PPV was 68%. The sensitivity and the negative predictive value could not be evaluated in this study since it only included patients with positive Vittel criteria. The criterion of “PH resuscitation” was present for 64 patients (32%), but 10 of them had an ISS < 16. This was statistically significant in correlation with the severity of the trauma in univariate analysis (OR = 7.2; P = 0.005; 95%CI: 1.6-31.6). However, despite this correlation the overall PPV was not significantly increased by the use of the criterion “PH resuscitation” (68% vs 67.8%). CONCLUSION: The criterion of “pre-hospital resuscitation” was statistically significant with the severity of the trauma, but did not increase the PPV. The use of “pre-hospital resuscitation” criterion could be re-considered if these results are confirmed by larger studies. PMID:25379459

  9. Selecting samples for Mars sample return: Triage by pyrolysis-FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sephton, Mark A.; Court, Richard W.; Lewis, James M.; Wright, Miriam C.; Gordon, Peter R.

    2013-04-01

    A future Mars Sample Return mission will deliver samples of the red planet to Earth laboratories for detailed analysis. A successful mission will require selection of the best samples that can be used to address the highest priority science objectives including assessment of past habitability and evidence of life. Pyrolysis is a commonly used method for extracting organic information from rocks but is most often coupled with complex analytical steps such as gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Pyrolysis-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is a less resource demanding method that still allows sample characterisation. Here we demonstrate how pyrolysis-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy could be used to triage samples destined to return to Earth, thereby maximising the scientific return from future sample return missions.

  10. Detection of benzodiazepines and tribenzazolams by TRIAGE: confirmation by solid-phase extraction utilizing SPEC.3ML.MP3 microcolumns and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Edinboro, L E; Poklis, A

    1994-10-01

    A new point-of-care urine drugs-of-abuse testing device, the BIOSITE TRIAGE, was evaluated for detection of benzodiazepines (BNZs). TRIAGE utilizes a unique, competitive, visual immunoassay methodology to simultaneously detect seven classes of drugs of abuse. Because of the unique ASCEND Multimmunoassay technology, conflicting results may arise when TRIAGE is compared with conventional immunoassay techniques. Apparent TRIAGE BNZ false-positive results may occur when gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) confirmation utilizes oxazepam as the analyte used to confirm the presence of BNZs. TRIAGE BNZ results were correlated with those of Syva EMIT, (n = 106, overall agreement 85%). Both negative and positive urine samples were tested by GC-MS for the following drugs: oxazepam, nordiazepam, desalkylflurazepam, OH-ethylflurazepam, lorazepam, temazepam, alpha-OH-alprazolam and alpha-OH-triazolam. Urine samples were extracted using the new ANSYS SPEC.3ML.MP3 solid-phase extraction microcolumn. The ANSYS procedure for BNZs was modified to include desalkylflurazepam, OH-ethylflurazepam, lorazepam, temazepam, alpha-OH-alprazolam, and alpha-OH-triazolam. Deuterated oxazepam and alpha-OH-alprazolam were used as internal standards. Limits of quantitation (LOQs) ranged from 25 to 100 ng/mL with a limit of detection of 25 ng/mL for all analytes. Individual analytes demonstrated within-run precision and between-run precision ranging from 0.9 to 4.7% CV and 1.3 to 16.9% CV, respectively. All analytes were linear from their LOQs to 1000 ng/mL. PMID:7823538

  11. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Novel Disaster Training Tool for School Nurses: Emergency Triage Drill Kit.

    PubMed

    Burke, Rita V; Goodhue, Catherine J; Berg, Bridget M; Spears, Robert; Barnes, Jill; Upperman, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-01

    As children spend approximately 28% of their day in school and disasters may strike at any time, it is important for school officials to conduct emergency preparedness activities. School nurses, teachers, and staff should be prepared to respond and provide support and first aid treatment. This article describes a collaborative effort within the Los Angeles Unified School District to enhance disaster preparedness. Specifically, the article outlines the program steps and tools developed to prepare staff in mass triage through an earthquake disaster training exercise. PMID:25899521

  12. CBRNE TC3: A Hybrid Approach to Casualty Care in the CBRNE Environment.

    PubMed

    Strain, John W

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) guidelines for the Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom contingency operations has dramatically reduced preventable combat deaths. A study of these principles and their application to medical treatment in the chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosives (CBRNE), weapons of mass destruction (WMD) environment is presented as a potential readiness and force multiplier for units engaged in this area of operations. Preparing medical operators for support of WMD sampling and mitigation missions requires extensive preventive medicine and post-exposure and downrange trauma threat preparedness. Training and equipping CBRN operators with treatment skills and appropriate interventional material requires pre-implementation planning specific to WMD threats (e.g., anthrax, radiation, organophosphates, and contaminated trauma). A scenario-based study reveals the tactics, techniques, and procedures for training, resourcing, and fielding the CBRN operator of the future. PMID:23817878

  13. [Treatment of injuries in the county of Ringkbing. 2. Function of the closed casualty department].

    PubMed

    Hansen, T B; Kristensen, K A; Poulsen, M B; Gravers, M; Laursen, C N; Hansen, K R

    1992-10-26

    The closed casualty department function in the County of Ringkbing was investigated during a period of four weeks. It was demonstrated that this functioned according to plan as the distribution general practice/casualty department was 3.4:1 and 70% of the patients in the casualty department were referred via general practice. The result of this was that the majority of minor injuries (removal of foreign bodies and treatment of wounds) were treated in general practice. In the casualty departments, there were fewer minor injuries and injuries which did not require specific treatment than are the case in open casualty departments. However, a definite diurnal variation was observed in the function of the closed casualty department as patients showed a greater tendency to seek treatment in the casualty department after working hours than during working hours and the general practitioners referred twice as many patients after working hours for continued treatment in the casualty departments. It is concluded that the closed casualty department system in the County of Ringkbing functions well but that problems may be anticipated with the function if the duty-rosters for the general practitioners are altered so that the distances between general practitioners on duty increase and these have an increased work-load. PMID:1462396

  14. Paper and people: the work of the casualty reception clerk.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D

    1989-12-01

    This paper examines the exercise of discretion by casualty reception staff, focussing on the problems of accountability that arise when their judgements help shape the process of patient categorization that culminates in clinical diagnosis. Rules and guidelines which ostensibly relate to bureaucratic objectives, are applied in ways which reflect situational exigencies of reception work, and values embedded in organisational culture. But reception staff are reluctant to acknowledge the importance of their decisions, and, particularly where judgements relate to patient condition, present rule-use as a straightforward and certain activity in which interpretation plays little part. PMID:10304220

  15. Traditional Nurse Triage vs. Physician Tele-Presence in a Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Greg P.; Chang, Todd; Pham, Phung K.; Grajower, Daniel N.; Nager, Alan L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare traditional nurse triage (TNT) in a Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) to physician tele-presence (PTP). Methods Prospective, 2×2 crossover study with random assignment using a sample of walk-in patients seeking care in a PED at a large, tertiary care children’s hospital, from May 2012 to January 2013. Outcomes of triage times, documentation errors, triage scores, and survey responses were compared between TNT and PTP. Comparison between PTP to actual treating PED physicians regarding the accuracy of ordering blood and urine tests, throat cultures, and radiologic imaging was also studied. Results Paired samples t-tests showed a statistically significant difference in triage time between TNT and PTP (p=0.03), but no significant difference in documentation errors (p=0.10). Triage scores of TNT were 71% accurate, compared to PTP, which were 95% accurate. Both parents and children had favorable scores regarding PTP and the majority indicated they would prefer PTP again at their next PED visit. PTP diagnostic ordering was comparable to the actual PED physician ordering, showing no statistical differences. Conclusions Utilizing physician tele-presence technology to remotely perform triage is a feasible alternative to traditional nurse triage, with no clinically significant differences in time, triage scores, errors and patient and parent satisfaction. PMID:24445223

  16. Calibrating Urgency: Triage Decision-Making in a Pediatric Emergency Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Vimla L.; Gutnik, Lily A.; Karlin, Daniel R.; Pusic, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Triage, the first step in the assessment of emergency department patients, occurs in a highly dynamic environment that functions under constraints of time, physical space, and patient needs that may exceed available resources. Through triage, patients are placed into one of a limited number of categories using a subset of diagnostic information.…

  17. Telephone triage assessment for musculoskeletal disorders: part 1.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Laran

    Changes in the delivery of occupational health and wellbeing services can affect the employer, employees and service users. Despite the impact of such changes, many organisations implement them without understanding their true effects. Support of staff and service users is needed if change is to be implemented and services reconfigured to improve overall efficiency. A diagnostic analysis has been recommended as a precursor to assess what impact a change would have. This paper explores the process of a diagnostic analysis before nursing telephone triage assessment for musculoskeletal disorders was implemented in an occupational health and wellbeing service. Mixed methods were used to gather the relevant information. PMID:23132003

  18. Imaging components for a robotic casualty evaluation system.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kenneth H; Lob, Shih-Chung; Lin, Ching-Fang; Lasser, Bob; Mun, Seong K

    2009-01-01

    Combat medics have a vital role in the protection of wounded soldiers in the battlespace. However, their duties expose them to great risks. Furthermore, these medics are a limited resource and must be carefully tasked in order to provide maximum benefit to their units. For these reasons, we are applying the American GNC Corporation's (AGNC) Coremicro(R) Robotic System for autonomous evaluation of battlefield casualties. These robots are intended to navigate to a casualty, determine his/her overall health status, and perform limited diagnostic imaging in order to assess the presence of injuries that would prevent or complicate extraction. In this paper, we describe development work on some of the key components of the proposed robotic system, namely the overall concept of operations (ConOps) and initial testing of infrared and ultrasound imaging cameras. When fully deployed, this system will act as a medical force multiplier, enabling improved care of wounded soldiers and protecting the health and safety of military medical personnel. PMID:19964740

  19. Evaluation of symptom checkers for self diagnosis and triage: audit study

    PubMed Central

    Semigran, Hannah L; Linder, Jeffrey A; Gidengil, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic and triage accuracy of online symptom checkers (tools that use computer algorithms to help patients with self diagnosis or self triage). Design Audit study. Setting Publicly available, free symptom checkers. Participants 23 symptom checkers that were in English and provided advice across a range of conditions. 45 standardized patient vignettes were compiled and equally divided into three categories of triage urgency: emergent care required (for example, pulmonary embolism), non-emergent care reasonable (for example, otitis media), and self care reasonable (for example, viral upper respiratory tract infection). Main outcome measures For symptom checkers that provided a diagnosis, our main outcomes were whether the symptom checker listed the correct diagnosis first or within the first 20 potential diagnoses (n=770 standardized patient evaluations). For symptom checkers that provided a triage recommendation, our main outcomes were whether the symptom checker correctly recommended emergent care, non-emergent care, or self care (n=532 standardized patient evaluations). Results The 23 symptom checkers provided the correct diagnosis first in 34% (95% confidence interval 31% to 37%) of standardized patient evaluations, listed the correct diagnosis within the top 20 diagnoses given in 58% (55% to 62%) of standardized patient evaluations, and provided the appropriate triage advice in 57% (52% to 61%) of standardized patient evaluations. Triage performance varied by urgency of condition, with appropriate triage advice provided in 80% (95% confidence interval 75% to 86%) of emergent cases, 55% (47% to 63%) of non-emergent cases, and 33% (26% to 40%) of self care cases (P<0.001). Performance on appropriate triage advice across the 23 individual symptom checkers ranged from 33% (95% confidence interval 19% to 48%) to 78% (64% to 91%) of standardized patient evaluations. Conclusions Symptom checkers had deficits in both triage and diagnosis. Triage advice from symptom checkers is generally risk averse, encouraging users to seek care for conditions where self care is reasonable. PMID:26157077

  20. 33 CFR 174.121 - Forwarding of casualty or accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... accident reports. 174.121 Section 174.121 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... § 174.121 Forwarding of casualty or accident reports. Within 30 days of the receipt of a casualty or accident report, the reporting authority receiving the report must forward a paper or electronic copy...

  1. 33 CFR 174.121 - Forwarding of casualty or accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... accident reports. 174.121 Section 174.121 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... § 174.121 Forwarding of casualty or accident reports. Within 30 days of the receipt of a casualty or accident report, the reporting authority receiving the report must forward a paper or electronic copy...

  2. 33 CFR 174.121 - Forwarding of casualty or accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... accident reports. 174.121 Section 174.121 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... § 174.121 Forwarding of casualty or accident reports. Within 30 days of the receipt of a casualty or accident report, the reporting authority receiving the report must forward a paper or electronic copy...

  3. 33 CFR 174.121 - Forwarding of casualty or accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... accident reports. 174.121 Section 174.121 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... § 174.121 Forwarding of casualty or accident reports. Within 30 days of the receipt of a casualty or accident report, each State that has an approved numbering system must forward a copy of that report to...

  4. 33 CFR 174.121 - Forwarding of casualty or accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accident reports. 174.121 Section 174.121 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... § 174.121 Forwarding of casualty or accident reports. Within 30 days of the receipt of a casualty or accident report, each State that has an approved numbering system must forward a copy of that report to...

  5. 49 CFR 850.15 - Marine casualty investigation by the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of practice for transportation accident hearings in 49 CFR part 845 shall apply. (b) The Board shall... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marine casualty investigation by the Board. 850.15... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS §...

  6. 49 CFR 850.15 - Marine casualty investigation by the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of practice for transportation accident hearings in 49 CFR part 845 shall apply. (b) The Board shall... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marine casualty investigation by the Board. 850.15... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS §...

  7. 33 CFR 164.61 - Marine casualty reporting and record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR 4.03-1, the master or person in charge of the vessel shall: (a) Ensure compliance with 46 CFR... required by 46 CFR 4.05-15 are retained for: (1) 30 days after the casualty if the vessel remains in the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Marine casualty reporting...

  8. 33 CFR 164.61 - Marine casualty reporting and record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR 4.03-1, the master or person in charge of the vessel shall: (a) Ensure compliance with 46 CFR... required by 46 CFR 4.05-15 are retained for: (1) 30 days after the casualty if the vessel remains in the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Marine casualty reporting...

  9. 33 CFR 164.61 - Marine casualty reporting and record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR 4.03-1, the master or person in charge of the vessel shall: (a) Ensure compliance with 46 CFR... required by 46 CFR 4.05-15 are retained for: (1) 30 days after the casualty if the vessel remains in the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marine casualty reporting...

  10. 46 CFR 4.40-15 - Marine casualty investigation by the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...'s rules of practice for transportation accident hearings in 49 CFR part 845 shall apply. (b) The... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marine casualty investigation by the Board. 4.40-15... MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  11. 33 CFR 164.61 - Marine casualty reporting and record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR 4.03-1, the master or person in charge of the vessel shall: (a) Ensure compliance with 46 CFR... required by 46 CFR 4.05-15 are retained for: (1) 30 days after the casualty if the vessel remains in the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Marine casualty reporting...

  12. 46 CFR 4.40-15 - Marine casualty investigation by the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...'s rules of practice for transportation accident hearings in 49 CFR part 845 shall apply. (b) The... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marine casualty investigation by the Board. 4.40-15... MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  13. 33 CFR 173.81 - Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. 173.81 Section 173.81 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY VESSEL NUMBERING AND CASUALTY AND ACCIDENT REPORTING Issue of Certificate of Number § 173.81...

  14. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety...

  15. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety...

  16. 33 CFR 173.81 - Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. 173.81 Section 173.81 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Issue of Certificate of Number § 173.81 Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. (a) In...

  17. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety...

  18. 33 CFR 173.81 - Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. 173.81 Section 173.81 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Issue of Certificate of Number § 173.81 Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. (a) In...

  19. 33 CFR 173.81 - Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. 173.81 Section 173.81 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Issue of Certificate of Number § 173.81 Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. (a) In...

  20. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety...

  1. 33 CFR 173.81 - Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. 173.81 Section 173.81 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Issue of Certificate of Number § 173.81 Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. (a) In...

  2. 46 CFR 4.40-15 - Marine casualty investigation by the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...'s rules of practice for transportation accident hearings in 49 CFR part 845 shall apply. (b) The... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marine casualty investigation by the Board. 4.40-15... MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  3. 49 CFR 850.15 - Marine casualty investigation by the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of practice for transportation accident hearings in 49 CFR part 845 shall apply. (b) The Board shall... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marine casualty investigation by the Board. 850.15... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS §...

  4. Initial experience with a rapid access blackouts triage clinic.

    PubMed

    Petkar, S; Bell, W; Rice, N; Iddon, P; Cooper, P; McKee, D; Curtis, N; Hanley, M; Stuart, J; Mackway Jones, K; Fitzpatrick, A P

    2011-02-01

    Transient loss of consciousness (T-LOC), or blackout, is common in acute medicine. Clinical skills are not done well, with at least 74,000 patients misdiagnosed and mistreated for epilepsy in England alone. The aim of this study was to provide a rapid, structured assessment and an electrocardiogram (ECG) for patients with blackouts, aiming to identify high risk, reduce misdiagnoses, reduce hospital admission rates for low-risk patients, diagnose and treat where appropriate, and also provide onward specialist referral. The majority of patients had syncope, and very few had epilepsy. A high proportion had an abnormal ECG. A specialist-nurse-led rapid access blackouts triage clinic (RABTC) provided rapid effective triage for risk, a comprehensive assessment format, direct treatment for many patients, and otherwise a prompt appropriate onward referral. Rapid assessment through a RABTC reduced re-admissions with blackouts. Widespread use of the web-based blackouts tool could provide the NHS with a performance map. The U.K. has low rates of pacing compared to Western Europe, which RABTCs might help correct. The RABTC sits between first responders and specialist referral, providing clinical assessment and ECG in all cases, and referral where appropriate. PMID:21404775

  5. CoIN: a network analysis for document triage

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yi-Yu; Kao, Hung-Yu

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there was a rapid increase in the number of medical articles. The number of articles in PubMed has increased exponentially. Thus, the workload for biocurators has also increased exponentially. Under these circumstances, a system that can automatically determine in advance which article has a higher priority for curation can effectively reduce the workload of biocurators. Determining how to effectively find the articles required by biocurators has become an important task. In the triage task of BioCreative 2012, we proposed the Co-occurrence Interaction Nexus (CoIN) for learning and exploring relations in articles. We constructed a co-occurrence analysis system, which is applicable to PubMed articles and suitable for gene, chemical and disease queries. CoIN uses co-occurrence features and their network centralities to assess the influence of curatable articles from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database. The experimental results show that our network-based approach combined with co-occurrence features can effectively classify curatable and non-curatable articles. CoIN also allows biocurators to survey the ranking lists for specific queries without reviewing meaningless information. At BioCreative 2012, CoIN achieved a 0.778 mean average precision in the triage task, thus finishing in second place out of all participants. Database URL: http://ikmbio.csie.ncku.edu.tw/coin/home.php PMID:24218542

  6. 19 CFR 158.21 - Allowance in duties for casualty, loss, or theft while in Customs custody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowance in duties for casualty, loss, or theft... LOST, DAMAGED, ABANDONED, OR EXPORTED Casualty, Loss, or Theft While in Customs Custody § 158.21 Allowance in duties for casualty, loss, or theft while in Customs custody. Section 563(a), Tariff Act...

  7. 19 CFR 158.21 - Allowance in duties for casualty, loss, or theft while in Customs custody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowance in duties for casualty, loss, or theft... LOST, DAMAGED, ABANDONED, OR EXPORTED Casualty, Loss, or Theft While in Customs Custody § 158.21 Allowance in duties for casualty, loss, or theft while in Customs custody. Section 563(a), Tariff Act...

  8. A redundant resource: a pre-planned casualty clearing station for a FIFA 2010 Stadium in Durban.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Timothy C; Samlal, Sanjay; Naidoo, Rajen; Hendrikse, Steven; Gloster, Alex; Ramlal, Melvin; Ngema, Sibongiseni; Rowe, Michael

    2012-10-01

    This report details the background, planning, and establishment of a mass-casualty management area for the Durban Moses Mabhida Stadium at the Natal Mounted Rifles base, by the Department of Health and the eThekwini Fire and Rescue Service, for the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) 2010 Soccer World Cup. The report discusses the use of the site during the seven matches played at that stadium, and details the aspects of mass-gathering major incident site planning for football (soccer). The area also was used as a treatment area for other single patient incidents outside of the stadium, but within the exclusion perimeter, and the 22 patients treated by the Casualty Clearing Station (CCS) team are described and briefly discussed. A site-specific patient presentation rate of 0.48 per 10,000 and transport-to-hospital rate (TTHR) of 0.09/10,000 are reported. Lessons learned and implications for future event planning are discussed in the light of the existing literature. PMID:22591650

  9. Decision analytic model exploring the cost and cost-offset implications of street triage

    PubMed Central

    Heslin, Margaret; Callaghan, Lynne; Packwood, Martin; Badu, Vincent; Byford, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine if street triage is effective at reducing the total number of people with mental health needs detained under section 136, and is associated with cost savings compared to usual police response. Design Routine data from a 6-month period in the year before and after the implementation of a street triage scheme were used to explore detentions under section 136, and to populate a decision analytic model to explore the impact of street triage on the cost to the NHS and the criminal justice sector of supporting people with a mental health need. Setting A predefined area of Sussex, South East England, UK. Participants All people who were detained under section 136 within the predefined area or had contact with the street triage team. Interventions The street triage model used here was based on a psychiatric nurse attending incidents with a police constable. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was change in the total number of detentions under section 136 between the before and after periods assessed. Secondary analysis focused on whether the additional costs of street triage were offset by cost savings as a result of changes in detentions under section 136. Results Detentions under section 136 in the street triage period were significantly lower than in the usual response period (118 vs 194 incidents, respectively; χ2 (1df) 18.542, p<0.001). Total NHS and criminal justice costs were estimated to be £1043 in the street triage period compared to £1077 in the usual response period. Conclusions Investment in street triage was offset by savings as a result of reduced detentions under section 136, particularly detentions in custody. Data available did not include assessment of patient outcomes, so a full economic evaluation was not possible. PMID:26868943

  10. Definitive treatment of combat casualties at military medical centers.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Romney C; Frisch, H Michael; Farber, Gerald L; Hayda, Roman A

    2006-01-01

    More than 9,000 casualties have been evacuated during the current conflict, and more than 40,000 orthopaedic surgical procedures have been performed. The most severely injured patients are treated in the United States at military medical centers. Individualized reconstructive plans are developed, and patients are treated with state-of-the-art techniques. Rehabilitation includes the assistance of the physical medicine and rehabilitation, physical therapy, and occupational therapy services, as well as, when necessary, psychiatric or other services. The extreme challenges of treating war-related soft-tissue defects include neurovascular injuries, burns, heterotopic ossification, infection, prolonged recovery, and persistent pain. Such injuries do not allow full restoration of function. Because of such devastating injuries, and despite use of up-to-date methods, outcomes can be less than optimal. PMID:17003202

  11. Treatment of acute abscesses in the casualty department.

    PubMed Central

    Simms, M H; Curran, F; Johnson, R A; Oates, J; Givel, J C; Chabloz, R; ALexander-Williams, J

    1982-01-01

    In the treatment of acute pyogenic soft-tissue abscess incision, curettage, and primary suture was compared with incision and drainage alone in a randomised prospective trial. Operations were performed under antibiotic cover by casualty officers, and patients were reviewed by an independent observer in a septic dressing clinic. Altogether 114 patients were studied, of whom 54 were treated by curettage and primary suture and 60 by simple drainage. The mean healing time was 8.9 days in those treated by primary suture and 7.8 days in those treated by simple drainage (p less than 0.05). Primary healing failed to occur in 19 (35%) of the sutured wounds, but there were no other complications in either group. It is concluded that incision and drainage alone is adequate treatment for acute soft-tissue abscess. PMID:6805714

  12. Trauma-related Infections in Battlefield Casualties From Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Kyle; Riddle, Mark S.; Danko, Janine R.; Blazes, David L.; Hayden, Richard; Tasker, Sybil A.; Dunne, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe risks for, and microbiology and antimicrobial resistance patterns of, war trauma associated infections from Operation Iraqi Freedom. Background: The invasion of Iraq resulted in casualties from high-velocity gunshot, shrapnel, and blunt trauma injuries as well as burns. Infectious complications of these unique war trauma injuries have not been described since the 1970s. Methods: Retrospective record review of all trauma casualties 5 to 65 years of age evacuated from the Iraqi theatre to U.S. Navy hospital ship, USNS Comfort March to May 2003.War trauma-associated infection was defined by positive culture from a wound or sterile body fluid (ie, blood, cerebrospinal fluid) and at least two of the following infection-associated signs/symptoms: fever, dehiscence, foul smell, peri-wound erythema, hypotension, and leukocytosis. A comparison of mechanisms of injury, demographics, and clinical variables was done using multivariate analysis. Results: Of 211 patients, 56 met criteria for infection. Infections were more common in blast injuries, soft tissue injuries, >3 wound sites, loss of limb, abdominal trauma, and higher Injury Severity Score (ISS). Wound infections accounted for 84% of cases, followed by bloodstream infections (38%). Infected were more likely to have had fever prior to arrival, and had higher probability of ICU admission and more surgical procedures. Acinetobacter species (36%) were the predominant organisms followed by Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas species (14% each). Conclusions: Similar to the Vietnam War experience, gram-negative rods, particularly Acinetobacter species, accounted for the majority of wound infections cared for on USNS Comfort during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Multidrug resistance was common, with the exception of the carbapenem class, limiting antibiotic therapy options. PMID:17457175

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF IT TRIAGE SYSTEM (TRACY) TO SHARE REGIONAL DISASTER MEDICAL INFORMATION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numada, Muneyoshi; Hada, Yasunori; Ohara, Miho; Meguro, Kimiro

    We developed an IT triage system for collecting disaster medical information in real time. FeliCa cards and card readers are used to obtain the number and cond ition of patients. The system is composed of two elements. First, the number of patie nts for each triage level and the accepted number of patients in each diagnosis and treatment department are obtained in real time, including response for changing triage level. Second, this information can be shared among hospitals, the administration, and residents in real time who are searching for their family. A disaster drill utiliz ing this system was held at the University of Yamanashi Hospital with 450 participants.

  14. Estimating shaking-induced casualties and building damage for global earthquake events: a proposed modelling approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    So, Emily; Spence, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Recent earthquakes such as the Haiti earthquake of 12 January 2010 and the Qinghai earthquake on 14 April 2010 have highlighted the importance of rapid estimation of casualties after the event for humanitarian response. Both of these events resulted in surprisingly high death tolls, casualties and survivors made homeless. In the Mw = 7.0 Haiti earthquake, over 200,000 people perished with more than 300,000 reported injuries and 2 million made homeless. The Mw = 6.9 earthquake in Qinghai resulted in over 2,000 deaths with a further 11,000 people with serious or moderate injuries and 100,000 people have been left homeless in this mountainous region of China. In such events relief efforts can be significantly benefitted by the availability of rapid estimation and mapping of expected casualties. This paper contributes to ongoing global efforts to estimate probable earthquake casualties very rapidly after an earthquake has taken place. The analysis uses the assembled empirical damage and casualty data in the Cambridge Earthquake Impacts Database (CEQID) and explores data by event and across events to test the relationships of building and fatality distributions to the main explanatory variables of building type, building damage level and earthquake intensity. The prototype global casualty estimation model described here uses a semi-empirical approach that estimates damage rates for different classes of buildings present in the local building stock, and then relates fatality rates to the damage rates of each class of buildings. This approach accounts for the effect of the very different types of buildings (by climatic zone, urban or rural location, culture, income level etc), on casualties. The resulting casualty parameters were tested against the overall casualty data from several historical earthquakes in CEQID; a reasonable fit was found.

  15. Building vulnerability and human casualty estimation for a pyroclastic flow: a model and its application to Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Robin J. S.; Baxter, Peter J.; Zuccaro, Giulio

    2004-05-01

    Pyroclastic flows clearly present a serious threat to life for the inhabitants of settlements on the slopes of volcanoes with a history of explosive eruptions; but it is increasingly realised that buildings can provide a measure of protection to occupants trapped by such flows. One important example is Vesuvius, whose eruption history includes many events which were lethal for the inhabitants of the neighbouring Vesuvian villages. Recent computational fluid dynamics computer modelling for Vesuvius [Todesco et al., Bull. Volcanol. 64 (2002) 155-177] has enabled a realistic picture of an explosive eruption to be modelled, tracing the time-dependent development of the physical parameters of a simulated flow at a large three-dimensional mesh of points, based on assumed conditions of temperature, mass-flow rate and particle size distribution at the vent. The output includes mapping of temperature, mixture density and mixture velocity over the whole adjacent terrain. But to date this information has not been used to assess the impacts of such flows on buildings and their occupants. In the project reported in this paper, estimates of the near-ground flow parameters were used to assess the impact of a particular simulated pyroclastic flow (modelled roughly on the 1631 eruption) on the buildings and population in four of the Vesuvian villages considered most at risk. The study had five components. First, a survey of buildings and the urban environment was conducted to identify the incidence of characteristics and elements likely to affect human vulnerability, and to classify the building stock. The survey emphasised particularly the number, location and type of openings characteristic of the major classes of the local building stock. In the second part of the study, this survey formed the basis for estimates of the probable impact of the pyroclastic flow on the envelope and internal air conditions of typical buildings. In the third part, a number of distinct ways in which human casualties would occur were identified, and estimates were made of the relationship between casualty rates and environmental conditions for each casualty type. In the fourth part of the study, the assumed casualty rates were used to estimate the proportions of occupants who would be killed or seriously injured for the assumed pyroclastic flow scenario in the Vesuvian villages studied, and their distribution by distance from the vent. It was estimated that in a daytime eruption, 25 min after the start of the eruption, there would be 480 deaths and a further 190 serious injuries, for every 1000 remaining in the area. In a night-time scenario, there would be 360 deaths with a further 230 serious injuries per 1000 after the same time interval. Finally, a set of risk factors for casualties was identified, and factors were discussed and ranked for their mitigation impact in the eruption scenario. The most effective mitigation action would of course be total evacuation before the start of the eruption. But if this were not achieved, barred window openings or sealed openings to slow the ingress of hot gases, together with a reduction of the fire load, could be effective means of reducing casualty levels.

  16. Triage and Referrals for Child Sexual Abuse Medical Examinations from the Sociolegal System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibbard, Roberta A.

    1998-01-01

    Examines issues concerning triage and referrals for medical child-sexual-abuse examinations from the sociolegal system. Research recommendations are offered in the areas of structure of care, process of care, and outcomes for evaluation. (DB)

  17. The cognitive processes underpinning clinical decision in triage assessment: a theoretical conundrum?

    PubMed

    Noon, Amy J

    2014-01-01

    High quality clinical decision-making (CDM) has been highlighted as a priority across the nursing profession. Triage nurses, in the Accident and Emergency (A&E) department, work in considerable levels of uncertainty and require essential skills including: critical thinking, evaluation and decision-making. The content of this paper aims to promote awareness of how triage nurses make judgements and decisions in emergency situations. By exploring relevant literature on clinical judgement and decision-making theory, this paper demonstrates the importance of high quality decision-making skills underpinning the triage nurse's role. Having an awareness of how judgements and decisions are made is argued as essential, in a time where traditional nurse boundaries and responsibilities are never more challenged. It is hoped that the paper not only raises this awareness in general but also, in particular, engages the triage nurse to look more critically at how they make their own decisions in their everyday practice. PMID:23685041

  18. Health care emergency management: establishing the science of managing mass casualty and mass effect incidents.

    PubMed

    Macintyre, Anthony G; Barbera, Joseph A; Brewster, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Particularly since 2001, the health care industry has witnessed many independent and often competing efforts to address mitigation and preparedness for emergencies. Clinicians, health care administrators, engineers, safety and security personnel, and others have each developed relatively independent efforts to improve emergency response. A broader conceptual approach through the development of a health care emergency management profession should be considered to integrate these various critical initiatives. When based on long-standing emergency management principles and practices, health care emergency management provides standardized, widely accepted management principles, application concepts, and terminology. This approach could also promote health care integration into the larger community emergency response system. The case for a formally defined health care emergency management profession is presented with discussion points outlining the advantages of this approach. PMID:19491589

  19. An Online Tool for Nurse Triage to Evaluate Risk for Acute Coronary Syndrome at Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Sittichanbuncha, Yuwares; Sanpha-asa, Patchaya; Keeratikasikorn, Chaiyapon; Aekphachaisawat, Noppadol

    2015-01-01

    Background. To differentiate acute coronary syndrome (ACS) from other causes in patients presenting with chest pain at the emergency department (ED) is crucial and can be performed by the nurse triage. We evaluated the effectiveness of the ED nurse triage for ACS of the tertiary care hospital. Methods. We retrospectively enrolled consecutive patients who were identified as ACS at risk patients by the ED nurse triage. Patients were categorized as ACS and non-ACS group by the final diagnosis. Multivariate logistic analysis was used to predict factors associated with ACS. An online model predictive of ACS for the ED nurse triage was constructed. Results. There were 175 patients who met the study criteria. Of those, 28 patients (16.0%) were diagnosed with ACS. Patients with diabetes, patients with previous history of CAD, and those who had at least one character of ACS chest pain were independently associated with having ACS by multivariate logistic regression. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) were 4.220 (1.445, 12.327), 3.333 (1.040, 10.684), and 12.539 (3.876, 40.567), respectively. Conclusions. The effectiveness of the ED nurse triage for ACS was 16%. The online tool is available for the ED triage nurse to evaluate risk of ACS in individuals. PMID:25922767

  20. Evaluation of field triage decision scheme educational resources: audience research with emergency medical service personnel.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Kelly; Eckstein, Daniel; Zambon, Allison

    2013-03-01

    In an effort to encourage appropriate field triage procedures, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the American College of Surgeons-Committee on Trauma, convened the National Expert Panel on Field Triage to update the Field Triage Decision Scheme: The National Trauma Triage Protocol (Decision Scheme). In support of the Decision Scheme, CDC developed educational resources for emergency medical service (EMS) professionals, one of CDC's first efforts to develop and broadly disseminate educational information for the EMS community. CDC wanted to systematically collect information from the EMS community on what worked and what did not with respect to these educational materials and which materials were of most use. An evaluation was conducted to obtain feedback from EMS professionals about the Decision Scheme and use of Decision Scheme educational materials. The evaluation included a survey and a series of focus groups. Findings indicate that a segment of the Decision Scheme's intended audience is using the materials and learning from them, and they have had a positive influence on their triage practices. However, many of the individuals who participated in this research are not using the Decision Scheme and indicated that the materials have not affected their triage practices. Findings presented in this article can be used to inform development and distribution of additional Decision Scheme educational resources to ensure they reach a greater proportion of EMS professionals and to inform other education and dissemination efforts with the EMS community. PMID:22773617

  1. 33 CFR 150.812 - What is the purpose of reporting casualties on deepwater ports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 46 CFR subpart 4.07 in conducting the investigation. ... casualties on deepwater ports? 150.812 Section 150.812 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Reports and...

  2. 33 CFR 150.812 - What is the purpose of reporting casualties on deepwater ports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 46 CFR subpart 4.07 in conducting the investigation. ... casualties on deepwater ports? 150.812 Section 150.812 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Reports and...

  3. Marine casualty and pollution database (raw data only) (on CD-ROM). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Marine Casualty and Pollution Database provides details about marine casualty and pollution incidents investigated by the US Coast Guard Marine Safety Officer. The database is an invaluable source of information to understand particulars and circumstances of marine accidents and pollution incidents. The CD-ROM contains forty data tables derived from marine casualty and pollution investigations conducted by investigators at US Coast Guard Marine Safety Offices throughout the United States. The data collection period began in 1973 and is ongoing. Also included on the CD-ROM are vessel and facility tables with specific information on vessel and facility constitution and operating details. The Coast Guard maintains a comprehensive database on approximately 460,000 US and foreign vessels and 32,000 facilities. Entity and attribute descriptions and suggested solutions to general marine pollution, vessel casualty, and personnel injury and death questions are outlined in the documentation.

  4. Estimating the human recovery costs of seriously injured road crash casualties.

    PubMed

    Bambach, M R; Mitchell, R J

    2015-12-01

    Road crashes result in substantial trauma and costs to societies around the world. Robust costing methods are an important tool to estimate costs associated with road trauma, and are key inputs into policy development and cost-benefit analysis for road safety programmes and infrastructure projects. With an expanding focus on seriously injured road crash casualties, in addition to the long standing focus on fatalities, methods for costing seriously injured casualties are becoming increasingly important. Some road safety agencies are defining a seriously injured casualty as an individual that was admitted to hospital following a road crash, and as a result, hospital separation data provide substantial potential for estimating the costs associated with seriously injured road crash casualties. The aim of this study is to establish techniques for estimating the human recovery costs of (non-fatal) seriously injured road crash casualties directly from hospital separation data. An individuals' road crash-related hospitalisation record and their personal injury insurance claim were linked for road crashes that occurred in New South Wales, Australia. These records provided the means for estimating all of the costs to the casualty directly related to their recovery from their injuries. A total of 10,897 seriously injured road crash casualties were identified and four methods for estimating their recovery costs were examined, using either unit record or aggregated hospital separation data. The methods are shown to provide robust techniques for estimating the human recovery costs of seriously injured road crash casualties, that may prove useful for identifying, implementing and evaluating safety programmes intended to reduce the incidence of road crash-related serious injuries. PMID:26436488

  5. Investigating the validity and usability of an interactive computer programme for assessing competence in telephone-based mental health triage.

    PubMed

    Sands, Natisha; Elsom, Stephen; Keppich-Arnold, Sandra; Henderson, Kathryn; King, Peter; Bourke-Finn, Karen; Brunning, Debra

    2016-02-01

    Telephone-based mental health triage services are frontline health-care providers that operate 24/7 to facilitate access to psychiatric assessment and intervention for people requiring assistance with a mental health problem. The mental health triage clinical role is complex, and the populations triage serves are typically high risk; yet to date, no evidence-based methods have been available to assess clinician competence to practice telephone-based mental health triage. The present study reports the findings of a study that investigated the validity and usability of the Mental Health Triage Competency Assessment Tool, an evidence-based, interactive computer programme designed to assist clinicians in developing and assessing competence to practice telephone-based mental health triage. PMID:26365233

  6. Bilateral Image Subtraction and Multivariate Models for the Automated Triaging of Screening Mammograms

    PubMed Central

    Celaya-Padilla, José; Martinez-Torteya, Antonio; Rodriguez-Rojas, Juan; Galvan-Tejada, Jorge; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José

    2015-01-01

    Mammography is the most common and effective breast cancer screening test. However, the rate of positive findings is very low, making the radiologic interpretation monotonous and biased toward errors. This work presents a computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) method aimed to automatically triage mammogram sets. The method coregisters the left and right mammograms, extracts image features, and classifies the subjects into risk of having malignant calcifications (CS), malignant masses (MS), and healthy subject (HS). In this study, 449 subjects (197 CS, 207 MS, and 45 HS) from a public database were used to train and evaluate the CADx. Percentile-rank (p-rank) and z-normalizations were used. For the p-rank, the CS versus HS model achieved a cross-validation accuracy of 0.797 with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.882; the MS versus HS model obtained an accuracy of 0.772 and an AUC of 0.842. For the z-normalization, the CS versus HS model achieved an accuracy of 0.825 with an AUC of 0.882 and the MS versus HS model obtained an accuracy of 0.698 and an AUC of 0.807. The proposed method has the potential to rank cases with high probability of malignant findings aiding in the prioritization of radiologists work list. PMID:26240818

  7. Outcome of sports injuries treated in a casualty department.

    PubMed Central

    Sandelin, J; Kiviluoto, O; Santavirta, S; Honkanen, R

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation analyses 2493 patients with a sports injury treated in a casualty department during a one-year period. Of the patients 73% were men, the age of the patients averaging 26 years and the mean follow-up time was 24 months. Soccer and indoor ball games caused 24% and 23% of the injuries respectively, these being followed by injuries in ice hockey in 14%. Track and field injuries scored low with 2% out of all injuries. Injuries to the lower extremity predominated. At follow-up, ligamentous injuries of the lower extremity were the major cause of discomfort. Further, in the group of patients with persistent discomfort 36% had suffered a fracture or a dislocation, 13% a contusion and 10% a wound. The mean period of sports incapacity after a sustained injury was 3 weeks. In track and field events the injury seldom disturbed training for more than one week, but in soccer, indoor ball games, skiing and skating the mean sports incapacity period varied between 6 and 3 weeks. Out of the total injured, 2% had to give up their sports activity completely. An injury of the lower extremity demanded on average 4 weeks' rest, an injury of the upper extremity and the trunk 2 weeks and injuries of the head and neck one week's rest. According to the present investigation sports injuries were in the majority of cases of a relatively benign nature and sick leave from work seldom exceeded 2 weeks. Images p103-a PMID:4027492

  8. Ultrasonography in the evaluation of hemoperitoneum in war casualties.

    PubMed

    Miletić, D; Fuckar, Z; Mraović, B; Dimec, D; Mozetic, V

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values of emergent ultrasound examination in the detection of hemoperitoneum among war casualties, and to compare the results of this method in a specific war situation and civil conditions. Ninety-four wounded individuals with suspected blunt or penetrating abdominal trauma were treated at a level I war hospital (group W), and 242 civilians with multiple injuries with suspected blunt abdominal trauma were evaluated at the emergency center of a university hospital (group C). All examinations were performed in less than 5 minutes with a portable ultrasonographic scanner, and typical points were scanned (Morison's pouch, Douglas and perisplenic spaces, paracolic gutter). In group W, hemoperitoneum was identified correctly in 19 patients, with three false-negative and no false-positive findings, whereas group C presented 98 true-positive results, 13 false-negative results, and again no false-positive results. We observed that ultrasonography in specific war conditions showed sensitivity of 86%, specificity of 100%, accuracy as high as 97%, positive predictive value of 100%, and negative predictive value of 96%, whereas in civil conditions the corresponding values were 88%, 100%, 95%, 100%, and 91%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values of emergent ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of hemoperitoneum are approximately equal in war and civil conditions. PMID:10459274

  9. Data Triage of Astronomical Transients: A Machine Learning Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebbapragada, U.

    This talk presents real-time machine learning systems for triage of big data streams generated by photometric and image-differencing pipelines. Our first system is a transient event detection system in development for the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a fully-automated synoptic sky survey that has demonstrated real-time discovery of optical transient events. The system is tasked with discriminating between real astronomical objects and bogus objects, which are usually artifacts of the image differencing pipeline. We performed a machine learning forensics investigation on PTF’s initial system that led to training data improvements that decreased both false positive and negative rates. The second machine learning system is a real-time classification engine of transients and variables in development for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), an upcoming wide-field radio survey with unprecedented ability to investigate the radio transient sky. The goal of our system is to classify light curves into known classes with as few observations as possible in order to trigger follow-up on costlier assets. We discuss the violation of standard machine learning assumptions incurred by this task, and propose the use of ensemble and hierarchical machine learning classifiers that make predictions most robustly.

  10. Redeye: A Digital Library for Forensic Document Triage

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, Paul Logasa; McKenzie, Amber T; Gillen, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Forensic document analysis has become an important aspect of investigation of many different kinds of crimes from money laundering to fraud and from cybercrime to smuggling. The current workflow for analysts includes powerful tools, such as Palantir and Analyst s Notebook, for moving from evidence to actionable intelligence and tools for finding documents among the millions of files on a hard disk, such as FTK. However, the analysts often leave the process of sorting through collections of seized documents to filter out the noise from the actual evidence to a highly labor-intensive manual effort. This paper presents the Redeye Analysis Workbench, a tool to help analysts move from manual sorting of a collection of documents to performing intelligent document triage over a digital library. We will discuss the tools and techniques we build upon in addition to an in-depth discussion of our tool and how it addresses two major use cases we observed analysts performing. Finally, we also include a new layout algorithm for radial graphs that is used to visualize clusters of documents in our system.

  11. Respiratory rate estimation during triage of children in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Ahmar; Fleming, Susannah; Thompson, Matthew; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of a child's health is critical for appropriate allocation of medical resources and timely delivery of healthcare in Emergency Departments. The accurate measurement of vital signs is a key step in the determination of the severity of illness and respiratory rate is currently the most difficult vital sign to measure accurately. Several previous studies have attempted to extract respiratory rate from photoplethysmogram (PPG) recordings. However, the majority have been conducted in controlled settings using PPG recordings from healthy subjects. In many studies, manual selection of clean sections of PPG recordings was undertaken before assessing the accuracy of the signal processing algorithms developed. Such selection procedures are not appropriate in clinical settings. A major limitation of AR modelling, previously applied to respiratory rate estimation, is an appropriate selection of model order. This study developed a novel algorithm that automatically estimates respiratory rate from a median spectrum constructed applying multiple AR models to processed PPG segments acquired with pulse oximetry using a finger probe. Good-quality sections were identified using a dynamic template-matching technique to assess PPG signal quality. The algorithm was validated on 205 children presenting to the Emergency Department at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK, with reference respiratory rates up to 50 breaths per minute estimated by paediatric nurses. At the time of writing, the authors are not aware of any other study that has validated respiratory rate estimation using data collected from over 200 children in hospitals during routine triage. PMID:26548638

  12. Tau triage decisions mediated by the chaperone network.

    PubMed

    Cook, Casey; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    The pathological accumulation of the microtubule-binding protein tau is linked to an increasing number of neurodegenerative conditions associated with aging, though the mechanisms by which tau accumulates in disease are unclear. In this review, we will summarize our previous research assessing the mechanism of action, as well as the therapeutic potential of Hsp90 inhibition for the treatment of tauopathies. Specifically, we describe the development of a high-throughput screening approach to identify and rank compounds, and demonstrate the selective elimination of aberrant p-tau species in the brain following treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor. Additionally, we identify CHIP as an essential component of the Hsp90 chaperone complex that mediates tau degradation, and present evidence to suggest that CHIP functions to identify and sequester neurotoxic tau species. Finally, we discuss recent data identifying an additional mechanism by which CHIP modulates protein triage decisions involving Hsp90. Specifically, CHIP indirectly regulates Hsp90 chaperone activity by modulating steady-state levels of the Hsp90 deacetylase, HDAC6, thus influencing both the acetylation state and function of Hsp90. Thus future research directions will focus on the manipulation of this network to promote degradation of pathogenic tau species in disease. PMID:22596270

  13. Swallowable fluorometric capsule for wireless triage of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, A; Ryou, M; Thompson, C C; Westervelt, R M

    2015-12-01

    Real-time detection of gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major challenge because there does not yet exist a minimally invasive technology that can both i) monitor for blood from an active hemorrhage and ii) uniquely distinguish it from blood left over from an inactive hemorrhage. Such a device would be an important tool for clinical triage. One promising solution, which we have proposed previously, is to inject a fluorescent dye into the blood stream and to use it as a distinctive marker of active bleeding by monitoring leakage into the gastrointestinal tract with a wireless fluorometer. This paper reports, for the first time to our knowledge, the development of a swallowable, wireless capsule with a built-in fluorometer capable of detecting fluorescein in blood, and intended for monitoring gastrointestinal bleeding in the stomach. The embedded, compact fluorometer uses pinholes to define a microliter sensing volume and to eliminate bulky optical components. The proof-of-concept capsule integrates optics, low-noise analog sensing electronics, a microcontroller, battery, and low power Zigbee radio, all into a cylindrical package measuring 11 mm × 27 mm and weighing 10 g. Bench-top experiments demonstrate wireless fluorometry with a limit-of-detection of 20 nM aqueous fluorescein. This device represents a major step towards a technology that would enable simple, rapid detection of active gastrointestinal bleeding, a capability that would save precious time and resources and, ultimately, reduce complications in patients. PMID:26490455

  14. A retrospective cohort pilot study to evaluate a triage tool for use in a pandemic

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this pilot study was to assess the usability of the draft Ontario triage protocol, to estimate its potential impact on patient outcomes, and ability to increase resource availability based on a retrospective cohort of critically ill patients cared for during a non-pandemic period. Methods Triage officers applied the protocol prospectively to 2 retrospective cohorts of patients admitted to 2 academic medical/surgical ICUs during an 8 week period of peak occupancy. Each patient was assigned a treatment priority (red -- 'highest', yellow -- 'intermediate', green -- 'discharge to ward', or blue/black -- 'expectant') by the triage officers at 3 separate time points (at the time of admission to the ICU, 48, and 120 hours post admission). Results Overall, triage officers were either confident or very confident in 68.4% of their scores; arbitration was required in 54.9% of cases. Application of the triage protocol would potentially decrease the number of required ventilator days by 49.3% (568 days) and decrease the total ICU days by 52.6% (895 days). On the triage protocol at ICU admission the survival rate in the red (93.7%) and yellow (62.5%) categories were significantly higher then that of the blue category (24.6%) with associated P values of < 0.0001 and 0.0003 respectively. Further, the survival rate of the red group was significantly higher than the overall survival rate of 70.9% observed in the cohort (P < 0.0001). At 48 and 120 hours, survival rates in the blue group increased but remained lower then the red or yellow groups. Conclusions Refinement of the triage protocol and implementation is required prior to future study, including improved training of triage officers, and protocol modification to minimize the exclusion from critical care of patients who may in fact benefit. However, our results suggest that the triage protocol can help to direct resources to patients who are most likely to benefit, and help to decrease the demands on critical care resources, thereby making available more resources to treat other critically ill patients. PMID:19874595

  15. Emergency Department Triage Scales and Their Components: A Systematic Review of the Scientific Evidence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) triage is used to identify patients' level of urgency and treat them based on their triage level. The global advancement of triage scales in the past two decades has generated considerable research on the validity and reliability of these scales. This systematic review aims to investigate the scientific evidence for published ED triage scales. The following questions are addressed: 1. Does assessment of individual vital signs or chief complaints affect mortality during the hospital stay or within 30 days after arrival at the ED? 2. What is the level of agreement between clinicians' triage decisions compared to each other or to a gold standard for each scale (reliability)? 3. How valid is each triage scale in predicting hospitalization and hospital mortality? A systematic search of the international literature published from 1966 through March 31, 2009 explored the British Nursing Index, Business Source Premier, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and PubMed. Inclusion was limited to controlled studies of adult patients (≥15 years) visiting EDs for somatic reasons. Outcome variables were death in ED or hospital and need for hospitalization (validity). Methodological quality and clinical relevance of each study were rated as high, medium, or low. The results from the studies that met the inclusion criteria and quality standards were synthesized applying the internationally developed GRADE system. Each conclusion was then assessed as having strong, moderately strong, limited, or insufficient scientific evidence. If studies were not available, this was also noted. We found ED triage scales to be supported, at best, by limited and often insufficient evidence. The ability of the individual vital signs included in the different scales to predict outcome is seldom, if at all, studied in the ED setting. The scientific evidence to assess interrater agreement (reliability) was limited for one triage scale and insufficient or lacking for all other scales. Two of the scales yielded limited scientific evidence, and one scale yielded insufficient evidence, on which to assess the risk of early death or hospitalization in patients assigned to the two lowest triage levels on a 5-level scale (validity). PMID:21718476

  16. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  17. Telephone survey of service-user experiences of a telephone-based mental health triage service.

    PubMed

    Elsom, Stephen; Sands, Natisha; Roper, Cath; Hoppner, Cayte; Gerdtz, Marie

    2013-10-01

    The participation of service users in all aspects of mental health service delivery including policy development, service planning and evaluation is increasingly an expectation of contemporary mental health care. Although there are a growing number of publications reporting service-user perspectives in the evaluation of mental health services, little attention has been paid to the views of service users about mental health triage services. The purpose of the study reported here was to examine service-users' (consumers and informal carers) experiences of a telephone-based mental health triage service. Using a framework developed from the World Health Organisation's elements of responsiveness, we conducted structured telephone interviews with service users who had contacted a telephone-based mental health triage service in regional Victoria, Australia. The main findings of the study were that consumers experienced more difficulty than carers in accessing the service and that, although most participants were satisfied, only a minority reported being involved in decision-making. Further work is needed to improve accessibility of mental health triage services and to investigate barriers to consumer self-referral. Professional development and practice support systems should be established to support mental health triage nurses in the development of collaborative, consumer-focused care. PMID:23360561

  18. Misidentification of English Language Proficiency in Triage: Impact on Satisfaction and Door-to-Room Time.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Vamsi; Roper, Jamie; Cossey, Kori; Roman, Crystal; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    We examined triage nurses' assessment of patients' language proficiency compared to patients' self-reported proficiency and the impact of language discordance on door-to-room time and patient satisfaction. This was a prospective study of emergency department walk-in patients. Patients completed a survey in which they identified their language proficiency. On a Likert scale, patients ranked how well they felt they were understood and how satisfied they were with the triage process. Nurses completed surveys identifying the patient's primary language and how well they felt they understood the patient. Door-to-room times were obtained from medical records. 163 patients were enrolled. 66 % of patients identified themselves as having good English proficiency, while 34 % of patients had limited English proficiency. Nurses misclassified 27 % of self-identified Spanish-speaking patients as being English proficient. Spanish-speakers felt less satisfied with triage than English-speakers (p < 0.01). There were no differences in door-to-room time. Triage nurses overestimate patient language skills. Spanish-speaking patients feel less satisfied with triage than English-speakers. PMID:25750135

  19. On-ground casualty risk reduction by structural design for demise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, Stijn; Funke, Quirin; Krag, Holger

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, awareness concerning the on-ground risk posed by un-controlled re-entering space systems has increased. On average over the past decade, an object with mass above 800 kg re-enters every week from which only a few, e.g. ESA's GOCE in 2013 and NASA's UARS in 2011, appeared prominent in international media. Space agencies and nations have discussed requirements to limit the on-ground risk for future missions. To meet the requirements, the amount of debris falling back on Earth has to be limited in number, mass and size. Design for demise (D4D) refers to all measures taken in the design of a space object to increase the potential for demise of the object and its components during re-entry. SCARAB (Spacecraft Atmospheric Re-entry and Break-Up) is ESA's high-fidelity tool which analyses the thermal and structural effects of atmospheric re-entry on spacecraft with a finite-element approach. For this study, a model of a representative satellite is developed in SCARAB to serve as test-bed for D4D analyses on a structural level. The model is used as starting point for different D4D approaches based on increasing the exposure of the satellite components to the aero-thermal environment, as a way to speed up the demise. Statistical bootstrapping is applied to the resulting on-ground fragment lists in order to compare the different re-entry scenarios and to determine the uncertainties of the results. Moreover, the bootstrap results can be used to analyse the casualty risk estimator from a theoretical point of view. The risk reductions for the analysed D4D techniques are presented with respect to the reference scenario for the modelled representative satellite.

  20. Assessment of Emergency Preparedness Modules in Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    von Waldner, Trina; McEwen, Deanna W.; White, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the impact of emergency preparedness simulations in mass triage and mass dispensing on student pharmacist performance and perceived competency when assuming pharmacist roles in disaster situations. Design. Second-year student pharmacists (144) completed two 3-hour simulations focusing on mass triage and mass dispensing. The mass triage simulation consisted of virtual and live victims to be triaged and assigned a transport order. In the mass dispensing simulation, students assumed patient and pharmacist roles in a point-of-dispensing exercise for influenza. Assessment. For the mass triage simulation, students were challenged most by determining which patients could wait for emergency care but did well assessing those who required immediate or minimal care (83% and 64% correct, respectively). During the mass dispensing simulation, students performed screening and dispensing functions with accuracy rates of 88% and 90%, respectively. Conclusion. Student pharmacists performed well in screening and dispensing functions, but struggled with mass casualty triage during emergency preparedness simulations. PMID:27073276

  1. Conservation triage or injurious neglect in endangered species recovery

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Leah R.

    2016-01-01

    Listing endangered and threatened species under the US Endangered Species Act is presumed to offer a defense against extinction and a solution to achieve recovery of imperiled populations, but only if effective conservation action ensues after listing occurs. The amount of government funding available for species protection and recovery is one of the best predictors of successful recovery; however, government spending is both insufficient and highly disproportionate among groups of species, and there is significant discrepancy between proposed and actualized budgets across species. In light of an increasing list of imperiled species requiring evaluation and protection, an explicit approach to allocating recovery funds is urgently needed. Here I provide a formal decision-theoretic approach focusing on return on investment as an objective and a transparent mechanism to achieve the desired recovery goals. I found that less than 25% of the $1.21 billion/year needed for implementing recovery plans for 1,125 species is actually allocated to recovery. Spending in excess of the recommended recovery budget does not necessarily translate into better conservation outcomes. Rather, elimination of only the budget surplus for “costly yet futile” recovery plans can provide sufficient funding to erase funding deficits for more than 180 species. Triage by budget compression provides better funding for a larger sample of species, and a larger sample of adequately funded recovery plans should produce better outcomes even if by chance. Sharpening our focus on deliberate decision making offers the potential to achieve desired outcomes in avoiding extinction for Endangered Species Act-listed species. PMID:26976572

  2. Conservation triage or injurious neglect in endangered species recovery.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Leah R

    2016-03-29

    Listing endangered and threatened species under the US Endangered Species Act is presumed to offer a defense against extinction and a solution to achieve recovery of imperiled populations, but only if effective conservation action ensues after listing occurs. The amount of government funding available for species protection and recovery is one of the best predictors of successful recovery; however, government spending is both insufficient and highly disproportionate among groups of species, and there is significant discrepancy between proposed and actualized budgets across species. In light of an increasing list of imperiled species requiring evaluation and protection, an explicit approach to allocating recovery funds is urgently needed. Here I provide a formal decision-theoretic approach focusing on return on investment as an objective and a transparent mechanism to achieve the desired recovery goals. I found that less than 25% of the $1.21 billion/year needed for implementing recovery plans for 1,125 species is actually allocated to recovery. Spending in excess of the recommended recovery budget does not necessarily translate into better conservation outcomes. Rather, elimination of only the budget surplus for "costly yet futile" recovery plans can provide sufficient funding to erase funding deficits for more than 180 species. Triage by budget compression provides better funding for a larger sample of species, and a larger sample of adequately funded recovery plans should produce better outcomes even if by chance. Sharpening our focus on deliberate decision making offers the potential to achieve desired outcomes in avoiding extinction for Endangered Species Act-listed species. PMID:26976572

  3. Novel Human Radiation Exposure Biomarker Panel Applicable for Population Triage

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, Jose G.; Chang, Polly; Balog, Robert; D'Andrea, Annalisa; Shaler, Thomas; Lin, Hua; Lee, Shirley; Harrison, Travis; Shura, Lei; Schoen, Lucy; Knox, Susan J.; Cooper, David E.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To identify a panel of radiation-responsive plasma proteins that could be used in a point-of-care biologic dosimeter to detect clinically significant levels of ionizing radiation exposure. Methods and Materials: Patients undergoing preparation for hematopoietic cell transplantation using radiation therapy (RT) with either total lymphoid irradiation or fractionated total body irradiation were eligible. Plasma was examined from patients with potentially confounding conditions and from normal individuals. Each plasma sample was analyzed for a panel of 17 proteins before RT was begun and at several time points after RT exposure. Paired and unpaired t tests between the dose and control groups were performed. Conditional inference trees were constructed based on panels of proteins to compare the non-RT group with the RT group. Results: A total of 151 patients (62 RT, 41 infection, 48 trauma) were enrolled on the study, and the plasma from an additional 24 healthy control individuals was analyzed. In comparison with to control individuals, tenascin-C was upregulated and clusterin was downregulated in patients receiving RT. Salivary amylase was strongly radiation responsive, with upregulation in total body irradiation patients and slight downregulation in total lymphoid irradiation patients compared with control individuals. A panel consisting of these 3 proteins accurately distinguished between irradiated patients and healthy control individuals within 3 days after exposure: 97% accuracy, 0.5% false negative rate, 2% false positive rate. The accuracy was diminished when patients with trauma, infection, or both were included (accuracy, 74%-84%; false positive rate, 14%-33%, false negative rate: 8%-40%). Conclusions: A panel of 3 proteins accurately distinguishes unirradiated healthy donors from those exposed to RT (0.8-9.6 Gy) within 3 days of exposure. These findings have significant implications in terms of triaging individuals in the case of nuclear or other radiologic events.

  4. Evolution and challenges in the design of computational systems for triage assistance

    PubMed Central

    Abad-Grau, María M.; Ierache, Jorge; Cervino, Claudio; Sebastiani, Paola

    2008-01-01

    Compared with expert systems for specific disease diagnosis, knowledge-based systems to assist decision making in triage usually try to cover a much wider domain but can use a smaller set of variables due to time restrictions, many of them subjective so that accurate models are difficult to build. In this paper we first study criteria that most affect the performance of systems for triage assistance. Such criteria include whether principled approaches from Machine Learning can be used to increase accuracy and robustness and to represent uncertainty, whether data and model integration can be performed or whether temporal evolution can be modeled to implement retriage or represent medication responses. Following the most important criteria we explore current systems and identify some missing features that, if added, may yield to more accurate triage systems. PMID:18337189

  5. [Emergency and disaster response in critical care unit in the Mexican Social Security Institute: triage and evacuation].

    PubMed

    Echevarría-Zuno, Santiago; Cruz-Vega, Felipe; Elizondo-Argueta, Sandra; Martínez Valdés, Everardo; Franco-Bey, Rubén; Méndez-Sánchez, Luis Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Providing medical assistance in emergencies and disaster in advance makes the need to maintain Medical Units functional despite the disturbing phenomenon that confronts the community, but conflict occurs when the Medical Unit needs support and needs to be evacuated, especially when the evacuation of patients in a Critical Care Unit is required. In world literature there is little on this topic, and what is there usually focuses on the conversion of areas and increased ability to care for mass casualties, but not about how to evacuate if necessary, and when a wrong decision can have fatal consequences. That is why the Mexican Social Security Institute gave the task of examining these problems to a working group composed of specialists of the Institute. The purpose was to evaluate and establish a method for performing a protocol in the removal of patients and considering always to safeguard both staff and patients and maintain the quality of care. PMID:23769257

  6. Triage Patterns for Medicare Patients Presenting to Nontrauma Hospitals With Moderate or Severe Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Deepika; Barnato, Amber E.; Rosengart, Matthew R.; Angus, Derek C.; Wallace, David J.; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand hospital-level variation in triage practices for patients with moderate-to-severe injuries presenting initially to nontrauma centers. Background Many patients with moderate-to-severe traumatic injuries receive care at nontrauma hospitals, despite evidence of a survival benefit from treatment at trauma centers. Methods We used claims from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to identify patients with moderate-to-severe injuries who presented initially to nontrauma centers. We determined whether or not they were transferred to a level I or II trauma center within 24 hours of presentation, and used multivariate regression to assess the influence of hospital-level factors on triage practices, after adjusting for differences in case mix. Results Transfer of patients with moderate-to-severe injuries to trauma centers occurred infrequently, with significant variation among hospitals (median 2%; interquartile range 1%–6%). Greater resource availability at nontrauma centers was associated with lower rates of successful triage, including the presence of neurosurgeons (relative reduction in transfer rate: 76%, P < 0.01), more than 20 intensive care unit beds (relative reduction 30%, P < 0.01) and a high resident-to-bed ratio (relative reduction 23%, P < 0.01). However, patients were more likely to survive if they presented to hospitals with higher triage rates (odds of death for patients cared for at hospitals with the highest tercile of triage rates, compared with lowest tercile: 0.92; 95% confidence interval: 0.85–0.99, P = 0.02). Conclusions Injured Medicare beneficiaries presenting to nontrauma centers experience high rates of undertriage, determined in part by increasing availability of resources. Care at hospitals with low rates of successful triage is associated with worse outcomes. PMID:24670846

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in combat casualties: military medicine and advances in mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael James

    2006-11-01

    Military medicine has made numerous enduring contributions to the advancement of pulmonary medicine. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was first recognized as a complication in battlefield casualties in World War I and continued to play a significant role in the treatment of casualties through the Vietnam War. Innovative surgeons during World War II devised methods to assist their patients with positive pressure breathing. This concept was later adopted and applied to the development of mechanical ventilation in the late 1940s and early 1950s. The continued treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in combat casualties by military physicians has provided a major impetus for advances in modern mechanical ventilation and intensive care unit medicine. PMID:17153538

  8. Benefits of multidisciplinary collaboration for earthquake casualty estimation models: recent case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, E.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquake casualty loss estimation, which depends primarily on building-specific casualty rates, has long suffered from a lack of cross-disciplinary collaboration in post-earthquake data gathering. An increase in our understanding of what contributes to casualties in earthquakes involve coordinated data-gathering efforts amongst disciplines; these are essential for improved global casualty estimation models. It is evident from examining past casualty loss models and reviewing field data collected from recent events, that generalized casualty rates cannot be applied globally for different building types, even within individual countries. For a particular structure type, regional and topographic building design effects, combined with variable material and workmanship quality all contribute to this multi-variant outcome. In addition, social factors affect building-specific casualty rates, including social status and education levels, and human behaviors in general, in that they modify egress and survivability rates. Without considering complex physical pathways, loss models purely based on historic casualty data, or even worse, rates derived from other countries, will be of very limited value. What’s more, as the world’s population, housing stock, and living and cultural environments change, methods of loss modeling must accommodate these variables, especially when considering casualties. To truly take advantage of observed earthquake losses, not only do damage surveys need better coordination of international and national reconnaissance teams, but these teams must integrate difference areas of expertise including engineering, public health and medicine. Research is needed to find methods to achieve consistent and practical ways of collecting and modeling casualties in earthquakes. International collaboration will also be necessary to transfer such expertise and resources to the communities in the cities which most need it. Coupling the theories and findings from the field surveys with experiments would also be advantageous as it is not always be possible to validate theories and models with actual earthquake data. In addition, colleagues in other disciplines will benefit from being introduced to the loss algorithms, methodologies and advances familiar to the engineering community, to help dissemination in earthquake mitigation and preparedness programs. It follows that new approaches to loss estimation must include a progressive assessment of what contributes to the final casualty value. In analyzing recent earthquakes, testing common hypotheses, talking to local and international researchers in the field, interviewing search and rescue and medical personnel, and comparing notes with colleagues who have visited other events, the author has developed a list of contributory factors to formulate fatality rates for use in earthquake loss estimation models. In this presentation, we will first look at the current state of data collection and assessment in casualty loss estimation. Then, the analyses of recent earthquake field data, which provide important insights to the contributory factors of fatalities in earthquakes, will be explored. The benefits of a multi-disciplinary approach in deriving fatality rates for masonry buildings will then be examined in detail.

  9. Variation in Prehospital Use and Uptake of the National Field Triage Decision Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Andy S.; Wang, N. Ewen; Sahni, Ritu; Hsia, Renee Y.; Haukoos, Jason S.; Barton, Erik D.; Holmes, James F.; Newgard, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Field Triage Decision Scheme is a national guideline that has been implemented widely for prehospital Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and trauma systems. However, little is known about the uptake, modification or variation in field application of triage criteria between trauma systems. Objective To describe and compare the use of field triage criteria by EMS personnel in 6 regions, including the timing of guideline uptake and use of non-guideline criteria. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of injured children and adults transported by 48 EMS agencies to 105 hospitals (trauma and non-trauma centers) in 6 Western U.S. regions from 2006 through 2008. We used probabilistic linkage to match patient-level prehospital information from multiple sources, including: EMS records, base-hospital phone communication records and trauma registry data files. Triage criteria were evaluated individually and grouped by steps (physiologic, anatomic, mechanism and special considerations). We used descriptive statistics to compare the frequency of triage criteria use (overall and between regions) and to evaluate the timing of guideline uptake across multiple versions of the guidelines. Results A total of 260,027 injured patients were evaluated and transported by EMS over the 3-year study period, of whom 46,414 (18%) met at least one field triage criterion and formed the primary sample for analysis. The 3 most common criteria cited (of 33 in use) were: EMS provider judgment (26%), age < 5 or > 55 years (10%) and GCS score <14 (9%). Of the 33 criteria in use, 5 (15%) were previously retired from the guidelines and 7 (21%) were never included in the guidelines. 11,048 (24%) of patients had more than 1 criteria applied (range 1 21). There was large variation in the type and frequency of criteria used between systems, particularly among the non-physiologic triage steps. Only 1 of 6 regions had translated the most recent guidelines into field use within 2 years of release. Conclusion There is large variation between regions in the frequency and type of field triage criteria used. Field uptake of guideline revisions appears slow and variable, suggesting opportunities for improvement in dissemination and implementation of updated guidelines. PMID:23452003

  10. An Instrument for In-situ Triage of Mars 2020 Rover Samples for Organics and Chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, F.; Whitaker, T.; Andrews, J.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a prototype instrument for triaging samples for elemental chemistry, organics, and Rb-Sr dates on the Mars 2020 Rover. Determining organic content and rock age are key drivers for Mars Sample Return (MSR). By identifying samples with organics, and potentially a range of dates, we increase near-term science return, while maximizing scientific and political will to compel the ultimate return of samples. Though organics have proven difficult to identify in-situ, understanding their distribution and variety could provide key constraints on the possibility of life; on the other hand, datable outcrops are clearly present at a range of potential landing sites, and could provide insight into the evolution of both local and global geology, and the history of solar system bombardment. Our instrument uses laser desorption resonance ionization mass spectrometry (LDRIMS) for Rb-Sr dates, and a subset of the LDRIMS lasers for L2MS measurements of organics. With LDRIMS, a sample is placed in a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer and surface atoms, molecules, and ions are desorbed with a 213 nm laser. The plume of expanding atoms is present for many μs, during which it is first illuminated with laser light tuned to ionize only Sr, and then 1-3 μs later, Rb . This eliminates isobars for Rb and Sr, and insures that the measured atoms come from the same ablation event, and hence target materials. L2MS uses high-power IR laser ablation to desorb neutral organic molecules, followed by a second, UV laser beam for ionization. Advantages of L2MS include the measurement of a wide array of elements, and it is one of the most sensitive available organic detection methods, with demonstrated detection to 10-18. We have previously demonstrated dates on granites with an average of 1.727×0.087 Ga (MSWD=1; ×0.062 for MSWD=2); both values have a precision and accuracy exceeding that called for by NASA. Finally, we have demonstrated ppm-level detections of organics in the Murchison meteorite using L2MS that closely match previously results (Fig. 1). In conclusion, we ultimately seek to enhance the characterization of landing sites on Mars by providing in-situ triage of potential samples for Earth return, improving the odds of returning relevant samples, and enhancing near-term science return. Figure 1: L2MS spectrum of Murchison organics present at ~10 ppm taken with dating instrument (blue), compared with previous results of Spencer et al, 2008 (red). The red peak at ~100 AMU is a standard, and that blue BPA peaks from 210-230 AMU are from the mounting epoxy. Note that both long period and short period stucture correlate, despite different sample sources, and 5 years between measurements.

  11. On-Ground Casualty Risk Reduction by Structural Design for Demise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, Stijn; Krag, Holger; Funke, Quirin

    In recent years, awareness concerning the risk posed by un-controlled re-entering spacecraft on ground has increased. Some re-entry events such as ESA's GOCE in 2013 and NASA's UARS appeared prominent in international media. Space agencies and nations, in cooperation within the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC), have established a requirements to limited the on-ground risk for future missions. To meet the requirements, the amount of debris falling back on Earth has to be limited in number, mass and size. Design for demise (D4D) refers to all measures taken in the design of a space object to increase the potential for demise of the object and its components during re-entry. SCARAB (Spacecraft Atmospheric Re-entry and Break-Up) is ESA's high-fidelity tool which analyses the thermal and structural effects of atmospheric re-entry on spacecraft in a finite-element approach. For this study, a model of a representative satellite is developed in Scarab to serve as test-bed for D4D analysis on a structural level. The model is used as starting point for different D4D approaches based on increasing the exposure of the satellite components to the aero-thermal environment, as a way to speed up the demise. Statistical bootstrapping is applied to the resulting on-ground fragment lists in order to compare the different re-entry scenarios and to determine the uncertainties of the results. Moreover, the bootstrap results can be used to analyse the casualty risk estimator from a theoretical point of view. The risk reductions for the analysed D4D techniques are presented w.r.t. the reference scenario for the modelled representative satellite.

  12. Comparison of female and male casualty cohorts from conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Hylden, Christina; Johnson, Anthony E; Rivera, Jessica C

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been interest in the literature regarding the casualties within the recent US military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, very little to date has looked specifically at a difference between the sexes. As the role of the female Soldier has changed over the years, so have the risk and the nature of the female casualty. Combat injuries in women are an important medical consideration that has yet to be studied. For the purposes of this study, the following questions pertained: Do female and male casualties from the US military in recent conflicts differ in age, service, rank, military operation, or other demographic characteristics? Do female and male casualties from the US military in recent conflicts differ in their injury characteristics such as Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS), injury type (blunt versus penetrating), injury cause (mechanism of injury), and injury date? The Department of Defense Trauma Registry (DoDTR) was queried, returning results for 425 female and 14,982 male subjects who sustained musculoskeletal injuries from October 2003 (beginning of hostilities in Iraq) to December 2012. The female and male cohorts were compared and analyzed for significance in demographics (age, service, rank, and military operation) and injury characteristics (ISS, AIS, injury type, injury cause, and injury date). Female casualties differ from their male counterparts in that they are slightly younger (F=26.11, M=27.83 years; P<.001), proportionally more female casualties were in the Army (F=81.5%, M=72.2%; P<.001), and proportionally more women were injured during Operation Iraqi Freedom (F=75.6%, M=63.2%; P<.001). Female casualties showed on average lower ISS (F=7.49; M=9.68; P<.001) and lower AIS specific to the skeletal anatomic region (F=2.06; M=2.36; P<.001); however when broken down into battle versus nonbattle injury, the difference disappeared. Women were less likely to be injured in battle (F=33.1%; M=70.9%; P<.001) and less likely to be injured due to an explosive device (F=27.7%, M=55.2%; P<.001). Women comprised 2.75% of the DoDTR casualties during the studied time frame and were less likely to be involved in explosions or during battle. The ISS were significantly different when comparing battle and nonbattle injuries for both of the sexes. However, since men were more likely to be injured in battle, their total ISS mean was higher. PMID:26101910

  13. Improving Emergency Department Triage Classification with Computerized Clinical Decision Support at a Pediatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunisch, Joseph Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Emergency Severity Index (ESI) is an emergency department (ED) triage classification system based on estimated patient-specific resource utilization. Rules for a computerized clinical decision support (CDS) system based on a patient's chief complaint were developed and tested using a stochastic model for predicting ESI scores.…

  14. Software-assisted spine registered nurse care coordination and patient triage--one organization's approach.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Leslie; Mueller, Lori; Horstman, Patricia

    2009-08-01

    Back disorders encompass a spectrum of conditions, from those of acute onset and short duration to lifelong disorders. The use of a traditional spine center model of patient flow, in which the patient is scheduled the first available appointment without an initial assessment of spine-related symptoms at West Virginia University Spine Center, Morgantown, West Virginia, resulted in frustration and delays for the spine patient and referring physician dissatisfaction. Today, the use of a software-assisted spine patient triage and registered nurse care coordinator patient navigation system in this multidiscipline, multimodality comprehensive spine program provides quick and efficient patient triage to the appropriate level of spine care (surgeon vs. nonsurgeon). The model consists of five major steps, which are explored in this article: medical history intake; films or studies retrieval; rapid review of the patient's medical condition and diagnostics by a spine specialist preappointment and subsequent triage to the appropriate level of spine care; registered nurse care coordinator patient education and guided navigation through the patient's preferred treatment plan; and last, diagnostic study, pain injection, and provider scheduling. Patient satisfaction scores, referring physician satisfaction scores, and resultant impact on referral volumes, ancillary utilization, workload productivity, and surgical yield demonstrate that this new approach to patient triage has made significant improvements in efficiency, productivity, and service. PMID:19678508

  15. Optimization versus Effortful Processing in Children's Cognitive Triage: Criticisms, Reanalyses, and New Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainerd, C. J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Evaluates two competing explanations for the phenomenon of cognitive triage, or the fact that easy-to-retrieve memories do not come to mind before hard-to-retrieve memories during recall. Reports experimental results that support an optimization model of recall rather than an effortful-processing model. (PAM)

  16. Nonstrategic Facilitation of Children's Recall: Evidence of Triage with Semantically Related Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haarnishfeger, Katherine K.; Brainerd, Charles J.

    1994-01-01

    Two studies examined whether triagelike patterns occur when children recall lists of semantically related words that support the use of mnemonic organizational strategies. Results provide evidence of the generality of triage effects in children's recall, finding such effects even in tasks that are highly supportive of mnemonic strategies. (HTH)

  17. Meeting the Demand for College Student Concerns in College Counseling Centers: Evaluating a Clinical Triage System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Jennifer A.; Weatherford, Ryan D.; Locke, Benjamin D.; DePalma, Natalie Hernandez; D'Iuso, Nadia T.

    2011-01-01

    University counseling centers, experiencing an imbalance between student demand and available resources, respond in various ways. The current mixed-method study evaluated one university counseling center transitioning from a wait-list system to a triage method of managing demand. Significant reductions in wait time and increase in attendance were…

  18. Operational Testing of a Combined Hardware-Software Strategy for Triage of Radiologically-Contaminated Persons.

    PubMed

    Waller, Edward J

    2015-08-01

    After a radiological dispersal device (RDD) event, it is possible for radionuclides to enter the human body through inhalation, ingestion, and skin and wound absorption. The dominant pathway will be through inhalation. From a health physics perspective, it is important to know the magnitude of the intake to perform dosimetric assessments. From a medical perspective, removal of radionuclides leading to dose (hence risk) aversion is of high importance. The efficacy of medical decorporation strategies is extremely dependent upon the time of treatment delivery after intake. The "golden hour," or more realistically 3-4 h, is imperative when attempting to increase removal of radionuclides from extracellular fluids prior to cellular incorporation. To assist medical first response personnel in making timely decisions regarding appropriate treatment delivery modes, a software tool has been developed which compiles existing radionuclide decorporation therapy data and allows a user to perform simple triage leading to potential appropriate decorporation treatment strategies. Three triage algorithms were included: (1) multi-parameter model (MPM), (2) clinical decision guidance (CDG) model, and (3) annual limit on intake (ALI) model. A radiation triage mask (RTM) has simultaneously been developed to provide a simple and rapid hardware solution for first responders to triage internally exposed personnel in the field. The hardware/software strategy was field tested with a military medical unit and was found by end-users to be relatively simple to learn and use. PMID:26102327

  19. Delivery room triage of large for gestational age infants of diabetic mothers

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Krista; Zheng, Katherine; Landon, Mark B; Nankervis, Craig A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review our 4-year experience (2008–2011) with delivery room triage of large for gestational age infants of diabetic mothers. Design/Methods: Retrospective cohort investigation of 311 large for gestational age infants of diabetic mothers (White’s Class A1 (77), A2 (87), B (77), and C-R (70)). Results: Of 311 women, 31% delivered at 34–36 weeks gestational age and 69% at term. While 70% were delivered by cesarean, 30% were vaginal deliveries. A total of 160 asymptomatic infants were triaged from the delivery room to the well baby nursery. Of these, 55 (34%) developed hypoglycemia. In 43 cases, the hypoglycemia was corrected by early feedings; in the remaining 12, intravenous dextrose treatment was required. A total of 151 infants were triaged from the delivery room to the neonatal intensive care unit. Admission diagnoses included respiratory distress (51%), prevention of hypoglycemia (27%), prematurity (21%), and asphyxia (1%). Hypoglycemia affected 66 (44%) of all neonatal intensive care unit infants. Conclusion: Safe triage of asymptomatic large for gestational age infants of diabetic mothers from the delivery room to well baby nursery can be accomplished in the majority of cases. Those infants in need of specialized care can be accurately identified and effectively treated in the neonatal intensive care unit setting. PMID:26770716

  20. 75 FR 38188 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Termination: Stonebridge Casualty Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... 1, 2009, at 74 FR 31536. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6915... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds--Termination: Stonebridge Casualty Insurance... the above-named company under 31 U.S.C. 9305 to qualify as acceptable surety on Federal bonds...

  1. 77 FR 75263 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; ULLICO Casualty Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... Supplement No. 3 to the Treasury Department Circular 570; 2012 Revision, published July 2, 2012, at 77 FR 39322. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; ULLICO Casualty Company...

  2. 75 FR 60865 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Amendment-Allegheny Casualty Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ..., at 75 FR 38192. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Amendment-- Allegheny Casualty Company... bond-approving officers should annotate their reference copies of the Treasury Department Circular...

  3. Eating Order: A 13-Week Trust Model Class for Dieting Casualties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Elizabeth G.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic dieting distorts eating behaviors and causes weight escalation. Desperation about losing weight results in pursuit of extreme weight loss measures. Instead of offering yet another diet, nutrition educators can teach chronic dieters (dieting casualties) to develop eating competence. Eating Order, a 13-week class for chronic dieters based on…

  4. The Battle of Bentonville: Caring for Casualties of the Civil War. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goode, John C.; Beck, Elaine

    At the First Battle of Manassas (Virginia) in 1861 many Union doctors fled the battlefield in fear. Those who remained found themselves without adequate medical supplies or ambulances for their patients. As the U.S. Civil War progressed and casualties mounted, military surgeons became more adept at caring for the wounded. By the Battle of…

  5. 77 FR 8956 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Mutual Casualty Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... Supplement No. 7 to the Treasury Department Circular 570, 2011 Revision, published July 1, 2011, at 76 FR 38892. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Mutual Casualty Company...

  6. 46 CFR 4.04-1 - Reports of potential vessel casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reports of potential vessel casualty. 4.04-1 Section 4.04-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE... Guard district rescue coordination center (RCC) cognizant over the area the vessel was last operating...

  7. 33 CFR 150.825 - Reporting a diving-related casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Reporting a diving-related casualty. Deaths and injuries related to diving within the safety zone of a deepwater port must be reported according to 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486, rather than to §§ 150.815 and 150... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting a...

  8. 33 CFR 150.825 - Reporting a diving-related casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Reporting a diving-related casualty. Deaths and injuries related to diving within the safety zone of a deepwater port must be reported according to 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486, rather than to §§ 150.815 and 150... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting a...

  9. 33 CFR 150.825 - Reporting a diving-related casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Reporting a diving-related casualty. Deaths and injuries related to diving within the safety zone of a deepwater port must be reported according to 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486, rather than to §§ 150.815 and 150... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting a...

  10. 33 CFR 150.825 - Reporting a diving-related casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Reporting a diving-related casualty. Deaths and injuries related to diving within the safety zone of a deepwater port must be reported according to 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486, rather than to §§ 150.815 and 150... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting a...

  11. 33 CFR 150.825 - Reporting a diving-related casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Reporting a diving-related casualty. Deaths and injuries related to diving within the safety zone of a deepwater port must be reported according to 46 CFR 197.484 and 197.486, rather than to §§ 150.815 and 150... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting a...

  12. 76 FR 53364 - Recreational Vessel Propeller Strike and Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Casualty Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). D. Public... Department of Homeland Security ECOS Engine cut-off switches EPA Environmental Protection Agency FR Federal... recreational vessel and propeller strike-related casualties. See 60 FR 25191 (May 11, 1995) (Request...

  13. 17 CFR 210.12-18 - Supplemental information (for property-casualty insurance underwriters).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supplemental information (for property-casualty insurance underwriters). 210.12-18 Section 210.12-18 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION FORM AND CONTENT OF AND REQUIREMENTS FOR FINANCIAL STATEMENTS,...

  14. 33 CFR 150.812 - What is the purpose of reporting casualties on deepwater ports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and property. The Coast Guard investigator will follow the procedures outlined in 46 CFR subpart 4.07... casualties on deepwater ports? 150.812 Section 150.812 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Reports and...

  15. 33 CFR 150.812 - What is the purpose of reporting casualties on deepwater ports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and property. The Coast Guard investigator will follow the procedures outlined in 46 CFR subpart 4.07... casualties on deepwater ports? 150.812 Section 150.812 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Reports and...

  16. 33 CFR 150.812 - What is the purpose of reporting casualties on deepwater ports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and property. The Coast Guard investigator will follow the procedures outlined in 46 CFR subpart 4.07... casualties on deepwater ports? 150.812 Section 150.812 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Reports and...

  17. 26 CFR 20.2054-1 - Deduction for losses from casualties or theft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Deduction for losses from casualties or theft. 20.2054-1 Section 20.2054-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable...

  18. 26 CFR 20.2054-1 - Deduction for losses from casualties or theft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Deduction for losses from casualties or theft. 20.2054-1 Section 20.2054-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable...

  19. 26 CFR 20.2054-1 - Deduction for losses from casualties or theft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deduction for losses from casualties or theft. 20.2054-1 Section 20.2054-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable...

  20. 26 CFR 20.2054-1 - Deduction for losses from casualties or theft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Deduction for losses from casualties or theft. 20.2054-1 Section 20.2054-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable...

  1. 26 CFR 20.2054-1 - Deduction for losses from casualties or theft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Deduction for losses from casualties or theft. 20.2054-1 Section 20.2054-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable...

  2. Improved quality and efficiency after the introduction of physician-led team triage in an emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Burström, Lena; Engström, Marie-Louise; Castrén, Maaret; Wiklund, Tony; Enlund, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Background Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) may negatively affect patient outcomes, so different triage models have been introduced to improve performance. Physician-led team triage obtains better results than other triage models. We compared efficiency and quality measures before and after reorganization of the triage model in the ED at our county hospital. Materials and methods We retrospectively compared two study periods with different triage models: nurse triage in 2008 (baseline) and physician-led team triage in 2012 (follow-up). Physician-led team triage was in use during day-time and early evenings on weekdays. Data were collected from electronic medical charts and the National Mortality Register. Results We included 20,073 attendances in 2008 and 23,765 in 2012. The time from registration to physician presentation decreased from 80 to 33 min (P < 0.001), and the length of stay decreased from 219 to 185 min (P < 0.001) from 2008 to 2012, respectively. All of the quality variables differed significantly between the two periods, with better results in 2012. The odds ratio for patients who left before being seen or before treatment was completed was 0.62 (95% confidence interval 0.54–0.72). The corresponding result for unscheduled returns was 0.36 (0.32–0.40), and for the mortality rates within 7 and 30 days 0.72 (0.59–0.88) and 0.84 (0.73–0.97), respectively. The admission rate was 37% at baseline and 32% at follow-up (P < 0.001). Conclusion Physician-led team triage improved the efficiency and quality in EDs. PMID:26553523

  3. Application of the Triage panel for drugs of abuse to forensic blood samples.

    PubMed

    Moriya, F; Hashimoto, Y

    1996-04-01

    A simple and rapid screening procedure with Triage has been developed to detect 7 classes of drugs of abuse, phencyclidine (PCP), benzodiazepines (BZO), cocaine metabolite (COC), amphetamines (AMP), cannabinoids (THC), opiates (OPI), and barbiturates (BAR), in hemolyzed blood. A clear supernatant was obtained by mixing the blood with sulfosalicylic acid. The supernatant was neutralized with ammonium acetate and then screened using Triage. The lower limits of detection of the Triage screening method for PCP, diazepam, benzolyecgonine, methamphetamine, morphine, 11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH), phenobarbital, and secobarbital were 50 ng/mL, 900 ng/mL, 1,000 ng/mL, 600 ng/mL, 900 ng/mL, and 900 ng/mL, respectively. The sensitivity of Triage for THC-COOH in deproteinized blood samples was much lower than that in urine samples. No false positive reactions were observed for the 6 classes of the drugs of abuse with the exception of AMP when the blood was decomposed. Phenethylamine, a putrefactive amine, gave positive results for AMP at concentrations over 5,000 ng/mL. The method was applied to 9 hemolyzed blood samples and 3 turbid urine samples from 12 forensic autopsy cases suspected of drug misuse. Among these, 5 were positive for AMP, 1 for OPI, and 4 for BAR. The presence of methamphetamine is only one of the 5, codeine in 1, and phenobarbital in 4 was confirmed by gas chromatography. All 4 samples which were false positive for AMP contained phenethylamine at relatively high concentrations because of moderate to heavy putrefaction. This method, although disadvantageous to test for AMP and THC, is helpful for the forensic toxicologist because any kind of bloody fluid can be tested rapidly with Triage to detect toxic levels of PCP, BZO, COC, OPI, and BAR. PMID:8691649

  4. Waiting Times in Emergency Department After Using the Emergency Severity Index Triage Tool

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodian, Farzad; Eqtesadi, Razie; Ghareghani, Atefe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hospital emergency departments (EDs) are as barometers of the health care system. Crowded EDs threaten delivery of timely care. Prolonged ED wait times reduce the quality of care and increase adverse and sometimes irreversible events. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the patients' waiting time at Namazi and Shahid Faghihi hospitals in Shiraz, Iran. Patients and Methods: This analytical cross-sectional study was conducted in two phases from December 2012 to May 2013. First, the researcher attended the EDs of the two hospitals and recorded the information of 900 patients who entered the ED, including arrival time, level of triage, and time of first visit by physician. Then, among patients admitted to the ED units, 273 were followed and waiting times for the first physician order in the referral unit and the commencement of clinical interventions (defined as check time by the nurse) were recorded. Results: The median waiting time from arrival to first visit by physician for the 900 patients included in the study was 8 (5-14) minutes [median (interquartile range)]. For the patients admitted to referral units, waiting time was 84 (43-145) minutes for the physician order and 85 (45-147) minutes for the commencement of first clinical intervention; 75% of the patients in triage level I, 84.6% in triage level II, and 95.6% in triage level III were visited within the target time limit. Conclusions: Waiting time for commencement of clinical action in patients admitted to the EDs was considerably high for patients with higher priorities; so, rapid care of critically ill patients, identified during the triage process, should be emphasized. PMID:25738132

  5. Validation of a DNA methylation HPV triage classifier in a screening sample.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, Attila T; Brentnall, Adam R; Scibior-Bentkowska, Dorota; Reuter, Caroline; Banwait, Rawinder; Cadman, Louise; Austin, Janet; Cuzick, Jack; Vasiljević, Natasa

    2016-06-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) DNA tests have excellent sensitivity for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or higher (CIN2+). A drawback of hrHPV screening, however, is modest specificity. Therefore, hrHPV-positive women might need triage to reduce adverse events and costs associated with unnecessary colposcopy. We compared the performance of HPV16/18 genotyping with a predefined DNA methylation triage test (S5) based on target regions of the human gene EPB41L3, and viral late gene regions of HPV16, HPV18, HPV31 and HPV33. Assays were run using exfoliated cervical specimens from 710 women attending routine screening, of whom 38 were diagnosed with CIN2+ within a year after triage to colposcopy based on cytology and 341 were hrHPV positive. Sensitivity and specificity of the investigated triage methods were compared by McNemar's test. At the predefined cutoff, S5 showed better sensitivity than HPV16/18 genotyping (74% vs 54%, P = 0.04) in identifying CIN2+ in hrHPV-positive women, and similar specificity (65% vs 71%, P = 0.07). When the S5 cutoff was altered to allow equal sensitivity to that of genotyping, a significantly higher specificity of 91% was reached (P < 0.0001). Thus, a DNA methylation test for the triage of hrHPV-positive women on original screening specimens might be a valid approach with better performance than genotyping. PMID:26790008

  6. Validation of a DNA methylation HPV triage classifier in a screening sample

    PubMed Central

    Brentnall, Adam R.; Scibior‐Bentkowska, Dorota; Reuter, Caroline; Banwait, Rawinder; Cadman, Louise; Austin, Janet; Cuzick, Jack; Vasiljević, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    High‐risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) DNA tests have excellent sensitivity for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or higher (CIN2+). A drawback of hrHPV screening, however, is modest specificity. Therefore, hrHPV‐positive women might need triage to reduce adverse events and costs associated with unnecessary colposcopy. We compared the performance of HPV16/18 genotyping with a predefined DNA methylation triage test (S5) based on target regions of the human gene EPB41L3, and viral late gene regions of HPV16, HPV18, HPV31 and HPV33. Assays were run using exfoliated cervical specimens from 710 women attending routine screening, of whom 38 were diagnosed with CIN2+ within a year after triage to colposcopy based on cytology and 341 were hrHPV positive. Sensitivity and specificity of the investigated triage methods were compared by McNemar's test. At the predefined cutoff, S5 showed better sensitivity than HPV16/18 genotyping (74% vs 54%, P = 0.04) in identifying CIN2+ in hrHPV‐positive women, and similar specificity (65% vs 71%, P = 0.07). When the S5 cutoff was altered to allow equal sensitivity to that of genotyping, a significantly higher specificity of 91% was reached (P < 0.0001). Thus, a DNA methylation test for the triage of hrHPV‐positive women on original screening specimens might be a valid approach with better performance than genotyping. PMID:26790008

  7. Determining the optimal approach to improving trauma triage decisions: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Deepika; Barnato, Amber E; Rosengart, Matthew R; Angus, Derek C; Smith, Kenneth J

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the optimal target of a future intervention to improve physician decision making in trauma triage. Study Design A comparison of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of current practice versus hypothetical interventions targeting either physicians’ decisional thresholds (attitudes towards transferring patients to trauma centers) or perceptual sensitivity (ability to identify patients who meet guidelines for transfer). Methods Taking the societal perspective, we constructed a Markov decision model. We drew estimates of triage patterns, mortality, utilities, and costs from the literature. We assumed that an intervention to change decisional threshold would reduce under-triage but also increase over-triage more than an intervention to change perceptual sensitivity. We performed a series of one-way sensitivity analyses, and studied the most influential variables in a Monte Carlo simulation. Results The ICER of an intervention to change perceptual sensitivity was $62,799/ quality-adjusted life years (QALY)-gained compared with current practice. The ICER of an intervention to change decisional threshold was $104,975/QALY-gained compared with an intervention to change perceptual sensitivity. These findings were most sensitive to the relative cost of hospitalizing patients with moderate-severe injuries and their relative risk of dying at non-trauma centers. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/QALY-gained, there was a 62% likelihood that an intervention to change perceptual sensitivity was the most cost-effective alternative. Conclusions Even a minor investment in changing decision making in trauma triage could greatly improve the quality of care provided. The optimal intervention depends on the characteristics of the individual trauma systems. PMID:22435966

  8. Using Propensity to Succeed Modeling to Increase Utilization and Adherence in a Nurse HealthLine Telephone Triage Program.

    PubMed

    Navratil-Strawn, Jessica L; Hawkins, Kevin; Hartley, Stephen K; Wells, Timothy S; Ozminkowski, Ronald J; Migliori, Richard J; Yeh, Charlotte S

    2016-01-01

    Propensity to succeed modeling was used to identify characteristics associated with higher utilization of a telephone triage program and adherence to nurse recommendations among callers. Characteristics significantly associated with calling the telephone triage service and engaging in triage services were being female and having an elevated health risk score. Callers most likely to adhere to nurse recommendations were younger than 85 years of age, had called on a weekday, and had received a recommendation to seek care at an emergency department or a doctor's office visit. Additional analyses suggest the propensity to succeed modeling is stable and valid. PMID:27232680

  9. [The role of the medical service in filling up the ranks of personnel combat casualties during war].

    PubMed

    Krutov, V S; Ziuzgin, S A; Ponomarenko, V N; Tsvetkov, V V

    1995-04-01

    This article is about the contribution of the Red Army Medical Service made in the process of combat casualty recovery of personnel of the active army in the years of the Great Patriotic war by returning wounded and sick to their ranks after their treatment. The authors show the main organizational measures which provided for creation of a casualty recovery system; describe the contents of information procedures for assuring the wounded and sick traffic control; emphasize the necessity to utilize the experience of the Red Army Medical Service for the development of the combat casualty recovery system in the Armed Forces in case of war. PMID:7610607

  10. The Impact of the Triage Health Care Delivery System upon Client Morale, Independent Living and the Cost of Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Joseph H., Jr.; Quinn, Joan L.

    1980-01-01

    Triage is unique because it includes several functions under a single health care delivery model. Clients' morale improved with their sense of control. Family support systems were enhanced. Costs were reasonable as was the reimbursement system. (JAC)

  11. What do we need for airway management of adult casualties on the Primary Casualty Receiving Facility? A review of airway management on Role 3 Afloat.

    PubMed

    Mercer, S; Read, J; Sudheer, S; Risdall, J E; Connor, D

    2015-01-01

    The Primary Casualty Receiving Facility (PCRF) of the Royal Navy (RN) is currently based on Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) ARGUS and provides a functioning hospital with surgical teams and a CT scanner (Role 3) within the maritime environment. The case mix could include complex trauma, critically ill patients returning to theatre several times, as well as non-battle injury procedures. This paper describes how we have used national guidelines, evidence from recent military experience, and the Clinical Guidelines for Operations (CGOs) to review and rationalise the airway equipment that is available and that would be required for the PCRF in its current configuration, whilst maintaining capability in a deployed setting. PMID:26867417

  12. Pilot Testing of Triage Coding System in Home-based Palliative Care Using Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale

    PubMed Central

    Dhiliwal, Sunil; Salins, Naveen; Deodhar, Jayitha; Rao, Raghavendra; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Home-based palliative care is an essential model of palliative care that aims to provide continuity of care at patient's own home in an effective and timely manner. This study was a pilot test of triage coding system in home-based palliative care using Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) scale. Methods: Objective of the study was to evaluate if the triage coding system in home-based palliative care: (a) Facilitated timely intervention, (b) improved symptom control, and (c) avoided hospital deaths. Homecare services were coded as high (Group 1 - ESAS scores ≥7), medium (Group 2 - ESAS scores 4–6), and low (Group 3 - ESAS scores 0–3) priority based on ESAS scores. In high priority group, patients received home visit in 0–3 working days; medium priority group, patients received home visit in 0–10 working days; and low priority group, patients received home visit in 0–15 working days. The triage duration of home visit was arbitrarily decided based on the previous retrospective audit and consensus of the experts involved in prioritization and triaging in home care. Results: “High priority” patients were visited in 2.63 ± 0.75 days; “medium priority” patients were visited in 7.00 ± 1.5 days, and “low priority” patients were visited in 10.54 ± 2.7 days. High and medium priority groups had a statistically significant improvement in most of the ESAS symptoms following palliative home care intervention. Intergroup comparison showed that improvement in symptoms was the highest in high priority group compared to medium and low priority group. There was an 8.5% increase in home and hospice deaths following the introduction of triage coding system. There was a significant decrease in deaths in the hospital in Group 1 (6.3%) (χ2 = 27.3, P < 0.001) compared to Group 2 (28.6%) and Group 3 (15.4%). Group 2 had more hospital deaths. Interval duration from triaging to first intervention was a significant predictor of survival with odds ratio 0.75 indicating that time taken for intervention from triaging was more significantly affecting survival than group triaging. Conclusion: Pilot study of testing triaging coding system in home-based palliative care showed, triage coding system: (a) Facilitated early palliative home care intervention, (b) improved symptom control, (c) decreased hospital deaths, predominantly in high priority group, and (d) time taken for intervention from triaging was a significant predictor of survival.

  13. A Multi-Site Assessment of the ACSCOT Field Triage Decision Scheme for Identifying Seriously Injured Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Newgard, Craig D; Zive, Dana; Holmes, James F; Bulger, Eileen M; Staudenmayer, Kristan; Liao, Michael; Rea, Thomas; Hsia, Renee Y; Wang, N Ewen; Fleischman, Ross; Jui, Jonathan; Mann, N Clay; Haukoos, Jason S; Sporer, Karl A; Gubler, K Dean; Hedges, Jerris R

    2011-01-01

    Background ACSCOT has developed and updated field trauma triage protocols for decades, yet the ability to identify major trauma patients remains unclear. We estimate the diagnostic value of the Field Triage Decision Scheme for identifying major trauma patients (Injury Severity Score [ISS] ≥ 16) in a large and diverse multi-site cohort. Study Design This was a retrospective cohort study of injured children and adults transported by 94 EMS agencies to 122 hospitals in 7 regions of the Western U.S. from 2006 through 2008. Patients who met any of the field trauma triage criteria (per EMS personnel) were considered triage positive. Hospital outcome measures were probabilistically linked to EMS records through trauma registries, state discharge data and emergency department data. The primary outcome defining a “major trauma patient” was ISS ≥ 16. Results 122,345 injured patients were evaluated and transported by EMS over the 3-year period, of who 34.5% met at least one triage criterion and 5.8% had ISS ≥ 16. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the criteria for identifying major trauma patients were 85.8% (95% CI 85.0 – 86.6%) and 68.7% (95% CI 68.4 – 68.9%). Triage sensitivity and specificity differed by age: 84.1% and 66.4% (0 – 17 years); 89.5% and 64.3% (18 – 54 years); and 79.9% and 75.4% (≥ 55 years). Evaluating the diagnostic value of triage by hospital destination (transport to Level I/II trauma centers) did not substantially improve these findings. Conclusions The sensitivity of the Field Triage Decision Scheme for identifying major trauma patients is lower and specificity higher than previously described, particularly among elders. PMID:22107917

  14. Effectiveness of a five-level Paediatric Triage System: an analysis of resource utilisation in the emergency department in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Che; Ng, Chip-Jin; Wu, Chang-Teng; Chen, Li-Chin; Chen, Jih-Chang; Hsu, Kuang-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a five-level Paediatric Triage and Acuity System (Ped-TTAS) by comparing the reliability of patient prioritisation and resource utilisation with the four-level Paediatric Taiwan Triage System (Ped-TTS) among non-trauma paediatric patients in the emergency department (ED). Methods The study design used was a retrospective longitudinal analysis based on medical chart review and a computer database. Except for a shorter list of complaints and some abnormal vital sign criteria modifications, the structure and triage process for applying Ped-TTAS was similar to that of the Paediatric Canadian Emergency Triage and Acuity Scale. Non-trauma paediatric patients presenting to the ED were triaged by well-trained triage nurses using the four-level Ped-TTS in 2008 and five-level Ped-TTAS in 2010. Hospitalisation rates and medical resource utilisation were analysed by acuity levels between the contrasting study groups. Results There was a significant difference in patient prioritisation between the four-level Ped-TTS and five-level Ped-TTAS. Improved differentiation was observed with the five-level Ped-TTAS in predicting hospitalisation rates and medical costs. Conclusions The five-level Ped-TTAS is better able to discriminate paediatric patients by triage acuity in the ED and is also more precise in predicting resource utilisation. The introduction of a more accurate acuity and triage system for use in paediatric emergency care should provide greater patient safety and more timely utilisation of appropriate ED resources. PMID:22983978

  15. DNA methylation analysis in self-sampled brush material as a triage test in hrHPV-positive women

    PubMed Central

    Boers, A; Bosgraaf, R P; van Leeuwen, R W; Schuuring, E; Heideman, D A M; Massuger, L F A G; Verhoef, V M J; Bulten, J; Melchers, W J G; van der Zee, A G J; Bekkers, R L M; Wisman, G B A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Primary high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) testing in cervical cancer screening shows relatively low specificity, which makes triage testing necessary. In this study, DNA methylation analysis was compared with cytology for triage testing in hrHPV-positive women. Moreover, feasibility of DNA methylation analysis directly on brush-based self-sampled specimens was assessed. Methods: Non-responding women from population-based screening were invited to self-collect a cervico-vaginal specimen for hrHPV testing; hrHPV-positive women were referred to a physician for triage liquid-based cytology. DNA methylation analysis was performed on 128 hrHPV-positive physician-collected triage samples and 50 matched brush self-samples with QMSP for C13ORF18, EPB41L3, JAM3 and TERT. Results: In physician-taken triage material, DNA methylation analysis of JAM3 showed the highest combined specificity (88%) and sensitivity (82%) for detection of CIN3+, whereas cytology showed a specificity of 48% and a sensitivity of 91%. Out of 39 women with abnormal cytology and normal histology (false-positive by cytology), 87% were negative for JAM3 and 90% for C13ORF18 methylation. Agreement between DNA methylation analysis performed directly on the matched self-sampled material and physician-taken samples was 88% for JAM3 (κ=0.75, P<0.001) and 90% for C13ORF18 (κ=0.77; P<0.001). Conclusions: DNA methylation analysis as a triage test in hrHPV-positive women is an attractive alternative to cytology. Furthermore, DNA methylation is feasible directly on brush-based self-samplers and showed good correlation with matched physician-taken samples. Direct molecular triage on self-collected specimens could optimise the screening program, especially for non-responders, as this would eliminate the need for an additional physician-taken scraping for triage testing. PMID:25032730

  16. 77 FR 52746 - Medical Countermeasures for a Burn Mass Casualty Incident

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... poster presentation. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the following public... sites after this document publishes in the Federal Register.) Requests for Poster Presentations: This public workshop will include a poster session. During online registration you may indicate if you wish...

  17. Using the OntoGene pipeline for the triage task of BioCreative 2012

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Fabio; Clematide, Simon; Hafner, Simon; Schneider, Gerold; Grigonytė, Gintarė; Romacker, Martin; Vachon, Therese

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe the architecture of the OntoGene Relation mining pipeline and its application in the triage task of BioCreative 2012. The aim of the task is to support the triage of abstracts relevant to the process of curation of the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database. We use a conventional information retrieval system (Lucene) to provide a baseline ranking, which we then combine with information provided by our relation mining system, in order to achieve an optimized ranking. Our approach additionally delivers domain entities mentioned in each input document as well as candidate relationships, both ranked according to a confidence score computed by the system. This information is presented to the user through an advanced interface aimed at supporting the process of interactive curation. Thanks, in particular, to the high-quality entity recognition, the OntoGene system achieved the best overall results in the task. PMID:23396322

  18. Using the OntoGene pipeline for the triage task of BioCreative 2012.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Fabio; Clematide, Simon; Hafner, Simon; Schneider, Gerold; Grigonyte, Gintare; Romacker, Martin; Vachon, Therese

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe the architecture of the OntoGene Relation mining pipeline and its application in the triage task of BioCreative 2012. The aim of the task is to support the triage of abstracts relevant to the process of curation of the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database. We use a conventional information retrieval system (Lucene) to provide a baseline ranking, which we then combine with information provided by our relation mining system, in order to achieve an optimized ranking. Our approach additionally delivers domain entities mentioned in each input document as well as candidate relationships, both ranked according to a confidence score computed by the system. This information is presented to the user through an advanced interface aimed at supporting the process of interactive curation. Thanks, in particular, to the high-quality entity recognition, the OntoGene system achieved the best overall results in the task. PMID:23396322

  19. Dicentric assay: inter-laboratory comparison in Indian laboratories for routine and triage applications.

    PubMed

    Bakkiam, D; Bhavani, M; Anantha Kumar, A Arul; Sonwani, Swetha; Venkatachalam, P; Sivasubramanian, K; Venkatraman, B

    2015-05-01

    An Inter-Laboratory Comparison (ILC) study on Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) was carried out between two Indian biodosimetry labs. Human peripheral blood samples exposed to 10 different doses of X-rays up to 5Gy were shared between the labs to generate calibration data. Validation of calibration curves was done by dose estimation of coded samples exposed to X- or gamma radiation. Reliability of the DCA data for triage application was evaluated by scoring 20, 50 and 100 metaphases in the dose range of 0.5-3.0Gy. No significant difference was observed between labs regarding the established calibration data as well as the DCA triage dose assessments. Scoring of 20 metaphases (MP) was adequate to detect radiation exposure of >2Gy whereas 50 MP were sufficient to determine exposures of 0.5Gy. Both labs performed the DCA in a reliable manner and made the first step in setting up a biodosimetry network in India. PMID:25728004

  20. Smartphone teledermoscopy referrals: a novel process for improved triage of skin cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Börve, Alexander; Dahlén Gyllencreutz, Johan; Terstappen, Karin; Johansson Backman, Eva; Aldenbratt, Anette; Danielsson, Markus; Gillstedt, Martin; Sandberg, Carin; Paoli, John

    2015-02-01

    In this open, controlled, multicentre and prospective observational study, smartphone teledermoscopy referrals were sent from 20 primary healthcare centres to 2 dermatology departments for triage of skin lesions of concern using a smartphone application and a compatible digital dermoscope. The outcome for 816 patients referred via smartphone teledermoscopy was compared with 746 patients referred via the traditional paper-based system. When surgical treatment was required, the waiting time was significantly shorter using teledermoscopy for patients with melanoma, melanoma in situ, squamous cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma in situ and basal cell carcinoma. Triage decisions were also more reliable with teledermoscopy and over 40% of the teledermoscopy patients could potentially have avoided face-to-face visits. Only 4 teledermoscopy referrals (0.4%) had to be excluded due to poor image quality. Smartphone teledermoscopy referrals allow for faster and more efficient management of patients with skin cancer as compared to traditional paper referrals. PMID:24923283

  1. Tactical Combat Casualty Care in the Canadian Forces: lessons learned from the Afghan war

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Erin; Forestier, Colleen; Withers, Nicholas; Tien, Homer; Pannell, Dylan

    2011-01-01

    Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) is intended to treat potentially preventable causes of death on the battlefield, but acknowledges that application of these treatments may place the provider and even the mission in jeopardy if performed at the wrong time. Therefore, TCCC classifies the tactical situation with respect to health care provision into 3 phases (care under fire, tactical field care and tactical evacuation) and only permits certain interventions to be performed in specific phases based on the danger to the provider and casualty. In the 6 years that the Canadian Forces (CF) have been involved in sustained combat operations in Kandahar, Afghanistan, more than 1000 CF members have been injured and more than 150 have been killed. As a result, the CF gained substantial experience delivering TCCC to wounded soldiers on the battlefield. The purpose of this paper is to review the principles of TCCC and some of the lessons learned about battlefield trauma care during this conflict. PMID:22099324

  2. Clinical management of casualties exposed to lung damaging agents: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Russell, D; Blaine, P G; Rice, P

    2006-01-01

    There is no specific antidote for the treatment of casualties exposed to chlorine, phosgene, or mustards; therefore, management is largely supportive. Corticosteroid treatment has been given to casualties accidentally exposed to chlorine. Clinical data on efficacy are inconclusive as the numbers given steroids have been small and the indications for administration unclear. There have been no clinical controlled studies. There is a stronger evidence base from animal studies, particularly from porcine and rodent models. Lung injury induced by phosgene and mustard appears to be mediated by glutathione depletion, lipid peroxidation, free radical generation, and subsequent cellular toxicity. There is limited evidence to suggest that repletion of glutathione reduces and/or prevents lung damage by these agents. This may provide an opportunity for therapeutic intervention. PMID:16714497

  3. Cognitive Training Can Reduce Civilian Casualties in a Simulated Shooting Environment.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Adam T; Cain, Matthew S; Mitroff, Stephen R

    2015-08-01

    Shooting a firearm involves a complex series of cognitive abilities. For example, locating an item or a person of interest requires visual search, and firing the weapon (or withholding a trigger squeeze) involves response execution (or inhibition). The present study used a simulated shooting environment to establish a relationship between a particular cognitive ability and a critical shooting error-response inhibition and firing on civilians, respectively. Individual-difference measures demonstrated, perhaps counterintuitively, that simulated civilian casualties were not related to motor impulsivity (i.e., an itchy trigger finger) but rather to an individual's cognitive ability to withhold an already initiated response (i.e., an itchy brain). Furthermore, active-response-inhibition training reduced simulated civilian casualties, which revealed a causal relationship. This study therefore illustrates the potential of using cognitive training to possibly improve shooting performance, which might ultimately provide insight for military and law-enforcement personnel. PMID:26170262

  4. Mathematical models for estimating earthquake casualties and damage cost through regression analysis using matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop mathematical models for estimating earthquake casualties such as death, number of injured persons, affected families and total cost of damage. To quantify the direct damages from earthquakes to human beings and properties given the magnitude, intensity, depth of focus, location of epicentre and time duration, the regression models were made. The researchers formulated models through regression analysis using matrices and used α = 0.01. The study considered thirty destructive earthquakes that hit the Philippines from the inclusive years 1968 to 2012. Relevant data about these said earthquakes were obtained from Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology. Data on damages and casualties were gathered from the records of National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. The mathematical models made are as follows: This study will be of great value in emergency planning, initiating and updating programs for earthquake hazard reductionin the Philippines, which is an earthquake-prone country.

  5. MET system: a new approach to m-health in emergency triage.

    PubMed

    Michalowski, Wojtek; Slowinski, Roman; Wilk, Szymon

    2004-01-01

    The MET (Mobile Emergency Triage) system is an m-health application that supports emergency triage of various types of acute pain at the point of care. The system is designed for use in the Emergency Department (ED) of a hospital and to aid physicians in disposition decisions. Given patient's condition, MET recommends a triage by consulting decision rules stored in the system's knowledge base. The rules have been created using a data mining method (based on rough set methodology) applied to data collected during a retrospective chart study and verified by the clinicians. MET is designed following the extended client-server architecture, suited for weak-connectivity conditions, where stable connection between clients and a server cannot be provided. The MET server interacts with the hospital's patient information system in order to retrieve information about patients admitted to the ED. It also stores current patients' demographic and clinical data to be exchanged with mobile clients. The MET mobile client, running on a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), is used for collecting clinical data and supporting triage decisions. The support function runs solely on the client side, thus it can be invoked anytime and anywhere, even if there is no communication link with the server (e.g., there is no wireless network available in the ED). Due to implementation on PDAs and working in weak-connectivity conditions, the MET system is very well suited for use in the ED and fits seamlessly into the regular clinical workflow without introducing any hindrances or disruptions that are often reported when using stationary (i.e., working on desktop computers) clinical systems. The system facilitates patient-centered service and timely, high quality patient management. It provides recommendations using a limited amount of clinical data, normally available at the point of care. Furthermore, it provides a possibility for the structured evaluation of this data by an attending physician. PMID:15747911

  6. Computerized telephone nurse triage. An evaluation of service quality and cost.

    PubMed

    Cariello, Francesca P

    2003-01-01

    The current reimbursement structure of health care in the United States motivates the providers of health care services to deliver these services with a cost-conscious mentality without compromising quality. This has led to the development of alternative methods of delivering health care services, one of which is computerized telephone nurse triage. This study investigates service quality from the perception of callers who used this system on behalf of a pediatric client. Cost was evaluated by comparing what the caller would have done if they did not speak with nurse triage with what they actually did after their interaction. A modified version of the SERVQUAL tool was administered via telephone survey to members of a managed health care plan who recently used nurse triage services for a pediatric patient. Findings were that the majority of callers--employed female parents--rated the level of service quality very highly. Education, employment status, age of the caller, child gender, birth order among siblings, and age of child did not affect the rating of service quality. Relationship to the child had an effect on the rating of service quality as men/fathers rated the level of service quality slightly lower than their female/mother counterparts. The evaluation of cost revealed that the action taken by the caller after they spoke with the nurse resulted in significant cost savings. Computerized telephone nurse triage is a well-accepted cost-saving alternative method of health care delivery that can effectively serve a variety of callers and pediatric patients. PMID:12698927

  7. 3q26 Amplification Is an Effective Negative Triage Test for LSIL: A Historical Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Heitmann, Erica R.; Lankachandra, Kamani M.; Wall, Jeff; Harris, George D.; McKinney, Hollie J.; Jalali, G. Reza; Verma, Yogita; Kershnar, Eric; Kilpatrick, Michael W.; Tsipouras, Petros; Harper, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Women with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) at cervical cancer screening are currently referred for further diagnostic work up despite 80% having no precancerous lesion. The primary purpose of this study is to measure the test characteristics of 3q26 chromosome gain (3q26 gain) as a host marker of carcinogenesis in women with LSIL. A negative triage test may allow these women to be followed by cytology alone without immediate referral to colposcopy. Methods and Findings A historical prospective study was designed to measure 3q26 gain from the archived liquid cytology specimens diagnosed as LSIL among women attending colposcopy between 2007 and 2009. 3q26 gain was assessed on the index liquid sample; and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were measured at immediate triage and at 6–16 months after colposcopic biopsy. The sensitivity of 3q26 gain measured at immediate triage from automated and manually reviewed tests in 65 non-pregnant unique women was 70% (95% CI: 35, 93) with a NPV of 89% (95% CI: 78, 96). The sensitivity and NPV increased to 80% (95% CI: 28, 99) and 98% (95% CI: 87, 100), respectively, when only the automated method of detecting 3q26 gain was used. Conclusions 3q26 gain demonstrates high sensitivity and NPV as a negative triage test for women with LSIL, allowing possible guideline changes to routine surveillance instead of immediate colposcopy. Prospective studies are ongoing to establish the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 3q26 gain for LSIL over time. PMID:22792164

  8. Manchester Triage System version II and resource utilisation in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Santos, André Peralta; Freitas, Paulo; Martins, Henrique Manuel Gil

    2014-02-01

    Emergency department (ED) triage systems aim to direct the best clinical assistance to those who are in the greatest urgency and guarantee that resources are efficiently applied. The study's purpose was to determine whether the Manchester Triage System (MTS) second version is a useful instrument for determining the risk of hospital admission, intrahospital death and resource utilisation in ED and to compare it with the MTS first version. This was a prospective study of patients that attended the ED at a large hospital. It comprised a total of 25,218 cases that were triaged between 11 July and 13 October 2011. The MTS codes were grouped into two clusters: red and orange into a 'high acuity/priority' (HP) cluster, and yellow, green and blue into a 'low acuity/priority' cluster. The risk of hospital admission in the HP cluster was 4.86 times that of the LP cluster for both admission route and ages. The percentage of patient hospital admission between medical and surgical specialties, in high and low priority clusters, was similar. We found the risk of death in the HP cluster to be 5.58 times that of the risk of the low acuity/priority cluster. The MTS had an inconsistent association relative to the utilisation of x-ray, while it seemed to portray a consistent association between ECG and laboratory utilisation and MTS cluster. There were no differences between medical and surgical specialities risk of admission. This suggests that improvements were made in the second version of MTS, particularly in the discriminators of patients triaged to surgical specialties, because this was not true for the first version of MTS. PMID:23345313

  9. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta: a gap analysis of severely injured UK combat casualties.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jonathan J; Ross, James D; Rasmussen, Todd E; Midwinter, Mark J; Jansen, Jan O

    2014-05-01

    The control of torso and junctional zone bleeding in combat casualties is particularly challenging because of its noncompressible nature. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) has demonstrated promise in translational large animal and early clinical series as an effective resuscitation and hemorrhage control adjunct. However, it is unknown what proportion of combat casualties has an injury pattern and clinical course that is amenable to REBOA deployment. The prospective UK Joint Theatre Trauma Registry was used to retrospectively identify all UK military personnel who has sustained a severe combat injury, defined as an Abbreviated Injury Scale of three or greater, in the course of 10 years. Patients were then divided into three groups based on Abbreviated Injury Scale injury pattern: no indications for REBOA, contraindications (mediastinal, cervical, and axillary hemorrhage), and indications (torso and pelvic hemorrhage). From a total of 1,317 patients, 925 (70.2%) had no indication, 148 (11.2%) had a contraindication, and 244 (18.5%) had an indication for REBOA. Within the group with indications for REBOA, there were 174 deaths: 79 at the point of wounding, 66 en route to hospital, and 29 in-hospital deaths. The median (interquartile range) time to death in patients dying en route was 75 (42-109) min, and the median prehospital time for casualties admitted to hospital was 61 (34-89) min. One-in-five severely injured UK combat casualties have a focus of hemorrhage in the abdomen or pelvic junctional region potentially amenable to REBOA deployment. The UK military should explore REBOA as a potential en route hemorrhage control and resuscitation adjunct. PMID:25133599

  10. Improving Five-level Triage Form According to the Experts Viewpoint; A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bazm, Ali; Khorasani, Elahe; Etemadi, Manal; Nadeali, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study is a qualitative study being conducted in five stages at Vali-Asr Hospital of Qom in 2013. After two surveys, the experts were interviewed using focus group discussion (FDG) and study was continuing with. Data were analyzed through studying the opinions of the specialized teams’ members, summarizing and classifying the data in qualitative phase. Results: Changes proposed in the triage form communicated by Iran’s emergency department according to the participants’ opinions include informing all the patients in the emergency department of some necessary information. Therefore, three parts of medical and medicinal history, vital signs and level of consciousness were added to the first part of the form and necessary emergency facilities were also added to the third level of triage. Conclusion: Measuring each item added to the general part of the triage form provides more precise diagnosis and more scientific classification, since the level to which the patient belongs should be identified based on medical history, clinical signs and level of consciousness.

  11. The Triage of Injured Patients: Mechanism of Injury, Regardless of Injury Severity, Determines Hospital Destination.

    PubMed

    Staudenmayer, Kristan; Wang, N Ewen; Weiser, Thomas G; Maggio, Paul; Mackersie, Robert C; Spain, David; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-04-01

    The target rate for trauma undertriage is <5 per cent, but rates are as high as 30 to 40 per cent in many trauma systems. We hypothesized that high undertriage rates were due to the tendency to undertriage injured elderly patients and a growing elderly population. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all hospital visits in California using the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Database over a 5-year period. All hospital admissions and emergency department visits associated with injury were longitudinally linked. The primary outcome was triage pattern. Triage patterns were stratified across three dimensions: age, mechanism of injury, and access to care. A total of 60,182 severely injured patients were included in the analysis. Fall-related injuries were frequently undertriaged compared with injuries from motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) and penetrating trauma (52% vs 12% and 10%, respectively). This pattern was true for all age groups. Conversely, MVCs and penetrating traumas were associated with high rates of overtriage (>70% for both). In conclusion, in contrast to our hypothesis, we found that triage is largely determined by mechanism of injury regardless of injury severity. High rates of undertriage are largely due to the undertriage of fall-related injuries, which occurs in both younger and older adults. Patients injured after MVCs and penetrating trauma victims are brought to trauma centers regardless of injury severity, resulting in high rates of overtriage. These findings suggest an opportunity to improve trauma system performance. PMID:27097630

  12. Casualty Risk Assessment Controlled Re-Entry of EPS - Ariane 5ES - ATV Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, M.-H.; Laine, N.; Aussilhou, C.

    2012-01-01

    To fulfil its mission of compliance check to the French Space Operations Act, CNES has developed ELECTRA© tool in order to estimate casualty risk induced by a space activity (like rocket launch, controlled or un-controlled re-entry on Earth of a space object). This article describes the application of such a tool for the EPS controlled re-entry during the second Ariane 5E/S flight (Johannes Kepler mission has been launched in February 2011). EPS is the Ariane 5E/S upper composite which is de-orbited from a 260 km circular orbit after its main mission (release of the Automated Transfer Vehicle - ATV). After a brief description of the launcher, the ATV-mission and a description of all the failure cases taken into account in the mission design (which leads to "back-up scenarios" into the flight software program), the article will describe the steps which lead to the casualty risk assessment (in case of failure) with ELECTRA©. In particular, the presence on board of two propulsive means of de-orbiting (main engine of EPS, and 4 ACS longitudinal nozzles in case of main engine failure or exhaustion) leads to a low remaining casualty risk.

  13. Earthquake casualty models within the USGS Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, Kishor; Wald, David J.; Earle, Paul; Porter, Keith A.; Hearne, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Since the launch of the USGS’s Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system in fall of 2007, the time needed for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to determine and comprehend the scope of any major earthquake disaster anywhere in the world has been dramatically reduced to less than 30 min. PAGER alerts consist of estimated shaking hazard from the ShakeMap system, estimates of population exposure at various shaking intensities, and a list of the most severely shaken cities in the epicentral area. These estimates help government, scientific, and relief agencies to guide their responses in the immediate aftermath of a significant earthquake. To account for wide variability and uncertainty associated with inventory, structural vulnerability and casualty data, PAGER employs three different global earthquake fatality/loss computation models. This article describes the development of the models and demonstrates the loss estimation capability for earthquakes that have occurred since 2007. The empirical model relies on country-specific earthquake loss data from past earthquakes and makes use of calibrated casualty rates for future prediction. The semi-empirical and analytical models are engineering-based and rely on complex datasets including building inventories, time-dependent population distributions within different occupancies, the vulnerability of regional building stocks, and casualty rates given structural collapse.

  14. The Casualty Assistance Readiness Enhancement System: A Case Study in Rapid Prototyping and Design for Flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerger, Simon R.; Wong, Ernest Y.; Henderson, Dale L.; Sperling, Brian K.; Bland, William

    Numerous government benefits are available to the surviving family of fallen U.S. military service members. Unfortunately, most of these entitlements require a considerable amount of paperwork to process correctly, necessitating a great deal of patience, attention to detail, and composure from families at a time when their grief is raw. Even though the U.S. Army appoints a Casualty Assistance Officer (CAO) to help surviving family members through this process, the soldiers serving as CAOs tend to be inexperienced and oftentimes find themselves challenged to provide accurate and thorough assistance. Consequently, some families do not receive all benefits in a timely manner, and some entitlements may be overlooked entirely. To help with the military's Casualty Program, we have developed the Casualty Assistance Readiness Enhancement System (CARES), an information system that improves how the Department of the Army cares for military families in arguably their greatest time of need. The tool and associated process reduced the time required to complete forms, reduced the potential for errors on repetitive information, assisted CAOs through the process, and provided electronic copies of completed forms.

  15. Provenancing of unidentified World War II casualties: Application of strontium and oxygen isotope analysis in tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Font, Laura; Jonker, Geert; van Aalderen, Patric A; Schiltmans, Els F; Davies, Gareth R

    2015-01-01

    In 2010 and 2012 two sets of unidentified human remains of two World War II soldiers were recovered in the area where the 1944-1945 Kapelsche Veer bridgehead battle took place in The Netherlands. Soldiers of four Allied nations: British Royal Marine Commandos, Free Norwegian Commandos, Free Poles and Canadians, fought against the German Army in this battle. The identification of these two casualties could not be achieved using dental record information of DNA analysis. The dental records of Missing in Action soldiers of the Allied nations did not match with the dental records of the two casualties. A DNA profile was determined for the casualty found in 2010, but no match was found. Due to the lack of information on the identification of the casualties provided by routine methods, an isotope study was conducted in teeth from the soldiers to constrain their provenance. The isotope study concluded that the tooth enamel isotope composition for both casualties matched with an origin from the United Kingdom. For one of the casualties a probable origin from the United Kingdom was confirmed, after the isotope study was conducted, by the recognition of a characteristic belt buckle derived from a Royal Marine money belt, only issued to British Royal Marines, found with the remains of the soldier. PMID:25577002

  16. A lean case study in an oncological hospital: implementation of a telephone triage system in the emergency service

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, José Crespo; Ramos, Madalena; Paixão, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Lean practices and thinking have increased substantially in the last few years. Applications of lean practices to health care are found worldwide. Despite that, new contributions are required because the application of lean thinking to hospitals has a long way to go. Lean practices and thinking do not include, in the literature or practice programs, any references to triage systems in health care units. The common triage systems require physical presence, but there are alternative methods to avoid the need to move patients: these alternative triage systems, given their characteristics, may be included in the spectrum of lean practices. Currently, patients that are already known to suffer from cancer are encouraged to go to hospital (public or private, with an oncological focus) when facing side effects from chemotherapy or radiation treatments; they are then submitted to a triage system (present themselves to the hospital for examination). The authors of this paper propose the introduction of telephone or email triage for impaired patients as a valid substitute for moving them physically, thereby often avoiding several unnecessary moves. This approach has, in fact, characteristics similar to a lean practice in that it reduces costs and maintains, if done properly, the overall service offered. The proposed ‘remote’ triage emerged from the results of a large survey sent to patients and also as the outcome of a set of semistructured interviews conducted with hospital nurses. With the results they obtained, the authors felt comfortable proposing this approach both to public and private hospitals, because the study was conducted in the most important, largest, and best-known oncological unit in Spain. As a final result, the health care unit studied is now taking the first steps to implement a remote triage system by telephone, and has begun to reduce the previously necessary movement of impaired patients. PMID:24376365

  17. Call-duration and triage decisions in out of hours cooperatives with and without the use of an expert system

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Rob SG; Post, Johan; van Rooij, Harry; de Haan, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Background Cooperatives delivering out of hours care in the Netherlands are hesitant about the use of expert systems during triage. Apart from the extra costs, cooperatives are not sure that quality of triage is sufficiently enhanced by these systems and believe that call duration will be prolonged drastically. No figures about the influence of the use of an expert system during triage on call duration and triage decisions in out of hours care in the Netherlands are available. Methods Electronically registered data concerning call duration and triage decisions were collected in two cooperatives. One in Tilburg, a cooperative in a Southern city of the Netherlands using an expert system, and one in Groningen, a cooperative in a Northern city not using an expert system. Some other relevant information about the care process was collected additionally. Data about call duration was compared using an independent sample t-test. Data about call decisions was compared using Chi Square. Results The mean call time in the cooperative using the TAS expert system is 4.6 minutes, in the cooperative not using the expert system 3.9 minutes. A significant difference of 0.7 minutes (0.4 – 1.0, 95% CI) minutes. In the cooperative with an expert system a larger percentage of patients is handled by the assistant, patients are less often referred to a telephone consultation with the GP and are less likely to be offered a visit by the GP. A quick interpretation of the impact of the difference in triage decisions, show that these may be large enough to support the hypothesis that longer call duration is compensated for by less contacts with the GP (by telephone or face-to-face). There is no proof, however, that these differences are caused by the use of the triage system. The larger amount of calls handled by the assistant may be partly caused by the fact that the assistants in the cooperative with an expert system more often consult the GP during triage. And it is not likely that the larger amount of home visits in Groningen can be attributed to the absence of an expert system. The expert system only offers advice whether a GP should be seen, not in which way (by consultation in the office or by home visit). Conclusion The differences in call times between a cooperative using an expert system and a cooperative not using an expert system are small; 0.4 – 1.0 min. Differences in triage decisions were found, but it is not proven that these can be contributed to the use of an expert system. PMID:18271970

  18. Nurse telephone triage for same day appointments in general practice: multiple interrupted time series trial of effect on workload and costs

    PubMed Central

    Richards, David A; Meakins, Joan; Tawfik, Jane; Godfrey, Lesley; Dutton, Evelyn; Richardson, Gerald; Russell, Daphne

    2002-01-01

    Objective To compare the workloads of general practitioners and nurses and costs of patient care for nurse telephone triage and standard management of requests for same day appointments in routine primary care. Design Multiple interrupted time series using sequential introduction of experimental triage system in different sites with repeated measures taken one week in every month for 12 months. Setting Three primary care sites in York. Participants 4685 patients: 1233 in standard management, 3452 in the triage system. All patients requesting same day appointments during study weeks were included in the trial. Main outcome measures Type of consultation (telephone, appointment, or visit), time taken for consultation, presenting complaints, use of services during the month after same day contact, and costs of drugs and same day, follow up, and emergency care. Results The triage system reduced appointments with general practitioner by 29-44%. Compared with standard management, the triage system had a relative risk (95% confidence interval) of 0.85 (0.72 to 1.00) for home visits, 2.41 (2.08 to 2.80) for telephone care, and 3.79 (3.21 to 4.48) for nurse care. Mean overall time in the triage system was 1.70 minutes longer, but mean general practitioner time was reduced by 2.45 minutes. Routine appointments and nursing time increased, as did out of hours and accident and emergency attendance. Costs did not differ significantly between standard management and triage: mean difference 1.48 more per patient for triage (95% confidence interval 0.19 to 3.15). Conclusions Triage reduced the number of same day appointments with general practitioners but resulted in busier routine surgeries, increased nursing time, and a small but significant increase in out of hours and accident and emergency attendance. Consequently, triage does not reduce overall costs per patient for managing same day appointments. What is already known on this topicNurse telephone triage is used to manage the increasing demand for same day appointments in general practiceEvidence that nurse telephone triage is effective is limitedWhat this study addsTriage resulted in 29-44% fewer same day appointments with general practitioners than standard managementNursing and overall time increased in the triage group as 40% of patients were managed by nursesTriage was not less costly than standard management because of increased costs for nursing, follow up, out of hours, and accident and emergency care PMID:12446539

  19. Development and implementation of a custom integrated database with dashboards to assist with hematopathology specimen triage and traffic

    PubMed Central

    Azzato, Elizabeth M.; Morrissette, Jennifer J. D.; Halbiger, Regina D.; Bagg, Adam; Daber, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: At some institutions, including ours, bone marrow aspirate specimen triage is complex, with hematopathology triage decisions that need to be communicated to downstream ancillary testing laboratories and many specimen aliquot transfers that are handled outside of the laboratory information system (LIS). We developed a custom integrated database with dashboards to facilitate and streamline this workflow. Methods: We developed user-specific dashboards that allow entry of specimen information by technologists in the hematology laboratory, have custom scripting to present relevant information for the hematopathology service and ancillary laboratories and allow communication of triage decisions from the hematopathology service to other laboratories. These dashboards are web-accessible on the local intranet and accessible from behind the hospital firewall on a computer or tablet. Secure user access and group rights ensure that relevant users can edit or access appropriate records. Results: After database and dashboard design, two-stage beta-testing and user education was performed, with the first focusing on technologist specimen entry and the second on downstream users. Commonly encountered issues and user functionality requests were resolved with database and dashboard redesign. Final implementation occurred within 6 months of initial design; users report improved triage efficiency and reduced need for interlaboratory communications. Conclusions: We successfully developed and implemented a custom database with dashboards that facilitates and streamlines our hematopathology bone marrow aspirate triage. This provides an example of a possible solution to specimen communications and traffic that are outside the purview of a standard LIS. PMID:25250187

  20. Evaluation of the on-site immunoassay drug-screening device Triage-TOX in routine forensic autopsy.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Mariko; Michiue, Tomomi; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    Instrumental identification of drugs with quantification is essential in forensic toxicology, while on-site immunoassay urinalysis drug-screening devices conveniently provide preliminary information when adequately used. However, suitable or sufficient urine specimens are not always available. The present study evaluated the efficacy of a new on-site immunoassay drug-screening device Triage-TOX (Alere Inc., San Diego, CA, USA), which has recently been developed to provide objective data on the one-step automated processor, using 51 urine and 19 pericardial fluid samples from 66 forensic autopsy cases, compared with Triage-Drug of Abuse (DOA) and Monitect-9. For benzodiazepines, the positive predictive value and specificity of Triage-TOX were higher than those of Triage-DOA; however, sensitivity was higher with Monitect-9, despite frequent false-positives. The results for the other drugs with the three devices also included a few false-negatives and false-positives. These observations indicate the applicability of Triage-TOX in preliminary drug screening using urine or alternative materials in routine forensic autopsy, when a possible false-negative is considered, especially for benzodiazepines, providing objective information; however, the combined use of another device such as Monitect-9 can help minimize misinterpretation prior to instrumental analysis. PMID:26593997

  1. Identifying prioritization criteria to supplement critical care triage protocols for the allocation of ventilators during a pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Winsor, Shawn; Bensimon, Cécile M; Sibbald, Robert; Anstey, Kyle; Chidwick, Paula; Coughlin, Kevin; Cox, Peter; Fowler, Robert; Godkin, Dianne; Greenberg, Rebecca A; Shaul, Randi Zlotnik

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify supplementary criteria to provide direction when the Ontario Health Plan for an Influenza Pandemic (OHPIP) critical care triage protocol is rendered insufficient by its inability to discriminate among patients assessed as urgent, and there are insufficient critical care resources available to treat those in that category. To accomplish this task, a Supplementary Criteria Task Force for Critical Care Triage was struck at the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics. The task force reviewed publically available protocols and policies on pandemic flu planning, identified 13 potential triage criteria and determined a set of eight key ethical, legal and practical considerations against which it assessed each criterion. An online questionnaire was distributed to clinical, policy and community stakeholders across Canada to obtain feedback on the 13 potential triage criteria toward selecting those that best met the eight considerations. The task force concluded that the balance of arguments favoured only two of the 13 criteria it had identified for consideration: first come, first served and random selection. The two criteria were chosen in part based on a need to balance the clearly utilitarian approach employed in the OHPIP with equity considerations. These criteria serve as a defensible "fail safe" mechanism for any triage protocol. PMID:25191808

  2. How Much Overtesting Is Needed to Safely Exclude a Diagnosis? A Different Perspective on Triage Testing Using Bayes' Theorem.

    PubMed

    Sikkens, Jonne J; Beekman, Djoeke G; Thijs, Abel; Bossuyt, Patrick M; Smulders, Yvo M

    2016-01-01

    Ruling out disease often requires expensive or potentially harmful confirmation testing. For such testing, a less invasive triage test is often used. Intuitively, few negative confirmatory tests suggest success of this approach. However, if negative confirmation tests become too rare, too many disease cases could have been missed. It is therefore important to know how many negative tests are needed to safely exclude a diagnosis. We quantified this relationship using Bayes' theorem, and applied this to the example of pulmonary embolism (PE), for which triage is done with a Clinical Decision Rule (CDR) and D-dimer testing, and CT-angiography (CTA) is the confirmation test. For a maximum proportion of missed PEs of 1% in triage-negative patients, we calculate a 67% 'mandatory minimum' proportion of negative CTA scans. To achieve this, the proportion of patients with PE undergoing triage testing should be appropriately low, in this case no higher than 24%. Pre-test probability, triage test characteristics, the proportion of negative confirmation tests, and the number of missed diagnoses are mathematically entangled. The proportion of negative confirmation tests-not too high, but definitely not too low either-could be a quality benchmark for diagnostic processes. PMID:26939066

  3. How Much Overtesting Is Needed to Safely Exclude a Diagnosis? A Different Perspective on Triage Testing Using Bayes' Theorem

    PubMed Central

    Thijs, Abel; Bossuyt, Patrick M.; Smulders, Yvo M.

    2016-01-01

    Ruling out disease often requires expensive or potentially harmful confirmation testing. For such testing, a less invasive triage test is often used. Intuitively, few negative confirmatory tests suggest success of this approach. However, if negative confirmation tests become too rare, too many disease cases could have been missed. It is therefore important to know how many negative tests are needed to safely exclude a diagnosis. We quantified this relationship using Bayes’ theorem, and applied this to the example of pulmonary embolism (PE), for which triage is done with a Clinical Decision Rule (CDR) and D-dimer testing, and CT-angiography (CTA) is the confirmation test. For a maximum proportion of missed PEs of 1% in triage-negative patients, we calculate a 67% 'mandatory minimum' proportion of negative CTA scans. To achieve this, the proportion of patients with PE undergoing triage testing should be appropriately low, in this case no higher than 24%. Pre-test probability, triage test characteristics, the proportion of negative confirmation tests, and the number of missed diagnoses are mathematically entangled. The proportion of negative confirmation tests—not too high, but definitely not too low either—could be a quality benchmark for diagnostic processes. PMID:26939066

  4. A Triple-Option Analgesia Plan for Tactical Combat Casualty Care: TCCC Guidelines Change 13-04.

    PubMed

    Butler, Frank K; Kotwal, Russ S; Buckenmaier, Chester C; Edgar, Erin P; O'Connor, Kevin C; Montgomery, Harold R; Shackelford, Stacy A; Gandy, John V; Wedmore, Ian S; Timby, Jeffrey W; Gross, Kirby R; Bailey, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Although the majority of potentially preventable fatalities among U.S. combat forces serving in Afghanistan and Iraq have died from hemorrhagic shock, the majority of U.S. medics carry morphine autoinjectors for prehospital battlefield analgesia. Morphine given intramuscularly has a delayed onset of action and, like all opioids, may worsen hemorrhagic shock. Additionally, on a recent assessment of prehospital care in Afghanistan, combat medical personnel noted that Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) battlefield analgesia recommendations need to be simplified?there are too many options and not enough clear guidance on which medication to use in specific situations. They also reported that ketamine is presently being used as a battlefield analgesic by some medics in theater with good results. This report proposes that battlefield analgesia be achieved using one or more of three options: (1) the meloxicam and Tylenol in the TCCC Combat Pill Pack for casualties with relatively minor pain who are still able to function as effective combatants; (2) oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC) for casualties who have moderate to severe pain, but who are not in hemorrhagic shock or respiratory distress and are not at significant risk for developing either condition; or (3) ketamine for casualties who have moderate to severe pain but who are in hemorrhagic shock or respiratory distress or are at significant risk for developing either condition. Ketamine may also be used to increase analgesic effect for casualties who have previously been given opioids (morphine or fentanyl.). PMID:24604434

  5. Educational Triage and Ability-Grouping in Primary Mathematics: A Case-Study of the Impacts on Low-Attaining Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This case-study, drawing on an unanticipated theme arising from a wider study of ability-grouping in primary mathematics, documents some of the consequences of educational triage in the final year of one primary school. The paper discusses how a process of educational triage, as a response to accountability pressures, is justified by teachers on…

  6. Improving prehospital trauma management for skiers and snowboarders - need for on-slope triage?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Injuries from skiing and snowboarding became a major challenge for emergency care providers in Switzerland. In the alpine setting, early assessment of injury and health status is essential for the initiation of adequate means of care and transport. Nevertheless, validated standardized protocols for on-slope triage are missing. This article can assist in understanding the characteristics of injured winter sportsmen and exigencies for future on-slope triage protocols. Methods Six-year review of trauma cases in a tertiary trauma centre. Consecutive inclusion of all injured skiers and snowboarders aged >15 (total sample) years with predefined, severe injury to the head, spine, chest, pelvis or abdomen (study sample) presenting at or being transferred to the study hospital. Descriptive analysis of age, gender and injury pattern. Results Amongst 729 subjects (total sample) injured from skiing or snowboarding, 401 (55%, 54% of skiers and 58% of snowboarders) suffered from isolated limb injury. Amongst the remaining 328 subjects (study sample), the majority (78%) presented with monotrauma. In the study sample, injury to the head (52%) and spine (43%) was more frequent than injury to the chest (21%), pelvis (8%), and abdomen (5%). The three most frequent injury combinations were head/spine (10% of study sample), head/thorax (9%), and spine/thorax (6%). Fisher's exact test demonstrated an association for injury combinations of head/thorax (p < 0.001), head/abdomen (p = 0.019), and thorax/abdomen (p < 0.001). Conclusion The data presented and the findings from previous investigations indicate the need for development of dedicated on-slope triage protocols. Future research must address the validity and practicality of diagnostic on-slope tests for rapid decision making by both professional and lay first responders. Thus, large-scale and detailed injury surveillance is the future research priority. PMID:21521524

  7. Emergency Medical Text Classifier: New system improves processing and classification of triage notes

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Stephanie W.; Travers, Debbie; Waller, Anna; Mahalingam, Deepika; Crouch, John; Schwartz, Todd A.; Mostafa, Javed

    2014-01-01

    Objective Automated syndrome classification aims to aid near real-time syndromic surveillance to serve as an early warning system for disease outbreaks, using Emergency Department (ED) data. We present a system that improves the automatic classification of an ED record with triage note into one or more syndrome categories using the vector space model coupled with a ‘learning’ module that employs a pseudo-relevance feedback mechanism. Materials and Methods: Terms from standard syndrome definitions are used to construct an initial reference dictionary for generating the syndrome and triage note vectors. Based on cosine similarity between the vectors, each record is classified into a syndrome category. We then take terms from the top-ranked records that belong to the syndrome of interest as feedback. These terms are added to the reference dictionary and the process is repeated to determine the final classification. The system was tested on two different datasets for each of three syndromes: Gastro-Intestinal (GI), Respiratory (Resp) and Fever-Rash (FR). Performance was measured in terms of sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp). Results: The use of relevance feedback produced high values of sensitivity and specificity for all three syndromes in both test sets: GI: 90% and 71%, Resp: 97% and 73%, FR: 100% and 87%, respectively, in test set 1, and GI: 88% and 69%, Resp: 87% and 61%, FR: 97% and 71%, respectively, in test set 2. Conclusions: The new system for pre-processing and syndromic classification of ED records with triage notes achieved improvements in Se and Sp. Our results also demonstrate that the system can be tuned to achieve different levels of performance based on user requirements. PMID:25379126

  8. Mobile Health Systems that Optimize Resources in Emergency Response Situations

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Tammara; Gao, Tia

    2010-01-01

    During mass casualty incidents, a large number of patients need to be triaged accurately in order to save the maximum number of lives. Recently portable health systems have been developed that can gather patient’s vital signs and wireless transmit this information to a central location for analysis. This research introduces a methodology to improve triage in mass casualty incidents by combining statistical optimization techniques with mobile health systems to manage resources using evidence based data. We combine data collected during a field test with data of patient’s vital signs to simulate how mobile health systems can optimize resources in emergency response situations. PMID:21347029

  9. Triage of Patients Consulted for ICU Admission During Times of ICU-Bed Shortage

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Jose; Blaak, Christa; Yeh, Angela; Fonseca, Xavier; Helm, Tanya; Butala, Ashvin; Morante, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    Background The demand for specialized medical services such as critical care often exceeds availability, thus rationing of intensive care unit (ICU) beds commonly leads to difficult triage decisions. Many factors can play a role in the decision to admit a patient to the ICU, including severity of illness and the need for specific treatments limited to these units. Although triage decisions would be based solely on patient and institutional level factors, it is likely that intensivists make different decisions when there are fewer ICU beds available. The objective of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of patients referred for ICU admission during times of limited beds availability. Methods A single center, prospective, observational study was conducted among consecutive patients in whom an evaluation for ICU admission was requested during times of ICU overcrowding, which comprised the months of April and May 2014. Results A total of 95 patients were evaluated for possible ICU admission during the study period. Their mean APACHE-II score was 16.8 (median 16, range 3 - 36). Sixty-four patients (67.4%) were accepted to ICU, 18 patients (18.9%) were triaged to SDU, and 13 patients (13.7%) were admitted to hospital wards. ICU had no beds available 24 times (39.3%) during the study period, and in 39 opportunities (63.9%) only one bed was available. Twenty-four patients (25.3%) were evaluated when there were no available beds, and eight of those patients (33%) were admitted to ICU. A total of 17 patients (17.9%) died in the hospital, and 15 (23.4%) expired in ICU. Conclusion ICU beds are a scarce resource for which demand periodically exceeds supply, raising concerns about mechanisms for resource allocation during times of limited beds availability. At our institution, triage decisions were not related to the number of available beds in ICU, age, or gender. A linear correlation was observed between severity of illness, expressed by APACHE-II scores, and the likelihood of being admitted to ICU. Alternative locations outside the ICU in which care for critically ill patients could be delivered should be considered during times of extreme ICU-bed shortage. PMID:25247021

  10. Cytology Specimen Management, Triage and Standardized Reporting of Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsies of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Won Jae; Bishop Pitman, Martha

    2015-01-01

    The recent advances in pancreas cytology specimen sampling methods have enabled a specific cytologic diagnosis in most cases. Proper triage and processing of the cytologic specimen is pivotal in making a diagnosis due to the need for ancillary testing in addition to cytological evaluation, which is especially true in the diagnosis of pancreatic cysts. Newly proposed terminology for pancreaticobiliary cytology offers a standardized language for reporting that aims to improve communication among patient caregivers and provide for increased flexibility in patient management. This review focuses on these updates in pancreas cytology for the optimal evaluation of solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas. PMID:26265683

  11. Telephone Triage: A Timely Data Source for Surveillance of Influenza-like Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Jeremy U.; Hogan, William R.; Wagner, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated telephone triage (TT) data for public health early warning systems. TT data is electronically available and contains coded elements that include the demographics and description of a caller’s medical complaints. In the study, we obtained emergency room TT data and after hours TT data from a commercial TT software and service company. We compared the timeliness of the TT data with influenza surveillance data from the Centers for Disease Control using the cross correlation function. Emergency room TT calls are one to five weeks ahead of surveillance data collected by the CDC. PMID:14728165

  12. Cost-effectiveness evaluation of a home visiting triage program for family planning in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bertera, R L; Green, L W

    1979-09-01

    Graduate Turkish midwives were trained in triage rules for determining family planning home visit frequency based on risk of couples. In a sample of 542 couples followed for six months, modern contraceptive use increased 22 per cent among high-risk and about 15 per cent among moderate- and low-risk couples. After making assumptions about the fecundity, contraceptive success, and pregnancy complications, the estimated average cost per complication averted was $61 for high-risk, $177 for moderate-risk and $526 for low-risk couples. PMID:112875

  13. Perceptions of doctors and nurses at a Ugandan hospital regarding the introduction and use of the South African Triage Scale

    PubMed Central

    Blitz, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Background International Hospital Kampala (IHK) experienced a challenge with how to standardise the triaging and sorting of patients. There was no triage tool to help to prioritise which patients to attend to first, with very sick patient often being missed. Aim and setting To explore whether the introduction of the South African Triage Scale (SATS) was seen as valuable and sustainable by the IHK’s outpatient department and emergency unit (OPD and EU) staff. Methods The study used qualitative methods to introduce SATS in the OPD and EU at IHK and to obtain the perceptions of doctors and nurses who had used it for 3–6 months on its applicability and sustainability. Specific questions about challenges faced prior to its introduction, strengths and weaknesses of the triage tool, the impact it had on staff practices, and their recommendations on the continued use of the tool were asked. In-depth interviews were conducted with 4 doctors and 12 nurses. Results SATS was found to be necessary, applicable and recommended for use in the IHK setting. It improved the sorting of patients, as well as nurse-patient and nurse-doctor communication. The IHK OPD & EU staff attained new skills, with nurses becoming more involved in-patient care. It is possibly also useful in telephone triaging and planning of hospital staffing. Conclusion Adequate nurse staffing, a computer application for automated coding of patients, and regular training would encourage consistent use and sustainability of SATS. Setting up a hospital committee to review signs and symptoms would increase acceptability and sustainability. SATS is valuable in the IHK setting because it improved overall efficiency of triaging and care, with significantly more strengths than weaknesses.

  14. Effectiveness of Five-Level Emergency Severity Index Triage System Compared With Three-Level Spot Check: An Iranian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Mohammadreza; Fallah, Razieh; Riahi, Leila; Delavari, Sajad; Rezaei, Satar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Triage for patients’ prioritization in the emergency department is a suitable solution to decrease overcrowding. Different methods are used for prioritization that needs effectiveness evaluation. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the emergency severity index (ESI) 5-level triage system in contrast with spot check triage. Patients and Methods: Data for this quasi-experimental study were extracted using a form to review 770 records of patients referred to emergency department of Imam Khomeini hospital (in Sari, north of Iran) during two separated periods each for four months; the first from 20th March to 19th July 2010 and the other from 21 March to 20 July 2011. The method used in the first time was spot check triage and the second one ESI triage. Data were processed with descriptive statistics and analyzed using independent samples t-test (CI = 95%). Results: Increase from 6.46 to 8.92 minutes in the average time from patient arrival to being visited by a physician (P < 0.001) and increase in average time from physician visit to receive the first nursing care from 7.68 to 15.89 minutes were significant (P < 0.001). The average waiting time for laboratory services was significantly decreased from 112.3 to 84.1 (P = 0.033). Increase in the average waiting time for radiology, decrease in average waiting time for sonography, average length of stay in the emergency department, and number of patients per emergency bed were not significant. Conclusions: Between the two systems of triage, ESI was more effective than the spot check and in the spatial and temporal domain of research, was a successful method in improving some indicators of emergency and improving the performance indices. Hospital managers by implementation of ESI system can take a step toward new health policies and improve the processes as key tools of continuous quality improvement system. PMID:26848473

  15. The clinical value of HPV genotyping in triage of women with high-risk-HPV-positive self-samples.

    PubMed

    Ebisch, Renée M F; de Kuyper-de Ridder, Gabriëlle M; Bosgraaf, Remko P; Massuger, Leon F A G; IntHout, Joanna; Verhoef, Viola M J; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Snijders, Peter J F; Meijer, Chris J L M; van Kemenade, Folkert J; Bulten, Johan; Siebers, Albert G; Bekkers, Ruud L M; Melchers, Willem J G

    2016-08-01

    Cytology alone, or combined with HPV16/18 genotyping, might be an acceptable method for triage in hrHPV-cervical cancer screening. Previously studied HPV-genotype based triage algorithms are based on cytology performed without knowledge of hrHPV status. The aim of this study was to explore the value of hrHPV genotyping combined with cytology as triage tool for hrHPV-positive women. 520 hrHPV-positive women were included from a randomised controlled self-sampling trial on screening non-attendees (PROHTECT-3B). Eighteen baseline triage strategies were evaluated for cytology and hrHPV genotyping (Roche Cobas 4800) on physician-sampled triage material. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), referral rate, and number of referrals needed to diagnose (NRND) were calculated for CIN2+ and CIN3+. A triage strategy was considered acceptable if the NPV for CIN3+ was ≥98%, combined with maintenance or improvement of sensitivity and an increase in specificity in reference to the comparator, being cytology with a threshold of atypical cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US). Three triage strategies met the criteria: HPV16+ and/or ≥LSIL; HPV16+ and/or ≥HSIL; (HPV16+ and/or HPV18+) and/or ≥HSIL. Combining HPV16+ and/or ≥HSIL yielded the highest specificity (74.9%, 95% CI 70.5-78.9), with a sensitivity (94.4%, 95% CI 89.0-97.7) similar to the comparator (93.5%, 95% CI 87.7-97.1), and a decrease in referral rate from 52.2% to 39.5%. In case of prior knowledge of hrHPV presence, triage by cytology testing can be improved by adjusting its threshold, and combining it with HPV16/18 genotyping. These strategies improve the referral rate and specificity for detecting CIN3+ lesions, while maintaining adequate sensitivity. PMID:26991464

  16. The association between demographic factors, user reported experiences and user satisfaction: results from three casualty clinics in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background User reported experiences and satisfaction are increasingly used as basis for quality indicators in the health sector. However, there is limited understanding of factors associated with user reported experiences and satisfaction with casualty clinics. Methods A random sample of 542 patients that had contacted any of three casualty clinics from mid April to mid May 2008 was mailed a questionnaire. A reminder was sent to non-respondents after six weeks. Descriptive statistics for four user reported experiences scales and 20 single items are presented. Multivariate regression analysis was used to assess associations between background variables and user reported experiences, and between user reported experiences and user satisfaction. Results 225 (41.5%) patients, carers and guardians returned a completed questionnaire. Users reported most positive experiences with the doctor services and the nursing services at the casualty clinics; on a scale from 0 to 100, where 100 is the best possible experience the doctor scale was 82 and the nursing scale 81. Users reported least positive experiences with the organization of the casualty clinic, with a scale score of 65. Self perceived health was associated with user satisfaction, while self perceived health and age were associated with user reported experiences with organization of the clinics. A range of user reported experience domains were related to user satisfaction, after controlling for socio-demographic variables, including experiences with doctor services at the clinics, organization of the clinics, information and self perceived incorrect treatment. Conclusions Users report positive experiences with the three casualty clinics, with organization as the aspect with largest improvement potential. The importance of age and health status for users' experiences and satisfaction with casualty clinics was shown, but a range of user reported experiences with the clinics were the most important predictors for user satisfaction. PMID:20925930

  17. The influence of car registration year on driver casualty rates in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Jeremy

    2012-03-01

    A previous paper analysed data from the British national road accident reporting system to investigate the influence upon car driver casualty rates of the general type of car being driven and its year of first registration. A statistical model was fitted to accident data from 2001 to 2005, and this paper updates the principal results using accident data from 2003 to 2007. Attention focuses upon the role of year of first registration since this allows the influence of developments in car design upon occupant casualty numbers to be evaluated. Three additional topics are also examined with these accident data. Changes over time in frontal and side impacts are compared. Changes in the combined risk for the two drivers involved in a car-car collision are investigated, being the net result of changes in secondary safety and aggressivity. Finally, the results of the new model relating to occupant protection are related to an index that had been developed previously to analyse changes over time in the secondary safety of the car fleet. PMID:22269528

  18. Using the Design for Demise Philosophy to Reduce Casualty Risk Due to Reentering Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Recently the reentry of a number of vehicles has garnered public attention due to their risk of human casualty due to fragments surviving reentry. In order to minimize this risk for their vehicles, a number of NASA programs have actively sought to minimize the number of components likely to survive reentry at the end of their spacecraft's life in order to meet and/or exceed NASA safety standards for controlled and uncontrolled reentering vehicles. This philosophy, referred to as "Design for Demise" or D4D, has steadily been adopted, to at least some degree, by numerous programs. The result is that many programs are requesting evaluations of components at the early stages of vehicle design, as they strive to find ways to reduce the number surviving components while ensuring that the components meet the performance requirements of their mission. This paper will discuss some of the methods that have been employed to ensure that the consequences of the vehicle s end-of-life are considered at the beginning of the design process. In addition this paper will discuss the technical challenges overcome, as well as some of the more creative solutions which have been utilized to reduce casualty risk.

  19. The essential roles of chemistry in high-throughput screening triage.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Walters, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    It is increasingly clear that academic high-throughput screening (HTS) and virtual HTS triage suffers from a lack of scientists trained in the art and science of early drug discovery chemistry. Many recent publications report the discovery of compounds by screening that are most likely artifacts or promiscuous bioactive compounds, and these results are not placed into the context of previous studies. For HTS to be most successful, it is our contention that there must exist an early partnership between biologists and medicinal chemists. Their combined skill sets are necessary to design robust assays and efficient workflows that will weed out assay artifacts, false positives, promiscuous bioactive compounds and intractable screening hits, efforts that ultimately give projects a better chance at identifying truly useful chemical matter. Expertise in medicinal chemistry, cheminformatics and purification sciences (analytical chemistry) can enhance the post-HTS triage process by quickly removing these problematic chemotypes from consideration, while simultaneously prioritizing the more promising chemical matter for follow-up testing. It is only when biologists and chemists collaborate effectively that HTS can manifest its full promise. PMID:25163000

  20. Urine levels of drugs for which Triage DOA screening was positive.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Fumio

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between urine levels of target drugs of abuse for which Triage DOA gave positive results, as well as the cut-off levels for these drugs. Thirty-eight forensic urine samples positive for commonly abused drugs were involved. Of these samples, 12 were positive for barbiturates (BAR), 11 for benzodiazepines (BZO), 8 for opiates (OPI), 7 for amphetamines (AMP), and 4 for tricyclic antidepressants (TCA). In the BAR-positive urine samples, phenobarbital, amobarbital or barbital was detected at concentrations higher than cut-off levels. In the BZO-positive samples, diazepam, nordiazepam, triazolam, nitrazepam and/or midazolam was detected at concentrations lower than cut-off levels; in the triazolam-involved urine, alpha-hydroxytriazolam, a metabolite of triazolam, showed concentrations higher than cut-off level. In the AMP-positive samples, methamphetamine was detected at concentrations higher than cut-off level. Urine samples positive for OPI contained total dihydrocodeine, codeine or morphine at concentrations higher than cut-off levels. In TCA-positive samples, amitriptyline was detected at concentrations higher or lower than cut-off level, and clomipramine was detected at a concentration much lower than cut-off level. Metabolites of BZO and TCA, which are not typically analyzed by instrumental procedures, may cross-react to varying degrees with the antibodies used for Triage DOA. PMID:19261513

  1. The essential roles of chemistry in high-throughput screening triage

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Walters, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that academic high-throughput screening (HTS) and virtual HTS triage suffers from a lack of scientists trained in the art and science of early drug discovery chemistry. Many recent publications report the discovery of compounds by screening that are most likely artifacts or promiscuous bioactive compounds, and these results are not placed into the context of previous studies. For HTS to be most successful, it is our contention that there must exist an early partnership between biologists and medicinal chemists. Their combined skill sets are necessary to design robust assays and efficient workflows that will weed out assay artifacts, false positives, promiscuous bioactive compounds and intractable screening hits, efforts that ultimately give projects a better chance at identifying truly useful chemical matter. Expertise in medicinal chemistry, cheminformatics and purification sciences (analytical chemistry) can enhance the post-HTS triage process by quickly removing these problematic chemotypes from consideration, while simultaneously prioritizing the more promising chemical matter for follow-up testing. It is only when biologists and chemists collaborate effectively that HTS can manifest its full promise. PMID:25163000

  2. Instruments to assess patient satisfaction after teleconsultation and triage: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Allemann Iseli, Martina; Kunz, Regina; Blozik, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is crucial for the acceptance, use, and adherence to recommendations from teleconsultations regarding health care requests and triage services. Objectives Our objectives are to systematically review the literature for multidimensional instruments that measure patient satisfaction after teleconsultation and triage and to compare these for content, reliability, validity, and factor analysis. Methods We searched Medline, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO for literature on these instruments. Two reviewers independently screened all obtained references for eligibility and extracted data from the eligible articles. The results were presented using summary tables. Results We included 31 publications, describing 16 instruments in our review. The reporting on test development and psychometric characteristics was incomplete. The development process, described by ten of 16 instruments, included a review of the literature (n=7), patient or stakeholder interviews (n=5), and expert consultations (n=3). Four instruments evaluated factor structure, reliability, and validity; two of those four demonstrated low levels of reliability for some of their subscales. Conclusion A majority of instruments on patient satisfaction after teleconsultation showed methodological limitations and lack rigorous evaluation. Users should carefully reflect on the content of the questionnaires and their relevance to the application. Future research should apply more rigorously established scientific standards for instrument development and psychometric evaluation. PMID:25028538

  3. Triage management, survival, and the law in the age of Ebola.

    PubMed

    Burkle, Frederick M; Burkle, Christopher M

    2015-02-01

    Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea lack the public health infrastructure, economic stability, and overall governance to stem the spread of Ebola. Even with robust outside assistance, the epidemiological data have not improved. Vital resource management is haphazard and left to the discretion of individual Ebola treatment units. Only recently has the International Health Regulations (IHR) and World Health Organization (WHO) declared Ebola a Public Health Emergency of International Concern, making this crisis their fifth ongoing level 3 emergency. In particular, the WHO has been severely compromised by post-2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) staffing, budget cuts, a weakened IHR treaty, and no unambiguous legal mandate. Population-based triage management under a central authority is indicated to control the transmission and ensure fair and decisive resource allocation across all triage categories. The shared responsibilities critical to global health solutions must be realized and the rightful attention, sustained resources, and properly placed legal authority be assured within the WHO, the IHR, and the vulnerable nations. PMID:25343493

  4. Assessing the applicability of FISH-based prematurely condensed dicentric chromosome assay in triage biodosimetry.

    PubMed

    Suto, Yumiko; Gotoh, Takaya; Noda, Takashi; Akiyama, Miho; Owaki, Makiko; Darroudi, Firouz; Hirai, Momoki

    2015-03-01

    The dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) has been regarded as the gold standard of radiation biodosimetry. The assay, however, requires a 2-d peripheral blood lymphocyte culture before starting metaphase chromosome analyses to estimate biological doses. Other biological assays also have drawbacks with respect to the time needed to obtain dose estimates for rapid decision on the correct line of medical treatment. Therefore, alternative technologies that suit requirements for triage biodosimetry are needed. Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in G0 lymphocytes can be detected as interphase chromosome aberrations by the cell fusion-mediated premature chromosome condensation (PCC) method. The method, in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques, has been proposed in early studies as a powerful tool for obtaining biological dose estimates without 2-d lymphocyte culture procedures. The present work assesses the applicability of FISH-based PCC techniques using pan-centromeric and telomeric peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes in triage mode biodosimetry and demonstrates that an improved rapid procedure of the prematurely condensed dicentric chromosome (PCDC) assay has the potential for evaluating exposed radiation doses in as short as 6 h after the collection of peripheral blood specimens. PMID:25627950

  5. Multi-sources data fusion framework for remote triage prioritization in telehealth.

    PubMed

    Salman, O H; Rasid, M F A; Saripan, M I; Subramaniam, S K

    2014-09-01

    The healthcare industry is streamlining processes to offer more timely and effective services to all patients. Computerized software algorithm and smart devices can streamline the relation between users and doctors by providing more services inside the healthcare telemonitoring systems. This paper proposes a multi-sources framework to support advanced healthcare applications. The proposed framework named Multi Sources Healthcare Architecture (MSHA) considers multi-sources: sensors (ECG, SpO2 and Blood Pressure) and text-based inputs from wireless and pervasive devices of Wireless Body Area Network. The proposed framework is used to improve the healthcare scalability efficiency by enhancing the remote triaging and remote prioritization processes for the patients. The proposed framework is also used to provide intelligent services over telemonitoring healthcare services systems by using data fusion method and prioritization technique. As telemonitoring system consists of three tiers (Sensors/ sources, Base station and Server), the simulation of the MSHA algorithm in the base station is demonstrated in this paper. The achievement of a high level of accuracy in the prioritization and triaging patients remotely, is set to be our main goal. Meanwhile, the role of multi sources data fusion in the telemonitoring healthcare services systems has been demonstrated. In addition to that, we discuss how the proposed framework can be applied in a healthcare telemonitoring scenario. Simulation results, for different symptoms relate to different emergency levels of heart chronic diseases, demonstrate the superiority of our algorithm compared with conventional algorithms in terms of classify and prioritize the patients remotely. PMID:25047520

  6. Detector photon response and absorbed dose and their applications to rapid triage techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Shannon Prentice

    As radiation specialists, one of our primary objectives in the Navy is protecting people and the environment from the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Focusing on radiological dispersal devices (RDD) will provide increased personnel protection as well as optimize emergency response assets for the general public. An attack involving an RDD has been of particular concern because it is intended to spread contamination over a wide area and cause massive panic within the general population. A rapid method of triage will be necessary to segregate the unexposed and slightly exposed from those needing immediate medical treatment. Because of the aerosol dispersal of the radioactive material, inhalation of the radioactive material may be the primary exposure route. The primary radionuclides likely to be used in a RDD attack are Co-60, Cs-137, Ir-192, Sr-90 and Am-241. Through the use of a MAX phantom along with a few Simulink MATLAB programs, a good anthropomorphic phantom was created for use in MCNPX simulations that would provide organ doses from internally deposited radionuclides. Ludlum model 44-9 and 44-2 detectors were used to verify the simulated dose from the MCNPX code. Based on the results, acute dose rate limits were developed for emergency response personnel that would assist in patient triage.

  7. After-Hours Telephone Coverage: The Application of an Area-Wide Telephone Triage and Advice System for Pediatric Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Steven R.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examines data from four years of operation of a program to manage after-hours pediatrics calls using specially trained pediatric nurses with standardized protocols to provide triage and advice. Found that over 100,000 calls had been successfully managed without adverse clinical outcomes. Satisfaction among subscribing pediatricians was 100%, and…

  8. Improving Medical Residents' Attitudes toward HIV-Infected Persons through Training in an HIV Staging and Triage Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlander, Jay D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study assessed the effectiveness of a weekly outpatient clinic for staging and triage of newly identified human-immunodeficiency-virus (HIV)-infected patients on 21 medical residents' attitudes and knowledge regarding HIV patient care, as compared with 20 control students. Results indicated that the experience positively affected student…

  9. An Intervention to Improve the Comfort And Satisfaction of Nurses in the Telephone Triage of Child Maltreatment Calls.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Nurses are mandated reporters of actual or suspected child maltreatment or the threat thereof. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to determine the knowledge and comfort of nurses in telephone triage in pediatric clinics when dealing with suspected or actual child abuse calls. Nurses (N = 17) from three pediatric primary care clinics and one specialty care orthopedic clinic were surveyed. Based on results of the survey showing a lack of knowledge and adequate referral resources perceived by the nursing staff, resources and staff education were developed, along with a script for guiding maltreatment calls toward standardization of care. Following the intervention, nurses reported an increased comfort level when doing telephone triage for child maltreatment calls, an increase in knowledge of risk factors for county resources. Further, they reported a substantial shift in opinion about the need for a standardized script when responding to child maltreatment telephone calls. Nurses undertaking telephone triage of high-risk child maltreatment calls can improve their comfort and knowledge through a survey of their needs and directed education and resource development for the management of child maltreatment telephone triage. PMID:26837100

  10. Spatial-temporal patterns in Mediterranean carnivore road casualties: Consequences for mitigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grilo, C.; Bissonette, J.A.; Santos-Reis, M.

    2009-01-01

    Many carnivores have been seriously impacted by the expansion of transportation systems and networks; however we know little about carnivore response to the extent and magnitude of road mortality, or which age classes may be disproportionately impacted. Recent research has demonstrated that wildlife-vehicle-collisions (WVC) involving carnivores are modulated by temporal and spatial factors. Thus, we investigated road mortality on a guild of small and medium-sized carnivores in southern Portugal using road-kill data obtained from a systematic 36 months monitoring period along highways (260 km) and national roads (314 km) by addressing the following questions: (a) which species and age class are most vulnerable to WVC? (b) are there temporal and/or spatial patterns in road-kill? and (c) which life-history and/or spatial factors influence the likelihood of collisions? We recorded a total of 806 carnivore casualties, which represented an average of 47 ind./100 km/year. Red fox and stone marten had the highest mortality rates. Our findings highlight three key messages: (1) the majority of road-killed individuals were adults of common species; (2) all carnivores, except genets, were more vulnerable during specific life-history phenological periods: higher casualties were observed when red fox and stone marten were provisioning young, Eurasian badger casualties occurred more frequently during dispersal, and higher Egyptian mongoose mortality occurred during the breeding period; and (3) modeling demonstrated that favorable habitat, curves in the road, and low human disturbance were major contributors to the deadliest road segments. Red fox carcasses were more likely to be found on road sections with passages distant from urban areas. Conversely, stone marten mortalities were found more often on national roads with high of cork oak woodland cover; Egyptian mongoose and genet road-kills were found more often on road segments close to curves. Based on our results, two key mitigation measures should help to reduce WVC in Portugal. The first involves the improvement of existing crossings with buried and small mesh size fence to guide the individuals towards to the passages, in road segments with high traffic volume (>1200 vehicles/night) and located in preferred carnivore habitats. The second mitigation involves cutting or removal of dense vegetation in verges of road segments with curves to aid motorists in seeing animals about to cross. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 420 - Impact Dispersion Areas and Casualty Expectancy Estimate for an Unguided Suborbital Launch Vehicle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... exclusion zone and impact dispersion areas, and how to evaluate whether the public risk presented by the... appendix also provides a method for performing an impact risk analysis that estimates the expected casualty... risk analysis in accordance with paragraph (e). (e) Impact Risk Analysis (1) An applicant...

  12. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 420 - Impact Dispersion Areas and Casualty Expectancy Estimate for an Unguided Suborbital Launch Vehicle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... exclusion zone and impact dispersion areas, and how to evaluate whether the public risk presented by the... appendix also provides a method for performing an impact risk analysis that estimates the expected casualty... risk analysis in accordance with paragraph (e). (e) Impact Risk Analysis (1) An applicant...

  13. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 420 - Impact Dispersion Areas and Casualty Expectancy Estimate for an Unguided Suborbital Launch Vehicle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... exclusion zone and impact dispersion areas, and how to evaluate whether the public risk presented by the... appendix also provides a method for performing an impact risk analysis that estimates the expected casualty... risk analysis in accordance with paragraph (e). (e) Impact Risk Analysis (1) An applicant...

  14. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 420 - Impact Dispersion Areas and Casualty Expectancy Estimate for an Unguided Suborbital Launch Vehicle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... exclusion zone and impact dispersion areas, and how to evaluate whether the public risk presented by the... appendix also provides a method for performing an impact risk analysis that estimates the expected casualty... risk analysis in accordance with paragraph (e). (e) Impact Risk Analysis (1) An applicant...

  15. 33 CFR 150.820 - When must a written report of casualty be submitted, and what must it contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must also include the information relating to alcohol and drug involvement specified by 46 CFR 4.05-12... CFR part 16. (c) If filed immediately after the event, the written report required by paragraph (a) of... casualty be submitted, and what must it contain? 150.820 Section 150.820 Navigation and Navigable...

  16. Daily variation in natural disaster casualties: information flows, safety, and opportunity costs in tornado versus hurricane strikes.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Sammy; Tavani, Daniele; Weiler, Stephan

    2013-07-01

    Casualties from natural disasters may depend on the day of the week they strike. With data from the Spatial Hazard Events and Losses Database for the United States (SHELDUS), daily variation in hurricane and tornado casualties from 5,043 tornado and 2,455 hurricane time/place events is analyzed. Hurricane forecasts provide at-risk populations with considerable lead time. Such lead time allows strategic behavior in choosing protective measures under hurricane threat; opportunity costs in terms of lost income are higher during weekdays than during weekends. On the other hand, the lead time provided by tornadoes is near zero; hence tornados generate no opportunity costs. Tornado casualties are related to risk information flows, which are higher during workdays than during leisure periods, and are related to sheltering-in-place opportunities, which are better in permanent buildings like businesses and schools. Consistent with theoretical expectations, random effects negative binomial regression results indicate that tornado events occurring on the workdays of Monday through Thursday are significantly less lethal than tornados that occur on weekends. In direct contrast, and also consistent with theory, the expected count of hurricane casualties increases significantly with weekday occurrences. The policy implications of observed daily variation in tornado and hurricane events are considered. PMID:23126406

  17. Perceptions of crisis care in populations who self-referred to a telephone-based mental health triage service.

    PubMed

    Sands, Natisha; Elsom, Stephen; Keppich-Arnold, Sandra; Henderson, Kathryn; Thomas, Phillipa A

    2016-03-01

    Although psychiatric crises are very common in people with mental illness, little is known about consumer perceptions of mental health crisis care. Given the current emphasis on recovery-oriented approaches, shared decision-making, and partnering with consumers in planning and delivering care, this knowledge gap is significant. Since the late 1990s, access to Australian mental health services has been facilitated by 24/7 telephone-based mental health triage systems, which provide initial psychiatric assessment, referral, support, and advice. A significant proportion of consumers access telephone-based mental health triage services in a state of crisis, but to date, there has been no published studies that specifically report on consumer perceptions on the quality and effectiveness of the care provided by these services. This article reports on a study that investigated consumer perceptions of accessing telephone-based mental health triage services. Seventy-five mental health consumers participated in a telephone interview about their triage service use experience. An eight-item survey designed to measure the responsiveness of mental health services was used for data collection. The findings reported here focus on the qualitative data produced in the study. Consumer participants shared a range of perspectives on telephone-based mental health triage that provide invaluable insights into the needs, expectations, and service use experiences of consumers seeking assistance with a mental health problem. Consumer perceptions of crisis care have important implications for practice. Approaches and interventions identified as important to quality care can be used to inform educational and practice initiatives that promote person-centred, collaborative crisis care. PMID:26733103

  18. Application of a triage approach to peripheral bone densitometry reduces the requirement for central DXA but is not cost effective.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Elizabeth J; Adams, Judith E

    2006-10-01

    A method proffered for the interpretation of measurements from peripheral dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (pDXA) is a triage approach to stratify patients into one of three risk categories; (i) high-treat, (ii) medium-refer for central DXA and (iii) low-reassure. The aim of this study was to apply the triage approach to measures from peripheral scanners and risk indices and stratify patients into one of three risk categories (i), (ii) or (iii). 207 post-menopausal women had central DXA from which they were categorised as non-osteoporotic or osteoporotic. Additional peripheral scans of the left calcaneus were performed on three scanners (GE Lunar Achilles and PIXI, McCue CubaClinical). From demographic details four risk indices were calculated and algorithms combining measures from peripheral scanners and one risk index were obtained. All peripheral measures, risk indices and combination algorithms were good at identifying women at risk of osteoporosis (ROC areas: 0.67-0.82). Each tool stratified varying numbers of osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic women into each risk category using the triage approach. One combination algorithm (PIXI & osteoporosis indices of risk (OSIRIS)) performed best by minimising misclassification (10% non-osteoporotic, 10% osteoporotic) and reducing requirement for central DXA to 36%. However the cost of implementing the triage approach for PIXI & OSIRIS was greater (263%) than central DXA (100%) scanning all women. Although the triage approach was an effective tool at identifying women at risk of osteoporosis the unnecessary treatment of non-osteoporotic women in the high risk category make it impractical. Therefore an alternative more cost-effective method has been suggested. PMID:16969598

  19. Biopsychosocial predictors of short-term success among people with low back pain referred to a physiotherapy spinal triage service

    PubMed Central

    Bath, Brenna; Lovo Grona, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Background A spinal triage assessment service may impact a wide range of patient outcomes. Investigating potential predictors of success or improvement may reveal why some people improve and some do not, as well as help to begin to explain potential mechanisms for improvements. The objective of this study was to determine which factors were associated with improved short-term self-reported pain, function, general health status, and satisfaction in people undergoing a spinal triage assessment performed by physiotherapists. Methods Participants with low back-related complaints were recruited from people referred to a spinal triage assessment program (N=115). Participants completed baseline questionnaires covering a range of sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological features. Self-reported measures of pain, function, quality of life, and satisfaction were completed at 4 weeks following the assessment. Determination of success was based on minimal important change scores of select outcome measures. Multivariate logistic regression was used to explore potential predictors of success for each outcome. Results Despite the complex and chronic presentation of most participants, some reported improvements in outcomes at 4 weeks post assessment with the highest proportion of participants demonstrating improvement (according to the minimal important change scores) in the Medical Outcomes Survey 36-item short-form version 2 physical component summary score (48.6%) and the lowest proportion of participants having improvements in the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (11.5%). A variety of different sociodemographic, psychological, clinical, and other variables were associated with success or improvement in each respective outcome. Conclusion There may be a potential mechanism of reassurance that occurs during the spinal triage assessment process as those with higher psychological distress (measured by the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire and the Distress and Risk Assessment Measure) were more likely to improve on certain outcomes. The use of an evaluation framework guided by a biopsychosocial model may help determine potential mechanisms of action for a physiotherapy-delivered triage program. PMID:25960675

  20. The effect of nurses’ preparedness and nurse practitioner status on triage call management in primary care: A secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from the ESTEEM trial

    PubMed Central

    Varley, Anna; Warren, Fiona C.; Richards, Suzanne H.; Calitri, Raff; Chaplin, Katherine; Fletcher, Emily; Holt, Tim A.; Lattimer, Valerie; Murdoch, Jamie; Richards, David A.; Campbell, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Nurse-led telephone triage is increasingly used to manage demand for general practitioner consultations in UK general practice. Previous studies are equivocal about the relationship between clinical experience and the call outcomes of nurse triage. Most research is limited to investigating nurse telephone triage in out-of-hours settings. Objective To investigate whether the professional characteristics of primary care nurses undertaking computer decision supported software telephone triage are related to call disposition. Design Questionnaire survey of nurses delivering the nurse intervention arm of the ESTEEM trial, to capture role type (practice nurse or nurse practitioner), prescriber status, number of years’ nursing experience, graduate status, previous experience of triage, and perceived preparedness for triage. Our main outcome was the proportion of triaged patients recommended for follow-up within the practice (call disposition), including all contact types (face-to-face, telephone or home visit), by a general practitioner or nurse. Settings 15 general practices and 7012 patients receiving the nurse triage intervention in four regions of the UK. Participants 45 nurse practitioners and practice nurse trained in the use of clinical decision support software. Methods We investigated the associations between nursing characteristics and triage call disposition for patient ‘same-day’ appointment requests in general practice using multivariable logistic regression modelling. Results Valid responses from 35 nurses (78%) from 14 practices: 31/35 (89%) had ≥10 years’ experience with 24/35 (69%) having ≥20 years. Most patient contacts (3842/4605; 86%) were recommended for follow-up within the practice. Nurse practitioners were less likely to recommend patients for follow-up odds ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.07; 0.49 than practice nurses. Nurses who reported that their previous experience had prepared them less well for triage were more likely to recommend patients for follow-up (OR 3.17, 95% CI 1.18–5.55). Conclusion Nurse characteristics were associated with disposition of triage calls to within practice follow-up. Nurse practitioners or those who reported feeling ‘more prepared’ for the role were more likely to manage the call definitively. Practices considering nurse triage should ensure that nurses transitioning into new roles feel adequately prepared. While standardised training is necessary, it may not be sufficient to ensure successful implementation. PMID:27087294

  1. Dentistry and Mass Disaster – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sakthi, D Sri

    2014-01-01

    Mass disaster situations may arise from natural or manmade circumstances like bioterrorism and dentists or dental responders have significant roles in human identification, following such occurrences. The various roles of dentists in mass disaster management, that include bio surveillance and notification, diagnosis and monitoring, triage, referrals of patients, immunizations, decontamination and infection control would be considered. The varying extents of use of forensic dental techniques and the resulting positive impacts made on human identification will also be included. The importance of preparation by way of special training for the dental personnel, mass disaster rehearsal, and use of modern day technology will be stressed on. PMID:25177658

  2. Pedestrian Injury Patterns According to Car and Casualty Characteristics in France

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jean-Louis; Lardy, Audrey; Laumon, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the injury patterns of pedestrians involved in collisions with cars, compares them with other road casualties and estimates the possible effect of car front profile on injury location. Injury patterns were identified using the Rhône Road Trauma Registry which covers all the casualties resulting from crashes in the Rhône Département (1.6 million inhabitants) who seek medical care in health facilities. Fatality rates were estimated from national police reports for the same years (1996–2007), and the two data sources were linked to obtain information on the front profile of the striking car. As with all groups of road users, most of the pedestrians involved in car crashes were young. However elderly people were overrepresented when the size of the exposed population was taken into account. The most frequently injured body regions were the lower extremities (50% of victims), the head/face/neck (38%) and the upper extremities (27%). Pelvic injuries were much more common for women. The most severe injuries (AIS4+) were mostly to the head and thorax, for all groups of road users. However, pedestrians sustained twice as many head injuries as thoracic injuries. When the front profiles were grouped together according to the most common car types in Europe, the risk of being killed was higher for MPVs. More specifically, the risk of sustaining an AIS2+ thoracic injury was higher in a collision with an MPV. Our study confirms that it is quite justified for the tests based on European Enhanced Vehicle-Safety Committee guidelines to be focused on the head and the lower extremities. However, no test procedure exists for thoracic injuries, which is the body region with the second highest number of severe or fatal injuries. PMID:22105391

  3. Casualty Insurance Pure Premium Estimation Using Two-Stage Regression Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Kumiko; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    We study a regression tree algorithm tailored to casualty insurance pure premium estimation problems. Casualty insurance premium is mainly determined by the expected amount that the insurance companies have to pay for the contract. Therefore, casualy insurance companies have to estimate the expected insurance amount on the basis of insurance risk factors. This problem is formulated as a regression problem, i.e. estimation of conditional mean E[Y|x], where Y is insurance amounts and x is risk factors. In this paper, we aim to implement the regression problem in regression tree framework. The difficulty of the problem lies in the fact that the distribution of insurance amount P(Y|x) is highly skewed and exhibits a long-tail toward positive direction. Conventional least-square-error regression tree algorithm is notoriously unstable under such long-tailed error distribution. On the other hand, several types of robust regression trees, such as least-absolute-error regression tree, are neither appropriate in this situation because they yields significant bias to conditional mean E[Y|x]. In this paper, we propose a two-stage tree fitting algorithm. In the first stage, the algorithm constructs a quantile tree, a kind of robust regression tree, which is stable but biased to conditional mean E[Y|x]. In the second stage, the algorithm corrects the bias using least-square error regression tree. We discuss the theoretical background of the algorithm and empirically investigate the performances. We applied the proposed algorithm to a car insurance data set of 318,564 records provided from a north-american insurance company and obtained significantly better results than conventional regression tree algorithm.

  4. Combat casualties undergoing lifesaving interventions have decreased heart-rate complexity at multiple time scales

    PubMed Central

    Cancio, Leopoldo C.; Batchinsky, Andriy I.; Baker, William L.; Necsoiu, Corina; Salinas, José; Goldberger, Ary L.; Costa, Madalena D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We found that heart-rate (HR) complexity metrics, such as sample entropy (SampEn), identified trauma patients receiving lifesaving interventions (LSIs). We now aimed: 1) to test a new multiscale entropy (MSE) index; 2) to compare it to single-scale measures including SampEn; and 3) to assess different parameter values for calculation of SampEn and MSE. Methods This was a study of combat casualties in an Emergency Department (ED) in Iraq. ECGs of 70 acutely injured adults were recorded. Twelve underwent LSIs and 58 did not. LSIs included endotracheal intubation (9); tube thoracostomy (9); and emergency transfusion (4). From each ECG, a segment of 800 consecutive beats was selected. Off-line, R waves were detected and R-to-R (RR) interval time series were generated. SampEn, MSE, and time-domain measures of HR variability (mean HR, standard deviation, pNN20, pNN50, rMSSD) were computed. Results Differences in mean HR (LSI=111±33, NonLSI=90±17) were not significant. Systolic arterial pressure was statistically but not clinically different (LSI=123±19, NonLSI=135±19). SampEn (LSI=0.90±0.42, NonLSI=1.19±0.35, p<0.05) and MSE index (LSI = 2.58±2.55, NonLSI=5.67±2.48, p<0.001) differed significantly. Conclusions Complexity of HR dynamics over a range of time scales was lower in high-risk than in low-risk combat casualties and outperformed traditional vital signs. PMID:24140167

  5. Bilinear common spatial pattern for single-trial ERP-based rapid serial visual presentation triage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, K.; Shen, K.; Shao, S.; Ng, W. C.; Li, X.

    2012-08-01

    Common spatial pattern (CSP) analysis is a useful tool for the feature extraction of event-related potentials (ERP). However, CSP is essentially time invariant, and thus unable to exploit the temporal information of ERP. This paper proposes a variant of CSP, namely bilinear common spatial pattern (BCSP), which is capable of accommodating both spatial and temporal information. BCSP generalizes CSP through iteratively optimizing bilinear filters. These bilinear filters constitute a spatio-temporal subspace in which the separation between two conditions is maximized. The method is unique in the sense that it is mathematically intuitive and simple, as all the bilinear filters are obtained by maximizing the power ratio as CSP does. The proposed method was evaluated on 20 subjects’ ERP data collected in rapid serial visual presentation triage experiments. The results show that BCSP achieved significantly higher average test accuracy (12.3% higher, p < 0.001).

  6. DESIGN AND PRELIMINARY VALIDATION OF A RAPID AUTOMATED BIODOSIMETRY TOOL FOR HIGH THROUGPUT RADIOLOGICAL TRIAGE.

    PubMed

    Chen, Youhua; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Hongliang; Garty, Guy; Xu, Yanping; Lyulko, Oleksandra V; Turner, Helen C; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Simaan, Nabil; Yao, Y Lawrence; Brenner, D J

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents design, hardware, software, and parameter optimization for a novel robotic automation system. RABiT is a Rapid Automated Biodosimetry Tool for high throughput radiological triage. The design considerations guiding the hardware and software architecture are presented with focus on methods of communication, ease of implementation, and need for real-time control versus soft time control cycles. The design and parameter determination for a non-contact PVC capillary laser cutting system is presented. A novel approach for lymphocyte concentration estimation based on computer vision is reported. Experimental evaluations of the system components validate the success of our prototype system in achieving a throughput of 6,000 samples in a period of 18 hours. PMID:21258614

  7. Rapid Analytical Methods for On-Site Triage for Traumatic Brain Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Stella H.; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Taitt, Chris R.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2012-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results from an event that causes rapid acceleration and deceleration of the brain or penetration of the skull with an object. Responses to stimuli and questions, loss of consciousness, and altered behavior are symptoms currently used to justify brain imaging for diagnosis and therapeutic guidance. Tests based on such symptoms are susceptible to false-positive and false-negative results due to stress, fatigue, and medications. Biochemical markers of neuronal damage and the physiological response to that damage are being identified. Biosensors capable of rapid measurement of such markers in the circulation offer a solution for on-site triage, as long as three criteria are met: (a) Recognition reagents can be identified that are sufficiently sensitive and specific, (b) the biosensor can provide quantitative assessment of multiple markers rapidly and simultaneously, and (c) both the sensor and reagents are designed for use outside the laboratory.

  8. Ultrasound: the triage tool in the emergency department: using ultrasound first.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Refky; Dogra, Vikram

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound in the emergency department has long been recognized as a powerful screening and diagnostic tool for both physicians and radiologists. In the emergency department, since time is of the essence, it becomes a critical tool in triaging patients. Over the years, ultrasound has gained several advantages over other modalities because of its non-ionizing radiation, portability, accessibility, non-invasive method and simpler learning curve. As a result, ultrasound has become one of the most frequently used diagnostic tools in the emergency department by non-radiologists. The value of ultrasound is implemented in every acute ailment in the emergency department such as trauma, acute abdomen, acute pelvic pain, acute scrotal pain, appendicitis in children and acute deep venous thrombosis. Our objective is to discuss the benefit of using ultrasound as the primary modality for each of these diseases. PMID:26568440

  9. DESIGN AND PRELIMINARY VALIDATION OF A RAPID AUTOMATED BIODOSIMETRY TOOL FOR HIGH THROUGPUT RADIOLOGICAL TRIAGE

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Youhua; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Hongliang; Garty, Guy; Xu, Yanping; Lyulko, Oleksandra V.; Turner, Helen C.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Simaan, Nabil; Yao, Y. Lawrence; Brenner, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents design, hardware, software, and parameter optimization for a novel robotic automation system. RABiT is a Rapid Automated Biodosimetry Tool for high throughput radiological triage. The design considerations guiding the hardware and software architecture are presented with focus on methods of communication, ease of implementation, and need for real-time control versus soft time control cycles. The design and parameter determination for a non-contact PVC capillary laser cutting system is presented. A novel approach for lymphocyte concentration estimation based on computer vision is reported. Experimental evaluations of the system components validate the success of our prototype system in achieving a throughput of 6,000 samples in a period of 18 hours. PMID:21258614

  10. Informed Cytology for Triaging HPV-Positive Women: Substudy Nested in the NTCC Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Christine; Giorgi-Rossi, Paolo; Cas, Frederic; Schiboni, Maria Luisa; Ghiringhello, Bruno; Dalla Palma, Paolo; Minucci, Daria; Rosso, Stefano; Zorzi, Manuel; Naldoni, Carlo; Segnan, Nereo; Confortini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV)–based screening needs triage. In most randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on HPV testing with cytological triage, cytology interpretation has been blind to HPV status. Methods: Women age 25 to 60 years enrolled in the New Technology in Cervical Cancer (NTCC) RCT comparing HPV testing with cytology were referred to colposcopy if HPV positive and, if no cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) was detected, followed up until HPV negativity. Cytological slides taken at the first colposcopy were retrieved and independently interpreted by an external laboratory, which was only aware of patients’ HPV positivity. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were computed for histologically proven CIN2+ with HPV status–informed cytology for women with a determination of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) or more severe. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Among HPV-positive women, informed cytology had cross-sectional sensitivity, specificity, PPV and 1-NPV for CIN2+ of 85.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 76.6 to 92.1), 65.9% (95% CI = 63.1 to 68.6), 16.2% (95% CI = 13.0 to 19.8), and 1.7 (95% CI = 0.9 to 2.8), respectively. Cytology was also associated with subsequent risk of newly diagnosed CIN2+ and CIN3+. The cross-sectional relative sensitivity for CIN2+ vs blind cytology obtained by referring to colposcopy and following up only HPV positive women who had HPV status–informed cytology greater than or equal to ASCUS was 1.58 (95% CI = 1.22 to 2.01), while the corresponding relative referral to colposcopy was 0.95 (95% CI = 0.86 to 1.04). Conclusions: Cytology informed of HPV positivity is more sensitive than blind cytology and could allow longer intervals before retesting HPV-positive, cytology-negative women. PMID:25568167

  11. A Web-Based Tool for Patient Triage in Emergency Department Settings: Validation Using the Emergency Severity Index

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Ash; Casale, Michael; Branson, Kim; Churi, Chaitanya; Komatireddy, Ravi; Feramisco, Jamison

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the concordance between triage scores generated by a novel Internet clinical decision support tool, Clinical GPS (cGPS) (Lumiata Inc, San Mateo, CA), and the Emergency Severity Index (ESI), a well-established and clinically validated patient severity scale in use today. Although the ESI and cGPS use different underlying algorithms to calculate patient severity, both utilize a five-point integer scale with level 1 representing the highest severity. Objective The objective of this study was to compare cGPS results with an established gold standard in emergency triage. Methods We conducted a blinded trial comparing triage scores from the ESI: A Triage Tool for Emergency Department Care, Version 4, Implementation Handbook to those generated by cGPS from the text of 73 sample case vignettes. A weighted, quadratic kappa statistic was used to assess agreement between cGPS derived severity scores and those published in the ESI handbook for all 73 cases. Weighted kappa concordance was defined a priori as almost perfect (kappa > 0.8), substantial (0.6 < kappa < 0.8), moderate (0.4 < kappa < 0.6), fair (0.2 < kappa< 0.4), or slight (kappa < 0.2). Results Of the 73 case vignettes, the cGPS severity score matched the ESI handbook score in 95% of cases (69/73 cases), in addition, the weighted, quadratic kappa statistic showed almost perfect agreement (kappa = 0.93, 95% CI 0.854-0.996). In the subanalysis of 41 case vignettes assigned ESI scores of level 1 or 2, the cGPS and ESI severity scores matched in 95% of cases (39/41 cases). Conclusions These results indicate that the cGPS is a reliable indicator of triage severity, based on its comparison to a standardized index, the ESI. Future studies are needed to determine whether the cGPS can accurately assess the triage of patients in real clinical environments. PMID:26063343

  12. Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) over-triage and the financial implications for major trauma centres in NSW, Australia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In NSW Australia, a formal trauma system including the use of helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) has existed for over 20 years. Despite providing many advantages in NSW, HEMS patients are frequently over-triaged; leading to financial implications for major trauma centres that receive HEMS patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the financial implications of HEMS over-triage from the perspective of major trauma centres in NSW. Methods The study sample included all trauma patients transported via HEMS to 12 major trauma centres in NSW during the period: 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2009. Clinical data were gathered from individual hospital trauma registries and merged with financial information obtained from casemix units at respective hospitals. HEMS over-triage was estimated based on the local definition of minor to moderate trauma (ISS≤12) and hospital length of stay of less than 24 hrs. The actual treatment costs were determined and compared to state-wide peer group averages to obtain estimates of potential funding discrepancies. Results A total of 707 patients transported by HEMS were identified, including 72% pre-hospital (PH; n=507) and 28% inter-hospital (IH; n=200) transports. Over-triage was estimated at 51% for PH patients and 29% for IH patients. Compared to PH patients, IH patients were more costly to treat on average (IH: $42,604; PH: $25,162), however PH patients were more costly overall ($12,329,618 [PH]; $8,265,152 [IH]). When comparing actual treatment costs to peer group averages we found potential funding discrepancies ranging between 4% and 32% across patient groups. Using a sensitivity analysis, the potential funding discrepancy increased with increasing levels of over-triage. Conclusions HEMS patients are frequently over-triaged in NSW, leading to funding implications for major trauma centres. In general, HEMS patient treatment costs are higher than the peer group average and the potential funding discrepancy varies by injury severity and the type of transport performed. Although severely injured HEMS patients are more costly to treat, HEMS patients with minor injuries make up the majority of HEMS transports and have larger relative potential funding discrepancies. Future episode funding models need to account for the variability of trauma patients and the proportion of patients transported via HEMS. PMID:23815080

  13. Gleaning Data From Disaster: A Hospital-Based Data Mining Method To Studying All-Hazard Triage After A Chemical Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Jean B.; Culley, Joan M.; Tavakoli, Abbas; Svendsen, Erik R

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this paper is to describe the methods of evaluating currently available triage models for their efficacy in appropriately triaging the surge of patients after an all-hazards disaster. Design We developed a method for evaluating currently available triage models using extracted data from medical records of the victims from the Graniteville chlorine disaster. Setting On January 6, 2005, a freight train carrying three tanker cars of liquid chlorine was inadvertently switched onto an industrial spur in central Graniteville, South Carolina. The train then crashed into a parked locomotive and derailed. This caused one of the chlorine tankers to rupture and immediately release ~60 tons of chlorine. Chlorine gas infiltrated the town with a population of 7,000. Participants This research focuses on the victims who received emergency care in South Carolina. Results With our data mapping and decision tree logic, we were successful in employing the available extracted clinical data to estimate triage categories for use in triage effectiveness research. Conclusions The methodology outlined in this paper can be used to assess the performance of triage models after a disaster. The steps are reliable and repeatable and can easily be extended or applied to other disaster datasets. PMID:24352925

  14. Automatic Pre-Hospital Vital Signs Waveform and Trend Data Capture Fills Quality Management, Triage and Outcome Prediction Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Colin F; Hu, Peter; Sen, Ayan; Dutton, Rick; Seebode, Steve; Floccare, Doug; Scalea, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Trauma Triage errors are frequent and costly. What happens in pre-hospital care remains anecdotal because of the dual responsibility of treatment (resuscitation and stabilization) and documentation in a time-critical environment. Continuous pre-hospital vital signs waveforms and numerical trends were automatically collected in our study. Abnormalities of pulse oximeter oxygen saturation (< 95%) and validated heart rate (> 100/min) showed better prediction of injury severity, need for immediate blood transfusion, intra-abdominal surgery, tracheal intubation and chest tube insertion than Trauma Registry data or Pre-hospital provider estimations. Automated means of data collection introduced the potential for more accurate and objective reporting of patient vital signs helping in evaluating quality of care and establishing performance indicators and benchmarks. Addition of novel and existing non-invasive monitors and waveform analyses could make the pulse oximeter the decision aid of choice to improve trauma patient triage. PMID:18999022

  15. A low-bandwidth graphical user interface for high-speed triage of potential items of interest in video imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, David J.; Khosla, Deepak; Martin, Kevin; Chen, Yang

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a user interface called the "Threat Chip Display" (TCD) for rapid human-in-the-loop analysis and detection of "threats" in high-bandwidth imagery and video from a list of "Items of Interest" (IOI), which includes objects, targets and events that the human is interested in detecting and identifying. Typically some front-end algorithm (e.g., computer vision, cognitive algorithm, EEG RSVP based detection, radar detection) has been applied to the video and has pre-processed and identified a potential list of IOI. The goal of the TCD is to facilitate rapid analysis and triaging of this list of IOI to detect and confirm actual threats. The layout of the TCD is designed for ease of use, fast triage of IOI, and a low bandwidth requirement. Additionally, a very low mental demand allows the system to be run for extended periods of time.

  16. Triage and Management of the Injured in World War I: The Diuturnity of Antoine De Page and a Belgian Colleague

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    A system of orderly triage of the injured in World War I and a protocol for early wound management of war injuries were introduced by Antoine De Page in 1914 at the beginning of World War I. The five steps of the De Page protocol (coined by the author as Ordre de Triage) were to be followed in detail by the French and Belgian armies. A younger Belgian colleague, Robert Danis, was recruited to aid in the management of the ambulance corps to transport the injured from dressing (“clearing”) stations to centers of more advanced care, away from the Franco-Belgian front. Danis, also from Brussels, introduced the principles of osteosynthesis of bone a little over a decade later. De Page and Danis, both surgeons, tendered immense carry-forwards for future generations. PMID:22110790

  17. [Principles of surgical care organization and structural characteristics of sanitary casualties in counter-terrorist operations in the Northern Caucasus (Report I)].

    PubMed

    Gumanenko, E K; Samokhvalov, I M; Trusov, A A; Severin, V V

    2005-01-01

    Two operational-and-tactical factors had the main influence on organization of the surgical care rendered to the casualties on the Northern Caucasus: the fulminant and maneuverable nature of combat operations at the beginning of both armed conflicts and rather small territory of war theatre. The main special features of organization of surgical care to the casualties were the use of Medical Squads of Special Purpose in the combat conditions and maximal approximation of the specialized surgical care to the wounded by echelonment of medical units and wide use of helicopter evacuation. The structure of sanitary losses was characterized by the increase in the frequency of mechanical traumas, thermal and combined injuries, by the high share of the casualties with head injuries. Besides the number of seriously wounded and critical casualties has increased. PMID:15754764

  18. HPV testing as a triage for borderline or mild dyskaryosis on cervical cytology: results from the Sentinel Sites study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, R S; Patnick, J; Kitchener, H C; Moss, S M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Earlier pilot studies of human papillomavirus (HPV) triage concluded that HPV triage was feasible and cost-effective. The aim of the present study was to study the impact of wider rollout of HPV triage for women with low-grade cytology on colposcopy referral and outcomes. Methods: Human papillomavirus testing of liquid-based cytology (LBC) samples showing low-grade abnormalities was used to select women for colposcopy referral at six sites in England. Samples from 10 051 women aged 25–64 years with routine call or recall cytology reported as borderline or mild dyskaryosis were included. Results: Human papillomavirus-positive rates were 53.7% in women with borderline cytology and 83.9% in those with mild dyskaryosis. The range between sites was 34.8–73.3% for borderline cytology, and 73.4–91.6% for mild dyskaryosis. In the single site using both LBC technologies there was no difference in rates between the two technologies. The positive predictive value of an HPV test was 16.3% for CIN2 or worse and 6.1% for CIN3 or worse, although there was considerable variation between sites. Conclusion: Triaging women with borderline cytological abnormalities and mild dyskaryosis with HPV testing would allow approximately a third of these women to be returned immediately to routine recall, and for a substantial proportion to be referred for colposcopy without repeat cytology. Variation in HPV-positive rates results in differing colposcopy workload. PMID:21897395

  19. Impact of an ABCDE team triage process combined with public guidance on the division of work in an emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Kantonen, Jarmo; Lloyd, Robert; Mattila, Juho; Menezes, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To study the effects of applying an emergency department (ED) triage system, combined with extensive publicity in local media about the “right” use of emergency services, on the division of work between ED nurses and general practitioners (GPs). Design. An observational and quasi-experimental study based on before–after comparisons. Setting. Implementation of the ABCDE triage system in a Finnish combined ED where secondary care is adjacent, and in a traditional primary care ED where secondary care is located elsewhere. Subjects. GPs and nurses from two different primary care EDs. Main outcome measures. Numbers of monthly visits to different professional groups before and after intervention in the studied primary care EDs and numbers of monthly visits to doctors in the local secondary care ED. Results. The beginning of the triage process increased temporarily the number of independent consultations and patient record entries by ED nurses in both types of studied primary care EDs and reduced the number of patient visits to a doctor compared with previous years but had no effect on doctor visits in the adjacent secondary care ED. No further decrease in the number of nurse or GP visits was observed by inhibiting the entrance of non-urgent patients. Conclusion. The ABCDE triage system combined with public guidance may reduce non-urgent patient visits to doctors in different kinds of primary care EDs without increasing visits in the secondary care ED. However, the additional work to implement the ABCDE system is mainly directed to nurses, which may pose a challenge for staffing. PMID:25968180

  20. Did the defeat of Saddam Hussein reduce suicide bombing casualties and attacks in Israel? A statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Schumm, Walter R

    2004-12-01

    It was hypothesized that one of the reasons for the U.S. invasion of Iraq was to stop the payments being made by Saddam Hussein to the families of suicide (homicide) bombers in Israel. The consequences of suicide (homicide) bombing attacks against Israel between March 2001 and August 2004 were evaluated as related to the time of the U.S. invasion of Iraq. On average per month during this period, there were fewer overall casualties after the invasion than before it. As many as nearly 1,100 casualties may have been prevented in Israel as a consequence of the U.S. invasion of Iraq, suggesting that at least one possible goal of the U.S. invasion may have been achieved, at least as averaged over the first 17 months after the invasion. PMID:15666913