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1

From Taub Numbers to the Bondi Mass  

E-print Network

Taub numbers are studied on asymptotically flat backgrounds with Killing symmetries. When the field equations are solved for a background spacetime and higher order functional derivatives (higher order variational derivatives of the Hilbert Lagrangean) are solved for perturbations from the background, such perturbed space-times admit zeroth, first, and second order Taub numbers. Zeroth order Taub numbers are Komar constants (upto numerical factors) or Penrose-Goldberg constants of the background. For a Killing symmetry of the background, first order Taub numbers give the contribution of the linearized perturbation to the associated backgound quantity, such as the perturbing mass. Second order Taub numbers give the contribution of second order perturbations to the background quantity. The Bondi mass is a sum of first and second order Taubs numbers on a Minkowski background.

E. N. Glass

1997-12-17

2

Ternary logic and mass quantum numbers  

SciTech Connect

Koide's prediction of the tau mass may be formulated as a condition on the three eigenvalues of a quantum Fourier series, using simple parameters, and similar triplets have been found for neutrino and hadron masses [2]. Assuming these parameters arise from quantum gravity, one would like to understand them from the more abstract context of category theory. In particular, whereas the logic of lepton spin is a linear analogue of the ordinary Boolean logic of the category of sets, mass triplets suggest an analogous ternary logic, requiring higher dimensional categorical structures.

Sheppeard, M. D. [Ka Tiritiri O Te Moana (New Zealand)

2010-06-15

3

AIAA Plasmadynamics and Lasers Conference, AIAA-2008-4214 23-26 June 2008, Seattle, WA  

E-print Network

39th AIAA Plasmadynamics and Lasers Conference, AIAA-2008-4214 23-26 June 2008, Seattle, WA Graduate Student, AME Department, B028 Hessert Laboratories, AIAA Student Member. Research Assistant Professor, AME Department, 122 Hessert Laboratories, AIAA Member. Assistant Professor, Department

Jumper, Eric

4

Electric potential patterns deduced for the SUNDIAL period of September 23-26, 1986  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-latitude electric potential and ionospheric conductance patterns are presented and discussed for the Northern Hemisphere during the SUNDIAL period of September 23-26, 1986 using the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) technique of Richmond and Kamide (1988). Data sources used for the model are satellite and ground magnetometers, electron precipitation instruments, incoherent scatter radars, and ionospheric coherent radars. The period

B. A. Emery; A. D. Richmond; H. W. Kroehl; C. D. Wells; J. M. Ruohoniemi

1990-01-01

5

Mass transfer around oblate spheroidal drops at low Reynolds numbers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Steady and unsteady mass transfer in the continuous phase around slightly deformed oblate spheroidal drops at low (but not zero) Reynolds numbers was investigated theoretically. Asymptotic analytical solutions for short and long times, at large Peclet numbers, were obtained by the useful equations derived by Lochiel and Calderbank and by Favelukis and Mudunuri for axisymmetric drops of revolution, with the

Moshe Favelukis

2010-01-01

6

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-print Network

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

2011-10-19

7

Neutrino masses, grand unification, and baryon number violation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

If grand unification is real, searches for baryon-number violation should be included on the list of observables that may reveal information regarding the origin of neutrino masses. Making use of an effective-operator approach and assuming that nature is SU(5) invariant at very short distances, we estimate the consequences of different scenarios that lead to light Majorana neutrinos for low-energy phenomena that violate baryon number minus lepton number (B -L) by two (or more) units, including neutron-antineutron oscillations and B -L violating nucleon decays. We find that, among all possible effective theories of lepton-number violation that lead to nonzero neutrino masses, only a subset is, broadly speaking, consistent with grand unification.

de Gouvêa, André; Herrero-García, Juan; Kobach, Andrew

2014-07-01

8

Neutrino Masses, Grand Unification, and Baryon Number Violation  

E-print Network

If grand unification is real, searches for baryon-number violation should be included on the list of observables that may reveal information regarding the origin of neutrino masses. Making use of an effective-operator approach and assuming that nature is SU(5) invariant at very short distances, we estimate the consequences of different scenarios that lead to light Majorana neutrinos for low-energy phenomena that violate baryon number minus lepton number (B-L) by two (or more) units, including neutron-antineutron oscillations and B-L violating nucleon decays. We find that, among all possible effective theories of lepton-number violation that lead to nonzero neutrino masses, only a subset is, broadly speaking, consistent with grand unification.

Andre de Gouvea; Juan Herrero-Garcia; Andrew Kobach

2014-04-15

9

Bacterial Abundance Measure bacterial numbers and mass per unit volume.  

E-print Network

.37 1021 l oceans-1 Crude estimate of element fluxes (x: bacterial biomass) · Growth rate: G = xBacterial Abundance Objective · Measure bacterial numbers and mass per unit volume. · Note, we). · Plate (or viable) count (Today). · Direct count. (Thursday). #12;Why do we want to measure bacterial

Vallino, Joseph J.

10

Bacterial Abundance Measure bacterial numbers and mass per unit volume.  

E-print Network

.37 � 1021 l oceans-1 Crude estimate of element fluxes (x: bacterial biomass) · Growth rate: G = µx; µBacterial Abundance Objective · Measure bacterial numbers and mass per unit volume. · Note, we). · Plate (or viable) count (Today). · Direct count. (Thursday). #12;Why do we want to measure bacterial

Vallino, Joseph J.

11

Electric potential patterns deduced for the SUNDIAL period of September 23-26, 1986  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High-latitude electric potential and ionospheric conductance patterns are presented and discussed for the Northern Hemisphere during the SUNDIAL period of September 23-26, 1986 using the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) technique of Richmond and Kamide (1988). Data sources used for the model are satellite and ground magnetometers, electron precipitation instruments, incoherent scatter radars, and ionospheric coherent radars. The period was characterized by many substorms, and a wide variety of instantaneous patterns of electrodynamic parameters on a hemispheric scale are derived throughout this period, of which only a few examples are displayed. The entire set of electric potentials and conductances are being made available through the NCAR CEDAR Data Base for further analysis and utilization in simulation models.

Emery, B. A.; Richmond, A. D.; Kroehl, H. W.; Wells, C. D.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

1990-01-01

12

SIMULTANEOUS CONSTRAINTS ON THE NUMBER AND MASS OF RELATIVISTIC SPECIES  

SciTech Connect

Recent indications from both particle physics and cosmology suggest the possible existence of more than three neutrino species. In cosmological analyses the effects of neutrino mass and number of species can in principle be disentangled for fixed cosmological parameters. However, since we do not have perfect measurements of the standard {Lambda} cold dark matter model parameters, some correlation remains between the neutrino mass and number of species, and both parameters should be included in the analysis. Combining the newest observations of several cosmological probes (cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure, expansion rate), we obtain N {sub eff} = 3.58{sup +0.15} {sub -0.16}(68% CL){sup +0.55} {sub -0.53}(95% CL) and {Sigma}m {sub {nu}} < 0.60 eV(95% CL), which are currently the strongest constraints on N {sub eff} and {Sigma}m {sub {nu}} from an analysis including both parameters. The preference for N {sub eff} >3 is at the 2{sigma} level.

Riemer-Sorensen, Signe; Parkinson, David; Davis, Tamara M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)] [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Blake, Chris, E-mail: signe@physics.uq.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)] [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

2013-02-15

13

Altered solar wind -magnetosphere interaction at low Mach numbers: coronal mass ejections  

E-print Network

1 Altered solar wind - magnetosphere interaction at low Mach numbers: coronal mass ejections Benoit fundamental alterations of the solar wind ­ magnetosphere interaction that occur during low Mach number solar wind. We first show that low Mach number solar wind conditions are often characteristic of coronal mass

Boyer, Edmond

14

Relationships Among Particle Number, Surface Area, and Respirable Mass Concentrations in Automotive Engine Manufacturing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the relationships between particle number, surface area, and respirable mass concentration measured simultaneously in a foundry and an automotive engine machining and assembly center. Aerosol concentrations were measured throughout each plant with a condensation particle counter for number concentration, a diffusion charger for active surface area concentration, and an optical particle counter for respirable mass concentration. At

William A. Heitbrink; Douglas E. Evans; Bon Ki Ku; Andrew D. Maynard; Thomas J. Slavin; Thomas M. Peters

2008-01-01

15

Low Peclet number mass and momentum transport in microcavities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the informed design of microfluidic devices, it is important to understand transport phenomena at the microscale. This letter outlines an analytically driven approach to the design of rectangular microcavities extending perpendicular to a perfusion microchannel for applications that may include microfluidic cell culture devices. We present equations to estimate the transition from advection- to diffusion-dominant transport inside cavities as a function of the geometry and flow conditions. We also estimate the time required for molecules, such as nutrients or drugs, to travel from the microchannel to a given length into the cavity. These analytical predictions can facilitate the rational design of microfluidic devices to optimize and maintain long-term, low Peclet number environments with minimal fluid shear stress.

Yew, A. G.; Pinero, D.; Hsieh, A. H.; Atencia, J.

2013-02-01

16

Phytoremediation of hazardous wastes. Technical report, 23--26 July 1995  

SciTech Connect

A new and innovative approach to phytoremediation (the use of plants to degrade hazardous contaminants) was developed. The new approach to phytoremediation involves rigorous pathway analyses, mass balance determinations, and identification of specific enzymes that break down trinitrotoluene (TNT), other explosives (RDX and HMX), nitrobenzene, and chlorinated solvents (e.g., TCE and PCE) (EPA 1994). As a good example, TNT is completely and rapidly degraded by nitroreductase and laccase enzymes. The aromatic ring is broken and the carbon in the ring fragments is incorporated into new plant fiber, as part of the natural lignification process. Half lives for TNT degradation approach 1 hr or less under ideal laboratory conditions. Continuous-flow pilot studies indicate that scale up residence times in created wetlands may be two to three times longer than in laboratory batch studies. The use of created wetlands and land farming techniques guided by rigorous field biochemistry and ecology promises to be a vital part of a newly evolving field, ecological engineering.

McCutcheon, S.C.; Wolfe, N.L.; Carreria, L.H.; Ou, T.

1995-07-26

17

Stratospheric composition balloon-borne experiment 23--26 September 1975. Research and development technical report  

SciTech Connect

Within the period September 1968 to September 1975, six balloon-borne experiments were conducted under the title of 'STRATospheric COMPosition (STRATCOM) Experiments.' The initial experiments (September 1968 and September 1969) were designed to measure the temperature variations near an altitude of 50 km that were to be associated with the diurnal stratospheric tide. Requirements by the Department of Defense for information concerning stratospheric composition, as well as measurements of national interest to the possible pollution of the stratosphere by the Super Sonic Transport and by chlorofluorocarbons, gradually increased the number, types, and complexity of measurements conducted during each successive experiment. This composite report presents, in one publication, the related results obtained from the various experiments comprising the STRATCOM VI-A and VI-B payloads as determined by the various experimenters. The results, coupled with the ECOM Report 'Correlation of Selected Atmospheric Composition Parameters for the Mid-Latitude September Stratosphere,' are representative of the correlated multi-instrument approach of the STRATCOM Program to the experimental study of the stratosphere, backed by chemical kenetic theory and atmospheric modeling.

Ballard, H.N.; Hudson, F.P.

1977-10-01

18

PROCEEDINGS: 1987 JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON STATIONARY SOURCE COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL. HELD IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA ON MARCH 23-26, 1987  

EPA Science Inventory

The two-volume proceedings document the 1987 Joint (EPA and EPRI) Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOx Control, held March 23-26, 1987 in New Orleans, LA. The 49 presentations covered: low NOx combustion developments (e.g., reburning and burner design modifications); coal-, oil...

19

A Guide to Mass Communication Sources. Journalism Monographs Number Seventy-Four.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to assist social scientists interested in conducting mass communication research, this report describes a number of sources of mass communication data and information. The sources are grouped in two categories: print media (primarily newspapers and magazines) and electronic media (radio, television, and motion pictures). These categories…

Dunn, M. Gilbert; Cooper, Douglas W.

20

Mass Media in Society: The Need of Research. Reports and Papers on Mass Communication, Number 59.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More and better research should be undertaken, nationally and internationally, on the effect of mass media upon society. Prior to such research, there needs to be an awareness of the realities of society today and of broadcasting structure. There should also be an understanding of the research that has already been done and of the gaps in that…

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

21

Proximate Constraints on the Evolution of Egg Size, Number, and Total Clutch Mass in Lizards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proximate constraints on egg size, number, and total clutch mass in side-blotched lizards were examined by experimentally reducing average clutch size from 4.6 eggs to one, two, and three eggs. Eggs from experimentally altered clutches were larger than those from controls, reflecting the trade-off between egg size and number. Moreover, the increased frequency of females with oviducally bound eggs or

Barry Sinervo; Paul Licht

1991-01-01

22

Scaling of offspring number and mass to plant and animal size: model and meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

The scaling of reproductive parameters to body size is important for understanding ecological and evolutionary patterns. Here, we derived allometric relationships for the number and mass of seeds, eggs and neonates from an existing model on population production. In a separate meta-analysis, we collected 79 empirical regressions on offspring mass and number covering different taxa and various habitats. The literature review served as a validation of the model, whereas, vice versa, consistency of isolated regressions with each other and related ecological quantities was checked with the model. The total offspring mass delivered in a reproductive event scaled to adult size with slopes in the range of about 3/4 to 1. Exponents for individual seed, egg and neonate mass varied around 1/2 for most heterotherms and between 3/4 and 1 for most homeotherms. The scaling of the progeny number released in a sowing, clutch or litter was opposite to that of their size. The linear regressions fitted into a triangular envelope where maximum offspring mass is limited by the size of the adult. Minimum seed and egg size scaled with weight exponents of approximately 0 up to 1/4. These patterns can be explained by the influence of parents on the fate of their offspring, covering the continuum of r-strategists (pelagic–aquatic, arial, most invertebrates, heterotherms) and K-strategists (littoral–terrestrial, some invertebrates, homeotherms). PMID:18196279

Mulder, Christian

2008-01-01

23

Relationships among particle number, surface area, and respirable mass concentrations in automotive engine manufacturing.  

PubMed

This study investigated the relationships between particle number, surface area, and respirable mass concentration measured simultaneously in a foundry and an automotive engine machining and assembly center. Aerosol concentrations were measured throughout each plant with a condensation particle counter for number concentration, a diffusion charger for active surface area concentration, and an optical particle counter for respirable mass concentration. At selected locations, particle size distributions were characterized with the optical particle counter and an electrical low pressure impactor. Statistical analyses showed that active surface area concentration was correlated with ultrafine particle number concentration and weakly correlated with respirable mass concentration. Correlation between number and active surface area concentration was stronger during winter (R2 = 0.6 for both plants) than in the summer (R2 = 0.38 and 0.36 for the foundry and engine plant respectively). The stronger correlation in winter was attributed to use of direct-fire gas fired heaters that produced substantial numbers of ultrafine particles with a modal diameter between 0.007 and 0.023 mu m. These correlations support findings obtained through theoretical analysis. Such analysis predicts that active surface area increasingly underestimates geometric surface area with increasing particle size, particularly for particles larger than 100 nm. Thus, a stronger correlation between particle number concentration and active surface area concentration is expected in the presence of high concentrations of ultrafine particles. In general, active surface area concentration may be a concentration metric that is distinct from particle number concentration and respirable mass concentration. For future health effects or toxicological studies involving nano-materials or ultrafine aerosols, this finding needs to be considered, as exposure metrics may influence data interpretation. PMID:18982535

Heitbrink, William A; Evans, Douglas E; Ku, Bon Ki; Maynard, Andrew D; Slavin, Thomas J; Peters, Thomas M

2009-01-01

24

US ISSN 0006-9698 CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 17 OCTOBER 2011 NUMBER 526  

E-print Network

US ISSN 0006-9698 CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 17 OCTOBER 2011 NUMBER 526 A NEW CRYPTIC SPECIES OF SALAMANDER, GENUS OEDIPINA (CAUDATA: PLETHODONTIDAE), FROM PREMONTANE ELEVATIONS IN NORTHERN NICARAGUA elevations of three isolated mountains in northern Nicaragua. The new cryptic species differs in molecular

Wake, David B.

25

Atmospheric particle number size distribution in central Europe: Statistical relations to air masses and meteorology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Atmospheric particle number size distributions determined over 1.5 years at a central European site were statistically analyzed in terms of their relation to time of day, season, meteorology, and synoptic-scale air masses. All size distributions were decomposed into lognormal particle modes corresponding to the accumulation, Aitken, aged nucleation, and nucleation modes. The concentration of nucleation mode particles (30 nm) lacked

Wolfram Birmili; Alfred Wiedensohler; Jost Heintzenberg; Katrin Lehmann

2001-01-01

26

Impact of the Knudsen number and mass-transfer expression on multi-phase kinetic modeling  

E-print Network

chemistry is important in ozone production via photochemical reactions involving VOCs and NOx in coastalImpact of the Knudsen number and mass-transfer expression on multi-phase kinetic modeling Prasad-transfer expressions are employed within the Model of Aerosol, Gas, and Interfacial Chemistry (MAGIC) to study gas

Dabdub, Donald

27

Inducing Conservation of Number, Weight, Volume, Area, and Mass in Pre-School Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The major question this study attempted to answer was, "Can conservation of number, area, weight, mass, and volume to be induced and retained by 3- and 4-year-old children by structured instruction with a multivariate approach? Three nursery schools in Iowa City supplied subjects for this study. The Institute of Child Behavior and Development…

Young, Beverly S.

28

Relic neutrinos: Physically consistent treatment of effective number of neutrinos and neutrino mass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We perform a model independent study of the neutrino momentum distribution at freeze-out, treating the freeze-out temperature as a free parameter. Our results imply that measurement of neutrino reheating, as characterized by the measurement of the effective number of neutrinos N?, amounts to the determination of the neutrino kinetic freeze-out temperature within the context of the standard model of particle physics where the number of neutrino flavors is fixed and no other massless (fractional) particles arise. At temperatures on the order of the neutrino mass, we show how cosmic background neutrino properties, i.e., energy density, pressure, and particle density, are modified in a physically consistent way as a function of neutrino mass and N?.

Birrell, Jeremiah; Yang, Cheng-Tao; Chen, Pisin; Rafelski, Johann

2014-01-01

29

Constraints on the Dark Matter Particle Mass from the Number of Milky Way Satellites  

E-print Network

We have conducted N-body simulations of the growth of Milky Way-sized halos in cold and warm dark matter cosmologies. The number of dark matter satellites in our simulated Milky Ways decreases with decreasing mass of the dark matter particle. Assuming that the number of dark matter satellites exceeds or equals the number of observed satellites of the Milky Way we derive lower limits on the dark matter particle mass. We find with 95% confidence m_s > 13.3 keV for a sterile neutrino produced by the Dodelson and Widrow mechanism, m_s > 8.9 keV for the Shi and Fuller mechanism, m_s > 3.0 keV for the Higgs decay mechanism, and m_{WDM} > 2.3 keV for a thermal dark matter particle. The recent discovery of many new dark matter dominated satellites of the Milky Way in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey allows us to set lower limits comparable to constraints from the complementary methods of Lyman-alpha forest modeling and X-ray observations of the unresolved cosmic X-ray background and of dark matter halos from dwarf galaxy to cluster scales. Future surveys like LSST, DES, PanSTARRS, and SkyMapper have the potential to discover many more satellites and further improve constraints on the dark matter particle mass.

Emil Polisensky; Massimo Ricotti

2011-03-29

30

Number of contractions to maintain mass and force of a denervated rat muscle.  

PubMed

Within 5 weeks, denervated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of rats lose 66% of mass, 91% of force, and 76% of fiber cross-sectional area (CSA). We previously determined the parameters of electrical stimulation for denervated rat EDL muscles to generate tetanic contractions sufficient to maintain mass and force close to control values. Using these parameters, we tested the hypothesis that a range exists for number of contractions per day, below and above which values for mass, maximum force, and fiber CSA are lower than values for innervated control muscles. For 5 weeks, denervated EDL muscles were stimulated to generate between 25 and 5000 contractions daily with contractions separated by constant intervals of rest, repeated 24 h per day. Force was not maintained with fewer than 200 or more than 800 contractions daily, whereas mass and fiber CSA were not maintained with fewer than 50 contractions daily. Protocols of stimulation that maintain muscle mass and force during prolonged periods of denervation may minimize problems clinically associated with denervation atrophy. PMID:15221882

Dow, Douglas E; Cederna, Paul S; Hassett, Cheryl A; Kostrominova, Tatiana Y; Faulkner, John A; Dennis, Robert G

2004-07-01

31

A mass threshold in the number density of passive galaxies at z ~ 2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The process that quenched star formation in galaxies at intermediate and high redshifts is still the subject of considerable debate. One way to investigate this puzzling issue is to study the number density of quiescent galaxies at z ? 2 and its dependence on mass. Here we present the results of a new study based on very deep Ks-band imaging (with the HAWK-I instrument on the VLT) of two HST CANDELS fields (the UKIDSS Ultra-deep survey (UDS) field and GOODS-South). The new HAWK-I data (taken as part of the HUGS VLT Large Program) reach detection limits of Ks> 26 (AB mag). We have combined this imaging with the other ground-based and HST data in the CANDELS fields to select a sample of passively-evolving galaxies in the redshift range 1.4 number of quiescent galaxies at K ? 22 is not due to incompleteness, but is real. This has enabled us to establish unambiguously that the number counts of quiescent galaxies at z ? 2 flatten and slightly decline at magnitudes fainter than Ks ~ 22 (AB mag.), in contrast to the number density of star-forming galaxies, which continues to rise to fainter magnitudes. We show that this trend corresponds to a stellar mass threshold M? ? 1010.8M? below which the mechanism that halts the star formation in high-redshift galaxies seems to be inefficient. We also show that, while pBzK galaxies at K< 23 are in the redshift range 1.4 23 a higher redshift population of z ? 3pBzK galaxies is detected and dominates the counts at the faintest magnitudes. Finally, we compare the observed pBzK number counts with those of quiescent galaxies extracted from four different semi-analytic models. We find that only two of these models reproduce the observed trend in the number counts, even qualitatively, and that none of the models provides a statistically acceptable description of the number density of quiescent galaxies at these redshifts. We conclude that the mass function of quiescent galaxies as a function of redshift continues to present a key and demanding challenge for proposed models of galaxy formation and evolution.

Sommariva, V.; Fontana, A.; Lamastra, A.; Santini, P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Nonino, M.; Castellano, M.; Ferguson, H.; McLure, R. J.; Galametz, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Lu, Y.; Menci, N.; Merson, A.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Somerville, R.; Targett, T.; Koekemoer, A. M.

2014-11-01

32

Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

1995-05-01

33

Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this video tutorial is to review a couple ways in which we think about numbers. Thinking in terms of street numbers, money in bank accounts, and quantum particles (e.g. Bose-Einstein condensate) is contrasted with focusing on associating numbers with distinguishable manipulatives, as is more familiar in K-8 courses. This video concludes with a reminder that the symbol "infinity" is not, itself, a number.

2013-06-14

34

Constraints on the Dark Matter Particle Mass from the Number of Milky Way Satellites  

E-print Network

We have conducted N-body simulations of the growth of Milky Way-sized halos in cold and warm dark matter cosmologies. The number of dark matter satellites in our simulated Milky Ways decreases with decreasing mass of the dark matter particle. Assuming that the number of dark matter satellites exceeds or equals the number of observed satellites of the Milky Way we derive lower limits on the dark matter particle mass. We find with 95% confidence m_s > 11.8 keV for a sterile neutrino produced by the Dodelson & Widrow mechanism and m_WDM > 2.1 keV for a thermal dark matter particle. The recent discovery of many new dark matter dominated satellites of the Milky Way in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey allows us to set lower limits comparable to constraints from the complementary methods of Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest modeling and the unresolved cosmic X-ray background. Future surveys like LSST, DES, PanSTARRS, and SkyMapper have the potential to discover many more satellites and further improve constraints on the dark ma...

Polisensky, Emil

2010-01-01

35

Measurement of atomic number and mass attenuation coefficient in magnesium ferrite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pure magnesium ferrite sample was prepared by standard ceramic technique and characterized by X-ray diffraction method. XRD pattern revealed that the sample possess single-phase cubic spinel structure. The linear attenuation coefficient (?), mass attenuation coefficient (?/?), total atomic cross-section (?_{tot}), total electronic cross-section (?_{ele}) and the effective atomic number (Z_{eff}) were calculated for pure magnesium ferrite (MgFe_{2}O_{4}). The values of ?-ray mass attenuation coefficient were obtained using a NaI energy selective scintillation counter with radioactive ?-ray sources having energy 0.36, 0.511, 0.662, 1.17 and 1.28 MeV. The experimentally obtained values of ?/? and Z_{eff} agreed fairly well with those obtained theoretically.

Kadam, R. H.; Alone, S. T.; Bichile, G. K.; Jadhav, K. M.

2007-05-01

36

Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This engaging web site contains information and interactive applets related to various number systems: Egyptian, Babylonian, Chinese, Greek, Roman, Mayan, and Arabic. Users learn the history and structure of each system as well as how to count and write numbers. The site also allows users to explore finger systems, calculating machines, other number bases, and "interesting numbers." A series of pages on data and graphs includes information and activities on gathering, analyzing, graphing and sorting data. (Because the section on the Arabic number system is so extensive, it is cataloged separately as a related resource.)

Edkins, Jo

2006-01-01

37

The Expected Number of Background Disease Events during Mass Immunization in China  

PubMed Central

It is critical to distinguish events that are temporarily associated with, but not caused by, vaccination from those caused by vaccination during mass immunization. We performed a literature search in China National Knowledge Infrastructure and Pubmed databases. The number of coincident events was calculated based on its incidence rate and periods after receipt of a dose of hypothesized vaccine. We included background incidences of Guillain-Barré syndrome, anaphylaxis, seizure, sudden adult death syndrome, sudden cardiac death, spontaneous abortion, and preterm labour or delivery. In a cohort of 10 million individuals, 7.71 cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome would be expected to occur within six weeks of vaccination as coincident background cases. Even for rare events, a large number of events can be expected in a short period because of the large population targeted for immunization. These findings may encourage health authorities to screen the safety of vaccines against unpredictable pathogens. PMID:23977153

Wang, YouXin; Wu, LiJuan; Yu, XinWei; Zhao, FeiFei; Russell, Alyce; Song, ManShu; Wang, Wei

2013-01-01

38

Low Mass-Damping Vortex-Induced Vibrations of a Single Cylinder at Moderate Reynolds Number.  

PubMed

The feasibility and accuracy of large eddy simulation is investigated for the case of three-dimensional unsteady flows past an elastically mounted cylinder at moderate Reynolds number. Although these flow problems are unconfined, complex wake flow patterns may be observed depending on the elastic properties of the structure. An iterative procedure is used to solve the structural dynamic equation to be coupled with the Navier-Stokes system formulated in a pseudo-Eulerian way. A moving mesh method is involved to deform the computational domain according to the motion of the fluid structure interface. Numerical simulations of vortex-induced vibrations are performed for a freely vibrating cylinder at Reynolds number 3900 in the subcritical regime under two low mass-damping conditions. A detailed physical analysis is provided for a wide range of reduced velocities, and the typical three-branch response of the amplitude behavior usually reported in the experiments is exhibited and reproduced by numerical simulation. PMID:25278637

Jus, Y; Longatte, E; Chassaing, J-C; Sagaut, P

2014-10-01

39

Externally driven global Alfvén eigenmodes applied for effective mass number measurement on TCABR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The excitation and detection of Global Alfvén Eigenmodes on TCABR for diagnostic purposes are presented. The modes can be excited with one or two in-vessel antennae, with up to 15 A of current in each, in the frequency range from 2 to 4 MHz. This scheme allows the estimation of the effective mass number at the plasma center, which value is affected by impurity concentration in the core. An amplifier based on MOSFETs is used to excite the waves driven by low power, in order to not change the basic plasma parameters. The variation of the GAE with density is verified and the location of the mode resonance at the plasma center is confirmed by the sawtooth beating, so that the correspondingly beating phase inversion improves the precision on the resonant condition determination. The toroidal parity of the modes N = 1,2 is determined by use of two opposite located antennae with different phase of the RF current. Knowledge of toroidal mode number is important as it identifies GAE location and defines the estimated effective mass value. The estimated value for Aeff is ˜1.4-1.5, corresponding to 5-7% of carbon impurity concentration. The measured value of Aeff is used to estimate Zeff, which is compared to older TCA experiments and the value obtained by the Spitzer conductivity.

Puglia, P. G. P. P.; Elfimov, A. G.; Ruchko, L. F.; Galvão, R. M. O.; Guimarães-Filho, Z.; Ronchi, G.

2014-12-01

40

Mass-number and isotope dependence of local microscopic optical potentials for polarized proton scattering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We derive local microscopic optical potentials U systematically for polarized proton scattering at 65 MeV using the local-potential version of the Melbourne g-matrix folding model. As target nuclei, we take 6He and neutron-rich Ne isotopes in addition to stable nuclei of mass number A=4-208 in order to clarify mass-number and isotope dependence of U. The local potentials reproduce the experimental data systematically and have geometries similar to the phenomenological optical potentials for stable targets. The target density is broadened by the weak-binding nature and/or deformation of unstable nuclei. For the real spin-orbit part of U the density broadening weakens the strength and enlarges the radius, whereas for the central part it enlarges both of the strength and the radius. The density-broadening effect is conspicuous for halo nuclei such as 6He and 31Ne. Similar discussions are made briefly for proton scattering at 200 MeV. We briefly investigate how the isovector and the nonspherical components of U affect proton scattering.

Toyokawa, Masakazu; Minomo, Kosho; Yahiro, Masanobu

2013-11-01

41

Measurements of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as DL-aspartic acid-LR(C4H7NO4), L-glutamine (C4H10N2O3), creatine monohydrate LR(C4H9N3O2H2O), creatinine hydrochloride (C4H7N3O·HCl) L-asparagine monohydrate(C4H9N3O2H2O), L-methionine LR(C5H11NO2S), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 0.101785 at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. Zeff and Neff experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error for amino acids.

Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.

2014-05-01

42

ModelE2-TOMAS development and evaluation using aerosol optical depths, mass and number concentrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional microphysics model (TOMAS) has been integrated into the state-of-the-art general circulation model, GISS ModelE2. TOMAS has the flexibility to select a size resolution as well as the lower size cutoff. A computationally efficient version of TOMAS is used here, which has 15 size bins covering 3 nm to 10 ?m aerosol dry diameter. For each bin, it simulates the total aerosol number concentration and mass concentrations of sulphate, pure elementary carbon (hydrophobic), mixed elemental carbon (hydrophilic), hydrophobic organic matter, hydrophilic organic matter, sea salt, mineral dust, ammonium, and aerosol-associated water. This paper provides a detailed description of the ModelE2-TOMAS model and evaluates the model against various observations including aerosol precursor gas concentrations, aerosol mass and number concentrations, and aerosol optical depths. Additionally, global budgets in ModelE2-TOMAS are compared with those of other global aerosol models, and the TOMAS model is compared to the default aerosol model in ModelE2, which is a bulk aerosol model. Overall, the ModelE2-TOMAS predictions are within the range of other global aerosol model predictions, and the model has a reasonable agreement with observations of sulphur species and other aerosol components as well as aerosol optical depth. However, ModelE2-TOMAS (as well as the bulk aerosol model) cannot capture the observed vertical distribution of sulphur dioxide over the Pacific Ocean possibly due to overly strong convective transport. The TOMAS model successfully captures observed aerosol number concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Anthropogenic aerosol burdens in the bulk aerosol model running in the same host model as TOMAS (ModelE2) differ by a few percent to a factor of 2 regionally, mainly due to differences in aerosol processes including deposition, cloud processing, and emission parameterizations. Larger differences are found for naturally emitted aerosols such as sea salt and mineral dust. With TOMAS, ModelE2 has three different aerosol models (the bulk aerosol model and modal-based aerosol microphysics model, MATRIX) and allows exploration of the uncertainties associated with aerosol modelling within the same host model, NASA GISS ModelE2.

Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Shindell, D. T.

2014-09-01

43

Provisioning Mass by Females of the Maritime Earwig, Anisolabis maritima, is not Adjusted Based on the Number of Young  

PubMed Central

The amount of parental provisioning is thought to reflect the need of offspring. This hypothesis was tested in the case of provisioning food mass to young with controlled clutch size using the maritime earwig, Anisolabis maritima Bonelli (Dermaptera: Anisolabididae). The female provisioned a constant mass of food to the young irrespective of the number of nymphs and the distance of food carrying. In addition, the survival rate of young did not change with adjusted clutch size. This study showed that A. maritima females appear to provide food mass to their nymphs independent of their number. PMID:22239204

Suzuki, Seizi

2011-01-01

44

Mass, number and size of lung fibres in the pathogenesis of asbestosis in sheep.  

PubMed Central

After long-term asbestos inhalation, the lung tissue burden is much less for chrysotile (CHRY) than for crocidolite (CRO) exposure. Nonetheless CHRY does not appear to be less fibrogenic. To study mechanisms responsible for the low retention of CHRY and the relationships with fibrogenesis, 15 sheep received a single intratracheal injection of either CHRY or CRO. Exposures in 100 ml saline consisted of 100 mg of 1-micron latex beads for the five control sheep, 100 mg UICC CRO fibres for the five CRO sheep and 100 mg UICC B CHRY fibres for the five CHRY sheep. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was carried out at months 2, 4, 6 and 8 after exposure and necropsy at month 8. BAL and tissue samples were analysed for fibres by transmission electron microscopy. At month 2, mass concentration in BAL was 108 +/- 30 ng/ml for CRO and 0.6 +/- 0.1 ng/ml for CHRY. BAL CRO decreased afterward but BAL CHRY did not. The mass concentration in the lung at month 8 was 40.6 +/- 8.7 ng/mg dry tissue for CRO and 11.5 +/- 7.0 ng/mg for CHRY. BAL fibrogenic activity at month 8 assessed by macrophage fibronectin production was less than 0.2 ng/10(6) cells/24 h in control sheep, 5 +/- 2 in CRO sheep and 11 +/- 2 in CHRY sheep (P less than 0.05 CRO vs CHRY). Histologic score of tissue injury fibrosis was 0 in control sheep, 1.9 +/- 0.3 in CRO sheep and 2.8 +/- 0.1 in CHRY sheep (P less than 0.05). At necropsy, the number size distribution of fibres per microgram of tissue from the (CRO)/(CHRY) sheep was respectively: (127 +/- 54)/(15 +/- 14) for fibres less than 5 microns, (18 +/- 17)/(32 +/- 14) for fibres greater than 5 microns, (1.6 +/- 8)/(7 +/- 13) for fibres greater than 20 microns. This study documented that the low pulmonary retention of CHRY was largely related to the faster alveolar clearance rate of CHRY mass. Fibrogenicity of CHRY remained higher and appeared to be related at least in part to the preferential retention of long and very long CHRY fibres. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2155635

Sébastien, P.; Bégin, R.; Masse, S.

1990-01-01

45

Cuban Mass Media: Organization, Control and Functions. Journalism Monographs Number Seventy-Eight.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mass media as interdependent parts of a larger social system both control and are controlled by other subsystems. The various combinations of control, in turn, determine the functions the media system will serve. In the 1960's, the Cuban mass media underwent frequent change that reflected the volatility of the revolutionary process. Today,…

Nichols, John Spicer

46

Regular expansion solutions for small Peclet number heat or mass transfer in concentrated two-phase particulate systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Steady state heat or mass transfer in concentrated ensembles of drops, bubbles or solid spheres in uniform, slow viscous motion, is investigated. Convective effects at small Peclet numbers are taken into account by expanding the nondimensional temperature or concentration in powers of the Peclet number. Uniformly valid solutions are obtained, which reflect the effects of dispersed phase content and rate of internal circulation within the fluid particles. The dependence of the range of Peclet and Reynolds numbers, for which regular expansions are valid, on particle concentration is discussed.

Yaron, I.

1974-01-01

47

Higgs boson mass, neutrino masses and mixing and keV dark matter in an U(1) R - lepton number model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss neutrino masses and mixing in the framework of a supersymmetric model with an U(1)R symmetry, consisting of a single right handed neutrino superfield with an appropriate R charge. The lepton number ( L) of the standard model fermions are identified with the negative of their R-charges. As a result, a subset of leptonic R-parity violating operators can be present and are consistent with the U(1) R symmetry. This model can produce one light Dirac neutrino mass at the tree level without the need of introducing a very small neutrino Yukawa coupling. We analyze the scalar sector of this model in detail paying special attention to the mass of the lightest Higgs boson. One of the sneutrinos might acquire a substantial vacuum expectation value leading to interesting phenomenological consequences. Different sum rules involving the physical scalar masses are obtained and we show that the lightest Higgs boson mass receives a contribution proportional to the square of the neutrino Yukawa coupling f. This allows for a 125 GeV Higgs boson at the tree level for f ~ and still having a small tree level mass for the active neutrino. In order to fit the experimental results involving neutrino masses and mixing angles we introduce a small breaking of U(1) R symmetry, in the context of anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking. In the presence of this small R-symmetry breaking, light neutrino masses receive contributions at the one-loop level involving the R-parity violating interactions. We also identify the right handed neutrino as a warm dark matter candidate in our model. In the case of R-symmetry breaking, the large f case is characterized by a few hundred MeV lightest neutralino as an unstable lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) and we brieflydiscuss the cosmological implications of such a scenario.

Chakraborty, Sabyasachi; Roy, Sourov

2014-01-01

48

The number of information bits related to the minimum quantum and gravitational masses in a vacuum dominated universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wesson obtained a limit on quantum and gravitational mass in the universe by combining the cosmological constant ?, Planck's constant ?, the speed of light c, and also the gravitational constant G. The corresponding masses are 2.0×10-62 kg and 2.3×1054 kg respectively, and in general can be obtained with the help of a generic dimensional analysis, or from an analysis where the cosmological constant appears in a four dimensional space-time and as a result of a higher dimensional reduction. In this paper our goal is to establish a relation for both quantum and gravitational mass as function of the information number bit N. For this reason, we first derive an expression for the cosmological constant as a function of information bit, since both masses depend on it, and then various resulting relations are explored, in relation to information number of bits N. Fractional information bits imply no information extraction is possible. We see, that the order of magnitude of the various parameters as well as their ratios involve the large number 10122, that is produced naturally from the fundamental parameters of modern cosmology. Finally, we propose that in a complete quantum gravity theory the idea of information the might have to be included, with the quantum bits of information ( q-bits) as one of its fundamental parameters, resulting thus to a more complete understanding of the universe, its laws, and its evolution.

Haranas, Ioannis; Gkigkitzis, Ioannis

2013-07-01

49

The Number of Information Bits Related to the Minimum Quantum and Gravitational Masses in a Vacuum Dominated Universe  

E-print Network

Wesson obtained a limit on quantum and gravitational mass in the universe by combining the cosmological constant Lambda, Planck constant, the speed of light c, and also the gravitational constant G. The corresponding masses are 2.0x10E-62 kg and 2.3E+54 kg respectively, and in general can be obtained with the help of a generic dimensional analysis, or from an analysis where the cosmological constant appears in a four dimensional space-time and as a result of a higher dimensional reduction. In this paper our goal is to establish a relation for both quantum and gravitational mass as function of the information number bit N. For this reason, we first derive an expression for the cosmological constant as a function of information bit, since both masses depend on it, and then various resulting relations are explored, in relation to information number of bits N. Fractional information bits imply no information extraction is possible. We see, that the order of magnitude of the various parameters as well as their ratios involve the large number 10E+122, that is produced naturally from the fundamental parameters of modern cosmology. Finally, we propose that in a complete quantum gravity theory the idea of information the might have to be included, with the quantum bits of information (q-bits) as one of its fundamental parameters, resulting thus to a more complete understanding of the universe, its laws, and its evolution.

Ioannis Haranas; Ioannis Gkigkitzis

2014-06-09

50

Dynamics of Mass Transport and Magnetic Fields in Low-Wire-Number-Array Z Pinches  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of mass transport were observed in a wire array implosion with multiframe laser probing. Plasma bubbles arise at breaks in the wires. Interferometry shows that the leading edge of the bubbles brings material to the axis of the array. The speed of this material was measured to be {>=}3x10{sup 7} cm/s during the wire array implosion. A shock was observed during the collision of the bubbles with the precursor. The Faraday effect indicates current flowing in breaks on the wires. The current switches from the imploding mass to the on-axis plasma column at the beginning of the x-ray pulse.

Ivanov, V. V.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Cowan, T. E.; Laca, P. J.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Haboub, A. [University of Nevada, Reno, 5625 Fox Ave, Reno, Nevada 89506 (United States); Sarkisov, G. S.; Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Deeney, C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 (United States); Bland, S. N. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

2006-09-22

51

Mass number dependence of the Skyrme-force-induced nuclear symmetry energy  

E-print Network

The global mass dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and its two basic ingredients due to the mean-level spacing and effective strength of the isovector mean-potential is studied within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model. In particular, our study determines the ratio of the surface-to-volume contributions to the nuclear symmetry energy to be ~1.6 and reveals that contributions due to mean-level spacing and effective strength of the isovector mean-potential are almost equal after removing momentum-dependent effects by rescaling them with isoscalar and isovector effective masses, respectively.

M. Rafalski; W. Satula; R. Wyss

2005-11-04

52

A Frustrated Fourth Estate: Portugal's Post-Revolutionary Mass Media. Journalism Monographs Number Eighty-Seven.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To explain how and why the Portuguese mass media constitute a frustrated Fourth Estate, this monograph summarizes the history and development of Portuguese media. The first section summarized the history of media legislation that has confronted Portuguese journalists and stunted the development of journalistic tradition. The second section…

Agee, Warren K.; Traquina, Nelson

1984-01-01

53

Investigation of Implosion Dynamics and Stagnation of Tungsten Wire Arrays With Varied Wire Number and Constant Total Mass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have just completed an experimental campaign to study the initiation, implosion dynamics, and radiation yield of tungsten wire arrays as a function of the wire number. The wire array dimensions and mass were those of interest for the z-pinch driven ICF program. An optimization study of the x-ray emitted peak power, rise time, and FWHM was effectuated by varying the wire number while keeping the total array mass constant and equal to ˜5.8mg. The driver utilized is the ˜20-MA Z accelerator in its usual short pulse mode of 100ns. We studied single arrays of 20-mm diameter and 1-cm height. The smaller wire number studied was 30 and the largest 600. It appears that 600 is the highest achievable wire number with present technology. Radial and axial diagnostics were utilized including crystal monochromatic x-ray backlighter. An optimum wire number of ˜370 was observed, which is very close to the routinely utilized 300 for the ICF program in Sandia. Experimental results will be presented and compared with numerical simulation

Mazarakis, Michael; Deeney, Christopher; Douglas, Melissa; Stygar, William; Sinars, Daniel; Cuneo, Michael; Chandler, Gordon; Nash, Thomas; Struve, Kenneth; McDaniel, Dillon; Chittenden, Jerry

2003-10-01

54

A comparative study of the number and mass of fine particles emitted with diesel fuel and marine gas oil (MGO)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current investigation reports on diesel particulate matter emissions, with special interest in fine particles from the combustion of two base fuels. The base fuels selected were diesel fuel and marine gas oil (MGO). The experiments were conducted with a four-stroke, six-cylinder, direct injection diesel engine. The results showed that the fine particle number emissions measured by both SMPS and ELPI were higher with MGO compared to diesel fuel. It was observed that the fine particle number emissions with the two base fuels were quantitatively different but qualitatively similar. The gravimetric (mass basis) measurement also showed higher total particulate matter (TPM) emissions with the MGO. The smoke emissions, which were part of TPM, were also higher for the MGO. No significant changes in the mass flow rate of fuel and the brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) were observed between the two base fuels.

Nabi, Md. Nurun; Brown, Richard J.; Ristovski, Zoran; Hustad, Johan Einar

2012-09-01

55

Diallel crosses reveal patterns of variation in fruit-set, seed mass, and seed number in Asclepias incarnata  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plants from each of two populations of Asclepias incarnata ssp. incarnata were hand-pollinated in diallel crosses and seed number per fruit, mean individual seed mass per fruit and fruit-set were determined for the parental plants. Two diallels were performed on the glasshouse-grown plants, one involving six plants from one population and the other involving five plants from the second population.

Sara R Lipow; Robert Wyatt

1999-01-01

56

Diallel crosses reveal patterns of variation in fruit-set, seed mass, and seed number in Asclepias incarnata.  

PubMed

Plants from each of two populations of Asclepias incarnata ssp. incarnata were hand-pollinated in diallel crosses and seed number per fruit, mean individual seed mass per fruit and fruit-set were determined for the parental plants. Two diallels were performed on the glasshouse-grown plants, one involving six plants from one population and the other involving five plants from the second population. The contributions to total phenotypic variation from joint, maternal, paternal, and two types of interaction sources of variation were then estimated. Variance attributable to maternal effects, reflecting differences between maternal plants resulting from environmental or genetic factors or both, comprised 31.3-68.4% of total variance in seed mass, 20.5-37.1% of variance in seed number, and 0.7-7.5% of variance in fruit-set. Interaction effects that depended on the direction of the cross accounted for 7.3-46.5% of variance in seed mass and 31.4-39.1% of variance in seed number. These interaction effects are consistent with the hypothesis that maternal plants provision resources differently to seeds depending on the specific genotypes of the embryos they contain. In the analysis of fruit-set, interaction effects independent of the direction of the cross (combined variance) explained 22.9-78.0% of phenotypic variance. These effects could have several causes, including inbreeding depression, shared incompatibility alleles, or 'control' of fruit-set by zygotes via hormonal signals or patterns of resource acquisition. PMID:10504429

Lipow, S R; Wyatt, R

1999-09-01

57

Particulate Matter Mass and Number Concentrations Inside a Naturally Ventilated School Building Located Adjacent to an Urban Roadway  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work presents the temporal characteristics of Particulate Matter (PM) mass and number concentrations measured inside a naturally ventilated school building, located close to a busy roadway in Chennai city. Two environmental dust monitor instruments (GRIMM Model 107 and Model 108) were used for measuring PM mass and number concentrations. The 1-h mean values of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 mass concentrations were found to be 262 ± 161, 68 ± 24, 40 ± 15 µg/m3 and 81 ± 26, 56 ± 2, 45 ± 19 µg/m3 during working hours (8am-4pm) and non-working hours (4pm-8am)/holidays, respectively. The PM number concentrations inside the room during working hours were found to be 2.4 × 105, 2.2 × 103 and 8.1 × 102 particles/l in the size range of 0.3-1, 1-3 and 3-10 µm, respectively. The present study reveals that during working hours, indoor PM concentrations of the classroom were influenced by the activities of occupants and during non working hours it was affected by outdoor vehicular emissions.

Chithra, V. S.; Shiva Nagendra, S. M.

2014-09-01

58

Particulate Matter Mass and Number Concentrations Inside a Naturally Ventilated School Building Located Adjacent to an Urban Roadway  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work presents the temporal characteristics of Particulate Matter (PM) mass and number concentrations measured inside a naturally ventilated school building, located close to a busy roadway in Chennai city. Two environmental dust monitor instruments (GRIMM Model 107 and Model 108) were used for measuring PM mass and number concentrations. The 1-h mean values of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 mass concentrations were found to be 262 ± 161, 68 ± 24, 40 ± 15 µg/m3 and 81 ± 26, 56 ± 2, 45 ± 19 µg/m3 during working hours (8am-4pm) and non-working hours (4pm-8am)/holidays, respectively. The PM number concentrations inside the room during working hours were found to be 2.4 × 105, 2.2 × 103 and 8.1 × 102 particles/l in the size range of 0.3-1, 1-3 and 3-10 µm, respectively. The present study reveals that during working hours, indoor PM concentrations of the classroom were influenced by the activities of occupants and during non working hours it was affected by outdoor vehicular emissions.

Chithra, V. S.; Shiva Nagendra, S. M.

2014-08-01

59

Quantitative Reasoning and Contemporary Problem Solving: Mass Bay Community College Numbers Count Workshop  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This workshop is for Massachusetts Bay Community College faculty interested in quantitative reasoning and its application in contemporary problem solving. Funded by Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Numbers Count Project provides data, tools, and curricular materials for use with undergraduates. We will focus on global health issues surrounding cancer and emphasize the use of medical data, visualization, modeling, and error control. In the age of Big Data, students must grapple with mathematical models, tools, and quantitative reasoning as they prepare for the workplace. As science and technology advance, the rapid acquisition of data frames an evolving intersection between mathematics and science. The use of data in our courses must be accompanied by opportunities to develop quantitative reasoning and familiarity with mathematical models.

Claudia Neuhauser (University of Minnesota-Rochester;Health Sciences)

2010-05-06

60

Number size distribution of aerosols at Mt. Huang and Nanjing in the Yangtze River Delta, China: Effects of air masses and characteristics of new particle formation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aerosol number spectra in the range of 10 nm-10 ?m were observed at Mt. Huang (Aug. 15-Sep. 15) and Nanjing (Oct. 13-Nov. 15) by a wide-range particle spectrometer (WPS) in 2011. Based on the backward trajectories obtained using the HYSPLIT model, the transport pathways of observed air masses during the study periods were classified into the following four groups: maritime air mass, continental air mass, marine-continental mixed air mass and local air mass. The variations in the aerosol number spectrum and the new particle formation (NPF) events for various types of air masses were discussed, along with meteorological data. The results showed that the average number concentration was 12,540 cm- 3 at Nanjing and only 2791 cm- 3 at Mt. Huang. The aerosol number concentration in Nanjing was 3-7 times higher than that in Mt. Huang; the large discrepancy was in the range of 10-100 nm. Different types of air masses had different effects on number concentration distribution. The number concentration of aerosols was higher in marine air masses, continental air masses and continental-marine mixed air masses at 10-50 nm, 100-500 nm and 50-200 nm, respectively. Under the four types of air masses, the aerosol size spectra had bimodal distributions in Nanjing and unimodal distributions in Mt. Huang (except under continental air masses: HT1). The effects of the diverse air masses on aerosol size segments of the concentration peak in Mt. Huang were stronger than those in Nanjing. The local air masses were dominant at these two sites and accounted for 44% of the total air masses. However, the aerosol number concentration was the lowest in Mt. Huang and the highest in Nanjing when local air masses were present. The number concentrations for foreign air masses increased at Mt. Huang and decreased at Nanjing. Different types of air masses had greater effects on the aerosol spectrum distribution at Mt. Huang than at Nanjing. During the NPF events, the particle growth rates at Mt. Huang (6.5-9.0 nm h- 1) were faster than those at Nanjing (4.8-5.6 nm h- 1). The relative humidity at Mt. Huang (36-65%) was higher than that at Nanjing (30-47%), but the wind speed trend was the opposite. The air masses during the NPF events were clean, i.e., they were mainly from over the ocean or districts with low ultrafine particle concentrations.

Wang, Honglei; Zhu, Bin; Shen, Lijuan; An, Junlin; Yin, Yan; Kang, Hanqing

2014-12-01

61

Evaluation of filter media for particle number, surface area and mass penetrations.  

PubMed

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) developed a standard for respirator certification under 42 CFR Part 84, using a TSI 8130 automated filter tester with photometers. A recent study showed that photometric detection methods may not be sensitive for measuring engineered nanoparticles. Present NIOSH standards for penetration measurement are mass-based; however, the threshold limit value/permissible exposure limit for an engineered nanoparticle worker exposure is not yet clear. There is lack of standardized filter test development for engineered nanoparticles, and development of a simple nanoparticle filter test is indicated. To better understand the filter performance against engineered nanoparticles and correlations among different tests, initial penetration levels of one fiberglass and two electret filter media were measured using a series of polydisperse and monodisperse aerosol test methods at two different laboratories (University of Minnesota Particle Technology Laboratory and 3M Company). Monodisperse aerosol penetrations were measured by a TSI 8160 using NaCl particles from 20 to 300 nm. Particle penetration curves and overall penetrations were measured by scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), condensation particle counter (CPC), nanoparticle surface area monitor (NSAM), and TSI 8130 at two face velocities and three layer thicknesses. Results showed that reproducible, comparable filtration data were achieved between two laboratories, with proper control of test conditions and calibration procedures. For particle penetration curves, the experimental results of monodisperse testing agreed well with polydisperse SMPS measurements. The most penetrating particle sizes (MPPSs) of electret and fiberglass filter media were ~50 and 160 nm, respectively. For overall penetrations, the CPC and NSAM results of polydisperse aerosols were close to the penetration at the corresponding median particle sizes. For each filter type, power-law correlations between the penetrations measured by different instruments show that the NIOSH TSI 8130 test may be used to predict penetrations at the MPPS as well as the CPC and NSAM results with polydisperse aerosols. It is recommended to use dry air (<20% RH) as makeup air in the test system to prevent sodium chloride particle deliquescing and minimizing the challenge particle dielectric constant and to use an adequate neutralizer to fully neutralize the polydisperse challenge aerosol. For a simple nanoparticle penetration test, it is recommended to use a polydisperse aerosol challenge with a geometric mean of ~50 nm with the CPC or the NSAM as detectors. PMID:22752097

Li, Lin; Zuo, Zhili; Japuntich, Daniel A; Pui, David Y H

2012-07-01

62

Changes in the number of eggs loaded in Pantala flavescens females with age from mass flights (Odonata: Libellulidae).  

PubMed

The wandering glider dragonfly Pantala flavescens migrates to Japan every spring, where the population increases until autumn, in which mass flights often occur, followed by death in the winter. There have been no reports to date on the maturation process of this species throughout its lifespan in Japan. We collected females from mass flights when the flight height was low, and classified them into seven age stages by examining their wing condition. Very few females of the older stage were collected from the mass flights. The wing condition corresponded with the change in body color and with the egg production process in the ovaries. While pre-reproductive-stage females did not release eggs when treated with our artificial oviposition technique, each reproductive-stage female released about 640 eggs. Nearly all eggs released were fertilized. The ovaries developed with the stage, and reproductive-stage females had about 1100 ovarioles. The estimated maximum fecundity was about 29,000 eggs. The lifetime number of eggs laid of P. flavescens should be revealed by dissection. PMID:25366154

Ichikawa, Yuta; Watanabe, Mamoru

2014-11-01

63

Influence of trans-boundary biomass burning impacted air masses on submicron particle number concentrations and size distributions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Submicron particle number concentration (PNC) and particle size distribution (PSD) in the size range of 5.6-560 nm were investigated in Singapore from 27 June 2009 through 6 September 2009. Slightly hazy conditions lasted in Singapore from 6 to 10 August. Backward air trajectories indicated that the haze was due to the transport of biomass burning impacted air masses originating from wild forest and peat fires in Sumatra, Indonesia. Three distinct peaks in the morning (08:00-10:00), afternoon (13:00-15:00) and evening (16:00-20:00) were observed on a typical normal day. However, during the haze period no distinct morning and afternoon peaks were observed and the PNC (39,775 ± 3741 cm-3) increased by 1.5 times when compared to that during non-haze periods (26,462 ± 6017). The morning and afternoon peaks on the normal day were associated with the local rush hour traffic while the afternoon peak was induced by new particle formation (NPF). Diurnal profiles of PNCs and PSDs showed that primary particle peak diameters were large during the haze (60 nm) period when compared to that during the non-haze period (45.3 nm). NPF events observed in the afternoon period on normal days were suppressed during the haze periods due to heavy particle loading in atmosphere caused by biomass burning impacted air masses.

Betha, Raghu; Zhang, Zhe; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

2014-08-01

64

Age, Body Mass Index, and Number of Previous Trials: Are They Prognosticators of Intra-Uterine-Insemination for Infertility Treatment?  

PubMed Central

Background To examine whether pregnancy rate (PR) of intrauterine insemination (IUI) is related to certain demographic factors, such as age and body mass index (BMI), along with number of IUI cycles performed, a set of infertile Saudi women. Materials and Methods During this prospective study (a 24-month period), 301 Saudi women with infertility underwent IUI in our infertility clinic. We investigated whether PR is correlated with patient age and BMI, and the number of IUI trials, in order to determine if they could be used as prognosticators of pregnancy success. Results The highest PR was 14.89% for ages 19-25 and the lowest PR was 4.16% for ages 41-45, indicating no statistically significant difference among PR in all age groups (p value of 0.225). Also, in terms of BMI, the highest PR was 13.04% for BMI ?35 and the lowest was 7.84% for BMI of <25 to 18.5, indicating no significant difference among different BMI groups (p value of 0.788). One-cycle treatment, as expected, was more successful (PR=12.84%) than 2-cycle treatment (PR=5.75%), however, 3-5-cycles treatment still showed encouraging results (PR=17.24%); but the difference did not reach statistical significance (p value=0.167). Conclusion PR after IUI treatment remained approximately 10% from 19 to 40 years of age and declined after 40. Although no significant difference was observed among different age groups, earlier treatment is still recommended. There was a positive but not statistically significant correlation between PR and patient’s BMI indicating that BMI is not a determining factor. There was also no correlation between PR and number of IUI trials. Patients can thus try as many times as they want before moving on to in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment. PMID:25379153

Isa, Ahmed M.; Abu-Rafea, Basim; Alasiri, Saleh A.; Binsaleh, Saleh; Ismail, Kareema H.; Vilos, George A.

2014-01-01

65

Lithium formate ion clusters formation during electrospray ionization: Evidence of magic number clusters by mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations.  

PubMed

Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry (collision-induced dissociation with N2). Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed in both positive and negative ion modes with the general formulae, (HCOOLi)nLi(+), (HCOOLi)nLim (m+), (HCOOLi)nHCOO(-), and (HCOOLi)n(HCOO)m (m-). Several magic number cluster (MNC) ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi)3Li(+) being the most abundant and stable cluster ion. Fragmentations of singly charged positive clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi)2) followed by the loss of monomer units (HCOOLi) although the former remains the dominant dissociation process. In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi)3Li(+) as the most abundant fragment ion at higher collision energies which then fragments further to dimer and monomer ions at lower abundances. In the negative ion mode, however, singly charged clusters dissociated via sequential loss of monomer units. Multiply charged clusters in both positive and negative ion modes dissociated mainly via Coulomb repulsion. Quantum chemical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the central lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability. PMID:25681903

Shukla, Anil; Bogdanov, Bogdan

2015-02-14

66

Mother and offspring fitness in an insect with maternal care: phenotypic trade-offs between egg number, egg mass and egg care  

PubMed Central

Background Oviparous females have three main options to increase their reproductive success: investing into egg number, egg mass and/or egg care. Although allocating resources to either of these three components is known to shape offspring number and size, potential trade-offs among them may have key impacts on maternal and offspring fitness. Here, we tested the occurrence of phenotypic trade-offs between egg number, egg mass and maternal expenditure on egg care in the European earwig, Forficula auricularia, an insect with pre- and post-hatching forms of maternal care. In particular, we used a series of laboratory observations and experiments to investigate whether these three components non-additively influenced offspring weight and number at hatching, and whether they were associated with potential costs to females in terms of future reproduction. Results We found negative associations between egg number and mass as well as between egg number and maternal expenditure on egg care. However, these trade-offs could only be detected after statistically correcting for female weight at egg laying. Hatchling number was not determined by single or additive effects among the three life-history traits, but instead by pairwise interactions among them. In particular, offspring number was positively associated with the number of eggs only in clutches receiving high maternal care or consisting of heavy eggs, and negatively associated with mean egg mass in clutches receiving low care. In contrast, offspring weight was positively associated with egg mass only. Finally, maternal expenditure on egg care reduced their future reproduction, but this effect was only detected when mothers were experimentally isolated from their offspring at egg hatching. Conclusions Overall, our study reveals simultaneous trade-offs between the number, mass and care of eggs. It also demonstrates that these factors interact in their impact on offspring production, and that maternal expenditure on egg care possibly shapes female future reproduction. These findings emphasize that studying reproductive success requires consideration of phenotypic trade-offs between egg-number, egg mass and egg care in oviparous species. PMID:24913927

2014-01-01

67

Tests of a mixed compression axisymmetric inlet with large transonic mass flow at Mach numbers 0.6 to 2.65  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 38.8-cm (15.28-in.) capture diameter model of a mixed-compression axisymmetric inlet system with a translating cowl was designed and tested. The internal contours, designed for Mach number 2.65, provided a throat area of 59 percent of the capture area when the cowl was retracted for transonic operation. Other model features included a boundary-layer removal system, vortex generators, an engine airflow bypass system, cowl support struts, and rotating rakes at the engine face. All tunnel testing was conducted at a tunnel total pressure of about 1 atm (a unit Reynolds number of about 8.53 million/m at Mach number 2.65) at angles of attack from 0 deg to 4 deg. Results for the following were obtained: total-pressure recovery and distortion at the engine face as a function of bleed mass-flow ratio, the effect of bleed and vortex generator configurations on pressure recovery and distortion, inlet tolerance to unstart due to changes in angle of attack or Mach number, surface pressure distributions, boundary-layer profiles, and transonic additive drag. At Mach number 2.65 and with the best bleed configurations, maximum total pressure recovery at the engine face ranged from 91 to 94.5 percent with bleed mass-flow ratios from 4 to 9 percent, respectively, and total-pressure distortion was less than 10 percent. At off-design supersonic Mach numbers above 1.70, maximum total-pressure recoveries and corresponding bleed mass flows were about the same as at Mach number 2.65, with about 10 to 15 percent distortion. In the transonic Mach number range, total pressure recovery was high (above 96 percent) and distortion was low (less than 15 percent) only when the inlet mass-flow ration was reduced 0.02 to 0.06 from the maximum theoretical value (0.590 at Mach number 1.0).

Smeltzer, D. B.; Sorensen, N. E.

1972-01-01

68

Emissions of NOx, particle mass and particle numbers from aircraft main engines, APU's and handling equipment at Copenhagen Airport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a detailed emission inventory for NOx, particle mass (PM) and particle numbers (PN) for aircraft main engines, APU's and handling equipment at Copenhagen Airport (CPH) based on time specific activity data and representative emission factors for the airport. The inventory has a high spatial resolution of 5 m × 5 m in order to be suited for further air quality dispersion calculations. Results are shown for the entire airport and for a section of the airport apron area ("inner apron") in focus. The methodology presented in this paper can be used to quantify the emissions from aircraft main engines, APU and handling equipment in other airports. For the entire airport, aircraft main engines is the largest source of fuel consumption (93%), NOx, (87%), PM (61%) and PN (95%). The calculated fuel consumption [NOx, PM, PN] shares for APU's and handling equipment are 5% [4%, 8%, 5%] and 2% [9%, 31%, 0%], respectively. At the inner apron area for handling equipment the share of fuel consumption [NOx, PM, PN] are 24% [63%, 75%, 2%], whereas APU and main engines shares are 43% [25%, 19%, 54%], and 33% [11%, 6%, 43%], respectively. The inner apron NOx and PM emission levels are high for handling equipment due to high emission factors for the diesel fuelled handling equipment and small for aircraft main engines due to small idle-power emission factors. Handling equipment is however a small PN source due to the low number based emission factors. Jet fuel sulphur-PM sensitivity calculations made in this study with the ICAO FOA3.0 method suggest that more than half of the PM emissions from aircraft main engines at CPH originate from the sulphur content of the fuel used at the airport. Aircraft main engine PN emissions are very sensitive to the underlying assumptions. Replacing this study's literature based average emission factors with "high" and "low" emission factors from the literature, the aircraft main engine PN emissions were estimated to change with a factor of 14.

Winther, Morten; Kousgaard, Uffe; Ellermann, Thomas; Massling, Andreas; Nøjgaard, Jacob Klenø; Ketzel, Matthias

2015-01-01

69

Fibrillation number based on wavelength and critical mass in patients who underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.  

PubMed

The heart characteristic length, the inverse of conduction velocity (CV), and the inverse of the refractory period are known to determine vulnerability to cardiac fibrillation (fibrillation number, FibN) in in silico or ex vivo models. The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy of FibN through in silico atrial modeling and to evaluate its clinical application in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who had undergone radiofrequency catheter ablation. We compared the maintenance duration of AF at various FibNAF values using in silico bidomain atrial modeling. Among 60 patients (72% male, 54±13 years old, 82% with paroxysmal AF) who underwent circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (CPVI) for AF rhythm control, we examined the relationship between FibN AF and postprocedural AF inducibility or induction pacing cycle length (iPCL). Clinical FibNAF was calculated using left atrium (LA) dimension (echocardiogram), the inverse of CV, and the inverse of the atrial effective refractory periods measured at proximal and distal coronary sinus. In silico simulation found a positive correlation between AF maintenance duration and FibNAF ( R = 0.90, ). After clinical CPVI, FibNAF ( 0.296±0.038 versus 0.192±0.028, ) was significantly higher in patients with postprocedural AF inducibility ( n = 41) than in those without ( n = 19 ). Among 41 patients with postprocedural AF inducibility, FibNAF ( P = 0.935, ) had excellent correlations with induction pacing cycle length. FibNAF, based on LA mass and wavelength, correlates well with AF maintenance in computational modeling and clinical AF inducibility after CPVI. PMID:25343755

Hwang, Minki; Park, Junbeum; Lee, Young-Seon; Park, Jae Hyung; Choi, Sung Hwan; Shim, Eun Bo; Pak, Hui-Nam

2015-02-01

70

Diurnal and annual characteristics of particle mass and number concentrations in urban, rural and Arctic environments in Finland  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to be able to detect annual and diurnal variation the nucleation, Aitken and accumulation mode aerosol number concentrations were investigated. In this study particulate matter and aerosol number concentrations based on three years (1999–2001) measurements in four different places, Helsinki, Hyytiälä, Pallas and Värriö in Finland were utilized. Mean PM10 concentration was found to be in urban, urban

Lauri Laakso; Tareq Hussein; Päivi Aarnio; Mika Komppula; Veijo Hiltunen; Yrjö Viisanen; Markku Kulmala

2003-01-01

71

A simple and robust method for determining the number of basic sites in peptides and proteins using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

A solution additive has been discovered that can be used to measure the number of basic sites in a peptide or protein using electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry. Addition of millimolar amounts of perchloric acid (HClO(4)) to aqueous solutions that contain peptides or proteins results in the noncovalent adduction of HClO(4) molecules to the multiply charged ions formed by ESI. For 18 oligopeptides and proteins, ranging in molecular weight from 0.5 to 18.3 kDa, the sum of the number of protons plus maximum number of HClO(4) molecules adducted to the lower charge state ions is equal to the number of basic sites in the molecule. This method provides a rapid means of obtaining information about the composition of a peptide or protein and does not require high-resolution measurements or any instrumental or experimental modifications. PMID:21338067

Flick, Tawnya G; Merenbloom, Samuel I; Williams, Evan R

2011-03-15

72

An investigation of several NACA 1-series inlets at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.29 for mass flow ratios near 1.0  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation to determine the performance of eight NACA 1-series inlets at massflow ratios near 1.0 was conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel. The inlet diameter ratios (ratio of inlet diameter to maximum diameter) were 0.85 and 0.89 for an inlet length ratio (ratio of inlet length to maximum diameter) of 1.0. Inlet lip radius varied from 0.061 cm to 0.251 cm, and internal contraction area ratio (ratio of inlet area to throat area) varied from 1.006 to 1.201. Reynolds number based on model maximum diameter ranged from 3,600,000 at a Mach number of 400,000 to 5,900,000 at a Mach number of 1.29. The results indicate that nearly uniform pressure distributions on a given inlet were obtained over a limited range of mass-flow ratios and Mach numbers. When inlet lip thickness was increased by means of lip radius or contraction ratio, the inlet critical Mach number decreased. Drag-divergence Mach number inferred from forebody pressure integrations was above 0.94 for most of the inlets tested.

Re, R. J.

1975-01-01

73

Studies on mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The total mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as Glycine (C2H5NO2), DL-Alanine (C3H7NO2), Proline (C5H9NO2), L-Leucine (C6H13NO2 ), L-Arginine (C6H14N4O2) and L-Arginine Monohydrochloride (C6H15ClN4O2), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 10.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities are in good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error.

Pawar, Pravina P.; Bichile, Govind K.

2013-11-01

74

Tensor mass and particle number peak at the same location in the scalar-tensor gravity boson star models - an analytical proof  

E-print Network

Recently in boson star models in framework of Brans-Dicke theory, three possible definitions of mass have been identified, all identical in general relativity, but different in scalar-tensor theories of gravity.It has been conjectured that it's the tensor mass which peaks, as a function of the central density, at the same location where the particle number takes its maximum.This is a very important property which is crucial for stability analysis via catastrophe theory. This conjecture has received some numerical support. Here we give an analytical proof of the conjecture in framework of the generalized scalar-tensor theory of gravity, confirming in this way the numerical calculations.

S. Yazadjiev

1999-06-11

75

Mass, quark-number, and root s(NN) dependence of the second and fourth flow harmonics in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions  

E-print Network

. Cosentino,37 J. G. Cramer,47 H. J. Crawford,5 D. Das,45 S. Das,45 S. Dash,15 M. Daugherity,42 M. M. de Moura,37 T. G. Dedovich,12 M. DePhillips,3 A. A. Derevschikov,32 L. Didenko,3 T. Dietel,14 P. Djawotho,17 S. M. Dogra,19 X. Dong,38 J. L. Drachenberg,41...PHYSICAL REVIEW C 75, 054906 (2007) Mass, quark-number, and?sNN dependence of the second and fourth flow harmonics in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions B. I. Abelev,50 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,45 B. D. Anderson,20 D. Arkhipkin,13 G...

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.

2007-01-01

76

Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Halo Occupation Number, Mass-to-Light Ratios and Omega(M)  

SciTech Connect

Using K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters we examine the near-infrared properties of moderate-redshift (0.19 < z < 0.55) galaxy clusters. We find that the number of K-band selected cluster galaxies within R{sub 500} (the Halo Occupation Number, HON) is well-correlated with the cluster dynamical mass (M{sub 500}) and X-ray Temperature (T{sub x}); however, the intrinsic scatter in these scaling relations is 37% and 46% respectively. Comparison with clusters in the local universe shows that the HON-M{sub 500} relation does not evolve significantly between z = 0 and z {approx} 0.3. This suggests that if dark matter halos are disrupted or undergo significant tidal-stripping in high-density regions as seen in numerical simulations, the stellar mass within the halos is tightly bound, and not removed during the process. The total K-band cluster light (L{sub 200},K) and K-band selected richness (parameterized by B{sub gc,K}) are also correlated with both the cluster T{sub x} and M{sub 200}. The total (intrinsic) scatter in the L{sub 200,K}-M{sub 200} and B{sub gc,K}-M{sub 200} relations are 43%(31%) and 35%(18%) respectively and indicates that for massive clusters both L{sub 200,K} and B{sub gc,K} can predict M{sub 200} with similar accuracy as T{sub x}, L{sub x} or optical richness (B{sub gc}). Examination of the mass-to-light ratios of the clusters shows that similar to local clusters, the K-band mass-to-light ratio is an increasing function of halo mass. Using the K-band mass-to-light ratios of the clusters, we apply the Oort technique and find {Omega}{sub m,0} = 0.22 {+-} 0.02, which agrees well with recent combined concordance cosmology parameters, but, similar to previous cluster studies, is on the low-density end of preferred values.

Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; /Toronto U., Astron. Dept.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

2007-03-01

77

Extension to Higher Mass Numbers of an Improved Knockout-Ablation-Coalescence Model for Secondary Neutron and Light Ion Production in Cosmic Ray Interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Purpose: An analytical knockout-ablation-coalescence model capable of making quantitative predictions of the neutron spectra from high-energy nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions is being developed for use in space radiation protection studies. The FORTRAN computer code that implements this model is called UBERNSPEC. The knockout or abrasion stage of the model is based on Glauber multiple scattering theory. The ablation part of the model uses the classical evaporation model of Weisskopf-Ewing. In earlier work, the knockout-ablation model has been extended to incorporate important coalescence effects into the formalism. Recently, alpha coalescence has been incorporated, and the ability to predict light ion spectra with the coalescence model added. The earlier versions were limited to nuclei with mass numbers less than 69. In this work, the UBERNSPEC code has been extended to make predictions of secondary neutrons and light ion production from the interactions of heavy charged particles with higher mass numbers (as large as 238). The predictions are compared with published measurements of neutron spectra and light ion energy for a variety of collision pairs. Furthermore, the predicted spectra from this work are compared with the predictions from the recently-developed heavy ion event generator incorporated in the Monte Carlo radiation transport code HETC-HEDS.

Indi Sriprisan, Sirikul; Townsend, Lawrence; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Miller, Thomas M.

78

Hydrodynamic chromatography - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, with post-column injection capability for simultaneous determination of nanoparticle size, mass concentration and particle number concentration (HDC-PCi-ICP-MS).  

PubMed

Hydrodynamic chromatography - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HDC-ICP-MS) is a technique that is widely used in the size-characterisation of nanoparticles. In this work, a system was modified to facilitate the injection of NIST-traceable standards into the post-column effluent, which then allowed the response from an eluting nanoparticle to be quantified against the response from the post-column standards. Combining the simultaneously acquired particle sizing data and mass concentration data allowed accurate quantification of the particle number concentration to be made in a single analytical run. This unique single-method approach was successfully validated against a nanoparticle system which had previously been characterised in a number of recent peer-reviewed publications. In addition to this, its robustness was assessed using extracts from a study investigating the fate of nanoparticles in sewage sludge, and found to provide much improved data compared to what might have been achieved using an external calibration approach. With in-vial limits of detection of 2 and 10 ng ml(-1) for titanium and silver respectively, it is insufficient for use with environmental waters, but is foreseen as being useful in screening nanoparticle production processes, or in the characterisation of higher concentration materials. As this instrumental configuration is likely to be of use to researchers involved in the general area of quantitative trace element speciation, detailed description of construction of the interface is given as ESI. PMID:25627965

Lewis, D J

2015-03-01

79

Comparison of particle mass and solid particle number (SPN) emissions from a heavy-duty diesel vehicle under on-road driving conditions and a standard testing cycle.  

PubMed

It is important to understand the differences between emissions from standard laboratory testing cycles and those from actual on-road driving conditions, especially for solid particle number (SPN) emissions now being regulated in Europe. This study compared particle mass and SPN emissions from a heavy-duty diesel vehicle operating over the urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS) and actual on-road driving conditions. Particle mass emissions were calculated using the integrated particle size distribution (IPSD) method and called MIPSD. The MIPSD emissions for the UDDS and on-road tests were more than 6 times lower than the U.S. 2007 heavy-duty particulate matter (PM) mass standard. The MIPSD emissions for the UDDS fell between those for the on-road uphill and downhill driving. SPN and MIPSD measurements were dominated by nucleation particles for the UDDS and uphill driving and by accumulation mode particles for cruise and downhill driving. The SPN emissions were ? 3 times lower than the Euro 6 heavy-duty SPN limit for the UDDS and downhill driving and ? 4-5 times higher than the Euro 6 SPN limit for the more aggressive uphill driving; however, it is likely that most of the "solid" particles measured under these conditions were associated with a combination release of stored sulfates and enhanced sulfate formation associated with high exhaust temperatures, leading to growth of volatile particles into the solid particle counting range above 23 nm. Except for these conditions, a linear relationship was found between SPN and accumulation mode MIPSD. The coefficient of variation (COV) of SPN emissions of particles >23 nm ranged from 8 to 26% for the UDDS and on-road tests. PMID:24328166

Zheng, Zhongqing; Durbin, Thomas D; Xue, Jian; Johnson, Kent C; Li, Yang; Hu, Shaohua; Huai, Tao; Ayala, Alberto; Kittelson, David B; Jung, Heejung S

2014-02-01

80

Analysis According to Gender and Body Mass Index of the Number of Steps Taken by Sedentary Workers as Measured by a Pedometer  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine according to gender and body mass index the number of steps taken by the sedentary workers as measured by a pedometer. [Subjects] Thirty-six sedentary workers in their twenties in Ulsan city were enrolled in for this study and their step counts were investigated. [Methods] Step counts at the workplace between 9 am and 6 pm everyday for 2 weeks were measured by a pedometer. Data were analyzed using SPSS 20.0 to compare step count according to gender and BMI on different days of the week. [Results] Females showed a higher step count than males on every day of the week except Fridays and Sundays. The step count was higher among the low weight group than overweight group on every day of the week. [Conclusion] Future studies should examine ways of helping sedentary workers to increase their step count. Also, more effort should be made to find practical ways of improving the number of steps taken in the workplace to keep workers in good health, as additional benefit would accrue, such as improved work efficiency. PMID:24259885

Cho, Sung-Hyoun; Oh, Byoung-Don; Cho, Byung-Jun

2013-01-01

81

Variation of high-power aluminum-wire array Z-pinch dynamics with wire number, array radius, and load mass  

SciTech Connect

A systematic study of annular aluminum-wire z-pinches on the Saturn accelerator shows that the quality of the implosion, including the radiated power, increases with wire number. Radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMEC) xy simulations suggest that the implosion transitions from that of individual wire plasmas to that of a continuous plasma shell when the interwire spacing is reduced below {approximately} 1.4 mm. In the plasma-shell regime, the experimental implosions exhibit 1D- and 2D-code characteristics as evidenced by the presence of a strong first and a weak second radiation pulse that correlates with a strong and weak radial convergence. In this regime, many of the radiation and plasma characteristics are in agreement with those simulated by 2D-RMHC rz simulations. Moreover, measured changes in the radiation pulse width with variations in array mass and radius are consistent with the simulations and are explained by the development of 2D fluid motion in the rz plane. Associated variations in the K-shell yield are qualitatively explained by simple K-shell radiation scaling models.

Sanford, T.W.L.; Mock, R.C.; Marder, B.M. [and others

1997-06-01

82

Three years of aerosol mass, black carbon and particle number concentrations at Montsec (southern Pyrenees, 1570 m a.s.l.)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Time variation of mass particulate matter (PM1 and PM1&minus10), black carbon (BC) and number of particles (N3: number of particles with an aerodynamic diameter higher than 3 nm, and N10: higher than 10 nm) concentrations at the high-altitude site of Montsec (MSC) in the southern Pyrenees was interpreted for the period 2010-2012. At MSC, PM10 (12 ?g m-3) and N7 (2140 # cm-3) three-year arithmetic average concentrations were higher than those measured at other high-altitude sites in central Europe during the same period (PM10: 3-9 ?g m-3 and N: 634-2070 # cm-3). By contrast, BC concentrations at MSC (0.2 ?g m-3) were equal to or even lower than those measured at these European sites (0.2-0.4 ?g m-3). These differences were attributed to the higher relevance of Saharan dust transport and to the higher importance of the biogenic precursor emissions and new particle formation (NPF) processes, and to the lower influence of anthropogenic emissions at MSC. The different time variation of PM and BC concentrations compared with that of N suggests that these aerosol parameters were governed by diverse factors at MSC. Both PM and BC concentrations showed marked differences for different meteorological scenarios, with enhanced concentrations under North African air outbreaks (PM1&minus10: 13 ?g m-3, PM1: 8 ?g m-3 and BC: 0.3 ?g m-3) and low concentrations when Atlantic advections occurred (PM1-10: 5 ?g m-3, PM1: 4 ?g m-3 and BC: 0.1 ?g m-3). PM and BC concentrations increased in summer, with a secondary maximum in early spring, and were at their lowest in winter, due to the contrasting origin of the air masses in the warmer seasons (spring and summer) and in the colder seasons (autumn and winter). The maximum in the warmer seasons was attributed to long-range transport processes that mask the breezes and regional transport breaking the daily cycles of these pollutants. By contrast, PM and BC concentrations showed clear diurnal cycles, with maxima at midday in the colder seasons. A statistically significant weekly variation was also obtained for the BC concentrations, displaying a progressive increase from Tuesday to Saturday, followed by a significant decrease on Sunday and Monday. N concentrations depended more on local meteorological variables such as temperature and solar radiation intensity than on the origin of the air mass. Therefore, arithmetic averages as a function of meteorological episodes showed the highest concentrations of N during summer regional episodes (N3: 4461 # cm-3 and N7: 3021 # cm-3) and the lowest concentrations during winter regional scenarios (N3: 2496 # cm-3 and N7: 1073 # cm-3). This dependence on temperature and solar radiation also accounted for the marked diurnal cycle of N concentrations throughout the year, with a peak at midday and for the absence of a weekly pattern. Measurements carried out at MSC enabled us to characterize the tropospheric background aerosols in the western Mediterranean basin (WMB). Our results highlight the importance of the NPF processes in southern Europe, underline the high contribution of long-range dust transport with respect to central Europe and its prevalence in elevated layers, and reveal that MSC is much less affected by anthropogenic emissions than other high-altitude sites in central Europe.

Ripoll, A.; Pey, J.; Minguillón, M. C.; Pérez, N.; Pandolfi, M.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.

2014-04-01

83

Three years of aerosol mass, black carbon and particle number concentrations at Montsec (southern~Pyrenees, 1570 m a.s.l.)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Time variation of mass particulate matter (PM1 and PM1-10), black carbon (BC) and particle number (N) concentrations at the high altitude site of Montsec (MSC) in the southern Pyrenees was interpreted for the period 2010-2012. The MSC site registered higher PM10 (12 ?g m-3) and N > 7 nm (2209 # cm-3) concentrations than those measured at other high altitude sites in central Europe (PM10: 3-9 ?g m-3 and N: 634-2070 # cm-3). By contrast, BC concentrations at MSC (0.2 ?g m-3) were equal or even lower than those measured at these European sites (0.2-0.4 ?g m-3). These differences were attributed to the lower influence of anthropogenic emissions and to the higher relevance of Saharan dust transport and new particle formation (NPF) processes at MSC. The different time variation of PM and BC concentrations compared with that of N suggests that these aerosol parameters were governed by diverse factors at MSC. Both PM and BC concentrations showed marked differences for different meteorological scenarios, with enhanced concentrations under North African outbreaks (PM1-10: 13 ?g m-3, PM1: 8 ?g m-3 and BC: 0.3 ?g m-3) and low concentrations when Atlantic advections occurred (PM1-10: 5 ?g m-3, PM1: 4 ?g m-3 and BC: 0.1 ?g m-3). Because of the contrasting origin of the air masses in the warmer seasons (spring and summer) and in the colder seasons (autumn and winter), PM and BC concentrations showed a marked increase in summer, with a secondary maximum in early spring, and were at their lowest during winter. The maximum in the warmer seasons was attributed to long-range transport processes which mask the breezes and regional transport breaking the daily cycles of these pollutants. By contrast, PM and BC concentrations showed clear diurnal cycles with maxima at midday in the colder seasons. A statistically significant weekly variation was also obtained for the BC concentrations, displaying a progressive increase from Tuesday to Saturday, followed by a significant decrease on Sunday and Monday. N concentrations depended more on local meteorological variables such as solar radiation than on the air mass origin. Therefore, the highest concentrations of N were associated with summer regional episodes (N > 3 nm: 4461 # cm-3 and N > 7 nm: 3021 # cm-3) and the lowest concentrations were related to winter regional scenarios (N > 3 nm: 2496 # cm-3 and N > 7 nm: 1073 # cm-3). This dependence on solar radiation also accounted for the marked diurnal cycle of N concentrations throughout the year with a peak at midday and for the absence of a weekly pattern. Measurements carried out at MSC enabled us to characterize the tropospheric background aerosols in the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB). Our results highlight the importance of the NPF processes in southern Europe, reveal much lower anthropogenic emissions than in central Europe, and underline the contribution of natural long-range transport such as Saharan dust.

Ripoll, A.; Pey, J.; Minguillón, M. C.; Pérez, N.; Pandolfi, M.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.

2013-10-01

84

A Novel Derivatization Reagent in the Determination of the Number of OH End Groups in Poly(ethylene glycol) by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

PubMed Central

The potential of a novel derivatization reagent, trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA), in determining the number of OH groups in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The MALDI mass spectra of the products revealed peaks of sodiated derivative cations, whose shift by the respective increments, ?m/z: 96?×?number of OH, allowed for the determination of the number of end functional groups with active hydrogens. In the present study, complete acylation of OH groups by TFAA proceeded rapidly, and only required mixing in acetonitrile solvent without purification. As a result, the number of OH end groups of PEG could be determined rapidly. PMID:24860712

Kagawa, Shuji

2013-01-01

85

A Novel Derivatization Reagent in the Determination of the Number of OH End Groups in Poly(ethylene glycol) by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry.  

PubMed

The potential of a novel derivatization reagent, trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA), in determining the number of OH groups in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The MALDI mass spectra of the products revealed peaks of sodiated derivative cations, whose shift by the respective increments, ?m/z: 96?×?number of OH, allowed for the determination of the number of end functional groups with active hydrogens. In the present study, complete acylation of OH groups by TFAA proceeded rapidly, and only required mixing in acetonitrile solvent without purification. As a result, the number of OH end groups of PEG could be determined rapidly. PMID:24860712

Kagawa, Shuji

2013-01-01

86

AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit, Orlando, FL. 23-26 June 2003 AIAA Paper No. 2003-3441 CFD VALIDATION ISSUES FOR BOUNDARY-LAYER STABILITY AND TRANSITION  

E-print Network

requirements for gas-turbine-engine blades and vanes, low-Reynolds-number vehicles, submarines and torpedoes, Reed et al. (1997) discuss progress on issues such as instability studies, nose-bluntness and angle-of-attack

87

Mass spectrometer calibration standard  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Inert perfluorinated alkane and alkyl ethers mixture is used to calibrate mass spectrometer. Noncontaminating, commercially-available liquid provides series of reproducible reference peaks over broad mass spectrum that ranges over mass numbers from 1 to 200.

Ross, D. S.

1978-01-01

88

Mass Media and Public Opinion: Report of the Soviet-Finnish Seminar (5th, Moscow, USSR, May 18-22, 1987). Publications Series B, Number 24.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A compilation of papers from a joint Finnish-Russian seminar on problems of communication research, this collection presents diverse opinions and results from researchers and observers in both countries. The titles of the papers and their authors are as follows: (1) "Role of Research and Training in Mass Communication and Public Opinion" (Pertti…

Jyrkiainen, Jyrki, Comp.

89

Estimates of internal dose equivalent to 22 target organs for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel-cycle facilities. Vol. 1. [Internal radiation dose conversion factors for man for 68 radionuclides of mass number less than 150  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is the first of a two-volume tabulation of internal radiation dose conversion factors for man for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of light-water-reactor fuel cycles. This volume treats 68 radionuclides, all of mass number less than 150. Intake by inhalation and ingestion is considered. In the former case, the ICRP Task Group Lung Model has been used

G. G. Killough; D. E. Jr. Dunning; S. R. Bernard; J. C. Pleasant

1978-01-01

90

Extensional flow convecting a reactant undergoing a first order homogeneous reaction and diffusional mass transfer from a sphere at low to intermediate Peclet and Damkohler numbers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Forced convective diffusion-reaction is considered for viscous axisymmetric extensional convecting velocity in the neighborhood of a sphere. For Peclet numbers in the range 0.1 less than or equal to Pe less than or equal to 500 and for Damkohler numbers increasing with increasing Pe but in the overall range 0.02 less than or equal to Da less than or equal to 10, average and local Sherwood numbers have been computed. By introducing the eigenfunction expansion c(r, Theta) = Sum of c(n)(r)P(n)(cos Theta) into the forced convective diffusion equation for the concentration of a chemical species undergoing a first order homogeneous reaction and by using properties of the Legendre functions Pn(cos Theta), the variable coefficient PDE can be reduced to a system of N + 1 second order ODEs for the radial functions c(sub n)(r), n = 0, 1, 2,..., N. The adaptive grid algorithm of Pereyra and Lentini can be used to solve the corresponding 2(N + 1) first order differential equations as a two-point boundary value problem on 1 less than or equal to r less than or equal to r(sub infinity). Convergence of the expansion for a specific value of N can thus be established and provides 'spectral' behavior as well as the full concentration field c(r, Theta).

Shah, N. Y.; Reed, X. B., Jr.

1995-01-01

91

Number Track  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students can use this interactive Flash applet to practice ordering whole numbers within 20. The applet displays a track and number tiles, which the user drags to create the correct sequence of numbers 1 through 20. Users may choose from four levels: place 5 missing numbers, place 10 numbers, arrange all 20 numbers, or create your own challenge.

Dan Bunker

2010-01-01

92

Mass, quark-number, and sqrt sNN dependence of the second andfourth flow harmonics in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleuscollisions  

SciTech Connect

We present STAR measurements of the azimuthal anisotropyparameter v_2 for pions, kaons, protons, Lambda, bar Lambda, Xi+bar Xi,and \\Omega + bar Omega, along with v_4 for pions, kaons, protons, andLambda + bar Lambda at mid-rapidity for Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4and 200 GeV. The v_2(p_T) values for all hadron species at 62.4 GeV aresimilar to those observed in 130 and 200 GeV collisions. For observedkinematic ranges, v_2 values at 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV are as little as10 percent-15 percent larger than those in Pb+Pb collisions at sqrt s NN=17.3 GeV. At intermediate transverse momentum (p_T from 1.5-5 GeV/c),the 62.4 GeV v_2(p_T) and v_4(p_T) values are consistent with thequark-number scaling first observed at 200 GeV. A four-particle cumulantanalysis is used to assess the non-flow contributions to pions andprotons and some indications are found for a smaller non-flowcontribution to protons than pions. Baryon v_2 is larger than anti-baryonv_2 at 62.4 and 200 GeV perhaps indicating either that the initialspatial net-baryon distribution is anisotropic, that the mechanismleading to transport of baryon number from beam- to mid-rapidity enhancesv_2, or that anti-baryon and baryon annihilation is larger in thein-plane direction.

Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

2007-01-06

93

Plasmadynamics and Lasers Conference 23-26 June, Seattle, WA  

E-print Network

capability, reconstructors have certain time delays associated with them, deformable mirrors (piezoelectric actuators) have certain response time characteristics, and so forth. In Ref. [3], significant bandwidth limitations were also found due to the amplifier used to power the deformable mirror. Frequency response

Jumper, Eric

94

Number Sense  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hacker has given you a challenge. He’ll run his number machine to create a number. Then you’ll get three numbers between one and nine. The challenge is to make a number that is larger than the one on Hacker’s machine. Be careful though--Hacker will give you numbers that can’t be bigger than his!

2008-01-01

95

Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm- 3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm- 3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges.

Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie; Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

2014-10-01

96

Number Line  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This iOS app helps students to visualize number sentences and create models for addition, subtractions, multiplication, and division. The number line can be adjusted to represent multiples of numbers from one to one hundred.

Clarity Innovations, Inc.

2013-11-22

97

Mystery Number  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This game for 2-3 players (K-5) combines logic and numbers. Players start with a 10x10 grid of the numbers 1 to 100. One person chooses a secret number and announces the range in which it falls. Other players ask yes or no questions to identify the number. They cross out the numbers on the board that are no longer possibilities. The player who identifies the secret number wins. Available as a downloadable pdf in English or in Spanish.

2011-01-01

98

Improved Jänecke mass formula  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we improve an empirical mass formula constructed by Jänecke and collaborators. This formula is enlightened by the Garvey-Kelson mass relations. The new version of the Jänecke formula reproduces 2275 atomic masses with neutron number N ?10 and proton number Z ?6 , at an average accuracy of 128 keV, by employing 576 parameters. The predictive power of our formula is exemplified by comparison with predicted results of other mass models.

He, Z.; Bao, M.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

2014-11-01

99

Neutrino mass  

SciTech Connect

Neutrinos play a dominant role in both particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. In the our present understanding of the strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces, the group structure of the Standard Model is SU(3){sub C} {circle_times} SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} U(I){sub EM}. In the Weinberg-Salam-Glashow Standard Electroweak Model, left-handed neutrinos sit in a doublet, while right-handed neutrinos are in a singlet, and therefore do not interact with the other known particles. Also in this model, the neutrinos are intrinsically massless. However, while the W-S-G model provides an amazingly accurate picture of our present cold Universe, It has a number of deficits. The Standard Model does not explain the origin of the group structure, It does not reduce the number of coupling constants required, nor does it offer any prediction for the physical masses of the particles. Thus, it is generally assumed that the Standard Model is but a subset of some larger gauge theory. A wide variety of Grand Unified field Theories (GUTs), Super Symmetric Models (SUSY), and Superstring models have been proposed as the model for this larger structure. In general, these models predict nonzero neutrino masses and contain mechanisms that provide for lepton-number violation. Thus, a variety of new phenomena are predicted, including finite neutrino masses and the possibility that neutrinos can oscillate from one type to another. This report looks at the possibility of detecting neutrino vat mass.

Bowles, T.J.

1993-04-01

100

Neutrino mass  

SciTech Connect

Neutrinos play a dominant role in both particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. In the our present understanding of the strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces, the group structure of the Standard Model is SU(3)[sub C] [circle times] SU(2)[sub L] [circle times] U(I)[sub EM]. In the Weinberg-Salam-Glashow Standard Electroweak Model, left-handed neutrinos sit in a doublet, while right-handed neutrinos are in a singlet, and therefore do not interact with the other known particles. Also in this model, the neutrinos are intrinsically massless. However, while the W-S-G model provides an amazingly accurate picture of our present cold Universe, It has a number of deficits. The Standard Model does not explain the origin of the group structure, It does not reduce the number of coupling constants required, nor does it offer any prediction for the physical masses of the particles. Thus, it is generally assumed that the Standard Model is but a subset of some larger gauge theory. A wide variety of Grand Unified field Theories (GUTs), Super Symmetric Models (SUSY), and Superstring models have been proposed as the model for this larger structure. In general, these models predict nonzero neutrino masses and contain mechanisms that provide for lepton-number violation. Thus, a variety of new phenomena are predicted, including finite neutrino masses and the possibility that neutrinos can oscillate from one type to another. This report looks at the possibility of detecting neutrino vat mass.

Bowles, T.J.

1993-01-01

101

Number Explorer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive application helps students to learn visually about numbers from their possible arrangements and how those arrangements relate to division, multiplication, and factors. The web applet divides numbers and displays calculation to show the remainder as a number, fraction, or decimal value and allows demonstration of types of numbers such as prime, square, and triangular. The number explorer has automated tests for divisibility, factor pairs, or prime factors. Three different shapes can be used, the original fish swim around and obediently arrange themselves to show number properties. However balls or cards cards can be used instead, these animate faster and are better for displaying numbers.

2012-01-01

102

Number Sense  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this online math game from Cyberchase, learners play against Hacker in a place value game. The goal is to make a number bigger than the one created by Hacker's number machine. Learners select the numbers in the order in which they want them to go into their machine. The challenge is to either make a number larger than the one on Hacker's machine or realize that it's impossible to make a number bigger than Hacker's, no matter what the combination.

2013-12-04

103

Number Tracks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This problem provides an opportunity for children to explore and visualize number patterns and sequences and to reinforce key number concepts and vocabulary such as odd and even, factors and multiples. Students cut consecutive number tracks into equal length pieces in several ways and investigate the patterns that emerge among the sums of the tracks. The Teachers' Notes page explains number tracks and offers suggestions for implementation, discussion questions, a printable sheet of number tracks (pdf), and ideas for extension and support.

104

Number Flash  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This iOS app helps students make the transition from counting to number recognition by thinking of a number of objects in relation to five and ten. The app displays a set number of items from one to twenty in ten frames then flashes away after the preset number of seconds. The user must identify the number that was shown on the ten frames.

Mark, Mitchell

2013-03-10

105

Number Cruncher  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Science NetLinks interactive game helps students increase their logic and decision making skills by challenging a player to consider a series of mathematical processes to find a path from a starting number to a goal number in a math maze. The activity appears as a 5x5 matrix of numbers, each of which has an operation symbol next to it, indicating whether it will be added to, subtracted from, or multiplied by the previous number. Starting in the center with a given number, players choose an adjoining number to complete the next step and they proceed until successfully reaching the goal number or until they have run out of usable numbers on the game board. To add an additional challenge to the game, a player can limit each level to reaching the target in seven or fewer steps.

2011-10-13

106

Complex Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a short study guide from the University of Maryland's Physics Education Research Group on introducing, interpreting, and using complex numbers. Mathematical equations are included to help students understand the nature of complex numbers.

2010-04-01

107

Number Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comments on the article by Gardner Murphy , which considered the psychological sources of Pythagorean number theory. The current author offers some supplementary information, noting that there are some additional meanings attached to some numbers in the culture of India.

Santokh S. Anant

1968-01-01

108

Tooth Numbering  

MedlinePLUS

... numbered as well. Illustrations created by Simple Steps designer Michael Becker Universal Numbering System Adults In this ... indicates that it is a deciduous (primary or "baby") tooth. So, a child's first tooth on the ...

109

Negative Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article is an account of how negative numbers became part of the "vocabulary" of mathematicians and of some of the earliest appearances of negative numbers in calculations of the ancient civilizations of China, India and Greece. Although negative numbers were used in calculations, negative answers to mathematical problems were considered meaningless or impossible. The troubled history of negative numbers presented in this article shows how the simple mathematical principles taken for granted today have taken thousands of years to develop.

Howard, Jill

2009-05-01

110

Number Factory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive Java applet promotes number sense, estimation, and provides practice with order of operations. The player's goal is to make a numerical expression using the four given numbers and the four basic operations with the result being the target number (or as close as they can get to it). The student can also use brackets in their calculation.

Doorman, Michiel

2012-01-07

111

Observation of different core water cluster ions Y-(H2O)n (Y = O2, HCN, HOx, NOx, COx) and magic number in atmospheric pressure negative corona discharge mass spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric ion water clusters have been of long-standing interest in the field of atmospheric sciences, because of them playing a central role in the formation of tropospheric aerosols which affect the photochemistry, radiation budget of the atmosphere and climate. On the basis of a mechanism of aerosol formation in the troposphere proposed by Yu and Turco, termed “ion-mediated nucleation” (Geophys. Res. Lett. 2000, 27, 883), atmospheric ion water clusters are most likely to be produced via two processes; 1) direct attachment of polar solvent molecules H2O to atmospheric ions due to them having strong binding energy via ion-dipole interactions, and 2) growth of ion-induced hydrates into larger water clusters bound via hydrogen-bonding networks by condensation with H2O molecules. The stability and growth rates of water clusters are strongly dependent on the thermochemical properties of individual atmospheric core ions. A large number of thermochemical information of the positive atmospheric ion H3O+ and its hydrates H3O+(H2O)n have been reported so far, while there has been little information of the water clusters with the negative atmospheric core ions. Therefore, fundamental studies of the thermochemistry of various negative atmospheric ion water clusters will contribute towards furthering an understanding of their unique role in atmospheric sciences and climate change. We have recently established an atmospheric pressure DC corona discharge device containing a specific corona needle electrode that made it possible to reproducibly generate negative core ions Y- originating from ambient air (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2007, 261, 38; Eur. Phys. J. D 2008, 50, 297). The change in electric field strength on the needle tip resulted in the formation of negative atmospheric core ions Y- with various different lifetimes in air. The low field strength brought about the dominant formation of core ions with short lifetimes in air such as O2- and HOx-, while the longer-lived core ions HCN-, NOx- and COx- were mainly produced at higher field strength. Furthermore, the use of the discharge system coupled to mass spectrometers led to the stable formation of large water clusters Y-(H2O)n due to adiabatic expansion caused by the pressure difference between the ambient discharge area (760 torr) and vacuum region in the mass spectrometers (? 1 torr). Here we show the resulting mass spectra of large water clusters Y-(H2O)n (0 ? n ? 80) with the dominant negative core ion Y- such as O2-, HO-, HO2-, HCN-, NO2-, NO3-, NO3-(HNO3)2, CO3- and HCO4- which play a central role in tropospheric ion chemistry, as well as the detailed mechanism of formation of those negative ion water clusters by atmospheric pressure DC corona discharge mass spectrometry. Here we also provide new thermochemical information about magic numbers and first hydrated shells for individual negative core ions Y-, which have particular stability in the Y-(H2O)n cluster series, by using the reliable mass spectrometry data obtained and the relationship between the temperature condition in a reaction chamber and the resulting cluster distribution.

Sekimoto, K.; Takayama, M.

2010-12-01

112

Number Balance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This open-ended interactive Flash applet helps students develop operation and number sense, facility with number facts, and understanding of equations. Users designate single-digit whole numbers or integers and operations on both sides of an equation and test for balance. Users can enter numbers by using the keyboard or arrow buttons or by dragging number tiles. Each element can be hidden and a seesaw may be toggled on/off. Teachers may use this applet to lead instruction, or students may use it independently to perform specific investigations or explore freely. Supplementary documents include Objectives, containing teaching suggestions, and a student recording sheet.

Dan Bunker

2005-01-01

113

Mass spectrometer mixture calibrations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mass spectrometric analyses of hydrogen isotope mixtures can be difficult to make for a number of reasons. The most difficult problem is the possibility of confronting extremely great and extremely small relative mass differences in the same analysis. Commercial mass spectrometers are now available that can overcome these problems. The analytical capabilities and limitations of these instruments will be discussed.

Hicks

1986-01-01

114

Number Sense  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will practice counting to 100 and making numbers with base ten blocks Let\\'s have some fun with math! First, practice counting to 100. Listen to the instructions on this website. Count to 100 Now that you have worked on counting to 100, let\\'s make some numbers! Use the base ten blocks to make the numbers shown on the screen! Base Ten Blocks Great work! The next ...

Black, Mrs.

2007-10-03

115

Complex Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The objective of this lesson is to gain a better understanding of complex numbers and their graphs Situation: The Swiss Mathemation, Jean Robert Argand developed a means to graphically represent complex numbers. This led to solving problems related to altenating electrical current, which provides current day luxuries. Could you do the same? Current Knowledge: Use your knowledge of complex number and the coordinate system and with your partner, ...

Mrs. Pierce

2010-11-16

116

Primary mass standard based on atomic masses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper summarises the activities of several national and international Metrology Institutes in replacing the kilogram artefact, the unit of mass, by the mass of a certain number of atoms, in particular the atomic masses of silicon or bismuth. This task is based on two different experiments: a very accurate determination of the Avogadro constant, NA, measuring the density and lattice parameter of an enriched silicon-28 crystal, and the accumulation of decelerated bismuth-209 ions by using a mass separator. The relative measurement uncertainties reached so far are in the first case 2 parts in 107, and in the latter several part in 104. The bismuth experiment is still in an early state of the work. The ratios between the masses of 28Si or 209Bi, respectively, and the present atomic mass standard, the mass of 12C, can be determined with an accuracy now approaching 10-10 using high precision Penning traps mass spectrometers.

Becker, Peter; Gläser, Michael

2006-04-01

117

Index Numbers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Index numbers are used to aggregate detailed information on prices and quantities into scalar measures of price and quantity levels or their growth. The paper reviews four main approaches to bilateral index number theory where two price and quantity vectors are to be aggregated: fixed basket and average of fixed baskets, stochastic, test or axiomatic and economic approaches. The paper

Erwin Diewert

2007-01-01

118

Number Line  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this brief article the numerous uses of the number line are detailed: counting, measurement, addition, subtraction, decimals, and fractions. The article contains visual representations of the some of the concepts and links to related topics.

2012-08-27

119

Complex Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Written by Tony R. Kuphaldt and Jason Starck, this chapter of All About Circuit's second volume on Alternating Current describes complex numbers: "In order to successfully analyze AC circuits, we need to work with mathematical objects and techniques capable of representing these multi-dimensional quantities. Here is where we need to abandon scalar numbers for something better suited: complex numbers." In addition to the introduction and credits to contributors, the chapter has seven sections: Vectors and AC waveforms, Simple vector addition, Complex vector addition, Polar and rectangular notation, Complex number arithmetic, More on AC "polarity," and Some examples with AC circuits. Each section has clear illustrations and a concise, bulleted review of what was covered at the end.

Kuphaldt, Tony R.

2008-07-15

120

Numbers Sense  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on work undertaken by schools as part of Qualifications and Curriculum Authority's (QCA's) "Engaging mathematics for all learners" project. The goal was to use in the classroom, materials and approaches from a Royal Institution (Ri) Year 10 master-class, "Number Sense", which was inspired by examples from Michael Blastland and…

Kathotia, Vinay

2009-01-01

121

Numbers & Operation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Let's get speedy with number use. Click on the game Going Bananas with Divsion which is in bold letters below. Using the mouse, click on Instructions and read them carefully. Then, click on Start Game . Then select 3-12 as your level to play. Use the mouse to select ...

Mrs. Fincher

2010-03-07

122

Number Patterns  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, learners are challenged to discover the relationship among six numbers. The objective of this activity is to engage learners in a problem-solving situation in which they practice aspects of the process of science. Learners can use an included Science Flowchart to chart their scientific experience. This lesson serves as a good introduction to the nature of scientific inquiry.

Scotchmoor, Judy

2010-01-01

123

Table Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive applet helps students develop fluency with multiplication facts. Users chose a factor from among the digits 1-9, each of which is associated with a mnemonic graphic. The applet then displays three numbers and the user selects the one which is a multiple of the chosen factor. The player must respond correctly to ten examples to complete a round. A one-point penalty for selecting an incorrect product discourages guessing. The few words that are displayed are in Dutch.

2008-01-01

124

Nuclear Masses in Astrophysics  

E-print Network

Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of N and Z and the data obtained apply to a variety of physics topics. One of the most crucial questions to be addressed in mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides is the one of understanding the processes of element formation in the Universe. To this end, accurate atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations. In this paper, a review on the latest achievements in mass spectrometry for nuclear astrophysics is given.

Christine Weber; Klaus Blaum; Hendrik Schatz

2008-12-09

125

Mass loss  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observational evidence for mass loss from cool stars is reviewed. Spectra line profiles are used for the derivation of mass-loss rates with the aid of the equation of continuity. This equation implies steady mass loss with spherical symmetry. Data from binary stars, Mira variables, and red giants in globular clusters are examined. Silicate emission is discussed as a useful indicator of mass loss in the middle infrared spectra. The use of thermal millimeter-wave radiation, Very Large Array (VLA) measurement of radio emission, and OH/IR masers are discussed as a tool for mass loss measurement. Evidence for nonsteady mass loss is also reviewed.

Goldberg, Leo

1987-01-01

126

Paint by Number  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Only in America, one might say, would artistic self-expression be so successfully mass produced, commodified, and regimented. Nevertheless, in a brave attempt at recuperation, the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History offers this new Website on the popular 1950s' hobby of painting by number from the perspective of "the artists and entrepreneurs who created the popular paint kits, the cultural critics who reviled them, and the hobbyists who happily completed them and hung them in their homes." Taking a decidedly cultural studies approach, the Website stresses the pleasures derived from the activity as well as the modifications to the kits made by many participants. It also places the phenomenon in the context of the culture of the 1950s, particularly its expansion of leisure time. There are plenty of images here of the creation of the numbers kits as well as representations of the finished product. A bibliography and a bulletin board for posting reminiscences about painting by number are also provided. The authors claim the hobby, which pretty much died out in the 1960s, had the "peculiarly American virtue" of inviting people "who never held a brush before to enter a world of art and creativity." The editors invite our readers to be the judge of that.

2001-01-01

127

Light Quark Mass Reweighting  

E-print Network

We present a systematic study of the effectiveness of light quark mass reweighting. This method allows a single lattice QCD ensemble, generated with a specific value of the dynamical light quark mass, to be used to determine results for other, nearby light dynamical quark masses. We study two gauge field ensembles generated with 2+1 flavors of dynamical domain wall fermions with light quark masses m_l=0.02 (m_\\pi=620 MeV) and m_l=0.01 (m_\\pi=420 MeV). We reweight each ensemble to determine results which could be computed directly from the other and check the consistency of the reweighted results with the direct results. The large difference between the 0.02 and 0.01 light quark masses suggests that this is an aggressive application of reweighting as can be seen from fluctuations in the magnitude of the reweighting factor by four orders of magnitude. Never-the-less, a comparison of the reweighed topological charge, average plaquette, residual mass, pion mass, pion decay constant, and scalar correlator between these two ensembles shows agreement well described by the statistical errors. The issues of the effective number of configurations and finite sample size bias are discussed. An examination of the topological charge distribution implies that it is more favorable to reweight from heavier mass to lighter quark mass.

Qi Liu; Norman H. Christ; Chulwoo Jung

2012-06-01

128

Mass spectrometry.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

1972-01-01

129

Mass Wasting  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mass Wasting is a course handout designed to initiate discussion on the factors involved in mass wasting (eg. creep, solifluction, falls, slides, and flows) and the methods used to prevent mass wasting. Definitions are given for key terms such as angle of repose and lahars. Photographs illustrate the effects of rockslides and slumps. Links are provided to the online Physical Geology resources at Georgia Perimeter College.

Pamela Gore

1998-11-28

130

Microlens Mass Functions  

E-print Network

A non-parametric statistical model is constructed to directly relate The distribution of observed microlens timescales to that of the mass Function of the population from which the lenses are drawn, corrected For observational selection based on timescales and event amplifications. Explicit distributions are derived for microlensing impact parameters and maximum amplifications; both are shown to be statistically independent of all other parameters in the problem, including lens mass. The model is used to demonstrate that the narrow range of microlens timescales observed toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is probably not consistent with lensing by a widely distributed spheroidal population of large velocity dispersion, as expected of a dark halo; but is consistent with lensing within a rotating thick disk. Poor numerical conditioning on the statistical connection between lens masses and event timescales, and small number statistics, severely limit the mass function information obtainable from current microlensing surveys toward the LMC.

William D. Heacox

2005-10-10

131

Nevan Krogan: Mass Spectrometry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lecture from the iBioSeminars project, presented by Nevan Krogan of the Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology at UC-San Francisco, covers mass spectrometry and its application to molecular biology. Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for elucidating the elemental composition of a sample or molecule. More recently, it has been used to characterize biological material, in particular proteins and protein complexes, in a variety of organisms. This lecture will review the underlying principles of how a mass spectrometer works, discuss up to date instrumentation that is presently being used in the biological research setting and provide specific examples of how mass spectrometry is being used to reveal functional insight into different biological systems. The video runs 27:36 and can be downloaded in a number of formats: QuickTime, MP4, M4V, and PPT. The video can also be streamed through YouTube or iTunes U.

Krogan, Nevan

2013-07-12

132

Quark masses  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review the current information about the eigenvalues of the quark mass matrix. The theoretical problems involved in a determination of the running masses mu, md, ms, mc and mb from experiment are discussed with the aim of getting reliable numerical values equipped with error bars that represent a conservative estimate of remaining uncertainties.

J. Gasser; H. Leutwyler

1982-01-01

133

Mass and radius formulas for low-mass neutron stars  

E-print Network

Neutron stars, produced at the death of massive stars, are often regarded as giant neutron-rich nuclei. This picture is especially relevant for low-mass (below about solar mass) neutron stars, where non-nucleonic components are not expected to occur. Due to the saturation property of nucleonic matter, leading to the celebrated liquid-drop picture of atomic nuclei, empirical nuclear masses and radii can be approximately expressed as function of atomic mass number. It is, however, not straightforward to express masses and radii of neutron stars even in the low-mass range where the structure is determined by a balance between the pressure of neutron-rich nucleonic matter and the gravity. Such expressions would be of great use given possible simultaneous mass and radius measurements. Here we successfully construct theoretical formulas for the masses and radii of low-mass neutron stars from various models that are consistent with empirical masses and radii of stable nuclei. In this process, we discover a new equation-of-state parameter that characterizes the structure of low-mass neutron stars. This parameter, which plays a key role in connecting the mass-radius relation of the laboratory nuclei to that of the celestial objects, could be constrained from future observations of low-mass neutron stars.

Hajime Sotani; Kei Iida; Kazuhiro Oyamatsu; Akira Ohnishi

2013-12-31

134

PIA update: Correlation analyses of mass spectra  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The PIA instrument aboard the Giotto spacecraft (a time of flight spectrometer) has been presented elsewhere. The mass spectra used in this analysis were decoded and mass numbers assigned according to the presence of carbon and silver, using the global values for these elements in their spectral absence. The results presented here were obtained using a frequency of occurrence based on analysis which correlated how often mass numbers appear in the mass spectra and which mass numbers tend to occur together in the same spectra; no amplitude information is utilized. The data are presented as plots of mass vs coincident mass for different subsets of the PIA data set, with both axes having units of atomic mass. Frequency contours are plotted at approximately five percent contour intervals, relative to the maximum AMU occurrence in that plot. The plots presented are symmetrical about the matrix diagonal, i.e., every mass is coincident with itself in a given spectra.

Mason, L. W.; Clark, B. C.

1988-01-01

135

Fibonacci numbers and Lucas numbers in graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A subset S?V(G) is independent if no two vertices of S are adjacent in G. In this paper we study the number of independent sets in graphs with two elementary cycles. In particular we determine the smallest number and the largest number of these sets among n-vertex graphs with two elementary cycles. The extremal values of the number of independent

Mariusz Startek; Andrzej Wloch; Iwona Wloch

2009-01-01

136

Mass media and public policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

If more informed voters receive favorable policies, then mass media should influence policy because it provides most of the information people use in voting. This paper uses a simple model to analyze the effect of mass media provision of news on a number of policy issues: redistribution, the size of the government sector, rents and corruption, the effectiveness of lobby

David Strömberg

2001-01-01

137

Mass Notification for Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mass notification is a high priority in educational institutions. As the number of electronic communication devices has diversified, so has the complexity of designing an effective mass notification system. Picking the right system, with the right features, support services and price, can be daunting. This publication, updated quarterly due to…

Schneider, Tod

2010-01-01

138

Atmospheric Mass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson about the amount of atmosphere a planet is likely to have. Learners will look for the relationship between atmospheric mass and other characteristics of the planet. When the results are not completely conclusive, the students explore possible causes of discrepancies in the data. They conclude that gravity, mass and diameter all have a role in determining atmospheric mass. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson 11 in the Astro-Venture Astronomy Unit. The lessons are designed for educators to use in conjunction with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

139

Mass of Ne-16  

E-print Network

PHYSICAL REVIEWER C VOLUME 27, NUMBER 1 Mass of ' Ne JANUARY 1983 C. J. Woodward, * R. E. Tribble, and D. M. Tanner Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 23 August 1982) The mass of ' Ne has been... 1983 The American Physical Society 28 C. J. WOODWARD, R. E. TRIBBLE, AND D. M. TANNER 27 tron rf. A 0.3 mm Kapton absorber foil was insert- ed after the proportional counter in order to ensure that the He particles stopped in the Si detector...

Woodward, C. J.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tanner, D. M.

1983-01-01

140

Mass of Si-24  

E-print Network

PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 22, NUMBER 1 JULY 1980 Mass of Si R. E. Tribble, D. M. Tanner, and A. F. Zeller* Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 11 January 1980) The Si( He, 'He... the role of a nuclear cdi than to accur- ately account for the trivial Coulomb contribution to the IMME coefficients. In addition to testing the IMME, mass measurements in isobaric quar- tets and quintets determine Coulomb energies rather far from...

Tribble, Robert E.; Tanner, D. M.; Zeller, A. F.

1980-01-01

141

Mass Extinction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video segment adapted from NOVA scienceNOW, learn about a chain of events, including ancient volcanoes, global warming, and deadly gases, which may have caused Earth's greatest mass extinction 250 million years ago.

WGBH Educational Foundation

2009-11-02

142

MassTRIX: mass translator into pathways.  

PubMed

Recent technical advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have brought the field of metabolomics to a point where large numbers of metabolites from numerous prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms can now be easily and precisely detected. The challenge today lies in the correct annotation of these metabolites on the basis of their accurate measured masses. Assignment of bulk chemical formula is generally possible, but without consideration of the biological and genomic context, concrete metabolite annotations remain difficult and uncertain. MassTRIX responds to this challenge by providing a hypothesis-driven approach to high precision MS data annotation. It presents the identified chemical compounds in their genomic context as differentially colored objects on KEGG pathway maps. Information on gene transcription or differences in the gene complement (e.g. samples from different bacterial strains) can be easily added. The user can thus interpret the metabolic state of the organism in the context of its potential and, in the case of submitted transcriptomics data, real enzymatic capacities. The MassTRIX web server is freely accessible at http://masstrix.org. PMID:18442993

Suhre, Karsten; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

2008-07-01

143

MassTRIX: mass translator into pathways  

PubMed Central

Recent technical advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have brought the field of metabolomics to a point where large numbers of metabolites from numerous prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms can now be easily and precisely detected. The challenge today lies in the correct annotation of these metabolites on the basis of their accurate measured masses. Assignment of bulk chemical formula is generally possible, but without consideration of the biological and genomic context, concrete metabolite annotations remain difficult and uncertain. MassTRIX responds to this challenge by providing a hypothesis-driven approach to high precision MS data annotation. It presents the identified chemical compounds in their genomic context as differentially colored objects on KEGG pathway maps. Information on gene transcription or differences in the gene complement (e.g. samples from different bacterial strains) can be easily added. The user can thus interpret the metabolic state of the organism in the context of its potential and, in the case of submitted transcriptomics data, real enzymatic capacities. The MassTRIX web server is freely accessible at http://masstrix.org PMID:18442993

Suhre, Karsten; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

2008-01-01

144

Masses & Springs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this online activity, learners use a realistic mass and spring laboratory. They hang masses from springs and adjust the spring stiffness and damping. Learners can even slow time and transport the lab to different planets! A chart shows the kinetic, potential, and thermal energy for each spring. Use this activity for a lesson on Hooke's Law and Conservation of Energy. This activity includes an online simulation, sample learning goals, a teacher's guide, and translations in over 30 languages.

Michael Dubson

2011-01-01

145

Mass action  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the first part of this video, we derive the law of mass action from one example of a picture of molecular collisions. For this course, we use the "law of mass action" to refer to an idea that chemical reaction kinetic rates can be expressed using products of the abundances of reactants raised to exponents. Studying cooperativity and Hill functions in the second part of the video allows us to investigate a simple example of bistability in the third video segment.

2013-06-21

146

Mass Wasting  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

First, Professor Stephen Nelson at Tulane University provides a straightforward description of mass wasting and recent disasters around the world (1). Visitors can find helpful illustrations of slumps and rock slides as well as a chart depicting the different processes that occur with varying velocities and water content. The second website, provided by Pamela Gore at Georgia Perimeter College, presents the factors involved with mass wasting and mass wasting processes (2). Visitors can find excellent real-life images of creep, rock slides, and talus slopes. Next, North Dakota State University illustrates creep, earthflow, slope failure, and slumps (3). The website furnishes images of mass wasting processes and explains the physical characteristics of the landscape. Fourth, the California State University at Long Beach discusses the causes, prevention, and types of mass wasting (4). Visitors can learn about the mass wasting disasters that occurred at La Conchita, Portuguese Bend, Mount Huascaran, Cable Canyon, and Vaiont Dam. Next, Professor Pidwirny at Okanagan University College offers an online text describing hillslope stability and mass movement (5). Students can learn about soil creep through a simple animation. The sixth website, developed by Natural Resources Canada, furnishes an interactive map of landslides in Canada (6). Users can select to view historic landslides, bedrock geology, surficial geology, and more. Next, the USGS offers information on the National Landslides Hazards Program, the National Landslide Information Center, and recent landslide events (7). Users can find a tutorial on landslides, real-time monitoring active of landslides, and related research projects. Lastly, at the Oswego State University of New York visitors can test their knowledge of mass wasting processes through a short quiz (8).

147

Air Masses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students will examine the physical characteristics of several types of air masses (bodies of air that resemble the characteristics of the land surfaces beneath them). By analyzing maps of air temperature and of dewpoint temperature (prepared by the teacher), they will discover that air masses can be identified and defined by their temperature and moisture content. Student worksheets and links to the necessary maps are provided.

148

Inertial Mass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The inertial balance is one device that can help students to quantify the quality of inertia--a body's resistance to a change in movement--in more generally understood terms of mass. In this hands-on activity, students use the inertial balance to develop a more quantitative idea of what mass means in an inertial sense. The activity also helps students refine their ability to use numerical data and line graphs as a tool for making predictions.

King, Kenneth P.

2007-12-01

149

Micelle aggregation numbers from colligative properties  

Microsoft Academic Search

An equilibrium model has been developed to derive micelle aggregation numbers n from colligative properties of surfactant solutions, with special regard to freezing point depression. The introduction of a mass action approach in the solute activity equation allows to get aggregation numbers close to those obtained from light scattering. The model can be applied with small formal changes to ionic

C. La Mesa

1990-01-01

150

THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLES  

SciTech Connect

We perform a Bayesian analysis of the mass distribution of stellar-mass black holes using the observed masses of 15 low-mass X-ray binary systems undergoing Roche lobe overflow and 5 high-mass, wind-fed X-ray binary systems. Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo calculations, we model the mass distribution both parametrically-as a power law, exponential, Gaussian, combination of two Gaussians, or log-normal distribution-and non-parametrically-as histograms with varying numbers of bins. We provide confidence bounds on the shape of the mass distribution in the context of each model and compare the models with each other by calculating their relative Bayesian evidence as supported by the measurements, taking into account the number of degrees of freedom of each model. The mass distribution of the low-mass systems is best fit by a power law, while the distribution of the combined sample is best fit by the exponential model. This difference indicates that the low-mass subsample is not consistent with being drawn from the distribution of the combined population. We examine the existence of a 'gap' between the most massive neutron stars and the least massive black holes by considering the value, M{sub 1%}, of the 1% quantile from each black hole mass distribution as the lower bound of black hole masses. Our analysis generates posterior distributions for M{sub 1%}; the best model (the power law) fitted to the low-mass systems has a distribution of lower bounds with M{sub 1%}>4.3 M{sub sun} with 90% confidence, while the best model (the exponential) fitted to all 20 systems has M{sub 1%}>4.5 M{sub sun} with 90% confidence. We conclude that our sample of black hole masses provides strong evidence of a gap between the maximum neutron star mass and the lower bound on black hole masses. Our results on the low-mass sample are in qualitative agreement with those of Ozel et al., although our broad model selection analysis more reliably reveals the best-fit quantitative description of the underlying mass distribution. The results on the combined sample of low- and high-mass systems are in qualitative agreement with Fryer and Kalogera, although the presence of a mass gap remains theoretically unexplained.

Farr, Will M.; Sravan, Niharika; Kalogera, Vicky [Northwestern University Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Cantrell, Andrew; Kreidberg, Laura; Bailyn, Charles D. [Department of Astrophysics, Yale University, P. O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Mandel, Ilya, E-mail: w-farr@northwestern.edu, E-mail: niharika.sravan@gmail.com, E-mail: vicky@northwestern.edu, E-mail: andrew.cantrell@yale.edu, E-mail: laura.kreidberg@yale.edu, E-mail: charles.bailyn@yale.edu, E-mail: ilyamandel@chgk.info [Kavli Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2011-11-10

151

Kindergarten Number Sense  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Let\\'s learn about numbers! How many Fish? Count the Fish Let\\'s count! How many... Matching is fun! Match the number How well do I really know these numbers? Getting to know the numbers Counting the kids Kids on the bus We love Ants! Count the ants Flying into the univerise of numbers Rocket ...

Estes, Mrs.

2007-11-02

152

Multiplication Series: Number Arrays  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This one-page article describes and illustrates how arrays can be used to represent many number concepts, including building multiplication facts, commutativity, parity (odd/even), and exploring factors, prime numbers, and square numbers.

153

Calculating the nuclear mass at finite angular momenta  

E-print Network

Mean field methods to calculate the nuclear mass are extended into the high spin regime to calculate the nuclear binding energy as a function of proton number, neutron number and angular momentum. Comparing the trend as a function of mass number for a selection of high-spin states, a similar agreement between theory and experiment is obtained as for ground state masses.

B. G. Carlsson; I. Ragnarsson

2005-03-30

154

Mass Extinction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video highlights a team of scientists who work on reconstructing the mass extinction that occurred 250 million years ago, the end of the Permian Period, and wiped out the majority of life on our planet, resetting the evolution of life. Clues suggest that deadly bacteria might have set off a chemical chain reaction that poisoned the Permian seas and atmosphere.

NOVA scienceNOW

155

Mass Wasting  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains 12 questions on the topic of mass wasting, which covers mudslides, lahars, landslides and more. This is part of the Principles of Earth Science course at the University of South Dakota. Users submit their answers and are provided immediate feedback.

Timothy Heaton

156

Sum-Difference Numbers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Starting with an interesting number game sometimes used by school teachers to demonstrate the factorization of integers, "sum-difference numbers" are defined. A positive integer n is a "sum-difference number" if there exist positive integers "x, y, w, z" such that n = xy = wz and x ? y = w + z. This paper characterizes all sum-difference numbers

Shi, Yixun

2010-01-01

157

Rapid scanning mass spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

Mass spectrometers and residual gas analyzers (RGA) are used in a variety of applications for analysis of volatile and semi-volatile materials. Analysis is performed by detecting fragments of gas molecules, based on their mass to charge ratio, which are generated in the mass spectrometer. When used as a detector for a gas chromatograph, they function as a means to quantitatively identify isolated volatile species which have been separated from other species via the gas chromatograph. Vacuum Technology, Inc., (VTI) produces a magnetic sector mass spectrometer/RGA which is used in many industrial and laboratory environments. In order to increase the utility of this instrument, it is desirable to increase the mass scanning speed, thereby increasing the number of applications for which it is suited. This project performed the following three upgrades on the computer interface. (1) A new electrometer was designed and built to process the signal from the detector. This new electrometer is more sensitive, over 10 times faster, and over 100 times more stable than the electrometer it will replace. (2) The controller EPROM was reprogrammed with new firmware. This firmware acts as an operating system for the interface and is used to shuttle communications between the PC and the AEROVAC mass spectrometer. (3) The voltage regulator which causes the ion selector voltage to ramp to allow ions of selected mass to be sequentially detected was redesigned and prototyped. The redesigned voltage regulator can be ramped up or down more than 100 times faster than the existing regulator. These changes were incorporated into a prototype unit and preliminary performance testing conducted. Results indicated that scanning speed was significantly increased over the unmodified version.

Leckey, J.H. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boeckmann, M.D. [Vacuum Technology, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1996-11-25

158

1 -Routing Number 2 -Account Number  

E-print Network

ACCOUNT Fill out the form above. If you have questions about the transit/routing number or the account and SAVE, you will still be able to access all the information via online, under View Paycheck Click on ADD

159

Mass and radius formulas for low-mass neutron stars  

E-print Network

Neutron stars, produced at the death of massive stars, are often regarded as giant neutron-rich nuclei. This picture is especially relevant for low-mass (below about solar mass) neutron stars, where non-nucleonic components are not expected to occur. Due to the saturation property of nucleonic matter, leading to the celebrated liquid-drop picture of atomic nuclei, empirical nuclear masses and radii can be approximately expressed as function of atomic mass number. It is, however, not straightforward to express masses and radii of neutron stars even in the low-mass range where the structure is determined by a balance between the pressure of neutron-rich nucleonic matter and the gravity. Such expressions would be of great use given possible simultaneous mass and radius measurements. Here we successfully construct theoretical formulas for the masses and radii of low-mass neutron stars from various models that are consistent with empirical masses and radii of stable nuclei. In this process, we discover a new equat...

Sotani, Hajime; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro; Ohnishi, Akira

2014-01-01

160

Hyper Space Complex Number  

E-print Network

A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

Shanguang Tan

2007-04-23

161

Dividing Rational Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will use rational numbers (i.e. multi-digit, decimals, and fractions) in order to complete a variety of division problems. State of Utah Core Curriculum: Standard 1 Objective 6 Demonstrate proficiency with the four operations, with positive rational numbers, and with addition and subtraction of integers. a. Multiply and divide a multi-digit number by a two-digit number, including decimals. b. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions and mixed numbers. c. Add and subtract integers. Attachments Decimal ...

Ms. Nielsen

2008-09-02

162

Bacterial Abundance Measure bacterial numbers and mass per unit volume.  

E-print Network

that contains medium for the culturing of fecal coliform bacteria (contains eosin-methylene blue dye) · Incubate ml-1 B U G CO2 B Time Conc. R #12;How is bacterial concentration measured? Laboratory cultures to directly count bacteria. Problem: Bacteria in natural environments are very small and difficult to see

Vallino, Joseph J.

163

Parts per Million Mass Accuracy on an Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer via Lock Mass Injection into a C-trap  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mass accuracy is a key parameter of mass spectrometric performance. TOF instruments can reach low parts per million, and FT-ICR instruments are capable of even greater accuracy provided ion numbers are well con- trolled. Here we demonstrate sub-ppm mass accuracy on a linear ion trap coupled via a radio frequency-only stor- age trap (C-trap) to the orbitrap mass spectrometer (LTQ

Jesper V. Olsen; Lyris M. F. de Godoy; Guoqing Li; Boris Macek; Peter Mortensen; Reinhold Pesch; Alexander Makarov; Oliver Lange; Stevan Horning; Matthias Mann

2005-01-01

164

50 CFR 23.26 - When is a U.S. or foreign CITES document valid?  

...CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ENDANGERED SPECIES OF WILD FAUNA AND FLORA (CITES...would not allow trade in CITES species. (3) CITES document U...that would not allow trade in the species. (6) Extension of...

2014-10-01

165

50 CFR 23.26 - When is a U.S. or foreign CITES document valid?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...of the issuing Management Authority, or if the document was issued as a partially completed document, the Management Authority lists...verification of a CITES document from the Secretariat or a foreign Management Authority...

2010-10-01

166

Space Congress, 28th, Cocoa Beach, FL, Apr. 23-26, 1991, Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The present conference on aerospace developments and issues encompasses interstellar and space-exploration initiatives, commercial space development, science payloads, space shuttle derivatives, space education, and Space Station activities. Specific issues addressed include magnetic shielding for interplanetary spacecraft, a launch-site comparison between the earth, moon, and Mars, the Spacehab approach, commercial infrastructure participation in the Space Station Freedom (SSF), the science uses of tethered satellites in low planetary orbits, and enabling life-sciences research on the SSF. Also addressed are simulations of shuttle and derivative-vehicle processing, daily operations that support the Global Positioning System, the utilization of common pressured modules on the SSF, the development of ground- and space-based laser systems, the crisis in human capital, and the automated servicing of scientific payloads aboard orbiting laboratories.

Not Available

1991-01-01

167

Space Congress, 28th, Cocoa Beach, FL, Apr. 23-26, 1991, Proceedings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present conference on aerospace developments and issues encompasses interstellar and space-exploration initiatives, commercial space development, science payloads, space shuttle derivatives, space education, and Space Station activities. Specific issues addressed include magnetic shielding for interplanetary spacecraft, a launch-site comparison between the earth, moon, and Mars, the Spacehab approach, commercial infrastructure participation in the Space Station Freedom (SSF), the science uses of tethered satellites in low planetary orbits, and enabling life-sciences research on the SSF. Also addressed are simulations of shuttle and derivative-vehicle processing, daily operations that support the Global Positioning System, the utilization of common pressured modules on the SSF, the development of ground- and space-based laser systems, the crisis in human capital, and the automated servicing of scientific payloads aboard orbiting laboratories.

1991-11-01

168

Decaying warm dark matter and neutrino masses.  

PubMed

Neutrino masses may arise from spontaneous breaking of ungauged lepton number. Because of quantum gravity effects the associated Goldstone boson - the majoron - will pick up a mass. We determine the lifetime and mass required by cosmic microwave background observations so that the massive majoron provides the observed dark matter of the Universe. The majoron decaying dark matter scenario fits nicely in models where neutrino masses arise via the seesaw mechanism, and may lead to other possible cosmological implications. PMID:17930494

Lattanzi, M; Valle, J W F

2007-09-21

169

Elements of number theory  

E-print Network

The dissertation argues for the necessity of a morphosemantic theory of number, that is, a theory of number serviceable both to semantics and morphology. The basis for this position, and the empirical core of the dissertation, ...

Harbour, Daniel, 1975-

2003-01-01

170

Narrow it Down: Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners will ask yes-no questions to identify a secret number (similar to Twenty Questions). Combine logic and numbers in this game for all ages. One person chooses a secret number and announces the range in which it falls, for instance: âIâm thinking of a number between 1 and 50.â Other players ask yes or no questions to identify the number. The player who identifies the secret number wins. This game is easy to adapt to different ages: young children can ask and reason about âmore thanâ and âless thanâ (Is it less than 7? Is there a 1 in the 10âs place)? and older ones can ask about multiples, factors, or number relationships (Is it a multiple of 3? Is it a square number?). Available as a web page and downloadable pdf.

Terc

2010-01-01

171

Multiplicative Conservation of Baryon Number and Baryogenesis  

E-print Network

In the canonical seesaw mechanism of neutrino mass, lepton number is only multiplicatively conserved, which enables the important phenomenon of leptogenesis to occur, as an attractive explanation of the present baryon asymmetry of the Universe. A parallel possibility, hitherto unrecognized, also holds for baryon number and baryogenesis. This new idea is shown to be naturally realized in the context of a known supersymmetric string-inspired extension of the Standard Model, based on E(6) particle content, and having an extra U(1)_N gauge symmetry. Within this framework, two-loop radiative neutrino masses are also possible, together with a new form of very long-lived matter.

Ernest Ma

2007-10-04

172

The elephant brain in numbers.  

PubMed

What explains the superior cognitive abilities of the human brain compared to other, larger brains? Here we investigate the possibility that the human brain has a larger number of neurons than even larger brains by determining the cellular composition of the brain of the African elephant. We find that the African elephant brain, which is about three times larger than the human brain, contains 257 billion (10(9)) neurons, three times more than the average human brain; however, 97.5% of the neurons in the elephant brain (251 billion) are found in the cerebellum. This makes the elephant an outlier in regard to the number of cerebellar neurons compared to other mammals, which might be related to sensorimotor specializations. In contrast, the elephant cerebral cortex, which has twice the mass of the human cerebral cortex, holds only 5.6 billion neurons, about one third of the number of neurons found in the human cerebral cortex. This finding supports the hypothesis that the larger absolute number of neurons in the human cerebral cortex (but not in the whole brain) is correlated with the superior cognitive abilities of humans compared to elephants and other large-brained mammals. PMID:24971054

Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Avelino-de-Souza, Kamilla; Neves, Kleber; Porfírio, Jairo; Messeder, Débora; Mattos Feijó, Larissa; Maldonado, José; Manger, Paul R

2014-01-01

173

The elephant brain in numbers  

PubMed Central

What explains the superior cognitive abilities of the human brain compared to other, larger brains? Here we investigate the possibility that the human brain has a larger number of neurons than even larger brains by determining the cellular composition of the brain of the African elephant. We find that the African elephant brain, which is about three times larger than the human brain, contains 257 billion (109) neurons, three times more than the average human brain; however, 97.5% of the neurons in the elephant brain (251 billion) are found in the cerebellum. This makes the elephant an outlier in regard to the number of cerebellar neurons compared to other mammals, which might be related to sensorimotor specializations. In contrast, the elephant cerebral cortex, which has twice the mass of the human cerebral cortex, holds only 5.6 billion neurons, about one third of the number of neurons found in the human cerebral cortex. This finding supports the hypothesis that the larger absolute number of neurons in the human cerebral cortex (but not in the whole brain) is correlated with the superior cognitive abilities of humans compared to elephants and other large-brained mammals. PMID:24971054

Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Avelino-de-Souza, Kamilla; Neves, Kleber; Porfírio, Jairo; Messeder, Débora; Mattos Feijó, Larissa; Maldonado, José; Manger, Paul R.

2014-01-01

174

Reform by the Numbers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although numbers such as average test scores or dropout rates can capture part of a school system's success or failure, school statistics seldom tell the whole story. School board members should realize that numbers might measure compliance or process, rather than improvement. Also, improvements in numbers might reflect changes in assessment…

Hanford, Terry; White, Kathleen

1991-01-01

175

The Numbered Forest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the activity of numbering trees in which students number trees or find the numbered trees and observe other features according to class time. This activity aims to increase student tracking, mapping, and writing skills and integrate them with math skills. Suggests follow up activities that focus on reading, writing, and language skills.…

Kissner, Emily

2000-01-01

176

The Remarkable Number "1"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In human history, the origin of the numbers came from definite practical needs. Indeed, there is strong evidence that numbers were created before writing. The number "1", dating back at least 20,000 years, was found as a counting symbol on a bone. The famous statement by the German mathematician Leopold Kronecker (1823-1891), "God…

Allen, G. Donald

2014-01-01

177

On Number Representation  

E-print Network

Place value numbers, such as the binary or decimal numbers can be represented by the end vertices (leaf or pendant vertices) of rooted symmetrical trees. Numbers that consist of at most a fixed number of digits are represented by vertices that are equidistant from the root vertex and the corresponding number representations do not depend on the distance from the root vertex. In this paper, we introduce place value number systems which are representable by rooted symmetrical trees and in which the representation of a number depends on the distance of the corresponding vertex from the root vertex. Such dependence activates the role of zero in such a way as to render its function equivalent to that of any other single digit number. Thus, in addition to being a place value holder, the digit zero (just as any other single digit numeral) affects the value of a number regardless of its position. For example 012 is different, in the new systems, from 12. As such, these new number systems could be thought of as a natural development for the role of zero. We also illustrate how addition is performed in these newly constructed number systems. In addition to being mathematical structures which could be of mathematical interest, these new number systems could possibly have applications in computing and computing security.

Rafael I. Rofa

2013-10-30

178

Decompose That Teen Number!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The students will receive explicit instruction from the teacher on the definition of decomposing a number and how to represent a decomposition with manipulatives, drawings, and equations. The students will use linking cubes to reflect numbers from 11-19, and to show their understanding of how to decompose a number. Students will record decompositions as an equation.

ROBIN MARMITT

2012-09-03

179

Discovery: Prime Numbers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prime numbers are important as the building blocks for the set of all natural numbers, because prime factorisation is an important and useful property of all natural numbers. Students can discover them by using the method known as the Sieve of Eratosthenes, named after the Greek geographer and astronomer who lived from c. 276-194 BC. Eratosthenes…

de Mestre, Neville

2008-01-01

180

Fermion number violation in heavy fermion decay  

E-print Network

The presence of a heavy fermion doublet of fourth generation in the standard model would lead to a anomalous decay with fermion number non-conservation. The anomalous decay path in the background of the electroweak instanton is demonstrated by numerical calculation. If the mass of fermion exceeds the critical value $m_f^{\\rm cr}$=9.2 TeV (for $M_H=M_W$), it is shown that there exists the rapid anomalous decay of the heavy fermion in semi-classical approximation. The dependence of the critical fermion mass on the Higgs mass is also presented.

Keyan Yang

1995-12-12

181

Mass loss from cool stars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The properties of cool stellar winds are discussed, summarizing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. The advantages of the UV spectral region for studying mass loss in cool stars are outlined; the evidence for mass outflow in objects spanning the cool half of the H-R diagram is reviewed; techniques and results of mass-loss-rate computations based on UV data are examined; detailed studies of single stars and binaries are described; the primary achievements of the IUE are listed; and a number of outstanding problems are briefly considered. Diagrams, graphs, sample spectra, and tables of numerical data are included. The mass-loss rates and wind velocities for Zeta Aur and VV Cep binaries are found to have ranges of about (6-1000) x 10 to the -9th solar mass/yr and 10-160 km/s, respectively.

Dupree, A. K.; Reimers, D.

1987-01-01

182

Higher-Order Mass Defect Analysis for Mass Spectra of Complex Organic Mixtures  

SciTech Connect

Higher-order mass defect analysis is introduced as a unique formula assignment and visualization method for the analysis of complex mass spectra. This approach is an extension of the concepts of Kendrick mass transformation widely used for identification of homologous compounds differing only by a number of base units (e.g., CH2, H2, O, CH2O, etc.) in complex mixtures. We present an iterative renormalization routine for defining higher order homologous series and multidimensional clustering of mass spectral features. This approach greatly simplifies visualization of complex mass spectra and increases the number of chemical formulae that can be confidently assigned for given mass accuracy. The potential for using higher-order mass defects for data reduction and visualization is shown. Higher-order mass defect analysis is described and demonstrated through third-order analysis of a de-isotoped high-resolution mass spectrum of crude oil containing nearly 13,000 peaks.

Roach, Patrick J.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

2011-06-15

183

Convoluted Convolved Fibonacci Numbers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The convolved Fibonacci numbers F_j^(r) are defined by (1-x-x^2)^{-r}=sum_{j>= 0}F_{j+1}^(r)x^j. In this note we consider some related numbers that can be expressed in terms of convolved Fibonacci numbers. These numbers appear in the numerical evaluation of a constant arising in the study of the average density of elements in a finite field having order congruent to a (mod d). We derive a formula expressing these numbers in terms of ordinary Fibonacci and Lucas numbers. The non-negativity of these numbers can be inferred from Witt's dimension formula for free Lie algebras. This note is a case study of the transform 1/n sum_{d|}n mu(d)f(z^d)^{n/d} (with f any formal series), which was introduced and studied in a companion paper by Moree.

Moree, Pieter

2004-04-01

184

Decimal Number Line  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive Flash applet helps students explore place value and develop number sense within whole numbers, integers and decimals. It allows a child or teacher to select an interval in the given number line and show that interval divided into ten equal parts but on a larger scale, which can then be repeated. Users may choose the size of the interval between markers on the first number line and the starting number of that line, as well as whether to hide or show individual number lines and the numbers on them. This applet lends itself well for use on an interactive white board. A pdf guide to this collection of teaching applets is cataloged separately.

2006-01-01

185

New element californium (atomic number 98)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm(242) with about 35-MeV helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay

S. G. Thompson; A. Ghiroso; G. T. Seaborg

1950-01-01

186

Predicting apparent Sherwood numbers for fluidized beds  

SciTech Connect

Mass transfer data of bubbling fluidized beds have been reevaluated with a new model which is completely predictive. The model is based on a two-phase approach with active bypass, formally plug flow for the suspension gas and a consideration of backmixing in the main kinetic coefficient, i.e. in the apparent particle-to-fluid Sherwood number. A good agreement with experimental results of various authors with a broad range of Reynolds numbers and particle diameters is demonstrated.

Groenewold, H.; Tsotsas, E.

1999-09-01

187

Galaxy cosmological mass function  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aims: This paper studies the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach that uses observational data provided by recent galaxy redshift surveys. Methods: Starting from a previously presented relation between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity L, and the average galactic mass ?g were computed in terms of the redshift. ?g was also alternatively estimated by means of a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allowed us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 mass-to-light ratio and its GSMF data. Results: Assuming ?g0 ? 1011?? as the local value of the average galactic mass, the LF approach results in LB ? (1 + z)(2.40 ± 0.03) and ?g ? (1 + z)(1.1 ± 0.2). However, using the GSMF results to calculate the average galactic mass produces ?g ? (1 + z)(- 0.58 ± 0.22). We chose the latter result because it is less biased. We then obtained the theoretical quantities of interest, such as the differential number counts, to finally calculate the GCMF, which can be fitted by a Schechter function, but whose fitted parameter values are different from the values found in the literature for the GSMF. Conclusions: This GCMF behavior follows the theoretical predictions from the cold dark matter models in which the less massive objects form first, followed later by more massive ones. In the range 0.5

Lopes, Amanda R.; Iribarrem, Alvaro; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.; Stoeger, William R.

2014-12-01

188

Relativistic theory of tidal Love numbers  

E-print Network

In Newtonian gravitational theory, a tidal Love number relates the mass multipole moment created by tidal forces on a spherical body to the applied tidal field. The Love number is dimensionless, and it encodes information about the body's internal structure. We present a relativistic theory of Love numbers, which applies to compact bodies with strong internal gravities; the theory extends and completes a recent work by Flanagan and Hinderer, which revealed that the tidal Love number of a neutron star can be measured by Earth-based gravitational-wave detectors. We consider a spherical body deformed by an external tidal field, and provide precise and meaningful definitions for electric-type and magnetic-type Love numbers; and these are computed for polytropic equations of state. The theory applies to black holes as well, and we find that the relativistic Love numbers of a nonrotating black hole are all zero.

Taylor Binnington; Eric Poisson

2009-09-16

189

Relativistic theory of tidal Love numbers  

SciTech Connect

In Newtonian gravitational theory, a tidal Love number relates the mass multipole moment created by tidal forces on a spherical body to the applied tidal field. The Love number is dimensionless, and it encodes information about the body's internal structure. We present a relativistic theory of Love numbers, which applies to compact bodies with strong internal gravities; the theory extends and completes a recent work by Flanagan and Hinderer, which revealed that the tidal Love number of a neutron star can be measured by Earth-based gravitational-wave detectors. We consider a spherical body deformed by an external tidal field, and provide precise and meaningful definitions for electric-type and magnetic-type Love numbers; and these are computed for polytropic equations of state. The theory applies to black holes as well, and we find that the relativistic Love numbers of a nonrotating black hole are all zero.

Binnington, Taylor; Poisson, Eric [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada) and Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada) and Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2009-10-15

190

Guess the Number  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive game gives students practice in counting and ordering numbers. Users try to determine the magician's secret number in as few tries as possible by adjusting their successive guesses according to feedback (too high or too low). Solvers can choose from three ranges of numbers (1 to 10, 1 to 100, or -1000 to 1000) and choose whether or not to view previous guesses.

2011-01-01

191

Number Line Bars  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teachers and students can use this interactive Java applet to model and carry out arithmetic operations on the number line. Users manipulate the size, position, and direction of color bars to represent addition, subtraction, multiplication and division with whole numbers, integers and fractions. Options include the ability to zoom in and out, change the colors of the bars, and adjust the step size of the bars and number line increments.

2000-01-01

192

Computing with Real Numbers  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce, in Part I, a number representation suitable for exact real number computation, consisting of an exponent and\\u000a a mantissa, which is an infinite stream of signed digits, based on the interval [?1,1]. Numerical operations are implemented\\u000a in terms of linear fractional transformations (LFT’s). We derive lower and upper bounds for the number of argument digits that are needed

Abbas Edalat; Reinhold Heckmann

2000-01-01

193

Interactive Fraction Number Lines  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson students make models of fractions, including a human number line. Using a number line, students develop conceptual understanding of fractions. Students use the number line to represent and compare fractions less than one. The activities are engaging and include full participation/engagement of all students. The fractions are limited to positive fractions less than one with a denominator of 2 or 4 including 0 and 1 whole.

Green, Michael

2012-05-25

194

Complex Numbers and Trigonometry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Complex numbers have applications in many applied sciences. This online text begins with an introduction to trigonometry, which serves as a starting point for additional discussion about complex numbers (also known as imaginary numbers). The drawings and figures are the only notable downside to this excellent resource, because many of them are somewhat crude; however, they are still fairly easy to follow. The book can be read online or downloaded for offline viewing.

Alexanderson, Gerald L.; Hillman, Abraham P.; Newton, Mervin E.

2005-12-07

195

Complex Numbers and Trigonometry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Complex numbers have applications in many applied sciences. This online text begins with an introduction to trigonometry, which serves as a starting point for additional discussion about complex numbers (also known as imaginary numbers). The drawings and figures are the only notable downside to this excellent resource, because many of them are somewhat crude; however, they are still fairly easy to follow. The book can be read online or downloaded for offline viewing.

Alexanderson, Gerald L.; Hillman, Abraham P.; Newton, Mervin E.

196

Multiple paternity in wild house mice (Mus musculus musculus): effects on offspring genetic diversity and body mass  

PubMed Central

Multiple mating is common in many species, but it is unclear whether multiple paternity enhances offspring genetic diversity or fitness. We conducted a survey on wild house mice (Mus musculus musculus), and we found that in 73 pregnant females, 29% of litters had multiple sires, which is remarkably similar to the 23–26% found in feral populations of Mus musculus domesticus in the USA and Australia, respectively. The question is: How has selection maintained multiple mating in these subspecies since the evolutionary divergence, ca. 2800–6000 years ago? We found no evidence that multiple paternity enhanced females’ litter size, contrary to the fertility assurance or genetic benefits hypotheses. Multiple paternity was associated with reduced mean and variance in offspring body mass, which suggests that females allocate fewer resources or that there is increased intrauterine conflict in multiple-versus single-sired litters. We found increased allelic diversity (though not heterozygosity) in multiple-sired litters, as predicted by the genetic diversity hypothesis. Finally, we found that the dams’ heterozygosity was correlated with the mean heterozygosity of their offspring in single-and multiple-sired litters, suggesting that outbred, heterozygous females were more likely to avoid inbreeding than inbred, homozygous females. Future studies are needed to examine how increased genetic diversity of litters and smaller mean (and variance) offspring body mass associated with multiple paternity affect offspring fitness. PMID:24558575

Thonhauser, Kerstin E; Thoß, Michaela; Musolf, Kerstin; Klaus, Teresa; Penn, Dustin J

2014-01-01

197

Multiple paternity in wild house mice (Mus musculus musculus): effects on offspring genetic diversity and body mass.  

PubMed

Multiple mating is common in many species, but it is unclear whether multiple paternity enhances offspring genetic diversity or fitness. We conducted a survey on wild house mice (Mus musculus musculus), and we found that in 73 pregnant females, 29% of litters had multiple sires, which is remarkably similar to the 23-26% found in feral populations of Mus musculus domesticus in the USA and Australia, respectively. The question is: How has selection maintained multiple mating in these subspecies since the evolutionary divergence, ca. 2800-6000 years ago? We found no evidence that multiple paternity enhanced females' litter size, contrary to the fertility assurance or genetic benefits hypotheses. Multiple paternity was associated with reduced mean and variance in offspring body mass, which suggests that females allocate fewer resources or that there is increased intrauterine conflict in multiple-versus single-sired litters. We found increased allelic diversity (though not heterozygosity) in multiple-sired litters, as predicted by the genetic diversity hypothesis. Finally, we found that the dams' heterozygosity was correlated with the mean heterozygosity of their offspring in single-and multiple-sired litters, suggesting that outbred, heterozygous females were more likely to avoid inbreeding than inbred, homozygous females. Future studies are needed to examine how increased genetic diversity of litters and smaller mean (and variance) offspring body mass associated with multiple paternity affect offspring fitness. PMID:24558575

Thonhauser, Kerstin E; Thoß, Michaela; Musolf, Kerstin; Klaus, Teresa; Penn, Dustin J

2014-01-01

198

Quark number fluctuations at high temperatures  

E-print Network

We calculate the second, fourth and sixth order quark number fluctuations in the deconfined phase of 2+1 flavor QCD using lattices with temporal extent Nt=4, 6, 8 and 12. We consider light, strange and charm quarks. We use p4 action for valence quarks and gauge configurations generated with p4 action with physical value of the strange quark mass and light quark mass mq=0.1ms generated by the RBC-Bielefeld collaboration. We observe that for all quark masses the quark number fluctuations rapidly get close to the corresponding ideal gas limits. We compare our results to predictions of a quasi-particle model and resummed high temperature perturbative calculations. We also investigate correlations among different flavor channels.

Peter Petreczky; Prasad Hegde; Alexander Velytsky

2009-11-01

199

Galaxy Cosmological Mass Function  

E-print Network

We study the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach using observational data provided by galaxy redshift surveys. Starting from the theory of Ribeiro & Stoeger (2003, arXiv:astro-ph/0304094) between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity $L$ and the average galactic mass $\\mathcal{M}_g$ are computed in terms of the redshift. $\\mathcal{M}_g$ is also alternatively estimated by a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allows us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range $0.5 Schechter parameters in the B-band, as well as this sample's stellar mass-to-light ratio and its GSMF data. Assuming ${\\mathcal{M}_{g_0}} \\approx 10^{11} \\mathcal{M}_\\odot$ as the local value of the average galactic mass, the LF approach results in $L_{B} \\propto (1+z)^{(2.40 \\pm 0.03)}$ and $\\mathcal{M}_g \\propto (1+z)^{(1.1\\pm0.2)}$. However, using the GSMF results produces $\\mathcal{M}_g \\propto (1+z)^{(-0.58 \\pm 0.22)}$. We chose the latter result as it is less biased. We then obtained the theoretical quantities of interest, such as the differential number counts, to calculate the GCMF, which can be fitted by a Schechter function. The derived GCMF follows theoretical predictions in which the less massive objects form first, being followed later by more massive ones. In the range $0.5 < z < 2.0$ the GCMF has a strong variation that can be interpreted as a higher rate of galaxy mergers or as a strong evolution in the star formation history of these galaxies.

Amanda R. Lopes; Alvaro Iribarrem; Marcelo B. Ribeiro; William R. Stoeger

2014-12-03

200

Mass transport through polycrystalline microstructures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mass transport properties are important in polycrystalline materials used as protective films. Traditionally, such properties have been studied by examining model polycrystalline structures, such as a regular array of straight grain boundaries. However, these models do not account for a number of features of real grain ensembles, including the grain size distribution and variations in grain shape. In this study,

T. P. Swiler; E. A. Holm; M. F. Young; S. A. Wright

1994-01-01

201

Law of Large Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by Charles M. Grinstead and J. Laurie Snell of Dartmouth College, this website is part of an online statistics textbook. Topics include: (1) Law of Large Numbers for Discrete Random Variables, (2) Chebyshev Inequality, (3) Law of Averages, (4) Law of Large Numbers for Continuous Random Variables, (5) Monte Carlo Method. There are several examples and exercises that accompany the material.

Grinstead, Charles M.

202

Numbers and Operations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Counting numbers 1-10 Help Champ the Monkey Count the Bananas! The higher you count the harder it gets when you Count the Fish In Pirate numbers count the barrels and then press the red button to launch the cannon. Make sure you're right or your ship will sink! Help count with Counting with Elmo and Zoe! ...

Gribbin, Miss

2010-11-10

203

The Fibonacci Numbers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After a brief historical account of Leonardo Pisano Fibonacci, some basic results concerning the Fibonacci numbers are developed and proved, and entertaining examples are described. Connections are made between the Fibonacci numbers and the Golden Ratio, biological nature, and other combinatorics examples. (MDH)

Onstad, Torgeir

1991-01-01

204

Definitions Numbered Space  

E-print Network

Definitions · Numbered Space ­ a single space marked with a number and reserved for a single permit 24/7 · Unnumbered Space ­ a space which can be used by any customer allowed to park in that lot. High Low Average Question 4: If I buy a staff permit for an UNNUMBERED* space in a non-gated surface

Behmer, Spencer T.

205

Templates, Numbers & Watercolors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how a second-grade class used large templates to draw and paint five-digit numbers. The lesson integrated artistic knowledge and vocabulary with their mathematics lesson in place value. Students learned how draftspeople use templates, and they studied number paintings by Charles Demuth and Jasper Johns. (KM)

Clemesha, David J.

1990-01-01

206

Avogadro's Number Ferromagnetically  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Avogadro's number, usually denoted by N[subscript A], plays a fundamental role in both physics and chemistry. It defines the extremely useful concept of the mole, which is the base unit of the amount of matter in the international system of units. The fundamental character of this number can also be illustrated by its appearance in the definitions…

Houari, Ahmed

2010-01-01

207

Prime Numbers Video  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This 4-minute video introduces the definition of a prime number and illustrates it through a discussion of factors and composite numbers. It makes use of the definition to explain why 1 is not a prime and ends with a question for the viewer to ponder.

2010-01-01

208

Counting whole numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Identify and use whole numbers up to 100 Here are some links to help you learn more about counting Teach R Kids Math counting and number activity themes Here are some games to help you practice your counting counting cherrios Bunny Count Connect the Dots Game ...

Hirst, Ms.

2007-10-12

209

Inventing Negative Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this quick time video segment from Cyberchase, viewers learn about extending a vertical number line below zero as they watch the CyberSquad rescue the Cyberspace Council, which is being held captive by Hacker in a tall building. This video is also featured in the lesson plan: "Introducing Negative Numbers" (cataloged separately). Teaching Tips and a transcript are included.

2008-10-10

210

Numbers in the News  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

All those numbers in the newspaper: what do they mean? Challenge learners to find out as they develop their number sense. Distribute newspaper pages to learners so that each pair gets a section with numbers at the right level of difficulty: easy—weather or sports scores; medium—clothing ads or event listings with times and dates; hard—automobile ads, monetary exchange rates. Learners try to find the smallest and largest numbers on the page (including best deal/best rate) and explain to others what they found. Variation for younger learners: look for the largest or smallest number on a walk around the building or around the block. Available as a web page and downloadable pdf.

TERC

2010-01-01

211

Froude number corrections in anthropological studies.  

PubMed

The Froude number has been widely used in anthropology to adjust for size differences when comparing gait parameters or other nonmorphological locomotor variables (such as optimal walking speed or speed at gait transitions) among humans, nonhuman primates, and fossil hominins. However, the dynamic similarity hypothesis, which is the theoretical basis for Froude number corrections, was originally developed and tested at much higher taxonomic levels, for which the ranges of variation are much greater than in the intraspecific or intrageneric comparisons typical of anthropological studies. Here we present new experimental data on optimal walking speed and the mass-specific cost of transport at that speed from 19 adult humans walking on a treadmill, and evaluate the predictive power of the dynamic similarity hypothesis in this sample. Contrary to the predictions of the dynamic similarity hypothesis, we found that the mass-specific cost of transport at experimentally measured optimal walking speed and Froude number were not equal across individuals, but retained a significant correlation with body mass. Overall, the effect of lower limb length on optimal walking speed was weak. These results suggest that the Froude number may not be an effective way for anthropologists to correct for size differences across individuals, but more studies are needed. We suggest that researchers first determine whether geometric similarity characterizes their data before making inferences based on the dynamic similarity hypothesis, and then check the consistency of their results with and without Froude number corrections before drawing any firm conclusions. PMID:16485296

Steudel-Numbers, Karen; Weaver, Timothy D

2006-09-01

212

Application of Rqd-Number and Rqd-Volume Multifractal Modelling to Delineate Rock Mass Characterisation in Kahang Cu-Mo Porphyry Deposit, Central Iran / Zastosowanie Metod Modelowania Numerycznego Oraz Modelowania Fraktalnego do Analizy JAKO?CI SKA? W Celu OKRE?LENIA Charakterystyki GÓROTWORU W Obszarze Z?O?A Cu-Mo W Kahang, ?RODKOWY Iran  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Identification of rock mass properties in terms of Rock Quality Designation (RQD) plays a significant role in mine planning and design. This study aims to separate the rock mass characterisation based on RQD data analysed from 48 boreholes in Kahang Cu-Mo porphyry deposit situated in the central Iran utilising RQD-Volume (RQD-V) and RQD-Number (RQD-N) fractal models. The log-log plots for RQD-V and RQD-N models show four rock mass populations defined by RQD thresholds of 3.55, 25.12 and 89.12% and 10.47, 41.68 and 83.17% respectively which represent very poor, poor, good and excellent rocks based on Deere and Miller rock classification. The RQD-V and RQD-N models indicate that the excellent rocks are situated in the NW and central parts of this deposit however, the good rocks are located in the most parts of the deposit. The results of validation of the fractal models with the RQD block model show that the RQD-N fractal model of excellent rock quality is better than the RQD-V fractal model of the same rock quality. Correlation between results of the fractal and the geological models illustrates that the excellent rocks are associated with porphyric quartz diorite (PQD) units. The results reveal that there is a multifractal nature in rock characterisation with respect to RQD for the Kahang deposit. The proposed fractal model can be intended for the better understanding of the rock quality for purpose of determination of the final pit slope. Identyfikacja w?a?ciwo?ci górotworu odgrywa zasadnicz? rol? w planowaniu wydobycia i projektowaniu kopalni. Praca niniejsza ma na celu okre?lenie charakterystyki górotworu w oparciu o dane o jako?ci ska? zebrane na podstawie próbek uzyskanych z 48 odwiertów wykonanych w z?o?u porfiru Cu-Mo w Kahang, zalegaj?cym w ?rodkowym Iranie przy u?yciu modeli fraktalnych RQD-V - Rock Quality Determination-Volume [Okre?lenie jako?ci ska?-obj?to??]) i RQD-N (Rock Quality Determination-Number [Okre?lenie jako?ci ska?-liczba]). Wykresy logarytmiczne wykonane dla modeli RQD-V i RQD-N wykazuj? istnienie czterech populacji warstw górotworu, okre?lonych na podstawie parametrów progowych: 3.55; 25.12; 89.12% oraz 10.47; 41.68 i 83.17%, odpowiadaj?cym kolejno stopniom jako?ci: bardzo s?aby, s?aby, dobry i bardzo dobry, zgodnie z klasyfikacj? ska? Deere i Millera. Wyniki uzyskane przy zastosowaniu modeli RQD-V i RQD-N wskazuj?, ?e najlepsze ska?y zalegaj? w pó?nocno- zachodniej i centralnej cz??ci z?o?a, z kolei dobrej jako?ci ska?y znale?? mo?na w obr?bie ca?ego z?o?a. Walidacja modeli fraktalnych w oparciu o model blokowy (RQD block model) wskazuje, ?e model RQD-N dla bardzo dobrej jako?ci ska? jest skuteczniejszy ni? model RQD-V dla tej samej jako?ci ska?. Wysoki stopie? korelacji pomi?dzy wynikami uzyskanymi w oparciu o modele fraktalne i geologiczne pokazuje, ?e najwy?szej jako?ci ska?y zwi?zane s? z obecno?ci? porfirowego diorytu kwarcowego. Badanie wykazuje fraktaln? natur? charakterystyki jako?ci ska? w z?o?u Kahang. Zaproponowany model fraktalny wykorzysta? mo?na do lepszego poznania zagadnienia jako?ci ska? w celu obliczenia nachylenia wyrobiska.

Yasrebi, Amir Bijan; Wetherelt, Andrew; Foster, Patrick J.; Afzal, Peyman; Coggan, John; Ahangaran, Dariush Kaveh

2013-12-01

213

Lepton number violating new physics and neutrinoless double beta decay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Neutrinoless double beta decay (0???) is a very promising experimental test for lepton number violation. Moreover, a strong connection between this decay and the phenomenon of neutrino masses exists. We will discuss the relation between 0??? and Majorana neutrino masses established by the Schechter-Valle theorem in a quantitative way and find that only a negligibly tiny Majorana mass contribution is guaranteed. Additionally, we will discuss lepton number violation and lepton flavor violation in the colored seesaw scenario. This model generates neutrino masses at the one-loop level, and it provides a direct and an indirect contribution to 0???, both of which may be the dominant one.

Duerr, Michael

2013-04-01

214

Number Conveyor Belt  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity for the interactive white board (free access with registration) allows a teacher to create an arithmetic sequence for students to watch being built as the sequence of numbers moves along a conveyor. Learners must determine the pattern being used so when the belt randomly stops, the missing number in the sequence can be dragged/ dropped into its place. The teacher sets the start number (0-19), the interval or common difference (1-10) and if the sequence will count up or down. This last option provides an opportunity to display patterns with integers.

2012-01-01

215

1.NBT Ordering Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Malik is given a list of numbers: 1 \\ \\ 5 \\ \\ 10 \\ \\ 50 \\ \\ 100 He wants to include the following numbers so all numbers will be listed in order from l...

2012-05-01

216

Genetics by the Numbers  

MedlinePLUS

... genome is larger than any other known species. Credit: Open Cage That's how many base pairs—or ... of chromosomes, which are made up of DNA. Credit: NHGRI That's the approximate number of genes in ...

217

On Hultman Numbers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Finding a sequence of transpositions that transforms a given permutation into the identity permutation and is of the shortest possible length is an important problem in bioinformatics. Here, a transposition consists in exchanging two contiguous intervals of the permutation. Bafna and Pevzner introduced the cycle graph as a tool for working on this problem. In particular, they took advantage of the decomposition of the cycle graph into so-called alternating cycles. Later, Hultman raised the question of determining the number of permutations with a cycle graph containing a given quantity of alternating cycles. The resulting number is therefore similar to the Stirling number of the first kind. We provide an explicit formula for computing what we call the Hultman numbers, and give a few numerical values. We also derive formulae for related cases, as well as for a much more general problem. Finally, we indicate a counting result related to another operation on permutations called the "block-interchange".

Doignon, Jean-Paul; Labarre, Anthony

2007-06-01

218

Two Symmetric Properties of Mersenne Numbers and Fermat Numbers  

E-print Network

Mersenne numbers and Fermat numbers are two hot and difficult issues in number theory. This paper constructs a special group for every positive odd number other than 1, and discovers an algorithm for determining the multiplicative order of 2 modulo q for each positive odd number q. It is worth mentioning that this paper discovers two symmetric properties of Mersenne numbers and Fermat numbers.

Shi Yongjin

2013-04-27

219

Exploring Number Sequences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This series of activities can be used to introduce number sequences and patterns and to reinforce parity (even and odd numbers) and its application in addition. The resources are intended for use on an interactive whiteboard but may also be used individually or in small groups. They can be accessed online or downloaded (zip) to a local computer. The pack includes teacher notes, background information on the content, and a student worksheet.

2011-01-01

220

SeanNumbers-Ofala  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page contains links to a video and several downloadable pdf files documenting the discussions of a third grade class investigating even and odd numbers. Included are a 10-minute Blue Stream video segment in which students discuss a classmate's suggestion that the number 6 could be even or odd, a document providing background information on the investigation that led to the discussion, a transcript of the video, and the teacher's journal entry reflecting on the discussion and its implications.

221

Fibonacci's Forgotten Number  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fibonacci's forgotten number is the sexagesimal number 1;22,7,42,33,4,40, which he described in 1225 as an approximation to the real root of x[superscript 3] + 2x[superscript 2] + 10x - 20. In decimal notation, this is 1.36880810785...and it is correct to nine decimal digits. Fibonacci did not reveal his method. How did he do it? There is also a…

Brown, Ezra; Brunson, Cornelius

2008-01-01

222

Addictive Number Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In 1996, just after Springer-Verlag published my books Additive Number Theory: The Classical Bases [34] and Additive Number Theory: Inverse Problems and the Geometry of Sumsets [35], I went into my local Barnes and Noble superstore on Route 22 in Springfield, New Jersey, and looked for them on the\\u000a shelves. Suburban bookstores do not usually stock technical mathematical books, and,

Melvyn B. Nathanson

223

Dangerous Doubles (Doubling Numbers)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson teaches students to use the strategy doubling numbers and doubles plus or minus one in order to use mental math to add one digit numbers. The students are engaged in learning through the read aloud of Double the Ducks by Stephen Murphy and then get to work with a partner to draw doubles and write equations that relate to their drawings. Students individually work on solving word problems using these strategies and manipulatives as necessary to solve.

Sharrer, Stephanie

2012-07-14

224

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ti-59 (Titanium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ti-59 (Titanium, atomic number Z = 22, mass number A = 59).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

225

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ar-46 (Argon)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ar-46 (Argon, atomic number Z = 18, mass number A = 46).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

226

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for F-18 (Fluorine)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope F-18 (Fluorine, atomic number Z = 9, mass number A = 18).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

227

Halo occupation numbers and galaxy bias  

E-print Network

We propose a heuristic model that displays the main features of realistic theories for galaxy bias. We show that the low-order clustering statistics of the dark-matter distribution depend almost entirely on the locations and density profiles of dark-matter haloes. A hypothetical galaxy catalogue depends on (i) the efficiency of galaxy formation, as manifested by the halo occupation number -- the number of galaxies brighter than some sample limit contained in a halo of a given mass; (ii) the location of these galaxies within their halo. The first factor is constrained by the empirical luminosity function of groups. For the second factor, we assume that one galaxy marks the halo centre, with any remaining galaxies acting as satellites that trace the halo mass. These simple assumptions amount to a recipe for non-local bias, in which the probability of finding a galaxy is not a simple function of its local mass density. We have applied this prescription to some CDM models of current interest, and find that the predictions are close to the observed galaxy correlations for a flat $\\Omega=0.3$ model ($\\Lambda$CDM), but not for an $\\Omega=1$ model with the same power spectrum ($\\tau$CDM). This is an inevitable consequence of cluster normalization for the power spectra: cluster-scale haloes of given mass have smaller core radii for high $\\Omega$, and hence display enhanced small-scale clustering. Finally, the pairwise velocity dispersion of galaxies in the $\\Lambda$CDM model is lower than that of the mass, allowing cluster-normalized models to yield a realistic Mach number for the peculiar velocity field. This is largely due to the strong variation of galaxy-formation efficiency with halo mass that is required in this model.

J. A. Peacock; R. E. Smith

2000-06-30

228

Energy or Mass and Interaction  

E-print Network

A review. Problems: 1-Many empirical parameters and large dimension number; 2-Gravitation and Electrodynamics are challenged by dark matter and energy. Energy and nonlinear electrodynamics are fundamental in a unified nonlinear interaction. Nuclear energy appears as nonlinear SU(2) magnetic energy. Gravitation and electromagnetism are unified giving Einstein's equation and a geometric energy momentum tensor. A solution energy in the newtonian limit gives the gravitational constant G. Outside of this limit G is variable. May be interpreted as dark matter or energy. In vacuum, known gravitational solutions are obtained. Electromagnetism is an SU(2) subgroup. A U(1) limit gives Maxwell's equations. Geometric fields determine a generalized Dirac equation and are the germ of quantum physics. Planck's h and of Einstein's c are given by the potential and the metric. Excitations have quanta of charge, flux and spin determining the FQHE. There are only three stable 1/2 spin fermions. Mass is a form of energy. The rest energies of the fermions give the proton/electron mass ratio. Potential excitations have energies equal to the weak boson masses allowing a geometric interpretation of Weinberg's angle. SU(2) gives the anomalous magnetic moments of proton, electron, neutron and generates nuclear range attractive potentials strong enough to produce the binding energies of the deuteron and other nuclides. Lepton and meson masses are due to topological excitations. The geometric mass spectrum is satisfactory. The proton has a triple structure. The alpha constant is a geometric number.

Gustavo R Gonzalez-Martin

2010-07-19

229

Mass of the H dibaryon.  

PubMed

Recent lattice QCD calculations have reported evidence for the existence of a bound state with strangeness -2 and baryon number 2 at quark masses somewhat higher than the physical values. By developing a description of the dependence of this binding energy on the up, down and strange quark masses that allows a controlled chiral extrapolation, we explore the hypothesis that this state is to be identified with the H dibaryon. Taking as input the recent results of the HAL and NPLQCD Collaborations, we show that the H dibaryon is likely to be unbound by 13±14??MeV at the physical point. PMID:21929231

Shanahan, P E; Thomas, A W; Young, R D

2011-08-26

230

Third Grade Number Actiivities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page provides examples of Third Grade Number (Operations and Algebraic Thinking, Number and Operations in Base Ten, and Number Operations-Fractions) activities aligned with the Common Core State Standards. A CCSS standard is stated and the possible activities are listed below and linked. All activities are suitable for use in Math Centers, small group or whole class settings and are designed to elicit a range of responses and provide opportunities for students to communicate their reasoning and mathematical thinking. Instructions for each task are typed in large print and written in child-friendly language to enable students to work on activities independently after a brief introduction to the task. All files listed are in PDF format.

Godwin, Nicola

2012-01-01

231

Beyond the Number Domain  

PubMed Central

In a world without numbers, we would be unable to build a skyscraper, hold a national election, plan a wedding, or pay for a chicken at the market. The numerical symbols used in all these behaviors build on the approximate number system (ANS) which represents the number of discrete objects or events as a continuous mental magnitude. In this review, we first discuss evidence that the ANS bears a set of behavioral and brain signatures that are universally displayed across animal species, human cultures, and development. We then turn to the question of whether the ANS constitutes a specialized cognitive and neural domain--a question central to understanding how this system works, the nature of its evolutionary and developmental trajectory, and its physical instantiation in the brain. PMID:19131268

Cantlon, Jessica F.; Platt, Michael L.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

2009-01-01

232

Positive About Negative Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article is devoted to the mathematical topic of negative numbers and provides a series of primary resources designed to familiarize children with the notion of counting on either side of a central point. The article presents that the activities listed should be played sequentially to build precursory ideas in understanding negative numbers. All the games discussed in the article are linked on the page and have been cataloged separately: Incy Wincy Spider, Tug of War, Swimming Pool, Tug Harder, First Connect Three and lastly Sea Level.

Woodham, Liz

2011-01-01

233

Cosmological baryon and lepton number in the presence of electroweak fermion-number violation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the presence of rapid fermion-number violation due to nonperturbative electroweak effects certain relations between the baryon number of the Universe and the lepton numbers of the Universe are predicted. In some cases the electron-neutrino asymmetry is exactly specified in terms of the baryon asymmetry. Without introducing new particles, beyond the usual quarks and leptons, it is necessary that the Universe possess a nonzero value of B - L prior to the epoch of fermion-number violation if baryon and lepton asymmetries are to survive. Contrary to intuition, even though electroweak processes violate B + L, a nonzero value of B + L persists after the epoch of rapid fermion-number violation. If the standard model is extended to include lepton-number violation, for example through Majorana neutrino masses, then electroweak processes will reduce the baryon number to zero even in the presence of an initial B - L unless 20 M(sub L) approximately greater than the square root of (T(sub B - L) m(sub P1)) where M(sub L) sets the scale of lepton number violation and T(sub B - L) is the temperature at which a B - L asymmetry is produced. In many models this implies that neutrinos must be so light that they cannot contribute appreciably to the mass density of the Universe.

Harvey, Jeffrey A.; Turner, Michael S.

1990-01-01

234

Expansion of rational numbers in Mobius number systems Petr Kurka  

E-print Network

Expansion of rational numbers in M¨obius number systems Petr K°urka Center for Theoretical Study- tions. We say that a M¨obius number system is rational, if it represents rational numbers by periodic. In the present paper we study expansions of rational numbers in the integer M¨obius number systems, whose

Kurka, Petr

235

Alienation, Mass Society and Mass Culture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph examines the nature of alienation in mass society and mass culture. Conceptually based on the "Gemeinschaft-Gesellschaft" paradigm of sociologist Ferdinand Tonnies, discussion traces the concept of alienation as it appears in the philosophies of Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Sartre, and others. Dwight Macdonald's "A Theory of Mass

Dam, Hari N.

236

Stability in Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this Illuminations lesson, students apply their knowledge of addition equations to investigate the equivalence of two numeric expressions using the "Pan Balance-Numbers" applet (cataloged separately). An instructional plan, questions for the students, assessment options, extensions, and teacher reflections are given for the lesson as well as links to the applet and a student activity sheet(word format).

Keller, Gary M.

2011-01-01

237

"Better than Their Numbers"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses College Summit, a nonprofit effort centered around the premise that there is a sizable number of students who are more capable of college academics than their test scores and grade point averages suggest. Its four-day summer sessions are focused not on ramping up students' academic performance but in mining students'…

Cech, Scott J.

2008-01-01

238

IN NUMBERS: Biostatistics Faculty  

E-print Network

STRENGTH IN NUMBERS: Biostatistics Faculty Are in Great Demand in the SPH and Beyond of the school's Department of Biostatistics faculty (clockwise starting from lower left): Drs. Catherine Sugar specialize in other aspects of clinical trials design. With this expertise, the Department of Biostatistics

Grether, Gregory

239

Houses with Height Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This applet allows students to freely build shapes by stacking cubes and "explore the relation between a building (house) consisting of cubes and the height numbers representing the height of the different parts of the building." This exercise helps students visualize and understand the concepts of volume and three-dimensional, measurable space.

Boon, Peter; Van Den Brink, Jan

2004-01-01

240

Emergency Numbers DANFORTH CAMPUS  

E-print Network

Fire Safety Active Shooter Natural Disasters Hazardous Material Spills Flu Information PreparingEmergency Numbers DANFORTH CAMPUS Ambulance · Fire · Police (314) 935-5555 Emergency Health Service 911 MEDICAL CAMPUS Ambulance · Fire · Police (314) 362-HELP (4357) Safety and Security 2012-2013 Guide

Subramanian, Venkat

241

Emergency Numbers DANFORTH CAMPUS  

E-print Network

Fire Safety Active Shooter Natural Disasters Hazardous Material Spills Flu Information PreparingEmergency Numbers DANFORTH CAMPUS Ambulance · Fire · Police (314) 935-5555 Emergency Health Service 911 MEDICAL CAMPUS Ambulance · Fire · Police (314) 362-HELP (4357) Safety and Security 2014-2015 Guide

Grant, Gregory

242

Poissonian copy numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Why do quantitative biologists sometimes claim that mRNA copy numbers are Poisson distributed in simple models of gene transcription? The first video segment addresses this question under the simplifying assumption that mRNA degradation occurs after a well-defined, deterministic lifetime, and the second segment illustrates the same basic concept for the more realistic situation in which degradation is stochastic.

2013-06-21

243

A Highly Random Number  

Microsoft Academic Search

In his celebrated 1936 paper Turing defined a machine to becircular iff it performs an infinite computation outputting only finitelymany symbols. We define ( as the probability that an arbitrary machinebe circular and we prove that is a random number that goes beyond$2, the probability that a universal self alelimiting machine halts. Thealgorithmic complexity of c is strictly greater than

Facultad De Ciencias Exactas; Gregory Chaitin; Sergio Daicz I; Vernica Becher

2001-01-01

244

Paint by Numbers Revived!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Remember paint by numbers? This revived trend was a perfect solution to teaching geometric shapes to the author's first-grade students. Geometric shapes are identified and used in early elementary art classrooms, but this lesson gives students a deeper understanding of shape, encourages problem-solving, and makes a strong correlation between math…

Hahn, Nic

2012-01-01

245

Large number hypothesis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dirac's large number hypothesis (LNH) and the Whitrow-Randall-Sciama relation are related to some cosmological models. The LNH and Whitrow-Randall-Sciama relations are neither equivalent nor consistent in general relativity, but they may both be valid in the Brans-Dicke theory and in another theory considered in this paper.

Berman, Marcelo Samuel

1992-08-01

246

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-print Network

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

Bolch, Tobias

247

ALARA notes, Number 8  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [eds.

1993-10-01

248

Higgs-Thomson-Fibonacci generation of lepton and quark masses  

SciTech Connect

Lepton-quark mass may derive from the primary Higgs-mechanism fermion mass by a fundamental law for fermion mass modification, without extension of the minimal standard model. Accurate mass values are obtained for all charged leptons and quarks if the fundamental law for fermion mass modification is given by m = m{sub e}Q{sup 2}(exp {lambda}{sub n}), where m{sub e} is the Higgs-generated electron mass, Q is the charge number of the lepton or quark and {lambda}{sub n}, a linearly additive parameter that depends on the fermion principal quantum number n, is simply related to the small Fibonacci numbers. The three neutrino masses are zero, and the top mass is close to m{sub t} = 163.6 GeV.

Rosen, G. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1996-02-01

249

Generalized van der Waerden numbers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Certain generalizations of arithmetic progressions are used to define numbers analogous to the van der Waerden numbers. Several exact values of the new numbers are given, and upper bounds for these numbers are obtained. In addition, a comparison is made between the number of different arithmetic progressions and the number of different generalized arithmetic progressions.

Bruce M. Landman

1986-01-01

250

On normal numbers Veronica Becher  

E-print Network

On normal numbers Ver´onica Becher Universidad de Buenos Aires & CONICET Workshop on Logic Language and Information, July 2014 #12;Normal numbers Normality is a basic form of randomness for real numbers. It asks that the expansions of real numbers obey the Law of Large Numbers. Ver´onica Becher On normal numbers 1 / 30 #12

Becher, Verónica

251

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE VENDOR NUMBER GUIDE  

E-print Network

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE VENDOR NUMBER GUIDE FOR DEPARTMENTS W-9 AND W-8BEN FORMS TAXPAYER ID NUMBER (TIN), FEDERAL EMPLOYER ID NUMBER (FEIN), AND EMPLOYER'S ID NUMBER (EIN) HOW TO FIND A VENDOR'S ID NUMBER IN BANNER HOW TO DETERMINE IF A VENDOR IS IN BANNER UPDATED MAY 2013 #12;Vendor Number Guide

252

Magic Numbers for Sphere Packings: Experimental Verification in Free Xenon Clusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

The existence of magic numbers for atomic microclusters has been found experimentally for the first time. The magic numbers n* manifest themselves in the mass spectra of free xenon clusters, nucleated in the gas phase. The observed numbers n*=13, 55, and 147 coincide with the numbers of spheres required for complete-shell icosahedra. The appearance of further magic numbers (19, 25,

O. Echt; K. Sattler; E. Recknagel

1981-01-01

253

Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System  

DOEpatents

Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

2005-12-06

254

Mass Distribution and Mass Transport in the Earth System: Recent Scientific Progress Due to Interdisciplinary Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This Special Issue on "Mass Distribution and Mass Transport in the Earth System: Recent Scientific Progress due to Interdisciplinary Research" reports a number of findings resulting from a collaborative effort run from 2006 until 2013, in the framework of the DFG Priority Program 1257 "Mass Distribution and Mass Transport in the Earth System". Contributions have been arranged along five lines, i.e. (1) improvements in geodesy: satellite mass monitoring through gravimetry and altimetry, (2) applications in large-scale hydrology, (3) applications in solid Earth research, (4) applications in cryospheric research, (5) applications in ocean sciences.

Kusche, Jürgen; Klemann, Volker; Sneeuw, Nico

2014-11-01

255

Storage and retrieval of mass spectral information  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computer handling of mass spectra serves two main purposes: the interpretation of the occasional, problematic mass spectrum, and the identification of the large number of spectra generated in the gas-chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of complex natural and synthetic mixtures. Methods available fall into the three categories of library search, artificial intelligence, and learning machine. Optional procedures for coding, abbreviating and filtering a library of spectra minimize time and storage requirements. Newer techniques make increasing use of probability and information theory in accessing files of mass spectral information.

Hohn, M. E.; Humberston, M. J.; Eglinton, G.

1977-01-01

256

Metrics For Comparing Plasma Mass Filters  

SciTech Connect

High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter. __________________________________________________

Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2012-08-15

257

Metrics for comparing plasma mass filters  

SciTech Connect

High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter.

Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

2011-10-15

258

Metrics for comparing plasma mass filters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter.

Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

2011-10-01

259

Spectroscopic Binary Mass Determination using Relativity  

E-print Network

High-precision radial-velocity techniques, which enabled the detection of extrasolar planets are now sensitive to relativistic effects in the data of spectroscopic binary stars (SBs). We show how these effects can be used to derive the absolute masses of the components of eclipsing single-lined SBs and double-lined SBs from Doppler measurements alone. High-precision stellar spectroscopy can thus substantially increase the number of measured stellar masses, thereby improving the mass-radius and mass-luminosity calibrations.

Shay Zucker; Tal Alexander

2006-11-14

260

First Grade Number Actiivities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page provides examples of First Grade Number (Operations and Algebraic Thinking, and Number and Operations in Base Ten) activities aligned with the Common Core State Standards. A CCSS standard is stated and the possible activities are listed below and linked. All activities are suitable for use in Math Centers, small group or whole class settings and are designed to elicit a range of responses and provide opportunities for students to communicate their reasoning and mathematical thinking. Instructions for each task are typed in large print and written in child-friendly language to enable students to work on activities independently after a brief introduction to the task. All files listed are in PDF format.

Godwin, Nicola

2012-01-01

261

Second grade Number Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page provides examples of Second Grade Number (Operations and Algebraic Thinking, and Number and Operations in Base Ten) activities aligned with the Common Core State Standards. A CCSS standard is stated and the possible activities are listed below and linked. All activities are suitable for use in Math Centers, small group or whole class settings and are designed to elicit a range of responses and provide opportunities for students to communicate their reasoning and mathematical thinking. Instructions for each task are typed in large print and written in child-friendly language to enable students to work on activities independently after a brief introduction to the task. All files listed are in PDF format.

Godwin, Nicola

2012-01-01

262

Accelerator mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples. PMID:18470926

Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

2008-01-01

263

On canonical number systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Let P(x) = pdxd + ::: + p0 2 Z(x) be such that d ‚ 1;pd = 1;p0 ‚ 2 and N = f0;1;:::;p0 ¡ 1g. We are proving in this note a new criterion for the pair fP(x);Ng to be a canonical number system. This enables us to prove that if p2;:::;pd¡1; Pd i=1 pi ‚ 0 and p0

Shigeki Akiyama; Attila Pethö

2002-01-01

264

All About Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this 14-min video British teacher Rosalind Caren demonstrates group activities designed to develop number sense, fluency with addition and subtraction fact families, and reasoning skills. Caren exhibits effective questioning techniques and routines. Headteacher/math coordinator Kate Frood describes the guiding principles and expectations of teaching at the school. Following a class observation Frood provides constructive feedback to Caren and her teaching assistants.

2012-01-01

265

Maths Doctor: Number  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Maths Doctor website from Macmillan Publishers contains more than 250 lessons that are free for anyone. Each lesson includes a three to five minute video tutorial on the topic and a related worksheet for the student to complete. Each worksheet has a convenient QR code that a student can scan to access the video. The Number section contains numerous lessons ranging from Conversion of Units to Dividing Fractions to Subtracting Negative Integers.

2014-06-20

266

Nature by Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This 4-minute computer animation highlights three forms in nature that have connections with numbers and geometry. The Fibonacci sequence and the golden ratio are shown relating to the chambered nautilus shell and the sunflower seed pattern. The Delaunay triangulation and Voronoi tessellation are shown to simulate the capillary distribution on a dragonfly wing. Included are descriptions of the mathematics and stills from the production.

267

Greek Number Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Number theory is the second large field of mathematics that comes to us from the Pythagoreans via Euclid. The Pythagorean\\u000a theorem led mathematicians to the study of squares and sums of squares; Euclid drew attention to the primes by proving that there are infinitely many of them. Euclid’s investigations were based on the so-called Euclidean algorithm, a method for finding

John Stillwell

268

Discrete symmetries and neutrino masses  

E-print Network

We constructed a model of neutrino masses using Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism with $U(1) \\times Z_3 \\times Z_2$ flavor symmetry. The model predicts that $(2/3)m_2/m_3 \\sim \\sqrt{2}\\sin\\theta_{13}$ at lepton number violating scale $M_1$. It is shown that the small values for $m_2/m_3$ and $\\sin\\theta_{13}$ are consequences of breaking discrete symmetries.

Kim Siyeon

2005-05-27

269

The Remarkable Number "1"  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In human history, the origin of the numbers came from definite practical needs. Indeed, there is strong evidence that numbers were created before writing. The number "1", dating back at least 20,000 years, was found as a counting symbol on a bone. The famous statement by the German mathematician Leopold Kronecker (1823-1891), "God made the integers; all else is the work of man," has spawned a lively modern philosophical discussion, and this discussion begins by trying to get a philosophical handle on "1." This approach remains under heavy discussion, and is more-or-less unresolved (Frege in Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik (English: The foundations of arithmetic). Polhman, 1884). In this note, we consider the many facets of "one" in it many guises and applications. Nonetheless, "one" has multiple meanings, from the very practical to the abstract, from mathematics to science to basically everything. We examine here a mere slice of mathematical history with a focus on the most basic and applicable concept therein. It troubles many, particularly students, even today.

Allen, G. Donald

2014-09-01

270

Parasites in algae mass culture  

PubMed Central

Parasites are now known to be ubiquitous across biological systems and can play an important role in modulating algal populations. However, there is a lack of extensive information on their role in artificial ecosystems such as algal production ponds and photobioreactors. Parasites have been implicated in the demise of algal blooms. Because individual mass culture systems often tend to be unialgal and a select few algal species are in wide scale application, there is an increased potential for parasites to have a devastating effect on commercial scale monoculture. As commercial algal production continues to expand with a widening variety of applications, including biofuel, food and pharmaceuticals, the parasites associated with algae will become of greater interest and potential economic impact. A number of important algal parasites have been identified in algal mass culture systems in the last few years and this number is sure to grow as the number of commercial algae ventures increases. Here, we review the research that has identified and characterized parasites infecting mass cultivated algae, the techniques being proposed and or developed to control them, and the potential impact of parasites on the future of the algal biomass industry. PMID:24936200

Carney, Laura T.; Lane, Todd W.

2014-01-01

271

FOREWORD: Special issue on mass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This special issue is intended to present a review of mass standards, mass determination and the efforts to replace the international prototype of the kilogram by a new definition of the kilogram based on a fundamental constant of physics. Mass is a quantity that is familiar to everybody primarily for its importance in commerce. It is not only one of the traditional quantities of metrology but also of science in general. The unit of mass has always been based on a material object and, since 1889, on the international prototype of the kilogram. The mass of any standard weight is derived from this prototype by a cascade of comparison measurements using balances. The sources of uncertainty of the mass of a standard depend upon the circumstances of the weighing process and the long-term instabilities of the intermediate standards. The international prototype—its mass is one kilogram by definition—may also suffer from instabilities or drifts in time, but until now it has not been possible to check this by comparison with a fundamental constant in physics. Repeated verifications of some 40 or so national prototypes of the members of the Metre Convention have shown significant drifts with an average of about 50 µg within 100 years, a fact that casts doubt on the stability of the international prototype itself. Experiments have been underway for about 30 years on linking fundamental constants such as the Avogadro constant or, correspondingly, the atomic mass unit and Planck's constant to the kilogram. Relative uncertainties of the order of 10-7 have been reached today, still one order of magnitude too large for monitoring the stability of the international prototype or for a new definition. The first article of this special issue gives information on the international and the national prototypes of the kilogram, its material, manufacture, cleaning procedures, stability investigations and the periodic verifications of national prototypes. The next article describes methods for determining the mass of multiples and submultiples of the kilogram. In practice, mass standards in the range from one milligram up to several thousands of kilograms are used for the mass determination of commercial objects or for the calibration of weighing instruments. The determination of the mass of multiples and submultiples of the kilogram is a procedure that links such mass standards to the kilogram by a number of—mostly redundant—weighing processes and mathematical procedures that result in the values and the uncertainties of the standards involved. The reproducibility of E-class weights is the topic of the next article. Classification of weights is defined in an international recommendation for legal metrology and is carried over into the national regulations of most countries. E-class weights are at the highest level in this context. Reproducibility is related to the instability of mass standards within some time interval. Corresponding observations and discussions of the results are reported. As already mentioned, weighing is an important source of the uncertainty of a mass standard. The requirements on weighing in legal metrology are discussed in the following article. It refers to the project of a new international recommendation for weights (revised OIML R 111) that describes procedures for mass determination and for testing the properties of weights according to the stated requirements for the different classes. The instability of mass standards is mostly due to surface contamination. A review of the stability of platinum-iridium and stainless-steel standards and their surface contamination is presented in the next article. It gives a comprehensive overview of published data and investigations on this topic. Magnetic weights interact with the magnetic field generated by a balance. A change in the balance indication is the consequence if certain limits are exceeded. Magnetic properties of weights, their measurements and magnetic interactions between weights and balances constitute the theme of the next article. After an introduction to

Gläser, Michael

2003-12-01

272

Using System Mass (SM), Equivalent Mass (EM), Equivalent System Mass (ESM) or Life Cycle Mass (LCM) in Advanced Life Support (ALS) Reporting  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Life Support (ALS) has used a single number, Equivalent System Mass (ESM), for both reporting progress and technology selection. ESM is the launch mass required to provide a space system. ESM indicates launch cost. ESM alone is inadequate for technology selection, which should include other metrics such as Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Life Cycle Cost (LCC) and also consider perfom.arxe 2nd risk. ESM has proven difficult to implement as a reporting metric, partly because it includes non-mass technology selection factors. Since it will not be used exclusively for technology selection, a new reporting metric can be made easier to compute and explain. Systems design trades-off performance, cost, and risk, but a risk weighted cost/benefit metric would be too complex to report. Since life support has fixed requirements, different systems usually have roughly equal performance. Risk is important since failure can harm the crew, but it is difficult to treat simply. Cost is not easy to estimate, but preliminary space system cost estimates are usually based on mass, which is better estimated than cost. Amass-based cost estimate, similar to ESM, would be a good single reporting metric. The paper defines and compares four mass-based cost estimates, Equivalent Mass (EM), Equivalent System Mass (ESM), Life Cycle Mass (LCM), and System Mass (SM). EM is traditional in life support and includes mass, volume, power, cooling and logistics. ESM is the specifically defined ALS metric, which adds crew time and possibly other cost factors to EM. LCM is a new metric, a mass-based estimate of LCC measured in mass units. SM includes only the factors of EM that are originally measured in mass, the hardware and logistics mass. All four mass-based metrics usually give similar comparisons. SM is by far the simplest to compute and easiest to explain.

Jones, Harry

2003-01-01

273

Variation in Plastid Number  

PubMed Central

Changes in the physiological state of the multiplastidic alga Olisthodiscus luteus result in a shift in chloroplast complement from 33 to 21 plastids. The effect of this induced change in organelle complement on nuclear and chloroplast DNA levels has been analyzed. Data suggest that the absolute amount of chloroplast and nuclear DNA found within a cell remains constant but that the amount of chloroplast DNA per plastid is inversely proportional to the number of chloroplasts to which that DNA must be distributed. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:16660558

Cattolico, Rose Ann

1978-01-01

274

Displaying Number Patterns  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This applet from the E-Examples of NCTM, which could be used as an interactive presentation tool, allows the student to link numerical patterns to a visual display as a number pattern is displayed on a calculator and on a hundred board simultaneously. The learner's task is to compare counting sequences on the calculator with the patterns they generate on the hundred board with the goal of helping students to see patterns and then make predictions. Instructions for using the applet are provided as well as background for the teacher.

Bill Kreahling, Bob Panoff, and the Shodor Education Foundation

2011-05-05

275

History of Prime Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The School of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of St Andrews, Scotland has developed an extensive collection of articles on the history of mathematics (See also NSDL Scout Report for Math, Engineering, and Technology, June 4, 2004). This article, written by J J O'Connor and E F Robertson, reviews the history of Prime Numbers. The article includes hyperlinks to topics addressed further in other sections of the website. For example, from this website visitors can also find articles on Pythagoras and Euclid.

276

[Selection of the peptide mass tolerance value for the protein identification with peptide mass fingerprinting].  

PubMed

Peptide mass-fingerprint is widely used for protein identification while studying proteome with the use of 1D or 2D electrophoresis. Peptide mass tolerance indicates the fit of theoretical peptide mass with the experimental measurements, and choice of this parameter sufficiently influences the protein identification. The role of peptide mass tolerance was estimated by counting the number of identified proteins for the reference set of mass-spectra. The reference set of 400 Ultraflex (Bruker Daltonics, Germany) mass-spectra was obtained for the slices of 1D gel of liver microsomes. Using Mascot server for protein identification, the peptide mass tolerance value was varied in the range from 0.02 to 0.40 Da with a step 0.01 Da. Depending on the tolerance the number of identified protein changes up to 10 times. Maximal number of identified proteins was reported for the tolerance value of 0.15 Da (120 ppm), which is 1.5 - 2 times higher than the recommended values for such type of mass-spectrometers. The software program PMFScan was developed to obtain the dependence of number of identified proteins of the tolerance values. PMID:21460888

Chernobrovkin, A L; Trifonova, O P; Petushkova, N A; Ponomarenko, E A; Lisitsa, A V

2011-01-01

277

Mass spectrometric immunoassay  

DOEpatents

Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

Nelson, Randall W (Phoenix, AZ); Williams, Peter (Phoenix, AZ); Krone, Jennifer Reeve (Granbury, TX)

2007-12-04

278

Le meurtrier de masse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multicide and other mass killing are sufficiently dramatic to excite great interest from clinicians, criminologists and behavioural scientists. A review of avaible literature on the topic is presented and analysed, in order to define mass murder and to learn about sociodemography and psychopathology of mass killers. Mass homicide is typically defined as the intentional killing of multiple individuals, injuring five

Y. Auxéméry

2011-01-01

279

Mass of the Earth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners use basic measurements of the Earth and pieces of rock and iron to estimate the mass of the Earth. Learners will calculate mass, volume, and density, convert units, and employ the water displacement method. To calculate an even more accurate estimate of the mass of the Earth, this resource includes optional instructions on how to measure the iron core mass.

Muller, Eric

2010-01-01

280

Mass spectrometric immunoassay  

DOEpatents

Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

Nelson, Randall W; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

2013-07-16

281

New normal numbers Veronica Becher  

E-print Network

New normal numbers Ver´onica Becher Universidad de Buenos Aires & CONICET, Argentina Joint work Departamento de Matem´atica, FCEyN, UBA, julio 2014 Ver´onica Becher New normal numbers 0 / 15 #12;Normal numbers Ver´onica Becher New normal numbers 1 / 15 #12;Normal numbers A base is an integer b greater than

Becher, Verónica

282

Generalized Maxwell Love numbers  

E-print Network

By elementary methods, I study the Love numbers of a homogeneous, incompressible, self-gravitating sphere characterized by a generalized Maxwell rheology, whose mechanical analogue is represented by a finite or infinite system of classical Maxwell elements disposed in parallel. Analytical, previously unknown forms of the complex shear modulus for the generalized Maxwell body are found by algebraic manipulation, and studied in the particular case of systems of springs and dashpots whose strength follows a power-law distribution. We show that the sphere is asymptotically stable for any choice of the mechanical parameters that define the generalized Maxwell body and analytical forms of the Love numbers are always available for generalized bodies composed by less than five classical Maxwell bodies. For the homogeneous sphere, real Laplace inversion methods based on the Post-Widder formula can be applied without performing a numerical discretization of the n-th derivative, which can be computed in a "closed-form" with the aid of the Faa di Bruno formula.

Giorgio Spada

2009-11-04

283

Comparative performance of double-focus and quadrupole mass spectrometers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Light-weight flight type double focus and quadruple mass spectrometer models were compared. Data cover size, weight, and power sensitivity required to achieve same resolution sensitivity at given mass number. Comparison was made using mathematical relationships. Analysis was confined to equal ion source area sensitivity variations not more than 40% over mass range.

Wilson, S. K.

1972-01-01

284

Fall Speeds and Masses of Solid Precipitation Particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements have been made of the fall speeds and masses of a large number of different types of solid precipitation particles. Particular attention is paid to the effects of riming and aggregation on the fall speeds and masses. Empirical expressions are given for the relationships between fall speeds and maximum dimensions and between masses and maximum dimensions for the particles

John D. Locatelli; Peter V. Hobbs

1974-01-01

285

Low Mach Number Fluctuating Hydrodynamics of Multispecies Liquid Mixtures  

E-print Network

We develop a low Mach number formulation of the hydrodynamic equations describing transport of mass and momentum in a multispecies mixture of incompressible miscible liquids at specified temperature and pressure that generalizes our prior work on ideal mixtures of ideal gases and binary liquid mixtures. In this formulation we combine and extend a number of existing descriptions of multispecies transport available in the literature. The formulation applies to non-ideal mixtures of arbitrary number of species, without the need to single out a 'solvent' species, and includes contributions to the diffusive mass flux due to gradients of composition, temperature and pressure. Momentum transport and advective mass transport are handled using a low Mach number approach that eliminates fast sound waves (pressure fluctuations) from the full compressible system of equations and leads to a quasi-incompressible formulation. Thermal fluctuations are included in our fluctuating hydrodynamics description following the princi...

Donev, A; Bhattacharjee, A K; Garcia, A L; Bell, J B

2014-01-01

286

Linear mass actuator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A linear mass actuator includes an upper housing and a lower housing connectable to each other and having a central passageway passing axially through a mass that is linearly movable in the central passageway. Rollers mounted in the upper and lower housings in frictional engagement with the mass translate the mass linearly in the central passageway and drive motors operatively coupled to the roller means, for rotating the rollers and driving the mass axially in the central passageway.

Holloway, Sidney E., III (inventor); Crossley, Edward A., Jr. (inventor); Jones, Irby W. (inventor); Miller, James B. (inventor); Davis, C. Calvin (inventor); Behun, Vaughn D. (inventor); Goodrich, Lewis R., Sr. (inventor)

1992-01-01

287

Heavy quark masses  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

Testa, Massimo

1990-01-01

288

Wizard's Number (0-100)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive Flash applet helps students develop number sense and basic number concepts. Players attempt to guess the wizard's number by clicking on dragons to get clues related to the number of digits, a more/less comparison with a benchmark, rounding, how far it is to the next ten, comparison of tens and units, and parity. Clicking on the wizard opens a keypad on which to type the secret number. A version covering numbers 0-1000 is cataloged separately.

2011-01-01

289

Wizard's Number (0-1000)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive Flash applet helps students develop number sense and basic number concepts. Players attempt to guess the wizard's number by clicking on dragons to get clues related to the digit sum, a more/less range comparison, rounding, how far it is to the next hundred, comparison of tens and units, the number of units, and parity. Clicking on the wizard opens a keypad on which to type the secret number. A version covering numbers 0-100 is cataloged separately.

2011-01-01

290

Modular redundant number systems  

SciTech Connect

With the increased use of public key cryptography, faster modular multiplication has become an important cryptographic issue. Almost all public key cryptography, including most elliptic curve systems, use modular multiplication. Modular multiplication, particularly for the large public key modulii, is very slow. Increasing the speed of modular multiplication is almost synonymous with increasing the speed of public key cryptography. There are two parts to modular multiplication: multiplication and modular reduction. Though there are fast methods for multiplying and fast methods for doing modular reduction, they do not mix well. Most fast techniques require integers to be in a special form. These special forms are not related and converting from one form to another is more costly than using the standard techniques. To this date it has been better to use the fast modular reduction technique coupled with standard multiplication. Standard modular reduction is much more costly than standard multiplication. Fast modular reduction (Montgomery`s method) reduces the reduction cost to approximately that of a standard multiply. Of the fast multiplication techniques, the redundant number system technique (RNS) is one of the most popular. It is simple, converting a large convolution (multiply) into many smaller independent ones. Not only do redundant number systems increase speed, but the independent parts allow for parallelization. RNS form implies working modulo another constant. Depending on the relationship between these two constants; reduction OR division may be possible, but not both. This paper describes a new technique using ideas from both Montgomery`s method and RNS. It avoids the formula problem and allows fast reduction and multiplication. Since RNS form is used throughout, it also allows the entire process to be parallelized.

NONE

1998-05-31

291

Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags  

DOEpatents

A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

2013-01-29

292

The Number of Planets, a Number-Referring Term?  

Microsoft Academic Search

singular terms referring to numbers as abstract objects: (1) The number of planets is eight. Frege took it as obvious that (1) is an identity statement. In this paper I will argue that Frege’s view about reference to numbers in natural language is fundamentally mistaken. The number of planets, I like to show, while it in general is a referential

Friederike Moltmann

293

Pauli Pascal Pyramids, Pauli Fibonacci Numbers, and Pauli Jacobsthal Numbers  

E-print Network

The three anti-commutative two-dimensional Pauli Pascal triangles can be generalized into multi-dimensional Pauli Pascal hyperpyramids. Fibonacci and Jacobsthal numbers are then generalized into Pauli Fibonacci numbers, Pauli Jacobsthal numbers, and Pauli Fibonacci numbers of higher order. And the question is: are Pauli rabbits killer rabbits?

Martin Erik Horn

2007-11-26

294

Generalized Lucas Numbers and Relations with Generalized Fibonacci Numbers  

E-print Network

In this paper, we present a new generalization of the Lucas numbers by matrix representation using Genaralized Lucas Polynomials. We give some properties of this new generalization and some relations between the generalized order-k Lucas numbers and generalized order-k Fibonacci numbers. In addition, we obtain Binet formula and combinatorial representation for generalized order-k Lucas numbers by using properties of generalized Fibonacci numbers.

Kaygisiz, Kenan

2011-01-01

295

Number Theoretic Background  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contents: 1. Introduction 2. Divisibility 2.1. Basics on Divisibility 2.2. The Greatest Common Divisor 2.3. The Euclidean Algorithm 2.4. The Diophantine Equation ax+by=c 3. Prime Numbers 3.1. The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic 3.2. There Are Infinitely Many Primes 3.3. The Density of Primes 3.4. Primes in Arithmetic Progressions 4. Continued Fractions 5. Modular Arithmetic 5.1. Congruences 5.2. Modular Inverses 5.3. The Chinese Remainder Theorem 5.4. The Structure of the Multiplicative Group (Z/NZ)^* 5.5. Primitive Roots 6. Quadratic Congruences 6.1. Euler's Criterion 6.2. The Legendre Symbol and Quadratic Reciprocity 7. Pell's Equation 7.1. The Group Law 7.2. Integer Solutions 7.3. Finding the Fundamental Solution 8. The Riemann Zeta Function 8.1 Analytic Continuation and Functinal Equation of ?(s) 8.2 Connecting the Primes and the Zeros of ?(s) 8.3 The Riemann Hypothesis References

Rudnick, Z.

296

Generalized Compositions of Natural Numbers  

E-print Network

We consider compositions of natural numbers when there are different types of each natural number. Several recursions as well as some closed formulas for the number of compositions is derived. We also find its relationships with some known classes of integers such as Fibonacci, Catalan, Pell, Pell-Lucas, and Jacobsthal numbers.

Janjic, Milan

2010-01-01

297

Algebraic properties of number theories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among other things we prove the following. (A) A number theory is convex if and only if it is inductive. (B) No r.e. number\\u000a theory has JEP. (C) No number theory has AP. We also give some information about the hard cores of number theories.

A. Macintyre; H. Simmons

1975-01-01

298

HOPF ALGEBRAS AND TRANSCENDENTAL NUMBERS  

E-print Network

HOPF ALGEBRAS AND TRANSCENDENTAL NUMBERS Michel Waldschmidt Universit´e P. et M. Curie (Paris VI clear, but we point out that it already plays a role in transcendental number theory: St´ephane Fischler-Lindemann). If is a non-zero algebraic number, then e is a transcendental number. Equivalently, if is a non

299

On normal numbers Veronica Becher  

E-print Network

On normal numbers Ver´onica Becher Universidad de Buenos Aires & CONICET, Argentina 16 Latin American Symposium on Mathematical Logic July 2014 Ver´onica Becher On normal numbers 0 / 22 #12;Normal numbers Normality is a basic form of randomness for real numbers. It asks that the expansions of real

Becher, Verónica

300

On normal numbers Veronica Becher  

E-print Network

On normal numbers Ver´onica Becher Universidad de Buenos Aires & CONICET Coloquio del Departamento de Matem´atica, FCEN, UBA, 2 octubre 2014 #12;Normal numbers Normality is a basic form of randomness´onica Becher On normal numbers 1 / 33 #12;Normal numbers Normality is a basic form of randomness for real

Becher, Verónica

301

Mass function of dark matter halos  

Microsoft Academic Search

We combine data from a number of N-body simulations to predict the abundance\\u000aof dark halos in Cold Dark Matter universes over more than 4 orders of\\u000amagnitude in mass. A comparison of different simulations suggests that the\\u000adominant uncertainty in our results is systematic and is smaller than 10--30%\\u000aat all masses, depending on the halo definition used. In

A. Jenkins; C. S. Frenk; S. D. M. White; J. M. Colberg; S. Cole; A. E. Evrard; H. M. P. Couchman; N. Yoshida

2000-01-01

302

Mass Immunization Programs: Principles and Standards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mass immunization involves delivering immunizations to a large number of people at one or more locations in a short interval\\u000a of time. Good mass immunization programs apply planning and quality standards that maximize return on resources invested and\\u000a provide the greatest individual benefits when immunizing many people in a short period of time. These programs can be used\\u000a to counter

J. D. Grabenstein; R. L. Nevin

303

Mass - Comparing Masses Without Use of Gravity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page gives instructions for performing mass measurements in the same method used by astronauts on the Skylab space station. Using a hacksaw blade, clamps, bolts, and a watch, the experiment shows how mass may be measured without recourse to gravity. The activity is the third of a 3-part teaching module on mass, developed by the educational website "From Stargazers to Starships". The first section discusses how such measurements were actually conducted in 1973 aboard "Skylab," and the second gives background information on the Skylab mission.

Stern, David

2005-01-04

304

Spacecraft applications of quadrupole mass spectrometry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Techniques of mass spectrometry are reviewed and the theory of the quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) is discussed. The QMS is shown to have several advantages over older types of mass spectrometers. The QMS has been flown on a large number of rockets and several satellites. More sophisticated versions of the QMS are proposed for future satellites. Special emphasis is placed on problems of contamination which are likely to be encountered on a large and complex satellite like the Advanced Technology Satellite ATS-G. The development of a QMS to detect and forestall such contamination is discussed.

Thekaekara, M. P.

1972-01-01

305

Hadron mass spectrum from lattice QCD.  

PubMed

Finite temperature lattice simulations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) are sensitive to the hadronic mass spectrum for temperatures below the "critical" temperature T(c) ? 160 MeV. We show that a recent precision determination of the QCD trace anomaly shows evidence for the existence of a large number of hadron states beyond those known from experiment. The lattice results are well represented by an exponentially growing mass spectrum up to a temperature T=155 MeV. Using simple parametrizations of the hadron mass spectrum we show how one may estimate the total spectral weight in these yet undermined states. PMID:21231577

Majumder, Abhijit; Müller, Berndt

2010-12-17

306

On the graviton mass  

Microsoft Academic Search

It was suggested that observations of the solar system exclude massive gravity, in the sense that the graviton mass must be rigorously zero. This is because there is a discontinuity in the linearized gravity theory at graviton mass equal to zero. The linearized Schwarzschild metric is not recovered for infinitesimal graviton mass, contradicting observations on light deviation by the Sun

Andrei Gruzinov

2005-01-01

307

On Defining Mass  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Though central to any pedagogical development of physics, the concept of mass is still not well understood. Properly defining mass has proven to be far more daunting than contemporary textbooks would have us believe. And yet today the origin of mass is one of the most aggressively pursued areas of research in all of physics. Much of the excitement…

Hecht, Eugene

2011-01-01

308

What is Mass Spectrometry?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from the American Society for Mass Spectrometry includes information about what mass spectometry is and how it is used. It has many useful figures and references to other materials. The material answers questions such as "What is mass spectrometry and what can it do for you?"

Chiu, Chia M.

309

Small numbers in supersymmetric theories of nature  

SciTech Connect

The Standard Model of particle interactions is a successful theory for describing the interactions of quarks, leptons and gauge bosons at microscopic distance scales. Despite these successes, the theory contains many unsatisfactory features. The origin of particle masses is a central mystery that has eluded experimental elucidation. In the Standard Model the known particles obtain their mass from the condensate of the so-called Higgs particle. Quantum corrections to the Higgs mass require an unnatural fine tuning in the Higgs mass of one part in 10{sup {minus}32} to obtain the correct mass scale of electroweak physics. In addition, the origin of the vast hierarchy between the mass scales of the electroweak and quantum gravity physics is not explained in the current theory. Supersymmetric extensions to the Standard Model are not plagued by this fine tuning issue and may therefore be relevant in Nature. In the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model there is also a natural explanation for electroweak symmetry breaking. Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories also correctly predict a parameter of the Standard Model. This provides non-trivial indirect evidence for these theories. The most general supersymmetric extension to the Standard Model however, is excluded by many physical processes, such as rare flavor changing processes, and the non-observation of the instability of the proton. These processes provide important information about the possible structure such a theory. In particular, certain parameters in this theory must be rather small. A physics explanation for why this is the case would be desirable. It is striking that the gauge couplings of the Standard Model unify if there is supersymmetry close to the weak scale. This suggests that at high energies Nature is described by a supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory. But the mass scale of unification must be introduced into the theory since it does not coincide with the probable mass scale of strong quantum gravity. The subject of this dissertation is both the phenomenology and model-building opportunities that may lie behind the small numbers that appear in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model.

Graesser, Michael L.

1999-05-01

310

Topological completions of the field of rational numbers which consist of Liouville numbers and rational numbers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some subfields of the field of real numbers which consist exclusively of rational numbers and Liouville numbers are given. Each of these fields is a completion of the rational number field endowed with a field topology finer than the usual topology.

J. E. Marcos

1999-01-01

311

Truly Hypercomplex Numbers: Unification of Numbers and Vectors  

E-print Network

Since the beginning of the quest of hypercomplex numbers in the late eighteenth century, many hypercomplex number systems have been proposed but none of them succeeded in extending the concept of complex numbers to higher dimensions. This paper provides a definitive solution to this problem by defining the truly hypercomplex numbers of dimension N greater than or equal to 3. The secret lies in the definition of the multiplicative law and its properties. This law is based on spherical and hyperspherical coordinates. These numbers which I call spherical and hyperspherical hypercomplex numbers define Abelian groups over addition and multiplication. Nevertheless, the multiplicative law generally does not distribute over addition, thus the set of these numbers equipped with addition and multiplication does not form a mathematical field. However, such numbers are expected to have a tremendous utility in mathematics and in science in general.

Redouane Bouhennache

2014-09-15

312

Concatenated Fibonacci and Lucas numbers do not form normal numbers  

E-print Network

We show that the infinite decimal numbers $\\mathcal{F} = 0.F_{1}F_{2}F_{3}...$ and $\\mathcal{L} = 0.L_{1}L_{2}L_{3}...$ obtained by concatenating respectively the Fibonacci and the Lucas numbers for their fractional parts are not normal numbers to base 10.

Mendonça, J Ricardo G

2011-01-01

313

Toddlers' Spontaneous Attention to Number and Verbal Number Quantification  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"S"pontaneous "a"ttention to "n"umber (SAN) is the tendency to notice the relatively abstract attribute of number despite the presence of other attributes. According to nativists, an innate concept of one to three directs young children's attention to these "intuitive numbers" in everyday situations--even before they acquire language. According to…

Li, Xia

2009-01-01

314

MassMass transfer andtransfer and MassMass transfer andtransfer and  

E-print Network

coefficientcoefficient /1/1 Mass flow species A:interface a p A = A mol/s M f1 (L) 2 (G) Mass transfer rate per area: A = A/a = "A mol/(m2·s) 1 (L) 2 (G) xi C1.i M t f ffi i t k x C y 1.i AA !!! Mass transfer coefficients - Värme- och strömningsteknik Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 �bo 3/44 p g and cA,interfaceB boundary MassMass heat

Zevenhoven, Ron

315

Nonequilibrium hadronization and constituent quark number scaling  

SciTech Connect

The constituent quark number scaling of elliptic flow is studied in a nonequilibrium hadronization and freeze-out model with rapid dynamical transition from ideal, deconfined, and chirally symmetric quark-gluon plasma, to final noninteracting hadrons. In this transition a bag model of constituent quarks is considered, where the quarks gain constituent quark mass while the background bag field breaks up and vanishes. The constituent quarks then recombine into simplified hadron states, while chemical, thermal, and flow equilibrium break down one after the other. In this scenario the resulting temperatures and flow velocities of baryons and mesons are different. Using a simplified few source model of the elliptic flow, we are able to reproduce the constituent quark number scaling, with assumptions on the details of the nonequilibrium processes.

Zschocke, Sven [TU Dresden, Institut fuer Planetare Geodaesie, Lohrmann-Observatorium, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Horvat, Szabolcs [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Allegaten 55, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Faculty of Physics, Babes-Bolyai University, Kogalniceanu str 1, 400084 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Mishustin, Igor N. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Csernai, Laszlo P. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Allegaten 55, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); MTA-KFKI Research Institute for Particle Physics and Nuclear Physics, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

2011-04-15

316

The initial mass ratio of solar type contact binaries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The initial mass ratio distribution function, which gives the normalized number of binary objects formed at a given mass ratio, is computed for solar-type contact binaries (W UMa stars). The initial function is derived from the present mass ratio distribution function by integrating backwards in time based on a mass ratio evolution function describing the variation of the mass ratio with time since the coming into contact of the components, which is determined by the rate of angular momentum loss which is in turn determined by the total mass and mass ratio of the system. All contact binaries produced are found to exhibit initial mass ratios greater than 0.8, indicating that the components had nearly equal masses. Implications of the results for RS CVn stars are noted.

van t Veer, F.

1981-05-01

317

Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry  

PubMed Central

This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

2011-01-01

318

Mass drivers. 3: Engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The last of a series of three papers by the Mass-Driver Group of the 1977 Ames Summer Study is presented. It develops the engineering principles required to implement the basic mass-driver. Optimum component mass trade-offs are derived from a set of four input parameters, and the program used to design a lunar launcher. The mass optimization procedures is then incorporated into a more comprehensive mission optimization program called OPT-4, which evaluates an optimized mass-driver reaction engine and its performance in a range of specified missions. Finally, this paper discusses, to the extent that time permitted, certain peripheral problems: heating effects in buckets due to magnetic field ripple; an approximate derivation of guide force profiles; the mechanics of inserting and releasing payloads; the reaction mass orbits; and a proposed research and development plan for implementing mass drivers.

Arnold, W.; Bowen, S.; Cohen, S.; Fine, K.; Kaplan, D.; Kolm, M.; Kolm, H.; Newman, J.; Oneill, G. K.; Snow, W.

1979-01-01

319

Butterflies and topological quantum numbers  

E-print Network

The Hofstadter model illustrates the notion of topological quantum numbers and how they account for the quantization of the Hall conductance. It gives rise to colorful fractal diagrams of butterflies where the colors represent the topological quantum numbers.

J. E. Avron; D. Osadchy

2001-10-20

320

Butterflies and topological quantum numbers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hofstadter model illustrates the notion of topological quantum numbers and how they account for the quantization of the Hall conductance. It gives rise to colorful fractal diagrams of butterflies where the colors represent the topological quantum numbers.

J. E. Avron; D. Osadchy

2001-01-01

321

Graphs, partitions and Fibonacci numbers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The Fibonacci number of a graph is the number of independent vertex subsets. In this paper, we investigate trees with large Fibonacci number. In particular, we show that all trees with n edges and Fibonacci number,> 2,\\/4 for constants A,B as n ! 1. This is proved by using a natural correspondence between partitions of integers and star-like trees.

Arnold Knopfmacher; Robert F. Tichy; Stephan Wagner; Volker Ziegler

2007-01-01

322

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-260 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-260 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 260).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

323

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-253 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-253 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 253).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

324

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-255 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-255 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 255).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

325

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-252 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-252 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 252).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

326

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-274 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-274 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 274).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

327

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-256 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-256 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 256).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

328

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-265 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-265 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 265).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

329

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-276 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-276 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 276).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

330

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-259 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-259 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 259).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

331

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-262 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-262 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 262).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

332

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-267 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-267 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 267).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

333

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-264 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-264 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 264).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

334

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-270 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-270 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 270).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

335

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-283 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-283 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 283).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

336

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-263 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-263 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 263).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

337

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-279 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-279 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 279).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

338

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-269 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-269 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 269).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

339

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-282 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-282 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 282).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

340

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-257 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-257 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 257).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

341

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-268 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-268 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 268).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

342

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-284 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-284 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 284).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

343

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-258 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-258 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 258).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

344

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-280 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-280 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 280).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

345

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-266 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-266 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 266).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

346

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-281 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-281 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 281).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

347

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-275 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-275 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 275).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

348

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-251 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-251 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 251).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

349

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-271 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-271 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 271).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

350

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-273 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-273 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 273).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

351

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-272 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-272 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 272).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

352

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-278 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-278 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 278).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

353

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-261 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-261 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 261).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

354

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-277 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-277 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 277).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

355

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Po-254 (Polonium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Po-254 (Polonium, atomic number Z = 84, mass number A = 254).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

356

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-287 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-287 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 287).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

357

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-345 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-345 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 345).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

358

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-279 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-279 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 279).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

359

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-355 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-355 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 355).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

360

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-271 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-271 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 271).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

361

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-297 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-297 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 297).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

362

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-276 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-276 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 276).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

363

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-323 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-323 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 323).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

364

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-348 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-348 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 348).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

365

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-311 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-311 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 311).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

366

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-292 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-292 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 292).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

367

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-270 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-270 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 270).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

368

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-341 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-341 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 341).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

369

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-310 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-310 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 310).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

370

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-337 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-337 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 337).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

371

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-272 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-272 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 272).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

372

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-322 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-322 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 322).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

373

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-350 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-350 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 350).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

374

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-347 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-347 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 347).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

375

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-280 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-280 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 280).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

376

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-278 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-278 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 278).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

377

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-342 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-342 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 342).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

378

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-284 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-284 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 284).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

379

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-290 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-290 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 290).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

380

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-349 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-349 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 349).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

381

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-329 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-329 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 329).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

382

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-334 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-334 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 334).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

383

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-281 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-281 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 281).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

384

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-300 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-300 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 300).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

385

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-318 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-318 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 318).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

386

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-312 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-312 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 312).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

387

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-282 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-282 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 282).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

388

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-316 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-316 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 316).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

389

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-306 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-306 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 306).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

390

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-288 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-288 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 288).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

391

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-321 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-321 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 321).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

392

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-307 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-307 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 307).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

393

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-340 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-340 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 340).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

394

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-305 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-305 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 305).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

395

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-291 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-291 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 291).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

396

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-285 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-285 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 285).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

397

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-309 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-309 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 309).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

398

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-286 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-286 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 286).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

399

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-308 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-308 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 308).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

400

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-295 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-295 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 295).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

401

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-344 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-344 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 344).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

402

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-325 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-325 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 325).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

403

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-273 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-273 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 273).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

404

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-304 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-304 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 304).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

405

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-332 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-332 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 332).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

406

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-315 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-315 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 315).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

407

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-353 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-353 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 353).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

408

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-269 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-269 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 269).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

409

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-320 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-320 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 320).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

410

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-328 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-328 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 328).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

411

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-275 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-275 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 275).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

412

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-314 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-314 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 314).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

413

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-351 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-351 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 351).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

414

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-298 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-298 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 298).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

415

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-343 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-343 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 343).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

416

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-336 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-336 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 336).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

417

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-266 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-266 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 266).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

418

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-338 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-338 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 338).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

419

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-299 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-299 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 299).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

420

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-277 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-277 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 277).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

421

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-301 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-301 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 301).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

422

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-333 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-333 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 333).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

423

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-265 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-265 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 265).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

424

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-313 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-313 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 313).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

425

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-294 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-294 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 294).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

426

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-331 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-331 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 331).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

427

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-339 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-339 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 339).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

428

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-293 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-293 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 293).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

429

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-289 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-289 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 289).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

430

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-303 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-303 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 303).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

431

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-317 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-317 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 317).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

432

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-346 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-346 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 346).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

433

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-267 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-267 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 267).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

434

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-326 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-326 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 326).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

435

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-330 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-330 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 330).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

436

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-296 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-296 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 296).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

437

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-319 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-319 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 319).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

438

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-352 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-352 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 352).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

439

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-274 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-274 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 274).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

440

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-268 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-268 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 268).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

441

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-302 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-302 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 302).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

442

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-264 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-264 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 264).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

443

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-263 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-263 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 263).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

444

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-335 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-335 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 335).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

445

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-283 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-283 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 283).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

446

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-324 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-324 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 324).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

447

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-327 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-327 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 327).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

448

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-354 (Seaborgium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-354 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 354).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

449

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ta-154 (Tantalum)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ta-154 (Tantalum, atomic number Z = 73, mass number A = 154).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

450

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for No-260 (Nobelium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope No-260 (Nobelium, atomic number Z = 102, mass number A = 260).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

451

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-290 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-290 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 290).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

452

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-302 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-302 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 302).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

453

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-296 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-296 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 296).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

454

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-292 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-292 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 292).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

455

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-306 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-306 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 306).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

456

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-310 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-310 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 310).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

457

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-324 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-324 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 324).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

458

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-287 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-287 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 287).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

459

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-323 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-323 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 323).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

460

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-325 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-325 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 325).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

461

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-312 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-312 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 312).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

462

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-311 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-311 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 311).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

463

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-289 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-289 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 289).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

464

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-315 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-315 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 315).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

465

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-304 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-304 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 304).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

466

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-286 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-286 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 286).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

467

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-308 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-308 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 308).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

468

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-314 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-314 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 314).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

469

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-320 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-320 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 320).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

470

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-294 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-294 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 294).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

471

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-305 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-305 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 305).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

472

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-313 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-313 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 313).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

473

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-300 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-300 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 300).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

474

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-298 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-298 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 298).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

475

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-307 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-307 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 307).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

476

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-288 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-288 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 288).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

477

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-299 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-299 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 299).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

478

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-291 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-291 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 291).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

479

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-301 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-301 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 301).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

480

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-322 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-322 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 322).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

481

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-316 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-316 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 316).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

482

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-318 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-318 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 318).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

483

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-293 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-293 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 293).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

484

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-295 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-295 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 295).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

485

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-326 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-326 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 326).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

486

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-317 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-317 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 317).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

487

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-321 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-321 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 321).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

488

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-309 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-309 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 309).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

489

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-319 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-319 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 319).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

490

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-297 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-297 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 297).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

491

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-303 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-303 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 303).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

492

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for No-285 (Nobelium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope No-285 (Nobelium, atomic number Z = 102, mass number A = 285).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

493

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for No-291 (Nobelium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope No-291 (Nobelium, atomic number Z = 102, mass number A = 291).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

494

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for No-309 (Nobelium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope No-309 (Nobelium, atomic number Z = 102, mass number A = 309).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

495

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for No-296 (Nobelium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope No-296 (Nobelium, atomic number Z = 102, mass number A = 296).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

496

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for No-321 (Nobelium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope No-321 (Nobelium, atomic number Z = 102, mass number A = 321).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

497

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for No-274 (Nobelium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope No-274 (Nobelium, atomic number Z = 102, mass number A = 274).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

498

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for No-280 (Nobelium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope No-280 (Nobelium, atomic number Z = 102, mass number A = 280).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

499

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for No-294 (Nobelium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope No-294 (Nobelium, atomic number Z = 102, mass number A = 294).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

500

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for No-302 (Nobelium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope No-302 (Nobelium, atomic number Z = 102, mass number A = 302).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.