Sample records for mass number 23-26

  1. From Taub Numbers to the Bondi Mass

    E-print Network

    E. N. Glass

    1997-12-17

    Taub numbers are studied on asymptotically flat backgrounds with Killing symmetries. When the field equations are solved for a background spacetime and higher order functional derivatives (higher order variational derivatives of the Hilbert Lagrangean) are solved for perturbations from the background, such perturbed space-times admit zeroth, first, and second order Taub numbers. Zeroth order Taub numbers are Komar constants (upto numerical factors) or Penrose-Goldberg constants of the background. For a Killing symmetry of the background, first order Taub numbers give the contribution of the linearized perturbation to the associated backgound quantity, such as the perturbing mass. Second order Taub numbers give the contribution of second order perturbations to the background quantity. The Bondi mass is a sum of first and second order Taubs numbers on a Minkowski background.

  2. Mass-induced transition in fermion number

    SciTech Connect

    Aragao de Carvalho, C.; Pureza, J. M.

    1989-05-15

    We show that if we increase the mass of fermions in interaction with a topological (kink) scalar background in 1+1 dimensions, the fractional fermion number of the system will eventually vanish. The transition is sharp and corresponds to the disappearance of localized states from the spectrum of a Dirac operator which is exactly solvable. Possible applications to different physical systems are discussed.

  3. Ternary logic and mass quantum numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppeard, M. D. [Ka Tiritiri O Te Moana (New Zealand)

    2010-06-15

    Koide's prediction of the tau mass may be formulated as a condition on the three eigenvalues of a quantum Fourier series, using simple parameters, and similar triplets have been found for neutrino and hadron masses [2]. Assuming these parameters arise from quantum gravity, one would like to understand them from the more abstract context of category theory. In particular, whereas the logic of lepton spin is a linear analogue of the ordinary Boolean logic of the category of sets, mass triplets suggest an analogous ternary logic, requiring higher dimensional categorical structures.

  4. IM 6K X-COUNTRYIM Sports ~ Fall 2013 REGISTER: Sept 23 26

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    IM 6K X-COUNTRYIM Sports ~ Fall 2013 REGISTER: Sept 23 ­ 26 at 101 IM Bldg. (8am - 4:30pm). PSU ID+Cards runner (Cash or Check) at time of entry, with your PSU ID+Card. COURSE BASICS: ~ PSU XC Club course: ALL DIVISIONS ... CHECK-IN with ID+card 9:30am ELIGIBILITY: PSU ID+Cards will be checked at entry

  5. Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses.

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolli, M.; Papenbrock, T.; Wild, S. M. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Department ofo Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee); (Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2012-01-01

    We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to 2049 nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of {chi} = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

  6. Occupation-number-based energy functional for nuclear masses

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolli, Michael G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Papenbrock, Thomas F [ORNL; Wild, S. M. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2012-01-01

    We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to 2049 nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of =1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

  7. Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses

    E-print Network

    M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

    2011-10-19

    We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

  8. EUROTHERM Seminar 74 Proceedings Heat transfer in unsteady and transitional flows March 23-26, 2003 Eindhoven (The Netherlands)

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EUROTHERM Seminar 74 Proceedings Heat transfer in unsteady and transitional flows March 23-26, 2003 to be governed by heat transfer and time microscales of turbulence through the inner sublayer. Physical interpreta- tions are given to relate the observed heat transfer correlation and these turbulence transition

  9. STUDINGER ET AL, POWER SPECTRA ANALYSIS, TERRA ANTARTICA, Vol. 4(1), 23-26 1997 1 INTRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Studinger, Michael

    STUDINGER ET AL, POWER SPECTRA ANALYSIS, TERRA ANTARTICA, Vol. 4(1), 23-26 1997 1 INTRODUCTION; Karner & Watts, 1983). This Power Spectra Analysis of Gravity Data from the Weddell Sea Embayment the Weddell Sea embay- ment and adjacent area we used gravity data power spectra analysis. This method yields

  10. Neutrino mass limit from galaxy cluster number density evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kahniashvili, Tina [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Center for Plasma Astrophysics, Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, 2A Kazbegi Avenue, GE-0160 Tbilisi (Georgia); Toerne, Eckhard von [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Arhipova, Natalia A. [Astro Space Center, P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, 84/32 Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Ratra, Bharat [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    Measurements of the evolution with redshift of the number density of massive galaxy clusters are used to constrain the energy density of massive neutrinos and so the sum of neutrino masses . We consider a spatially flat cosmological model with cosmological constant, cold dark matter, baryonic matter, and massive neutrinos. Accounting for the uncertainties in the measurements of the relevant cosmological parameters we obtain a limit of (95% C.L.)

  11. PROCEEDINGS: 1987 JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON STATIONARY SOURCE COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL. HELD IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA ON MARCH 23-26, 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume proceedings document the 1987 Joint (EPA and EPRI) Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOx Control, held March 23-26, 1987 in New Orleans, LA. The 49 presentations covered: low NOx combustion developments (e.g., reburning and burner design modifications); coal-, oil...

  12. A Guide to Mass Communication Sources. Journalism Monographs Number Seventy-Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, M. Gilbert; Cooper, Douglas W.

    Designed to assist social scientists interested in conducting mass communication research, this report describes a number of sources of mass communication data and information. The sources are grouped in two categories: print media (primarily newspapers and magazines) and electronic media (radio, television, and motion pictures). These categories…

  13. Mass Media in Society: The Need of Research. Reports and Papers on Mass Communication, Number 59.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    More and better research should be undertaken, nationally and internationally, on the effect of mass media upon society. Prior to such research, there needs to be an awareness of the realities of society today and of broadcasting structure. There should also be an understanding of the research that has already been done and of the gaps in that…

  14. Source and Health Implication of Diurnal Atmospheric PM Mass and Number Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Olvera, H. A.; Garcia, J. H.; Pingitore, N. E.

    2007-12-01

    Exposure to atmospheric PM has been known to be associated with adverse health effects, decreased heart-rate variability, and respiratory and cardiopulmonary related morbidity and mortality. New evidence suggests that physical characteristics (mass, size, number, surface area, and morphology) of particles are strongly associated with mortality and morbidity through acute exposure. In particular, as reported in the literature, fine or ultrafine particles are more toxic than coarse particles on an equivalent mass basis while particles of less than 30 nm or greater than 2.5 um in diameter deposit more effectively (approximately 80 percent) in lung versus approximately 18 percent for particles in the range of 100 nm and 1 um. In addition, positive association has been observed between day to day variation in PM2.5 and hospital admissions, mortality and particle surface area, or particle number concentration and oxidative stress-induced DNA damage. This presentation shows the results of a study characterizing the physical properties of PM in El Paso, Texas. Diurnal PM mass concentration peaks previously observed at several other cities along the U.S.-Mexico border and elsewhere in the world were observed in El Paso. The hourly PM particle count varied from less than 10,000 particles/cm3 to greater than 80,000 particles/cm3 during the diurnal PM mass peaks. The total number of PM particles peaked in the morning and in the evening while the mode of the particle size changed from 20 nm to 50 nm, indicating different PM sources may be responsible for the mass and number concentrations and agglomeration of particles in the atmosphere during the day may possibly plays a role. A multivariate regression analysis was performed to correlate the PM mass and number concentrations to environmental variables. Real- time wind statistics were used in conjunction with traffic data at a nearby highway for identifying sources of the PM mass and number concentration peaks. Evaluation of the diurnal variation of PM physical properties and a recent study on PM mass and mortality implies that particle number may be a better environmental indicator for mortality than PM2.5 mass. This publication was made possible by grant number 1 S11 ES013339-01A1 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), NIH. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIEHS, NIH.

  15. Global energy gradients and size in colonial organisms: Worker mass and worker number

    E-print Network

    Kaspari, Mike

    by independently changing worker mass and or worker number. In a survey of 49 ecosystems from tundra to tropical (family Formicidae) are colonial ectotherms that are important players in every terrestrial biome from tundra to rainforest (19, 23) and whose distribution thus spans global gradients of NPP and T. Studies

  16. Atmospheric particle number size distribution in central Europe: Statistical relations to air masses and meteorology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfram Birmili; Alfred Wiedensohler; Jost Heintzenberg; Katrin Lehmann

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric particle number size distributions determined over 1.5 years at a central European site were statistically analyzed in terms of their relation to time of day, season, meteorology, and synoptic-scale air masses. All size distributions were decomposed into lognormal particle modes corresponding to the accumulation, Aitken, aged nucleation, and nucleation modes. The concentration of nucleation mode particles (30 nm) lacked

  17. Inducing Conservation of Number, Weight, Volume, Area, and Mass in Pre-School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Beverly S.

    The major question this study attempted to answer was, "Can conservation of number, area, weight, mass, and volume to be induced and retained by 3- and 4-year-old children by structured instruction with a multivariate approach? Three nursery schools in Iowa City supplied subjects for this study. The Institute of Child Behavior and Development…

  18. Lepton number violation and neutrino masses in 3-3-1 models

    E-print Network

    Richard H. Benavides; Luis N. Epele; Huner Fanchiotti; Carlos García Canal; William A. Ponce

    2015-03-05

    Lepton number violation and its relation to neutrino masses is investigated in several versions of the $SU(3)_c\\otimes SU(3)_L\\otimes U(1)_x$ model. Spontaneous and explicit violation and conservation of the lepton number are considered. In one of the models (the so-called economical one), the lepton number is spontaneously violated and it is found that the would be Majoron is not present because it is gauged away, poviding in this way the longitudinal polarization component to a now massive gauge field.

  19. Baryon number asymmetry and dark matter in the neutrino mass model with an inert doublet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwase, Shoichi; Suematsu, Daijiro

    2012-09-01

    The radiative neutrino mass model with an inert doublet scalar has been considered as a promising candidate which can explain neutrino masses, dark matter abundance and baryon number asymmetry if dark matter is identified with the lightest neutral component of the inert doublet. We reexamine these properties by imposing all the data of the neutrino oscillation, which are recently suggested by the reactor experiments. We find that the sufficient baryon number asymmetry seems not to be easily generated in a consistent way with all the data of the neutrino masses and mixing as long as the right-handed neutrinos are kept in TeV regions. Two possible modifications of the model are examined.

  20. Free vibration analysis of beams carrying a number of two-degree-of-freedom spring-damper-mass systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jia-Jang Wu

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a technique to replace a two-degree-of-freedom (two-dof) spring-damper-mass (SDM) system by a set of effective masses, so that one may obtain the natural frequencies of a beam carrying any number of elastically mounted two-dof lumped masses from the same beam carrying a number of rigidly attached effective masses. Due to the existence of damping, the characteristic equation

  1. Connecting Neutrino Masses and Dark Matter by High-dimensional Lepton Number Violation Operator

    E-print Network

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Tsai, Lu-Hsing; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new model with the Majorana neutrino masses generated at two-loop level, in which the lepton number violation (LNV) processes, such as neutrinoless double beta decays, are mainly induced by the dimension-7 LNV effective operator O_7=\\bar l_R^c \\gamma^\\mu L_L(D_mu \\Phi) \\Phi \\Phi. Note that it is necessary to impose an Z_2 symmetry in order that O_7 dominates over the conventional dimension-5 Weinberg operator, which naturally results in a stable Z_2-odd neutral particle to be the cold dark matter candidate. More interestingly, due to the non-trivial dependence of the charged lepton masses, the model predicts the neutrino mass matrix to be in the form of the normal hierarchy. We also focus on a specific parameter region of great phenomenological interests, such as electroweak precision tests, dark matter direct searches along with its relic abundance, and lepton flavor violation processes.

  2. Effects of Lewis number on coupled heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subjected to external convective heating.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Anjun; Zhang, Yuwen; Ma, Hongbin; Critser, John

    2009-03-01

    Heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subject to the boundary condition of the third kind is investigated. The closed form of temperature and concentration distributions, the local Nusselt number based on the total external heat transfer and convective heat transfer inside the tube, as well as the Sherwood number were obtained. The effects of Lewis number and Biot number on heat and mass transfer were investigated. PMID:20862211

  3. A mass threshold in the number density of passive galaxies at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommariva, V.; Fontana, A.; Lamastra, A.; Santini, P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Nonino, M.; Castellano, M.; Ferguson, H.; McLure, R. J.; Galametz, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Lu, Y.; Menci, N.; Merson, A.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Somerville, R.; Targett, T.; Koekemoer, A. M.

    2014-11-01

    The process that quenched star formation in galaxies at intermediate and high redshifts is still the subject of considerable debate. One way to investigate this puzzling issue is to study the number density of quiescent galaxies at z ? 2 and its dependence on mass. Here we present the results of a new study based on very deep Ks-band imaging (with the HAWK-I instrument on the VLT) of two HST CANDELS fields (the UKIDSS Ultra-deep survey (UDS) field and GOODS-South). The new HAWK-I data (taken as part of the HUGS VLT Large Program) reach detection limits of Ks> 26 (AB mag). We have combined this imaging with the other ground-based and HST data in the CANDELS fields to select a sample of passively-evolving galaxies in the redshift range 1.4 number of quiescent galaxies at K ? 22 is not due to incompleteness, but is real. This has enabled us to establish unambiguously that the number counts of quiescent galaxies at z ? 2 flatten and slightly decline at magnitudes fainter than Ks ~ 22 (AB mag.), in contrast to the number density of star-forming galaxies, which continues to rise to fainter magnitudes. We show that this trend corresponds to a stellar mass threshold M? ? 1010.8M? below which the mechanism that halts the star formation in high-redshift galaxies seems to be inefficient. We also show that, while pBzK galaxies at K< 23 are in the redshift range 1.4 23 a higher redshift population of z ? 3pBzK galaxies is detected and dominates the counts at the faintest magnitudes. Finally, we compare the observed pBzK number counts with those of quiescent galaxies extracted from four different semi-analytic models. We find that only two of these models reproduce the observed trend in the number counts, even qualitatively, and that none of the models provides a statistically acceptable description of the number density of quiescent galaxies at these redshifts. We conclude that the mass function of quiescent galaxies as a function of redshift continues to present a key and demanding challenge for proposed models of galaxy formation and evolution.

  4. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  5. Low Mass-Damping Vortex-Induced Vibrations of a Single Cylinder at Moderate Reynolds Number.

    PubMed

    Jus, Y; Longatte, E; Chassaing, J-C; Sagaut, P

    2014-10-01

    The feasibility and accuracy of large eddy simulation is investigated for the case of three-dimensional unsteady flows past an elastically mounted cylinder at moderate Reynolds number. Although these flow problems are unconfined, complex wake flow patterns may be observed depending on the elastic properties of the structure. An iterative procedure is used to solve the structural dynamic equation to be coupled with the Navier-Stokes system formulated in a pseudo-Eulerian way. A moving mesh method is involved to deform the computational domain according to the motion of the fluid structure interface. Numerical simulations of vortex-induced vibrations are performed for a freely vibrating cylinder at Reynolds number 3900 in the subcritical regime under two low mass-damping conditions. A detailed physical analysis is provided for a wide range of reduced velocities, and the typical three-branch response of the amplitude behavior usually reported in the experiments is exhibited and reproduced by numerical simulation. PMID:25278637

  6. Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-06-14

    The purpose of this video tutorial is to review a couple ways in which we think about numbers. Thinking in terms of street numbers, money in bank accounts, and quantum particles (e.g. Bose-Einstein condensate) is contrasted with focusing on associating numbers with distinguishable manipulatives, as is more familiar in K-8 courses. This video concludes with a reminder that the symbol "infinity" is not, itself, a number.

  7. Hailstone heat and mass transfer theory and three-component nusselt numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List, Roland

    The search for major faults in the theory of heat and mass transfer of hailstones shows that interactions between different types of direct and indirect heat transfers cannot account for discrepancies with experiments. The residence time of cloud droplets in the boundary layer is of the order of 10 -5 s, thus drastically reducing interaction possibilities with the heat transfers by conduction and convection and by the diffusion of water vapour. As a consequence, calculations from experimental data seem to be incomplete and cause Nusselt numbers to increase fourfold with increasing liquid water content and air temperature. It is proposed that the increase in surface area of up to 50% by a shape change from spheroid to wheel (at constant axis ratio) could be at the root of the problem. New experiments presently under way should clarify this point. In discussing transfers, new 2- and 3-component Nusselt numbers are defined which lead to an easier understanding of the total heat and mass transfer of hailstones.

  8. Mass-number and isotope dependence of the local microscopic optical potential for polarized proton scattering

    E-print Network

    Masakazu Toyokawa; Kosho Minomo; Masanobu Yahiro

    2013-11-20

    We derive local microscopic optical potentials $U$ systematically for polarized proton scattering at 65~MeV using the local-potential version of the Melbourne $g$-matrix folding model. As target nuclei, we take $^{6}$He and neutron-rich Ne isotopes in addition to stable nuclei of mass number $A=4$--$208$ in order to clarify mass-number and isotope dependence of $U$. The local potentials reproduce the experimental data systematically and have geometries similar to the phenomenological optical potentials for stable targets. The target density is broadened by the weak-binding nature and/or deformation of unstable nuclei. For the real spin-orbit part of $U$ the density broadening weakens the strength and enlarges the radius, whereas for the central part it enlarges both of the strength and the radius. The density-broadening effect is conspicuous for halo nuclei such as $^{6}$He and $^{31}$Ne. Similar discussions are made briefly for proton scattering at 200~MeV. We briefly investigate how the isovector and the non spherical components of $U$ affect proton scattering.

  9. Does mass play a role in partition functions even in low Reynolds number systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Rebecca W.; Franklin, Nica; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    2014-03-01

    Classical statistical mechanics predicts that heavy components of a reconfigurable object will preferentially occupy positions at the edges of the object while lighter components will most often reside near the object's center of mass. This predicted influence of mass comes in through the rotational component of the partition function, which favors configurations with larger moments of inertia. It is tempting to apply these findings of statistical mechanics directly to colloidal systems, but is this appropriate when colloidal systems are immersed in liquid rather than surrounded by vaccuum? Does mass have a place in the partition function of colloidal clusters at low Reynolds numbers where we are accustomed to ignoring inertia? Here, we measure how silica microspheres distribute themselves when mixed with identically-sized polystyrene microspheres to form weakly-bound clusters of up to ten spheres. Using an array of microwells, we observe thousands of two-dimensional clusters to answer these fundamental questions. This work is funded by the NSF through grant no. 1306410.

  10. Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jo Edkins

    2006-01-01

    This engaging web site contains information and interactive applets related to various number systems: Egyptian, Babylonian, Chinese, Greek, Roman, Mayan, and Arabic. Users learn the history and structure of each system as well as how to count and write numbers. The site also allows users to explore finger systems, calculating machines, other number bases, and "interesting numbers." A series of pages on data and graphs includes information and activities on gathering, analyzing, graphing and sorting data. (Because the section on the Arabic number system is so extensive, it is cataloged separately as a related resource.)

  11. Evidence for a long-lived superheavy nucleus with atomic mass number A=292 and atomic number Z=~122 in natural Th

    E-print Network

    A. Marinov; I. Rodushkin; D. Kolb; A. Pape; Y. Kashiv; R. Brandt; R. V. Gentry; H. W. Miller

    2008-04-24

    Evidence for the existence of a superheavy nucleus with atomic mass number A=292 and abundance (1-10)x10^(-12) relative to 232Th has been found in a study of natural Th using inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry. The measured mass matches the predictions [1,2] for the mass of an isotope with atomic number Z=122 or a nearby element. Its estimated half-life of t1/2 >= 10^8 y suggests that a long-lived isomeric state exists in this isotope. The possibility that it might belong to a new class of long-lived high spin super- and hyperdeformed isomeric states is discussed.[3-6

  12. The mass and number size distributions of black carbon aerosol over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddington, C. L.; McMeeking, G.; Mann, G. W.; Coe, H.; Frontoso, M. G.; Liu, D.; Flynn, M.; Spracklen, D. V.; Carslaw, K. S.

    2013-05-01

    Black carbon-containing aerosol particles play an important role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. However, the magnitude and sign of the net radiative effect is strongly dependent on the physical properties of the black carbon (BC) component of the particles, such as mass concentration, number size distribution and mixing state. Here we use a global aerosol model combined with aircraft measurements of BC particle number and size from the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) to assess the realism with which these physical properties are predicted by global models. The comparison reveals a substantial mismatch between the measured and modelled BC size distribution over the size range of the SP2 instrument (90-400 nm BC diameter). The model predicts BC particle number concentrations a factor ~3.5-5.7 higher than measured and a mode diameter that is ~40-65 nm smaller than observed. More than ~90% of the model particles with dry diameters ?260 nm contain BC, while the observations suggest only 14% on average. These model-observation biases in the BC properties are considerably greater than for the overall particle distribution, suggesting that the discrepancy is associated with model assumptions about the size and mixing state of the emitted carbonaceous particles. We expect the discrepancy in BC size distribution to be common among most global aerosol models, with implications for model estimates of absorption optical depth and direct radiative forcing.

  13. Particle-number conservation in odd mass proton-rich nuclei in the isovector pairing case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellah, M.; Allal, N. H.; Oudih, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    An expression of a wave function which describes odd-even systems in the isovector pairing case is proposed within the BCS approach. It is shown that it correctly generalizes the one used in the pairing between like-particles case. It is then projected on the good proton and neutron numbers using the Sharp-BCS (SBCS) method. The expressions of the expectation values of the particle-number operator and its square, as well as the energy, are deduced in both approaches. The formalism is applied to study the isovector pairing effect and the number projection one on the ground state energy of odd mass N ? Z nuclei using the single-particle energies of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean-field. It is shown that both effects on energy do not exceed 2%, however, the absolute deviations may reach several MeV. Moreover, the np pairing effect rapidly diminishes as a function of (N - Z). The deformation effect is also studied. It is shown that the np pairing effect, either before or after the projection, as well as the projection effect, when including or not the isovector pairing, depends upon the deformation. However, it seems that the predicted ground state deformation will remain the same in the four approaches.

  14. COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM GALAXY CLUSTERING AND THE MASS-TO-NUMBER RATIO OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Tinker, Jeremy L.; Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10013 (United States); Sheldon, Erin S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Physics Department, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Becker, Matthew R.; Rozo, Eduardo [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Zu, Ying; Weinberg, David H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Zehavi, Idit [Department of Astronomy and CERCA, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Busha, Michael T. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Koester, Benjamin P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 6037 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    We place constraints on the average density ({Omega}{sub m}) and clustering amplitude ({sigma}{sub 8}) of matter using a combination of two measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: the galaxy two-point correlation function, w{sub p} (r{sub p} ), and the mass-to-galaxy-number ratio within galaxy clusters, M/N, analogous to cluster M/L ratios. Our w{sub p} (r{sub p} ) measurements are obtained from DR7 while the sample of clusters is the maxBCG sample, with cluster masses derived from weak gravitational lensing. We construct nonlinear galaxy bias models using the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) to fit both w{sub p} (r{sub p} ) and M/N for different cosmological parameters. HOD models that match the same two-point clustering predict different numbers of galaxies in massive halos when {Omega}{sub m} or {sigma}{sub 8} is varied, thereby breaking the degeneracy between cosmology and bias. We demonstrate that this technique yields constraints that are consistent and competitive with current results from cluster abundance studies, without the use of abundance information. Using w{sub p} (r{sub p} ) and M/N alone, we find {Omega}{sup 0.5}{sub m}{sigma}{sub 8} = 0.465 {+-} 0.026, with individual constraints of {Omega}{sub m} = 0.29 {+-} 0.03 and {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.85 {+-} 0.06. Combined with current cosmic microwave background data, these constraints are {Omega}{sub m} = 0.290 {+-} 0.016 and {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.826 {+-} 0.020. All errors are 1{sigma}. The systematic uncertainties that the M/N technique are most sensitive to are the amplitude of the bias function of dark matter halos and the possibility of redshift evolution between the SDSS Main sample and the maxBCG cluster sample. Our derived constraints are insensitive to the current level of uncertainties in the halo mass function and in the mass-richness relation of clusters and its scatter, making the M/N technique complementary to cluster abundances as a method for constraining cosmology with future galaxy surveys.

  15. Chablat D. et Wenger P., "Design of a Spherical Wrist with Parallel Architecture: Application to Vertebrae of an Eel Robot", Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Rob. and Automation, Barcelone, 23-26 Avril 2005.

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to Vertebrae of an Eel Robot", Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Rob. and Automation, Barcelone, 23-26 Avril 2005. Design of a Spherical Wrist with Parallel Architecture: Application to Vertebrae of an Eel Robot Damien Chablat project, which aims to design and to build an eel robot for inspection of immersed piping. The kinematic

  16. Studies on mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some thermoluminescent dosimetric compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önder, P.; Tur?ucu, A.; Demir, D.; Gürol, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mass attenuation coefficient, ?m , effective atomic number, Zeff, and effective electron density, Nel, were determined experimentally and theoretically for some thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) compounds such as MgSO4, CdSO4, Al2O3, Mg2SiO4, ZnSO4, CaSO4, CaF2, NaSO4, Na4P2O7, Ca5F(PO4)3, SiO2, CaCO3 and BaSO4 at 8.04, 8.91, 13.37, 14.97, 17.44, 19.63, 22.10, 24.90, 30.82, 32.06, 35.40, 36.39, 37.26, 43.74, 44.48, 50.38, 51.70, 53.16, 80.99, 276.40, 302.85, 356.01, 383.85 and 661.66 keV photon energies by using an HPGe detector with a resolution of 182 eV at 5.9 keV. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were estimated using mixture rule. The calculated values were compared with the experimental values for all compounds. Good agreement has been observed between experimental and theoretical values within experimental uncertainties.

  17. Measurements of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2014-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as DL-aspartic acid-LR(C4H7NO4), L-glutamine (C4H10N2O3), creatine monohydrate LR(C4H9N3O2H2O), creatinine hydrochloride (C4H7N3O·HCl) L-asparagine monohydrate(C4H9N3O2H2O), L-methionine LR(C5H11NO2S), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 0.101785 at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. Zeff and Neff experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error for amino acids.

  18. The Luminosity, Stellar Mass, and Number Density Evolution of Field Galaxies of Known Morphology from z = 0.5 - 3

    E-print Network

    Christopher J. Conselice; Jeffrey A. Blackburne; Casey Papovich

    2004-09-16

    The evolution of rest-frame B-band luminosities, stellar masses, and number densities of field galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field North and South are studied as a function of rest-frame B-band morphological type out to redshifts z~3 using a sample of 1231 I 1, although examples exist at z > 2. The number and number fraction of peculiar galaxies consistent with undergoing major mergers rises consistently at redshifts z > 2. Through simulations we argue that this decline is robust at the 4 sigma level against morphological k-corrections and redshift effects. We trace the evolution of rest-frame B-band luminosity density as a function of morphology out to z~3 finding that the luminosity density is steadily dominated by peculiars at z > 1.5 with a peak fraction of 60-90% at z~3. By z~0.5 B-band luminosity fractions are similar to their local values. The stellar mass density follows a similar trend as the luminosity density, with some important exceptions. At high redshifts, z > 2, over 60-80% of stellar mass is attached to peculiars, while at z< 1, 80-95% of stellar mass is attached to ellipticals and spirals. In contrast to the luminosity density, the stellar mass density of ellipticals is greater than spirals at z < 1.5, and the stellar masses in both types grow together at z < 1, while number densities remain constant. (abridged)

  19. Southern Ocean Aerosols: Particle Composition and the Mass and Number Budget (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, L. M.; Frossard, A. A.; Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P.

    2013-12-01

    Marine aerosol particles play an important role in Earth's radiative balance, and the aerosol at latitudes over 60 degrees south constitute one of the atmosphere's cleanest marine aerosol regions. As such, the Southern Ocean provides both a critical baseline in contrast to industrialized regions and a reasonable modern analog for studying pre-industrial conditions. For both of these reasons, the particle composition and budget are important for understanding aerosol-cloud interactions in the marine atmosphere. To date, there are only very limited measurements of the aerosol populations in the Southern Ocean region. The Cape Grim station provides an important long-term record showing that the two main components of these aerosol particles are sea salts and non-sea salt sulfate. Intensive field campaigns have provided snapshots that also demonstrate the presence of organic components from both sea spray and secondary atmospheric processes. Much of the evidence to date suggests that the wind and sea state are major drivers of both supermicron and submicron particle mass, but seasonal influence from biological sulfate sources can control the particle number. In this talk, we consider the aerosol particle budget in the Southern Ocean region in comparison to other regions in order to identify the most important uncertainties for aerosol-cloud interactions in this region.

  20. Fundamental theory for prediction of multicomponent mass transfer in single-liquid drops at intermediate Reynolds numbers (10? Re?250)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Uribe-Ramirez; W. J. Korchinsky

    2000-01-01

    A solution of the problem of low flux, multicomponent, mass transfer in single, circulating liquid drops is presented in this work. The prediction from fundamental theory of single-component mass transfer for drops travelling at intermediate Reynolds numbers (10?Re?250), reported by the authors (Uribe-Ram??rez & Korchinsky (2000) Chemical Engineering Science, in press), is extended to the case of several solutes transferring

  1. Intermittent stretch training of rabbit plantarflexor muscles increases soleus mass and serial sarcomere number.

    PubMed

    De Jaeger, Dominique; Joumaa, Venus; Herzog, Walter

    2015-06-15

    In humans, enhanced joint range of motion is observed after static stretch training and results either from an increased stretch tolerance or from a change in the biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit. We investigated the effects of an intermittent stretch training on muscle biomechanical and structural variables. The left plantarflexors muscles of seven anesthetized New Zealand (NZ) White rabbits were passively and statically stretched three times a week for 4 wk, while the corresponding right muscles were used as nonstretched contralateral controls. Before and after the stretching protocol, passive torque produced by the left plantarflexor muscles as a function of the ankle angle was measured. The left and right plantarflexor muscles were harvested from dead rabbits and used to quantify possible changes in muscle structure. Significant mass and serial sarcomere number increases were observed in the stretched soleus but not in the plantaris or medial gastrocnemius. This difference in adaptation between the plantarflexors is thought to be the result of their different fiber type composition and pennation angles. Neither titin isoform nor collagen amount was modified in the stretched compared with the control soleus muscle. Passive torque developed during ankle dorsiflexion was not modified after the stretch training on average, but was decreased in five of the seven experimental rabbits. Thus, an intermittent stretching program similar to those used in humans can produce a change in the muscle structure of NZ White rabbits, which was associated in some rabbits with a change in the biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit. PMID:26078433

  2. Inclusive B-meson production at small p_T in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme

    E-print Network

    B. A. Kniehl; G. Kramer; I. Schienbein; H. Spiesberger

    2015-02-03

    We calculate the cross section for the inclusive production of B mesons in pp and ppbar collisions at next-to-leading order in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme and show that a suitable choice of factorization scales leads to a smooth transition to the fixed-flavor-number scheme. Our numerical results are in good agreement with data from the Tevatron and LHC experiments at small and at large transverse momenta.

  3. Regular expansion solutions for small Peclet number heat or mass transfer in concentrated two-phase particulate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaron, I.

    1974-01-01

    Steady state heat or mass transfer in concentrated ensembles of drops, bubbles or solid spheres in uniform, slow viscous motion, is investigated. Convective effects at small Peclet numbers are taken into account by expanding the nondimensional temperature or concentration in powers of the Peclet number. Uniformly valid solutions are obtained, which reflect the effects of dispersed phase content and rate of internal circulation within the fluid particles. The dependence of the range of Peclet and Reynolds numbers, for which regular expansions are valid, on particle concentration is discussed.

  4. Cuban Mass Media: Organization, Control and Functions. Journalism Monographs Number Seventy-Eight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, John Spicer

    The mass media as interdependent parts of a larger social system both control and are controlled by other subsystems. The various combinations of control, in turn, determine the functions the media system will serve. In the 1960's, the Cuban mass media underwent frequent change that reflected the volatility of the revolutionary process. Today,…

  5. Higgs boson mass, neutrino masses and mixing and keV dark matter in an U(1) R - lepton number model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sabyasachi; Roy, Sourov

    2014-01-01

    We discuss neutrino masses and mixing in the framework of a supersymmetric model with an U(1)R symmetry, consisting of a single right handed neutrino superfield with an appropriate R charge. The lepton number ( L) of the standard model fermions are identified with the negative of their R-charges. As a result, a subset of leptonic R-parity violating operators can be present and are consistent with the U(1) R symmetry. This model can produce one light Dirac neutrino mass at the tree level without the need of introducing a very small neutrino Yukawa coupling. We analyze the scalar sector of this model in detail paying special attention to the mass of the lightest Higgs boson. One of the sneutrinos might acquire a substantial vacuum expectation value leading to interesting phenomenological consequences. Different sum rules involving the physical scalar masses are obtained and we show that the lightest Higgs boson mass receives a contribution proportional to the square of the neutrino Yukawa coupling f. This allows for a 125 GeV Higgs boson at the tree level for f ~ and still having a small tree level mass for the active neutrino. In order to fit the experimental results involving neutrino masses and mixing angles we introduce a small breaking of U(1) R symmetry, in the context of anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking. In the presence of this small R-symmetry breaking, light neutrino masses receive contributions at the one-loop level involving the R-parity violating interactions. We also identify the right handed neutrino as a warm dark matter candidate in our model. In the case of R-symmetry breaking, the large f case is characterized by a few hundred MeV lightest neutralino as an unstable lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) and we brieflydiscuss the cosmological implications of such a scenario.

  6. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities and mass attenuation coefficients in Au alloys.

    PubMed

    Han, I; Demir, L

    2010-01-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho) for pure Au and Au99Be1, Au88Ge12, Au95Zn5 alloys were measured at 59.5 and 88.0 keV photon energies. The samples were irradiated with 241Am and 109Cd radioactive point source using transmission arrangement. The gamma- rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Total atomic and electronic cross-sections (sigmat and sigmae), effective atomic and electron densities (Zeff and Nel) were determined using the obtained mass attenuation coefficients for investigated Au alloys. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients of each alloy were estimated using mixture rule. PMID:20421703

  7. Mass number dependence of the Skyrme-force-induced nuclear symmetry energy

    E-print Network

    M. Rafalski; W. Satula; R. Wyss

    2005-11-04

    The global mass dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and its two basic ingredients due to the mean-level spacing and effective strength of the isovector mean-potential is studied within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model. In particular, our study determines the ratio of the surface-to-volume contributions to the nuclear symmetry energy to be ~1.6 and reveals that contributions due to mean-level spacing and effective strength of the isovector mean-potential are almost equal after removing momentum-dependent effects by rescaling them with isoscalar and isovector effective masses, respectively.

  8. A comparative study of the number and mass of fine particles emitted with diesel fuel and marine gas oil (MGO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Md. Nurun; Brown, Richard J.; Ristovski, Zoran; Hustad, Johan Einar

    2012-09-01

    The current investigation reports on diesel particulate matter emissions, with special interest in fine particles from the combustion of two base fuels. The base fuels selected were diesel fuel and marine gas oil (MGO). The experiments were conducted with a four-stroke, six-cylinder, direct injection diesel engine. The results showed that the fine particle number emissions measured by both SMPS and ELPI were higher with MGO compared to diesel fuel. It was observed that the fine particle number emissions with the two base fuels were quantitatively different but qualitatively similar. The gravimetric (mass basis) measurement also showed higher total particulate matter (TPM) emissions with the MGO. The smoke emissions, which were part of TPM, were also higher for the MGO. No significant changes in the mass flow rate of fuel and the brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) were observed between the two base fuels.

  9. Semiempirical shell model masses with magic number Z=126 for superheavy elements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Liran; A. Marinov; N. Zeldes

    2000-01-01

    A semiempirical shell model mass equation applicable to superheavy elements up to Z=126 is presented and shown to have a high predictive power. The equation is applied to the recently discovered superheavy nuclei 293118 and 289114 and their decay products.

  10. Semiempirical Shell Model Masses with Magic Number Z = 126 for Superheavy Elements

    E-print Network

    S. Liran; A. Marinov; N. Zeldes

    2000-06-21

    A semiempirical shell model mass equation applicable to superheavy elements up to Z = 126 is presented and shown to have a high predictive power. The equation is applied to the recently discovered superheavy nuclei Z = 118, A = 293 and Z = 114, A = 289 and their decay products.

  11. A Further Study of the Frampton-Glashow-Yanagida Model for Neutrino Masses, Flavor Mixing and Baryon Number Asymmetry

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jue

    2015-01-01

    In light of the latest neutrino oscillation data, we revisit the minimal scenario of type-I seesaw model, in which only two heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos are introduced to account for both tiny neutrino masses and the baryon number asymmetry in our Universe. In this framework, we carry out a systematic study of the Frampton-Glashow-Yanagida ansatz by taking into account the renormalization-group running of neutrino mixing parameters and the flavor effects in leptogenesis. We demonstrate that the normal neutrino mass ordering is disfavored even in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with a large value of $\\tan \\beta$, for which the running effects could be significant. Furthermore, it is pointed out that the original scenario with a hierarchical mass spectrum of heavy Majorana neutrinos contradicts with the upper bound derived from a naturalness criterion, and the resonant mechanism with nearly-degenerate heavy Majorana neutrinos can be a possible way out.

  12. Magic numbers in the mass distribution of the benzene + -argon n ions: evaporation dynamics and cluster structure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clémence Guillaume; Jacques Le Calvé; Iliana Dimicoli; Michel Mons

    1994-01-01

    The intensity distribution of benzene+-Arn cluster ions formed by laser ionization of neutral clusters has been investigated: two main intensity anomalies (magic numbers atn=20 and 45) have been observed in the 15–60 size range. The evaporation dynamics of these species in the 2–50 microsecond time window following ionization has been studied using the electrostatic mirror of a reflectron time-of-flight mass

  13. Diallel crosses reveal patterns of variation in fruit-set, seed mass, and seed number in Asclepias incarnata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sara R Lipow; Robert Wyatt

    1999-01-01

    Plants from each of two populations of Asclepias incarnata ssp. incarnata were hand-pollinated in diallel crosses and seed number per fruit, mean individual seed mass per fruit and fruit-set were determined for the parental plants. Two diallels were performed on the glasshouse-grown plants, one involving six plants from one population and the other involving five plants from the second population.

  14. Primordial nucleosynthesis of intermediate-mass elements in baryon-number-inhomogeneous big bang models - Observational tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Kajino; G. J. Mathews; G. M. Fuller

    1990-01-01

    The primordial nucleosynthesis of intermediate-mass nuclei up to A = 28 in the neutron-rich and proton-rich environments produced by baryon-number-inhomogeneous big bang models is discussed. It is found that there could be several observational signatures of such neutron-rich and proton-rich primordial nucleosynthesis if sufficiently accurate isotopic and elemental abundance ratios could be measured for extremely metal-poor stars. These observations could

  15. Particulate Matter Mass and Number Concentrations Inside a Naturally Ventilated School Building Located Adjacent to an Urban Roadway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chithra, V. S.; Shiva Nagendra, S. M.

    2014-08-01

    This work presents the temporal characteristics of Particulate Matter (PM) mass and number concentrations measured inside a naturally ventilated school building, located close to a busy roadway in Chennai city. Two environmental dust monitor instruments (GRIMM Model 107 and Model 108) were used for measuring PM mass and number concentrations. The 1-h mean values of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 mass concentrations were found to be 262 ± 161, 68 ± 24, 40 ± 15 µg/m3 and 81 ± 26, 56 ± 2, 45 ± 19 µg/m3 during working hours (8am-4pm) and non-working hours (4pm-8am)/holidays, respectively. The PM number concentrations inside the room during working hours were found to be 2.4 × 105, 2.2 × 103 and 8.1 × 102 particles/l in the size range of 0.3-1, 1-3 and 3-10 µm, respectively. The present study reveals that during working hours, indoor PM concentrations of the classroom were influenced by the activities of occupants and during non working hours it was affected by outdoor vehicular emissions.

  16. Particulate Matter Mass and Number Concentrations Inside a Naturally Ventilated School Building Located Adjacent to an Urban Roadway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chithra, V. S.; Shiva Nagendra, S. M.

    2014-09-01

    This work presents the temporal characteristics of Particulate Matter (PM) mass and number concentrations measured inside a naturally ventilated school building, located close to a busy roadway in Chennai city. Two environmental dust monitor instruments (GRIMM Model 107 and Model 108) were used for measuring PM mass and number concentrations. The 1-h mean values of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 mass concentrations were found to be 262 ± 161, 68 ± 24, 40 ± 15 µg/m3 and 81 ± 26, 56 ± 2, 45 ± 19 µg/m3 during working hours (8am-4pm) and non-working hours (4pm-8am)/holidays, respectively. The PM number concentrations inside the room during working hours were found to be 2.4 × 105, 2.2 × 103 and 8.1 × 102 particles/l in the size range of 0.3-1, 1-3 and 3-10 µm, respectively. The present study reveals that during working hours, indoor PM concentrations of the classroom were influenced by the activities of occupants and during non working hours it was affected by outdoor vehicular emissions.

  17. Diallel crosses reveal patterns of variation in fruit-set, seed mass, and seed number in Asclepias incarnata.

    PubMed

    Lipow, S R; Wyatt, R

    1999-09-01

    Plants from each of two populations of Asclepias incarnata ssp. incarnata were hand-pollinated in diallel crosses and seed number per fruit, mean individual seed mass per fruit and fruit-set were determined for the parental plants. Two diallels were performed on the glasshouse-grown plants, one involving six plants from one population and the other involving five plants from the second population. The contributions to total phenotypic variation from joint, maternal, paternal, and two types of interaction sources of variation were then estimated. Variance attributable to maternal effects, reflecting differences between maternal plants resulting from environmental or genetic factors or both, comprised 31.3-68.4% of total variance in seed mass, 20.5-37.1% of variance in seed number, and 0.7-7.5% of variance in fruit-set. Interaction effects that depended on the direction of the cross accounted for 7.3-46.5% of variance in seed mass and 31.4-39.1% of variance in seed number. These interaction effects are consistent with the hypothesis that maternal plants provision resources differently to seeds depending on the specific genotypes of the embryos they contain. In the analysis of fruit-set, interaction effects independent of the direction of the cross (combined variance) explained 22.9-78.0% of phenotypic variance. These effects could have several causes, including inbreeding depression, shared incompatibility alleles, or 'control' of fruit-set by zygotes via hormonal signals or patterns of resource acquisition. PMID:10504429

  18. Double-? transformations in isobaric triplets with mass numbers A=124, 130, and 136

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, D. A.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Droese, C.; Eliseev, S.; Herfurth, F.; Minaya Ramirez, E.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Schweikhard, L.; Shabaev, V. M.; Smirnov, M. V.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Zuber, K.; Zubova, N. A.

    2012-10-01

    The Q values of double-electron capture in 124Xe, 130Ba, and 136Ce and double-beta decay of 124Sn and 130Te have been determined with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP with a few hundred eV uncertainty. These nuclides are members of three isobaric triplets with common daughter nuclides. The main goal of this work was to investigate the existence of the resonant enhancement of the neutrinoless double-electron-capture rates in 124Xe and 130Ba in order to assess their suitability for the search for neutrinoless double-electron capture. Based on our results, in neither of these cases is the resonance condition fulfilled.

  19. Contribution from indoor sources to particle number and mass concentrations in residential houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia; Hitchins, Jane; Gilbert, Dale

    As part of a large study investigating indoor air in residential houses in Brisbane, Australia, the purpose of this work was to quantify emission characteristics of indoor particle sources in 15 houses. Submicrometer particle number and approximation of PM 2.5 concentrations were measured simultaneously for more than 48 h in the kitchen of all the houses by using a condensation particle counter (CPC) and a photometer (DustTrak), respectively. In addition, characterizations of particles resulting from cooking conducted in an identical way in all the houses were measured by using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and a DustTrak. All the events of elevated particle concentrations were linked to indoor activities using house occupants diary entries, and catalogued into 21 different types of indoor activities. This enabled quantification of the effect of indoor sources on indoor particle concentrations as well as quantification of emission rates from the sources. For example, the study found that frying, grilling, stove use, toasting, cooking pizza, cooking, candle vaporizing eucalyptus oil and fan heater use, could elevate the indoor submicrometer particle number concentration levels by more than five times, while PM 2.5 concentrations could be up to 3, 30 and 90 times higher than the background levels during smoking, frying and grilling, respectively.

  20. COLOR DISTRIBUTIONS, NUMBER, AND MASS DENSITIES OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT 1.5 < z < 3: COMPARING OBSERVATIONS WITH MERGER SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wuyts, Stijn; Cox, Thomas J.; Hayward, Christopher C.; Hernquist, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Franx, Marijn [Leiden University, Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M. [MPE, Giessenbackstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hopkins, Philip F. [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Labbe, Ivo [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Marchesini, Danilo; Van Dokkum, Pieter G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Robertson, Brant E. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Toft, Sune [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-07-20

    We present a comparison between the observed color distribution, number, and mass density of massive galaxies at 1.5 < z < 3 and a model by Hopkins et al. that relates the quasar and galaxy population on the basis of gas-rich mergers. In order to test the hypothesis that quiescent red galaxies are formed after a gas-rich merger involving quasar activity, we confront photometry of massive (M>4 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) galaxies extracted from the FIRES, GOODS-South, and MUSYC surveys, together spanning an area of 496 arcmin{sup 2}, with synthetic photometry from hydrodynamical merger simulations. As in the Hopkins et al. model, we use the observed quasar luminosity function to estimate the merger rate. We find that the synthetic U - V and V - J colors of galaxies that had a quasar phase in their past match the colors of observed galaxies that are best characterized by a quiescent stellar population. At z {approx} 2.6, the observed number and mass density of quiescent red galaxies with M>4 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} is consistent with the model in which every quiescent massive galaxy underwent a quasar phase in the past. At z {approx} 1.9, 2.8 times less quiescent galaxies are observed than predicted by the model as descendants of higher redshift quasars. The merger model also predicts a large number and mass density of galaxies undergoing star formation driven by the merger. We find that the predicted number and mass density accounts for 30%-50% of the observed massive star-forming galaxies. However, their colors do not match those of observed star-forming galaxies. In particular, the colors of dusty red galaxies (accounting for 30%-40% of the massive galaxy population) are not reproduced by the simulations. Several possible origins of this discrepancy are discussed. The observational constraints on the validity of the model are currently limited by cosmic variance and uncertainties in stellar population synthesis and radiative transfer.

  1. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities from mass attenuation coefficients near the K edge in some samarium compounds.

    PubMed

    Akman, F; Durak, R; Turhan, M F; Kaçal, M R

    2015-07-01

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some samarium compounds were determined using the experimental total mass attenuation coefficient values near the K edge in the X-ray energy range from 36.847 up to 57.142keV. The measurements, in the region from 36.847 to 57.142keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the K?2, K?1, K?1 and K?2 X-rays from different secondary source targets excited by the 59.54keV gamma-photons from an Am-241 annular source. This paper presents the first measurement of the effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some samarium compounds near the K edge. The results of the study showed that the measured values were in good agreement with the theoretically calculated ones. PMID:25880612

  2. Analytical solution to predicting gaseous mass flow rates of microchannels in a wide range of Knudsen numbers.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qifeng; Liu, Xiaoli; Wang, Enzhi; Wang, Sijing

    2013-07-01

    To predict the gaseous mass flow rate of microchannels, conventional analytical solutions based on the Navier-Stokes equation or volume diffusion hydrodynamics (bivelocity hydrodynamics) associated with first-order or second-order slip boundary condition are not very successful, especially in high-Knudsen-number flow. An analytical solution which agrees with experimental data to a Knudsen number of 50 is presented in this paper. To achieve this goal, a concept of effective volume diffusion is defined. Then, with a general slip boundary condition, the gaseous mass flow rate of microchannel is derived by solving the momentum equation of this effective volume diffusion hydrodynamics. Compared with six other analytical solutions and one group of numerical solutions of the linearized Boltzmann equation, this solution is validated by three groups of experimental data. The results not only illustrate an improvement of this solution compared with other analytical solutions but also show the importance of the effective volume diffusion hydrodynamics for compressible microfluids. PMID:23944549

  3. Significance of mass and number of fibers in the correlation of V79 cytoxicity with tumorigenic potential of mineral fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Palekar, L.D.; Most, B.M.; Coffin, D.L.

    1988-08-01

    The cytotoxicity of four tumorigenic minerals: erionite(w), erionite(c), UICC crocidolite, UICC chrysotile and nontumorigenic mordenite was compared in Chinese hamster lung V79 cells. The results indicate that the tumorigenic minerals were toxic by showing more than 50% toxicity for at least one dose between 10 and 100/sup +/g/ml. Mordenite was nontoxic. Higher potency of erionite, however, was not evident in this system when the dose considered was expressed in mass units. On the other hand, when the degree of cytotoxicity was considered per number of mineral fibers, it was clear that fewer erionite fibers of all three dimensions (A greater than or equal to 3; L greater than or equal to 8.0 ..mu..m, W less than or equal to 0.25 ..mu..m; and L less than or equal to 5.0 ..mu..m, W less than or equal to 0.1 ..mu..m) than those of UICC crocidolite and UICC chrysotile were needed to produce similar toxicity. This suggests that the dose in number of fibers may be a better parameter than the total mass dose as a correlate of tumorigenic potential.

  4. Significance of mass and number of fibers in the correlation of V79 cytotoxicity with tumorigenic potential of mineral fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Palekar, L.D.; Most, B.M.; Coffin, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of four tumorigenic minerals, erionite(w), erionite(c), UICC crocidolite, UICC chrysotile to Chinese hamster V79 cells was compared. The results indicate that the minerals were toxic by showing more than 50% toxicity for at least one dose between 10 and 100 micrograms. This confirms the previous findings that V79 cytotoxicity corresponds to the tumorigenic potentials of the mineral fibers. Higher potency of erionite, however, was not evident in the system when the dose considered was expressed in mass units. On the other hand, when the degree of cytotoxicity was considered per number of mineral fibers, it was clear that fewer erionite fibers of all three dimensions (A greater than or equal to 3; L greater than or equal to 8.0 micrometers, W less than or equal to 0.25 micrometers; and L less than or equal to 5.0 micrometers, W less than or equal to 0.1 micrometers) than those of UICC crocidolite and UICC chrysotile were needed to produce similar toxicity. This suggests that the dose in number of fibers may be a better parameter than the total mass dose as a correlate of tumorigenic potential.

  5. Changes in the number of eggs loaded in Pantala flavescens females with age from mass flights (Odonata: Libellulidae).

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Yuta; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-11-01

    The wandering glider dragonfly Pantala flavescens migrates to Japan every spring, where the population increases until autumn, in which mass flights often occur, followed by death in the winter. There have been no reports to date on the maturation process of this species throughout its lifespan in Japan. We collected females from mass flights when the flight height was low, and classified them into seven age stages by examining their wing condition. Very few females of the older stage were collected from the mass flights. The wing condition corresponded with the change in body color and with the egg production process in the ovaries. While pre-reproductive-stage females did not release eggs when treated with our artificial oviposition technique, each reproductive-stage female released about 640 eggs. Nearly all eggs released were fertilized. The ovaries developed with the stage, and reproductive-stage females had about 1100 ovarioles. The estimated maximum fecundity was about 29,000 eggs. The lifetime number of eggs laid of P. flavescens should be revealed by dissection. PMID:25366154

  6. Featured Article: Beta cell specific pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha gene deletion results in a reduced islet number and ?-cell mass postnatally.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mulchand S; Srinivasan, Malathi; Strutt, Brenda; Mahmood, Saleh; Hill, David J

    2014-05-20

    The ability of pancreatic ?-cells to undertake glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) depends on the generation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) within the mitochondria from pyruvate, a major rate-limiting enzyme being pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC). However, glucose metabolism also controls ?-cell mass. To examine the role of PDC in the regulation of pancreatic ?-cell development and maturation, we generated ?-cell-targeted PDH? subunit knock-out male mice (?-PDHKO) and compared these with control males (?-PDHCT) from birth until 6-8 weeks age. Pancreas morphology, transcription factor expression, pancreatic insulin content, and circulating glucose and insulin values were compared. Compared to ?-PDHCT male mice, ?-PDHKO animals had significantly reduced pancreatic insulin content from birth, a lower serum insulin content from day 15, and relative hyperglycemia from day 30. Isolated islets from ?-PDHKO mice demonstrated a reduced GSIS. The number of islets per pancreatic area, mean islet area, and the proportion of islet cells that were ?-cells were all reduced in ?-PDHKO animals. Similarly the number of insulin-immunopositive, extra-islet small endocrine cell clusters, a possible source of ?-cell progenitors, was lower in ?-PDHKO mice. Analysis of pancreatic expression of transcription factors responsible for ?-cell lineage commitment, proliferation, and maturation, Pdx1, Neurogenin3, and NeuroD1 showed that mRNA abundance was reduced in the ?-PDHKO. This demonstrates that PDC is not only required for insulin expression and glucose-stimulated secretion, but also directly influences ?-cell growth and maturity, and positions glucose metabolism as a direct regulator of ?-cell mass and plasticity. PMID:24845368

  7. Mass and number size distributions of particulate matter components: comparison of an industrial site and an urban background site.

    PubMed

    Taiwo, Adewale M; Beddows, David C S; Shi, Zongbo; Harrison, Roy M

    2014-03-15

    Size-resolved composition of particulate matter (PM) sampled in the industrial town of Port Talbot (PT), UK was determined in comparison to a typical urban background site in Birmingham (EROS). A Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) sampler was deployed for two separate sampling campaigns with the addition of a Grimm optical spectrometer at the PT site. MOUDI samples were analysed for water-soluble anions (Cl(-), NO?(-) and SO?(2-)) and cations (Na(+), NH4(+), K(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+)) and trace metals (Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sb, Ba and Pb). The PM mass distribution showed a predominance of fine particle (PM?.?) mass at EROS whereas the PT samples were dominated by the coarse fraction (PM?.????). SO?(2-), Cl(-), NH4(+), Na(+), NO?(-), and Ca(2+) were the predominant ionic species at both sites while Al and Fe were the metals with highest concentrations at both sites. Mean concentrations of Cl(-), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cr, Mn, Fe and Zn were higher at PT than EROS due to industrial and marine influences. The contribution of regional pollution by sulphate, ammonium and nitrate was greater at EROS relative to PT. The traffic signatures of Cu, Sb, Ba and Pb were particularly prominent at EROS. Overall, PM at EROS was dominated by secondary aerosol and traffic-related particles while PT was heavily influenced by industrial activities and marine aerosol. Profound influences of wind direction are seen in the 72-hour data, especially in relation to the PT local sources. Measurements of particle number in 14 separate size bins plotted as a function of wind direction and speed are highly indicative of contributing sources, with local traffic dominant below 0.5 ?m, steelworks emissions from 0.5 to 15 ?m, and marine aerosol above 15 ?m. PMID:24419284

  8. Mother and offspring fitness in an insect with maternal care: phenotypic trade-offs between egg number, egg mass and egg care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oviparous females have three main options to increase their reproductive success: investing into egg number, egg mass and/or egg care. Although allocating resources to either of these three components is known to shape offspring number and size, potential trade-offs among them may have key impacts on maternal and offspring fitness. Here, we tested the occurrence of phenotypic trade-offs between egg number, egg mass and maternal expenditure on egg care in the European earwig, Forficula auricularia, an insect with pre- and post-hatching forms of maternal care. In particular, we used a series of laboratory observations and experiments to investigate whether these three components non-additively influenced offspring weight and number at hatching, and whether they were associated with potential costs to females in terms of future reproduction. Results We found negative associations between egg number and mass as well as between egg number and maternal expenditure on egg care. However, these trade-offs could only be detected after statistically correcting for female weight at egg laying. Hatchling number was not determined by single or additive effects among the three life-history traits, but instead by pairwise interactions among them. In particular, offspring number was positively associated with the number of eggs only in clutches receiving high maternal care or consisting of heavy eggs, and negatively associated with mean egg mass in clutches receiving low care. In contrast, offspring weight was positively associated with egg mass only. Finally, maternal expenditure on egg care reduced their future reproduction, but this effect was only detected when mothers were experimentally isolated from their offspring at egg hatching. Conclusions Overall, our study reveals simultaneous trade-offs between the number, mass and care of eggs. It also demonstrates that these factors interact in their impact on offspring production, and that maternal expenditure on egg care possibly shapes female future reproduction. These findings emphasize that studying reproductive success requires consideration of phenotypic trade-offs between egg-number, egg mass and egg care in oviparous species. PMID:24913927

  9. Extending the Capabilities of Single Particle Mass Spectrometry: I. Measurements of Aerosol Number Concentration, Size Distribution, and Asphericity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy D. Vaden; Dan Imre; Josef Beránek; Alla Zelenyuk

    2011-01-01

    Single particle mass spectrometers have traditionally been deployed to measure the size and composition of individual particles. The relatively slow sampling rates of these instruments are determined by the rate at which the ionization lasers can fire and\\/or mass spectra can be recorded. Under most conditions, our single particle mass spectrometer, SPLAT, can detect and size particles at much higher

  10. Tests of a mixed compression axisymmetric inlet with large transonic mass flow at Mach numbers 0.6 to 2.65

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, D. B.; Sorensen, N. E.

    1972-01-01

    A 38.8-cm (15.28-in.) capture diameter model of a mixed-compression axisymmetric inlet system with a translating cowl was designed and tested. The internal contours, designed for Mach number 2.65, provided a throat area of 59 percent of the capture area when the cowl was retracted for transonic operation. Other model features included a boundary-layer removal system, vortex generators, an engine airflow bypass system, cowl support struts, and rotating rakes at the engine face. All tunnel testing was conducted at a tunnel total pressure of about 1 atm (a unit Reynolds number of about 8.53 million/m at Mach number 2.65) at angles of attack from 0 deg to 4 deg. Results for the following were obtained: total-pressure recovery and distortion at the engine face as a function of bleed mass-flow ratio, the effect of bleed and vortex generator configurations on pressure recovery and distortion, inlet tolerance to unstart due to changes in angle of attack or Mach number, surface pressure distributions, boundary-layer profiles, and transonic additive drag. At Mach number 2.65 and with the best bleed configurations, maximum total pressure recovery at the engine face ranged from 91 to 94.5 percent with bleed mass-flow ratios from 4 to 9 percent, respectively, and total-pressure distortion was less than 10 percent. At off-design supersonic Mach numbers above 1.70, maximum total-pressure recoveries and corresponding bleed mass flows were about the same as at Mach number 2.65, with about 10 to 15 percent distortion. In the transonic Mach number range, total pressure recovery was high (above 96 percent) and distortion was low (less than 15 percent) only when the inlet mass-flow ration was reduced 0.02 to 0.06 from the maximum theoretical value (0.590 at Mach number 1.0).

  11. Emissions of NOx, particle mass and particle numbers from aircraft main engines, APU's and handling equipment at Copenhagen Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winther, Morten; Kousgaard, Uffe; Ellermann, Thomas; Massling, Andreas; Nøjgaard, Jacob Klenø; Ketzel, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed emission inventory for NOx, particle mass (PM) and particle numbers (PN) for aircraft main engines, APU's and handling equipment at Copenhagen Airport (CPH) based on time specific activity data and representative emission factors for the airport. The inventory has a high spatial resolution of 5 m × 5 m in order to be suited for further air quality dispersion calculations. Results are shown for the entire airport and for a section of the airport apron area ("inner apron") in focus. The methodology presented in this paper can be used to quantify the emissions from aircraft main engines, APU and handling equipment in other airports. For the entire airport, aircraft main engines is the largest source of fuel consumption (93%), NOx, (87%), PM (61%) and PN (95%). The calculated fuel consumption [NOx, PM, PN] shares for APU's and handling equipment are 5% [4%, 8%, 5%] and 2% [9%, 31%, 0%], respectively. At the inner apron area for handling equipment the share of fuel consumption [NOx, PM, PN] are 24% [63%, 75%, 2%], whereas APU and main engines shares are 43% [25%, 19%, 54%], and 33% [11%, 6%, 43%], respectively. The inner apron NOx and PM emission levels are high for handling equipment due to high emission factors for the diesel fuelled handling equipment and small for aircraft main engines due to small idle-power emission factors. Handling equipment is however a small PN source due to the low number based emission factors. Jet fuel sulphur-PM sensitivity calculations made in this study with the ICAO FOA3.0 method suggest that more than half of the PM emissions from aircraft main engines at CPH originate from the sulphur content of the fuel used at the airport. Aircraft main engine PN emissions are very sensitive to the underlying assumptions. Replacing this study's literature based average emission factors with "high" and "low" emission factors from the literature, the aircraft main engine PN emissions were estimated to change with a factor of 14.

  12. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu*, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ...

  13. Simulations of Kelvin-Helmholtz modes in partially ionized dusty plasmas comparing different charge numbers, charge polarities, and masses of the dust

    SciTech Connect

    Wiechen, Heinz M. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Results of multifluid simulations of Kelvin-Helmholtz modes in partially ionized, dusty plasmas are presented assuming different masses and charges of the dust. The results show a stabilizing effect for more massive dust grains and indicate a destabilizing effect for higher charge numbers. No significant dependence on the charge polarity of the dust was found.

  14. GENERAL: Normally-Ordered Time Evolution Operator for Mass-Varying Harmonic Oscillator and Wigner Function of Squeezed Number State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xu-Bing; Xu, Xue-Fen; Fan, Hong-Yi

    2010-07-01

    For investigating dynamic evolution of a mass-varying harmonic oscillator we constitute a ket-bra integration operator in coherent state representation and then perform this integral by virtue of the technique of integration within an ordered product of operators. The normally ordered time evolution operator is thus obtained. We then derive the Wigner function of u(t)|nrangle, where |nrangle is a Fock state, which exhibits a generalized squeezing, the squeezing effect is related to the varying mass with time.

  15. Probing the N = 32 shell closure below the magic proton number Z = 20: Mass measurements of the exotic isotopes 52,53K

    E-print Network

    Rosenbusch, M; Atanasov, D; Barbieri, C; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; Cipollone, A; George, S; Herfurth, F; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Navrátil, P; Neidherr, D; Schweikhard, L; Somà, V; Stanja, J; Wienholtz, F; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2015-01-01

    The recently confirmed neutron-shell closure at N = 32 has been investigated for the first time below the magic proton number Z = 20 with mass measurements of the exotic isotopes 52,53K, the latter being the shortest-lived nuclide investigated at the online mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. The resulting two-neutron separation energies reveal a 3 MeV shell gap at N = 32, slightly lower than for 52Ca, highlighting the doubly-magic nature of this nuclide. Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Boguliubov and ab initio Gorkov-Green function calculations are challenged by the new measurements but reproduce qualitatively the observed shell effect.

  16. Probing the N=32 Shell Closure below the Magic Proton Number Z=20: Mass Measurements of the Exotic Isotopes ^{52,53}K.

    PubMed

    Rosenbusch, M; Ascher, P; Atanasov, D; Barbieri, C; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; Cipollone, A; George, S; Herfurth, F; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Navrátil, P; Neidherr, D; Schweikhard, L; Somà, V; Stanja, J; Wienholtz, F; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2015-05-22

    The recently confirmed neutron-shell closure at N=32 has been investigated for the first time below the magic proton number Z=20 with mass measurements of the exotic isotopes ^{52,53}K, the latter being the shortest-lived nuclide investigated at the online mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. The resulting two-neutron separation energies reveal a 3 MeV shell gap at N=32, slightly lower than for ^{52}Ca, highlighting the doubly magic nature of this nuclide. Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and ab initio Gorkov-Green function calculations are challenged by the new measurements but reproduce qualitatively the observed shell effect. PMID:26047224

  17. Probing the N =32 Shell Closure below the Magic Proton Number Z =20 : Mass Measurements of the Exotic Isotopes K,5352

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbusch, M.; Ascher, P.; Atanasov, D.; Barbieri, C.; Beck, D.; Blaum, K.; Borgmann, Ch.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Cakirli, R. B.; Cipollone, A.; George, S.; Herfurth, F.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, S.; Lunney, D.; Manea, V.; Navrátil, P.; Neidherr, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Somà, V.; Stanja, J.; Wienholtz, F.; Wolf, R. N.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-01

    The recently confirmed neutron-shell closure at N =32 has been investigated for the first time below the magic proton number Z =20 with mass measurements of the exotic isotopes K,5352 , the latter being the shortest-lived nuclide investigated at the online mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. The resulting two-neutron separation energies reveal a 3 MeV shell gap at N =32 , slightly lower than for 52Ca, highlighting the doubly magic nature of this nuclide. Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and ab initio Gorkov-Green function calculations are challenged by the new measurements but reproduce qualitatively the observed shell effect.

  18. Probing the N = 32 shell closure below the magic proton number Z = 20: Mass measurements of the exotic isotopes 52,53K

    E-print Network

    M. Rosenbusch; P. Ascher; D. Atanasov; C. Barbieri; D. Beck; K. Blaum; Ch. Borgmann; M. Breitenfeldt; R. B. Cakirli; A. Cipollone; S. George; F. Herfurth; M. Kowalska; S. Kreim; D. Lunney; V. Manea; P. Navrátil; D. Neidherr; L. Schweikhard; V. Somà; J. Stanja; F. Wienholtz; R. N. Wolf; K. Zuber

    2015-06-01

    The recently confirmed neutron-shell closure at N = 32 has been investigated for the first time below the magic proton number Z = 20 with mass measurements of the exotic isotopes 52,53K, the latter being the shortest-lived nuclide investigated at the online mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. The resulting two-neutron separation energies reveal a 3 MeV shell gap at N = 32, slightly lower than for 52Ca, highlighting the doubly-magic nature of this nuclide. Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Boguliubov and ab initio Gorkov-Green function calculations are challenged by the new measurements but reproduce qualitatively the observed shell effect.

  19. THE NUMBER DENSITY AND MASS DENSITY OF STAR-FORMING AND QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT 0.4 {<=} z {<=} 2.2

    SciTech Connect

    Brammer, Gabriel B. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Whitaker, K. E.; Van Dokkum, P. G.; Lee, K.-S.; Muzzin, A. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Marchesini, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Franx, M. [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Kriek, M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Labbe, I.; Quadri, R. F.; Williams, R. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Rudnick, G., E-mail: gbrammer@eso.org [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Malott Hall, Room 1082, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States)

    2011-09-20

    We study the buildup of the bimodal galaxy population using the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey, which provides excellent redshifts and well-sampled spectral energy distributions of {approx}27, 000 galaxies with K < 22.8 at 0.4 < z < 2.2. We first show that star-forming galaxies and quiescent galaxies can be robustly separated with a two-color criterion over this entire redshift range. We then study the evolution of the number density and mass density of quiescent and star-forming galaxies, extending the results of the COMBO-17, DEEP2, and other surveys to z = 2.2. The mass density of quiescent galaxies with M {approx}> 3 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} increases by a factor of {approx}10 from z {approx} 2 to the present day, whereas the mass density in star-forming galaxies is flat or decreases over the same time period. Modest mass growth by a factor of {approx}2 of individual quiescent galaxies can explain roughly half of the strong density evolution at masses >10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, due to the steepness of the exponential tail of the mass function. The rest of the density evolution of massive, quiescent galaxies is likely due to transformation (e.g., quenching) of the massive star-forming population, a conclusion which is consistent with the density evolution we observe for the star-forming galaxies themselves, which is flat or decreasing with cosmic time. Modest mass growth does not explain the evolution of less massive quiescent galaxies ({approx}10{sup 10.5} M{sub sun}), which show a similarly steep increase in their number densities. The less massive quiescent galaxies are therefore continuously formed by transforming galaxies from the star-forming population.

  20. Sperm competition games: Sperm size (mass) and number under raffle and displacement, and the evolution of P2

    E-print Network

    Pitnick, Scott

    number / space available for sperm competition). Such dependencies generate complex relationships between). Discerning the relationship between variation in a given trait and competitive male fertilization success behaviour (e.g. swimming speed), sperm longevity, seminal plasma biochemistry, and complex interactions

  1. Effects of amino acids on egg number and egg mass of brown (heavy breed) and white (light breed) laying hens.

    PubMed

    Bonekamp, R P R T; Lemme, A; Wijtten, P J A; Sparla, J K W M

    2010-03-01

    Different types (light to heavy) of laying hens are used in practice. There are questions about the optimum level of balanced protein (BP) supply in feed for different types of hens. Therefore, a broad range of amino acids intake levels [550 to 800 mg of true fecal digestible (TFD) Lys/hen per d] was tested on heavy (Lohmann Brown Classic) and light (Lohmann LSL Classic) laying hens from 24 to 60 wk of age. The other indispensable amino acids were fed in fixed ratios to TFD Lys in all treatments. A total of 282 Lohmann Brown Classic and 282 Lohmann LSL Classic hens (24 wk of age) were divided into 12 experimental groups (individually housed) based on daily egg mass production and BW. Replicates of the heavy strain started with a similar average daily egg mass production (51.1 g/hen per d), laying percentage (95.9%), and hen weight (1,860 g). Replicates of the light strain started with a similar average daily egg mass production (52.0 g/hen per d), laying percentage (97.3%), and hen weight (1,478 g). Diets were fed restrictively with an aimed feed intake of 110 g/hen per day [308 kcal/hen per d of AME(n (layers))] and 100 g/hen per day [280 kcal/hen per d of AME(n (layers))] for heavy and light hens, respectively, to achieve the required BP intake levels. For light hens, a BP intake with 600 mg of TFD Lys was sufficient for optimal laying percentage, whereas maximum laying percentage was not achieved with the highest TFD Lys in heavy hens. For egg weight, daily egg mass production as well as feed conversion regression analysis revealed that asymptotes were not achieved with the highest amino acid levels in both layer strains. PMID:20181869

  2. VOLUME 60, NUMBER 20 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 16 MAY 1988 Mass Transport in Propagating Patterns of Convection

    E-print Network

    Moses, Elisha

    of Convection Elisha Moses Department of Physics, Weizmann Institute, Rehovot, Israel and Victor Steinberg observation of convective transport in oscillatory convection of a binary mixture. The results show. PACS numbers: 47.25.Jn Extensive studies of oscillatory convection in binary mixtures have recently

  3. Determination of thermodynamic potentials and the aggregation number for micelles with the mass-action model by isothermal titration calorimetry: A case study on bile salts.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Westh, Peter; Holm, René

    2015-09-01

    The aggregation number (n), thermodynamic potentials (?G, ?H, ?S) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) for 6 natural bile salts were determined on the basis of both original and previously published isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data. Different procedures to estimate parameters of micelles with ITC were compared to a mass-action model (MAM) of reaction type: n?S?Mn. This analysis can provide guidelines for future ITC studies of systems behaving in accordance with this model such as micelles and proteins that undergo self-association to oligomers. Micelles with small aggregation numbers, as those of bile salts, are interesting because such small aggregates cannot be characterized as a separate macroscopic phase and the widely applied pseudo-phase model (PPM) is inaccurate. In the present work it was demonstrated that the aggregation number of micelles was constant at low concentrations enabling determination of the thermodynamic potentials by the MAM. A correlation between the aggregation number and the heat capacity was found, which implies that the dehydrated surface area of bile salts increases with the aggregation number. This is in accordance with Tanford's principles of opposing forces where neighbouring molecules in the aggregate are better able to shield from the surrounding hydrophilic environment when the aggregation number increases. PMID:25978555

  4. Correlation between volume fraction and volume-weighted mean volume, and between total number and total mass of islets in post-weaning and young Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Inuwa, IM; El Mardi, AS

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the number and volume distribution of islets of Langerhans in post-weaning young Wistar rat pancreas and their variation with age. Four groups of six normal Wistar Kyoto rats, at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks of age, were used. The whole pancreas was weighed (W), fixed in buffered formaldehyde and embedded in JB4 resin, and 1.5-µm serial sections were obtained. A fraction of whole tissue was obtained in accordance with the multistage fractionator principle and used to estimate total number of islets (Nis). Volume fraction (Vf) of islets and volume-weighted mean volume (Vv) of islets were estimated using point-counting and point-sampled intercept methods, respectively. The numbers of islets increased steadily with age (P  < 0.001), whereas the volume-weighted mean volume of individual islets was not significantly different among all age groups of rats (P  > 0.05). There was a strong positive correlation between total islet number and islet mass (r = 0.96, P  = 0.001), and between volume fraction and islet mass (r = 0.969, P  = 0.001). However, there was a weak positive correlation between volume fraction and volume-weighted mean islet volume (r = 0.6, P  = 0.002) in the age window investigated. These findings indicate that there was an increase in the number and volume fraction of islets with age in post-weaning young rats but that individual islet volume did not change significantly. It appears the mechanism of alteration in islet morphology in the rat is mainly by the formation of new islets while keeping their individual volume distribution unchanged. PMID:15730483

  5. An Experimental Modeling and Investigation of Change in Cold Mass Fraction and Nozzle Numbers on Performance of Counter Flow Vortex Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, S. S.; Ray, D. K.

    2012-06-01

    An experimental investigation has been performed to realize thorough behavior of a vortex tube system. The vortex tube is a simple device operating as a refrigerating unit without any moving parts. It consists of a principal tube, to which a high pressure gas stream enters tangentially where it splits into two streams: one hot and one cold temperature streams. This paper discusses the experimental investigation of vortex tube performance as it relates to cold mass fraction, and nozzle number. Four different orifices, each with three, four, five and six nozzles respectively, were manufactured and used during the test. The experiments have been conducted with each one of those orifices stated above, and the performance of the vortex tube has been tested with air at inlet pressure of 5 bar and the cold mass fractions of 0.5-0.72.

  6. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Halo Occupation Number, Mass-to-Light Ratios and Omega(M)

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; /Toronto U., Astron. Dept.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    Using K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters we examine the near-infrared properties of moderate-redshift (0.19 < z < 0.55) galaxy clusters. We find that the number of K-band selected cluster galaxies within R{sub 500} (the Halo Occupation Number, HON) is well-correlated with the cluster dynamical mass (M{sub 500}) and X-ray Temperature (T{sub x}); however, the intrinsic scatter in these scaling relations is 37% and 46% respectively. Comparison with clusters in the local universe shows that the HON-M{sub 500} relation does not evolve significantly between z = 0 and z {approx} 0.3. This suggests that if dark matter halos are disrupted or undergo significant tidal-stripping in high-density regions as seen in numerical simulations, the stellar mass within the halos is tightly bound, and not removed during the process. The total K-band cluster light (L{sub 200},K) and K-band selected richness (parameterized by B{sub gc,K}) are also correlated with both the cluster T{sub x} and M{sub 200}. The total (intrinsic) scatter in the L{sub 200,K}-M{sub 200} and B{sub gc,K}-M{sub 200} relations are 43%(31%) and 35%(18%) respectively and indicates that for massive clusters both L{sub 200,K} and B{sub gc,K} can predict M{sub 200} with similar accuracy as T{sub x}, L{sub x} or optical richness (B{sub gc}). Examination of the mass-to-light ratios of the clusters shows that similar to local clusters, the K-band mass-to-light ratio is an increasing function of halo mass. Using the K-band mass-to-light ratios of the clusters, we apply the Oort technique and find {Omega}{sub m,0} = 0.22 {+-} 0.02, which agrees well with recent combined concordance cosmology parameters, but, similar to previous cluster studies, is on the low-density end of preferred values.

  7. Petroleomics by electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectrometry coupled to partial least squares with variable selection methods: prediction of the total acid number of crude oils.

    PubMed

    Terra, Luciana A; Filgueiras, Paulo R; Tose, Lílian V; Romão, Wanderson; de Souza, Douglas D; de Castro, Eustáquio V R; de Oliveira, Mirela S L; Dias, Júlio C M; Poppi, Ronei J

    2014-10-01

    Negative-ion mode electrospray ionization, ESI(-), with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was coupled to a Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression and variable selection methods to estimate the total acid number (TAN) of Brazilian crude oil samples. Generally, ESI(-)-FT-ICR mass spectra present a power of resolution of ca. 500,000 and a mass accuracy less than 1 ppm, producing a data matrix containing over 5700 variables per sample. These variables correspond to heteroatom-containing species detected as deprotonated molecules, [M - H](-) ions, which are identified primarily as naphthenic acids, phenols and carbazole analog species. The TAN values for all samples ranged from 0.06 to 3.61 mg of KOH g(-1). To facilitate the spectral interpretation, three methods of variable selection were studied: variable importance in the projection (VIP), interval partial least squares (iPLS) and elimination of uninformative variables (UVE). The UVE method seems to be more appropriate for selecting important variables, reducing the dimension of the variables to 183 and producing a root mean square error of prediction of 0.32 mg of KOH g(-1). By reducing the size of the data, it was possible to relate the selected variables with their corresponding molecular formulas, thus identifying the main chemical species responsible for the TAN values. PMID:25068148

  8. Emissions of organic aerosol mass, black carbon, particle number, and regulated and unregulated gases from scooters and light and heavy duty vehicles with different fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, R.; Clairotte, M.; Adam, T. W.; Giechaskiel, B.; Heringa, M. F.; Elsasser, M.; Martini, G.; Manfredi, U.; Streibel, T.; Sklorz, M.; Zimmermann, R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Astorga, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Prevot, A. S. H.

    2014-06-01

    A sampling campaign with seven different types of vehicles was conducted in 2009 at the vehicle test facilities of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra (Italy). The vehicles chosen were representative of some categories circulating in Europe and were fueled either with standard gasoline or diesel and some with blends of rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel. The aim of this work was to improve the knowledge about the emission factors of gas phase and particle-associated regulated and unregulated species from vehicle exhaust. Unregulated species such as black carbon (BC), primary organic aerosol (OA) content, particle number (PN), monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and a~selection of unregulated gaseous compounds, including nitrous acid (N2O), ammonia (NH3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and methane (CH4), were measured in real time with a suite of instruments including a high-resolution aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer, a resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a high resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Diesel vehicles, without particle filters, featured the highest values for particle number, followed by gasoline vehicles and scooters. The particles from diesel and gasoline vehicles were mostly made of BC with a low fraction of OA, while the particles from the scooters were mainly composed of OA. Scooters were characterized by super high emissions factors for OA, which were orders of magnitude higher than for the other vehicles. The heavy duty diesel vehicle (HDDV) featured the highest nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions, while the scooters had the highest emissions for total hydrocarbons and aromatic compounds due to the unburned and partially burned gasoline and lubricant oil mixture. Generally, vehicles fuelled with biodiesel blends showed lower emission factors of OA and total aromatics than those from the standard fuels. The scooters were the main emitters of aromatic compounds, followed by the gasoline vehicle, the diesel vehicles and the HDDV.

  9. Measurement of Black Carbon, Particle Number and Mass, and Lung-Deposited Surface Area Emission Factors from in-Use Locomotive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban-Weiss, G. A.; Krasowsky, T.; Sioutas, C.; Daher, N.

    2014-12-01

    As pollutant emissions from motor vehicles have vastly decreased over the last decades, the relative contribution from non-road sources has increased. There is a serious lack of real-world emissions measurements for many non-road sources including locomotives. As such, uncertainties in emissions from these sources is high. Locomotives contribute to human exposure of diesel pollutants near ports, railyards, and rail lines. Reducing uncertainty in current estimates of locomotive emissions is needed for enhancing the accuracy of emission inventories with corresponding improvements in health risk, air pollution, and climate assessments. Particulate matter emissions from a large sample (N=88) of in-use freight locomotives were measured in the Alameda Corridor, located near the port of Los Angeles. Emission factors for black carbon (BC), particle number (PN), fine particulate mass (PM2.5), and lung-deposited surface area (LDSA) were computed based on 1 Hz measurements of the rise and fall of particulate emissions and CO2 concentrations as the locomotives passed the sampling location. Mean emission factors ± standard deviations were 0.9 ± 0.5 g kg-1 of fuel consumed for BC, (2.1 ± 1.5)x1016 # kg-1 for PN, 1.6 ± 1.3 g kg-1 for PM2.5, and (2.2 ± 1.7)x1013 ?m2 kg-1 for LDSA. Emission factors for individual trains were slightly skewed, with the dirtiest 10% of locomotives responsible for 20%, 24%, 28%, and 27% of total BC, PN, PM2.5, and LDSA emissions, respectively. BC versus LDSA emissions from individual locomotives were found to be anti-correlated, suggesting that the highest emitters of black carbon may in fact result in less particle lung-deposited surface area than lower BC emitters. Using results presented here along with previous measurements, we compare for freight trains versus diesel trucks the amount of BC emissions associated with pulling an intermodal freight container over a given distance. Emission factors for locomotives presented here establish a baseline prior to reductions that are anticipated as a result of Federal regulation and state control efforts in 2015.

  10. Sixth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies Held in Cooperation with the Fifteenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains copies of those technical papers received in time for publication prior to the Sixth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies which is being held in cooperation with the Fifteenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems at the University of Maryland-University College Inn and Conference Center March 23-26, 1998. As one of an ongoing series, this Conference continues to provide a forum for discussion of issues relevant to the management of large volumes of data. The Conference encourages all interested organizations to discuss long term mass storage requirements and experiences in fielding solutions. Emphasis is on current and future practical solutions addressing issues in data management, storage systems and media, data acquisition, long term retention of data, and data distribution. This year's discussion topics include architecture, tape optimization, new technology, performance, standards, site reports, vendor solutions. Tutorials will be available on shared file systems, file system backups, data mining, and the dynamics of obsolescence.

  11. Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference 23-26 September 2008

    E-print Network

    Barth, Jack

    :45 Evening Session: General Contributions II 5:45 ­ 6:30 EPOC Business Meeting 6:30 ­ 8:00 Dinner 8:15 ­ 10 insights and/or products for societal use 12:00 EPOC 2008 closes; Lunch (available and included

  12. Neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.

    1993-04-01

    Neutrinos play a dominant role in both particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. In the our present understanding of the strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces, the group structure of the Standard Model is SU(3){sub C} {circle_times} SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} U(I){sub EM}. In the Weinberg-Salam-Glashow Standard Electroweak Model, left-handed neutrinos sit in a doublet, while right-handed neutrinos are in a singlet, and therefore do not interact with the other known particles. Also in this model, the neutrinos are intrinsically massless. However, while the W-S-G model provides an amazingly accurate picture of our present cold Universe, It has a number of deficits. The Standard Model does not explain the origin of the group structure, It does not reduce the number of coupling constants required, nor does it offer any prediction for the physical masses of the particles. Thus, it is generally assumed that the Standard Model is but a subset of some larger gauge theory. A wide variety of Grand Unified field Theories (GUTs), Super Symmetric Models (SUSY), and Superstring models have been proposed as the model for this larger structure. In general, these models predict nonzero neutrino masses and contain mechanisms that provide for lepton-number violation. Thus, a variety of new phenomena are predicted, including finite neutrino masses and the possibility that neutrinos can oscillate from one type to another. This report looks at the possibility of detecting neutrino vat mass.

  13. Neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Neutrinos play a dominant role in both particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. In the our present understanding of the strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces, the group structure of the Standard Model is SU(3)[sub C] [circle times] SU(2)[sub L] [circle times] U(I)[sub EM]. In the Weinberg-Salam-Glashow Standard Electroweak Model, left-handed neutrinos sit in a doublet, while right-handed neutrinos are in a singlet, and therefore do not interact with the other known particles. Also in this model, the neutrinos are intrinsically massless. However, while the W-S-G model provides an amazingly accurate picture of our present cold Universe, It has a number of deficits. The Standard Model does not explain the origin of the group structure, It does not reduce the number of coupling constants required, nor does it offer any prediction for the physical masses of the particles. Thus, it is generally assumed that the Standard Model is but a subset of some larger gauge theory. A wide variety of Grand Unified field Theories (GUTs), Super Symmetric Models (SUSY), and Superstring models have been proposed as the model for this larger structure. In general, these models predict nonzero neutrino masses and contain mechanisms that provide for lepton-number violation. Thus, a variety of new phenomena are predicted, including finite neutrino masses and the possibility that neutrinos can oscillate from one type to another. This report looks at the possibility of detecting neutrino vat mass.

  14. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie; Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm- 3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm- 3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges.

  15. Number Line

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Clarity Innovations, Inc.

    2013-11-22

    This iOS app helps students to visualize number sentences and create models for addition, subtractions, multiplication, and division. The number line can be adjusted to represent multiples of numbers from one to one hundred.

  16. Mystery Number

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    TERC

    2010-01-01

    Combine logic and numbers in this game for all ages. Players start with a 10x10 grid of the numbers 1 to 100. One person chooses a secret number and announces the range in which it falls. Other players ask yes or no questions to identify the number. They cross out the numbers on the board that are no longer possibilities. The player who identifies the secret number wins. Available as a downloadable pdf and in Spanish.

  17. Mass Disasters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristina Cattneo; Danilo De Angelis; Marco Grandi

    A mass disaster is commonly construed as an event (air, naval, railway, or motorway accident, flooding, earthquake, and so\\u000a on), resulting in a large number of victims that need to be identified and subject to medicolegal investigation. Furthermore,\\u000a depending on which continent one comes from, innumerous protocols and procedures are available, the Interpol Disaster Victim\\u000a Identification form being the most

  18. Selenium: Atomic Number 34, Mass Number 78.96

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Tin Win

    Selenium, a trace element, is an antioxidant and is an essential component for normal functioning of the immune system and thyroid gland. It is a micronutrient. Normal daily needs, sources, effects of deficiency and excess of selenium are mentioned. Some current issues and controversies concerning selenium are discussed. These include thyroid function, cancer, heart disease, arthritis, HIV \\/ AIDS, and

  19. Centre of Mass, Moments, Torque Centre of Mass

    E-print Network

    Feldman, Joel

    Centre of Mass, Moments, Torque Centre of Mass If you support a body at its center of mass (in a uniform gravitational field) it balances perfectly. That's the definition of the center of mass of the body. If the body consists of a m1 m2 m3 m4 finite number of masses m1, · · · , mn attached

  20. Number Factory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michiel Doorman

    2003-01-01

    This interactive game develops fluency and flexibility with whole number operations. In each round the player is given 4 single-digit whole numbers, presented in the context of a factory. The player uses each number exactly once with the interactive calculator to arrive as close as possible to a given target number.

  1. Number Flash

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mitchell Mark

    2013-03-10

    This iOS app helps students make the transition from counting to number recognition by thinking of a number of objects in relation to five and ten. The app displays a set number of items from one to twenty in ten frames then flashes away after the preset number of seconds. The user must identify the number that was shown on the ten frames.

  2. Mass spectrometer mixture calibrations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hicks

    1986-01-01

    Mass spectrometric analyses of hydrogen isotope mixtures can be difficult to make for a number of reasons. The most difficult problem is the possibility of confronting extremely great and extremely small relative mass differences in the same analysis. Commercial mass spectrometers are now available that can overcome these problems. The analytical capabilities and limitations of these instruments will be discussed.

  3. Nifty Numbers!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Miss.Cochran

    2008-03-26

    You will be working with numbers in all sorts of ways. First, you will play cop by picking numbers based on their divisibility. Then you will be adding and subtracting fractions in two fun and exciting games. First, as a cop, you will catch numbers that are divisible by which ever number you pick, avoinding crashing into non-divisible numbers. Number Cop-Divisibility Now, play Fishy Fractions! and help feed the seagull by practicing adding fractions. Make sure you read the instructions before getting started! Make sure to simplify your answers! After you ...

  4. Leftist Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The leftist number system consists of numbers with decimal digits arranged in strings to the left, instead of to the right. This system fails to be a field only because it contains zerodivisors. The same construction with prime base yields the p-adic numbers.

  5. Number theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Schroeder

    1989-01-01

    Number theory, an abstract branch of mathematics that deals with relationships between whole numbers, has provided highly useful answers to numerous real-world problems. The author briefly reviews earlier uses of number theory and then examines recent applications to music, cryptography, and error-correction codes

  6. Number Sense

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Black

    2007-10-03

    Students will practice counting to 100 and making numbers with base ten blocks Let\\'s have some fun with math! First, practice counting to 100. Listen to the instructions on this website. Count to 100 Now that you have worked on counting to 100, let\\'s make some numbers! Use the base ten blocks to make the numbers shown on the screen! Base Ten Blocks Great work! The next ...

  7. Number Grids and Number Triangles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Quincy Brown

    Practice counting, counting by tens, place value, and fact families by entering your answers into the blank boxes; click the big blue and green buttons to check your work. Each of the five levels of Number Grid activities displays a section of a matrix containing a set of of consecutive whole numbers. A move from one number to the next within a row corresponds to a change of one; a move from one number to the next within a column refers to a change of ten. The three levels of Number Triangle activities provide practice with fact families and inverse relationships through flash cards. An addition/subtraction Number Triangle has two addends and a sum; a multiplication/division Number Triangle has two factors and a product.

  8. Number Cruncher

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this online puzzle game, learners need to choose a path from a starting number to a goal number. Along the path are simple operations (e.g. add 1, subtract 2, multiply by 2) to change the current number to a new number. This is a good challenge for young learners. When learners set up a free account at Kinetic City, they can answer bonus questions at the end of the activity as a quick assessment. As a larger assessment, learners can complete the Bug Blaster game after they've completed several activities.

  9. Matching Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-01-01

    This interactive Flash version of the familiar game Concentration helps students develop number sense by matching various symbolic and pictorial representations of single digit numbers. The scoring rewards a systematic strategy over random guessing. The resource includes teacher notes with suggestions for implementation and differentiation, discussion questions, and printable sets of cards (pdf).

  10. Number Watch

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Brignell, Professor Emeritus from the Department of Electronics & Computer Science at the University of Southampton, is the author of this informal website "devoted to the monitoring of the misleading numbers that rain down on us via the media." Brignell says he aims to "nail" a few of the "Single Issue Fanatics (SIFs), politicians, bureaucrats, quasi-scientists (junk, pseudo- or just bad)," who use misleading numbers to write catchy articles or who try to keep numbers away from public notice. Since April 2000, he has been posting a "number of the month" as well as a "number for the year," which offer his commentary on media usage of misleading numbers and explanations for why the numbers are misleading. He also posts book reviews and an extensive list of online resources on statistics and statistics education. The FAQ section includes answers to some interesting questions, such as "Is there such a thing as average global temperature?" and some more basic questions such as "What is the Normal Distribution and what is so normal about it?" The Bits and Pieces section includes a variety of short articles on statistics and his definitions for some terms he uses on the website. Visitors are also invited to join the discussion forum (complete with a few advertisements) and view comments by others who want to discuss "wrong numbers in science, politics and the media." A few comments sent to Brignell and his responses are also posted online. This site is also reviewed in the February 11, 2005_NSDL MET Report_.

  11. Tooth Numbering

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tooth on the lower right would be T. Palmer Notation Method Adults In this system, the mouth ... the upper right quadrant. Children In children, the Palmer Notation System uses uppercase letters instead of numbers. ...

  12. Urinary tract masses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diana L. Farmer

    2000-01-01

    Disorders of the urinary tract account for the majority of abdominal masses in infants. The most common causes of a flank mass in a neonate are a hydronephrotic kidney followed by a multicystic kidney. An increasing number of disorders resulting in hydronephrosis are diagnosed by prenatal ultrasound scan, and their natural history continues to be elucidated. This review will examine

  13. Numbers, Please!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelin, John R.

    2013-01-01

    What topic would you choose if you had the luxury of writing forever? In this article, John Thelin provides his response: He would opt to write about the history of higher education in a way that relies on quantitative data. "Numbers, please!" is his research request in taking on a longitudinal study of colleges and universities over…

  14. Number Sense!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Painter

    2006-10-27

    Perform operations with whole numbers, simple fractions, and decimals. 1. Begin your work at the Comparing Fractions website. Complete 10 problems. 2. When you are finished Comparing Fractions, I\\'m sure you will hunger for more! Click on the website, Who Wants Pizza? These activities are sure to fill your brain with nutritious information. 3. Explore Egyptian ...

  15. Spatial Mass

    E-print Network

    Benjamin Nachman; Ariel Schwartzman

    2014-07-08

    In analogy to the transverse mass constructed from two objects, we define the spatial mass constructed from the input objects 3-vector momenta. This observable is insensitive to jet mass scale and resolution uncertainties when constructed from small-radius hadronic jets. Thus it improves the effective resolution on multijet masses for searches and measurements in hadronic final states. To illustrate the efficacy of the spatial mass, we consider a top quark mass measurement at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the 3-jet final state. The reduction in uncertainty comes with a negligible cost in sensitivity.

  16. Mass loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Leo

    1987-01-01

    Observational evidence for mass loss from cool stars is reviewed. Spectra line profiles are used for the derivation of mass-loss rates with the aid of the equation of continuity. This equation implies steady mass loss with spherical symmetry. Data from binary stars, Mira variables, and red giants in globular clusters are examined. Silicate emission is discussed as a useful indicator of mass loss in the middle infrared spectra. The use of thermal millimeter-wave radiation, Very Large Array (VLA) measurement of radio emission, and OH/IR masers are discussed as a tool for mass loss measurement. Evidence for nonsteady mass loss is also reviewed.

  17. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePLUS

    Mass in the abdomen ... the doctor make a diagnosis. For example, the abdomen is usually divided into four areas: Right-upper ... pain or masses include: Epigastric -- center of the abdomen just below the rib cage Periumbilical -- area around ...

  18. High Precision Dynamical Masses of Very Low Mass Binaries

    E-print Network

    Konopacky, Q M; Barman, T S; Rice, E L; Bailey, J I; White, R J; McLean, I S; Duchene, G

    2010-01-01

    [ABRIDGED] We present the results of a 3 year monitoring program of a sample of very low mass (VLM) field binaries using both astrometric and spectroscopic data obtained in conjunction with the laser guide star adaptive optics system on the W.M. Keck II 10 m telescope. Fifteen systems have undergone sufficient orbital motion, allowing us to derive their relative orbital parameters and hence their total system mass. These measurements triple the number of masses for VLM objects. Among the 11 systems with both astrometric and spectroscopic measurements, six have sufficient radial velocity variations to allow us to obtain individual component masses. This is the first derivation of the component masses for five of these systems. Altogether, the orbital solutions of these low mass systems show a correlation between eccentricity and orbital period, consistent with their higher mass counterparts. In our primary analysis, we find that there are systematic discrepancies between our dynamical mass measurements and the...

  19. Paint by Number

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Only in America, one might say, would artistic self-expression be so successfully mass produced, commodified, and regimented. Nevertheless, in a brave attempt at recuperation, the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History offers this new Website on the popular 1950s' hobby of painting by number from the perspective of "the artists and entrepreneurs who created the popular paint kits, the cultural critics who reviled them, and the hobbyists who happily completed them and hung them in their homes." Taking a decidedly cultural studies approach, the Website stresses the pleasures derived from the activity as well as the modifications to the kits made by many participants. It also places the phenomenon in the context of the culture of the 1950s, particularly its expansion of leisure time. There are plenty of images here of the creation of the numbers kits as well as representations of the finished product. A bibliography and a bulletin board for posting reminiscences about painting by number are also provided. The authors claim the hobby, which pretty much died out in the 1960s, had the "peculiarly American virtue" of inviting people "who never held a brush before to enter a world of art and creativity." The editors invite our readers to be the judge of that.

  20. COMPLEX NUMBERS 1. Definition of complex numbers

    E-print Network

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    COMPLEX NUMBERS 1. Definition of complex numbers Complex conjugate, Magnitude Operations Addition, multiplication, reciprocal number 2. Representation of complex numbers in polar complex variable #12;2.2.A Complex numbers #12;#12;3 #12;4 #12;In short, Anytime we write Ae j we

  1. 3. Complex Numbers 17 3 Complex Numbers

    E-print Network

    Givental, Alexander

    3. Complex Numbers 17 3 Complex Numbers Law and Order Life is unfair: The quadratic equation x2 - 1 solutions to the equation. This is how complex numbers could have been invented. More formally, complex numbers a and b are called respectively the real part and imagi- nary part of the complex number z

  2. Neutrino Masses at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppisch, Frank F.

    2015-04-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is the traditional tool to probe Majorana neutrino masses and lepton number violating physics in general. On the other hand, many models incorporating Majorana neutrino masses also predict new states and lepton number violating interactions at the TeV scale that can potentially be probed at the LHC. We provide a brief overview of the pertinent operators and a selection of physics models in order to highlight the interplay between neutrinoless double beta decay and LHC searches.

  3. Quark masses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Gasser; H. Leutwyler

    1982-01-01

    We review the current information about the eigenvalues of the quark mass matrix. The theoretical problems involved in a determination of the running masses mu, md, ms, mc and mb from experiment are discussed with the aim of getting reliable numerical values equipped with error bars that represent a conservative estimate of remaining uncertainties.

  4. Atmospheric Mass

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a lesson about the amount of atmosphere a planet is likely to have. Learners will look for the relationship between atmospheric mass and other characteristics of the planet. When the results are not completely conclusive, the students explore possible causes of discrepancies in the data. They conclude that gravity, mass and diameter all have a role in determining atmospheric mass. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson 11 in the Astro-Venture Astronomy Unit. The lessons are designed for educators to use in conjunction with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

  5. The Lewis number under supercritical conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Harstad; J. Bellan

    1999-01-01

    An effective Lewis number is calculated for situations where temperature and mass fraction gradients are very large by defining effective thermal and mass diffusivities; such situations may occur in systems where there is more than one chemical component, and in particular under supercritical conditions. The definitions evolve from a model assuming that derivatives of certain functions are small with respect

  6. Skyrmions and the pion mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, Richard A.; Sutcliffe, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    We present numerical evidence that suggests the introduction of a nonzero pion mass might dramatically affect the structure of minimal energy skyrmions. It appears that the shell-like skyrmions which are the minima when the pions are massless can fail to be minimal energy bound states for particular baryon numbers, with a strong dependence upon the value of the pion mass. The effects of a pion mass may include the replacement of shell-like configurations with crystal chunks and the loss of shell-like bound states with baryon numbers five and eight; which is in agreement with expectations based on real nuclei.

  7. Volume 70, Numbers 1 & 2 (complete)

    E-print Network

    Dickson, Donald

    2012-01-01

    in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. Review by #30;#26;#23;#26;#25;#27;#26; #30; #21;#11;#26;#14;#23; #28;#7; ............. #6;#5; John L. Kessell. Pueblos, Spaniards, and the Kingdom of New Mexico. Review by #15; #27;#14; #30; #21; #14; #26; #12; #14..., however, would travel as fugitives, pursued by Parliamentarians who were assisted by newly developed networks of communication. #14;eir representations would not appear in pageants, but in a public sphere of newsbooks and co ee houses. McRae uses...

  8. Teaching Number Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Educators define number sense as a set of conceptual relationships between quantities and numerical symbols. The instructional principals of teaching number sense and number worlds program are mentioned.

  9. Scrotal masses

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the scrotum, the sac that contains the testicles. ... Enlarged scrotum Painless or painful testicle lump ... If the scrotal mass is part of the testicle, it has a higher risk of being cancerous. ...

  10. Air Masses

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, students will examine the physical characteristics of several types of air masses (bodies of air that resemble the characteristics of the land surfaces beneath them). By analyzing maps of air temperature and of dewpoint temperature (prepared by the teacher), they will discover that air masses can be identified and defined by their temperature and moisture content. Student worksheets and links to the necessary maps are provided.

  11. Mass action

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Liao

    In the first part of this video, we derive the law of mass action from one example of a picture of molecular collisions. For this course, we use the "law of mass action" to refer to an idea that chemical reaction kinetic rates can be expressed using products of the abundances of reactants raised to exponents. Studying cooperativity and Hill functions in the second part of the video allows us to investigate a simple example of bistability in the third video segment.

  12. Mass Wasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    First, Professor Stephen Nelson at Tulane University provides a straightforward description of mass wasting and recent disasters around the world (1). Visitors can find helpful illustrations of slumps and rock slides as well as a chart depicting the different processes that occur with varying velocities and water content. The second website, provided by Pamela Gore at Georgia Perimeter College, presents the factors involved with mass wasting and mass wasting processes (2). Visitors can find excellent real-life images of creep, rock slides, and talus slopes. Next, North Dakota State University illustrates creep, earthflow, slope failure, and slumps (3). The website furnishes images of mass wasting processes and explains the physical characteristics of the landscape. Fourth, the California State University at Long Beach discusses the causes, prevention, and types of mass wasting (4). Visitors can learn about the mass wasting disasters that occurred at La Conchita, Portuguese Bend, Mount Huascaran, Cable Canyon, and Vaiont Dam. Next, Professor Pidwirny at Okanagan University College offers an online text describing hillslope stability and mass movement (5). Students can learn about soil creep through a simple animation. The sixth website, developed by Natural Resources Canada, furnishes an interactive map of landslides in Canada (6). Users can select to view historic landslides, bedrock geology, surficial geology, and more. Next, the USGS offers information on the National Landslides Hazards Program, the National Landslide Information Center, and recent landslide events (7). Users can find a tutorial on landslides, real-time monitoring active of landslides, and related research projects. Lastly, at the Oswego State University of New York visitors can test their knowledge of mass wasting processes through a short quiz (8).

  13. Masses & Springs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-12-27

    In this online activity, learners use a realistic mass and spring laboratory. They hang masses from springs and adjust the spring stiffness and damping. Learners can even slow time and transport the lab to different planets! A chart shows the kinetic, potential, and thermal energy for each spring. Use this activity for a lesson on Hooke's Law and Conservation of Energy. This activity includes an online simulation, sample learning goals, a teacher's guide, and translations in over 30 languages.

  14. Mass genotyping by sequencing technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large scale genotyping of a moderate number of loci is cost prohibitive with current chip-based technologies. We demonstrate the ability to use next generation sequencing technologies to genotype many DNA samples for a moderate number of loci – a mass genotyping by sequencing technology (MGST). Ou...

  15. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, Will M.; Sravan, Niharika; Kalogera, Vicky [Northwestern University Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Cantrell, Andrew; Kreidberg, Laura; Bailyn, Charles D. [Department of Astrophysics, Yale University, P. O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Mandel, Ilya, E-mail: w-farr@northwestern.edu, E-mail: niharika.sravan@gmail.com, E-mail: vicky@northwestern.edu, E-mail: andrew.cantrell@yale.edu, E-mail: laura.kreidberg@yale.edu, E-mail: charles.bailyn@yale.edu, E-mail: ilyamandel@chgk.info [Kavli Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-11-10

    We perform a Bayesian analysis of the mass distribution of stellar-mass black holes using the observed masses of 15 low-mass X-ray binary systems undergoing Roche lobe overflow and 5 high-mass, wind-fed X-ray binary systems. Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo calculations, we model the mass distribution both parametrically-as a power law, exponential, Gaussian, combination of two Gaussians, or log-normal distribution-and non-parametrically-as histograms with varying numbers of bins. We provide confidence bounds on the shape of the mass distribution in the context of each model and compare the models with each other by calculating their relative Bayesian evidence as supported by the measurements, taking into account the number of degrees of freedom of each model. The mass distribution of the low-mass systems is best fit by a power law, while the distribution of the combined sample is best fit by the exponential model. This difference indicates that the low-mass subsample is not consistent with being drawn from the distribution of the combined population. We examine the existence of a 'gap' between the most massive neutron stars and the least massive black holes by considering the value, M{sub 1%}, of the 1% quantile from each black hole mass distribution as the lower bound of black hole masses. Our analysis generates posterior distributions for M{sub 1%}; the best model (the power law) fitted to the low-mass systems has a distribution of lower bounds with M{sub 1%}>4.3 M{sub sun} with 90% confidence, while the best model (the exponential) fitted to all 20 systems has M{sub 1%}>4.5 M{sub sun} with 90% confidence. We conclude that our sample of black hole masses provides strong evidence of a gap between the maximum neutron star mass and the lower bound on black hole masses. Our results on the low-mass sample are in qualitative agreement with those of Ozel et al., although our broad model selection analysis more reliably reveals the best-fit quantitative description of the underlying mass distribution. The results on the combined sample of low- and high-mass systems are in qualitative agreement with Fryer and Kalogera, although the presence of a mass gap remains theoretically unexplained.

  16. Mass customization: providing custom products and services with mass production efficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Piller

    Mass customization is designed to deliver highly customized products with mass production efficiency. While discussed in the literature for more than a decade, mass customization has only recently been introduced to a large extent. Using a number of case examples from the automotive, sports equip- ment, and credit card industry, we will discuss in this paper how mass customization supports

  17. Applications of Fibonacci Numbers

    E-print Network

    Benjamin, Arthur T.

    Applications of Fibonacci Numbers Volume 9 KLUWERACADEMIC PUBLISHERS #12;Applications of Fibonacci Numbers I Volume 9 Proceedingsof The Tenth International Research Conference on Fibonacci Numbers the presence of both Fibonacci numbers and binomial coefficients demands a combinatorial explanation. Beginning

  18. Mass Spectrometry and Glycomics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jasna Peter-Katalinic

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in biochemical and biophysical research of complex carbohydrates has to meet a number of challenges\\u000a if compared to other biomacromolecules, like proteins and nucleic acids. MS, as an universal and indispensible tool for analysis\\u000a of biological samples after introduction of soft ionization techniques, like Fast Atom Bombardment (FAB), electrospray (ESI)\\u000a and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), allows

  19. Complex numbers Quaternions

    E-print Network

    Complex numbers Quaternions Imaginary numbers and Quaternions Katrin Leschke University of Leicester June 29, 2010 Katrin Leschke Imaginary numbers and Quaternions #12;Complex numbers Quaternions Imaginary numbers and Quaternions #12;Complex numbers Quaternions Vectors in 2d­space A vector in 2d

  20. Number Concepts with "Number Worlds": Thickening Understandings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Peter; Sinclair, Nathalie; Zazkis, Rina

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the nature of preservice elementary school teachers' understandings of several concepts in elementary number theory that are evoked by a computer-based microworld called "Number Worlds". In particular, the focus is on the concepts of factor, multiple and prime number. The notion of "thickness" is examined with respect to…

  1. Lepton family number violation

    SciTech Connect

    Herczeg, P.

    1999-03-01

    At present there is evidence from neutrino oscillation searches that the neutrinos are in fact massive particles and that they mix. If confirmed, this would imply that the conservation of LFN is not exact. Lepton family number violation (LFNV) has been searched for with impressive sensitivities in many processes involving charged leptons. The present experimental limits on some of them (those which the author shall consider here) are shown in Table 1. These stringent limits are not inconsistent with the neutrino oscillation results since, given the experimental bounds on the masses of the known neutrinos and the neutrino mass squared differences required by the oscillation results, the effects of LFNV from neutrino mixing would be too small to be seen elsewhere (see Section 2). The purpose of experiments searching for LFNV involving the charged leptons is to probe the existence of other sources of LFNV. Such sources are present in many extensions of the SM. In this lecture the author shall discuss some of the possibilities, focusing on processes that require muon beams. Other LFNV processes, such as the decays of the kaons and of the {tau}, provide complementary information. In the next Section he shall consider some sources of LFNV that do not require an extension of the gauge group of the SM (the added leptons or Higgs bosons may of course originate from models with extended gauge groups). In Section 3 he discusses LFNV in left-right symmetric models. In Section 4 he considers LFNV in supersymmetric models, first in R-parity conserving supersymmetric grand unified models, and then in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation. The last section is a brief summary of the author`s conclusions.

  2. Sample preparation on polymeric solid phase extraction sorbents for liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric analysis of human whole blood--a study on a number of beta-agonists and beta-antagonists.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, Martin; Sabanovic, Alma

    2006-07-01

    Alternative strategies for sample preparation of human blood samples were evaluated including protein precipitation (PP) and solid phase extraction (SPE) on Waters Oasis polymeric columns. Gradient chromatography within 15 min was performed on a Hypersil Polar-RP column combined with a Sciex API 2000 triple quadrupol instrument equipped with an electro-spray interface. Beta-agonists and beta-antagonists available on the Swedish market were included in the study. A combination of zinc sulphate and ethanol was found effective for PP. A clear supernatant was achieved that either could be injected directly on the LC-MS-MS system for analysis or transferred to a SPE column for further extraction and analyte concentration. Retention on the hydrophilic-lipophilic balanced sorbent HLB as well as the mixed mode cationic MCX and anionic MAX sorbents were investigated. On HBL the relative lipophilicity of the target analytes was investigated. At a high pH when the amino alcohols are deprotonised the more non-polar analytes (e.g., carvediol, betaxolol, bisoprolol and propranolol) were well retained on the sorbent and for the majority methanol content higher than 50% in water (v/v) was needed for elution. Some analytes though, with additional weak acidic functionalities (fenoterol, salbutamol, sotalol, and terbutaline) were poorly retained. On MAX the retention of these weak acids was improved when loaded under basic conditions but under neutral conditions analyte recoveries was comparable with HLB. On MCX all the analytes were well retained allowing a wash step of 100% methanol at neutral and low pH. By applying the supernatant from PP in combination with an additional portion of aqueous formic acid (2%) the analytes could be loaded and retained. High extraction recoveries were found for most analytes but for a few, significant losses were seen during PP (e.g., formoterol) and/or evaporation (e.g., fenoterol, formoterol, labetalol and terbutaline). The effectiveness of the sample preparation was evaluated by ESI ion-suppression studies by post column infusion of the target analyte. An ethanol zinc sulphate aq mixture was found to be more effective than acetonitrile, methanol or ethanol for PP of human whole blood samples. Beside suppression by salts in the front peak, only limited suppression from other artefacts such as more lipophilic compounds was found late in the chromatograms. Some tendency though to concentrate more lipophilic artefacts on the Oasis sorbents was seen. These findings show that the Oasis MCX sorbent is well suited for sample preparation of beta-agonists and beta-antagonists from human whole blood if the objective is to cover a great number of the analytes in the same assay. PMID:16600255

  3. Number and entropy of halo black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul H.; Ludwick, Kevin

    2011-03-01

    Based on constraints from microlensing and disk stability, both with and without limitations from wide binary surveys, we estimate the total number and entropy of intermediate mass black holes. Given the visible universe comprises 10 11 halos each of mass ˜10 12 M?, typical core black holes of mean mass ˜10 7 M? set the dimensionless entropy ( S/ k) of the universe at a thousand googols. Identification of all dark matter as black holes sets the dimensionless entropy of the universe at 10 million googols, implying that dark matter can contribute over 99% of entropy, which favors all dark matter as black holes in the mass regime of ˜10 5 M?.

  4. Space Elevator Ribbon Mass and Taper Ratio

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom Nugent

    Assumptions about tensile strength and density aect the space elevator ribbon taper ratio, and therefore its mass. We examine the technical trade-os between material properties and total mass of a modern space elevator ribbon, and the economic trade-os between ribbon mass, the number of rocket launches required to loft the initial ribbon, and the time required to build the ribbon

  5. Galaxy Cosmological Mass Function

    E-print Network

    Amanda R. Lopes; Alvaro Iribarrem; Marcelo B. Ribeiro; William R. Stoeger

    2014-12-03

    We study the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach using observational data provided by galaxy redshift surveys. Starting from the theory of Ribeiro & Stoeger (2003, arXiv:astro-ph/0304094) between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity $L$ and the average galactic mass $\\mathcal{M}_g$ are computed in terms of the redshift. $\\mathcal{M}_g$ is also alternatively estimated by a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allows us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range $0.5 biased. We then obtained the theoretical quantities of interest, such as the differential number counts, to calculate the GCMF, which can be fitted by a Schechter function. The derived GCMF follows theoretical predictions in which the less massive objects form first, being followed later by more massive ones. In the range $0.5 < z < 2.0$ the GCMF has a strong variation that can be interpreted as a higher rate of galaxy mergers or as a strong evolution in the star formation history of these galaxies.

  6. Mass Extinction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NOVA scienceNOW

    This video highlights a team of scientists who work on reconstructing the mass extinction that occurred 250 million years ago, the end of the Permian Period, and wiped out the majority of life on our planet, resetting the evolution of life. Clues suggest that deadly bacteria might have set off a chemical chain reaction that poisoned the Permian seas and atmosphere.

  7. Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. Scott; Thakur, Rohan A.

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is unique among the various spectroscopy techniques in both theory and instrumentation. As you may recall, spectroscopy involves the interaction of electromagnetic radiation or some form of energy with molecules. The molecules absorb the radiation and produce a spectrum either during the absorption process or as the excited molecules return to the ground state. MS works by placing a charge on a molecule, thereby converting it to an ion in a process called ionization. The generated ions are then resolved according to their mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) by subjecting them to electrostatic fields (mass analyzer) and finally detected. An additional stage of ion fragmentation may be included before detection to elicit structural information in a technique known as tandem MS. The result of ion generation, separation, fragmentation, and detection is manifested as a mass spectrum that can be interpreted to yield molecular weight or structural information. The uniqueness of this process allows the method to be used for both detection and identification of an unknown compound.

  8. Comparing Numbers-Between

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    This activity for the interactive white board (free access with registration) allows the learner to practice comparing numbers. Two numbers are given and students identify those numbers inbetween the numbers by dragging them from below into the shaded window. A number line is provide as a means for the learner to check their choices.

  9. Kindergarten Number Sense

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Estes

    2007-11-02

    Let\\'s learn about numbers! How many Fish? Count the Fish Let\\'s count! How many... Matching is fun! Match the number How well do I really know these numbers? Getting to know the numbers Counting the kids Kids on the bus We love Ants! Count the ants Flying into the univerise of numbers Rocket ...

  10. Root numbers of curves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARIA SABITOVA

    2004-01-01

    We generalize a theorem of D. Rohrlich concerning root numbers of elliptic curves over the field of rational numbers. Our result applies to curves of all higher genera over number fields. Namely, under certain conditions which naturally extend the conditions used by D. Rohrlich, we show that the root number associated to a smooth projective curve over a number field

  11. Number Systems Introduction & Objectives

    E-print Network

    Bouhraoua, Abdelhafid

    number system that was in common use is the decimal number system ( ) which has a total of 10 digits (0 to the more familiar decimal system · In this lesson, you will learn: What is meant by a weighted number system. Basic features of weighted number systems. Commonly used number systems, e.g. decimal, binary

  12. Occupancy Numbers in Testing Random Number Generators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Figotin; A. Gordon; J. Quinn; N. Stavrakas; S. Molchanov

    2002-01-01

    Abstract. The classical occupancy,problem,where n balls are placed in N cells is used for testing of random,number generators. We show that the statistics of appropriately chosen occupancy numbers,are incompatible with the statistics of many,pseudorandom,number,generators (PRNGs) evenif they are trun cated. More thanthat, the in compatibility shows up onrelatively small samples long before the period of the PRNG is reached. We

  13. Representing decimal numbers on the number line

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Library of Virtual Manipulatives

    2010-03-02

    The user can choose decimals with explore, practice, assess on the screen. Using explore, the student drags the point to the number line and the decimal value of that point is given. Using practice, the student drags the point to the location of the designated decimal number. Zooming in produces lines representing whole numbers, tenths, hundredths, and thousandths in succession. The zooming allows the student to choose the correct point, rather than the approximate location. The series of lines with successively smaller place values is a visual model for extending the base ten system to decimal numbers.

  14. Proceedings of ICCSA 2014 Normandie University, Le Havre, France -June 23-26, 2014

    E-print Network

    the psychological reactions of the population in situations of disasters, and study their propagation mode. We pro MODELING OF HUMAN BEHAVIORS DURING CATASTROPHIC EVENTS. N. Verdi`ere, V. Lanza, R. Charrier, D. Provitolo approach for modeling the human collective behaviors in the specific scenario of a sudden catastrophe

  15. Beam Control Conference 11-BC-050 23-26 May 2011, Orlando, FL

    E-print Network

    Gordeyev, Stanislav

    communications. This paper presents experimentally-measured instantaneous near-field wavefront statistics due Far-Field Laser Intensity Drop-Outs Caused by Turbulent Boundary Layers Stanislav Gordeyev, Jacob-based communication systems instantaneous SR should be studied as well. An attached transonic boundary layer

  16. ACAL32, Berkeley, 23-26 March 2001 COMPLEX SENTENCES IN AFRICAN LANGUAGES

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . These are : * LLACAN (Langage, Langues et Culture d'Afrique Noire), UMR 7594 (CNRS, Inalco, Paris7) 7, rue Guy his clothes]DC, [you look at him and see he is beautiful naked.]MC. Hausa concessive clauses : 1

  17. 2000 JAPAN-USA Symposium on Flexible Automation July 23-26, 2000, Ann Arbor, MI

    E-print Network

    Saitou, Kazuhiro "Kazu"

    (cbaydar@umich.edu) Kazuhiro Saitou (kazu@umich.edu) Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA ABSTRACT Unexpected failures are one of the most % of the control coding effort is based on error recovery by using Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) codes

  18. EAGE Conference & Exhibition incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2011 Vienna, Austria, 23-26 May 2011

    E-print Network

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    a source at point xs and a receiver at point x. If we decompose the wavefield and the Green function into the amplitudes ai, Aij and the phase terms exp(i), exp(iT) ui = ai exp(i), Gi j = Ai j exp(iT), where and T are travel times of the wavefield and the Green function respectively, Born aproximation in the isotropic

  19. Mass Audubon

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Founded in 1896 by two women with a passion for the protection of birds, Mass Audubon works to protect the nature of Massachusetts for people and wildlife. Its 100,000 members help care for 35,000 acres of conservation land. On its site, visitors can learn about its advocacy work through reports, policy papers, and educational outreach efforts. In the Our Conservation Network area, visitors can learn about Mass audubon's work in land conservation, ecological management, community reach, and climate change. Moving on, the Learn area features information about the Museum of American Bird Art, resources for young conservationists ("EcoKids"), and resources for school groups hoping to pay a visit to some of their land holdings. It's worth nothing that the News & Events area contains blogs, videos, press releases, and details on fun photo contests.

  20. Numbers Defy the Law of Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Ruma; Lann, Avital Lavie

    2015-01-01

    As the number of independent tosses of a fair coin grows, the rates of heads and tails tend to equality. This is misinterpreted by many students as being true also for the absolute numbers of the two outcomes, which, conversely, depart unboundedly from each other in the process. Eradicating that misconception, as by coin-tossing experiments,…

  1. Number Sense Series: Developing Early Number Sense

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jenni Way

    The author of this one-page article discusses early number sense and how it develops. She provides research background and suggests teaching strategies that promote early number sense, including instructions for simple games using dot cards. The article includes a list of references and a link to a follow-up article, "A Sense of 'ten' and Place Value" (cataloged separately).

  2. First mass analysis of stratospheric negative ions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Arnold; G. Henschen

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented in terms of observed mass numbers and tentative identifications for mass-spectrometric measurements of stratospheric negative ions. The measurements were made during three daytime flights of a balloon-borne mass-spectrometer probe to peak altitudes of 33.5, 35, and 37 km. The major ion masses are shown to cover the range from 125 to 295 amu; it is suggested

  3. Mass Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    2001-01-18

    The purpose of this CRADA was to use Honeywell's experience in low temperature cofire ceramics and traditional ceramics to assemble a relatively low-cost, mass-producible miniature mass analyzer. The specific design, given to us by Mass Sensors, LLC, was used to test for helium. The direct benefit for the participant was to have a prototype unit assembled for the purpose of proof of concept and the ability to secure venture capital investors. From that, the company would begin producing their own product for sale. The consumer/taxpayer benefits come from the wide variety of industries that can utilize this technology to improve quality of life. Medical industry can use this technology to improve diagnostic ability; manufacturing industry can use it for improved air, water, and soil monitoring to minimize pollution; and the law enforcement community can use this technology for identification of substances. These are just a few examples of the benefit of this technology. The benefits to DOE were in the area of process improvement for cofire and ceramic materials. From this project we demonstrated nonlinear thickfilm fine lines and spaces that were 5-mil wide with 5-mil spaces; determined height-to diameter-ratios for punched and filled via holes; demonstrated the ability to punch and fill 5-mil microvias; developed and demonstrated the capability to laser cut difficult geometries in 40-mil ceramic; developed and demonstrated coupling LTCC with standard alumina and achieving hermetic seals; developed and demonstrated three-dimensional electronic packaging concepts; and demonstrated printing variable resistors within 1% of the nominal value and within a tightly defined ratio. The capability of this device makes it invaluable for many industries. The device could be used to monitor air samples around manufacturing plants. It also could be used for monitoring automobile exhaust, for doing blood gas analysis, for sampling gases being emitted by volcanoes, for studying activities of insects, and many other things. The ultimate goal was to build two iterations of the mass sensor. However, due to technical difficulties, only one iteration of the device was manufactured. Initial work to optimize the ion source and build a small ion pump was not successful. Consequently, the ion pump was not incorporated into the analyzer design. Mass Sensors, LLC, is still testing the analyzers that were assembled.

  4. 1 Random Number Generation.

    E-print Network

    Lim, Chjan C.

    Generation. The problem. Essential to a Monte Carlo algorithm is a good random number generator randomly selected numbers are multiplied together, and the faulty random number generator produced only by four. Unfortunately, there do not exist any known truly random number generators; despite

  5. Building Numbers from Primes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Prime numbers are often described as the "building blocks" of natural numbers. This article shows how the author and his students took this idea literally by using prime factorizations to build numbers with blocks. In this activity, students explore many concepts of number theory, including the relationship between greatest common factors and…

  6. Operations on fuzzy numbers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DIDIER DUBOIS; HENRI PRADE

    1978-01-01

    A fuzzy number is a fuzzy subset of the real line whose highest membership values are clustered around a given real number called the mean value ; the membership function is monotonia on both sides of this mean value. In this paper, the usual algebraic operations on real numbers are extended to fuzzy numbers by the use of a fuzzification

  7. Spooky Sequences- Square Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mark Cogan

    2002-01-01

    This interactive Flash game helps students recognize and generate the sequence of square numbers, and also to discover the pattern of differences between them. The applet displays a sequence of six consecutive square numbers with one number missing. The player provides the missing number to "send the ghosts back to the haunted house." Each game consists of five sequences to complete.

  8. Numbers and Operations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Williams

    2008-04-03

    Numbers, Matching and Addition Let\\'s count How many chicks are there? Great! Now lets try Number Match Let\\'s try Seahorse Counting Now Concentrate on Concentration Number Match Addition Practice Quick Adding and Robot Addition Make the number with Base 10 ...

  9. Sum-Difference Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Yixun

    2010-01-01

    Starting with an interesting number game sometimes used by school teachers to demonstrate the factorization of integers, "sum-difference numbers" are defined. A positive integer n is a "sum-difference number" if there exist positive integers "x, y, w, z" such that n = xy = wz and x ? y = w + z. This paper characterizes all sum-difference numbers

  10. Preparation for mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    VandenBerg, Sheri L; Davidson, Scott B

    2015-06-01

    Mass casualty incidents are events where the number of injured patients exceeds the resources of the health care institution to the degree that care may not be available or may be limited for a portion of the casualties. Mass casualty incidents are increasing in frequency throughout the United States. Managing mass casualty incidents has not traditionally been part of the nursing curriculum; however, our changing world requires us to become educated and prepared to respond to these scenarios. This article focuses on intentional explosive disasters and the nursing and institutional response to these incidents. This information is of value to nursing professionals and other health care providers. PMID:25981720

  11. Mass of Ca-36 

    E-print Network

    Tribble, Robert E.; Cossairt, J. D.; Kenefick, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    (number of counts) logarithmic. Several particle groups are lndlcated. MASS OF 36Ca 2029 I I l Ca( He He) Ca 4000 ?POSITION SPECTRUM Ca(4He, He) Ca 5000- 0O 2000 Iooo? s.sss 7.800 8e- C C3 Oy. 2- n, nn -58.5 -58& -57.5 Q Value Wf1 -570... I. Properties of the A =36 isobaric quintet members and the IMME coefficients. Nuclide Mass excess (keV) E? (keV) Ref. 36Ca "A.r 36( I 36S -2 0 1 2 -6440 + 40 -19376.3 + 1.6 -25 222.3+ 1.1 -30 666.0 + 1.5 0.0 10 854.2 + 1.6 4299...

  12. US ISSN 0006-9698 CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 2012 NUMBER 533

    E-print Network

    Bi, Xin

    BEHAVIOR OF THE PITCHFORK-MANDIBLED PONERINE ANT THAUMATOMYRMEX PALUDIS (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) CHRISTIAN the Brazilian Amazon. This study of T. paludis implies that specialized predation on polyxenid millipedes ge^nero e´ composto por mu´ltiplas espe´cies morfologicamente similares. KEY WORDS: predation; ants

  13. Bacterial Abundance Measure bacterial numbers and mass per unit volume.

    E-print Network

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    . Challenges with natural samples · Low concentrations Methods · Dry and weigh (not with natural samples. Problem: Bacteria in natural environments are very small and difficult to see and distinguish from that contains medium for the culturing of fecal coliform bacteria (contains eosin-methylene blue dye) · Incubate

  14. Bacterial Abundance Measure bacterial numbers and mass per unit volume.

    E-print Network

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    . Challenges with natural samples · Low concentrations Methods · Dry and weigh (not with natural samples. Problem: Bacteria in natural environments are very small and difficult to see and distinguish from-methylene blue dye) · Incubate filter at 40ºC (or higher) · Count colonies to determine colonies/100 ml water EPA

  15. Bacterial Abundance Measure bacterial numbers and mass per unit volume.

    E-print Network

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    . Basic method: · Aseptically collect and filter water onto sterile filter. · Place filter on sterile pad filter at 40ºC (or higher) · Count colonies to determine colonies/100 ml water EPA requirements (cfu/100 largely used for isolation or water testing, such as coliform test. 9 ml 100 #12;Dilution Plate

  16. Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflieger, D.; Forest, E.; Vinh, J.

    For twenty years or so now, mass spectrometry has been used to get exact measurements of the mass of biological molecules such as proteins, nucleic acids,oligosaccharides, and so on. Over the past ten years, this technology has followed the trend toward miniaturisation and the samples required can be much smaller. In particular, the nanoelectrospray source (online or by needle) allow one to work at flow rates of a few tens of nanolitres/min. There are many applications, both in the field of proteomics and in the analysis of protein structure, dynamics, and interactions. Combining this source with nanoHPLC, complex mixtures only available in small quantities can be separated and analysed online. There are also some advantages over conventional HPLC, despite a set of constraints related to the small dimensions and low flow rates. Combining capillary electrophoresis with the electrospray source also gives useful results, with its own set of advantages and constraints. Finally, developments are currently underway to combine this source with chips, providing a means of separation and analysis online.

  17. Galaxy cosmological mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Amanda R.; Iribarrem, Alvaro; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.; Stoeger, William R.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: This paper studies the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach that uses observational data provided by recent galaxy redshift surveys. Methods: Starting from a previously presented relation between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity L, and the average galactic mass ?g were computed in terms of the redshift. ?g was also alternatively estimated by means of a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allowed us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 mass-to-light ratio and its GSMF data. Results: Assuming ?g0 ? 1011?? as the local value of the average galactic mass, the LF approach results in LB ? (1 + z)(2.40 ± 0.03) and ?g ? (1 + z)(1.1 ± 0.2). However, using the GSMF results to calculate the average galactic mass produces ?g ? (1 + z)(- 0.58 ± 0.22). We chose the latter result because it is less biased. We then obtained the theoretical quantities of interest, such as the differential number counts, to finally calculate the GCMF, which can be fitted by a Schechter function, but whose fitted parameter values are different from the values found in the literature for the GSMF. Conclusions: This GCMF behavior follows the theoretical predictions from the cold dark matter models in which the less massive objects form first, followed later by more massive ones. In the range 0.5

  18. The neutron star mass distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kiziltan, Bülent [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kottas, Athanasios; De Yoreo, Maria [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Thorsett, Stephen E., E-mail: bkiziltan@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California and UCO/Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-11-20

    In recent years, the number of pulsars with secure mass measurements has increased to a level that allows us to probe the underlying neutron star (NS) mass distribution in detail. We critically review the radio pulsar mass measurements. For the first time, we are able to analyze a sizable population of NSs with a flexible modeling approach that can effectively accommodate a skewed underlying distribution and asymmetric measurement errors. We find that NSs that have evolved through different evolutionary paths reflect distinctive signatures through dissimilar distribution peak and mass cutoff values. NSs in double NS and NS-white dwarf (WD) systems show consistent respective peaks at 1.33 M {sub ?} and 1.55 M {sub ?}, suggesting significant mass accretion (?m ? 0.22 M {sub ?}) has occurred during the spin-up phase. The width of the mass distribution implied by double NS systems is indicative of a tight initial mass function while the inferred mass range is significantly wider for NSs that have gone through recycling. We find a mass cutoff at ?2.1 M {sub ?} for NSs with WD companions, which establishes a firm lower bound for the maximum NS mass. This rules out the majority of strange quark and soft equation of state models as viable configurations for NS matter. The lack of truncation close to the maximum mass cutoff along with the skewed nature of the inferred mass distribution both enforce the suggestion that the 2.1 M {sub ?} limit is set by evolutionary constraints rather than nuclear physics or general relativity, and the existence of rare supermassive NSs is possible.

  19. Multiplicative Conservation of Baryon Number and Baryogenesis

    E-print Network

    Ernest Ma

    2007-10-04

    In the canonical seesaw mechanism of neutrino mass, lepton number is only multiplicatively conserved, which enables the important phenomenon of leptogenesis to occur, as an attractive explanation of the present baryon asymmetry of the Universe. A parallel possibility, hitherto unrecognized, also holds for baryon number and baryogenesis. This new idea is shown to be naturally realized in the context of a known supersymmetric string-inspired extension of the Standard Model, based on E(6) particle content, and having an extra U(1)_N gauge symmetry. Within this framework, two-loop radiative neutrino masses are also possible, together with a new form of very long-lived matter.

  20. WMAPping out Neutrino Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Aaron T

    2003-02-18

    Recent data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) place important bounds on the neutrino sector. The precise determination of the baryon number in the universe puts a strong constraint on the number of relativistic species during Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis. WMAP data, when combined with the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), also directly constrain the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. These results conflict with a neutrino oscillation interpretation of the result from the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) over the entire favored mixing region. We also note that the Heidelberg--Moscow evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay is only consistent with the WMAP+2dFGRS data for the largest values of the nuclear matrix element.

  1. Infinite and natural numbers

    E-print Network

    Jailton C. Ferreira

    2002-02-14

    The infinite numbers of the set M of finite and infinite natural numbers are defined starting from the sequence 0\\Phi, where 0 is the first natural number, \\Phi is a succession of symbols S and xS is the successor of the natural number x. The concept of limit of the natural number n, when n tends to infinite, is examined. Definitions and theorems about operations with elements of M, equivalence and equality of natural numbers, distance between elements of M and the order of the elements are presented.

  2. Elements of number theory

    E-print Network

    Harbour, Daniel, 1975-

    2003-01-01

    The dissertation argues for the necessity of a morphosemantic theory of number, that is, a theory of number serviceable both to semantics and morphology. The basis for this position, and the empirical core of the dissertation, ...

  3. UCGE Reports Number 20378

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    UCGE Reports Number 20378 Department of Geomatics Engineering Integration of UWB Ranging and GPS OF GEOMATICS ENGINEERING CALGARY, ALBERTA DECEMBER 2012 © Yuhang Jiang 2012 #12;UCGE Reports Number 20378

  4. Narrow it Down: Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    TERC

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, learners will ask yes-no questions to identify a secret number (similar to Twenty Questions). Combine logic and numbers in this game for all ages. One person chooses a secret number and announces the range in which it falls, for instance: “I’m thinking of a number between 1 and 50.” Other players ask yes or no questions to identify the number. The player who identifies the secret number wins. This game is easy to adapt to different ages: young children can ask and reason about “more than” and “less than” (Is it less than 7? Is there a 1 in the 10’s place)? and older ones can ask about multiples, factors, or number relationships (Is it a multiple of 3? Is it a square number?). Available as a web page and downloadable pdf.

  5. PET: [number sign]1 is number one

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.

    1994-09-01

    Subsidized in the beginning by bottle deposits, now spurred by the ability of curbside recycling to collect more than soda bottles, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) recycling has made great strides in the last 10 years. Its growth rate and increased market demand are the envy of many other materials. Appropriate, if not deliberately, this number-one resin is listed under the Society for the Plastics Industry's resin identification code as [number sign]1. Unlike most recyclables, the market demand for recycled PET is greater than the supply. As a result, demand not supply, is fueling the increase in PET recycling.

  6. Summing Consecutive Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This problem offers a simple context to begin an exploration of the properties of numbers and to make conjectures about those properties. Learners explore the sums of consecutive numbers and whether all positive numbers from 1-30 can be written as the sum of two or more consecutive numbers. The Teachers' Notes page offers suggestions for implementation, key discussion questions, ideas for extension and support.

  7. Discovery: Prime Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2008-01-01

    Prime numbers are important as the building blocks for the set of all natural numbers, because prime factorisation is an important and useful property of all natural numbers. Students can discover them by using the method known as the Sieve of Eratosthenes, named after the Greek geographer and astronomer who lived from c. 276-194 BC. Eratosthenes…

  8. Decompose That Teen Number!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    ROBIN MARMITT

    2012-09-03

    The students will receive explicit instruction from the teacher on the definition of decomposing a number and how to represent a decomposition with manipulatives, drawings, and equations. The students will use linking cubes to reflect numbers from 11-19, and to show their understanding of how to decompose a number. Students will record decompositions as an equation.

  9. Theory of Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Olsson, Martin

    This course provides an introduction to number theory, including topics such as prime numbers, congruences, quadratic reciprocity, diophantine equations, irrational numbers, continued fractions and elliptic curves. The materials include lecture notes, exams and assignments with solutions. MIT presents OpenCourseWare as free educational material online. No registration or enrollment is required to use the materials.

  10. Simple Number Skills

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jo Edkins

    2010-01-01

    This is a collection of simple interactive activities to help young children practice early number skills. They use visual representations to develop counting and subitizing skills, number sense, place value concepts, and basic whole number operations (addition, subtraction, doubling). A teacher page summarizes the purpose and functions of each activity.

  11. A imaginary number system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald E. Knuth

    1960-01-01

    For centuries the decimal number system reigned supreme, except, perhaps, among the Mayan Indians, until the advent of digital computers brought the binary and octal systems into the limelight. This paper introduces another number system which may prove useful for manipulating complex numbers on machines.

  12. Approximating the domatic number

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Uriel Feige; Magnús M. Halldórsson; Guy Kortsarz

    2000-01-01

    Abstract. A set of vertices in a graph is a dominating set if every vertex outside the set has a neighbor in the set. The domatic number,problem is that of partitioning the vertices of a graph into the maximum number of disjoint dominating sets. Let n denote the number of vertices, ? the minimum degree, and ? the maximum degree.

  13. Approximating the Domatic Number

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Uriel Feige; Magnús M. Halldórsson; Guy Kortsarz; Aravind Srinivasan

    2002-01-01

    A set of vertices in a graph is a dominating set if every vertex outside the set has a neighbor in the set. The domatic number problem is that of partitioning the vertices of a graph into the maximum number of disjoint dominating sets. Let n denote the number of vertices, ? the minimum degree, and ? the maximum degree.

  14. Random Number Generation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Joiner

    The process of creating numbers that simulate randomness on a computer is known as pseudorandom number generation. The "pseudo" in pseudo random refers to the fact that if you use a rule to generate a number, it is by definition not random, though it may appear so, and be close enough to random for all practical purposes.

  15. Relativistic theory of tidal Love numbers

    E-print Network

    Taylor Binnington; Eric Poisson

    2009-09-16

    In Newtonian gravitational theory, a tidal Love number relates the mass multipole moment created by tidal forces on a spherical body to the applied tidal field. The Love number is dimensionless, and it encodes information about the body's internal structure. We present a relativistic theory of Love numbers, which applies to compact bodies with strong internal gravities; the theory extends and completes a recent work by Flanagan and Hinderer, which revealed that the tidal Love number of a neutron star can be measured by Earth-based gravitational-wave detectors. We consider a spherical body deformed by an external tidal field, and provide precise and meaningful definitions for electric-type and magnetic-type Love numbers; and these are computed for polytropic equations of state. The theory applies to black holes as well, and we find that the relativistic Love numbers of a nonrotating black hole are all zero.

  16. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF SUBGIANT PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, James P. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2013-09-01

    High mass stars are hostile to Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity on the main-sequence, so RV searches for planets around massive stars have relied on evolved stars. A large number of planets have been found around evolved stars with M > 1.5 M{sub Sun }. To test the robustness of mass determinations, Lloyd compared mass distributions of planet hosting subgiants with distributions from integrating isochrones and concluded that it is unlikely the subgiant planet hosts are this massive, but rather that the mass inferences are systematically in error. The conclusions of Lloyd have been called in to question by Johnson et al., who show TRILEGAL-based mass distributions that disagree with the mass distributions in Lloyd, which they attribute to Malmquist bias. Johnson et al. argue that the very small spectroscopic observational uncertainties favor high masses, and there are a large number of high mass sub giants in RV surveys. However, in this Letter, it is shown that Malmquist bias does not impact the mass distributions, but the mass distribution is sensitive to Galaxy model. The relationship needed to reconcile the subgiant planet host masses with any model of the Galactic stellar population is implausible, and the conclusion of Lloyd that spectroscopic mass determinations of subgiants are likely to have been overestimated is robust.

  17. Convoluted convolved Fibonacci numbers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pieter Moree

    2003-01-01

    The convolved Fibonacci numbers F_j^(r) are defined by\\u000a (1-z-z^2)^{-r}=\\\\sum_{j>=0}F_{j+1}^(r)z^j. In this note some related numbers\\u000athat can be expressed in terms of convolved Fibonacci numbers are considered.\\u000aThese numbers appear in the numerical evaluation of a certain number\\u000atheoretical constant.\\u000a This note is a case study of the transform {1\\/n}\\\\sum_{d|n}mu(d)f(z^d)^{n\\/d},\\u000awith f any formal series and mu the Moebius function),

  18. Mass differences of SU(3) strange hadrons

    E-print Network

    B. F. Riley

    2003-11-03

    Mass differences between octet strange baryons, octet and decuplet strange baryons, and nonet vector mesons and octet baryons of equal strangeness coincide (within the small experimental uncertainties) with the levels of a recently proposed hadron mass spectrum. A number, M, characterises the mass difference in relation to the strange quark mass of the spectrum. The mass diference of Lambda and Sigma0 (delta I=1) is characterised by M=+1. The mass difference of Sigma0 and Sigma(1385)0 (delta J=1) is characterised by M=-1. Vector meson-baryon (delta J=1/2) mass differences are characterised by M=-1/2. The mass differences of strange decuplet baryon resonances (delta S=1) are characterised by M=-2 and M=-3, where M is equal to the strangeness of the more massive baryon.

  19. Shell corrections, magic numbers, and mean field

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, V. Yu. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute for Nuclear Research (Ukraine)], E-mail: denisov@kinr.kiev.ua

    2007-02-15

    It is shown that the positions of deep local minima of shell corrections associated with magic numbers in the region of superheavy nuclei depend on the parameters of the central and spin-orbit mean-field potentials. The accuracy of nuclear-mass predictions made within various models for superheavy nuclei is analyzed.

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for K-35 (Potassium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope K-35 (Potassium, atomic number Z = 19, mass number A = 35).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mg-30 (Magnesium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mg-30 (Magnesium, atomic number Z = 12, mass number A = 30).

  2. Mass transfer andMass transfer and Mass transfer andMass transfer and

    E-print Network

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    eknik Mass transfer andMass transfer and arationste Mass transfer andMass transfer and separationSepa Massöverföring och separationsteknikMassöverföring och separationsteknik ("MÖF("MÖF--ST")ST") 4 erföringo 6. Mass transfer and convection6. Mass transfer and convection Massöve Ron Zevenhoven Åbo Akademi Universityy

  3. Mass transfer andMass transfer and Mass transfer andMass transfer and

    E-print Network

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    eknik Mass transfer andMass transfer and arationste Mass transfer andMass transfer and separationSepa Massöverföring och separationsteknikMassöverföring och separationsteknik ("MÖF("MÖF--ST")ST") 4 erföringo 8. Mass transfer8. Mass transfer with chemical reactionwith chemical reaction Massöve with chemical reactionwith

  4. Quark number fluctuations at high temperatures

    E-print Network

    Peter Petreczky; Prasad Hegde; Alexander Velytsky

    2009-11-01

    We calculate the second, fourth and sixth order quark number fluctuations in the deconfined phase of 2+1 flavor QCD using lattices with temporal extent Nt=4, 6, 8 and 12. We consider light, strange and charm quarks. We use p4 action for valence quarks and gauge configurations generated with p4 action with physical value of the strange quark mass and light quark mass mq=0.1ms generated by the RBC-Bielefeld collaboration. We observe that for all quark masses the quark number fluctuations rapidly get close to the corresponding ideal gas limits. We compare our results to predictions of a quasi-particle model and resummed high temperature perturbative calculations. We also investigate correlations among different flavor channels.

  5. Cepheid Masses -CYC4-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1994-01-01

    For 2 decades the "Cepheid mass problem" has persisted: Mass determinations from standard evolutionary tracks and those from pulsation theory gave conflicting values. The luminosity of a Cepheid of given mass depends sensitively on the amount of convective overshoot above the core of the main sequence progenitor. Hence a good mass determination for the Cepheid with known luminosity will measure the amount of convective core overshoot. This knowledge is important for interpretation of HR diagrams of populous clusters in the LMC and especially for age determinations. It is also necessary for the understanding of the mixing processes in stars. IUE observations have revealed a number of Cepheid binaries with blue companions, whose orbits have now been determined by groundbased observations. We propose to measure the orbital radial velocities of 5 blue Cepheid companions on GHRS spectra for wavelengths shorter than 2000 A. The ratios of the orbital velocities for the binaries provide the mass ratios for the stars. The effective temperature of the companion can be determined from its energy distribution. For main sequence stars this also determines its mass. With GHRS spectra the orbital velocity ratio and thereby the mass ratio can be determined with an accuracLy of +/- 10 %.

  6. Cepheid Masses -CYC3-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-06-01

    For 2 decades the "Cepheid mass problem" has persisted: Mass determinations from standard evolutionary tracks and those from pulsation theory gave conflicting values. The luminosity of a Cepheid of given mass depends sensitively on the amount of convective overshoot above the core of the main sequence progenitor. Hence a good mass determination for the Cepheid with known luminosity will measure the amount of convective core overshoot. This knowledge is important for interpretation of HR diagrams of populous clusters in the LMC and especially for age determinations. It is also necessary for the understanding of the mixing processes in stars. IUE observations have revealed a number of Cepheid binaries with blue companions, whose orbits have now been determined by groundbased observations. We propose to measure the orbital radial velocities of 5 blue Cepheid companions on GHRS spectra for wavelengths shorter than 2000 A. The ratios of the orbital velocities for the binaries provide the mass ratios for the stars. The effective temperature of the companion can be determined from its energy distribution. For main sequence stars this also determines its mass. With GHRS spectra the orbital velocity ratio and thereby the mass ratio can be determined with an accuracLy of +/- 10 %.

  7. Naturally small Dirac neutrino masses in supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, Steven; Dedes, Athanasios [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP), Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Tamvakis, Kyriakos [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, GR 451 10, Ioannina (Greece)

    2005-02-01

    We show that Dirac neutrino masses of the right size can arise from the Kaehler potential of supergravity. They are proportional to the supersymmetry and the electroweak breaking scales. We find that they have the experimentally observed value provided that the ultraviolet cutoff of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model is between the Grand Unification scale and the heterotic string scale. If lepton number is not conserved, then relatively suppressed Majorana masses can also be present, resulting in pseudo-Dirac neutrino masses.

  8. Mass spectrometry in plant proteomic analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Colas; O. Koroleva; P. J. Shaw

    2010-01-01

    The current revolution in proteomics has been generated by the combination of very sensitive mass spectrometers coupled to microcapillary liquid chromatography, specific proteolysis of protein mixtures and software that is capable of searching vast numbers of mass measurements against predicted peptides from sequenced genomes. The challenges of post?genomic plant biology include characterization of protein function, post?translational modifications and composition of

  9. Mass Media and the Fear of Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Linda; Gilbert, Kevin

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of the research on mass media effects on perceptions of crime danger, personal fear of crime, and reactions to crime risk. Discovers that mass media effects involve a number of variables and moderators. These include audience characteristics, degree and type of coverage, and location. (MJP)

  10. Curvature and Tachibana numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Sergey E [Finance Academy under the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-31

    The aim of this paper is to define the rth Tachibana number t{sub r} of an n-dimensional compact oriented Riemannian manifold as the dimension of the space of conformally Killing r-forms, for r=1,2,...,n-1. We also describe properties of these numbers, by analogy with properties of the Betti numbers b{sub r} of a compact oriented Riemannian manifold. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  11. Your Number Is...

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This problem provides an opportunity to introduce a visual way of representing operations on unknown numbers to help lead students to using a symbolic representation. Learners are asked to think of a number and then through an interactivity are given a sequence of operational instructions to follow which leads all students to the same final number. The Teachers' Notes page offers suggestions for implementation, key discussion questions, ideas for extension and support.

  12. Your Number Was

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This problem provides an opportunity to introduce the concept of representing operations on unknown numbers algebraically and leads to work on inverse operations. Students are asked to think of a number, follow a sequence of computational instructions and finally to enter the result into the "machine." Students explore how the "machine" works out the starting number. The Teachers' Notes page offers rationale, suggestions for implementation, discussion questions, ideas for extension and support.

  13. Complex Numbers and Trigonometry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Alexanderson, Gerald L.

    Complex numbers have applications in many applied sciences. This online text begins with an introduction to trigonometry, which serves as a starting point for additional discussion about complex numbers (also known as imaginary numbers). The drawings and figures are the only notable downside to this excellent resource, because many of them are somewhat crude; however, they are still fairly easy to follow. The book can be read online or downloaded for offline viewing.

  14. Interactive Fraction Number Lines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Green

    2012-05-25

    In this lesson students make models of fractions, including a human number line. Using a number line, students develop conceptual understanding of fractions. Students use the number line to represent and compare fractions less than one. The activities are engaging and include full participation/engagement of all students. The fractions are limited to positive fractions less than one with a denominator of 2 or 4 including 0 and 1 whole.

  15. Estimating quantum chromatic numbers

    E-print Network

    Vern I. Paulsen; Simone Severini; Daniel Stahlke; Ivan G. Todorov; Andreas Winter

    2014-07-25

    We develop further the new versions of quantum chromatic numbers of graphs introduced by the first and fourth authors. We prove that the problem of computation of the commuting quantum chromatic number of a graph is solvable by an SDP and describe an hierarchy of variants of the commuting quantum chromatic number which converge to it. We introduce the tracial rank of a graph, a parameter that gives a lower bound for the commuting quantum chromatic number and parallels the projective rank, and prove that it is multiplicative. We describe the tracial rank, the projective rank and the fractional chromatic numbers in a unified manner that clarifies their connection with the commuting quantum chromatic number, the quantum chromatic number and the classical chromatic number, respectively. Finally, we present a new SDP that yields a parameter larger than the Lov\\'asz number and is yet a lower bound for the tracial rank of the graph. We determine the precise value of the tracial rank of an odd cycle.

  16. Honors problem 1: Complex numbers. Arithmetic of complex numbers

    E-print Network

    Leininger, Christopher J.

    Honors problem 1: Complex numbers. Arithmetic of complex numbers Recall that the complex numbers identify the complex numbers with the set of linear polynomials with real coefficients). The numbers as a subset of the complex numbers by identifying the real number a with a+0i. The imaginary numbers

  17. Application of Rqd-Number and Rqd-Volume Multifractal Modelling to Delineate Rock Mass Characterisation in Kahang Cu-Mo Porphyry Deposit, Central Iran / Zastosowanie Metod Modelowania Numerycznego Oraz Modelowania Fraktalnego do Analizy JAKO?CI SKA? W Celu OKRE?LENIA Charakterystyki GÓROTWORU W Obszarze Z?O?A Cu-Mo W Kahang, ?RODKOWY Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasrebi, Amir Bijan; Wetherelt, Andrew; Foster, Patrick J.; Afzal, Peyman; Coggan, John; Ahangaran, Dariush Kaveh

    2013-12-01

    Identification of rock mass properties in terms of Rock Quality Designation (RQD) plays a significant role in mine planning and design. This study aims to separate the rock mass characterisation based on RQD data analysed from 48 boreholes in Kahang Cu-Mo porphyry deposit situated in the central Iran utilising RQD-Volume (RQD-V) and RQD-Number (RQD-N) fractal models. The log-log plots for RQD-V and RQD-N models show four rock mass populations defined by RQD thresholds of 3.55, 25.12 and 89.12% and 10.47, 41.68 and 83.17% respectively which represent very poor, poor, good and excellent rocks based on Deere and Miller rock classification. The RQD-V and RQD-N models indicate that the excellent rocks are situated in the NW and central parts of this deposit however, the good rocks are located in the most parts of the deposit. The results of validation of the fractal models with the RQD block model show that the RQD-N fractal model of excellent rock quality is better than the RQD-V fractal model of the same rock quality. Correlation between results of the fractal and the geological models illustrates that the excellent rocks are associated with porphyric quartz diorite (PQD) units. The results reveal that there is a multifractal nature in rock characterisation with respect to RQD for the Kahang deposit. The proposed fractal model can be intended for the better understanding of the rock quality for purpose of determination of the final pit slope. Identyfikacja w?a?ciwo?ci górotworu odgrywa zasadnicz? rol? w planowaniu wydobycia i projektowaniu kopalni. Praca niniejsza ma na celu okre?lenie charakterystyki górotworu w oparciu o dane o jako?ci ska? zebrane na podstawie próbek uzyskanych z 48 odwiertów wykonanych w z?o?u porfiru Cu-Mo w Kahang, zalegaj?cym w ?rodkowym Iranie przy u?yciu modeli fraktalnych RQD-V - Rock Quality Determination-Volume [Okre?lenie jako?ci ska?-obj?to??]) i RQD-N (Rock Quality Determination-Number [Okre?lenie jako?ci ska?-liczba]). Wykresy logarytmiczne wykonane dla modeli RQD-V i RQD-N wykazuj? istnienie czterech populacji warstw górotworu, okre?lonych na podstawie parametrów progowych: 3.55; 25.12; 89.12% oraz 10.47; 41.68 i 83.17%, odpowiadaj?cym kolejno stopniom jako?ci: bardzo s?aby, s?aby, dobry i bardzo dobry, zgodnie z klasyfikacj? ska? Deere i Millera. Wyniki uzyskane przy zastosowaniu modeli RQD-V i RQD-N wskazuj?, ?e najlepsze ska?y zalegaj? w pó?nocno- zachodniej i centralnej cz??ci z?o?a, z kolei dobrej jako?ci ska?y znale?? mo?na w obr?bie ca?ego z?o?a. Walidacja modeli fraktalnych w oparciu o model blokowy (RQD block model) wskazuje, ?e model RQD-N dla bardzo dobrej jako?ci ska? jest skuteczniejszy ni? model RQD-V dla tej samej jako?ci ska?. Wysoki stopie? korelacji pomi?dzy wynikami uzyskanymi w oparciu o modele fraktalne i geologiczne pokazuje, ?e najwy?szej jako?ci ska?y zwi?zane s? z obecno?ci? porfirowego diorytu kwarcowego. Badanie wykazuje fraktaln? natur? charakterystyki jako?ci ska? w z?o?u Kahang. Zaproponowany model fraktalny wykorzysta? mo?na do lepszego poznania zagadnienia jako?ci ska? w celu obliczenia nachylenia wyrobiska.

  18. Energy or Mass and Interaction

    E-print Network

    Gustavo R Gonzalez-Martin

    2010-07-19

    A review. Problems: 1-Many empirical parameters and large dimension number; 2-Gravitation and Electrodynamics are challenged by dark matter and energy. Energy and nonlinear electrodynamics are fundamental in a unified nonlinear interaction. Nuclear energy appears as nonlinear SU(2) magnetic energy. Gravitation and electromagnetism are unified giving Einstein's equation and a geometric energy momentum tensor. A solution energy in the newtonian limit gives the gravitational constant G. Outside of this limit G is variable. May be interpreted as dark matter or energy. In vacuum, known gravitational solutions are obtained. Electromagnetism is an SU(2) subgroup. A U(1) limit gives Maxwell's equations. Geometric fields determine a generalized Dirac equation and are the germ of quantum physics. Planck's h and of Einstein's c are given by the potential and the metric. Excitations have quanta of charge, flux and spin determining the FQHE. There are only three stable 1/2 spin fermions. Mass is a form of energy. The rest energies of the fermions give the proton/electron mass ratio. Potential excitations have energies equal to the weak boson masses allowing a geometric interpretation of Weinberg's angle. SU(2) gives the anomalous magnetic moments of proton, electron, neutron and generates nuclear range attractive potentials strong enough to produce the binding energies of the deuteron and other nuclides. Lepton and meson masses are due to topological excitations. The geometric mass spectrum is satisfactory. The proton has a triple structure. The alpha constant is a geometric number.

  19. Numbers Are Not Everything

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Milton W.

    2009-01-01

    Numbers--of publications, grant money, PhD students, and invited talks, for example--play too large a role in assessments of faculty. The author's thirty-five years of experience in higher education have convinced him that overreliance on such numbers is a big problem, especially, but not exclusively, in the sciences. Every scientist recognizes…

  20. Law of Large Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Grinstead, Charles M.

    Created by Charles M. Grinstead and J. Laurie Snell of Dartmouth College, this website is part of an online statistics textbook. Topics include: (1) Law of Large Numbers for Discrete Random Variables, (2) Chebyshev Inequality, (3) Law of Averages, (4) Law of Large Numbers for Continuous Random Variables, (5) Monte Carlo Method. There are several examples and exercises that accompany the material.

  1. Hyperquarks and generation number

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmann, Alfons J.; Schmid, Michael L. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    In a model in which quarks and leptons are built up from two spin-(1/2) preons as fundamental entities, a new class of fermionic bound states (hyperquarks) arises. It turns out that these hyperquarks are necessary to fulfill the 't Hooft anomaly constraint, which then links the number of fermionic generations to the number of colors and hypercolors.

  2. Counting whole numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Hirst

    2007-10-12

    Identify and use whole numbers up to 100 Here are some links to help you learn more about counting Teach R Kids Math counting and number activity themes Here are some games to help you practice your counting counting cherrios Bunny Count Connect the Dots Game ...

  3. Participant number in this

    E-print Network

    Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

    to sign the grant agreement or to commit the organisation for this project Family name First name(s) Title/technological aspects in this project Family name First name(s) Title 34 Gender 35 (Female ­ F / Male ­ M) PositionA2.1: Who we are Project number 1 Project acronym 2 Participant number in this project 10

  4. Number Base Clocks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Visually explore counting and place value with different number bases, from base 2 to base 16, and up to the hundreds place using a clock like interface. The activity also allows you to look at the numbers on the clock in base 10 or in your other chosen base to explore the relationship between those values.

  5. The Fibonacci Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onstad, Torgeir

    1991-01-01

    After a brief historical account of Leonardo Pisano Fibonacci, some basic results concerning the Fibonacci numbers are developed and proved, and entertaining examples are described. Connections are made between the Fibonacci numbers and the Golden Ratio, biological nature, and other combinatorics examples. (MDH)

  6. Fraction Number Line

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    Using this interactive fraction number line, students can identify and locate equivalent fractions as well as compare fractions. They can move the mouse to the left or right and "mark" fractions on the number line. A section called "Which is Larger?" provides examples of fraction pairs to compare.

  7. Education by the Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadership, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Education, it seems, is increasingly driven by the numbers. Whether it is measuring student performance or a school district's ability to balance the books, one will find data out there about it. So much data, in fact, that it is difficult to sort through all the numbers to get the needed information. This article describes California's Ed-Data…

  8. Generalized binary number systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Attila Kovacs

    The object of this note is to analyze canonical radix expansions in algebraic number fields, especially using 0 and 1 as digits. We shall prove that infinitely many such binary number system exist and we enumerate all of them up to degree 8, where degree means the degree of the defining polynomial. In general, we prove that there are infinitely

  9. Numbers, taxonomy, and judgment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. T. Williams

    1967-01-01

    From the earliest times man has endowed numbers with magical properties. We all know that misfortunes come in threes, that the seventh son of a seventh son has remarkable gifts, and that it is unlucky to sit down thirteen at table. Even in more erudite spheres the tendency is discernible: how else can we explain the interest in perfect numbers,

  10. Unrecognizable Sets of Numbers

    E-print Network

    Minsky, Marvin

    1964-11-01

    When is a set A of positive integers, represented as binary numbers, "regular" in the sense that it is a set of sequences that can be recognized by a finite-state machine? Let pie A(n) be the number of members of A less ...

  11. Teachers Name Contact Number

    E-print Network

    South Australia, University of

    Teachers Name Contact Number Email School Year Level of Students Number of students attending Lakes on Thursday 19 September 2013, 1.00--3.30pm. Workshops are between 1.00 and 3.00pm, with a free Lakes campus Switch On: Mawson Lakes--Registration Form #12;

  12. Hypercomplex numbers Johanna Ramo

    E-print Network

    Wright, Francis

    ordinary numbers. You can add, subtract, multiply and divide them, and on top of that, do some nice things but kept them secret. They made their living by challenging each other to public contests of 1 #12;problem kept secret. The mathematicians of the time did not like negative numbers because to them they had

  13. Mass transport through polycrystalline microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, T.P.; Holm, E.A.; Young, M.F.; Wright, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Mass transport properties are important in polycrystalline materials used as protective films. Traditionally, such properties have been studied by examining model polycrystalline structures, such as a regular array of straight grain boundaries. However, these models do not account for a number of features of real grain ensembles, including the grain size distribution and variations in grain shape. In this study, a finite difference scheme is developed to study transient and steady-state mass transport through realistic two dimensional polycrystalline microstructures. Comparisons with the transport properties of traditional model microstructures provide regimes of applicability of such models. The effects of microstructural parameters such as average grain size are examined.

  14. Theoretical expression for the autoconversion rate of the cloud droplet number concentration

    E-print Network

    (mass autoconversion rate in g cmÀ3 sÀ1 ). Further examination of the theoretical number and mass of the liquid water content (mass autoconversion rate hereaf- ter) [Berry, 1968; Kessler, 1969; Manton]. [3] However, the autoconversion rate for the cloud drop- let concentration (number autoconversion

  15. Honors problem 1: Complex numbers. Arithmetic of complex numbers

    E-print Network

    Leininger, Christopher J.

    Honors problem 1: Complex numbers. Arithmetic of complex numbers Recall that the complex numbers we can identify the complex numbers with the set of linear polynomials with real coefficients as a subset of the complex numbers by identifying the real number a with a + 0i. The imaginary numbers

  16. Conversion Between Different Number Systems Positional number systems

    E-print Network

    Simonson, Shai

    Conversion Between Different Number Systems Positional number systems Our decimal number system digits are used in both numbers. (Although we are accustomed to our decimal number system, which of each position correspond to powers of the base of the number system. So for our decimal number system

  17. Higgs-Thomson-Fibonacci generation of lepton and quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, G. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Lepton-quark mass may derive from the primary Higgs-mechanism fermion mass by a fundamental law for fermion mass modification, without extension of the minimal standard model. Accurate mass values are obtained for all charged leptons and quarks if the fundamental law for fermion mass modification is given by m = m{sub e}Q{sup 2}(exp {lambda}{sub n}), where m{sub e} is the Higgs-generated electron mass, Q is the charge number of the lepton or quark and {lambda}{sub n}, a linearly additive parameter that depends on the fermion principal quantum number n, is simply related to the small Fibonacci numbers. The three neutrino masses are zero, and the top mass is close to m{sub t} = 163.6 GeV.

  18. 1.NBT Ordering Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Malik is given a list of numbers: 1 \\ \\ 5 \\ \\ 10 \\ \\ 50 \\ \\ 100 He wants to include the following numbers so all numbers will be listed in order from l...

  19. Introduction to Negative Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    WNET.org

    2006-01-01

    This lesson plan based on a Cyberchase activity, first addresses a common misconception: starting measurement from 1 instead of 0. Then, it introduces negative numbers by extending a number line beyond 0 in the negative (left) direction. It is motivated by the Cyber Squad’s mission to find the captured Cyberchase Council on a particular floor of a tall building as seen in two quicktime videos: “Importance of the Origin" and "Inventing Negative Numbers" (each are cataloged separately). In addition to the learning activity, other support materials are included: handouts, assessments and answer keys.

  20. Number Conveyor Belt

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    This activity for the interactive white board (free access with registration) allows a teacher to create an arithmetic sequence for students to watch being built as the sequence of numbers moves along a conveyor. Learners must determine the pattern being used so when the belt randomly stops, the missing number in the sequence can be dragged/ dropped into its place. The teacher sets the start number (0-19), the interval or common difference (1-10) and if the sequence will count up or down. This last option provides an opportunity to display patterns with integers.

  1. Halo occupation numbers and galaxy bias

    E-print Network

    J. A. Peacock; R. E. Smith

    2000-06-30

    We propose a heuristic model that displays the main features of realistic theories for galaxy bias. We show that the low-order clustering statistics of the dark-matter distribution depend almost entirely on the locations and density profiles of dark-matter haloes. A hypothetical galaxy catalogue depends on (i) the efficiency of galaxy formation, as manifested by the halo occupation number -- the number of galaxies brighter than some sample limit contained in a halo of a given mass; (ii) the location of these galaxies within their halo. The first factor is constrained by the empirical luminosity function of groups. For the second factor, we assume that one galaxy marks the halo centre, with any remaining galaxies acting as satellites that trace the halo mass. These simple assumptions amount to a recipe for non-local bias, in which the probability of finding a galaxy is not a simple function of its local mass density. We have applied this prescription to some CDM models of current interest, and find that the predictions are close to the observed galaxy correlations for a flat $\\Omega=0.3$ model ($\\Lambda$CDM), but not for an $\\Omega=1$ model with the same power spectrum ($\\tau$CDM). This is an inevitable consequence of cluster normalization for the power spectra: cluster-scale haloes of given mass have smaller core radii for high $\\Omega$, and hence display enhanced small-scale clustering. Finally, the pairwise velocity dispersion of galaxies in the $\\Lambda$CDM model is lower than that of the mass, allowing cluster-normalized models to yield a realistic Mach number for the peculiar velocity field. This is largely due to the strong variation of galaxy-formation efficiency with halo mass that is required in this model.

  2. The magical Fibonacci number

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Mack

    1990-01-01

    Fibonacci numbers are explained, and some of the many manifestations of the Fibonacci series in nature are described. These range from the so-called golden spiral to the Penrose tiling patterns that describe the structure of quasicrystals

  3. The Numbers Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustick, David

    1997-01-01

    Describes a simple activity that explores and reveals the principles of significant figures and scientific notation using a 500 gram bag of unpopped popcorn. Students must devise a method for determining the number of kernels in the bag. (DDR)

  4. Zero: A "None" Number?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Glenda J.; Walshaw, Margaret A.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the challenges students face in making sense of zero as a number. A range of different student responses to a computation problem involving zero reveal students' different understandings of zero.

  5. Fluctuations in recoil numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterbon, K. B.

    The variance of the number of high-energy recoils produced in a cascade is calculated in the power-cross-section approximation. These' recoils have initial energy greater than some specified threshold value, which in turn is greater than a displacement energy. Displacement energy is neglected in this calculation. This distribution of high-energy-recoil number is wider than the Kinchin-Pease distribution but narrower than a Poisson distribution: the variance is (asymptotically) proportional to the number of recoils for all three, and the proportionality constant for the recoil number is greater than the Kinchin-Pease constant but less than unity. Both the asymptotic value of the variance and the energy dependence are obtained. These quantities should be of interest in the study of recoil implantation.

  6. History of Complex Numbers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ravi P. Agarwal; Kanishka Perera; Sandra Pinelas

    \\u000a The problem of complex numbers dates back to the 1st century, when Heron of Alexandria (about 75 AD) attempted to find the\\u000a volume of a frustum of a pyramid, which required computing the square root of 81-144 (though negative numbers were not conceived in the Hellenistic world). We also have the following quotation from Bhaskara\\u000a Acharya (working in 486 AD),

  7. Fibonacci's Forgotten Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ezra; Brunson, Cornelius

    2008-01-01

    Fibonacci's forgotten number is the sexagesimal number 1;22,7,42,33,4,40, which he described in 1225 as an approximation to the real root of x[superscript 3] + 2x[superscript 2] + 10x - 20. In decimal notation, this is 1.36880810785...and it is correct to nine decimal digits. Fibonacci did not reveal his method. How did he do it? There is also a…

  8. The number of \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthias Beck; Moshe Cohen; Jessica Cuomo; Paul Gribelyuk

    2002-01-01

    We define a magic square to be a square matrix whose entries are nonnegative\\u000aintegers and whose rows, columns, and main diagonals sum up to the same number.\\u000aWe prove structural results for the number of such squares as a function of the\\u000asize of the matrix and the line sum. We give examples for small sizes and show\\u000asimilar

  9. Metrics For Comparing Plasma Mass Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2012-08-15

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter. __________________________________________________

  10. Metrics for comparing plasma mass filters

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter.

  11. Storage and retrieval of mass spectral information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohn, M. E.; Humberston, M. J.; Eglinton, G.

    1977-01-01

    Computer handling of mass spectra serves two main purposes: the interpretation of the occasional, problematic mass spectrum, and the identification of the large number of spectra generated in the gas-chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of complex natural and synthetic mixtures. Methods available fall into the three categories of library search, artificial intelligence, and learning machine. Optional procedures for coding, abbreviating and filtering a library of spectra minimize time and storage requirements. Newer techniques make increasing use of probability and information theory in accessing files of mass spectral information.

  12. Definitions Algebra of complex numbers

    E-print Network

    Lega, Joceline

    Definitions Algebra of complex numbers Polar coordinates form of complex numbers Check your knowledge Review of Complex Numbers Definitions, Algebra of complex numbers, Polar coordinates Review of Complex Numbers #12;Definitions Algebra of complex numbers Polar coordinates form of complex numbers Check

  13. Effective Mass and Energy-Mass Relationship

    E-print Network

    Viktor Ariel

    2012-05-14

    The particle effective mass is often a challenging concept in solid state physics due to the many different definitions of the effective mass that are routinely used. Also, the most commonly used theoretical definition of the effective mass was derived from the assumption of a parabolic energy-momentum relationship, E(p), and therefore should not be applied to non-parabolic materials. In this paper, we use wave-particle duality to derive a definition of the effective mass and the energy-mass approximation suitable for non-parabolic materials. The new energy-mass relationship can be considered a generalization of Einstein's E=mc^2 suitable for arbitrary E(p) and therefore applicable to solid state materials and devices. We show that the resulting definition of the effective mass seems suitable for non-paraboic solid state materials such as HgCdTe, GaAs, and graphene.

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples. PMID:18470926

  15. Simulations between triangular and hexagonal number-conserving cellular automata

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    conservation laws of mass or energy. In this paper, we first propose a necessary condition for triangular model of CA applies to phenomena governed by conservation laws of mass or energy. Boccara et al. [1] studied number conservation of one-dimensional CAs on circular configurations. Durand et al. [2

  16. 7 CFR 29.9205 - Identification number (farm serial number).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Identification number (farm serial number). ...Statement and Regulations Governing the Identification and Certification of Nonquota Tobacco...Area Definitions § 29.9205 Identification number (farm serial number)....

  17. 7 CFR 29.9205 - Identification number (farm serial number).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification number (farm serial number). ...Statement and Regulations Governing the Identification and Certification of Nonquota Tobacco...Area Definitions § 29.9205 Identification number (farm serial number)....

  18. The masses of elementary particles and hadrons

    E-print Network

    Ding-Yu Chung

    2001-07-28

    The masses of elementary particles and hadrons can be calculated from the periodic table of elementary particles. The periodic table is derived from dimensional hierarchy for the seven extra spatial dimensions. As a molecule is the composite of atoms with chemical bonds, a hadron is the composite of elementary particles with hadronic bonds. The masses of elementary particles and hadrons can be calculated using the periodic table with only four known constants: the number of the extra spatial dimensions in the superstring, the mass of electron, the mass of Z=B0, and the fine structure constant. The calculated masses are in good agreement with the observed values. For examples, the calculated masses for the top quark, neutron, and pion are 176.5 GeV, 939.54MeV, and 135.01MeV in excellent agreement with the observed masses, 176 =B1 13 GeV, 939.57 MeV, and 134.98 MeV, respectively. The masses of 110 hadrons are calculated. The overall average difference between the calculated masses and the observed masses for all hadrons is 0.29 MeV. The periodic table of elementary particles provides the most comprehensive explanation and calculation for the masses of elementary particles and hadrons.

  19. Erdos Number Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Have you ever wondered about the mathematics behind the idea of "six degrees of separation?" The Erd's Number Project offers several fairly comprehensive lists of co-author relationships to elaborate (with a bit of humor) studies of the dynamics involved in "the collaboration graph," which the website says is "a 'real-life' fairly large graph for combinatorialists to study." The co-author relationship list begins with the Hungarian mathematician Paul Erd's and branches outward, so that anyone who co-authored with Erd's is assigned Erd's number 1 and anyone who co-authored with an Erd's number 1 is assigned the Erd's number 2, and so on. The website offers some suggestions for how the lists might be used, including finding your own Erd's number, testing algorithms, or just getting a sense of the different areas of mathematics represented by Erd's' co-authors. Visitors can also learn more about Erd's, read articles about collaboration in mathematics, or browse through the websites which are linked from the co-author data lists.

  20. Expansion of rational numbers in Mobius number systems Petr Kurka

    E-print Network

    Kurka, Petr

    Expansion of rational numbers in M¨obius number systems Petr K°urka Center for Theoretical Study- tions. We say that a M¨obius number system is rational, if it represents rational numbers by periodic. In the present paper we study expansions of rational numbers in the integer M¨obius number systems, whose

  1. Using System Mass (SM), Equivalent Mass (EM), Equivalent System Mass (ESM) or Life Cycle Mass (LCM) in Advanced Life Support (ALS) Reporting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Life Support (ALS) has used a single number, Equivalent System Mass (ESM), for both reporting progress and technology selection. ESM is the launch mass required to provide a space system. ESM indicates launch cost. ESM alone is inadequate for technology selection, which should include other metrics such as Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Life Cycle Cost (LCC) and also consider perfom.arxe 2nd risk. ESM has proven difficult to implement as a reporting metric, partly because it includes non-mass technology selection factors. Since it will not be used exclusively for technology selection, a new reporting metric can be made easier to compute and explain. Systems design trades-off performance, cost, and risk, but a risk weighted cost/benefit metric would be too complex to report. Since life support has fixed requirements, different systems usually have roughly equal performance. Risk is important since failure can harm the crew, but it is difficult to treat simply. Cost is not easy to estimate, but preliminary space system cost estimates are usually based on mass, which is better estimated than cost. Amass-based cost estimate, similar to ESM, would be a good single reporting metric. The paper defines and compares four mass-based cost estimates, Equivalent Mass (EM), Equivalent System Mass (ESM), Life Cycle Mass (LCM), and System Mass (SM). EM is traditional in life support and includes mass, volume, power, cooling and logistics. ESM is the specifically defined ALS metric, which adds crew time and possibly other cost factors to EM. LCM is a new metric, a mass-based estimate of LCC measured in mass units. SM includes only the factors of EM that are originally measured in mass, the hardware and logistics mass. All four mass-based metrics usually give similar comparisons. SM is by far the simplest to compute and easiest to explain.

  2. Multiplying Whole Numbers & Fractions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-01-01

    In this 9-minute video, Amy Spies shows her 4th grade class working through a problem multiplying a fraction by a whole number. During the lesson Amy realized that the students were not pulling out the knowledge that she had intended. She then revised the lesson and gave them examples and non-examples and through discussion had them make the connection between repeated addition and multiplying a fraction by a whole number. Students also gained a deeper understanding of the meaning of the numerator and denominator in these repeated addition problems.

  3. Robustness of cosmological axion mass limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Gariazzo, Stefano; Giusarma, Elena; Mena, Olga

    2015-06-01

    We present the cosmological bounds on the thermal axion mass in an extended cosmological scenario in which the primordial power spectrum of scalar perturbations differs from the usual power-law shape predicted by the simplest inflationary models. The power spectrum is instead modeled by means of a "piecewise cubic Hermite interpolating polynomial" (pchip). When using cosmic microwave background measurements combined with other cosmological data sets, the thermal axion mass constraints are degraded only slightly. The addition of the measurements of ?8 and ?m from the 2013 Planck cluster catalog on galaxy number counts relaxes the bounds on the thermal axion mass, mildly favoring a ˜1 eV axion mass, regardless of the model adopted for the primordial power spectrum. However, in general, such a preference disappears if the sum of the three active neutrino masses is also considered as a free parameter in our numerical analyses, due to the strong correlation between the masses of these two hot thermal relics.

  4. ?-Cell Mass and Turnover in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Saisho, Yoshifumi; Butler, Alexandra E.; Manesso, Erica; Elashoff, David; Rizza, Robert A.; Butler, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to establish ?-cell mass, ?-cell apoptosis, and ?-cell replication in humans in response to obesity and advanced age. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We examined human autopsy pancreas from 167 nondiabetic individuals 20–102 years of age. The effect of obesity on ?-cell mass was examined in 53 lean and 61 obese subjects, and the effect of aging was examined in 106 lean subjects. RESULTS ?-Cell mass is increased by ?50% with obesity (from 0.8 to 1.2 g). With advanced aging, the exocrine pancreas undergoes atrophy but ?-cell mass is remarkably preserved. There is minimal ?-cell replication or apoptosis in lean humans throughout life with no detectable changes with obesity or advanced age. CONCLUSIONS ?-Cell mass in human obesity increases by ?50% by an increase in ?-cell number, the source of which is unknown. ?-Cell mass is well preserved in humans with advanced aging. PMID:22875233

  5. Psychosocial considerations for mass decontamination.

    PubMed

    Lemyre, Louise; Johnson, Colleen; Corneil, Wayne

    2010-11-01

    Mass exposure to explosions, infectious agents, foodborne illnesses, chemicals or radiological materials may require mass decontamination that have critical psychosocial implications for the public and for both traditional and non-traditional responders in terms of impact and of response. Five main issues are common to mass decontamination events: (i) perception, (ii) somatisation, (iii) media role and communication, (iv) information sharing, (v) behavioural guidance and (vi) organisational issues. Empirical evidence is drawn from a number of cases, including Chernobyl; Goiania, Brazil; the sarin gas attack in Tokyo; the anthrax attacks in the USA; Three Mile Island; and by features of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome pandemic. In this paper, a common platform for mass casualty management is explored and suggestions for mass interventions are proposed across the complete event timeline, from pre-event threat and warning stages through to the impact and reconstruction phases. Implication for responders, healthcare and emergency infrastructure, public behaviour, screening processes, risk communication and media management are described. PMID:20924122

  6. Generalized van der Waerden numbers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce M. Landman

    1986-01-01

    Certain generalizations of arithmetic progressions are used to define numbers analogous to the van der Waerden numbers. Several exact values of the new numbers are given, and upper bounds for these numbers are obtained. In addition, a comparison is made between the number of different arithmetic progressions and the number of different generalized arithmetic progressions.

  7. Mass of the Earth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-07-11

    In this activity, learners use basic measurements of the Earth and pieces of rock and iron to estimate the mass of the Earth. Learners will calculate mass, volume, and density, convert units, and employ the water displacement method. To calculate an even more accurate estimate of the mass of the Earth, this resource includes optional instructions on how to measure the iron core mass.

  8. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W.; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2005-12-13

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  9. Activated Immunoaffinity Catalog Numbers

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Activated Immunoaffinity Supports Catalog Numbers 153-6046 Affi-Gel® 10 Gel 153-6052 Affi-Gel 15 Gel 153-6098 Affi-Gel 10 and 15 Gel #12;Table of Contents Section 1 Introduction ................................. 19 Section 6 Monitoring For Protein Coupling .. 22 Section 7 Troubleshooting

  10. Instruction Catalog Number

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Affi-Gel® Protein A MAPS® II Kit Instruction Manual Catalog Number 153-6159 For Technical Service;Introduction The Affi-Gel protein A MAPS II (Monoclonal Antibody Purification System) kit provides a dramatic improvement in protein A-agarose methods for purification of mouse IgG1 from ascites fluid. When Affi-Gel

  11. Playing the Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Some say that the educators now have a gender-stratified system of higher education, with nearly 60 percent of all undergraduates being women and fewer men attending each year. The battle for gender equity for women in higher education has been a long and contentious one. In the decades since, increasing numbers of women have gone to college, to…

  12. Review Article Number 138

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Virinder S Parmar; Amitabh Jha; Kirpal S Bisht; Poonam Taneja; Sanjay K Singh; Ajay Kumar; Denmarkpp; Rajni Jain; Carl E Olsen

    1999-01-01

    Yew trees, taxonomically classified under the genus Taxus, are sources of a number of physiologically active compounds of different classes. Taxane derivatives with various carbon skeletons, lignans, flavonoids, steroids and sugar derivatives have been isolated from different Taxus species. Compounds isolated from the genus Taxus between 1908 and December 1997 have been comprehensively reviewed.

  13. Teaching Denominate Numbers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isidore Springer

    1915-01-01

    A topic rarely mentioned in experiments on Arithmetic is that of the teaching of denominate numbers. This topic usually appears about the sixth year of the child's school life, receives very little attention from the makers of text books, and up to the present time has been hardly noticed in the ever increasing volume of arithmetical investigations. The following is

  14. Numbers, Groups Cryptography

    E-print Network

    Singh, Anurag

    Numbers, Groups and Cryptography Gordan Savin #12;#12;Contents Chapter 1. Euclidean Algorithm 5 1. Euclidean Algorithm 5 2. Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic 9 3. Uniqueness of Factorization 14 4. Efficiency of the Euclidean Algorithm 16 Chapter 2. Groups and Arithmetic 21 1. Groups 21 2. Congruences 25 3. Modular

  15. Numbers, Groups Cryptography

    E-print Network

    Hacon, Christopher

    Numbers, Groups and Cryptography Gordan Savin #12;#12;Contents Chapter 1. Euclidean Algorithm 5 1. Euclidean Algorithm 5 2. Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic 9 3. Uniqueness of Factorization 13 4. Efficiency of the Euclidean Algorithm 16 Chapter 2. Groups and Arithmetic 19 1. Groups 19 2. Congruences 23 3. Modular

  16. IN NUMBERS: Biostatistics Faculty

    E-print Network

    Grether, Gregory

    STRENGTH IN NUMBERS: Biostatistics Faculty Are in Great Demand in the SPH and Beyond of the school's Department of Biostatistics faculty (clockwise starting from lower left): Drs. Catherine Sugar specialize in other aspects of clinical trials design. With this expertise, the Department of Biostatistics

  17. Proposal Number: Competition title

    E-print Network

    Proposal Number: Competition title: Year: PROPOSAL - TITLE PAGE PROJECT TITLE: Program: TitleName Init LastName Co-Project Leader: FirstName Init LastName Fax: Email: Position/Title: FirstName Init, State, Zip: Phone: Fax: Email: Position/Title: FINANCIAL SUMMARY: Project Duration: Federal Funds: (e

  18. Fibonacci numbers and words

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giuseppe Pirillo

    1997-01-01

    Let ? be the golden ratio (?5 + 1)\\/2, fn the nth Fibonacci finite word and f the Fibonacci infinite word. Let r be a rational number greater than (2 + ?)\\/2 and u a nondashempty word. If ur is a factor of f, then there exists n ? 1 such that u is a conjugate of fn and, moreover,

  19. Number and Operation Games

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Allen

    2010-10-09

    Play the counting games below. First, help Curious George juggle the fruit in the Curious George Juggling game. Next, count the fish in the Fish Counting game. Then, try to catch the correct number of fish in the net. Go Fishing! ...

  20. Poissonian copy numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Liao

    Why do quantitative biologists sometimes claim that mRNA copy numbers are Poisson distributed in simple models of gene transcription? The first video segment addresses this question under the simplifying assumption that mRNA degradation occurs after a well-defined, deterministic lifetime, and the second segment illustrates the same basic concept for the more realistic situation in which degradation is stochastic.

  1. A Highly Random Number

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Facultad De Ciencias Exactas; Gregory Chaitin; Sergio Daicz I; Vernica Becher

    2001-01-01

    In his celebrated 1936 paper Turing defined a machine to becircular iff it performs an infinite computation outputting only finitelymany symbols. We define ( as the probability that an arbitrary machinebe circular and we prove that is a random number that goes beyond$2, the probability that a universal self alelimiting machine halts. Thealgorithmic complexity of c is strictly greater than

  2. UCGE Reports Number 20162

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    together. To compute the remaining errors, the receiver clock error must be removed, which is possibleUCGE Reports Number 20162 Department of Geomatics Engineering Temporal Characteristics of GPS Error://www.geomatics.ucalgary.ca/links/GradTheses.html) by Michael C. Olynik July 2002 #12;THE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY TEMPORAL CHARACTERISTICS OF GPS ERROR SOURCES

  3. Number2.com

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Free online SAT, ACT, and GRE test preparation courses. Register for tutorials and practice sessions that dynamically adapt to performance, providing customized feedback for every response and monitoring overall student progress in the coaching system. Number2.com also offers a vocabulary builder, question of the day, and word of the day; and links to financial aid, college application, and career planning resources.

  4. Houses with Height Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-09-21

    This applet allows students to freely build shapes by stacking cubes and "explore the relation between a building (house) consisting of cubes and the height numbers representing the height of the different parts of the building." This exercise helps students visualize and understand the concepts of volume and three-dimensional, measurable space.

  5. Quasar number density evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. T. Stocke; S. C. Perrenod

    1981-01-01

    A simple model of quasar number density evolution is presented based on the occurrence of quasar-like radio galaxies (i.e., strong optical emission lines and type 2 radio morphology) exclusively in regions of low galaxy and intergalactic medium (IGM) density. This suggests a limit for the IGM density of 10 to the -4th (+ or - 1) per cu cm below

  6. UCGE Reports Number 20176

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    sensitivity GPS receiver involved hard- ware simulations and extensive field testing in a forest, urbanUCGE Reports Number 20176 Department of Geomatics Engineering High Sensitivity GPS Performance://www.geomatics.ucalgary.ca/links/GradTheses.html) by Glenn D. MacGougan June 2003 #12;THE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY High Sensitivity GPS Performance Analysis

  7. UCGE Reports Number 20042

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    -time statistical testing and implementation procedure for use in kinematic GPS positioning is given basedUCGE Reports Number 20042 Quality Control for Differential Kinematic GPS Positioning (URL: http OF CALGARY QUALITY CONTROL FOR DIFFERENTIAL KINEMATIC GPS POSITIONING BY GANG LU A THESIS SUBMITTED

  8. UCGE Reports Number 20277

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    testing UWB-GPS integration in numerous scenarios, this thesis proves that UWB is a feasible solutionUCGE Reports Number 20277 Department of Geomatics Engineering Ultra Wideband Augmented GPS (URL;UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY Ultra Wideband Augmented GPS by David Sung-Tat Chiu A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY

  9. Create an Address Number

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-01-01

    This place value and problem solving lesson focuses on forming 3-digit address numbers to meet specific requirement. The lesson provides an opportunity for learners to use the problem-solving strategies of looking for patterns and establishing an organized list. Students also learn that careful reading of information and understanding of mathematical language are important to finding appropriate solutions.

  10. Detecting squarefree numbers

    E-print Network

    Andrew R. Booker; Ghaith A. Hiary; Jon P. Keating

    2015-01-05

    We present an algorithm, based on the explicit formula for $L$-functions and conditional on GRH, for proving that a given integer is squarefree with little or no knowledge of its factorization. We analyze the algorithm both theoretically and practically, and use it to prove that several RSA challenge numbers are not squarefull.

  11. "Better than Their Numbers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses College Summit, a nonprofit effort centered around the premise that there is a sizable number of students who are more capable of college academics than their test scores and grade point averages suggest. Its four-day summer sessions are focused not on ramping up students' academic performance but in mining students'…

  12. Origami and Constructible Numbers

    E-print Network

    Hull, Thomas C.

    Origami and Constructible Numbers (and some other stuff) Tom Hull, Merrimack College thull of Origami? #12;What are the Basic Operations of Origami? Given two points P1 and P2, we can fold the crease important move in origami (probably) #12;Origami angle trisection L3 2 3 L1 L1 L2 p1 p2 #12;Origami angle

  13. Developing Early Number Sense

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Laura Domalik

    2010-01-01

    In this 5-minute video Laura Domalik defines number sense and provides instructional strategies for counting and vocabulary, including counting on, counting back, one more than (+1), one less than (-1), basic fact concepts of +1 and -1, and missing addends. She demonstrates a game called Garbage, which can be played alone or with a partner.

  14. Paint by Numbers Revived!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Nic

    2012-01-01

    Remember paint by numbers? This revived trend was a perfect solution to teaching geometric shapes to the author's first-grade students. Geometric shapes are identified and used in early elementary art classrooms, but this lesson gives students a deeper understanding of shape, encourages problem-solving, and makes a strong correlation between math…

  15. Roundoff and Number Representation

    E-print Network

    Schörghofer, Norbert

    illustrated in figure 2-1). In the decimal system this corresponds to a maximum/minimum exponent of ±38 and approximately 7 decimal dig- its (at least 6 and at most 9). For a 64-bit number (8 bytes) there are 11 bits for the exponent (±308) and 52 bits for the mantissa, which gives around 16 decimal digits of precision (at least

  16. Fluctuation-driven computing on number-conserving cellular automata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jia Lee; Katsunobu Imai; Qing-sheng Zhu

    A number-conserving cellular automaton (NCCA) is a cellular automaton in which the states of cells are denoted by integers, and the sum of all of the numbers in a configuration is conserved throughout its evolution. NCCAs have been widely used to model physical systems that are ruled by conservation laws of mass or energy. Imai et al. [13] showed that

  17. A correlation for mass transfer coefficients in elbows

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Shirazi, S.A.; Shadley, J.R.; Rybicki, E.F.; Dayalan, E. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Mass transfer can have a significant effect on corrosion rates depending on the solution chemistry and flow conditions. Therefore, knowledge of the distribution of mass transfer coefficients along the flow geometry can be useful in determining the severity of corrosion rates in situations where mass transfer is a factor. In this investigation, mass transfer in 90 elbows was examined. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code was used to model the flow in an elbow and compute mass transfer coefficients. Results were compared to available experimental data to verify the model. Although the number of variables involved in corrosion process is large, only two dimensionless parameters, namely, the flow Reynolds number and the Schmidt number are important for characterizing the mass transfer process. Mass transfer in elbows is also influenced by elbow geometry parameters such as the elbow radius to pipe diameter ratio (r/D). Based on these three dimensionless parameters, mass transfer between the elbow wall and the fluid was simulated and a correlation was developed to predict the maximum elbow mass transfer coefficient as a function of the flow Reynolds number, the Schmidt number and the elbow r/D. This investigation was motivated by a need to predict mass transfer coefficients in elbows for use in conjunction with a comprehensive model for calculating CO{sub 2} corrosion rates in oil and gas pipelines.

  18. Probing the Mass Distribution to High Redshift in the UDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, David

    2003-07-01

    We propose to study two aspects of galaxy mass assembly using galaxy-galaxy lensing in the Ultra Deep Field {UDF}: evolution of galaxy mass and mass-to-light ratio {M/L} with cosmic time, and mass profiles in the inner 1-10 kpc. The UDF data will enable detection of changes in the average galaxy mass of as little as 10% from 11 Gyr ago to now. The mean mass profile will also be tightly constrained over the same range of lookback times. Lensing probes all types of galaxies equally well, and the large-number statistics will easily support subdivision into various galaxy types. Our data products will be a calibrated set of galaxy mass evolution results to complement the more traditional galaxy luminosity/number/type evolution results which will undoubtedly spring from the UDF, plus an independent photometric-redshift catalog of the UDF and mass maps of the 30' x 30' area surrounding the UDF.

  19. Honors question 3: Complex numbers (revisited). Arithmetic of complex numbers

    E-print Network

    Leininger, Christopher J.

    Honors question 3: Complex numbers (revisited). Arithmetic of complex numbers Recall that the complex numbers are formally defined as C = {a + bi} where a and b can be any real numbers and i is treated as a variable (so we can identify the complex numbers with the set of linear polynomials with real

  20. Number Theory Elliptic curves BSD Research : Number Theory group

    E-print Network

    Wuthrich, Christian

    Number Theory Elliptic curves BSD Research : Number Theory group Christian Wuthrich 14 Dec 2011 Christian Wuthrich #12;Number Theory Elliptic curves BSD Number theory is the Queen of Mathematics. Christian Wuthrich #12;Number Theory Elliptic curves BSD Sometimes our research looks like this

  1. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOEpatents

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2010-06-01

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  2. MASS CALC: Z CALCULATE THE Z MASS

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    Structure and properties of matter o Conservation of energy and increase in disorder o Interactions by measuring their decay products and using conservation laws. · Conservation laws and mass-energy conversion momentum conservation, energy conservation and two-dimensional vector addition to calculate the mass

  3. CT number definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, J. A.; Drage, N. A.; Richmond, S.

    2012-04-01

    The accuracy of CT number plots has been found lacking in several medical applications. This is of concern since the ability to compare and evaluate results on a reproducible and standard basis is essential to long term development. Apart from the technical limitations arising from the CT scanner and the data treatment, there are fundamental issues with the definition of the Hounsfield number, namely the absence of a standard photon energy and the need to specify the attenuation mechanism for standard measurements. This paper presents calculations to demonstrate the shortcomings of the present definition with a brief discussion. The remedy is straightforward, but probably of long duration as it would require an international agreement.

  4. Nature by Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This 4-minute computer animation highlights three forms in nature that have connections with numbers and geometry. The Fibonacci sequence and the golden ratio are shown relating to the chambered nautilus shell and the sunflower seed pattern. The Delaunay triangulation and Voronoi tessellation are shown to simulate the capillary distribution on a dragonfly wing. Included are descriptions of the mathematics and stills from the production.

  5. Maths Doctor: Number

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Maths Doctor website from Macmillan Publishers contains more than 250 lessons that are free for anyone. Each lesson includes a three to five minute video tutorial on the topic and a related worksheet for the student to complete. Each worksheet has a convenient QR code that a student can scan to access the video. The Number section contains numerous lessons ranging from Conversion of Units to Dividing Fractions to Subtracting Negative Integers.

  6. Variable Number of \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Huang; Joan Llach

    2007-01-01

    Particle filter is a sequential Monte Carlo method for object tracking in a recursive Bayesian filtering framework. The efficiency and accuracy of the particle filter depends on two key factors: how many particles are used and how these particles are re-located. In this paper, we estimate the number of required particles using the Kullback-Leibler distance (KLD), which is called KLD-sampling,

  7. The Remarkable Number "1"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. Donald

    2014-09-01

    In human history, the origin of the numbers came from definite practical needs. Indeed, there is strong evidence that numbers were created before writing. The number "1", dating back at least 20,000 years, was found as a counting symbol on a bone. The famous statement by the German mathematician Leopold Kronecker (1823-1891), "God made the integers; all else is the work of man," has spawned a lively modern philosophical discussion, and this discussion begins by trying to get a philosophical handle on "1." This approach remains under heavy discussion, and is more-or-less unresolved (Frege in Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik (English: The foundations of arithmetic). Polhman, 1884). In this note, we consider the many facets of "one" in it many guises and applications. Nonetheless, "one" has multiple meanings, from the very practical to the abstract, from mathematics to science to basically everything. We examine here a mere slice of mathematical history with a focus on the most basic and applicable concept therein. It troubles many, particularly students, even today.

  8. Beyond Natural Numbers: Negative Number Representation in Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Kristen P.; Rosenberg-Lee, Miriam; Tsang, Jessica M.; Schwartz, Daniel L.; Menon, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    Unlike natural numbers, negative numbers do not have natural physical referents. How does the brain represent such abstract mathematical concepts? Two competing hypotheses regarding representational systems for negative numbers are a rule-based model, in which symbolic rules are applied to negative numbers to translate them into positive numbers when assessing magnitudes, and an expanded magnitude model, in which negative numbers have a distinct magnitude representation. Using an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging design, we examined brain responses in 22 adults while they performed magnitude comparisons of negative and positive numbers that were quantitatively near (difference <4) or far apart (difference >6). Reaction times (RTs) for negative numbers were slower than positive numbers, and both showed a distance effect whereby near pairs took longer to compare. A network of parietal, frontal, and occipital regions were differentially engaged by negative numbers. Specifically, compared to positive numbers, negative number processing resulted in greater activation bilaterally in intraparietal sulcus (IPS), middle frontal gyrus, and inferior lateral occipital cortex. Representational similarity analysis revealed that neural responses in the IPS were more differentiated among positive numbers than among negative numbers, and greater differentiation among negative numbers was associated with faster RTs. Our findings indicate that despite negative numbers engaging the IPS more strongly, the underlying neural representation are less distinct than that of positive numbers. We discuss our findings in the context of the two theoretical models of negative number processing and demonstrate how multivariate approaches can provide novel insights into abstract number representation. PMID:22363276

  9. Mass Immunization Programs: Principles and Standards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Grabenstein; R. L. Nevin

    Mass immunization involves delivering immunizations to a large number of people at one or more locations in a short interval\\u000a of time. Good mass immunization programs apply planning and quality standards that maximize return on resources invested and\\u000a provide the greatest individual benefits when immunizing many people in a short period of time. These programs can be used\\u000a to counter

  10. Mass function of dark matter halos

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Jenkins; C. S. Frenk; S. D. M. White; J. M. Colberg; S. Cole; A. E. Evrard; H. M. P. Couchman; N. Yoshida

    2000-01-01

    We combine data from a number of N-body simulations to predict the abundance\\u000aof dark halos in Cold Dark Matter universes over more than 4 orders of\\u000amagnitude in mass. A comparison of different simulations suggests that the\\u000adominant uncertainty in our results is systematic and is smaller than 10--30%\\u000aat all masses, depending on the halo definition used. In

  11. Double Beta Decays and Neutrino Masses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroyasu Ejiri

    2005-01-01

    Neutrino-less double beta decays (0nu beta beta), which violate the lepton number conservation law by Delta L= 2, are of great interest for studying the fundamental properties of neutrinos beyond the standard electroweak theory. High-sensitivity 0 nu beta beta studies with mass sensitivities of the solar and atmospheric nu-masses are crucial for studying the Majorana nature of nu's, the nu

  12. Mass of He-8

    E-print Network

    Tribble, Robert E.; Cossairt, J. D.; May, D. P.; Kenefick, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    reaction Q value and mass excess. Deduced coefficients of IMME for the A=8 isobaric quintet. INTRODUCTION TABLE I. Summary of previous 8He mass measure- ments. Reaction Mass excess {MeV) Reference 26Mg {4He,SHe)22Mg "Mg{4He sHe)"Mg "O{4He SHe... an accurate 'He mass excess is that it represents the Tz=2 member of the A = 8 isobaric quintet. A = 8 is the only isobaric quintet in which the masses of all five members have been determined. The quadra- tic isobaric multiplet mass equation (IMME...

  13. q Numbers of quantum groups, Fibonacci numbers, and orthogonal polynomials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. I. Kachurik

    1998-01-01

    We obtain algebraic relations (identities) for q-numbers that do not contain q\\u000a ?-factors. We derive a formula that expresses any q-number [x] in terms of the q-number [2]. We establish the relationship between the q-numbers [n] and the Fibonacci numbers, Chebyshev polynomials, and other special functions. The sums of combinations of q-numbers, in particular, the sums of their powers, are

  14. Complex Numbers First: Define i

    E-print Network

    Sands, Jonathan W.

    Complex Numbers First: Define i Solve the quadratic: Ryan Tarring Max Van Over Mike Diamond Mentor therefore, #12;The set of complex numbers is when we add real numbers to real multiples of this imaginary unit Complex numbers are written in the form: a +bi for real numbers a&b if b is not equal to 0 #12

  15. Crossing Numbers and Parameterized Complexity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Pelsmajer; Marcus Schaefer

    2007-01-01

    The odd crossing number of G is the smallest number of pairs of edges that cross an odd number of times in any drawing of G. We show that there always is a drawing realizing the odd crossing number of G that uses at most 9k crossings, where k is the odd crossing number of G. As a consequence of

  16. Elliptic Pseudoprimes Elliptic Carmichael Numbers

    E-print Network

    Silverman, Joseph H.

    Elliptic Pseudoprimes and Elliptic Carmichael Numbers Joseph H. Silverman Brown University AMS January 6, 9:00­9:20am 0 #12;Elliptic Carmichael Numbers 1 Pseudoprimes and Carmichael Numbers Let a 2) There are infinitely many Carmichael numbers. #12;Elliptic Carmichael Numbers 2 Elliptic Pseudoprimes The reason

  17. Conway Numbers and Iteration Theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James D. Louck

    1997-01-01

    Conway (“On Numbers and Games,” Academic Press, New York, 1976) has given an inductive procedure for generating the real numbers that extends in a natural way to a new class of numbers called the surreals. The number 0 is defined at the first step in terms of a pair of empty sets. At step 1, the number 1 and its

  18. Quasar number density evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Stocke, J.T.; Perrenod, S.C.

    1981-04-15

    We present a simple model of quasar number density evolution, based upon the occurrence of quasar-like radio galaxies (i.e., strong optical emission lines and type 2 radio morphology) exclusively in regions of low galaxy and intergalactic medium (IGM) density. This suggests a limit for the IGM density of 10/sup -4plus-or-minus1/ cm/sup -3/ below which quasars are allowed to form and above which they are not allowed. In the recent past (z< or approx. =1), the inferred quasar environments are the outskirts of clusters and near the centers of groups of galaxies. However, models of rich cluster evolution consistent with current X-ray observations predict gas densities <10/sup -4/ cm/sup -3/ in cluster cores in the more distant past (1< or approx. =z< or approx. =5). This suggests that quasars were allowed to form in the cores of rich clusters at those epochs, which explains both the rich absorption spectra of high-redshift quasars and the absence of clusters surrounding quasars at lower redshift. The rapid increase in core gas density of clusters and groups in the recent past decreases the number of available quasar sites with time, although not nearly as rapidly as observed. Thus, our model explains some, but probably not all, of the number density evolution of quasars, requiring additional evolution with is independent of environment. At very high redshifts (z>5) the universe has not expanded sufficiently to allow any quasar formation in our model. Such a cutoff is suggested by recent observations.

  19. By the Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-10

    Learners describe objects in a room using only numbers and shapes. They can measure the object (like a desk) and make a list of facts about it (e.g. 21 inches tall, 42 inches wide, 3 different colors). Then other learners try to identify the objects described. When learners set up a free account at Kinetic City, they can answer bonus questions at the end of the activity as a quick assessment. As a larger assessment, learners can complete the Bug Blaster game after they've completed several activities.

  20. 1.NBT Comparing Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Materials A spinner with the numbers 0, 1, 2, ... 9 A spinner with the decades 00, 10, 20, ... 90 Math journal or teacher-made worksheet Pencil Actions...

  1. Relative Sunspot Number (RSN)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity about assessing magnetic activity on the Sun as astronomers do. Learners will select and compare five visible light solar images and identify and label each individual sunspot group. Then, learners will count all possible sunspots from each group and use both counts in a standard equation to calculate the Relative Sunspot Number for each respective solar image. This activity requires access to the internet to obtain images from the SOHO image archive. This is Activity 8 of the Space Weather Forecast curriculum.

  2. History of Prime Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The School of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of St Andrews, Scotland has developed an extensive collection of articles on the history of mathematics (See also NSDL Scout Report for Math, Engineering, and Technology, June 4, 2004). This article, written by J J O'Connor and E F Robertson, reviews the history of Prime Numbers. The article includes hyperlinks to topics addressed further in other sections of the website. For example, from this website visitors can also find articles on Pythagoras and Euclid.

  3. mass communication advertising &

    E-print Network

    Finzi, Adrien

    mass communication advertising & public relations introduction. Graduate programs in the Department of Mass Communication, Advertising, and Public Relations provide an entry to a wide spectrum of careers the opportunity to create content, campaigns, strategy, and research in public relations, advertising

  4. On Gravity and Mass

    E-print Network

    Athanasios Markou

    2009-03-03

    Motivated mainly by the fact that no charged elementary particles having zero mass have been observed up to now, we investigate the question whether the mass of the elementary particles is connected with their electric charge and whether gravity can be derived from QED. The graviton is considered as a two-photon bound state. A relation between mass and charge of elementary particles is derived. Masses of the light quarks $d$ and $u$ are calculated from the electron mass, assuming that $d$, $u$ and $e$ are all fundamental and not composite. In this picture, the heavier quarks and leptons are considered as not fundamental, the massive neutral gauge bosons (and then their charged partners) are composite. The here calculated $u$ and $d$ quark masses, result in quark-mass ratios which display interesting regularities. The lightest quark mass turns out to be quite small. This may be interesting in connection to the strong CP problem.

  5. Generalized Maxwell Love numbers

    E-print Network

    Giorgio Spada

    2009-11-04

    By elementary methods, I study the Love numbers of a homogeneous, incompressible, self-gravitating sphere characterized by a generalized Maxwell rheology, whose mechanical analogue is represented by a finite or infinite system of classical Maxwell elements disposed in parallel. Analytical, previously unknown forms of the complex shear modulus for the generalized Maxwell body are found by algebraic manipulation, and studied in the particular case of systems of springs and dashpots whose strength follows a power-law distribution. We show that the sphere is asymptotically stable for any choice of the mechanical parameters that define the generalized Maxwell body and analytical forms of the Love numbers are always available for generalized bodies composed by less than five classical Maxwell bodies. For the homogeneous sphere, real Laplace inversion methods based on the Post-Widder formula can be applied without performing a numerical discretization of the n-th derivative, which can be computed in a "closed-form" with the aid of the Faa di Bruno formula.

  6. Rare Copy Number Variants

    PubMed Central

    Grozeva, Detelina; Kirov, George; Ivanov, Dobril; Jones, Ian R.; Jones, Lisa; Green, Elaine K.; St Clair, David M.; Young, Allan H.; Ferrier, Nicol; Farmer, Anne E.; McGuffin, Peter; Holmans, Peter A.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Context Recent studies suggest that copy number variation in the human genome is extensive and may play an important role in susceptibility to disease, including neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. The possible involvement of copy number variants (CNVs) in bipolar disorder has received little attention to date. Objectives To determine whether large (>100 000 base pairs) and rare (found in <1% of the population) CNVs are associated with susceptibility to bipolar disorder and to compare with findings in schizophrenia. Design A genome-wide survey of large, rare CNVs in a case-control sample using a high-density microarray. Setting The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Participants There were 1697 cases of bipolar disorder and 2806 nonpsychiatric controls. All participants were white UK residents. Main Outcome Measures Overall load of CNVs and presence of rare CNVs. Results The burden of CNVs in bipolar disorder was not increased compared with controls and was significantly less than in schizophrenia cases. The CNVs previously implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia were not more common in cases with bipolar disorder. Conclusions Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder differ with respect to CNV burden in general and association with specific CNVs in particular. Our data are consistent with the possibility that possession of large, rare deletions may modify the phenotype in those at risk of psychosis: those possessing such events are more likely to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia, and those without them are more likely to be diagnosed as having bipolar disorder. PMID:20368508

  7. Digital Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Casimir Bamberger; Uwe Renz; Andreas Bamberger

    2011-01-01

    Methods to visualize the two-dimensional (2D) distribution of molecules by mass spectrometric imaging evolve rapidly and yield\\u000a novel applications in biology, medicine, and material surface sciences. Most mass spectrometric imagers acquire high mass\\u000a resolution spectra spot-by-spot and thereby scan the object’s surface. Thus, imaging is slow and image reconstruction remains\\u000a cumbersome. Here we describe an imaging mass spectrometer that exploits

  8. Mass and Heat Recovery 

    E-print Network

    Hindawai, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    uses. Figure (1) showing the mass and heat recovery system (MHRS) layout . This layout can divided to four (4) sections : 1. Mass and heat collection (MHC) . 2. Mass and heat storage unit (MHSU) . 3. Heat recovery unit (HRU) . 4. Mass... recovery unit (MRU) . ESL-IC-10-10-56 Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Kuwait, October 26-28, 2010 - 2 - ESL-IC-10-10-56 Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference for Enhanced...

  9. On Defining Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Though central to any pedagogical development of physics, the concept of mass is still not well understood. Properly defining mass has proven to be far more daunting than contemporary textbooks would have us believe. And yet today the origin of mass is one of the most aggressively pursued areas of research in all of physics. Much of the excitement…

  10. What is Mass Spectrometry?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chiu, Chia M.

    This site from the American Society for Mass Spectrometry includes information about what mass spectometry is and how it is used. It has many useful figures and references to other materials. The material answers questions such as "What is mass spectrometry and what can it do for you?"

  11. Calculating centres of mass

    E-print Network

    Vickers, James

    Calculating centres of mass 15.2 Introduction In this section we show how the idea of integration as the limit of a sum can be used to find the centre of mass of an object such as a thin plate completing this Section you should be able to . . . calculate the position of the centre of mass

  12. Theories of fermion masses

    SciTech Connect

    Bagger, J.; Dimopoulos, S.; Georgi, H.; Raby, S.

    1984-05-01

    We present grand unified theories in which the quark masses and mixing angles are calculated in terms of the lepton masses through simple group theory. The theories contain no small Yukawa couplings. A favored value of the top quark mass is 35 GeV.

  13. Fractional conservation of mass

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen W. Wheatcraft; Mark M. Meerschaert

    2008-01-01

    The traditional conservation of mass equation is derived using a first-order Taylor series to represent flux change in a control volume, which is valid strictly for cases of linear changes in flux through the control volume. We show that using higher-order Taylor series approximations for the mass flux results in mass conservation equations that are intractable. We then show that

  14. Proliferation of Mass Destruction

    E-print Network

    Deutch, John

    Combating Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction Report of the Commission to Assess the Organization of the Federal Government to Combat the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction Pursuant of the Federal Government to Combat the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction. The Commission

  15. ALPHA, Mass Generation and Quantum Information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shantilal Goradia

    2008-01-01

    The generation of Planck energy 10E19 Gev\\/Planck time during the observable age of the universe (10E60 Planck times) would generate 10E79 Gev. 10E79 Gev approximates the energy of the baryon number, implying an increase of the baryon number by 10E19\\/Planck time. What is the source of energy for this mass generation? The ALPHA implicated as negative entropy in [1] must

  16. Number Games, Magnitude Representation, and Basic Number Skills in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyte, Jemma Catherine; Bull, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    The effect of 3 intervention board games (linear number, linear color, and nonlinear number) on young children's (mean age = 3.8 years) counting abilities, number naming, magnitude comprehension, accuracy in number-to-position estimation tasks, and best-fit numerical magnitude representations was examined. Pre- and posttest performance was…

  17. Abstract. Geometry and Complex Numbers GEOMETRY AND COMPLEX NUMBERS

    E-print Network

    Lee, Carl

    Abstract. Geometry and Complex Numbers GEOMETRY AND COMPLEX NUMBERS JERZY DYDAK Contents 1. Introduction 2 2. Solving equations 10 3. Geometric proofs 20 Key words and phrases. Complex numbers. 1 #12-Euclidean, Projective, and Discrete' by Michael Henle (2nd edition, Prentice Hall). (2) `Complex numbers and geometry

  18. Pauli Pascal Pyramids, Pauli Fibonacci Numbers, and Pauli Jacobsthal Numbers

    E-print Network

    Martin Erik Horn

    2007-11-26

    The three anti-commutative two-dimensional Pauli Pascal triangles can be generalized into multi-dimensional Pauli Pascal hyperpyramids. Fibonacci and Jacobsthal numbers are then generalized into Pauli Fibonacci numbers, Pauli Jacobsthal numbers, and Pauli Fibonacci numbers of higher order. And the question is: are Pauli rabbits killer rabbits?

  19. Baryon masses with dynamical twisted mass fermions

    E-print Network

    ETM Collaboration; Constantia Alexandrou; Tomasz Korzec; Giannis Koutsou; Remi Baron; Pierre Guichon; Mariane Brinet; Jaume Carbonell; Vincent Drach; Zhaofeng Liu; Olivier Pène; Carsten Urbach

    2007-10-05

    We present results on the mass of the nucleon and the $\\Delta$ using two dynamical degenerate twisted mass quarks. The evaluation is performed at four quark masses corresponding to a pion mass in the range of 690-300 MeV on lattices of size 2.1 fm and 2.7 fm. We check for cutoff effects by evaluating these baryon masses on lattices of spatial size 2.1 fm with lattice spacings $a(\\beta=3.9)=0.0855(6)$ fm and $a(\\beta=4.05)=0.0666(6)$ fm, determined from the pion sector and find them to be within our statistical errors. Lattice results are extrapolated to the physical limit using continuum chiral perturbation theory. The nucleon mass at the physical point provides a determination of the lattice spacing. Using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory at ${\\cal O}(p^3)$ we find $a(\\beta=3.9)=0.0879(12)$ fm, with a systematic error due to the chiral extrapolation estimated to be about the same as the statistical error. This value of the lattice spacing is in good agreement with the value determined from the pion sector. We check for isospin breaking in the $\\Delta$-system. We find that $\\Delta^{++,-}$ and $\\Delta^{+,0}$ are almost degenerate pointing to small flavor violating effects.

  20. CONSTRAINTS ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STELLAR MASS AND HALO MASS AT LOW AND HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Maulbetsch, Christian; Van den Bosch, Frank C.; Maccio, Andrea V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig, E-mail: moster@mpia.d, E-mail: maulbets@mpia.d, E-mail: vdbosch@mpia.d, E-mail: maccio@mpia.d, E-mail: somerville@stsci.ed, E-mail: naab@usm.lmu.d, E-mail: oser@usm.lmu.d [Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen, Scheinerstr. 1, 81679 Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-02-20

    We use a statistical approach to determine the relationship between the stellar masses of galaxies and the masses of the dark matter halos in which they reside. We obtain a parameterized stellar-to-halo mass (SHM) relation by populating halos and subhalos in an N-body simulation with galaxies and requiring that the observed stellar mass function be reproduced. We find good agreement with constraints from galaxy-galaxy lensing and predictions of semi-analytic models. Using this mapping, and the positions of the halos and subhalos obtained from the simulation, we find that our model predictions for the galaxy two-point correlation function (CF) as a function of stellar mass are in excellent agreement with the observed clustering properties in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at z = 0. We show that the clustering data do not provide additional strong constraints on the SHM function and conclude that our model can therefore predict clustering as a function of stellar mass. We compute the conditional mass function, which yields the average number of galaxies with stellar masses in the range m +- dm/2 that reside in a halo of mass M. We study the redshift dependence of the SHM relation and show that, for low-mass halos, the SHM ratio is lower at higher redshift. The derived SHM relation is used to predict the stellar mass dependent galaxy CF and bias at high redshift. Our model predicts that not only are massive galaxies more biased than low-mass galaxies at all redshifts, but also the bias increases more rapidly with increasing redshift for massive galaxies than for low-mass ones. We present convenient fitting functions for the SHM relation as a function of redshift, the conditional mass function, and the bias as a function of stellar mass and redshift.

  1. Generalized Lucas Numbers and Relations with Generalized Fibonacci Numbers

    E-print Network

    Kaygisiz, Kenan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new generalization of the Lucas numbers by matrix representation using Genaralized Lucas Polynomials. We give some properties of this new generalization and some relations between the generalized order-k Lucas numbers and generalized order-k Fibonacci numbers. In addition, we obtain Binet formula and combinatorial representation for generalized order-k Lucas numbers by using properties of generalized Fibonacci numbers.

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Pm-147 (Promethium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Pm-147 (Promethium, atomic number Z = 61, mass number A = 147).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for U-233 (Uranium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope U-233 (Uranium, atomic number Z = 92, mass number A = 233).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-254 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-254 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 254).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-322 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-322 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 322).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-273 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-273 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 273).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-257 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-257 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 257).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-253 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-253 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 253).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-295 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-295 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 295).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-323 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-323 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 323).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-282 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-282 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 282).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-331 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-331 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 331).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-332 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-332 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 332).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-242 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-242 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 242).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-284 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-284 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 284).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-279 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-279 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 279).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-272 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-272 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 272).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-324 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-324 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 324).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-276 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-276 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 276).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-251 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-251 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 251).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-283 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-283 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 283).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-320 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-320 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 320).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-311 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-311 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 311).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-261 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-261 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 261).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-243 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-243 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 243).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-240 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-240 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 240).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-244 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-244 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 244).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-312 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-312 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 312).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-306 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-306 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 306).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-301 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-301 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 301).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-259 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-259 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 259).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-316 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-316 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 316).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-263 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-263 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 263).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-270 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-270 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 270).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-299 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-299 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 299).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-308 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-308 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 308).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-265 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-265 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 265).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-280 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-280 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 280).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-260 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-260 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 260).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-248 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-248 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 248).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-328 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-328 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 328).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-274 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-274 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 274).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-297 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-297 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 297).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-281 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-281 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 281).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-292 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-292 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 292).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-315 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-315 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 315).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-241 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-241 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 241).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-271 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-271 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 271).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-258 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-258 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 258).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-326 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-326 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 326).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-252 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-252 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 252).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-247 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-247 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 247).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-267 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-267 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 267).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-329 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-329 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 329).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-277 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-277 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 277).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-269 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-269 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 269).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-302 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-302 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 302).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-304 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-304 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 304).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-321 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-321 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 321).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-291 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-291 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 291).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-314 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-314 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 314).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-262 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-262 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 262).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-298 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-298 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 298).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-307 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-307 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 307).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-325 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-325 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 325).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-309 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-309 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 309).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-327 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-327 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 327).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-246 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-246 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 246).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-317 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-317 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 317).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-268 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-268 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 268).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-249 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-249 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 249).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-303 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-303 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 303).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-305 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-305 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 305).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-300 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-300 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 300).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-293 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-293 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 293).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-285 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-285 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 285).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-275 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-275 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 275).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-255 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-255 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 255).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-294 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-294 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 294).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-319 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-319 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 319).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-245 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-245 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 245).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-286 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-286 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 286).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-310 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-310 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 310).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-266 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-266 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 266).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-289 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-289 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 289).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-313 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-313 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 313).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-256 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-256 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 256).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-288 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-288 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 288).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-318 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-318 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 318).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-296 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-296 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 296).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-290 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-290 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 290).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-278 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-278 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 278).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-330 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-330 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 330).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-250 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-250 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 250).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-287 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-287 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 287).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-264 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-264 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 264).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-287 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-287 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 287).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-294 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-294 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 294).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-222 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-222 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 222).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-265 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-265 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 265).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-286 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-286 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 286).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-262 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-262 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 262).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-218 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-218 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 218).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-220 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-220 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 220).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-271 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-271 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 271).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-251 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-251 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 251).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-270 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-270 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 270).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-289 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-289 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 289).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-258 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-258 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 258).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-237 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-237 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 237).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-288 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-288 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 288).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-249 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-249 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 249).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-230 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-230 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 230).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-276 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-276 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 276).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-273 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-273 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 273).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-282 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-282 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 282).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-281 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-281 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 281).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-225 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-225 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 225).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-257 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-257 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 257).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-223 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-223 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 223).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-250 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-250 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 250).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-233 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-233 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 233).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-245 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-245 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 245).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-278 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-278 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 278).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-231 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-231 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 231).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-239 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-239 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 239).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-234 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-234 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 234).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-279 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-279 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 279).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-227 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-227 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 227).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-284 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-284 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 284).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-256 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-256 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 256).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-285 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-285 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 285).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-269 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-269 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 269).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-295 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-295 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 295).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-226 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-226 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 226).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-242 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-242 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 242).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-266 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-266 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 266).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-236 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-236 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 236).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-232 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-232 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 232).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-238 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-238 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 238).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-267 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-267 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 267).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-291 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-291 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 291).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-228 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-228 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 228).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-277 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-277 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 277).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-221 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-221 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 221).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-241 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-241 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 241).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-263 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-263 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 263).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-248 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-248 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 248).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-283 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-283 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 283).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-240 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-240 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 240).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-253 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-253 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 253).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-243 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-243 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 243).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-255 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-255 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 255).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-235 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-235 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 235).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-275 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-275 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 275).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-254 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-254 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 254).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-272 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-272 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 272).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-293 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-293 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 293).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-219 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-219 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 219).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-268 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-268 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 268).