Science.gov

Sample records for mass properties engineering

  1. E-Standards For Mass Properties Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerro, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    A proposal is put forth to promote the concept of a Society of Allied Weight Engineers developed voluntary consensus standard for mass properties engineering. This standard would be an e-standard, and would encompass data, data manipulation, and reporting functionality. The standard would be implemented via an open-source SAWE distribution site with full SAWE member body access. Engineering societies and global standards initiatives are progressing toward modern engineering standards, which become functioning deliverable data sets. These data sets, if properly standardized, will integrate easily between supplier and customer enabling technically precise mass properties data exchange. The concepts of object-oriented programming support all of these requirements, and the use of a JavaTx based open-source development initiative is proposed. Results are reported for activity sponsored by the NASA Langley Research Center Innovation Institute to scope out requirements for developing a mass properties engineering e-standard. An initial software distribution is proposed. Upon completion, an open-source application programming interface will be available to SAWE members for the development of more specific programming requirements that are tailored to company and project requirements. A fully functioning application programming interface will permit code extension via company proprietary techniques, as well as through continued open-source initiatives.

  2. New Mass Properties Engineers Aerospace Ballasting Challenge Facilitated by the SAWE Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutright, Amanda; Shaughnessy, Brendan

    2010-01-01

    The discipline of Mass Properties Engineering tends to find the engineers; not typically vice versa. In this case, two engineers quickly found their new responsibilities deep in many aspects of mass properties engineering and required to meet technical challenges in a fast paced environment. As part of NASA's Constellation Program, a series of flight tests will be conducted to evaluate components of the new spacecraft launch vehicles. One of these tests is the Pad Abort 1 (PA-1) flight test which will test the Launch Abort System (LAS), a system designed to provide escape for astronauts in the event of an emergency. The Flight Test Articles (FTA) used in this flight test are required to match mass properties corresponding to the operational vehicle, which has a continually evolving design. Additionally, since the structure and subsystems for the Orion Crew Module (CM) FTA are simplified versions of the final product, thousands of pounds of ballast are necessary to achieve the desired mass properties. These new mass properties engineers are responsible for many mass properties aspects in support of the flight test, including meeting the ballasting challenge for the CM Boilerplate FTA. SAWE expert and experienced mass properties engineers, both those that are directly on the team and many that supported via a variety of Society venues, significantly contributed to facilitating the success of addressing this particular mass properties ballasting challenge, in addition to many other challenges along the way. This paper discusses the details regarding the technical aspects of this particular mass properties challenge, as well as identifies recommendations for new mass properties engineers that were learned from the SAWE community along the way.

  3. Mass drivers. 3: Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, W.; Bowen, S.; Cohen, S.; Fine, K.; Kaplan, D.; Kolm, M.; Kolm, H.; Newman, J.; Oneill, G. K.; Snow, W.

    1979-01-01

    The last of a series of three papers by the Mass-Driver Group of the 1977 Ames Summer Study is presented. It develops the engineering principles required to implement the basic mass-driver. Optimum component mass trade-offs are derived from a set of four input parameters, and the program used to design a lunar launcher. The mass optimization procedures is then incorporated into a more comprehensive mission optimization program called OPT-4, which evaluates an optimized mass-driver reaction engine and its performance in a range of specified missions. Finally, this paper discusses, to the extent that time permitted, certain peripheral problems: heating effects in buckets due to magnetic field ripple; an approximate derivation of guide force profiles; the mechanics of inserting and releasing payloads; the reaction mass orbits; and a proposed research and development plan for implementing mass drivers.

  4. Ballistics/mass properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drendel, Albert S.; Richards, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    The propulsion performance and reconstructed mass properties data from Morton Thiokol's RSRM-4 motors, which were assigned to the STS-30R launch, are presented. The composite type solid propellant burn rates were close to predicted. The performance of the pair of motors were compared to some CEI Specification CPW1-3600 for compliance. Some aspects of the CEI Specification could not be compared because of low sampling of data. The performance of the motors were well within the CEI specification requirements. Post flight reconstructured RSRM mass properties are within expected values for the RSRM quarterweight and halfweight configurations.

  5. Engineering correlations of variable-property effects on laminar forced convection mass transfer for dilute vapor species and small particles in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A simple engineering correlation scheme is developed to predict the variable property effects on dilute species laminar forced convection mass transfer applicable to all vapor molecules or Brownian diffusing small particle, covering the surface to mainstream temperature ratio of 0.25 T sub W/T sub e 4. The accuracy of the correlation is checked against rigorous numerical forced convection laminar boundary layer calculations of flat plate and stagnation point flows of air containing trace species of Na, NaCl, NaOH, Na2SO4, K, KCl, KOH, or K2SO4 vapor species or their clusters. For the cases reported here the correlation had an average absolute error of only 1 percent (maximum 13 percent) as compared to an average absolute error of 18 percent (maximum 54 percent) one would have made by using the constant-property results.

  6. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  7. ACTOMP - AUTOCAD TO MASS PROPERTIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A.

    1994-01-01

    AutoCAD to Mass Properties was developed to facilitate quick mass properties calculations of structures having many simple elements in a complex configuration such as trusses or metal sheet containers. Calculating the mass properties of structures of this type can be a tedious and repetitive process, but ACTOMP helps automate the calculations. The structure can be modelled in AutoCAD or a compatible CAD system in a matter of minutes using the 3-Dimensional elements. This model provides all the geometric data necessary to make a mass properties calculation of the structure. ACTOMP reads the geometric data of a drawing from the Drawing Interchange File (DXF) used in AutoCAD. The geometric entities recognized by ACTOMP include POINTs, 3DLINEs, and 3DFACEs. ACTOMP requests mass, linear density, or area density of the elements for each layer, sums all the elements and calculates the total mass, center of mass (CM) and the mass moments of inertia (MOI). AutoCAD utilizes layers to define separate drawing planes. ACTOMP uses layers to differentiate between multiple types of similar elements. For example if a structure is made of various types of beams, modeled as 3DLINEs, each with a different linear density, the beams can be grouped by linear density and each group placed on a separate layer. The program will request the linear density of 3DLINEs for each new layer it finds as it processes the drawing information. The same is true with POINTs and 3DFACEs. By using layers this way a very complex model can be created. POINTs are used for point masses such as bolts, small machine parts, or small electronic boxes. 3DLINEs are used for beams, bars, rods, cables, and other similarly slender elements. 3DFACEs are used for planar elements. 3DFACEs may be created as 3 or 4 Point faces. Some examples of elements that might be modelled using 3DFACEs are plates, sheet metal, fabric, boxes, large diameter hollow cylinders and evenly distributed masses. ACTOMP was written in Microsoft

  8. NERVA mass properties computer methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, I. K.

    1972-01-01

    The computer codes are presented that were used for the weight, center of gravity, and mass moment of inertia calculations and documentation for the NERVA. The two programs, E15301 and 12001B, are the basic tools used for weights work on the NERVA program. Used in conjunction with one another, they allow for rapid weights estimates for new concepts or changes while allowing for orderly documentation, which is a necessity in any effective weights effort. Program E15301 requires that each component be resolved into a collection of standard shapes. Separate subroutines then process geometric and material density data for each entry. The master program the performs all calculations necessary to combine these results into a total weight, center of gravity, and moment of inertia for the component. Program 12001B accepts previously calculated weight and center of gravity data for individual components. The program sums weights and calculates center of gravities and moments of inertia for systems of up to four levels of assemblies. The output identifies the engine parts in a format usable directly in a formal report.

  9. Computing Mass Properties From AutoCAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A.

    1990-01-01

    Mass properties of structures computed from data in drawings. AutoCAD to Mass Properties (ACTOMP) computer program developed to facilitate quick calculations of mass properties of structures containing many simple elements in such complex configurations as trusses or sheet-metal containers. Mathematically modeled in AutoCAD or compatible computer-aided design (CAD) system in minutes by use of three-dimensional elements. Written in Microsoft Quick-Basic (Version 2.0).

  10. Modeling the effect of engine assembly mass on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Feng; Stodolsky, Frank

    An analytical model is developed to estimate the impact of reducing engine assembly mass (the term engine assembly refers to the moving components of the engine system, including crankshafts, valve train, pistons, and connecting rods) on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy. The relative changes in frictional mean effective pressure and fuel economy are proportional to the relative change in assembly mass. These changes increase rapidly as engine speed increases. Based on the model, a 25% reduction in engine assembly mass results in a 2% fuel economy improvement for a typical mid-size passenger car over the EPA Urban and Highway Driving Cycles.

  11. Dynamic property studies of Sterling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tani, Y.; Seibara, M.; Takenai, K.; Yamaguchi, W.

    1984-01-01

    A description is given of the results of dynamic property tests that were carried out using a trial produced prototype of a 50 KW Sterling engine. The features of the engine are shown graphically. A high thermal efficiency is found in the low rotation region.

  12. Engineering optical properties of semiconductor metafilm superabsorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2016-04-01

    Light absorption in ultrathin layer of semiconductor has been considerable interests for many years due to its potential applications in various optical devices. In particular, there have been great efforts to engineer the optical properties of the film for the control of absorption spectrums. Whereas the isotropic thin films have intrinsic optical properties that are fixed by materials' properties, metafilm that are composed by deep subwavelength nano-building blocks provides significant flexibilities in controlling the optical properties of the designed effective layers. Here, we present the ultrathin semiconductor metafilm absorbers by arranging germanium (Ge) nanobeams in deep subwavelength scale. Resonant properties of high index semiconductor nanobeams play a key role in designing effective optical properties of the film. We demonstrate this in theory and experimental measurements to build a designing rule of efficient, controllable metafilm absorbers. The proposed strategy of engineering optical properties could open up wide range of applications from ultrathin photodetection and solar energy harvesting to the diverse flexible optoelectronics.

  13. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  14. MASPROP- MASS PROPERTIES OF A RIGID STRUCTURE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    The computer program MASPROP was developed to rapidly calculate the mass properties of complex rigid structural systems. This program's basic premise is that complex systems can be adequately described by a combination of basic elementary structural shapes. Thirteen widely used basic structural shapes are available in this program. They are as follows: Discrete Mass, Cylinder, Truncated Cone, Torus, Beam (arbitrary cross section), Circular Rod (arbitrary cross section), Spherical Segment, Sphere, Hemisphere, Parallelepiped, Swept Trapezoidal Panel, Symmetric Trapezoidal Panels, and a Curved Rectangular Panel. MASPROP provides a designer with a simple technique that requires minimal input to calculate the mass properties of a complex rigid structure and should be useful in any situation where one needs to calculate the center of gravity and moments of inertia of a complex structure. Rigid body analysis is used to calculate mass properties. Mass properties are calculated about component axes that have been rotated to be parallel to the system coordinate axes. Then the system center of gravity is calculated and the mass properties are transferred to axes through the system center of gravity by using the parallel axis theorem. System weight, moments of inertia about the system origin, and the products of inertia about the system center of mass are calculated and printed. From the information about the system center of mass the principal axes of the system and the moments of inertia about them are calculated and printed. The only input required is simple geometric data describing the size and location of each element and the respective material density or weight of each element. This program is written in FORTRAN for execution on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 62K (octal) of 60 bit words. The development of this program was completed in 1978.

  15. Evaluating word semantic properties using Sketch Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoykova, Velislava; Simkova, Maria

    2015-02-01

    The paper describes approach to use statistically-based tools incorporated into Sketch Engine system for electronic text corpora processing to mining big textual data for search and extract word semantic properties. It presents and compares series of word search experiments using different statistical approaches and evaluates results for Bulgarian language EUROPARL 7 Corpus search to extract word semantic properties. Finally, the methodology is extended for multilingual application using Slovak language EUROPARL 7 Corpus.

  16. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  17. Engineered Proteins: Redox Properties and Their Applications

    PubMed Central

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Tian, Hui; Wang, Xiaotang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Oxidoreductases and metalloproteins, representing more than one third of all known proteins, serve as significant catalysts for numerous biological processes that involve electron transfers such as photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, and molecular signaling. The functional properties of the oxidoreductases/metalloproteins are determined by the nature of their redox centers. Protein engineering is a powerful approach that is used to incorporate biological and abiological redox cofactors as well as novel enzymes and redox proteins with predictable structures and desirable functions for important biological and chemical applications. The methods of protein engineering, mainly rational design, directed evolution, protein surface modifications, and domain shuffling, have allowed the creation and study of a number of redox proteins. This review presents a selection of engineered redox proteins achieved through these methods, resulting in a manipulation in redox potentials, an increase in electron-transfer efficiency, and an expansion of native proteins by de novo design. Such engineered/modified redox proteins with desired properties have led to a broad spectrum of practical applications, ranging from biosensors, biofuel cells, to pharmaceuticals and hybrid catalysis. Glucose biosensors are one of the most successful products in enzyme electrochemistry, with reconstituted glucose oxidase achieving effective electrical communication with the sensor electrode; direct electron-transfer-type biofuel cells are developed to avoid thermodynamic loss and mediator leakage; and fusion proteins of P450s and redox partners make the biocatalytic generation of drug metabolites possible. In summary, this review includes the properties and applications of the engineered redox proteins as well as their significance and great potential in the exploration of bioelectrochemical sensing devices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1796–1822. PMID:22435347

  18. Engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Sofi, M.; Deventer, J.S.J. van . E-mail: jannie@unimelb.edu.au; Mendis, P.A. . E-mail: pamendis@unimelb.edu.au; Lukey, G.C.

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents the engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs) with a compressive strength of 50 MPa. The study includes a determination of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, compressive strength, and the splitting tensile strength and flexural strength of IPCs, formulated using three different sources of Class-F fly ash. Six IPC mix designs were adopted to evaluate the effects of the inclusion of coarse aggregates and granulated blast furnace slag into the mixes. A total of 90 cylindrical and 24 small beam specimens were investigated, and all tests were carried out pursuant to the relevant Australian Standards. Although some variability between the mixes was observed, the results show that, in most cases, the engineering properties of IPCs compare favorably to those predicted by the relevant Australian Standards for concrete mixtures.

  19. Model-Based Systems Engineering Approach to Managing Mass Margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Seung H.; Bayer, Todd J.; Cole, Bjorn; Cooke, Brian; Dekens, Frank; Delp, Christopher; Lam, Doris

    2012-01-01

    When designing a flight system from concept through implementation, one of the fundamental systems engineering tasks ismanaging the mass margin and a mass equipment list (MEL) of the flight system. While generating a MEL and computing a mass margin is conceptually a trivial task, maintaining consistent and correct MELs and mass margins can be challenging due to the current practices of maintaining duplicate information in various forms, such as diagrams and tables, and in various media, such as files and emails. We have overcome this challenge through a model-based systems engineering (MBSE) approach within which we allow only a single-source-of-truth. In this paper we describe the modeling patternsused to capture the single-source-of-truth and the views that have been developed for the Europa Habitability Mission (EHM) project, a mission concept study, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  20. Engineering electrical properties of graphene: chemical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Yuna; Novoselov, Konstantin; Hong, Byung Hee

    2015-12-01

    To ensure the high performance of graphene-based devices, it is necessary to engineer the electrical properties of graphene with enhanced conductivity, controlled work function, opened or closed bandgaps, etc. This can be performed by various non-covalent chemical approaches, including molecular adsorption, substrate-induced doping, polymerization on graphene, deposition of metallic thin films or nanoparticles, etc. In addition, covalent approaches such as the substitution of carbon atoms with boron or nitrogen and the functionalization with hydrogen or fluorine are useful to tune the bandgaps more efficiently, with better uniformity and stability. In this review, representative examples of chemically engineered graphene and its device applications will be reviewed, and remaining challenges will be discussed.

  1. Variability in properties of Salado Mass Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Harrington, P.T.; Hansen, F.D.

    1995-08-01

    Salado Mass Concrete (SMC) has been developed for use as a seal component in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This concrete is intended to be mixed from pre-bagged materials, have an initial slump of 10 in., and remain pumpable and placeable for two hours after mixing. It is a mass concrete because it will be placed in monoliths large enough that the heat generated during cement hydration has the potential to cause thermal expansion and subsequent cracking, a phenomenon to avoid in the seal system. This report describes effects on concrete properties of changes in ratio of water to cement, batch size, and variations in characteristics of different lots of individual components of the concrete. The research demonstrates that the concrete can be prepared from laboratory-batched or pre-bagged dry materials in batches from 1.5 ft{sup 3} to 5.0 yd{sup 3}, with no chemical admixtures other than the sodium chloride added to improve bonding with the host rock, at a water-to-cement ratio ranging from 0.36 to 0.42. All batches prepared according to established procedures had adequate workability for at least 1.5 hours, and achieved or exceeded the target compressive strength of 4500 psi at 180 days after casting. Portland cement and fly ash from different lots or sources did not have a measurable effect on concrete properties, but variations in a shrinkage-compensating cement used as a component of the concrete did appear to affect workability. A low initial temperature and the water-reducing and set-retarding functions of the salt are critical to meeting target properties.

  2. Design properties of hydrogel tissue-engineering scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Junmin; Marchant, Roger E

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the recent progress in the design and synthesis of hydrogels as tissue-engineering scaffolds. Hydrogels are attractive scaffolding materials owing to their highly swollen network structure, ability to encapsulate cells and bioactive molecules, and efficient mass transfer. Various polymers, including natural, synthetic and natural/synthetic hybrid polymers, have been used to make hydrogels via chemical or physical crosslinking. Recently, bioactive synthetic hydrogels have emerged as promising scaffolds because they can provide molecularly tailored biofunctions and adjustable mechanical properties, as well as an extracellular matrix-like microenvironment for cell growth and tissue formation. This article addresses various strategies that have been explored to design synthetic hydrogels with extracellular matrix-mimetic bioactive properties, such as cell adhesion, proteolytic degradation and growth factor-binding. PMID:22026626

  3. Mass Properties for Space Systems Standards Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beech, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Current Verbiage in S-120 Applies to Dry Mass. Mass Margin is difference between Required Mass and Predicted Mass. Performance Margin is difference between Predicted Performance and Required Performance. Performance estimates and corresponding margin should be based on Predicted Mass (and other inputs). Contractor Mass Margin reserved from Performance Margin. Remaining performance margin allocated according to mass partials. Compliance can be evaluated effectively by comparison of three areas (preferably on a single sheet). Basic and Predicted Mass (including historical trend). Aggregate potential changes (threats and opportunities) which gives Mass Forecast. Mass Maturity by category (Estimated/Calculated/Actual).

  4. NASA Dryden: Flight Loads Lab Capabilities and Mass Properties Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, David Michael; Bakalyar, John A.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation covers the basic capabilities of the Dryden Flight Loads Lab. It also covers in detail the mass properties capabilities of the loads lab, focusing on the recent mass properties testing of the X-48B, and the recent tests of the Dynamic Inertia Measurement method (DIMM). Presentation focuses on the test methods and issues discovered during the mass properties testing of the X-48B leading to the requirement of new instrumentation on all conventional mass properties testing. Presentation also focuses on development of DIMM for replacement of conventional mass properties tests.

  5. Genetic Engineering of Optical Properties of Biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul; Naviaux, Robert; Yaffe, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Baker's yeast cells are easily cultured and can be manipulated genetically to produce large numbers of bioparticles (cells and mitochondria) with controllable size and optical properties. We have recently employed nanolaser spectroscopy to study the refractive index of individual cells and isolated mitochondria from two mutant strains. Results show that biomolecular changes induced by mutation can produce bioparticles with radical changes in refractive index. Wild-type mitochondria exhibit a distribution with a well-defined mean and small variance. In striking contrast, mitochondria from one mutant strain produced a histogram that is highly collapsed with a ten-fold decrease in the mean and standard deviation. In a second mutant strain we observed an opposite effect with the mean nearly unchanged but the variance increased nearly a thousand-fold. Both histograms could be self-consistently modeled with a single, log-normal distribution. The strains were further examined by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis to measure changes in protein composition. All of these data show that genetic manipulation of cells represents a new approach to engineering optical properties of bioparticles.

  6. Climate engineering by manipulation of cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristjansson, J. E.; Alterskjær, K.; Storelvmo, T.; Muri, H.; Pfeffer, M. A.; Niemeier, U.; Schmidt, H.

    2012-12-01

    following questions, among others: 1) What is the relative role of the direct and indirect forcing in the case of sea salt injections? 2) How does the climate effect of sea salt injections depend on injected particle size and mass? 3) In what geographical regions should sea salt injections be carried out for maximum global impact? 4) In the case of IN injections into cirrus formation regions, how do the results depend on injection rates? 5) What happens in the transient simulations when climate engineering is switched off ('termination effect')? Finally, we will discuss the limitations of current model studies and suggest directions for future research.

  7. Property-Based Software Engineering Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briand, Lionel C.; Morasca, Sandro; Basili, Victor R.

    1997-01-01

    Little theory exists in the field of software system measurement. Concepts such as complexity, coupling, cohesion or even size are very often subject to interpretation and appear to have inconsistent definitions in the literature. As a consequence, there is little guidance provided to the analyst attempting to define proper measures for specific problems. Many controversies in the literature are simply misunderstandings and stem from the fact that some people talk about different measurement concepts under the same label (complexity is the most common case). There is a need to define unambiguously the most important measurement concepts used in the measurement of software products. One way of doing so is to define precisely what mathematical properties characterize these concepts, regardless of the specific software artifacts to which these concepts are applied. Such a mathematical framework could generate a consensus in the software engineering community and provide a means for better communication among researchers, better guidelines for analysts, and better evaluation methods for commercial static analyzers for practitioners. In this paper, we propose a mathematical framework which is generic, because it is not specific to any particular software artifact and rigorous, because it is based on precise mathematical concepts. We use this framework to propose definitions of several important measurement concepts (size, length, complexity, cohesion, coupling). It does not intend to be complete or fully objective; other frameworks could have been proposed and different choices could have been made. However, we believe that the formalisms and properties we introduce are convenient and intuitive. This framework contributes constructively to a firmer theoretical ground of software measurement.

  8. Property-Based Software Engineering Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briand, Lionel; Morasca, Sandro; Basili, Victor R.

    1995-01-01

    Little theory exists in the field of software system measurement. Concepts such as complexity, coupling, cohesion or even size are very often subject to interpretation and appear to have inconsistent definitions in the literature. As a consequence, there is little guidance provided to the analyst attempting to define proper measures for specific problems. Many controversies in the literature are simply misunderstandings and stem from the fact that some people talk about different measurement concepts under the same label (complexity is the most common case). There is a need to define unambiguously the most important measurement concepts used in the measurement of software products. One way of doing so is to define precisely what mathematical properties characterize these concepts regardless of the specific software artifacts to which these concepts are applied. Such a mathematical framework could generate a consensus in the software engineering community and provide a means for better communication among researchers, better guidelines for analysis, and better evaluation methods for commercial static analyzers for practitioners. In this paper, we propose a mathematical framework which is generic, because it is not specific to any particular software artifact, and rigorous, because it is based on precise mathematical concepts. This framework defines several important measurement concepts (size, length, complexity, cohesion, coupling). It is not intended to be complete or fully objective; other frameworks could have been proposed and different choices could have been made. However, we believe that the formalism and properties we introduce are convenient and intuitive. In addition, we have reviewed the literature on this subject and compared it with our work. This framework contributes constructively to a firmer theoretical ground of software measurement.

  9. Does UV irradiation affect polymer properties relevant to tissue engineering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischbach, Claudia; Tessmar, Jörg; Lucke, Andrea; Schnell, Edith; Schmeer, Georg; Blunk, Torsten; Göpferich, Achim

    2001-10-01

    For most tissue engineering approaches aiming at the repair or generation of living tissues the interaction of cells and polymeric biomaterials is of paramount importance. Prior to contact with cells or tissues, biomaterials have to be sterilized. However, many sterilization procedures such as steam autoclave or heat sterilization are known to strongly affect polymer properties. UV irradiation is used as an alternative sterilization method in many tissue engineering laboratories on a routine basis, however, potential alterations of polymer properties have not been extensively considered. In this study we investigated the effects of UV irradiation on spin-cast films made from biodegradable poly( D, L-lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)-monomethyl ether diblock copolymers (Me.PEG-PLA) which have recently been developed for controlled cell-biomaterial interaction. After 2 h of UV irradiation, which is sufficient for sterilization, no alterations in cell adhesion to polymer films were detected, as demonstrated with 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. This correlated with unchanged film topography and molecular weight distribution. However, extended UV irradiation for 5-24 h elicited drastic responses regarding Me.PEG-PLA polymer properties and interactions with biological elements: Large increases in unspecific protein adsorption and subsequent cell adhesion were observed. Changes in polymer surface properties could be correlated with the observed alterations in cell/protein-polymer interactions. Atomic force microscopy analysis of polymer films revealed a marked "smoothing" of the polymer surface after UV irradiation. Investigations using GPC, 1H-NMR, mass spectrometry, and a PEG-specific colorimetric assay demonstrated that polymer film composition was time-dependently affected by exposure to UV irradiation, i.e., that large amounts of PEG were lost from the copolymer surface. The data indicate that sterilization using UV irradiation for 2 h is an appropriate technique for the

  10. Strain engineering band gap, effective mass and anisotropic Dirac-like cone in monolayer arsenene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can; Xia, Qinglin; Nie, Yaozhuang; Rahman, Mavlanjan; Guo, Guanghua

    2016-03-01

    The electronic properties of two-dimensional puckered arsenene have been investigated using first-principles calculations. The effective mass of electrons exhibits highly anisotropic dispersion in intrinsic puckered arsenene. Futhermore, we find that out-of-plane strain is effective in tuning the band gap, as the material undergoes the transition into a metal from an indirect gap semiconductor. Remarkably, we observe the emergence of Dirac-like cone with in-plane strain. Strain modulates not only the band gap of monolayer arsenene, but also the effective mass. Our results present possibilities for engineering the electronic properties of two-dimensional puckered arsenene and pave a way for tuning carrier mobility of future electronic devices.

  11. Common Lunar Lander (CLL) Conceptual Design and Mass Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Shelby

    1991-01-01

    The conceptual design and mass properties are presented for the CLL in viewgraph format. The spacecraft structural mass is given for orbital assembly, thermal insulation, integrated propulsion, power generation, avionics, environment control, and pyrotechnics and landing system. The mass is given of the lander as well as the transfer stage.

  12. SCALING PROPERTIES OF THE TRANSVERSE MASS SPECTRA.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHAFFNER-BIELICH,J.; KHARZEEV,D.; MCLERRAN,L.; VENUGOPALAN,R.

    2002-01-13

    Motivated from the formation of an initial state of gluon-saturated matter, we discuss scaling relations for the transverse mass spectra at BNL's Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). We show on linear plots, that the transverse mass spectra for various hadrons can be described by an universal function in m{sub t}. The transverse mass spectra for different centralities can be rescaled into each other. Finally, we demonstrate that m{sub t}-scaling is also present in proton-antiproton collider data and compare it to m{sub t}-scaling at RHIC.

  13. Textile Processes for Engineering Tissues with Biomimetic Architectures and Properties.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Afsoon; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tamayol, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Textile technologies in which fibers containing biological factors and cells are formed and assembled into constructs with biomimetic properties have attracted significant attention in the field of tissue engineering. This Forum article highlights the most prominent advances of the field in the areas of fiber fabrication and construct engineering. PMID:27499277

  14. Lunar surface engineering properties experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. K.; Goodman, R. E.; Hurlbut, F. C.; Houston, W. N.; Willis, D. R.; Witherspoon, P. A.; Hovland, H. J.

    1971-01-01

    Research on the mechanics of lunar soils and on developing probes to determine the properties of lunar surface materials is summarized. The areas of investigation include the following: soil simulation, soil property determination using an impact penetrometer, soil stabilization using urethane foam or phenolic resin, effects of rolling boulders down lunar slopes, design of borehole jack and its use in determining failure mechanisms and properties of rocks, and development of a permeability probe for measuring fluid flow through porous lunar surface materials.

  15. Mass properties survey of solar array technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, Robert

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the technologies, electrical performance, and mass characteristics of many of the presently available and the more advanced developmental space solar array technologies is presented. Qualitative trends and quantitative mass estimates as total array output power is increased from 1 kW to 5 kW at End of Life (EOL) from a single wing are shown. The array technologies are part of a database supporting an ongoing solar power subsystem model development for top level subsystem and technology analyses. The model is used to estimate the overall electrical and thermal performance of the complete subsystem, and then calculate the mass and volume of the array, batteries, power management, and thermal control elements as an initial sizing. The array types considered here include planar rigid panel designs, flexible and rigid fold-out planar arrays, and two concentrator designs, one with one critical axis and the other with two critical axes. Solar cell technologies of Si, GaAs, and InP were included in the analyses. Comparisons were made at the array level; hinges, booms, harnesses, support structures, power transfer, and launch retention mountings were included. It is important to note that the results presented are approximations, and in some cases revised or modified performance and mass estimates of specific designs.

  16. 'Food for Engineers': Intellectual Property Education for Innovators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soetendorp, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Intellectual property competence can assist individuals and organizations to capitalize on opportunities presented by accelerating developments in the knowledge economy. Engineers translate ideas into concrete solutions, which are frequently useful and commercially valuable, if the intrinsic intellectual property has been identified and protected.…

  17. Users guide for the shuttle mass properties automated system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamil, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    A set of programs developed for use on the JSC Univac 1100 series computers and designed to automate the collection and processing of data into the mass properties section of the shuttle operational data book is described.

  18. IMP: Interactive mass properties program. Volume 1: Program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    A method of computing a weights and center of gravity analysis of a flight vehicle using interactive graphical capabilities of the Adage 340 computer is described. The equations used to calculate area, volume, and mass properties are based on elemental surface characteristics. The input/output methods employ the graphic support of the Adage computer. Several interactive program options are available for analyzing the mass properties of a vehicle. These options are explained.

  19. Mass properties measurement system: Dynamics and statics measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents and interprets experimental data obtained from the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS). Statics measurements yield the center-of-gravity of an unknown mass and dynamics measurements yield its inertia matrix. Observations of the MPMS performance has lead us to specific design criteria and an understanding of MPMS limitations.

  20. Innovative mechanism for measuring the mass properties of an object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolcott, Kedron R.; Graham, Todd A.; Doty, Keith L.

    1994-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Robotics Group recently completed development and testing on a novel approach to measure the mass properties of a rigid body. This unique design can measure the payload's weight, mass center location, and moments of inertia about three orthogonal axes. Furthermore, these measurements only require a single torque sensor and a single angular position sensor.

  1. Geometrical Properties of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, Hebe; Bothmer, Volker

    Based on the SOHO/LASCO dataset, a collection of "structured" coronal mass ejections (CMEs) has been compiled within the period 1996-2002, in order to analyze their three-dimensional configuration. These CME events exhibit white-light fine structures, likely indicative of their possible 3D topology. From a detailed investigation of the associated low coronal and photospheric source regions, a generic scheme has been deduced, which considers the white-light topology of a CME projected in the plane of the sky as being primarily dependent on the orientation and position of the source region's neutral line on the solar disk. The obtained results imply that structured CMEs are essentially organized along a symmetry axis, in a cylindrical manner. The measured dimensions of the cylinder's base and length yield a ratio of 1.6. These CMEs seem to be better approximated by elliptic cones, rather than by the classical ice cream cone, characterized by a circular cross section.

  2. Terahertz spectroscopy properties of the selected engine oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shouming; Zhao, Kun; Lu, Tian; Zhao, Songqing; Zhou, Qingli; Shi, Yulei; Zhao, Dongmei; Zhang, Cunlin

    2010-11-01

    Engine oil, most of which is extracted from petroleum, consist of complex mixtures of hydrocarbons of molecular weights in the range of 250-1000. Variable amounts of different additives are put into them to inhibit oxidation, improve the viscosity index, decrease the fluidity point and avoid foaming or settling of solid particles among others. Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy contains rich physical, chemical, and structural information of the materials. Most low-frequency vibrational and rotational spectra of many petrochemicals lie in this frequency range. In recent years, much attention has been paid to the THz spectroscopic studies of petroleum products. In this paper, the optical properties and spectroscopy of selected kinds of engine oil consisting of shell HELIX 10W-40, Mobilube GX 80W-90, GEELY ENGINE OIL SG 10W-30, SMA engine oil SG 5W-30, SMA engine oil SG 10W-30, SMA engine oil SG 75W-90 have been studied by the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the spectral range of 0.6-2.5 THz. Engine oil with different viscosities in the terahertz spectrum has certain regularity. In the THz-TDS, with the increase of viscosity, time delay is greater and with the increase of viscosity, refractive indexes also grow and their rank is extremely regular. The specific kinds of engine oil can be identified according to their different spectral features in the THz range. The THz-TDS technology has potentially significant impact on the engine oil analysis.

  3. Engineering processing and properties of nickel aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1988-01-01

    Ordered intermetallic compounds of iron, nickel, and titanium are materials recently under development for structural applications. Among these, Ni/sub 3/Al has been made reasonably ductile by the addition of small amounts of boron. Further additions of zirconium and chromium have been utilized for enhancement of high temperature strength and intermediate temperature ductility. Nickel aluminide alloys based on Ni/sub 3/Al are near commercialization. This paper describes the melting, processing, mechanical properties, physical properties, corrosion, and weldability of these alloys. Applications for nickel aluminides have been identified. Potential suppliers who have recently licensed the nickel aluminide technology from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are also listed. 16 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Exotic properties and optimal control of quantum heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Congjie; Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    A quantum heat engine of a specific type is studied. This engine contains a single particle confined in the infinite square well potential with variable width and consists of three processes: the isoenergetic process (which has no classical analogs) as well as the isothermal and adiabatic processes. It is found that the engine possesses exotic properties in its performance. The efficiency takes the maximum value when the expansion ratio of the engine is appropriately set, and, in addition, the lower the temperature is, the higher the maximum efficiency becomes, highlighting aspects of the influence of quantum effects on thermodynamics. A comment is also made on the relevance of this engine to that of Carnot.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF OTHER GALAXY PROPERTIES FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Wen Xiaoqing; Xu Jianying; Ding Yingping; Huang Tong

    2010-06-10

    At a stellar mass of 3 x 10{sup 10} M {sub {Theta}} we divide the volume-limited Main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6) into two distinct families and explore the environmental dependence of galaxy properties for High Stellar Mass (HSM) and Low Stellar Mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that for HSM and LSM galaxies, the environmental dependence of some typical galaxy properties, such as color, morphologies, and star formation activities, is still very strong, which at least shows that the stellar mass is not fundamental in correlations between galaxy properties and the environment. We also note that the environmental dependence of the size for HSM and LSM galaxies is fairly weak, which is mainly due to the galaxy size being insensitive to environment.

  6. Survey of ultrasonic properties of aircraft Engine Titanium forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Linxiao; Margetan, F. J.; Thompson, R. B.; Degtyar, Andrei

    2002-05-01

    The Engine Titanium Consortium is surveying the ultrasonic properties of representative Ti-6-4 forgings used in rotating jet engine components. Velocity, attenuation and backscattered grain noise are being measured as function of position and inspection direction. The overall goal is to better understand and improve ultrasonic defect detection. This paper provides a summary of the work to date on this ongoing project. UT properties are generally found to vary systematically with position, and some properties, such as the grain noise anisotropy, appears to be well correlated to the local forging strain. We demonstrate how the UT properties from the highest noise region of a forging are being used to estimate defect detectability for improved inspection schemes.

  7. Comparisons of rational engineering correlations of thermophoretically-augmented particle mass transfer with STAN5-predictions for developing boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Modification of the code STAN5 to properly include thermophoretic mass transport, and examination of selected test cases developing boundary layers which include variable properties, viscous dissipation, transition to turbulence and transpiration cooling. Under conditions representative of current and projected GT operation, local application of St(M)/St(M),o correlations evidently provides accurate and economical engineering design predictions, especially for suspended particles characterized by Schmidt numbers outside of the heavy vapor range.

  8. Materials with engineered mesoporosity for programmed mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Dara V.

    Transport in nanostructured materials is of great interest for scientists in various fields, including molecular sequestration, catalysis, artificial photosynthesis and energy storage. This thesis will present work on the transport of molecular and ionic species in mesoporous materials (materials with pore sizes between 2 and 50 nm). Initially, discussion will focus on the synthesis of mesoporous ZnS nanorattles and the size selected mass transport of small molecules through the mesopores. Discussion will then shift of exploration of cation exchange and electroless plating of metals to alter the mesoporous hollow sphere (MHS) materials and properties. The focus of discussion will then shift to the transport of ions into and out of a hierarchically structured gold electrode. Finally, a model gamma-bactiophage was developed to study the electromigration of charged molecules into and out of a confined geometry. A catalytically active biomolecular species was encapsulated within the central cavity of ZnS MHS. Both the activity of the encapsulated enzyme and the size-selective transport through the wall of the MHS were verified through the use of a common fluorogen, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium azide. Additionally, the protection of the enzyme was shown through size-selected blocking of a protease. The mesoporous hollow sphere system introduces size-selectivity to catalyzed chemical reactions; future work may include variations in pore sizes, and pore wall chemical functionalization. The pore size in ZnS mesoporous hollow spheres is controlled between 2.5 and 4.1 nm through swelling of the lyotropic liquid crystal template. The incorporation of a swelling agent is shown to linearly vary the hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystalline phase, which templates the mesopores, while allowing the high fidelity synthesis of mesoporous hollow spheres. Fluorescnently labeled ssDNA was utilized as a probe to explore the change in mesopore permeability afforded by the swollen template

  9. Fundamental Properties of Low-Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Michael C.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Allard, France; Blake, Cullen H.; Bonnefoy, M.; Cody, Ann Marie; Kraus, Adam; Day-Jones, A. C.; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes

    2009-02-16

    Precise measurements of the fundamental properties of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs are key to understanding the physics underlying their formation and evolution. While there has been great progress over the last decade in studying the bulk spectrophotometric properties of low-mass objects, direct determination of their masses, radii, and temperatures have been very sparse. Thus, theoretical predictions of low-mass evolution and ultracool atmospheres remain to be rigorously tested. The situation is alarming given that such models are widely used, from the determination of the low-mass end of the initial mass function to the characterization of exoplanets.An increasing number of mass, radius, and age determinations are placing critical constraints on the physics of low-mass objects. A wide variety of approaches are being pursued, including eclipsing binary studies, astrometric-spectroscopic orbital solutions, interferometry, and characterization of benchmark systems. In parallel, many more systems suitable for concerted study are now being found, thanks to new capabilities spanning both the very widest (all-sky surveys) and very narrowest (diffraction-limited adaptive optics) areas of the sky. This Cool Stars 15 splinter session highlighted the current successes and limitations of this rapidly growing area of precision astrophysics.

  10. Aircraft Structural Mass Property Prediction Using Conceptual-Level Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexstone, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology that extends the use of the Equivalent LAminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) structural analysis code from conceptual-level aircraft structural analysis to conceptual-level aircraft mass property analysis. Mass property analysis in aircraft structures has historically depended upon parametric weight equations at the conceptual design level and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) at the detailed design level. ELAPS allows for the modeling of detailed geometry, metallic and composite materials, and non-structural mass coupled with analytical structural sizing to produce high-fidelity mass property analyses representing fully configured vehicles early in the design process. This capability is especially valuable for unusual configuration and advanced concept development where existing parametric weight equations are inapplicable and FEA is too time consuming for conceptual design. This paper contrasts the use of ELAPS relative to empirical weight equations and FEA. ELAPS modeling techniques are described and the ELAPS-based mass property analysis process is detailed. Examples of mass property stochastic calculations produced during a recent systems study are provided. This study involved the analysis of three remotely piloted aircraft required to carry scientific payloads to very high altitudes at subsonic speeds. Due to the extreme nature of this high-altitude flight regime, few existing vehicle designs are available for use in performance and weight prediction. ELAPS was employed within a concurrent engineering analysis process that simultaneously produces aerodynamic, structural, and static aeroelastic results for input to aircraft performance analyses. The ELAPS models produced for each concept were also used to provide stochastic analyses of wing structural mass properties. The results of this effort indicate that ELAPS is an efficient means to conduct multidisciplinary trade studies at the conceptual design level.

  11. Aircraft Structural Mass Property Prediction Using Conceptual-Level Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexstone, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology that extends the use of the Equivalent LAminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) structural analysis code from conceptual-level aircraft structural analysis to conceptual-level aircraft mass property analysis. Mass property analysis in aircraft structures has historically depended upon parametric weight equations at the conceptual design level and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) at the detailed design level ELAPS allows for the modeling of detailed geometry, metallic and composite materials, and non-structural mass coupled with analytical structural sizing to produce high-fidelity mass property analyses representing fully configured vehicles early in the design process. This capability is especially valuable for unusual configuration and advanced concept development where existing parametric weight equations are inapplicable and FEA is too time consuming for conceptual design. This paper contrasts the use of ELAPS relative to empirical weight equations and FEA. ELAPS modeling techniques are described and the ELAPS-based mass property analysis process is detailed Examples of mass property stochastic calculations produced during a recent systems study are provided This study involved the analysis of three remotely piloted aircraft required to carry scientific payloads to very high altitudes at subsonic speeds. Due to the extreme nature of this high-altitude flight regime,few existing vehicle designs are available for use in performance and weight prediction. ELAPS was employed within a concurrent engineering analysis process that simultaneously produces aerodynamic, structural, and static aeroelastic results for input to aircraft performance analyses. The ELAPS models produced for each concept were also used to provide stochastic analyses of wing structural mass properties. The results of this effort indicate that ELAPS is an efficient means to conduct multidisciplinary trade studies at the conceptual design level.

  12. Toward Mass Customization in the Age of Information: The Case for Open Engineering Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Timothy W.; Lautenschlager, Uwe; Mistree, Farrokh

    1997-01-01

    In the Industrial Era, manufacturers used "dedicated" engineering systems to mass produce their products. In today's increasingly competitive markets, the trend is toward mass customization, something that becomes increasingly feasible when modern information technologies are used to create open engineering systems. Our focus is on how designers can provide enhanced product flexibility and variety (if not fully customized products) through the development of open engineering systems. After presenting several industrial examples, we anchor our new systems philosophy with two real engineering applications. We believe that manufacturers who adopt open systems will achieve competitive advantage in the Information Age.

  13. Engineering properties of Incoloy-903 and CTX-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, P. E.

    1980-01-01

    Engineering properties of Incoloy-903 sheet and CTX-1 (high strength austentic Fe-Ni-Co alloy) bar are characterized in report. Report includes tables and plots of test data and photographs of microstructure of samples used. Two appendixes include specimen configuration and data collected from industrial survey.

  14. Properties of jet engine combustion particles during the PartEmis experiment: Microphysics and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, A.; Stein, C.; Nyeki, S.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Giebl, H.; Hitzenberger, R.; Döpelheuer, A.; Vrchoticky, S.; Puxbaum, H.; Johnson, M.; Hurley, C. D.; Marsh, R.; Wilson, C. W.

    2003-07-01

    The particles emitted from an aircraft engine combustor were investigated in the European project PartEmis. Measured aerosol properties were mass and number concentration, size distribution, mixing state, thermal stability of internally mixed particles, hygroscopicity, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation potential. The combustor operation conditions corresponded to modern and older engine gas path temperatures at cruise altitude, with fuel sulphur contents (FSC) of 50, 410, and 1270 μg g-1. Operation conditions and FSC showed only a weak influence on the microphysical aerosol properties, except for hygroscopic and CCN properties. Particles of size D >= 30 nm were almost entirely internally mixed. Particles of sizes D < 20 nm showed a considerable volume fraction of compounds that volatilise at 390 K (10-15%) and 573 K (4-10%), while respective fractions decreased to <5% for particles of size D >= 50 nm.

  15. RSRM-3 (360L003) Ballistics/Mass Properties Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubacher, B. A.; Richards, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    The propulsion performance and reconstructed mass properties data from Morton Thiokol's RSRM-3 motors which were assigned to the STS-29 launch are presented. The composite type solid propellant burn rates were close to predicted. The performance of the pair of motors were compared to some CEI Specifications. The performance from each motor as well as matched pair performance values were well within the CEI specification requirements. The nominal thrust time curve and impulse gate information is included. Post flight reconstructed Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) mass properties are within expected values for the lightweight configuration.

  16. Some engineering properties of cotton-phenolic laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P.; Toplosky, V. J.

    2002-05-01

    Although cotton/phenolic laminates are commonly used at cryogenic temperatures as structural and insulating materials, the available low temperature materials properties data is limited. We have reviewed the existing low temperature database for cotton/phenolic and have identified areas of need. We have conducted a materials test program on the two common types (linen and canvas) of cotton/phenolic laminates to add to the existing database and to generate new data in areas where needed. Also included is a comparison of cotton/phenolic engineering properties to the properties of NEMA G-10 CR glass-cloth reinforced laminate. The properties studied here are tensile and compressive strength, elastic modulus, shear properties and thermal expansion characteristics over the temperature range from 295 K to 4 K.

  17. Tuning Surface Properties of Low Dimensional Materials via Strain Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengchun; Liu, Fuzhu; Wu, Chao; Yang, Sen

    2016-08-01

    The promising and versatile applications of low dimensional materials are largely due to their surface properties, which along with their underlying electronic structures have been well studied. However, these materials may not be directly useful for applications requiring properties other than their natal ones. In recent years, strain has been shown to be an additionally useful handle to tune the physical and chemical properties of materials by changing their geometric and electronic structures. The strategies for producing strain are summarized. Then, the electronic structure of quasi-two dimensional layered non-metallic materials (e.g., graphene, MX2, BP, Ge nanosheets) under strain are discussed. Later, the strain effects on catalytic properties of metal-catalyst loaded with strain are focused on. Both experimental and computational perspectives for dealing with strained systems are covered. Finally, an outlook on engineering surface properties utilizing strain is provided. PMID:27376498

  18. Impact of thermal energy storage properties on solar dynamic space power conversion system mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Coles-Hamilton, Carolyn E.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1987-01-01

    A 16 parameter solar concentrator/heat receiver mass model is used in conjunction with Stirling and Brayton Power Conversion System (PCS) performance and mass computer codes to determine the effect of thermal energy storage (TES) material property changes on overall PCS mass as a function of steady state electrical power output. Included in the PCS mass model are component masses as a function of thermal power for: concentrator, heat receiver, heat exchangers (source unless integral with heat receiver, heat sink, regenerator), heat engine units with optional parallel redundancy, power conditioning and control (PC and C), PC and C radiator, main radiator, and structure. Critical TES properties are: melting temperature, heat of fusion, density of the liquid phase, and the ratio of solid-to-liquid density. Preliminary results indicate that even though overalll system efficiency increases with TES melting temperature up to 1400 K for concentrator surface accuracies of 1 mrad or better, reductions in the overall system mass beyond that achievable with lithium fluoride (LiF) can be accomplished only if the heat of fusion is at least 800 kJ/kg and the liquid density is comparable to that of LiF (1880 kg/cu m.

  19. Impact of thermal energy storage properties on solar dynamic space power conversion system mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Coles-Hamilton, Carolyn E.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1987-01-01

    A 16 parameter solar concentrator/heat receiver mass model is used in conjunction with Stirling and Brayton Power Conversion System (PCS) performance and mass computer codes to determine the effect of thermal energy storage (TES) material property changes on overall PCS mass as a function of steady state electrical power output. Included in the PCS mass model are component masses as a function of thermal power for: concentrator, heat receiver, heat exchangers (source unless integral with heat receiver, heat sink, regenerator), heat engine units with optional parallel redundancy, power conditioning and control (PC and C), PC and C radiator, main radiator, and structure. Critical TES properties are: melting temperature, heat of fusion, density of the liquid phase, and the ratio of solid-to-liquid density. Preliminary results indicate that even though overall system efficiency increases with TES melting temperature up to 1400 K for concentrator surface accuracies of 1 mrad or better, reductions in the overall system mass beyond that achievable with lithium fluoride (LiF) can be accomplished only if the heat of fusion is at least 800 kJ/kg and the liquid density is comparable to that of LiF (1800 kg/cu m).

  20. Air mass flow estimation in turbocharged diesel engines from in-cylinder pressure measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Desantes, J.M.; Galindo, J.; Guardiola, C.; Dolz, V.

    2010-01-15

    Air mass flow determination is needed for the control of current internal combustion engines. Current methods are based on specific sensors (as hot wire anemometers) or indirect estimation through manifold pressure. With the availability of cylinder pressure sensors for engine control, methods based on them can be used for replacing or complementing standard methods. Present paper uses in cylinder pressure increase during the intake stroke for inferring the trapped air mass. The method is validated on two different turbocharged diesel engines and compared with the standard methods. (author)

  1. Tissue-engineered cartilage with inducible and tunable immunomodulatory properties

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Katherine A.; Link, Jarrett M.; Brunger, Jonathan M.; Moutos, Franklin T.; Gersbach, Charles A.; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is mediated in part by inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 (IL-1), which promote degradation of articular cartilage and prevent human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis. In this study, we combined gene therapy and functional tissue engineering to develop engineered cartilage with immunomodulatory properties that allow chondrogenesis in the presence of pathologic levels of IL-1 by inducing overexpression of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in MSCs via scaffold-mediated lentiviral gene delivery. A doxycycline-inducible vector was used to transduce MSCs in monolayer or within 3D woven PCL scaffolds to enable tunable IL-1Ra production. In the presence of IL-1, IL-1Ra-expressing engineered cartilage produced cartilage-specific extracellular matrix, while resisting IL-1-induced upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases and maintaining mechanical properties similar to native articular cartilage. The ability of functional engineered cartilage to deliver tunable anti-inflammatory cytokines to the joint may enhance the long-term success of therapies for cartilage injuries or osteoarthritis. PMID:24767790

  2. Tissue-engineered cartilage with inducible and tunable immunomodulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Glass, Katherine A; Link, Jarrett M; Brunger, Jonathan M; Moutos, Franklin T; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is mediated in part by inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 (IL-1), which promote degradation of articular cartilage and prevent human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis. In this study, we combined gene therapy and functional tissue engineering to develop engineered cartilage with immunomodulatory properties that allow chondrogenesis in the presence of pathologic levels of IL-1 by inducing overexpression of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in MSCs via scaffold-mediated lentiviral gene delivery. A doxycycline-inducible vector was used to transduce MSCs in monolayer or within 3D woven PCL scaffolds to enable tunable IL-1Ra production. In the presence of IL-1, IL-1Ra-expressing engineered cartilage produced cartilage-specific extracellular matrix, while resisting IL-1-induced upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases and maintaining mechanical properties similar to native articular cartilage. The ability of functional engineered cartilage to deliver tunable anti-inflammatory cytokines to the joint may enhance the long-term success of therapies for cartilage injuries or osteoarthritis. PMID:24767790

  3. Immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties of engineered nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskaya, A N; Dobrovolskaia, M A

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle interactions with various components of the immune system are determined by their physicochemical properties such as size, charge, hydrophobicity and shape. Nanoparticles can be engineered to either specifically target the immune system or to avoid immune recognition. Nevertheless, identifying their unintended impacts on the immune system and understanding the mechanisms of such accidental effects are essential for establishing a nanoparticle's safety profile. While immunostimulatory properties have been reviewed before, little attention in the literature has been given to immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. The purpose of this review is to fill this gap. We will discuss intended immunosuppression achieved by either nanoparticle engineering, or the use of nanoparticles to carry immunosuppressive or anti-inflammatory drugs. We will also review unintended immunosuppressive properties of nanoparticles per se and consider how such properties could be either beneficial or adverse. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Nanomedicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-17 PMID:24724793

  4. Mass Property Measurements of the Mars Science Laboratory Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The NASA/JPL Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft mass properties were measured on a spin balance table prior to launch. This paper discusses the requirements and issues encountered with the setup, qualification, and testing using the spin balance table, and the idiosyncrasies encountered with the test system. The final mass measurements were made in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) at Kennedy Space Center on the fully assembled and fueled spacecraft. This set of environmental tests required that the control system for the spin balance machine be at a remote location, which posed additional challenges to the operation of the machine

  5. Computer program for determining mass properties of a rigid structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R. A.; Gilbert, J. L.; Klich, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program was developed for the rapid computation of the mass properties of complex structural systems. The program uses rigid body analyses and permits differences in structural material throughout the total system. It is based on the premise that complex systems can be adequately described by a combination of basic elemental shapes. Simple geometric data describing size and location of each element and the respective material density or weight of each element were the only required input data. From this minimum input, the program yields system weight, center of gravity, moments of inertia and products of inertia with respect to mutually perpendicular axes through the system center of gravity. The program also yields mass properties of the individual shapes relative to component axes.

  6. Mass-Transport Properties In Growth Of Crystals From Vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemeier, H.

    1992-01-01

    Brief report summarizes results of experimental and theoretical studies of mass-transport properties of GeSe/Gel4 and Hg0.8Cd0.2Te systems in connection with growth of crystals in closed ampoules. Primary emphasis in studies was on thermochemical analyses, on development of mathematical models to predict diffusion-limited mass transport, and on comparison of theoretically predicted with experimental fluxes. Results applied to design, preparation, performance, and analysis of crystal-growth experiments of semiconducting materials on Earth and in outer space. Model extended to predict mass flux and overall composition of transport products of Hg0.8Cd0.2Te transport system.

  7. Determination of PM mass emissions from an aircraft turbine engine using particle effective density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durdina, L.; Brem, B. T.; Abegglen, M.; Lobo, P.; Rindlisbacher, T.; Thomson, K. A.; Smallwood, G. J.; Hagen, D. E.; Sierau, B.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Inventories of particulate matter (PM) emissions from civil aviation and air quality models need to be validated using up-to-date measurement data corrected for sampling artifacts. We compared the measured black carbon (BC) mass and the total PM mass determined from particle size distributions (PSD) and effective density for a commercial turbofan engine CFM56-7B26/3. The effective density was then used to calculate the PM mass losses in the sampling system. The effective density was determined using a differential mobility analyzer and a centrifugal particle mass analyzer, and increased from engine idle to take-off by up to 60%. The determined mass-mobility exponents ranged from 2.37 to 2.64. The mean effective density determined by weighting the effective density distributions by PM volume was within 10% of the unit density (1000 kg/m3) that is widely assumed in aircraft PM studies. We found ratios close to unity between the PM mass determined by the integrated PSD method and the real-time BC mass measurements. The integrated PSD method achieved higher precision at ultra-low PM concentrations at which current mass instruments reach their detection limit. The line loss model predicted ∼60% PM mass loss at engine idle, decreasing to ∼27% at high thrust. Replacing the effective density distributions with unit density lead to comparable estimates that were within 20% and 5% at engine idle and high thrust, respectively. These results could be used for the development of a robust method for sampling loss correction of the future PM emissions database from commercial aircraft engines.

  8. Frequency Shift During Mass Properties Testing Using Compound Pendulum Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, David; Regan, Chris

    2012-01-01

    During mass properties testing on the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft (The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, large inertia measurement errors were observed in results from compound pendulum swings when compared to analytical models. By comparing periods of oscillations as measured from an average over the test period versus the period of each oscillation, it was noticed that the frequency of oscillation was shifting significantly throughout the test. This phenomenon was only noticed during compound pendulum swings, and not during bifilar pendulum swings. The frequency shift was only visible upon extensive data analysis of the frequency for each oscillation, and did not appear in averaged frequency data over the test period. Multiple test articles, test techniques, and hardware setups were used in attempts to eliminate or identify the cause of the frequency shift. Plotting the frequency of oscillation revealed a region of minimal shift that corresponded to a larger amplitude range. This region of minimal shift provided the most accurate results compared to a known test article; however, the amplitudes that produce accurate inertia measurements are amplitudes larger than those generally accepted in mass properties testing. This paper examines two case studies of the frequency shift, using mass properties testing performed on a dummy test article, and on the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft.

  9. Multiscale Approach to Characterize Mechanical Properties of Tissue Engineered Skin.

    PubMed

    Tupin, S; Molimard, J; Cenizo, V; Hoc, T; Sohm, B; Zahouani, H

    2016-09-01

    Tissue engineered skin usually consist of a multi-layered visco-elastic material composed of a fibrillar matrix and cells. The complete mechanical characterization of these tissues has not yet been accomplished. The purpose of this study was to develop a multiscale approach to perform this characterization in order to link the development process of a cultured skin to the mechanical properties. As a proof-of-concept, tissue engineered skin samples were characterized at different stages of manufacturing (acellular matrix, reconstructed dermis and reconstructed skin) for two different aging models (using cells from an 18- and a 61-year-old man). To assess structural variations, bi-photonic confocal microscopy was used. To characterize mechanical properties at a macroscopic scale, a light-load micro-mechanical device that performs indentation and relaxation tests was designed. Finally, images of the internal network of the samples under stretching were acquired by combining confocal microscopy with a tensile device. Mechanical properties at microscopic scale were assessed. Results revealed that adding cells during manufacturing induced structural changes, which provided higher elastic modulus and viscosity. Moreover, senescence models exhibited lower elastic modulus and viscosity. This multiscale approach was efficient to characterize and compare skin equivalent samples and permitted the first experimental assessment of the Poisson's ratio for such tissues. PMID:26942585

  10. Property rights and genetic engineering: developing nations at risk.

    PubMed

    Shrader-Frechette, Kristin

    2005-01-01

    Eighty percent of (commercial) genetically engineered seeds (GES) are designed only to resist herbicides. Letting farmers use more chemicals, they cut labor costs. But developing nations say GES cause food shortages, unemployment, resistant weeds, and extinction of native cultivars when "volunteers" drift nearby. While GES patents are reasonable, this paper argues many patent policies are not. The paper surveys GE technology, outlines John Locke's classic account of property rights, and argues that current patent policies must be revised to take account of Lockean ethical constraints. After answering a key objection, it provides concrete suggestions for implementing its ethical conclusions. PMID:15727008

  11. Some engineering properties of heavy concrete added silica fume

    SciTech Connect

    Akkaş, Ayşe; Başyiğit, Celalettin; Esen, Serap

    2013-12-16

    Many different types of building materials have been used in building construction for years. Heavy concretes can be used as a building material for critical building as it can contain a mixture of many heavy elements. The barite itself for radiation shielding can be used and also in concrete to produce the workable concrete with a maximum density and adequate structural strength. In this study, some engineering properties like compressive strength, elasticity modules and flexure strength of heavy concretes’ added Silica fume have been investigated.

  12. Properties of nuclear matter from macroscopic-microscopic mass formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Ou, Li; Zhang, Yingxun

    2015-12-01

    Based on the standard Skyrme energy density functionals together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approach, the properties of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter represented in two macroscopic-microscopic mass formulas: Lublin-Strasbourg nuclear drop energy (LSD) formula and Weizsäcker-Skyrme (WS*) formula, are extracted through matching the energy per particle of finite nuclei. For LSD and WS*, the obtained incompressibility coefficients of symmetric nuclear matter are K∞ = 230 ± 11 MeV and 235 ± 11 MeV, respectively. The slope parameter of symmetry energy at saturation density is L = 41.6 ± 7.6 MeV for LSD and 51.5 ± 9.6 MeV for WS*, respectively, which is compatible with the liquid-drop analysis of Lattimer and Lim [4]. The density dependence of the mean-field isoscalar and isovector effective mass, and the neutron-proton effective masses splitting for neutron matter are simultaneously investigated. The results are generally consistent with those from the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations and nucleon optical potentials, and the standard deviations are large and increase rapidly with density. A better constraint for the effective mass is helpful to reduce uncertainties of the depth of the mean-field potential.

  13. Pharmaceutical and Toxicological Properties of Engineered Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Palombo, Matthew; Deshmukh, Manjeet; Myers, Daniel; Gao, Jieming; Szekely, Zoltan; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Novel engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are being developed to enhance therapy. The physicochemical properties of ENMs can be manipulated to control/direct biodistribution and target delivery, but these alterations also have implications for toxicity. It is well known that size plays a significant role in determining ENM effects since simply nanosizing a safe bulk material can render it toxic. However, charge, shape, rigidity, and surface modifications also have a significant influence on the biodistribution and toxicity of nanoscale drug delivery systems (NDDSs). In this review, NDDSs are considered in terms of platform technologies, materials, and physical properties that impart their pharmaceutical and toxicological effects. Moving forward, the development of safe and effective nanomedicines requires standardized protocols for determining the physical characteristics of ENMs as well as assessing their potential long-term toxicity. When such protocols are established, the remarkable promise of nanomedicine to improve the diagnosis and treatment of human disease can be fulfilled. PMID:24160695

  14. Quantitative ultrasonic evaluation of mechanical properties of engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1978-01-01

    Current progress in the application of ultrasonic techniques to nondestructive measurement of mechanical strength properties of engineering materials is reviewed. Even where conventional NDE techniques have shown that a part is free of overt defects, advanced NDE techniques should be available to confirm the material properties assumed in the part's design. There are many instances where metallic, composite, or ceramic parts may be free of critical defects while still being susceptible to failure under design loads due to inadequate or degraded mechanical strength. This must be considered in any failure prevention scheme that relies on fracture analysis. This review will discuss the availability of ultrasonic methods that can be applied to actual parts to assess their potential susceptibility to failure under design conditions.

  15. Control System Upgrade for a Mass Property Measurement Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, William; Hinkle, R. Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Mass Property Measurement Facility (MPMF) at the Goddard Space Flight Center has undergone modifications to ensure the safety of Flight Payloads and the measurement facility. The MPMF has been technically updated to improve reliability and increase the accuracy of the measurements. Modifications include the replacement of outdated electronics with a computer based software control system, the addition of a secondary gas supply in case of a catastrophic failure to the gas supply and a motor controlled emergency stopping feature instead of a hard stop.

  16. Variability properties and masses of central black hole for blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Junhui

    2001-06-01

    In this paper, the compiled long-term optical and infrared measurements of some blazars are used to analyze the variation properties, and the optical data are used to search for periodicity evidence in the lightcurve by means of the Jurkevich technique and the discrete correlation function (DCF) method. The periods are found in the range of 1.5 to 19 years. The short time scales are used to estimate the central black hole masses which are found in the range of (3.8 - 130)×107Msolar for the gamma-ray loud blazars. Some discussions are presented.

  17. Kalman Filter for Mass Property and Thrust Identification (MMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queen, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission consists of four identically instrumented, spin-stabilized observatories, elliptically orbiting the Earth in a tetrahedron formation. For the operational success of the mission, on-board systems must be able to deliver high-precision orbital adjustment maneuvers. On MMS, this is accomplished using feedback from on-board star sensors in tandem with accelerometers whose measurements are dynamically corrected for errors associated with a spinning platform. In order to determine the required corrections to the measured acceleration, precise estimates of attitude, rate, and mass-properties is necessary. To this end, both an on-board and ground-based Multiplicative Extended Kalman Filter (MEKF) were formulated and implemented in order to estimate the dynamic and quasi-static properties of the spacecraft.

  18. Nanomechanical properties of hybrid coatings for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Skarmoutsou, Amalia; Lolas, Georgios; Charitidis, Costas A; Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria; Farsari, Maria

    2013-09-01

    Bone tissue engineering has emerged as a promising alternative approach in the treatment of bone injuries and defects arising from malformation, osteoporosis, and tumours. In this approach, a temporary scaffold possessing mechanical properties resembling those of natural bone is needed to serve as a substrate enhancing cell adhesion and growth, and a physical support to guide the formation of the new bone. In this regard, the scaffold should be biocompatible, biodegradable, malleable and mechanically strong. Herein, we investigate the mechanical properties of three coatings of different chemical compositions onto silanized glass substrates; a hybrid material consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, a type of a hybrid organic-inorganic material of the above containing also 50 mol% 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) moieties and a pure organic material, based on PDMAEMA. This study investigates the variations in the measured hardness and reduced modulus values, wear resistance and plastic behaviour before and after samples' submersion in cell culture medium. Through this analysis we aim to explain how hybrid materials behave under applied stresses (pile-up formations), how water uptake changes this behaviour, and estimate how these materials will react while interaction with cells in tissue engineering applications. Finally, we report on the pre-osteoblastic cell adhesion and proliferation on three-dimensional structures of the hybrid materials within the first hour and up to 7 days in culture. It was evident that hybrid structure, consisting of 50 mol% organic-inorganic material, reveals good mechanical behaviour, wear resistance and cell adhesion and proliferation, suggesting a possible candidate in bone tissue engineering. PMID:23726922

  19. New method for time-resolved diesel engine exhaust particle mass measurement.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, U; Niemelä, V; Mohr, M

    2004-11-01

    The Dekati mass monitor (DMM; Dekati Ltd., Finland), a relatively new real-time mass measurement instrument, was investigated in this project. In contrast to the existing gravimetric filter method also used as a standard for regulation purposes, this instrument provides second-by-second data on mass concentration in the engine exhaust gas. The principle of the DMM is based on particle charging, inertial and electrical size classification, and electrical detection of aerosol particles. This study focuses on the instrument's practical performance. Details on calibration and the theory of operation will be published elsewhere. The exhaust emissions of two heavy-duty engines complying with the Euro III emission standard were measured on a dynamic engine test bench. We looked atthe particle number and mass emissions of the engines in different transient test cycles and steady-state conditions. The ability to follow transient test cycles and the response times of the DMM were investigated. The aerosol mass concentration measured by the DMM was compared with the mass concentration obtained by the standard gravimetric filter method with Teflon-coated glass fiber filters. The total mass concentration (integral over the whole cycle) measured by the DMM is about 20% higher than that measured by the standard gravimetric filter method. The total mass concentration from the DMM was also compared with the volume concentration calculated from the electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) measurements. Correlations were made with other particle measuring systems. The DMM correlates very well with the particulate mass (R2 = 0.95) and exhibits good linearity and repeatability. The response time to a well-defined change in exhaust concentration was observed to be fast and stable. The DMM was able to follow transient test cycles and provides good results on a second-by-second basis. The instrument used in this study was still under development, and there is therefore no complete

  20. MASSES, RADII, AND CLOUD PROPERTIES OF THE HR 8799 PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard E-mail: dsaumon@lanl.gov E-mail: andrew.ackerman@nasa.gov E-mail: freedman@darkstar.arc.nasa.gov

    2012-08-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Some studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here, we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against observations of field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike some previous studies, we require mutually consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure thus yields plausible values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends, including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition-some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to whether or not we include the H- and the K-band spectrum in our analysis. Solutions for planets c and d are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that, like in L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present an exploratory evolution calculation that accounts for this effect. Finally we recompute the bolometric luminosity of all three planets.

  1. Morphology and Optical Properties of Black-Carbon Particles Relevant to Engine Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelsen, H. A.; Bambha, R.; Dansson, M. A.; Schrader, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Black-carbon particles are believed to have a large influence on climate through direct radiative forcing, reduction of surface albedo of snow and ice in the cryosphere, and interaction with clouds. The optical properties and morphology of atmospheric particles containing black carbon are uncertain, and characterization of black carbon resulting from engines emissions is needed. Refractory black-carbon particles found in the atmosphere are often coated with unburned fuel, sulfuric acid, water, ash, and other combustion by-products and atmospheric constituents. Coatings can alter the optical and physical properties of the particles and therefore change their optical properties and cloud interactions. Details of particle morphology and coating state can also have important effects on the interpretation of optical diagnostics. A more complete understanding of how coatings affect extinction, absorption, and incandescence measurements is needed before these techniques can be applied reliably to a wide range of particles. We have investigated the effects of coatings on the optical and physical properties of combustion-generated black-carbon particles using a range of standard particle diagnostics, extinction, and time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) measurements. Particles were generated in a co-flow diffusion flame, extracted, cooled, and coated with oleic acid. The diffusion flame produces highly dendritic soot aggregates with similar properties to those produced in diesel engines, diffusion flames, and most natural combustion processes. A thermodenuder was used to remove the coating. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to monitor aggregate sizes; a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) was used to measure coating mass fractions, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize particle morphologies. The results demonstrate important differences in optical measurements between coated and uncoated particles.

  2. Online Data Resources in Chemical Engineering Education: Impact of the Uncertainty Concept for Thermophysical Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sun Hyung; Kang, Jeong Won; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Magee, Joseph W.; Diky, Vladimir; Muzny, Chris D.; Kazakov, Andrei F.; Chirico, Robert D.; Frenkel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We review the concept of uncertainty for thermophysical properties and its critical impact for engineering applications in the core courses of chemical engineering education. To facilitate the translation of developments to engineering education, we employ NIST Web Thermo Tables to furnish properties data with their associated expanded…

  3. Properties and clinical implications of body mass indices.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, K P; Lee, J; Lau, S P; Chow, O K; Wong, T W; Davis, D P

    1990-01-01

    The properties of body mass indices were evaluated in a cross sectional study of the weights and heights of 5016 Chinese boys and girls aged between 3 and 18 years. Of the indices examined (weight/height (W/H), weight/height2 (W/H2), weight/height3 (W/H3) and weight/heightp (W/Hp], W/Hp was the only one that consistently showed least correlation with height, and so could be regarded as the optimal body mass index by the criterion of independence of the index from height. The exponent 'p' of W/Hp is, however, highly dependent on age; the value increases steadily between the age of 3 and 7-9 years, and then varies considerably around puberty. Only the age specific exponent ensures a lack of correlation between body mass index (W/Hp) and height. Age specific W/Hp should therefore be used in intrapopulation studies of weight or problems associated with obesity in children. Interpopulation comparison of weight and adiposity by W/H, W/H2, or W/H3 may give misleading results because of their dependence on height. Our results also suggest that the conventional weight for height charts may not be accurate enough for clinical use. PMID:2357091

  4. Analysis of cast TiAl properties for engine materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Y.G.; Matsuda, K.; Masaki, S.; Imamura, R.; Arai, M.

    1995-12-31

    A gamma TiAl alloy, Alloy01, was developed for casting aeroengine hot parts in an effort to replace current Ni-base superalloys. To evaluate engineering applicability, many commercial size ingots of Alloy01 were melted, and cast into various component shapes. Property measurements were made on cast-size specimens and in some cases on machined from blade samples. These included tensile strength and ductility, creep and creep rupture strength, low and high cycle fatigue, fracture toughness, crack growth rate, and some physical properties. Some of the important observations were made as follows; the room temperature (RT) strength and ductility are believed to be determined by three major factors, aluminum content, oxygen content, and macro-structural elements. Among those the macrostructure (grain size, grain structures, and shrinkage porosity) was considered most important. The best ductility obtained for as-cast specimens was 0.5%, but a HIP treatment increased the ductility to more than 1%. The alloy exhibited an excellent creep and fatigue strength. A comparison of the property data with those of a superalloy indicated that the TiAl is technically qualified for some of the components without major design changes.

  5. Hygroscopic Properties of Aircraft Engine Exhaust Aerosol Produced From Traditional and Alternative Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Chen, G.; Anderson, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    Aircraft emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols constitute an important component of anthropogenic climate forcing, of which aerosol-cloud interactions remain poorly understood. It is currently thought that the ability of these aerosols to alter upper tropospheric cirrus cloud properties may produce radiative forcings many times larger than the impact of linear contrails alone and which may partially offset the impact of greenhouse gas emissions from aviation (Burkhardt and Karcher, Nature, 2011). Consequently, it is important to characterize the ability of these engine-emitted aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) to form clouds. While a number of studies in the literature have examined aerosol-cloud interactions for laboratory-generated soot or from aircraft engines burning traditional fuels, limited attention has been given to how switching to alternative jet fuels impacts the ability of engine-emitted aerosols to form clouds. The key to understanding these changes is the aerosol hygroscopicity. To address this need, the second NASA Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX-II) was conducted in 2011 to examine the aerosol emissions from the NASA DC-8 under a variety of different engine power and fuel type conditions. Five fuel types were considered including traditional JP-8 fuel, synthetic Fischer-Tropsh (FT) fuel , sulfur-doped FT fuel (FTS) , hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuel, and a 50:50 blend of JP-8 with HRJ. Emissions were sampled from the DC-8 on the airport jetway at a distance of 145 meters downwind of the engine by a comprehensive suite of aerosol instrumentation that provided information on the aerosol concentration, size distribution, soot mass, and CCN activity. Concurrent measurements of carbon dioxide were used to account for plume dilution so that characteristic emissions indices could be determined. It is found that both engine power and fuel type significantly influence the hygroscopic properties of

  6. Study of Fuel Property Effects Using Future Low Emissions Heavy Duty Truck Engine Hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sharon

    2000-08-20

    Fuel properties have had substantial impact on engine emissions. Fuel impact varies with engine technology. An assessment of fuel impact on future low emission designs was needed as part of an EMAEPA-API study effort

  7. Electrical engineering of the optical properties in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Hairui; Guo, Junji; Liao, Wenhu; Zhao, Heping

    2015-02-01

    Based on the intersubband transition theorem of the semiconductors, we have theoretically investigated the optical properties of a three-terminal silicene-based device under the irradiation of a circularly polarized terahertz electromagnetic field. The system spin-orbit-coupled electronic structure may be engineered to topological insulated (TI) and band insulated (BI) state, respectively, by the staggered sublattice potential from the back-gate voltage. It has been demonstrated that the dielectric functions and optical absorption spectra from the TI spin-up and spin-down subbands behave redshift and blueshift, respectively, with the increase in the sublattice potential, while those from the BI spin-up and spin-down subbands have been proven to be continually blue-shifted with the staggered sublattice potential. The novel features may be useful in the design of the spintronic and optoelectronic devices based on silicene.

  8. Engineering filamentous bacteriophages for enhanced gold binding and metallization properties.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Arslan, Taner; Lee, Hyeji

    2015-09-15

    Filamentous bacteriophages are nanowire-like virion molecules consisting of a single stranded DNA (ssDNA) as the genomic material packed in a protein cage. In this study, Tyr containing 5-mer peptides were displayed on phage filaments for enhanced Au binding and reduction properties. Wild type fd (AEGDD) and engineered YYYYY, AYSSG and AYGDD phages were investigated by Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), Atomic force microscopy (AFM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analyses. Presence of only one Tyr unit on five aa flexible region of p8 coat proteins increased Au binding affinities of engineered phages. YYYYY phages were shown to have the strongest Au surface and AuNP binding affinities. Recombinant phages were shown to be coated with Au clusters after one-step metallization reaction. With further genetic modifications, phages can be programmed to function as site specific self-assembling biotemplates for bottom-up manufacturing in nanoelectronics and biosensor application studies. PMID:26004572

  9. Engineering properties of cement/lime-stabilized Egyptian soft clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, M. A.; Samieh, A. M.; Matter, H. E.

    2015-09-01

    Soft clay formations are extensively located in many coastal areas around the world. The significant high compressibility and low shear strength of these formations impose challenging engineering problems. The deep cement/lime-mix-in-place method is one of the ground improvement techniques exhibiting successful use in stabilizing soft clay. Analysis and design of the deep mixing systems necessitate the identification of the additive content, the proportions of the lime to cement and the characteristics of the stabilized clay. This paper investigates experimentally the influence of adding lime and cement or cement alone, as stabilizing additives, on the engineering behavior of an Egyptian soft clay extracted from the north delta region. A series of laboratory tests were carried out considering, different additive contents of 8, 10, 12, and 14% of the dry weight, with different proportions of lime to cement of 50:50, 25:75 and 0:100. A series of unconfined compression strength tests were performed after different periods; one week, four weeks and 8 weeks, to assess the effect of curing period on the stabilized clay response. In addition, one dimensional consolidation tests were carried out to evaluate the compressibility properties of the stabilized clay. This study declared that the use of an additive content in the range of 12% and more is recommended to improve the characteristics of the considered Egyptian clay. It was pointed out that addition of lime and cement to soft clay significantly increases the strength characteristics and significantly reduces the compressibility characteristics of such clay.

  10. Masses, Radii, and Cloud Properties of the HR 8799 Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have compared the photometric and limited spectral data of the planets to the predictions of various atmosphere and evolution models and concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Most studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike almost all previous studies we specify mutually self-consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure yields plausible and self-consistent values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are in fact not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition, some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to the H and K band spectrum. Solutions for planets c and particularly d are less certain but are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that as for L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present a new evolution calculation that predicts cooling tracks on the near-infrared color

  11. SED and Emission Line Properties of Red 2MASS AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Schmidt, Gary; Ghosh, Himel

    2009-09-01

    Radio and far-IR surveys, and modeling of the cosmic X-ray background suggest that a large population of obscured AGN has been missed by traditional, optical surveys. The Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) has revealed a large population (surface density comparable to that of optically selected AGN with Ks<14.5mag) of mostly nearby (median z=0.25), red, moderately obscured AGN, among which 75% are previously unidentified emission-line AGN, with 85% showing broad emission lines. We present the SED and emission line properties of 44 such red (J-Ks>2) 2MASS AGN observed with Chandra. They lie at z<0.37, span a full range of spectral types (Type 1, intermediate, Type 2),Ks-to-X-ray slopes, and polarization (<13%). Their IR-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are red in the near-IR/opt/UV showing little or no blue bump. The optical colors are affected by reddening, host galaxy emission, redshift, and in few, highly polarized objects, also by scattered AGN light. The levels of obscuration obtained from optical, X-rays, and far-IR imply N_H properties shows that, while obscuration/inclination is important, the dominant cause of variance in the sample (eigenvector 1) is the L/L_{edd} ratio (perhaps because the red near-IR selection limits the range of inclination/obscuration values in our sample). This analysis also distinguishes two sources of obscuration: the host galaxy and circumnuclear absorption.

  12. Mass Properties Measurement in the X-38 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Wayne L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper details the techniques used in measuring the mass properties for the X-38 family of test vehicles. The X-38 Project was a NASA internal venture in which a series of test vehicles were built in order to develop a Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station. Three atmospheric test vehicles and one spaceflight vehicle were built to develop the technologies required for a CRV. The three atmospheric test vehicles have undergone flight-testing by a combined team from the NASA Johnson Space Center and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The flight-testing was performed at Edward's Air Force Base in California. The X-38 test vehicles are based on the X-24A, which flew in the '60s and '70s. Scaled Composites, Inc. of Mojave, California, built the airframes and the vehicles were outfitted at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Mass properties measurements on the atmospheric test vehicles included weight and balance by the three-point suspension method, four-point suspension method, three load cells on jackstands, and on three in-ground platform scales. Inertia measurements were performed as well in which Ixx, Iyy, Izz, and Ixz were obtained. This paper describes each technique and the relative merits of each. The proposed measurement methods for an X-38 spaceflight test vehicle will also be discussed. This vehicle had different measurement challenges, but integrated vehicle measurements were never conducted. The spaceflight test vehicle was also developed by NASA and was scheduled to fly on the Space Shuttle before the project was cancelled.

  13. Semiconductor nanomembranes: a platform for new properties via strain engineering

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    New phenomena arise in single-crystal semiconductors when these are fabricated in very thin sheets, with thickness at the nanometer scale. We review recent research on Si and Ge nanomembranes, including the use of elastic strain sharing, layer release, and transfer, that demonstrate new science and enable the fabrication of materials with unique properties. Strain engineering produces new strained forms of Si or Ge not possible in nature, new layered structures, defect-free SiGe sheets, and new electronic band structure and photonic properties. Through-membrane elastic interactions cause the double-sided ordering of epitaxially grown nanostressors on Si nanomembranes, resulting in a spatially and periodically varying strain field in the thin crystalline semiconductor sheet. The inherent influence of strain on the band structure creates band gap modulation, thereby creating effectively a single-element electronic superlattice. Conversely, large-enough externally applied strain can make Ge a direct-band gap semiconductor, giving promise for Group IV element light sources. PMID:23153167

  14. Cooling system having reduced mass pin fins for components in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J

    2014-03-11

    A cooling system having one or more pin fins with reduced mass for a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The cooling system may include one or more first surfaces defining at least a portion of the cooling system. The pin fin may extend from the surface defining the cooling system and may have a noncircular cross-section taken generally parallel to the surface and at least part of an outer surface of the cross-section forms at least a quartercircle. A downstream side of the pin fin may have a cavity to reduce mass, thereby creating a more efficient turbine airfoil.

  15. Headspace analysis of engine oil by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Levermore, D M; Josowicz, M; Rees, W S; Janata, J

    2001-03-15

    This study establishes the rationale necessary for determining the time to change engine oil. This is based on identifying gaseous components in new and used automobile lubricants. Key compounds, so-called "signature", are separated and identified qualitatively by coupled gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Volatile antioxidants at zero miles and fuel contaminants at low mileage are observed in the headspace of engine oil. Several oxidative degradation components have been positively identified in the used oil, which include the following: acetaldehyde, acetone, butanal, 2-propanol, acetic acid, 2-hexanol, benzoic acid, benzaldehyde, and 1-pentanol. This study strongly suggests that the status of lubricating oil can be determined by the analysis of the gas phase above the oil. Most importantly, it opens the possibility of performing conditional maintenance of the combustion engine based on information obtained from gas sensors. PMID:11305675

  16. Conductometric Sensor for Soot Mass Flow Detection in Exhausts of Internal Combustion Engines.

    PubMed

    Feulner, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Müller, Andreas; Schott, Andreas; Zöllner, Christian; Brüggemann, Dieter; Moos, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Soot sensors are required for on-board diagnostics (OBD) of automotive diesel particulate filters (DPF) to detect filter failures. Widely used for this purpose are conductometric sensors, measuring an electrical current or resistance between two electrodes. Soot particles deposit on the electrodes, which leads to an increase in current or decrease in resistance. If installed upstream of a DPF, the "engine-out" soot emissions can also be determined directly by soot sensors. Sensors were characterized in diesel engine real exhausts under varying operation conditions and with two different kinds of diesel fuel. The sensor signal was correlated to the actual soot mass and particle number, measured with an SMPS. Sensor data and soot analytics (SMPS) agreed very well, an impressing linear correlation in a double logarithmic representation was found. This behavior was even independent of the used engine settings or of the biodiesel content. PMID:26580621

  17. Conductometric Sensor for Soot Mass Flow Detection in Exhausts of Internal Combustion Engines

    PubMed Central

    Feulner, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Müller, Andreas; Schott, Andreas; Zöllner, Christian; Brüggemann, Dieter; Moos, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Soot sensors are required for on-board diagnostics (OBD) of automotive diesel particulate filters (DPF) to detect filter failures. Widely used for this purpose are conductometric sensors, measuring an electrical current or resistance between two electrodes. Soot particles deposit on the electrodes, which leads to an increase in current or decrease in resistance. If installed upstream of a DPF, the “engine-out” soot emissions can also be determined directly by soot sensors. Sensors were characterized in diesel engine real exhausts under varying operation conditions and with two different kinds of diesel fuel. The sensor signal was correlated to the actual soot mass and particle number, measured with an SMPS. Sensor data and soot analytics (SMPS) agreed very well, an impressing linear correlation in a double logarithmic representation was found. This behavior was even independent of the used engine settings or of the biodiesel content. PMID:26580621

  18. A study of mass data storage technology for rocket engine data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ready, John F.; Benser, Earl T.; Fritz, Bernard S.; Nelson, Scott A.; Stauffer, Donald R.; Volna, William M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a nine month study program on mass data storage technology for rocket engine (especially the Space Shuttle Main Engine) health monitoring and control are summarized. The program had the objective of recommending a candidate mass data storage technology development for rocket engine health monitoring and control and of formulating a project plan and specification for that technology development. The work was divided into three major technical tasks: (1) development of requirements; (2) survey of mass data storage technologies; and (3) definition of a project plan and specification for technology development. The first of these tasks reviewed current data storage technology and developed a prioritized set of requirements for the health monitoring and control applications. The second task included a survey of state-of-the-art and newly developing technologies and a matrix-based ranking of the technologies. It culminated in a recommendation of optical disk technology as the best candidate for technology development. The final task defined a proof-of-concept demonstration, including tasks required to develop, test, analyze, and demonstrate the technology advancement, plus an estimate of the level of effort required. The recommended demonstration emphasizes development of an optical disk system which incorporates an order-of-magnitude increase in writing speed above the current state of the art.

  19. Effect of variety and moisture content on some engineering properties of paddy rice.

    PubMed

    Adebowale, Abdul-Rasaq A; Sanni, Lateef O; Owo, Hameed O; Karim, Olayinka R

    2011-10-01

    The effect of variety and moisture content on some engineering properties of five improved paddy rice varieties was investigated within moisture content range of 10% and 30% dry basis (d.b.). Increase in moisture content was found to increase the linear dimensions, mass of 100 seeds, surface area, apparent volume, true volume, arithmetic mean diameter, effective geometric diameter, sphericity, angle of repose, porosity and static coefficient of friction while bulk density and true density decreased with increase in moisture content. Static coefficient of friction was found to increase as moisture content increased from 0.34-0.46, 0.35-0.59, 0.36-0.46 and 0.34-0.45, respectively on plywood, galvanized steel, mild steel and glass structural surfaces. The highest static coefficient was found on galvanized steel. Angle of repose was found to increase as moisture content increases. The study concludes that variety and changes in moisture content significantly (P < 0.05) affected most of the engineering properties determined. PMID:23572787

  20. Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Foss, Peter; Wyzgoski, Michael; Trantina, Gerry; Kunc, Vlastimil; Schutte, Carol; Smith, Mark T.

    2009-12-23

    This report summarizes our FY 2009 research activities for the project titled:"Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures." These activities include (i) the completion of the development of a fiber length attrition model for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs), (ii) development of the a fatigue damage model for LFTs and its implementation in ABAQUS, (iii) development of an impact damage model for LFTs and its implementation in ABAQUS, (iv) development of characterization methods for fatigue testing, (v) characterization of creep and fatigue responses of glass-fiber/polyamide (PA6,6) and glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP), (vi) characterization of fiber length distribution along the flow length of glass/PA6,6 and glass-fiber/PP, and (vii) characterization of impact responses of glass-fiber/PA6,6. The fiber length attrition model accurately captures the fiber length distribution along the flow length of the studied glass-fiber/PP material. The fatigue damage model is able to predict the S-N and stiffness reduction data which are valuable to the fatigue design of LFTs. The impact damage model correctly captures damage accumulation observed in experiments of glass-fiber/PA6,6 plaques.Further work includes validations of these models for representative LFT materials and a complex LFT part.

  1. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CORONAL DIMMING AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Reinard, A. A.

    2009-11-01

    Coronal dimmings are closely related to the footpoints of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and, as such, offer information about CME origins and evolution. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between CME and dimming properties. In particular, we compare CME quantities for events with and without associated dimmings. We find that dimming-associated CMEs, on average, have much higher speeds than non-dimming-associated events. In fact, CMEs without an associated dimming do not appear to travel faster than 800 km s{sup -1}, i.e., the fast solar wind speed. Dimming-associated events are also more likely to be associated with flares, and those flares tend to have the highest magnitudes. We propose that each of these phenomena is affected by the energy available in the source region. Highly energetic source regions produce fast CMEs that are accompanied by larger flares and visible dimmings, while less energetic source regions produce slow CMEs that are accompanied by smaller flares and may or may not have dimmings. The production of dimmings in the latter case may depend on a number of factors including initiation height of the CME, source region magnetic configuration, and observational effects. These results have important implications for understanding and predicting CME initiations.

  2. RSRM-11 (36OW011) ballistics mass properties (STS-35)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, B. J.; Gruet, L. P.; Richards, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    The propulsion performance and reconstructed mass properties data from Thiolol's RSRM-11 motors which were assigned to the STS-35 launch are contained. The Thiokol manufacturing designations for the motors were 360W011A/360W011B, which are referred to as RSRM-11A and RSRM-B, respectively. The launch of STS-35 occurred on 2 December 1990 at the Eastern Test Range (ETR). The data contained herein was input to the STS-35 Flight Evaluation Report. The SRM propellant, TP-H1148, is a composite type solid propellants, formulated of polybutediene acrylic acid, acryonitrile terpolymer binder, epoxy curing agent, ammonium perchlorate oxidizer, and aluminum powder fuel. A small amount of burning rate catalyst (iron oxide) was added to achieve the desired propellant burn rate. The propellant evaluation and raw material information for the RSRM-11 are included. The ballistic performance presented was based on the Operational Flight Instrumentation (OFI) 12.5 sample per second pressure data for the steady state and tail off portion of the pressure trace. Recent studies have shown that the transducers are affected by the measuring system at KSC and temperature gradients created by the igniter heaters. Therefore, an adjustment to the data from each transducer is made to make the initial reading match the atmospheric pressure at the time of launch.

  3. RSRM-9 (360L009): Ballistics mass properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drendel, Albert S.; Richards, M. C.

    1990-01-01

    The propulsion performance and reconstructed mass properties data from Thiokol's RSRM-9 motors which were assigned to the STS-36 launch are presented. The SRM propellant, TP-H1148, is a composite type solid propellant, formulated of polybutadiene acrylic acid acryonitrile terpolymer binder (PBAN), epoxy curing agent, ammonium perchlorate oxidizer and aluminum powder fuel. A small amount of burning rate catalyst (iron oxide) was added to achieve the desired propellant burn rate. The propellant evaluation and raw material information for the RSRM-9 are included. The propellant grain design consists of four segments. There is a forward segment with an eleven point star with a transition into a tapered circular perforated (CP) configuration. There are two center segments that result in a double tapered CP configuration and an aft segment with a triple taper CP configuration and a cutout for the partially submerged nozzle. The ballistic performance presented is based on the Operational Flight Instrumentation (OFI) 12.5 sample per second pressure data for the steady state and tail off portion of the pressure trace. No high sample rate pressure gauges, Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI), were used on this flight and therefore no ignition data is presented.

  4. Human Mars Mission: Weights and Mass Properties. Pt. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brothers, Bobby

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a final report on The Human Mars Mission Weights and Measures. The topics included in this report are: 1) Trans-Earth Injection Storage Human Mars Mission (HMM) Chemical Design Reference Mission (DRM) v4.0a Weight Breakout; 2) Ascent Stage HMM Chemical DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 3) Descent Stages HMM Chemical DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 4) Trans-Mars Injection Stages HMM Chemical DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 5) Trans-Earth Injection Stage HMM Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 6) Ascent Stage HMM SEP DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 7) Descent Stages HMM SEP DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 8) Trans-Mars Injection Stages HMM SEP DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 9) Crew Taxi Stage HMM SEP DRM v4.0 Weight Breakout; 10)Trans-Earth Injection Stage HMM Nuclear DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 11) Ascent Stage HMM Nuclear DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 12) Descent Stages HMM Nuclear DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 13) Trans-Mars Injection Stages HMM Nuclear DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; and 14) HMM Mass Properties Coordinate System.

  5. Chemical ionization mass spectrometric measurements of SO2 emissions from jet engines in flight and test chamber operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunton, D. E.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Borghetti, J. F.; Federico, G. S.; Miller, T. M.; Thorn, W. F.; Viggiano, A. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Cofer, W. R.; McDougal, D. S.; Wey, C. C.

    2000-11-01

    We report the results of two measurements of the concentrations and emission indices of gas-phase sulfur dioxide (EI(SO2)) in the exhaust of an F100-200E turbofan engine. The broad goals of both experiments were to obtain exhaust sulfur speciation and aerosol properties as a function of fuel sulfur content. In the first campaign, an instrumented NASA T-39 Sabreliner aircraft flew in close formation behind several F-16 fighter aircraft to obtain near-field plume composition and aerosol properties. In the second, an F-100 engine of the same type was installed in an altitude test chamber at NASA Glenn Research Center where gas composition and nonvolatile aerosol concentrations and size distributions were obtained at the exit plane of the engine. In both experiments, SO2 concentrations were measured with the Air Force Research Laboratory chemical ionization mass spectrometer as a function of altitude, engine power, and fuel sulfur content. A significant aspect of the program was the use of the same fuels, the same engine type, and many of the same diagnostics in both campaigns. Several different fuels were purchased specifically for these experiments, including high-sulfur Jet A (˜1150 ppmm S), low-sulfur Jet A (˜10 ppmm S), medium-sulfur mixtures of these two fuels, and military JP-8+100 (˜170 and ˜300 ppmm S). The agreement between the flight and test cell measurements of SO2 concentrations was excellent, showing an overall precision of better than ±10% and an estimated absolute accuracy of ±20%. The EI(SO2) varied from 2.49 g SO2/kg fuel for the high-sulfur fuel in the test chamber to less than 0.01 g/kg for the lowest-sulfur fuel. No dependence of emission index on engine power, altitude or simulated altitude, separation distance or plume age, or the presence of contrails was observed. In all experiments the measured EI(SO2) was consistent with essentially all of the fuel sulfur appearing as gas-phase SO2 in the exhaust. However, accurate determination of S

  6. Relationship Between Petrographic Characteristics and the Engineering Properties of Jurassic Sandstones, Hamedan, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, M.; Momeni, A. A.; Rafiei, B.; Khodabakhsh, S.; Torabi-Kaveh, M.

    2013-09-01

    To study the relationship between engineering properties and petrographic characteristics, 20 rock samples were collected from Jurassic sandstones in the Hamedan region, western Iran. The specimens were tested to determine uniaxial compressive strength, point load strength index, tangent modulus, porosity, and dry and saturated unit weights. Samples were also subjected to petrographic examination, which included the observation of 11 parameters and modal analysis. Based on the results of a statistical analysis, polynomial prediction equations were developed to estimate physical and mechanical properties from petrographic characteristics. The results show that textural characteristics are more important than mineral compositions for predicting engineering characteristics. The packing density, packing proximity and grain shape are the petrographic properties that significantly affect the engineering properties of samples. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed, employing four steps comprising various combinations of petrographic characteristics for each engineering parameter. The optimal equation, along with the relevant combination of petrographic characteristics for estimating the engineering properties of the rock samples is proposed.

  7. Apollo/Soyuz test project operational data book. Volume 2: ASTP mass properties data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Spacecraft mass properties data are provided for use in mission planning, trajectory documentation, mission simulations, and consumable loading. Spacecraft for use in determining locations of spacecraft components and the relationship to coordinate systems in the launch and docked configuration. Mass properties and consumable loading data for the ASTP mission are included along with consumables mass property data and mission independent consumable loading information for the CSM and DM.

  8. Spacecraft mass property identification with torque-generating control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergmann, E.; Dzielski, J.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that an applied force was necessary to perform in-flight identification of the mass and center of mass of a spacecraft. This paper shows that the mass and center of mass of a rigid spacecraft can be determined using only torque-producing actuators such as control-moment gyros or reaction wheels, and commonly available sensors, e.g., rate gyros and accelerometers. A space-station application is presented.

  9. Mass-based design and optimization of wave rotors for gas turbine engine enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S.; Liu, H.

    2016-04-01

    An analytic method aiming at mass properties was developed for the preliminary design and optimization of wave rotors. In the present method, we introduce the mass balance principle into the design and thus can predict and optimize the mass qualities as well as the performance of wave rotors. A dedicated least-square method with artificial weighting coefficients was developed to solve the over-constrained system in the mass-based design. This method and the adoption of the coefficients were validated by numerical simulation. Moreover, the problem of fresh air exhaustion (FAE) was put forward and analyzed, and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) was investigated. Parameter analyses and optimization elucidated which designs would not only achieve the best performance, but also operate with minimum EGR and no FAE.

  10. Sewage sludge to landfill: some pertinent engineering properties.

    PubMed

    O'Kelly, Brendan C

    2005-06-01

    More stringent controls on the quality of wastewater discharges have given rise to increasing volumes of sewage sludge for disposal, principally to land, using either land-spreading or sludge-to-landfill operations. Current sludge-to-landfill methods generally involve mixing the concentrated sludge with other solid waste in municipal landfills. However, stricter waste disposal legislation and higher landfill taxes are forcing the water industry to look for more efficient disposal strategies. Landfill operators are also increasingly reluctant to accept sludge material in the slurry state because of construction difficulties and the potential for instability of the landfill slopes. The engineering and drying properties of a municipal sewage sludge are presented and applied, in particular, to the design, construction, and performance of sewage sludge monofills. Sludge handling and landfill construction are most effectively conducted within the water content range of 85% water content, the optimum water content for standard proctor compaction, and 95% water content, the sticky limit of the sludge material. Standard proctor compaction of the sludge within this water content range also achieves the maximum dry density of approximately 0.56 tonne/m3, which maximizes the storage capacity and, hence, the operational life of the landfill site. Undrained shear strength-water content data (pertinent to the stability of the landfill body during construction) and effective stress-strength parameters, which take into account the landfill age and the effects of ongoing sludge digestion, are presented. Landfill subsidence, which occurs principally because of creep and decomposition of the solid organic particles, is significant and continues indefinitely but at progressively slower rates. PMID:16022414

  11. Structure-property relationships of nanoscale engineered perovskite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei

    Recent advances in the synthesis of nanoscale customized structure have demonstrated that reactive molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) can be used to construct nanostructure of oxides with atomic control. The ability to engineer the structure and chemistry of oxides at the nanometer scale makes possible for the creation of new functional materials that can be designed to have exceptional properties. This thesis focused on understanding structure-property relationships of such nanoscale customized oxides utilizing state-of-the-art transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Epitaxial thin films of n = 1--5 members of Ruddlesden-Popper homologous series Srn+1Ti nO3n+1 were synthesized by reactive MBE. We investigated the structure and microstructure of these thin films by x-ray diffraction along with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) in combination with computer image simulations. We found that the thin films of n = 1--3 members are nearly free of intergrowths, e.g. phase-pure, while n = 4 and 5 thin films contain noticeably more intergrowth defects and anti-phase boundaries in their perovskite sheets. We show that these results are consistent with what is known about the thermodynamics of Sr n+1TinO3 n+1 phases. We also investigated the atomic structure and interfacial structure of artificial PbTiO3/SrTiO3 and BaTiO3/SrTiO 3 superlattices grown by MBE both with and without digital compositional grading. Both of these systems form a solid solution over their entire composition range. Thus, these layered heterostructures are metastable. We demonstrated, however, that the thermodynamically metastable superlattices can be kinetically stabilized via layer-by-layer growth. In addition, we found that the interfaces between two constituents in the heterostructures are atomically-abrupt. The superlattice thin films were made fully coherent with the substrates, resulting in a homogeneous large strain in the BaTiO3 layers due to the lattice mismatch between BaTiO3

  12. Estimation of trapped mass by in-cylinder pressure resonance in HCCI engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luján, José Manuel; Guardiola, Carlos; Pla, Benjamín; Bares, Pau

    2016-01-01

    High pressure gradients at homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines heavily excite the pressure resonance. The pressure resonant frequency depends on speed of sound in the cylinder, and thus on the bulk gas temperature. Present paper profits this relation estimating the trapped mass inside the cylinder. In contrast to other estimation methods in the literature, the presented method is based on the trace of the in-cylinder pressure during the cycle; therefore, it permits a cycle-to-cycle mass estimation, and avoids errors associated with other assumptions, such as heat transfer during compression or initial temperature of the in-cylinder gases. The proposed strategy only needs the pressure signal, a volume estimation and a composition assumption to obtain several trapped mass estimates during one cycle. These estimates can be later combined for providing an error estimate of the measurement, with the assumption of negligible blow-by. The method is demonstrated in two HCCI engines of different size, showing good performance in steady operation and presenting great potential to control transient operation.

  13. Mass spectrometric analysis and aerodynamic properties of various types of combustion-related aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J.; Weimer, S.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Helas, G.; Gwaze, P.; Schmid, O.; Andreae, M. O.; Kirchner, U.

    2006-12-01

    Various types of combustion-related particles in the size range between 100 and 850 nm were analyzed with an aerosol mass spectrometer and a differential mobility analyzer. The measurements were performed with particles originating from biomass burning, diesel engine exhaust, laboratory combustion of diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as from spark soot generation. Physical and morphological parameters like fractal dimension, effective density, bulk density and dynamic shape factor were derived or at least approximated from the measurements of electrical mobility diameter and vacuum aerodynamic diameter. The relative intensities of the mass peaks in the mass spectra obtained from particles generated by a commercial diesel passenger car, by diesel combustion in a laboratory burner, and by evaporating and re-condensing lubrication oil were found to be very similar. The mass spectra from biomass burning particles show signatures identified as organic compounds like levoglucosan but also others which are yet unidentified. The aerodynamic behavior yielded a fractal dimension (Df) of 2.09 +/- 0.06 for biomass burning particles from the combustion of dry beech sticks, but showed values around three, and hence more compact particle morphologies, for particles from combustion of more natural oak. Scanning electron microscope images confirmed the finding that the beech combustion particles were fractal-like aggregates, while the oak combustion particles displayed a much more compact shape. For particles from laboratory combusted diesel fuel, a Df value of 2.35 was found, for spark soot particles, Df [approximate] 2.10. The aerodynamic properties of fractal-like particles from dry beech wood combustion indicate an aerodynamic shape factor [chi] that increases with electrical mobility diameter, and a bulk density of 1.92 g cm-3. An upper limit of [chi] [approximate] 1.2 was inferred for the shape factor of the more compact particles from oak combustion.

  14. RAPID DYNAMICAL MASS SEGREGATION AND PROPERTIES OF FRACTAL STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jincheng; Chen Li; De Grijs, Richard

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the evolution of young star clusters using N-body simulations. We confirm that subvirial and fractal-structured clusters will dynamically mass segregate on a short timescale (within 0.5 Myr). We adopt a modified minimum-spanning-tree method to measure the degree of mass segregation, demonstrating that the stars escaping from a cluster's potential are important for the temporal dependence of mass segregation in the cluster. The form of the initial velocity distribution will also affect the degree of mass segregation. If it depends on radius, the outer parts of the cluster would expand without undergoing collapse. In velocity space, we find 'inverse mass segregation', which indicates that massive stars have higher velocity dispersions than their lower-mass counterparts.

  15. Relationships among particle number, surface area, and respirable mass concentrations in automotive engine manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, William A; Evans, Douglas E; Ku, Bon Ki; Maynard, Andrew D; Slavin, Thomas J; Peters, Thomas M

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between particle number, surface area, and respirable mass concentration measured simultaneously in a foundry and an automotive engine machining and assembly center. Aerosol concentrations were measured throughout each plant with a condensation particle counter for number concentration, a diffusion charger for active surface area concentration, and an optical particle counter for respirable mass concentration. At selected locations, particle size distributions were characterized with the optical particle counter and an electrical low pressure impactor. Statistical analyses showed that active surface area concentration was correlated with ultrafine particle number concentration and weakly correlated with respirable mass concentration. Correlation between number and active surface area concentration was stronger during winter (R2 = 0.6 for both plants) than in the summer (R2 = 0.38 and 0.36 for the foundry and engine plant respectively). The stronger correlation in winter was attributed to use of direct-fire gas fired heaters that produced substantial numbers of ultrafine particles with a modal diameter between 0.007 and 0.023 mu m. These correlations support findings obtained through theoretical analysis. Such analysis predicts that active surface area increasingly underestimates geometric surface area with increasing particle size, particularly for particles larger than 100 nm. Thus, a stronger correlation between particle number concentration and active surface area concentration is expected in the presence of high concentrations of ultrafine particles. In general, active surface area concentration may be a concentration metric that is distinct from particle number concentration and respirable mass concentration. For future health effects or toxicological studies involving nano-materials or ultrafine aerosols, this finding needs to be considered, as exposure metrics may influence data interpretation. PMID:18982535

  16. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 4: Detail mass properties data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Mass properties data are presented to describe the characteristics of an expendable second stage with a reusable space shuttle booster. The final mass characteristics of the vehicle configurations for three specified payloads are presented in terms of weight, center of gravity, and mass moments of inertia. Three basic subjects are the integrated vehicle system, the expendable second stage, and the booster modifications.

  17. Forest engineering implication of storm-induced mass wasting in the Oregon Coast Range, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Charles L.

    1999-12-01

    A severe winter storm, under conditions of high antecedent moisture and a substantial snow pack at higher elevations, in February of 1996 resulted in rapid flooding and a large number of precipitation-induced landslides. The number of mass wasting events greatly exceeded the expectations of many land managers, given the magnitude (50-year return interval ) of the storm event. Both ground and aerial surveys were used to characterize the nature of these events and relate the occurrence of mass wasting activity to the topography, geology, and land management activities of the region. This paper is based upon an aerial videography transect of the north Oregon Coast Range and explores the potential of this technique, with special reference to storm damage assessment in commercial forestry areas. Given the efforts to enhance and protect anadromous fish-rearing habitat in the region's perennial streams, this survey explores the implications of current and past forest engineering practices, and suggests that engineering efforts to 'de-construct' the legacy of old roads and culvert systems may be appropriate in the drainage basins with the highest potential habitat values.

  18. Probing Late Neutrino Mass Properties With SupernovaNeutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Joseph; Goldberg, Haim; Perez, Gilad; Sarcevic, Ina

    2007-08-08

    Models of late-time neutrino mass generation contain new interactions of the cosmic background neutrinos with supernova relic neutrinos (SRNs). Exchange of an on-shell light scalar may lead to significant modification of the differential SRN flux observed at earth. We consider an Abelian U(1) model for generating neutrino masses at low scales, and show that there are cases for which the changes induced in the flux allow one to distinguish the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos, as well as the type of neutrino mass hierarchy (normal or inverted or quasi-degenerate). In some region of parameter space the determination of the absolute values of the neutrino masses is also conceivable. Measurements of the presence of these effects may be possible at the next-generation water Cerenkov detectors enriched with Gadolinium, or a 100 kton liquid argon detector.

  19. A review of the behaviour and engineering properties of carbonate soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulos, H. G.

    1980-12-01

    The nature and origins of carbonate soil deposits are reviewed and methods of classifying such soils are discussed. Data on their engineering behavior is then presented, including shear strength properties, compressibility and consolidation characteristics, and their response to cyclic loading.

  20. New engineering design, instrument modeling, and data analysis techniques for spaceborne mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Daniel J.

    This work describes technological innovations that can be used to improve upon space-borne mass spectrometers (MS), enabling breakthrough science and the development of the next-generation of sensors. Emphasis is placed on the two classes of MS with the strongest spaceflight heritage: quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MS). For the QMS, higher order auxiliary excitation techniques are modeled and implemented for the first time for both commercial and spaceflight-like sensors. These techniques, through modest modification of instrument electronics, are shown to significantly improve upon the maximum attainable mass resolution, sensitivity, ion rejection efficiency, and stability of measured mass spectra. For the TOF-MS, a complete analysis of instrument noise sources is conducted, and a mathematical framework for instrument measurements is developed. Such a framework results in an end-to-end forward modeling of instrument noise, dataset signal-to-noise estimation, and noise event removal algorithms. The developed noise processing techniques are applied to the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) instrument on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft to enable the first ever mapping of the spatial distribution of heavy ions at Mercury, the first in situ measurements of solar wind heavy ion non-thermal properties in the inner heliosphere, as well as the first in situ measurements made inside of Earth's orbit of ionized helium originating from interstellar space.

  1. Transient Hypoxia Improves Matrix Properties in Tissue Engineered Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Yodmuang, Supansa; Gadjanski, Ivana; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage is a hypoxic tissue, with oxygen tension ranging from <10% at the cartilage surface to <1% in the deepest layers. In addition to spatial gradients, cartilage development is also associated with temporal changes in oxygen tension. However, a vast majority of cartilage tissue engineering protocols involves cultivation of chondrocytes or their progenitors under ambient oxygen concentration (21% O2), that is, significantly above physiological levels in either developing or adult cartilage. Our study was designed to test the hypothesis that transient hypoxia followed by normoxic conditions results in improved quality of engineered cartilaginous ECM. To this end, we systematically compared the effects of normoxia (21% O2 for 28 days), hypoxia (5% O2 for 28 days) and transient hypoxia—reoxygenation (5% O2 for 7 days and 21% O2 for 21 days) on the matrix composition and expression of the chondrogenic genes in cartilage constructs engineered in vitro. We demonstrated that reoxygenation had the most effect on the expression of cartilaginous genes including COL2A1, ACAN, and SOX9 and increased tissue concentrations of amounts of glycosaminoglycans and type II collagen. The equilibrium Young’s moduli of tissues grown under transient hypoxia (510.01 ± 28.15 kPa) and under normoxic conditions (417.60 ± 68.46 kPa) were significantly higher than those measured under hypoxic conditions (279.61 ± 20.52 kPa). These data suggest that the cultivation protocols utilizing transient hypoxia with reoxygenation have high potential for efficient cartilage tissue engineering, but need further optimization in order to achieve higher mechanical functionality of engineered constructs. PMID:23203946

  2. An engineered anisotropic nanofilm with unidirectional wetting properties.

    PubMed

    Malvadkar, Niranjan A; Hancock, Matthew J; Sekeroglu, Koray; Dressick, Walter J; Demirel, Melik C

    2010-12-01

    Anisotropic textured surfaces allow water striders to walk on water, butterflies to shed water from their wings and plants to trap insects and pollen. Capturing these natural features in biomimetic surfaces is an active area of research. Here, we report an engineered nanofilm, composed of an array of poly(p-xylylene) nanorods, which demonstrates anisotropic wetting behaviour by means of a pin-release droplet ratchet mechanism. Droplet retention forces in the pin and release directions differ by up to 80 μN, which is over ten times greater than the values reported for other engineered anisotropic surfaces. The nanofilm provides a microscale smooth surface on which to transport microlitre droplets, and is also relatively easy to synthesize by a bottom-up vapour-phase technique. An accompanying comprehensive model successfully describes the film's anisotropic wetting behaviour as a function of measurable film morphology parameters. PMID:20935657

  3. Flight and Static Exhaust Flow Properties of an F110-GE-129 Engine in an F-16XL Airplane During Acoustic Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzman, Jon K.; Webb, Lannie D.; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The exhaust flow properties (mass flow, pressure, temperature, velocity, and Mach number) of the F110-GE-129 engine in an F-16XL airplane were determined from a series of flight tests flown at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. These tests were performed in conjunction with NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (LARC) as part of a study to investigate the acoustic characteristics of jet engines operating at high nozzle pressure conditions. The range of interest for both objectives was from Mach 0.3 to Mach 0.9. NASA Dryden flew the airplane and acquired and analyzed the engine data to determine the exhaust characteristics. NASA Langley collected the flyover acoustic measurements and correlated these results with their current predictive codes. This paper describes the airplane, tests, and methods used to determine the exhaust flow properties and presents the exhaust flow properties. No acoustics results are presented.

  4. Properties of thermoacoustic engines desirable for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, Scott

    2005-09-01

    The advantages of a technology that are promoted at its inception are not always those that may eventually allow it to win out over its competition. A collaboration with Northrop Grumman Space Technology on a small thermoacoustic-Stirling electric generator has shed some light on certain advantages of thermoacoustic-Stirling engines beyond ``no moving parts'' or ``less moving parts.'' Some of these advantages will be discussed

  5. Education of Intellectual Properties for the Training of Creative Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yoshifumi; Kajiwara, Katuhiko; Oodan, Kyouji

    Kurume National College of Technology has obtained results concerning intellectual property education combined with inventive education. In the education program, students learn about industrial property and practical expertise such as searching the open patents, making up patent-maps, and making patent application papers to the Patent Office under the guidance of a teacher, a patent adviser and attorney. As a result, some of the creative students have already applied for patents. In the future, we are going to prepare a managing system for the intellectual property at our college for the intensification of cooperative application with the local company.

  6. Pericytes: Properties, Functions and Applications in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Gökçinar-Yagci, Beyza; Uçkan-Çetinkaya, Duygu; Çelebi-Saltik, Betül

    2015-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are one of the most studied adult stem cells and in recent years. They have become attractive agents/cell source for cellular therapy and regenerative medicine applications. During investigations about their origin, researchers hypothesized that perivascular regions are the common anatomical regions where MSCs come from and perivascular cells like pericytes (PCs) (Rouget cells, mural cells) are in vivo counterparts of MSCs. Beside capillaries and microvessels as their most common locations, PCs are also found in large vessels (arteries and veins). They can be isolated from several tissues and organs particularly from retina and brain. There are different approaches about their isolation, characterization and culture but there has been no common protocol yet because of the lack of defined PC-specific marker. They make special contact with endothelial cells in the basement membrane and have very important functions in several tissues and organs. They participate in vascular development, stabilization, maturation, and remodeling, blood pressure control, endothelial cell proliferation and differentiation, contractility of vascular smooth muscle cells, wound healing, vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, long-term maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow niche. Their multipotential differentiation capacity and participation in many events in the body make PCs preferred cells in tissue engineering applications including 3D blood-brain barrier models, skeletal muscle constructs, bone tissue engineering and tissue-engineered vascular grafts. PMID:25865146

  7. Mass spectrometry characterisation of fatty acids from metabolically engineered soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Murad, André M; Vianna, Giovanni R; Machado, Alex M; da Cunha, Nicolau B; Coelho, Cíntia M; Lacerda, Valquiria A M; Coelho, Marly C; Rech, Elibio L

    2014-05-01

    Improving the quality and performance of soybean oil as biodiesel depends on the chemical composition of its fatty acids and requires an increase in monounsaturated acids and a reduction in polyunsaturated acids. Despite its current use as a source of biofuel, soybean oil contains an average of 25 % oleic acid and 13 % palmitic acid, which negatively impacts its oxidative stability and freezing point, causing a high rate of nitrogen oxide emission. Gas chromatography and ion mobility mass spectrometry were conducted on soybean fatty acids from metabolically engineered seed extracts to determine the nature of the structural oleic and palmitic acids. The soybean genes FAD2-1 and FatB were placed under the control of the 35SCaMV constitutive promoter, introduced to soybean embryonic axes by particle bombardment and down-regulated using RNA interference technology. Results indicate that the metabolically engineered plants exhibited a significant increase in oleic acid (up to 94.58 %) and a reduction in palmitic acid (to <3 %) in their seed oil content. No structural differences were observed between the fatty acids of the transgenic and non-transgenic oil extracts. PMID:24652150

  8. Determination of densified biomass mass properties using 3D laser scanning and image analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass densification is viewed as the indispensable feedstock preprocessing operation for efficient transport, storage, material flow through machines, and handling activities. Accurate mass properties of densified biomass such as surface area, volume, and envelope density form fundamental data for...

  9. Some statistical properties of strange attractors: engineering view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijangos, M.; Kontorovich, V.; Aguilar-Torrentera, J.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, the statistical characterization of strange attractors is investigated via the so-called 'model distribution' approach. It is shown that in order to calculate the first four cumulants, which are necessary to create a model distribution of kurtosis approximation, a systematic method for the calculus of the variance needs to be considered. Correspondently, an analytical method based on the Kolmogorov-Sinai (K-S) entropy for variance approximation is herein proposed. The methodology is of interest for its application in the statistical analysis of chaotic systems that model physical phenomena found in some areas of electrical (communication) engineering.

  10. Method for simultaneous measurement of mass loading and fluid property changes using a quartz crystal microbalance

    DOEpatents

    Granstaff, Victoria E.; Martin, Stephen J.

    1993-01-01

    A method, using a quartz crystal microbalance, to obtain simultaneous measurement of solid mass accumulation and changes in liquid density-viscosity product. The simultaneous real-time measurements of electrical parameters yields that changes in surface mass can be differentiated from changes in solution properties. Two methods to obtain the admittance/frequency data are employed.

  11. Method for simultaneous measurement of mass loading and fluid property changes using a quartz crystal microbalance

    DOEpatents

    Granstaff, V.E.; Martin, S.J.

    1993-04-13

    A method is described, using a quartz crystal microbalance, to obtain simultaneous measurement of solid mass accumulation and changes in liquid density-viscosity product. The simultaneous real-time measurements of electrical parameters yields that changes in surface mass can be differentiated from changes in solution properties. Two methods to obtain the admittance/frequency data are employed.

  12. Bioinspired Reductionistic Peptide Engineering for Exceptional Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avinash, M. B.; Raut, Devaraj; Mishra, Manish Kumar; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Govindaraju, T.

    2015-11-01

    A simple solution-processing and self-assembly approach that exploits the synergistic interactions between multiple hydrogen bonded networks and aromatic interactions was utilized to synthesize molecular crystals of cyclic dipeptides (CDPs), whose molecular weights (~0.2 kDa) are nearly three orders of magnitude smaller than that of natural structural proteins (50-300 kDa). Mechanical properties of these materials, measured using the nanoindentation technique, indicate that the stiffness and strength are comparable and sometimes better than those of natural fibres. The measured mechanical responses were rationalized by recourse to the crystallographic structural analysis and intermolecular interactions in the self-assembled single crystals. With this work we highlight the significance of developing small molecule based bioinspired design strategies to emulate biomechanical properties. A particular advantage of the successfully demonstrated reductionistic strategy of the present work is its amenability for realistic industrial scale manufacturing of designer biomaterials with desired mechanical properties.

  13. Engineer-able optical properties of trilayer graphene nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshginqalam, Bahar; T, Hamid Toloue A.; Taghi Ahmadi, Mohammad; Sabatyan, Arash

    2016-03-01

    Graphene with a single atomic layer of carbon indicates two-dimensional behavior which plays an important role in sensor application, because of its high surface-to-volume ratio. Its interesting optical properties lead to low-cost and accurate optical devices as well. In the presented work trilayer graphene nanoribbon (TGN) with focus on its optical property for different incident wave lengths in the presence of applied voltage is explored. In low bias condition the optical conductance is modeled and dielectric constant and refractive index based on the estimated conductance are calculated theoretically; finally the obtained results are investigated numerically. Controllable optical properties supported by applied voltage on TGN are proved. Consequently, the proposed model indicates TGN as a possible candidate on surface plasmon based sensors, which needs to be explored.

  14. Bioinspired Reductionistic Peptide Engineering for Exceptional Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Avinash, M. B.; Raut, Devaraj; Mishra, Manish Kumar; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Govindaraju, T.

    2015-01-01

    A simple solution-processing and self-assembly approach that exploits the synergistic interactions between multiple hydrogen bonded networks and aromatic interactions was utilized to synthesize molecular crystals of cyclic dipeptides (CDPs), whose molecular weights (~0.2 kDa) are nearly three orders of magnitude smaller than that of natural structural proteins (50–300 kDa). Mechanical properties of these materials, measured using the nanoindentation technique, indicate that the stiffness and strength are comparable and sometimes better than those of natural fibres. The measured mechanical responses were rationalized by recourse to the crystallographic structural analysis and intermolecular interactions in the self-assembled single crystals. With this work we highlight the significance of developing small molecule based bioinspired design strategies to emulate biomechanical properties. A particular advantage of the successfully demonstrated reductionistic strategy of the present work is its amenability for realistic industrial scale manufacturing of designer biomaterials with desired mechanical properties. PMID:26525957

  15. Nondestructive identification of engineering properties of metal fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vala, J.; Horák, M.

    2012-09-01

    Macroscopic homogeneity of metal fibre composites, namely those used for building structures, characterized by constant volume fraction of randomly oriented fibre particles, as well as their isotropy, or, alternatively, prescribed orientation of fibres, determines their mechanical, thermal, etc. properties, consequently their long-time behaviour, reliability and range of user applications. Destructive tests are available under laboratory conditions, but frequently impossible in situ, thus the development of reliable nondestructive approaches is required. This paper presents the physical and mathematical background of two classes of such tests, based i) on the planar radiographic images, analyzed with help of the fast Fourier transform, ii) on the magnetic properties of materials, using the Hall effect and properties of solutions of the Laplace equation. Practical results with fibre concrete samples from Brno University of Technology demonstrate the advantages and drawbacks of both approaches and sketch the possibilities of their future generalization.

  16. Band structure engineering and thermoelectric properties of charge-compensated filled skutterudites

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiaoya; Yang, Jiong; Wu, Lijun; Salvador, James R.; Zhang, Cheng; Villaire, William L.; Haddad, Daad; Yang, Jihui; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-12

    Thermoelectric properties of semiconductors are intimately related to their electronic band structure, which can be engineered via chemical doping. Dopant Ga in the cage-structured skutterudite Co4Sb12 substitutes Sb sites while occupying the void sites. Combining quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that Ga dual-site occupancy breaks the symmetry of the Sb-Sb network, splits the deep triply-degenerate conduction bands, and drives them downward to the band edge. The charge-compensating nature of the dual occupancy Ga increases overall filling fraction limit. By imparting this unique band structure feature, and judiciously doping the materials by increasing the Yb content, we promote the Fermi level to a point where carriers are in energetic proximity to these features. Increased participation of these heavier bands in electronic transport leads to increased thermopower and effective mass. Further, the localized distortion from Ga/Sb substitution enhances the phonon scattering to reduce the thermal conductivity effectively.

  17. Band Structure Engineering and Thermoelectric Properties of Charge-Compensated Filled Skutterudites

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoya; Yang, Jiong; Wu, Lijun; Salvador, James R.; Zhang, Cheng; Villaire, William L.; Haddad, Daad; Yang, Jihui; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric properties of semiconductors are intimately related to their electronic band structure, which can be engineered via chemical doping. Dopant Ga in the cage-structured skutterudite Co4Sb12 substitutes Sb sites while occupying the void sites. Combining quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that Ga dual-site occupancy breaks the symmetry of the Sb-Sb network, splits the deep triply-degenerate conduction bands, and drives them downward to the band edge. The charge-compensating nature of the dual occupancy Ga increases overall filling fraction limit. By imparting this unique band structure feature, and judiciously doping the materials by increasing the Yb content, we promote the Fermi level to a point where carriers are in energetic proximity to these features. Increased participation of these heavier bands in electronic transport leads to increased thermopower and effective mass. Further, the localized distortion from Ga/Sb substitution enhances the phonon scattering to reduce the thermal conductivity effectively. PMID:26456013

  18. Band Structure Engineering and Thermoelectric Properties of Charge-Compensated Filled Skutterudites.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoya; Yang, Jiong; Wu, Lijun; Salvador, James R; Zhang, Cheng; Villaire, William L; Haddad, Daad; Yang, Jihui; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric properties of semiconductors are intimately related to their electronic band structure, which can be engineered via chemical doping. Dopant Ga in the cage-structured skutterudite Co4Sb12 substitutes Sb sites while occupying the void sites. Combining quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that Ga dual-site occupancy breaks the symmetry of the Sb-Sb network, splits the deep triply-degenerate conduction bands, and drives them downward to the band edge. The charge-compensating nature of the dual occupancy Ga increases overall filling fraction limit. By imparting this unique band structure feature, and judiciously doping the materials by increasing the Yb content, we promote the Fermi level to a point where carriers are in energetic proximity to these features. Increased participation of these heavier bands in electronic transport leads to increased thermopower and effective mass. Further, the localized distortion from Ga/Sb substitution enhances the phonon scattering to reduce the thermal conductivity effectively. PMID:26456013

  19. Band structure engineering and thermoelectric properties of charge-compensated filled skutterudites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, Xiaoya; Yang, Jiong; Wu, Lijun; Salvador, James R.; Zhang, Cheng; Villaire, William L.; Haddad, Daad; Yang, Jihui; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-12

    Thermoelectric properties of semiconductors are intimately related to their electronic band structure, which can be engineered via chemical doping. Dopant Ga in the cage-structured skutterudite Co4Sb12 substitutes Sb sites while occupying the void sites. Combining quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that Ga dual-site occupancy breaks the symmetry of the Sb-Sb network, splits the deep triply-degenerate conduction bands, and drives them downward to the band edge. The charge-compensating nature of the dual occupancy Ga increases overall filling fraction limit. By imparting this unique band structure feature, and judiciously doping the materials by increasing the Yb content,more » we promote the Fermi level to a point where carriers are in energetic proximity to these features. Increased participation of these heavier bands in electronic transport leads to increased thermopower and effective mass. Further, the localized distortion from Ga/Sb substitution enhances the phonon scattering to reduce the thermal conductivity effectively.« less

  20. Multi-component nanofibrous scaffolds with tunable properties for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Moncy V.

    Bone is a highly complex tissue which is an integral part of vertebrates and hence any damage has a major negative effect on the quality of life. Tissue engineering is regarded as an ideal route to resolve the issues related to the scarcity of tissue and organ for transplantation. Apart from cell line and growth factors, the choice of materials and fabrication technique for scaffold are equally important. The goal of this work was to develop a multi-component nanofibrous scaffold based on a synthetic polymer (poly(lactic-co-glycolide) (PLGA)), a biopolymer (collagen) and a biomineral (nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA)) by electrospinning technique, which mimics the nanoscopic, chemical, and anisotropic features of bone. Preliminary studies involved fabrication of nanocomposite scaffolds based on PLGA and nano-HA. Morphological and mechanical characterizations revealed that at low concentrations, nano-HA acted as reinforcements, whereas at higher concentrations the presence of aggregation was detrimental to the scaffold. Hydrolytic degradation studies revealed the scaffold had a little mass loss and the mechanical property was maintained for a period of 6 weeks. This study was followed by evaluation of a blend system based on PLGA and collagen. Collagen addition provides hydrophilicity and the necessary cell binding sites in PLGA. The structural characterization revealed that the blend had limited interactions between the two components. The mechanical characterization revealed that with increasing collagen concentration, there was a decline in mechanical properties. However, crosslinking of the blend system, with carbodiimide (EDC) resulted in improving the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. A multi-component system was developed by adding different concentrations of nano-HA to a fixed PLGA/collagen blend composition (80/20). Morphological and mechanical characterizations revealed properties similar to the PLGA/HA system. Cyto-compatibility studies revealed

  1. PHYSICAL AND ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES AND SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of a laboratory testing program to investigate the properties of raw and chemically fixed hazardous industrial wastes and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludges. Specimens of raw and fixed sludges were subjected to a variety of tests commonly used...

  2. Engineering Biomaterial Properties for Central Nervous System Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivet, Christopher John

    Biomaterials offer unique properties that are intrinsic to the chemistry of the material itself or occur as a result of the fabrication process; iron oxide nanoparticles are superparamagnetic, which enables controlled heating in the presence of an alternating magnetic field, and a hydrogel and electrospun fiber hybrid material provides minimally invasive placement of a fibrous, artificial extracellular matrix for tissue regeneration. Utilization of these unique properties towards central nervous system disease and dysfunction requires a thorough definition of the properties in concert with full biological assessment. This enables development of material-specific features to elicit unique cellular responses. Iron oxide nanoparticles are first investigated for material-dependent, cortical neuron cytotoxicity in vitro and subsequently evaluated for alternating magnetic field stimulation induced hyperthermia, emulating the clinical application for enhanced chemotherapy efficacy in glioblastoma treatment. A hydrogel and electrospun fiber hybrid material is first applied to a rat brain to evaluate biomaterial interface astrocyte accumulation as a function of hybrid material composition. The hybrid material is then utilized towards increasing functional engraftment of dopaminergic progenitor neural stem cells in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Taken together, these two scenarios display the role of material property characterization in development of biomaterial strategies for central nervous system repair and regeneration.

  3. Physical properties, chemical composition, and cloud forming potential of particulate emissions from a marine diesel engine at various load conditions.

    PubMed

    Petzold, A; Weingartner, E; Hasselbach, J; Lauer, P; Kurok, C; Fleischer, F

    2010-05-15

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions from one serial 4-stroke medium-speed marine diesel engine were measured for load conditions from 10% to 110% in test rig studies using heavy fuel oil (HFO). Testing the engine across its entire load range permitted the scaling of exhaust PM properties with load. Emission factors for particle number, particle mass, and chemical compounds were determined. The potential of particles to form cloud droplets (cloud condensation nuclei, CCN) was calculated from chemical composition and particle size. Number emission factors are (3.43 +/- 1.26) x 10(16) (kg fuel)(-1) at 85-110% load and (1.06 +/- 0.10) x 10(16) (kg fuel)(-1) at 10% load. CCN emission factors of 1-6 x 10(14) (kg fuel)(-1) are at the lower bound of data reported in the literature. From combined thermal and optical methods, black carbon (BC) emission factors of 40-60 mg/(kg fuel) were determined for 85-100% load and 370 mg/(kg fuel) for 10% load. The engine load dependence of the conversion efficiency for fuel sulfur into sulfate of (1.08 +/- 0.15)% at engine idle to (3.85 +/- 0.41)% at cruise may serve as input to global emission calculations for various load conditions. PMID:20402501

  4. [Effects of fuel properties on the performance of a typical Euro IV diesel engine].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-miao; Wang, Jian-xin; Shuai, Shi-jin

    2008-09-01

    With the purpose of establishing diesel fuel standard for China National 4th Emission Standard, as one part of Beijing "Auto-Oil" programme, engine performance test has been done on a typical Euro IV diesel engine using eight diesel fuels with different fuel properties. Test results show that, fuel properties has little effect on power, fuel consumption, and in-cylinder combustion process of tested Euro IV diesel engine; sulfate in PM and gaseous SO2 emissions increase linearly with diesel sulfur content increase; cetane number increase cause BSFC and PM reduce and NOx increase; T90 decrease cause NOx reduce while PM shows trend of reduce. Prediction equations of tested Euro IV diesel engine's ESC cycle NOx and PM emissions before SCR response to diesel fuel sulfur content, cetane number, T90 and aromatics have been obtained using linear regression method on the base of test results. PMID:19068662

  5. Chemical analysis of diesel engine nanoparticles using a nano-DMA/thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tobias, H J; Beving, D E; Ziemann, P J; Sakurai, H; Zuk, M; McMurry, P H; Zarling, D; Waytulonis, R; Kittelson, D B

    2001-06-01

    Diesel engines are known to emit high number concentrations of nanoparticles (diameter < 50 nm), but the physical and chemical mechanisms by which they form are not understood. Information on chemical composition is lacking because the small size, low mass concentration, and potential for contamination of samples obtained by standard techniques make nanoparticles difficult to analyze. A nano-differential mobility analyzer was used to size-select nanoparticles (mass median diameter approximately 25-60 nm) from diesel engine exhaust for subsequent chemical analysis by thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometry. Mass spectra were used to identify and quantify nanoparticle components, and compound molecular weights and vapor pressures were estimated from calibrated desorption temperatures. Branched alkanes and alkyl-substituted cycloalkanes from unburned fuel and/or lubricating oil appear to contribute most of the diesel nanoparticle mass. The volatility of the organic fraction of the aerosol increases as the engine load decreases and as particle size increases. Sulfuric acid was also detected at estimated concentrations of a few percent of the total nanoparticle mass. The results are consistent with a mechanism of nanoparticle formation involving nucleation of sulfuric acid and water, followed by particle growth by condensation of organic species. PMID:11414024

  6. Quantitative Ultrasonic Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Engineering Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the application of ultrasonic techniques to nondestructive measurement of mechanical strength of engineering materials is reviewed. A dormant concept in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is invoked. The availability of ultrasonic methods that can be applied to actual parts to assess their potential susceptibility to failure under design conditions is discussed. It was shown that ultrasonic methods yield measurements of elastic moduli, microstructure, hardness, fracture toughness, tensile strength, yield strength, and shear strength for a wide range of materials (including many types of metals, ceramics, and fiber composites). It was also indicated that although most of these methods were shown feasible in laboratory studies, more work is needed before they can be used on actual parts in processing, assembly, inspection, and maintenance lines.

  7. Bringing Outreach into the Engineering Classroom--A Mass and Heat Transfer Course Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eniola-Adefeso, Omolola

    2010-01-01

    One major contributing factor to the low number of students receiving degrees in engineering is the two decades of steady decline in student enrollment in engineering disciplines. Evidence in the literature suggests that this decline can be linked to K-12 students' lack of knowledge of engineering careers and their perception of engineering as…

  8. A thermodynamic approach to obtain materials properties for engineering applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Y. Austin

    1993-01-01

    With the ever increases in the capabilities of computers for numerical computations, we are on the verge of using these tools to model manufacturing processes for improving the efficiency of these processes as well as the quality of the products. One such process is casting for the production of metals. However, in order to model metal casting processes in a meaningful way it is essential to have the basic properties of these materials in their molten state, solid state as well as in the mixed state of solid and liquid. Some of the properties needed may be considered as intrinsic such as the density, heat capacity or enthalpy of freezing of a pure metal, while others are not. For instance, the enthalpy of solidification of an alloy is not a defined thermodynamic quantity. Its value depends on the micro-segregation of the phases during the course of solidification. The objective of the present study is to present a thermodynamic approach to obtain some of the intrinsic properties and combining thermodynamics with kinetic models to estimate such quantities as the enthalpy of solidification of an alloy.

  9. Rational engineering of physicochemical properties of nanomaterials for biomedical applications with nanotoxicological perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navya, P. N.; Daima, Hemant Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Innovative engineered nanomaterials are at the leading edge of rapidly emerging fields of nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. Meticulous synthesis, unique physicochemical properties, manifestation of chemical or biological moieties on the surface of materials make engineered nanostructures suitable for a variety of biomedical applications. Besides, tailored nanomaterials exhibit entirely novel therapeutic applications with better functionality, sensitivity, efficiency and specificity due to their customized unique physicochemical and surface properties. Additionally, such designer made nanomaterials has potential to generate series of interactions with various biological entities including DNA, proteins, membranes, cells and organelles at nano-bio interface. These nano-bio interactions are driven by colloidal forces and predominantly depend on the dynamic physicochemical and surface properties of nanomaterials. Nevertheless, recent development and atomic scale tailoring of various physical, chemical and surface properties of nanomaterials is promising to dictate their interaction in anticipated manner with biological entities for biomedical applications. As a result, rationally designed nanomaterials are in extensive demand for bio-molecular detection and diagnostics, therapeutics, drug and gene delivery, fluorescent labelling, tissue engineering, biochemical sensing and other pharmaceuticals applications. However, toxicity and risk associated with engineered nanomaterials is rather unclear or not well understood; which is gaining considerable attention and the field of nanotoxicology is evolving promptly. Therefore, this review explores current knowledge of articulate engineering of nanomaterials for biomedical applications with special attention on potential toxicological perspectives.

  10. Reuse of coal mining wastes in civil engineering. Part 1: Properties of minestone

    SciTech Connect

    Skarzynska, K.M.

    1995-07-01

    This review is intended to introduce the readers to the geotechnical properties of minestone obtained from various countries and to describe laboratory and field methods used to examine and evaluate such material. The contents of the paper consist of general information on the environmental consequences of coal mining, the origin of the by-product, and the classification of the material. Primary emphasis has been placed on describing the physical and mechanical properties with respect to geotechnical engineering. Characteristic properties, such as degradation, weathering, spontaneous heating, etc., are specific for this man-made soil and are discussed in relationship to civil engineering. Finally, the current and far-reaching effects of existing radioactivity is also presented. Preparation of the review is based on an extensive literature survey, as well as on the investigations of the author and practical applications. A general conclusion can be made from the reviewed data that a noticeable similarity does exist between the chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of minestone from different sources and countries. this is important because the research results and practical experience obtained in one country may then be applied to projects in another country. The review should be helpful in understanding the behavior of minestone during its transport for prospective utilization in different engineering projects. The author hopes that the information will be useful to those studying environmental, civil, and water engineering, as well as for designers and researchers investigating the potential use of this man-made (anthropogenic) soil in various fields of engineering.

  11. Engineering Database of Liquid Salt Thermophysical and Thermochemical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar S. Sohal; Matthias A. Ebner; Piyush Sabharwall; Phil Sharpe

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a review of thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of candidate molten salt coolants, which may be used as a primary coolant within a nuclear reactor or heat transport medium from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to a processing plant, for example, a hydrogen-production plant. Thermodynamic properties of four types of molten salts, including LiF-BeF2 (67 and 33 mol%, respectively; also known as FLiBe), LiF-NaF-KF (46.5, 11.5, and 52 mol%, also known as FLiNaK), and KCl-MgCl2 (67 and 33 mol%), and sodium nitrate-sodium nitrite-potassium nitrate (NaNO3–NaNO2–KNO3, (7-49-44 or 7-40-53 mol%) have been investigated. Limitations of existing correlations to predict density, viscosity, specific heat capacity, surface tension, and thermal conductivity, were identified. The impact of thermodynamic properties on the heat transfer, especially Nusselt number was also discussed. Stability of the molten salts with structural alloys and their compatibility with the structural alloys was studied. Nickel and alloys with dense Ni coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides but not so in chlorides. Of the chromium containing alloys, Hastelloy N appears to have the best corrosion resistance in fluorides, while Haynes 230 was most resistant in chloride. In general, alloys with increasing carbon and chromium content are increasingly subject to corrosion by the fluoride salts FLiBe and FLiNaK, due to attack and dissolution of the intergranular chromium carbide. Future research to obtain needed information was identified.

  12. Health as a property of engineered living systems.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sune

    2013-10-01

    This article considers naturalistic analyses of the concepts of health and disease in light of the possibility of constructing novel living systems. The article begins by introducing the vision of synthetic biology as the application of engineering principles to the construction of biological systems, the main analyses of the concepts of health and disease, and the standard theories of function in artefacts and organisms. The article then suggests that reflection on the possibility of artefactual organisms amounts to a challenge to the functional theories of health and disease proposed by Wakefield and Boorse. More specifically, Wakefield and Boorse's theories are reconstructed as responses to a dilemma concerning how to allow for the ascription of health and disease to artefactual organisms without at the same time opening up the possibility of diseased nonliving artefacts such as cars and computers. It is argued that neither response will enable us to ascribe health and disease to artefactual organisms, because both theories, in order to rule out the possibility of ascribing health and disease to nonliving artefacts, make such ascriptions conditional on having a natural-selection history or being part of a species which has been designed by evolution. PMID:24010853

  13. Properties and biotechnological applications of natural and engineered haloalkane dehalogenases.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuji; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Masataka

    2015-12-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenases (HLDs) convert halogenated compounds to corresponding alcohols, halides, and protons. They belong to α/β-hydrolases, and their principal catalytic mechanism is SN2 nucleophilic substitution followed by the addition of water. Since HLDs generally have broad and different substrate specificities, they have various biotechnological applications. HLDs have previously been believed to be present only in bacterial strains that utilize xenobiotic halogenated compounds, and three archetypal HLDs, i.e., DhlA, DhaA, and LinB, have been intensively investigated by biochemical, structural, and computational analyses. Furthermore, by using the resulting data and target-selected random mutagenesis approaches, these HLDs have been successfully engineered to improve their substrate specificities and activities. In addition, important insights into protein evolution have been obtained by studying these HLDs. At the same time, the genome and metagenome information has revealed that HLD homologues are widely distributed in many bacterial strains, including ones that have not been reported to degrade halogenated compounds. Some of these cryptic HLD homologues have been experimentally confirmed to be "true" HLDs with unique substrate specificities and enantioselectivities. Although their biological functions and physiological roles remain mysterious, these potential HLDs are considered promising materials for the development of new biocatalysts. PMID:26373728

  14. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): merging galaxies and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Propris, Roberto; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Driver, Simon P.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee; Loveday, Jon; Phillipps, Steve; Robotham, Aaron S. G.

    2014-11-01

    We derive the close pair fractions and volume merger rates for galaxies in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey with -23 < Mr < -17 (ΩM = 0.27, ΩΛ = 0.73, H0 = 100 km s-1 Mpc-1) at 0.01 < z < 0.22 (look-back time of <2 Gyr). The merger fraction is approximately 1.5 per cent Gyr-1 at all luminosities (assuming 50 per cent of pairs merge) and the volume merger rate is ≈3.5 × 10-4 Mpc-3 Gyr-1. We examine how the merger rate varies by luminosity and morphology. Dry mergers (between red/spheroidal galaxies) are found to be uncommon and to decrease with decreasing luminosity. Fainter mergers are wet, between blue/discy galaxies. Damp mergers (one of each type) follow the average of dry and wet mergers. In the brighter luminosity bin (-23 < Mr < -20), the merger rate evolution is flat, irrespective of colour or morphology, out to z ˜ 0.2. The makeup of the merging population does not appear to change over this redshift range. Galaxy growth by major mergers appears comparatively unimportant and dry mergers are unlikely to be significant in the buildup of the red sequence over the past 2 Gyr. We compare the colour, morphology, environmental density and degree of activity (BPT class, Baldwin, Phillips & Terlevich) of galaxies in pairs to those of more isolated objects in the same volume. Galaxies in close pairs tend to be both redder and slightly more spheroid dominated than the comparison sample. We suggest that this may be due to `harassment' in multiple previous passes prior to the current close interaction. Galaxy pairs do not appear to prefer significantly denser environments. There is no evidence of an enhancement in the AGN fraction in pairs, compared to other galaxies in the same volume.

  15. Rock mass mechanical property estimations for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.; Hardy, M.P.; Bauer, S.J.

    1993-06-01

    Rock mass mechanical properties are important in the design of drifts and ramps. These properties are used in evaluations of the impacts of thermomechanical loading of potential host rock within the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Representative intact rock and joint mechanical properties were selected for welded and nonwelded tuffs from the currently available data sources. Rock mass qualities were then estimated using both the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (Q) and Geomechanics Rating (RMR) systems. Rock mass mechanical properties were developed based on estimates of rock mass quality, the current knowledge of intact properties, and fracture/joint characteristics. Empirical relationships developed to correlate the rock mass quality indices and the rock mass mechanical properties were then used to estimate the range of rock mass mechanical properties.

  16. Performance Evaluation and Optimization of Diesel Fuel Properties and Chemistry in an HCCI Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Bunting, Bruce G; Eaton, Scott J; Crawford, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    The nine CRC fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE fuels) have been evaluated in a simple, premixed HCCI engine under varying conditions of fuel rate, air-fuel ratio, and intake temperature. Engine performance was found to vary mainly as a function of combustion phasing as affected by fuel cetane and engine control variables. The data was modeled using statistical techniques involving eigenvector representation of the fuel properties and engine control variables, to define engine response and allow optimization across the fuels for best fuel efficiency. In general, the independent manipulation of intake temperature and air-fuel ratio provided some opportunity for improving combustion efficiency of a specific fuel beyond the direct effect of targeting the optimum combustion phasing of the engine (near 5 CAD ATDC). High cetane fuels suffer performance loss due to easier ignition, resulting in lower intake temperatures, which increase HC and CO emissions and result in the need for more advanced combustion phasing. The FACE fuels also varied in T90 temperature and % aromatics, independent of cetane number. T90 temperature was found to have an effect on engine performance when combined with high centane, but % aromatics did not, when evaluated independently of cetane and T90.

  17. Estimating flow properties of quasi-newtonian mass-movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Bulmer, M.; Baloga, S.; Glaze, L.

    2001-12-01

    A variety of models exist in the literature to describe the flow behavior and rheological nature of debris flows. These include viscoplastic models, inertial grain flow models, fluid-solid momentum transport models and empirical Chezy-type models. For the purpose of planetary studies, the Chezy-type models have been found very useful. These models make few apriori assumptions on the physical processes ongoing in a debris flow, but rather parameterize the momentum transport and energy dissipation of debris flows with semi-empirical constants. When properly calibrated with appropriate field and laboratory evidence, these constants can provide a first order qualitative view into the behavior and rheological character, particularly water content, of a debris flow. Such a view permits the development and use of the more sophisticated debris flow models mentioned above where the physical processes are explicitly accounted for and from which, in conjunction with observation, quantitative rheological parameters can be determined. The strength of the Chezy-type models lies in that its parameterizing constants can be derived relatively easily from topographic data and airborne or space-based imaging and compared with a large body of terrestrial analogs. In this study, we will use a form of the Chezy model commonly applied to investigate quasi-Newtonian flows that are fast moving fluids bearing various kinds of loading or suspension. We will present a list of the Chezy constants for a wide-range of debris flows, ranging from water to water-rich landslides. This calibration table was determined by completing a literature search where velocity, channel slope, channel cross-sectional area, channel width and rheological characteristics of the debris flows were available. We show how rheological inferences, particularly water- content of one type of mass movement - debris flows - can be constrained using planetary data sets. These inferences are derived through judicious use of

  18. Heat-flow properties of systems with alternate masses or alternate on-site potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Emmanuel; Santana, Leonardo M.; Ávila, Ricardo

    2011-07-01

    We address a central issue of phononics: the search of properties or mechanisms to manage the heat flow in reliable materials. We analytically study standard and simple systems modeling the heat flow in solids, namely, the harmonic, self-consistent harmonic and also anharmonic chains of oscillators, and we show an interesting insulating effect: While in the homogeneous models the heat flow decays as the inverse of the particle mass, in the chain with alternate masses it decays as the inverse of the square of the mass difference, that is, it decays essentially as the mass ratio (between the smaller and the larger one) for a large mass difference. A similar effect holds if we alternate on-site potentials instead of particle masses. The existence of such behavior in these different systems, including anharmonic models, indicates that it is a ubiquitous phenomenon with applications in the heat flow control.

  19. Preparation of gelatin based porous biocomposite for bone tissue engineering and evaluation of gamma irradiation effect on its properties.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Minhajul; Khan, Mubarak A; Rahman, Mohammed Mizanur

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradable porous hybrid polymer composites were prepared by using gelatin as base polymer matrix, β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and calcium sulfate (CS) as cementing materials, chitosan as an antimicrobial agent, and glutaraldehyde and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as crosslinkers at different mass ratios. Thereafter, the composites were subjected to γ-radiation sterilization. The structure and properties of these composite scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mechanical properties testing (compressive, bending, tensile and impact), thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), and physical stability test in simulated body fluid (SBF). We found that TCP rich composites showed enhanced mechanical properties among all the crosslinked composites. γ-Radiation sterilization triggered further cross linking in polymer matrix resulting a decrease in pore size of the composites and an increase in pore wall thickness with improved mechanical and thermal properties. The chemically crosslinked composite with 40% TCP followed by γ-radiation sterilization showed the smallest pore size distribution with a mean pore diameter of 159.22μm, which falls in the range of 100-350μm - known to be suitable for osteoconduction. Considering its improved mechanical and thermal properties along with osteoconduction ability without cytotoxicity, we propose this biocomposite as a viable candidate for bone tissue engineering. PMID:25686994

  20. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  1. Interface engineered multifunctional oxide thin films with optimized properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Gregory Roy

    2010-06-01

    In our world today, energy has become one of the most valuable resources, in particular, renewable and clean energy sources. The research presented here represents an investigation into three separate areas of this topic. In thin film applications, the ordered structures as well as the inherent thinness of the films precludes the normal physics found in bulk materials. Characterizations of films of this type can provide information on molecular level charge transfer processes of the film layer materials since diffusive properties are minimal. With the control given by pulsed laser deposition methods, film and interface structure can be altered allowing for an examination of these effects on the materials properties. For the electrolyte and cathode materials, this equates to finding thermal and PO2 dependencies for electronic and ionic transport. For barium titanate, aside from the effects of oxygen vacancies, the interface quality between the electrodes and the ferroelectric material determines the effectiveness of energy transfer between these boundaries. That is, poor bonding characteristics or the formation of intermediate layers will introduce inconsistencies and (possibly) unwanted piezoelectric response properties of the material which could introduce parasitic dampening (resistance) of the mechanical vibrations of a piezoelectric transducer, altering its resonant characteristics. The clean reaction products and potential for high power outputs provide a strong impetus into investigations of fuel cell structures to improve their functionality. With conventional applications being dominated by high temperature (>700 °C) cells utilizing YSZ as an electrolyte medium, much gain can be made in efficiency through the lowering of cell operation temperature. The first part of my research focuses on the growth and characterization of a novel multilayered electrolyte structure consisting of alternating layers of GCO and YSZ for use in a medium temperature (400--600

  2. Real gas properties and Space Shuttle Main Engine fuel turbine performance prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harloff, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The H2/H2O mixture thermodynamic and transport properties variations for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) fuel turbine over a range of temperatures and pressures are examined. The variation of molecular viscosity, specific heat at constant pressure, and Prandtl number for the hydrogen/steam mixture are fitted using polynominal relationships for future turbine performance use. The mixture property variations are calculated using GASP and WASP computer programs. The air equivalent performance of the SSME fuel turbine is computed.

  3. Strain Engineering of the Electronic Properties in -doped Oxide Superlattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    You, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jun Hee; Okamoto, Satoshi; Cooper, Valentino R; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-01-01

    Strain effects on the electronic properties of (LaTiO3)1/(SrTiO3)N superlattices were investigated using density functional theory. Under biaxial in-plane strain within the range of 5% // 5%, the dxy orbital electrons are highly localized at the interfaces whereas the dyz and dxz orbital electrons are more distributed in the SrTiO3 (STO) spacer layers. For STO thickness N 3 unit cells (u.c.), the dxy orbital electrons form two-dimensional (2D) electron gases (2DEGs). The quantized energy levels of the 2DEG are insensitive to the STO spacer thickness, but are strongly dependent on the applied biaxial in-plane strain. As the in-plane strain changes frommore » compressive to tensile, the quantized energy levels of the dxy orbitals decrease thereby creating more states with 2D character. In contrast to the dxy orbital, the dyz and dxz orbitals always have three-dimensional (3D) transport characteristics and their energy levels increase as the strain changes from compressive to tensile. Since the charge densities in the dxy orbital and the dyz and dxz orbitals respond to biaxial in-plane strain in an opposite way, the transport dimensionality of the majority carriers can be controlled between 2D and 3D by applying biaxial in-plane strain.« less

  4. Microstructure engineering from metallic powder blends for enhanced mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlois, P.; Fagnon, N.; Dirras, G.

    2010-07-01

    The present work focuses on the transformation of high-purity Ni powder blends of controlled volume fractions (40 and 60 %) of nanometre-sized (100 nm) and micrometre-sized (544 nm) particles into bulk samples as part of a strategy for producing ultrafine-grained materials usefully exhibiting both strength and ductility. The process involved cold isostatic pressing at 1.5 GPa and sintering. The resulting bulk samples had relative densities near 95 %, were texture-free, and exhibited two different grain size distributions with an average value of 600 ± 30 nm. The mechanical properties were investigated by compression and microhardness tests, both at room temperature, and compared to the behaviour of a sample processed from micrometre-sized powder only. Samples prepared from the blends exhibited high yield stresses of 440 and 550 MPa after compression, and they did sustain work hardening. Tests conducted before and after compression up to 50 % deformation showed the same relative amount of hardness increase around 20 %, which was three times lower than that of the monolithic sample for which a decrease of the average grain size close to 26 % was measured.

  5. Strain engineered optoelectronic properties of transition metal dichalcogenides lateral heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaekwang; Yoon, Mina

    2015-03-01

    Most three-dimensional bulk-scale materials rarely survive beyond 1% strain, while recently spotlighted two-dimensional (2-D) materials can sustain a high elastic strain (up to 10%) to optimize optical quantities such as band gaps and absorption spectra governing optoelectronic device performance. Despite the enormous interest in strained 2-D materials, most researches are focused on single materials or vertical heterostructures where precise control of stacking orientation is challenging. Here, using first-principles density-functional calculations, we explore how uniaxial tensile strains modify overall electronic and optical properties of transition metal dichalcogenides lateral heterostructures, such as MoX2/WX2 (X =S, Se). Based on the detailed optoelectronic information, we predict the optimal strain condition for maximal power efficiency. Furthermore, we find that uniaxial tensile strain readily develops a continuously varying direct-bandgap across the lateral heterojunctions, which results in the broad range absorption of solar spectrum useful for future optoelectronic devices. This research was conducted at the CNMS, which is sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy; a portion of theory work was supported by the LDRD Program of ORNL.

  6. Strain engineering of electronic properties of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniadaki, Aristea E.; Kopidakis, Georgios; Remediakis, Ioannis N.

    2016-02-01

    We present Density Functional Theory (DFT) results for the electronic and dielectric properties of single-layer (2D) semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides MX2 (M=Mo, W; X=S, Se, Te) under isotropic, uniaxial (along the zigzag and armchair directions), and shear strain. Electronic band gaps decrease while dielectric constants increase for heavier chalcogens X. The direct gaps of equilibrium structures often become indirect under certain types of strain, depending on the material. The effects of strain and of broken symmetry on the band structure are discussed. Gaps reach maximum values at small compressive strains or in equilibrium, and decrease with larger strains. In-plane dielectric constants generally increase with strain, reaching a minimum value at small compressive strains. The out-of-plane constants exhibit a similar behavior under shear strain but under isotropic and uniaxial strain they increase with compression and decrease with tension, thus exhibiting a monotonic behavior. These DFT results are theoretically explained using only structural parameters and equilibrium dielectric constants. Our findings are consistent with available experimental data.

  7. The effect of cellulose molar mass on the properties of palmitate esters.

    PubMed

    Willberg-Keyriläinen, Pia; Talja, Riku; Asikainen, Sari; Harlin, Ali; Ropponen, Jarmo

    2016-10-20

    Nowadays one of the growing trends is to replace oil-based products with cellulose-based materials. Currently most cellulose esters require a huge excess of chemicals and have therefore, not been broadly used in the industry. Here, we show that decreasing the molar mass of cellulose by ozone hydrolysis provides cellulose functionalization with less chemical consumption. To reveal the differences in reactivity and chemical consumption, we showed esterification of both native cellulose and ozone treated hydrolyzed cellulose. Based on the results, the molar mass of the starting cellulose has a significant effect on the end product's degree of substitution and properties. Furthermore, molar mass controlled palmitate esters form mechanically strong, flexible and optically transparent films with excellent water barrier properties. We anticipate that molar mass controlled cellulose will provide a starting point for the greater use of cellulose based materials, in various application, such as films and composites. PMID:27474646

  8. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Richard

    2011-08-01

    The 13th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces focused on the progress in surface metrology, surface characterisation instrumentation and properties of engineering surfaces. The conference provided an international forum for academics, industrialists and engineers from different disciplines to meet and exchange their ideas, results and latest research. The conference was held at Twickenham Stadium, situated approximately six miles from Heathrow Airport and approximately three miles from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL). This was the thirteenth in the very successful series of conferences, which have firmly established surface topography as a new and exciting interdisciplinary field of scientific and technological studies. Scientific Themes: Surface, Micro and Nano Metrology Measurement and Instrumentation Metrology for MST Devices Freeform Surface Measurement and Characterisation Uncertainty, Traceability and Calibration AFM/SPM Metrology Tribology and Wear Phenomena Functional Applications Stylus and Optical Instruments

  9. Engineering support activities for the Apollo 17 Surface Electrical Properties Experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cubley, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of the engineering support activities which were required to ensure fulfillment of objectives specified for the Apollo 17 SEP (Surface Electrical Properties) Experiment. Attention is given to procedural steps involving verification of hardware acceptability to the astronauts, computer simulation of the experiment hardware, field trials, receiver antenna pattern measurements, and the qualification test program.

  10. Mass transport properties of Pu/DT mixtures from orbital free molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, Joel David; Ticknor, Christopher; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-09-16

    Mass transport properties (shear viscosity and diffusion coefficients) for Pu/DT mixtures were calculated with Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics (OFMD). The results were fitted to simple functions of mass density (for ρ=10.4 to 62.4 g/cm3) and temperature (for T=100 up to 3,000 eV) for Pu/DT mixtures consisting of 100/0, 25/75, 50/50, and 75/25 by number.

  11. Improving magnetic properties of MgB2 bulk superconductors by synthetic engine oil treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylan Koparan, E.; Savaskan, B.; Yanmaz, E.

    2016-08-01

    The present study focuses on the effects of standby time of the MgB2 samples immersed in synthetic engine oil on the critical current density (Jc(H)), magnetic field dependence of the pinning force density fp(b) and Tc performances of MgB2 bulk superconductors. Synthetic engine oil was used as a product which is cheap and a rich carbon source. Manufactured MgB2 pellet samples were immersed at different standby time of 30 min, 120 min, 300 min and 1440 min in synthetic engine oil after the first heating process. Finally, MgB2 samples immersed in synthetic engine oil were sintered at 1000 °C and kept for 15 min in Ar atmosphere. The critical current density of all of MgB2 samples immersed at different standby time in engine oil in whole field range was better than that of the pure MgB2 sample because of the number of the pinning centers. The MgB2 sample immersed at 300 min standby time in synthetic engine oil has the best performance compared to other samples. The Jc value for the pure sample is 2.0 × 103 A/cm2, whereas for the MgB2 sample immersed at 300 min standby time in engine oil the Jc is enhanced to 4.8 × 103A/cm2 at 5 K and 3 T. The superconducting transition temperature (Tc) did not change with the increasing standby time of the samples in synthetic engine oil at all. The best diamagnetic property was obtained from the sample which kept in synthetic engine oil for 300 min. Synthetic engine oil treatment results in remarkable improvement of the critical current density and pinning force performances of MgB2 superconductors. It was found that all MgB2 samples have a different pinning property at different measuring temperatures. Using synthetic engine oil as a product which is cheap and a rich carbon source in MgB2 bulk superconductors makes MgB2 samples immersed in synthetic engine oil a good candidate for industrial applications.

  12. Online monitoring of mechanical properties of three-dimensional tissue engineered constructs for quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinwald, Yvonne; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Yang, Ying; Baba Ismail, Yanny M.; El Haj, Alicia J.

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical preconditioning and mechanical properties of tissue engineered constructs are essential for their capability to regenerate damaged tissues. To online monitor the mechanical properties a hydrostatic pressure bioreactor was coupled with optical coherence tomography into a new image modality termed hydrostatic pressure optical coherence elastography (HP-OCE). HP-OCE was utilised to assess the properties of three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs while being physically stimulated within the hydrostatic force bioreactor. Hydrogels have been infiltrated into porous rapid prototyped or salt-leached scaffolds to mimic heterogeneous mechanical properties of cell-seeded constructs. Variations of mechanical properties in the solid scaffolds and agarose gels with different gel concentrations as well as the presences of cells have been clearly delineated by HP-OCE. Results indicate that HP-OCE allows contactless real-time non-invasive monitoring of the mechanical properties of tissue constructs and the effect of physical stimulation on cellular activities.

  13. Engineered Surface Properties of Porous Tungsten from Cryogenic Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoop, Julius Malte

    Porous tungsten is used to manufacture dispenser cathodes due to it refractory properties. Surface porosity is critical to functional performance of dispenser cathodes because it allows for an impregnated ceramic compound to migrate to the emitting surface, lowering its work function. Likewise, surface roughness is important because it is necessary to ensure uniform wetting of the molten impregnate during high temperature service. Current industry practice to achieve surface roughness and surface porosity requirements involves the use of a plastic infiltrant during machining. After machining, the infiltrant is baked and the cathode pellet is impregnated. In this context, cryogenic machining is investigated as a substitutionary process for the current plastic infiltration process. Along with significant reductions in cycle time and resource use, surface quality of cryogenically machined un-infiltrated (as-sintered) porous tungsten has been shown to significantly outperform dry machining. The present study is focused on examining the relationship between machining parameters and cooling condition on the as-machined surface integrity of porous tungsten. The effects of cryogenic pre-cooling, rake angle, cutting speed, depth of cut and feed are all taken into consideration with respect to machining-induced surface morphology. Cermet and Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) cutting tools are used to develop high performance cryogenic machining of porous tungsten. Dry and pre-heated machining were investigated as a means to allow for ductile mode machining, yet severe tool-wear and undesirable smearing limited the feasibility of these approaches. By using modified PCD cutting tools, high speed machining of porous tungsten at cutting speeds up to 400 m/min is achieved for the first time. Beyond a critical speed, brittle fracture and built-up edge are eliminated as the result of a brittle to ductile transition. A model of critical chip thickness ( hc ) effects based on cutting

  14. Dielectric Property Enhancement in Polymer Composites with Engineered Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krentz, Timothy Michael

    This thesis reports studies into the dielectric behavior of polymer composites filled with silica nanoparticles. The permittivity and dielectric breakdown strength (DBS) of these materials are critical to their performance in insulating applications such as high voltage power transmission. Until now, the mechanisms which lead to improvements in DBS in these systems have been poorly understood, in part because the effects of dispersion of the filler and the filler's surface electronic characteristics have been confused. The new surface modifications created in this thesis permit these two parameters to be addressed independently, leading to the hypothesis that nanocomposite dielectric materials exhibit DBS enhancement when electron avalanches are prevented from proceeding to reach a critical size capable of causing failure. The same control of dispersion and surface properties also lead to changes in the permittivity of the composite based upon the polarizability and trapping behavior of the filler. In this work, the dispersion and surface states of silica nanoparticles were independently controlled with two separate populations of surface molecules. Two matrix materials were studied, and in each system, a different, matrix-compatible long chain polymer is required to control dispersion. Conversely, a second population of short molecules is shown to be capable of creating electronic traps associated with the silica nanoparticle surface which lead to DBS enhancements largely independent of the matrix, indicating that the same failure mechanism is operating in both epoxy and polypropylene. Progressive variation in dispersion quality is attained with this surface modification scheme. This creates progressively smaller volumes of matrix polymer unaffected by the filler. This work shows that when these volumes approach and become smaller than the same scale as predicted for electron avalanches, the greatest changes in DBS are seen. Likewise, the plateau behavior of this

  15. Clustering Properties and Halo Masses for Central Galaxies in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lixin; Li, Cheng; Jing, Y. P.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the clustering and dark matter halo mass for a sample of ˜16,000 central galaxies selected from the SDSS/DR7 group catalog. We select subsamples of central galaxies on three two-dimensional planes, each formed by stellar mass (M{}*) and one other property out of optical color (g - r), surface stellar mass density ({μ }*), and central stellar velocity dispersion ({σ }*). For each subsample we measure both the projected cross-correlation function ({w}p({r}p)) relative to a reference galaxy sample, and an average mass of the host dark matter halos (M{}{{h}}). Both {w}p({r}p) and M{}{{h}} show the strongest dependence on M{}*, and there is no clear dependence on the other properties when M{}* is fixed. This result provides strong support to the previously adopted assumption that, for central galaxies, stellar mass is the best indicator of the host dark halo mass. For comparison we have estimated {w}p({r}p) for the full galaxy population and the population of satellite galaxies. Both populations show similar clustering properties in all cases, but they are similar to the centrals only at high masses (M{}* ≳ {10}11 {M}⊙ ). At lower masses, their {w}p({r}p) depends more strongly on {σ }* and g - r than on M{}*. It is thus necessary to consider central and satellite galaxies separately when studying the link between galaxies and dark matter halos. We discuss the implications of our results for the relative roles of halo mass and galaxy structure in quenching the star formation in central galaxies.

  16. Apollo Soyuz Test Project Weights and Mass Properties Operational Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. A., Jr.; Hischke, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) Weights and Mass Properties Operational Management System was established to assure a timely and authoritative method of acquiring, controlling, generating, and disseminating an official set of vehicle weights and mass properties data. This paper provides an overview of the system and its interaction with the various aspects of vehicle and component design, mission planning, hardware and software simulations and verification, and real-time mission support activities. The effect of vehicle configuration, design maturity, and consumables updates is discussed in the context of weight control.

  17. Dynamic Modeling Accuracy Dependence on Errors in Sensor Measurements, Mass Properties, and Aircraft Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    A nonlinear simulation of the NASA Generic Transport Model was used to investigate the effects of errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry on the accuracy of dynamic models identified from flight data. Measurements from a typical system identification maneuver were systematically and progressively deteriorated and then used to estimate stability and control derivatives within a Monte Carlo analysis. Based on the results, recommendations were provided for maximum allowable errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry to achieve desired levels of dynamic modeling accuracy. Results using other flight conditions, parameter estimation methods, and a full-scale F-16 nonlinear aircraft simulation were compared with these recommendations.

  18. Mass property identification - A comparison study between extended Kalman filter and neuro-filter approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Quang; Chipman, Richard; Sunkel, John

    1991-01-01

    Two algorithms, extended Kalman filter and neuro-filter, are formulated to perform mass property identification for the Space Station Freedom. Control moment gyros that are part of the Station's basic momentum management system are chosen to provide input excitation in the form of applied torques. These torques together with the measured angular body rate responses are supplied to the filters. From these data, both algorithms are shown to accurately identify the station mass properties when excitation levels are high and balanced between axes. The neuro-filter, however, is shown to be more robust and to perform well even with weakly persistent, unbalanced signals contaminated with noise.

  19. The Wind and Mass-loss Properties of the Most Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestenlehner, Joachim; Vink, Jorick; Gräfener, Götz; Najarro, Francisco

    2013-06-01

    Mass-loss rates play an important role in the evolution of massive stars. The initial, present day and the mass at their end of their lifetime is considerable different as a result of mass loss. Different stages of evolution have different mass-loss rates. The understanding of massive star evolution is tightly connected to the understanding of their mass loss properties. In the context of the VLT-Flames Tarantula Survey I will present the results from our spectral analysis of stars in the transition region from O-stars to very massive WN(h)-stars. WN(h)-stars are very young and massive stars which develop already in the earliest stages of their evolution WR-star like winds. For the analysis we used the non-LTE radiative transfer code CMFGEN to investigate the wind and mass-loss properties of these very massive stars. This analysis also tests theoretical predictions which suggest a notable change of the mass-loss behaviour at a certain Eddington factor in the transition region from O to WN(h)-stars (Bestenlehner et al. 2011, Bestenlehner et al. in prep.)

  20. Biomechanical properties of the spinal cord: implications for tissue engineering and clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Richard D; Choi, David; Phillips, James B

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury is a severely debilitating condition which can leave individuals paralyzed and suffering from autonomic dysfunction. Regenerative medicine may offer a promising solution to this problem. Previous research has focused primarily on exploring the cellular and biological aspects of the spinal cord, yet relatively little remains known about the biomechanical properties of spinal cord tissue. Given that a number of regenerative strategies aim to deliver cells and materials in the form of tissue-engineered therapies, understanding the biomechanical properties of host spinal cord tissue is important. We review the relevant biomechanical properties of spinal cord tissue and provide the baseline knowledge required to apply these important physical concepts to spinal cord tissue engineering. PMID:27592549

  1. Determining Engineering Properties of the Shallow Lunar Subsurface using Seismic Surface Wave Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeluru, P. M.; Baker, G. S.

    2008-12-01

    The geology of Earth's moon has previously been examined via telescopic observations, orbiting spacecraft readings, lunar sample analysis, and also from some geophysical data. Previous researchers have examined layering of the moon and models exist explaining the velocity variations in the mantle and core. However, no studies (or datasets) currently exist regarding the engineering properties of the shallow (<30 m) lunar subsurface. Engineering properties--like shear modulus and Poisson's ratio--are key parameters for civil engineering works, as they characterize the mechanical behavior of geotechnical materials under various types of loading. Therefore, understanding the physical and engineering properties within the upper 30 m of the lunar subsurface will be critical for lunar exploration if deployment of large structures, large-scale excavation, and/or landing of large spacecraft on the surface is desired. Advances in near-surface geophysical techniques, such as Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Wave (MASW), has greatly increased our ability to map subsurface variations in physical properties. The MASW method involves deployment of multiple seismometers to acquire 1-D or 2-D shear wave velocity profiles that can be directly related to various engineering properties. The advantage of this technique over drilling boreholes or any other geophysical technique is that it is less intensive, non-invasive, more cost- effective, and more robust because strong surface-wave records are almost guaranteed. In addition, data processing and analysis is fairly straightforward, and the MASW method allows for analysis of a large area of interest as compared to drilling boreholes. A new scheme using randomly distributed geophones (likely deployed from a mortar-type device) instead of a conventional linear array will be presented. A random array is necessary for lunar exploration because of the logistical constraints involved in deploying a linear or circular array robotically or by

  2. Diameter Versus Mass in the Development of the Orion Life Support Umbilical: A Case Study in Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Nicole; Falconi, Eric; Barido, Richard; Lewis, John

    2009-01-01

    Systems engineering could also be called the art of compromise. At its heart, systems engineering seeks to find that solution which maximizes the utility of the system, usually compromising the performance of each individual subsystem. While seemingly straightforward, systems engineering methodology is complicated when the utility to be maximized is unclear and the costs to each individual subsystem are not - or not easily - quantifiable. In this paper, we explore one such systems engineering problem within the Constellation Program as a case study in applied systems engineering. During suited operations, astronauts within Orion will be connected to an umbilical to receive and return breathing gas. The pressure drop associated with this umbilical must be overcome by the Orion vehicle. A smaller umbilical, which is desirable for crew operations, means a higher pressure drop, resulting in additional mass and power for the vehicle. We outline the technical considerations in the development of this integrated system and discuss the method by which we reached the ultimate solution. This paper, while just one example of the kind of problem solving that happens every day, offers insight into what happens when the theories of systems engineering are put into practice.

  3. Physicochemical and optical properties of combustion-generated particles from Ship Diesel Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Jeong, S.; Jin, H. C.; Kim, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Shipping contributes significantly to the anthropogenic burden of particulate matter (PM), and is among the world's highest polluting combustion sources per fuel consumed. Moreover, ships are a highly concentrated source of pollutants which are emitted into clean marine environments (e.g., Artic region). Shipping utilizes heavy fuel oil (HFO) which is less distilled compared to fuels used on land and few investigations on shipping related PM properties are available. BC is one of the dominant combustion products of ship diesel engines and its chemical and microphysical properties have a significant impact on climate by influencing the amount of albedo reduction on bright surfaces such as in polar regions. We have carried out a campaign to characterize the PM emissions from medium-sized marine engines in Gunsan, Jeonbuk Institute of Automotive Technology. The properties of ship-diesel PM have characterized depending on (1) fuel sulfur content (HFO vs. ULSD) and (2) engine conditions (Running state vs. Idling state). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) equipped with HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy were used for physicochemical analysis. Optical properties, which are ultimately linked to the snow/ice albedo decrease impacting climate, were assessed as well. PM generated under high engine temperature conditions had typical features of soot, e.g., concentric circles comprised of closely packed graphene layers, however PM generated by the idling state at low combustion temperature was characterized by amorphous and droplet-like carbonaceous particles with no crystalline structure. Significant differences in optical properties depending on the combustion conditions were also observed. Particles from running conditions showed wavelength-independent absorbing properties, whereas the particles from idling conditions showed enhanced absorption at shorter wavelengths, which is

  4. Quality control of automotive engine oils with mass-sensitive chemical sensors--QCMs and molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Dickert, F L; Forth, P; Lieberzeit, P A; Voigt, G

    2000-04-01

    Molecularly imprinted polyurethanes were used as sensor materials for monitoring the degradation of automotive engine oils. Imprinting with characteristic oils permits the analysis of these complex mixtures without accurately knowing their composition. Mass-sensitive quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) coated with such layers exhibit mass effects in addition to frequency shifts caused by viscosity, which can be compensated by an uncoated quartz or a non-imprint layer. Incorporation of degradation products into the imprinted coatings is a bulk phenomenon, which is proven by variation of the sensor layer height. Therefore, the resulting sensor effects are determined by the degradation products in the oil. PMID:11227411

  5. Gelatin Scaffolds with Controlled Pore Structure and Mechanical Property for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shangwu; Zhang, Qin; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-03-01

    Engineering of cartilage tissue in vitro using porous scaffolds and chondrocytes provides a promising approach for cartilage repair. However, nonuniform cell distribution and heterogeneous tissue formation together with weak mechanical property of in vitro engineered cartilage limit their clinical application. In this study, gelatin porous scaffolds with homogeneous and open pores were prepared using ice particulates and freeze-drying. The scaffolds were used to culture bovine articular chondrocytes to engineer cartilage tissue in vitro. The pore structure and mechanical property of gelatin scaffolds could be well controlled by using different ratios of ice particulates to gelatin solution and different concentrations of gelatin. Gelatin scaffolds prepared from ≥70% ice particulates enabled homogeneous seeding of bovine articular chondrocytes throughout the scaffolds and formation of homogeneous cartilage extracellular matrix. While soft scaffolds underwent cellular contraction, stiff scaffolds resisted cellular contraction and had significantly higher cell proliferation and synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Compared with the gelatin scaffolds prepared without ice particulates, the gelatin scaffolds prepared with ice particulates facilitated formation of homogeneous cartilage tissue with significantly higher compressive modulus. The gelatin scaffolds with highly open pore structure and good mechanical property can be used to improve in vitro tissue-engineered cartilage. PMID:26650856

  6. Porous ovalbumin scaffolds with tunable properties: a resource-efficient biodegradable material for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Luo, Baiwen; Choong, Cleo

    2015-01-01

    Natural materials are promising alternatives to synthetic materials used in tissue engineering applications as they have superior biocompatibility and promote better cell attachment and proliferation. Ovalbumin, a natural polymer found in avian egg white, is an example of a nature-derived material. Despite the availability and reported biocompatibility of ovalbumin, limited research has been carried out to investigate the efficacy of ovalbumin-based scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering applications. Hence, the current study was carried out to investigate the effect of different crosslinkers on ovalbumin scaffold properties as first step towards the development of ovalbumin-based scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering applications. In this study, highly porous three-dimensional scaffolds were fabricated by using three different crosslinkers: glutaraldehyde, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether. Results showed that the overall scaffold properties such as morphology, pore size and mechanical properties could be modulated based on the type and concentration of crosslinkers used during the fabrication process. Subsequently, the efficacy of the different scaffolds for supporting cell proliferation was investigated. In vitro degradation was also carried on for the best scaffold based on the mechanical and cellular results. Overall, this study is a demonstration of the viability of ovalbumin-based scaffolds as cell carriers for soft tissue engineering applications. PMID:25158688

  7. Characteristic of blended fuel properties and engine cycle-to-cycle variations with butanol additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Obed M.; Mamat, Rizalman; Abdullah, Nik R.; Abdullah, Abdul Adam

    2015-05-01

    Biodiesel fuel characteristics are one of the most important parameters that limited their application in diesel engines. Though biodiesel-diesel blended fuel can replace diesel satisfactorily at low blending ratios up to 20%, problems related to fuel property persist at high blending ratio. Hence, in the present study, the feasibility of biodiesel-diesel blended fuel B30 was investigated with respect to its properties and engine cyclic variations with increasing butanol additive. The blended fuel with additive were tested experimentally in a diesel engine and the in-cylinder pressure data were collected and analyzed using the coefficient of variation and wavelet power spectrum to evaluate the engine cyclic variations compared to diesel fuel engine test results. The fuel property test results showed slight improvement in density and acid value with significant reduction in viscosity when increasing butanol additive. Furthermore, the blended fuel pour point was reduced to -6 °C at 8% butanol additive. On the other hand, the energy content slightly affected with increasing butanol additive in the blend. From the wavelet power spectrum, it is observed that the short-period oscillations appear intermittently in pure blended fuel, while the long and intermediate-term periodicities tends to appear with increasing additive ratio. Moreover, the spectral power increased with an increase in the additive ratio indicating that the additive has a noticeable effect on increasing the cycle to cycle variation. The coefficient of variation of indicated mean effective pressure for B30 were found to be the lowest and increases with increasing additive ratios. Both the wavelet analysis and coefficient of variation results reveals that blended fuel B30 has engine cyclic variations comparable to diesel fuel with increasing butanol additive up to 4%.

  8. VAMP: A computer program for calculating volume, area, and mass properties of aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, P. J.; Glatt, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    A computerized procedure developed for analyzing aerospace vehicles evaluates the properties of elemental surface areas with specified thickness by accumulating and combining them with arbitrarily specified mass elements to form a complete evaluation. Picture-like images of the geometric description are capable of being generated.

  9. Measurements of the top-quark mass and properties at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünser, Marc; CMS Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the top-quark mass and other top-quark properties are presented, obtained from the CMS data collected in 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The mass of the top quark is measured using several methods and decay channels. The measurements of the top-quark properties include the W helicity in top-quark decays, the search for anomalous couplings, and the ratio of top-quarks decaying to bW over qW in order to gain information on |Vtb| using both t\\bar t and single-top quark event samples. The results are compared with predictions from the standard model as well as new physics models. The cross section of t\\bar t events produced in association with a W, Z boson or a photon is also measured.

  10. Understanding properties of engineered catalyst supports using contact angle measurements and X-ray reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Amama, Placidus B; Islam, Ahmad E; Saber, Sammy M; Huffman, Daniel R; Maruyama, Benji

    2016-02-01

    There is significant interest in broadening the type of catalyst substrates that support the growth of high-quality carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets. In this study, ion beam bombardment has been utilized to modify catalyst substrates for CNT carpet growth. Using a combination of contact angle measurements (CAMs) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) for the first time, new correlations between the physicochemical properties of pristine and engineered catalyst substrates and CNT growth behavior have been established. The engineered surfaces obtained after exposure to different degrees of ion beam damage have distinct physicochemical properties (porosity, layer thickness, and acid-base properties). The CAM data were analyzed using the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model, enabling the determination of the acid-base properties of the substrate surfaces. For the XRR data, a Fourier analysis of the interference patterns enabled extraction of layer thickness, while the atomic density and interfacial roughness were extracted by analyzing the amplitude of the interference oscillations. The dramatic transformation of the substrate from "inactive" to "active" is attributed to a combined effect of substrate porosity or damage depth and Lewis basicity. The results reveal that the efficiency of catalyst substrates can be further improved by increasing the substrate basicity, if the minimum surface porosity is established. This study advances the use of a non-thermochemical approach for catalyst substrate engineering, as well as demonstrates the combined utility of CAM and XRR as a powerful, nondestructive, and reliable tool for rational catalyst design. PMID:26781333

  11. Estimation of engineering properties of selected tuffs by using grain/matrix ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkanç, Mustafa; Solak, Burak

    2016-08-01

    Petrographic properties of rocks substantially affect their physical and mechanical properties. In the present study, for the purpose of examining the relationship between the petrographic and geomechanical properties of pyroclastic rocks, fresh samples were taken from tuffs of different textural properties that have wide distribution in Cappadocia region. Experimental studies were conducted on 20 fresh samples to determine their engineering properties through petrographic examinations. Dry and saturated unit weights, water absorption by weight, effective porosity, capillary water absorption, slake durability index, P-wave velocity, point load index, uniaxial compressive strength and nail penetration index of the samples were determined. Higher geomechanical values were obtained from the samples of Kavak tuffs affected by hydromechanical alteration and by tuffs with high welded rates. On thin sections prepared with the fresh samples, petrographic studies were carried out by using a point counter with a polarizing microscope, and mineral composition, texture, void ratio, volcanic glass presence and state of these fragments within the rock, secondary mineral formation and opaque mineral presence were determined. Grain/matrix ratio (GMR) was calculated by using the ratios of phenocrysts, microlites, volcanic glass, voids and opaque minerals after point counting on thin sections. A potential relationship between the petrographic and geomechanical properties of fresh samples was tried to determine by counting correlation analysis. Such a relationship can be significantly and extensively suggestible for engineering applications. For this purpose, we used the poorly-welded Kavak and densely-welded Kızılkaya tuff samples in our study.

  12. Photoresponsive Polysaccharide-Based Hydrogels with Tunable Mechanical Properties for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Giuseppe E; Carrion, Bita; Coleman, Rhima M; Ostrowski, Alexis D

    2016-06-15

    Photoresponsive hydrogels were obtained by coordination of alginate-acrylamide hybrid gels (AlgAam) with ferric ions. The photochemistry of Fe(III)-alginate was used to tune the chemical composition, mechanical properties, and microstructure of the materials upon visible light irradiation. The photochemical treatment also induced changes in the swelling properties and transport mechanism in the gels due to the changes in material composition and microstructure. The AlgAam gels were biocompatible and could easily be dried and rehydrated with no change in mechanical properties. These gels showed promise as scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering, where the photochemical treatment could be used to tune the properties of the material and ultimately change the growth and extracellular matrix production of chondrogenic cells. ATDC5 cells cultured on the hydrogels showed a greater than 2-fold increase in the production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) in the gels irradiated for 90 min compared to the dark controls. Our method provides a simple photochemical tool to postsynthetically control and adjust the chemical and mechanical environment in these gels, as well as the pore microstructure and transport properties. By changing these properties, we could easily access different levels of performance of these materials as substrates for tissue engineering. PMID:27223251

  13. Geo-engineering evaluation of Termaber basalt rock mass for crushed stone aggregate and building stone from Central Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engidasew, Tesfaye Asresahagne; Barbieri, Giulio

    2014-11-01

    The geology of the central part of Ethiopia exhibits a variety of rock types that can potentially be developed for construction stone production, of which the most wide spread and important one is the Termaber basalt. Even though some preliminary work is done on these rocks towards construction material application, it remains largely that this resource is untouched and needs further scientific characterization for the use in large scale industrial application. Basaltic rocks have been widely used in many parts of the world as concrete aggregate and dimension stone for various civil structures. The present research study was carried out for Geo-engineering evaluation of Termaber basalt rock mass for crushed stone aggregate and building stone from Central Ethiopia (around Debre Birhan). The main objective of the present research study was to assess the general suitability of the Termaber basalt to be used as coarse aggregate for concrete mix and/or to utilize it as cut stone at industrial level. Only choice made with full knowledge of the basic characteristics of the material, of its performance and durability against the foreseen solicitations will ensure the necessary quality of the stone work and thereby a possibility to reach its intended service life. In order to meet out the objective of the present study, data from both field and laboratory were collected and analyzed. The field data included geological investigations based on different methods and sample collection while the laboratory work included, uniaxial compressive strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity, dynamic elasticity modulus, bulk density, water absorption, specific gravity, open porosity, aggregate impact value, petrographic examination and XRF, aggregate crushing value, Los Angeles abrasion value, sodium sulfate soundness, X-ray diffraction and alkali silica reactivity tests. The field and laboratory data were compiled and compared together to reveal the engineering performance of the rock mass in

  14. Experimental study on the mechanical properties of simulated columnar jointed rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wei-min; Deng, Rong-gui; Zhong, Zhi-bin; Fu, Xiao-min; Wang, Cong-yan

    2015-02-01

    Columnar jointed rock mass is a kind of structural rock mass commonly encountered in igneous rocks. Due to the effects of columnar joint networks, anisotropy is the typical mechanical property of columnar jointed rock mass, i.e. deformation and strength varying with loading direction. Correct understanding of the mechanical anisotropy of columnar jointed rock mass is a key problem that should be solved for demonstration and design of large scale rock mass projects such as dams and underground cavern excavations constructed in it. Plaster simulated columnar jointed rock mass specimens at dip angles varying from 0° to 90° with respect to the axial stress were tested under uniaxial compression conditions to investigate the mechanical anisotropy and failure modes. Based on analyses of experimental results, it was found that the strength and deformation of columnar jointed rock masses had pronounced ‘U-shaped’ anisotropy. In the anisotropic curves, the maximum and minimum values occurred at β = 90° and β = 45°, respectively. It was also shown that the lateral strain ratio was relatively high, especially when the dip angle was close to (45° - φj/2), where φj was the joint friction angle. An empirical expression was adopted to predict the ‘U-shaped’ anisotropy of deformation and strength and the predicted anisotropic curves agreed reasonably well with experimental data. Furthermore, four types of failure modes were summarized based on experimental results and corresponding mechanisms were also discussed.

  15. Geo-Engineering Evaluation of Rock Masses for Crushed Rock and Cut Stones in Khartoum State, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheirelseed, E. E.; Ming, T. H.; Abdalla, S. B.

    The purpose of this study is to find artificial coarse aggregates and cut stones around Khartoum. To meat the objectives of the study, data from both field and laboratory are collected. The field data includes geological investigations based on different methods and samples collection, whereas the laboratory tests consists of specific gravity, water absorption, impact value, crushing value, Los Angeles abrasion, soundness tests. The field and laboratory results were weighed and compiled together to reveal the engineering performance of the different rock masses in term of cut stone and crushed aggregates. The results show that most of the examined rock masses are suitable for crushing, building and dressed stones. For decorative slabs only foliated granite and syenite masses can be used.

  16. Synthesis and Properties of Flexible Polyurethane Using Ferric Catalyst for Hypopharyngeal Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhisen; Wang, Jian; Lu, Dakai; Li, Qun; Zhou, Chongchang; Zhu, Yabin; Hu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable polyurethane is an ideal candidate material to fabricate tissue engineered hypopharynx from its good mechanical properties and biodegradability. We thus synthesized a hydrophilic polyurethane via reactions among polyethylene glycol (PEG), e-caprolactone (e-CL) and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), and thrihydroxymethyl propane (TMP). The product possessed a fast degradability due to its good wettability and good mechanical parameters with the elongations at break (137 ± 10%) and tensile strength (4.73 ± 0.46 MPa), which will make it a good matrix material for soft tissue like hypopharynx. Its biological properties were evaluated via in vitro and in vivo tests. The results showed that this hydrophilic polyurethane material can support hypopharyngeal fibroblast growth and owned good degradability and low inflammatory reaction in subcutaneous implantation. It will be proposed as the scaffold for hypopharyngeal tissue engineering research in our future study. PMID:26236737

  17. Synthesis and Properties of Flexible Polyurethane Using Ferric Catalyst for Hypopharyngeal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhisen; Wang, Jian; Lu, Dakai; Li, Qun; Zhou, Chongchang; Zhu, Yabin; Hu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable polyurethane is an ideal candidate material to fabricate tissue engineered hypopharynx from its good mechanical properties and biodegradability. We thus synthesized a hydrophilic polyurethane via reactions among polyethylene glycol (PEG), e-caprolactone (e-CL) and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), and thrihydroxymethyl propane (TMP). The product possessed a fast degradability due to its good wettability and good mechanical parameters with the elongations at break (137 ± 10%) and tensile strength (4.73 ± 0.46 MPa), which will make it a good matrix material for soft tissue like hypopharynx. Its biological properties were evaluated via in vitro and in vivo tests. The results showed that this hydrophilic polyurethane material can support hypopharyngeal fibroblast growth and owned good degradability and low inflammatory reaction in subcutaneous implantation. It will be proposed as the scaffold for hypopharyngeal tissue engineering research in our future study. PMID:26236737

  18. Ultrasound Imaging Techniques for Spatiotemporal Characterization of Composition, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deng, Cheri X; Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound techniques are increasingly being used to quantitatively characterize both native and engineered tissues. This review provides an overview and selected examples of the main techniques used in these applications. Grayscale imaging has been used to characterize extracellular matrix deposition, and quantitative ultrasound imaging based on the integrated backscatter coefficient has been applied to estimating cell concentrations and matrix morphology in tissue engineering. Spectral analysis has been employed to characterize the concentration and spatial distribution of mineral particles in a construct, as well as to monitor mineral deposition by cells over time. Ultrasound techniques have also been used to measure the mechanical properties of native and engineered tissues. Conventional ultrasound elasticity imaging and acoustic radiation force imaging have been applied to detect regions of altered stiffness within tissues. Sonorheometry and monitoring of steady-state excitation and recovery have been used to characterize viscoelastic properties of tissue using a single transducer to both deform and image the sample. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography uses separate ultrasound transducers to produce a more potent deformation force to microscale characterization of viscoelasticity of hydrogel constructs. These ultrasound-based techniques have high potential to impact the field of tissue engineering as they are further developed and their range of applications expands. PMID:26771992

  19. Passaged Adult Chondrocytes Can Form Engineered Cartilage with Functional Mechanical Properties: A Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kenneth W.; Lima, Eric G.; Bian, Liming; O'Conor, Christopher J.; Jayabalan, Prakash S.; Stoker, Aaron M.; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R.; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Cook, James L.

    2010-01-01

    It was hypothesized that previously optimized serum-free culture conditions for juvenile bovine chondrocytes could be adapted to generate engineered cartilage with physiologic mechanical properties in a preclinical, adult canine model. Primary or passaged (using growth factors) adult chondrocytes from three adult dogs were encapsulated in agarose, and cultured in serum-free media with transforming growth factor-β3. After 28 days in culture, engineered cartilage formed by primary chondrocytes exhibited only small increases in glycosaminoglycan content. However, all passaged chondrocytes on day 28 elaborated a cartilage matrix with compressive properties and glycosaminoglycan content in the range of native adult canine cartilage values. A preliminary biocompatibility study utilizing chondral and osteochondral constructs showed no gross or histological signs of rejection, with all implanted constructs showing excellent integration with surrounding cartilage and subchondral bone. This study demonstrates that adult canine chondrocytes can form a mechanically functional, biocompatible engineered cartilage tissue under optimized culture conditions. The encouraging findings of this work highlight the potential for tissue engineering strategies using adult chondrocytes in the clinical treatment of cartilage defects. PMID:19845465

  20. Seismic Waveform Parameters and the Engineering Properties of Unconsolidated Sediments: Laboratory Measurements and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boadu, F.; Owusu-Nimo, F.

    2009-05-01

    The ability to locate and monitor weaker soil/rock units in the subsurface non-invasively using geophysical measurements would be very useful for geotechnical engineers involved in geo-hazard mitigation. Velocity and attenuation studies indicate that velocity and attenuation of transmitted P-waves are affected by the microstructure and mechanical state of the sediments. This investigative work explores the use of direct information from the spectra of waveforms propagating though the unconsolidated medium, hypothesized here to provide us with useful information about the engineering and petrophysical properties of the medium. Numerical investigations using a reformulation of Biot's theory by indicate that the spectral signature, shape and frequency content as well as the distribution of spectral energy are sensitive to the porosity, degree of saturation and the skeletal frame modulus of the medium, which are important in determining its mechanical stability. It will be shown from laboratory investigations that the spectral signature, spectral energy distribution and frequency content of seismic waveforms propagating through unconsolidated geomaterials provide valuable information that can be used to characterize their engineering and petrophysical properties. Such investigations are desirable and will be of great interest to geotechnical engineers involved in monitoring and assessment of the strength and stability conditions of subsurface geo-materials and a geo-hazard mitigation and assessment.

  1. Monitoring of the Physical and Chemical Properties of a Gasoline Engine Oil during Its Usage.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Behnam; Semnani, Abolfazl; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza; Shakoori Langeroodi, Hamid; Hakim Davood, Massoud

    2012-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of a mineral-based gasoline engine oil have been monitored at 0, 500, 1000, 2000, 3500, 6000, 8500, and 11500 kilometer of operation. Tracing has been performed by inductively coupled plasma and some other techniques. At each series of measurements, the concentrations of twenty four elements as well as physical properties such as: viscosity at 40 and 100°C; viscosity index; flash point; pour point; specific gravity; color; total acid and base numbers; water content have been determined. The results are indicative of the decreasing trend in concentration of additive elements and increasing in concentration for wear elements. Different trends have been observed for various physical properties. The possible reasons for variations in physical and chemical properties have been discussed. PMID:22567569

  2. Combustion gas properties of various fuels of interest to gas turbine engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. E.; Trout, A. M.; Wear, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A series of computations were made using the gas property computational schemes of Gordon and McBride to compute the gas properties and species concentration of ASTM-Jet A and dry air. The computed gas thermodynamic properties in a revised graphical format which gives information which is useful to combustion engineers is presented. A series of reports covering the properties of many fuel and air combinations will be published. The graphical presentation displays on one chart of the output of hundreds of computer sheets. The reports will contain microfiche cards, from which complete tables and graphs can be obtained. The extent of the planned effort and is documented samples of the many tables and charts that will be available on the microfiche cards are presented.

  3. Tailoring the Spectroscopic Properties of Semiconductor Nanowires via Surface-Plasmon-Based Optical Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires, due to their unique electronic, optical, and chemical properties, are firmly placed at the forefront of nanotechnology research. The rich physics of semiconductor nanowire optics arises due to the enhanced light–matter interactions at the nanoscale and coupling of optical modes to electronic resonances. Furthermore, confinement of light can be taken to new extremes via coupling to the surface plasmon modes of metal nanostructures integrated with nanowires, leading to interesting physical phenomena. This Perspective will examine how the optical properties of semiconductor nanowires can be altered via their integration with highly confined plasmonic nanocavities that have resulted in properties such as orders of magnitude faster and more efficient light emission and lasing. The use of plasmonic nanocavities for tailored optical absorption will also be discussed in order to understand and engineer fundamental optical properties of these hybrid systems along with their potential for novel applications, which may not be possible with purely dielectric cavities. PMID:25396030

  4. Monitoring of the Physical and Chemical Properties of a Gasoline Engine Oil during Its Usage

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Behnam; Semnani, Abolfazl; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza; Shakoori Langeroodi, Hamid; Hakim Davood, Massoud

    2012-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of a mineral-based gasoline engine oil have been monitored at 0, 500, 1000, 2000, 3500, 6000, 8500, and 11500 kilometer of operation. Tracing has been performed by inductively coupled plasma and some other techniques. At each series of measurements, the concentrations of twenty four elements as well as physical properties such as: viscosity at 40 and 100°C; viscosity index; flash point; pour point; specific gravity; color; total acid and base numbers; water content have been determined. The results are indicative of the decreasing trend in concentration of additive elements and increasing in concentration for wear elements. Different trends have been observed for various physical properties. The possible reasons for variations in physical and chemical properties have been discussed. PMID:22567569

  5. Engineering the Structure and Properties of DNA-Nanoparticle Superstructures Using Polyvalent Counterions.

    PubMed

    Chou, Leo Y T; Song, Fayi; Chan, Warren C W

    2016-04-01

    DNA assembly of nanoparticles is a powerful approach to control their properties and prototype new materials. However, the structure and properties of DNA-assembled nanoparticles are labile and sensitive to interactions with counterions, which vary with processing and application environment. Here we show that substituting polyamines in place of elemental counterions significantly enhanced the structural rigidity and plasmonic properties of DNA-assembled metal nanoparticles. These effects arose from the ability of polyamines to condense DNA and cross-link DNA-coated nanoparticles. We further used polyamine wrapped DNA nanostructures as structural templates to seed the growth of polymer multilayers via layer-by-layer assembly, and controlled the degree of DNA condensation, plasmon coupling efficiency, and material responsiveness to environmental stimuli by varying polyelectrolyte composition. These results highlight counterion engineering as a versatile strategy to tailor the properties of DNA-nanoparticle assemblies for various applications, and should be applicable to other classes of DNA nanostructures. PMID:26942662

  6. Engineering of the band gap and optical properties of thin films of yttrium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    You, Chang Chuan; Mongstad, Trygve; Maehlen, Jan Petter; Karazhanov, Smagul

    2014-07-21

    Thin films of oxygen-containing yttrium hydride show photochromic effect at room temperature. In this work, we have studied structural and optical properties of the films deposited at different deposition pressures, discovering the possibility of engineering the optical band gap by variation of the oxygen content. In sum, the transparency of the films and the wavelength range of photons triggering the photochromic effect can be controlled by variation of the deposition pressure.

  7. Cloning Nacre's 3D Interlocking Skeleton in Engineering Composites to Achieve Exceptional Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hewei; Yue, Yonghai; Guo, Lin; Wu, Juntao; Zhang, Youwei; Li, Xiaodong; Mao, Shengcheng; Han, Xiaodong

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic/polymer composite equipped with 3D interlocking skeleton (3D IL) is developed through a simple freeze-casting method, exhibiting exceptionally light weight, high strength, toughness, and shock resistance. Long-range crack energy dissipation enabled by 3D interlocking structure is considered as the primary reinforcing mechanism for such superior properties. The smart composite design strategy should hold a place in developing future structural engineering materials. PMID:27135462

  8. Strain engineering for mechanical properties in graphene nanoribbons revisited: The warping edge effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the strain engineering and the edge effect for mechanical properties in graphene nanoribbons. The free edges of the graphene nanoribbons are warped due to compressive edge stresses. There is a structural transformation for the free edges from the three-dimensional warping configuration to the two-dimensional planar structure at the critical strain ɛc = 0.7%, at which the applied mechanical stress is equal to the intrinsic compressive edge stress. This structural transformation leads to step-like changes in several mechanical properties studied in the present work, including the Young's modulus, the Poisson's ratio, the quality factor of nanomechanical resonators, and the phonon edge mode.

  9. A study of ultrasonic property variations within jet-engine nickel alloy billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldipur, P.; Margetan, F. J.; Yu, Linxiao; Thompson, R. B.

    2002-05-01

    A summary is presented of an ongoing project to measure the UT properties of jet-engine nickel alloy billets and to correlate their properties with the local billet microstructure. To date, measurements have been performed on four "strip" coupons cut from three different Nickel alloy billets (IN718 and Waspaloy). Longitudinal-wave velocities, attenuation, backscattered noise capacity (FOM) have been measured at selected sites for two propagation directions. The UT results are consistent with equiaxed microstructures in which the mean grain diameter varies with radial depth. The grain diameter at selected sites is determined from detailed metallographic studies and compared with that estimated from the measured attenuation.

  10. Mass properties calibration of the NASA Langley low frequency vibration test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javeed, Mehzad; Russell, James W.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents a description and calibration results of the modified NASA Langley Low Frequency Vibration Test Apparatus. The description includes both the suspension system and the data acquisition system. The test apparatus consists of a 2 inch thick, 21 inch diameter aluminum plate that is suspended from an advanced suspension system using a 40 foot long cable system. The test apparatus employed three orthogonally aligned pairs of Sundstrand QA-700 servo accelerometers that can measure accelerations as low as 1 micro-g. The calibration involved deriving the mass and moments of inertia of the test platform from measured input forces and measured acceleration responses. The derived mass and moments were compared to test platform mass properties obtained initially from measurements with a special mass properties instrument. Results of the calibration tests showed that using the product of the test apparatus mass and the measured accelerations, the disturbance force at the center of gravity (CG) can be determined within 4 percent on all three axes. Similarly the disturbance moments about the X, Y, and Z axes can be determined within 5 percent by using the product of the measured moments of inertia and the angular accelerations about the X, Y, and Z axes.

  11. Strain Engineering of Octahedral Rotations and Physical Properties of SrRuO3 Films

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenlai; Song, Wendong; Yang, Ping; Ding, Jun; Chow, Gan Moog; Chen, Jingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Strain engineering is an effective way to modify functional properties of thin films. Recently, the importance of octahedral rotations in pervoskite films has been recognized in discovering and designing new functional phases. Octahedral behavior of SrRuO3 film as a popular electrode in heterostructured devices is of particular interest for its probable interfacial coupling of octahedra with the functional overlayers. Here we report the strain engineering of octahedral rotations and physical properties that has been achieved in SrRuO3 films in response to the substrate-induced misfit strains of almost the same amplitude but of opposite signs. It shows that the compressively strained film on NdGaO3 substrate displays a rotation pattern of a tetragonal phase whilst the tensilely strained film on KTaO3 substrate has the rotation pattern of the bulk orthorhombic SrRuO3 phase. In addition, the compressively strained film displays a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy while the tensilely strained film has the magnetic easy axis lying in the film plane. The results show the prospect of strain engineered octahedral architecture in producing desired property and novel functionality in the class of perovskite material. PMID:26018639

  12. Collective flow properties of intermediate mass fragments and isospin effects in fragmentation at Fermi energies

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, V.; Zus, R.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.

    2013-11-13

    Within a microscopic transport model (Stochastic Mean Field) we analyze the collective flow properties associated to the intermediate mass fragments produced in nuclear fragmentation. We study the transverse and elliptic flow parameters for each rank in mass hierarchy. The results are plotted for {sup 124}Sn + {sup 124}Sn systems at an energy of 50AMeV and for an impact parameter b=4fm. The correlation with the dynamics of the isospin degree of freedom is also discussed and the results are presented for the same systems.

  13. Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

  14. The Mass Distribution and Assembly of the Milky Way from the Properties of the Magellanic Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Busha, Michael T.; Marshall, Philip J.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Klypin, Anatoly; Primack, Joel; /UC, Santa Cruz, Phys. Dept.

    2012-02-29

    We present a new measurement of the mass of the Milky Way (MW) based on observed properties of its largest satellite galaxies, the Magellanic Clouds (MCs), and an assumed prior of a {Lambda}CDM universe. The large, high-resolution Bolshoi cosmological simulation of this universe provides a means to statistically sample the dynamical properties of bright satellite galaxies in a large population of dark matter halos. The observed properties of the MCs, including their circular velocity, distance from the center of the MW, and velocity within the MW halo, are used to evaluate the likelihood that a given halo would have each or all of these properties; the posterior probability distribution function (PDF) for any property of the MW system can thus be constructed. This method provides a constraint on the MW virial mass, 1.2{sup +0.7} - {sub 0.4}(stat.){sup +0.3} - {sub 0.3}(sys.) x 10{sup 12} M {circle_dot} (68% confidence), which is consistent with recent determinations that involve very different assumptions. In addition, we calculate the posterior PDF for the density profile of the MW and its satellite accretion history. Although typical satellites of 10{sup 12} M {circle_dot} halos are accreted over a wide range of epochs over the last 10 Gyr, we find a {approx}72% probability that the MCs were accreted within the last Gyr, and a 50% probability that they were accreted together.

  15. Determination and Assessment of Parameters Influencing Rock Mass Cavability in Block Caving Mines Using the Probabilistic Rock Engineering System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Ramin; Ataei, Mohammad; Khalokakaie, Reza; Jalali, Seyed Mohammad Esmaeil; Sereshki, Farhang

    2015-05-01

    Mining methods such as block caving or sublevel caving rely on the characteristics of the rock mass to cave efficiently to fulfill an economical production. The identification of influencing parameters and cavability assessment are, thus, a prime geotechnical focus for all potential caving projects. In the caving operation, many factors, such as natural and induced factors, affect the caving performance. In this study, after discussing the caving process and identifying all effective parameters, the interaction matrix based on the rock engineering system (RES) is introduced to study the influencing parameters in rock mass cavability. The interaction matrix analyzes the interrelationship between the parameters affecting rock engineering activities. As the interaction matrix codes are not unique, probabilistic coding can be performed non-deterministically, allowing consideration of uncertainties in the RES analysis. As a result, the parameters with the highest probability of being dominant or subordinate, and also the parameters with the highest probability of being interactive, are introduced. The proposed approach could be a simple but efficient tool in the evaluation of the parameters affecting the cavability of rock mass in block caving mines and, hence, useful in decision-making under uncertainties.

  16. Characterization of real gas properties for space shuttle main engine fuel turbine and performance calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harloff, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Real thermodynamic and transport properties of hydrogen, steam, the SSME mixture, and air are developed. The SSME mixture properties are needed for the analysis of the space shuttle main engine fuel turbine. The mixture conditions for the gases, except air, are presented graphically over a temperature range from 800 to 1200 K, and a pressure range from 1 to 500 atm. Air properties are given over a temperature range of 320 to 500 K, which are within the bounds of the thermodynamics programs used, in order to provide mixture data which is more easily checked (than H2/H2O). The real gas property variation of the SSME mixture is quantified. Polynomial expressions, needed for future computer analysis, for viscosity, Prandtl number, and thermal conductivity are given for the H2/H2O SSME fuel turbine mixture at a pressure of 305 atm over a range of temperatures from 950 to 1140 K. These conditions are representative of the SSME turbine operation. Performance calculations are presented for the space shuttle main engine (SSME) fuel turbine. The calculations use the air equivalent concept. Progress towards obtaining the capability to evaluate the performance of the SSME fuel turbine, with the H2/H2O mixture, is described.

  17. Dependence of Dynamic Modeling Accuracy on Sensor Measurements, Mass Properties, and Aircraft Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) nonlinear simulation was used to investigate the effects of errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry on the accuracy of identified parameters in mathematical models describing the flight dynamics and determined from flight data. Measurements from a typical flight condition and system identification maneuver were systematically and progressively deteriorated by introducing noise, resolution errors, and bias errors. The data were then used to estimate nondimensional stability and control derivatives within a Monte Carlo simulation. Based on these results, recommendations are provided for maximum allowable errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry to achieve desired levels of dynamic modeling accuracy. Results using additional flight conditions and parameter estimation methods, as well as a nonlinear flight simulation of the General Dynamics F-16 aircraft, were compared with these recommendations

  18. Emissions from diesel versus biodiesel fuel used in a CRDI SUV engine: PM mass and chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, Jitendra; Gupta, Tarun; Gupta, Sudhir; Agarwal, Avinash K

    2011-07-01

    The diesel tailpipe emissions typically undergo substantial physical and chemical transformations while traveling through the tailpipe, which tend to modify the original characteristics of the diesel exhaust. Most of the health-related attention for diesel exhaust has focused on the carcinogenic potential of inhaled exhaust components, particularly the highly respirable diesel particulate matter (DPM). In the current study, parametric investigations were made using a modern automotive common rail direct injection (CRDI) sports utility vehicle (SUV) diesel engine operated at different loads at constant engine speed (2400 rpm), employing diesel and 20% biodiesel blends (B20) produced from karanja oil. A partial flow dilution tunnel was employed to measure the mass of the primary particulates from diesel and biodiesel blend on a 47-mm quartz substrate. This was followed by chemical analysis of the particulates collected on the substrate for benzene-soluble organic fraction (BSOF) (marker of toxicity). BSOF results showed decrease in its level with increasing engine load for both diesel and biodiesel. In addition, real-time measurements for organic carbon/elemental carbon (OC/EC), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (marker of toxicity) were carried out on the diluted primary exhaust coming out of the partial flow dilution tunnel. PAH concentrations were found to be the maximum at 20% rated engine load for both the fuels. The collected particulates from diesel and biodiesel-blend exhaust were also analyzed for concentration of trace metals (marker of toxicity), which revealed some interesting results. PMID:21689006

  19. Mass transfer properties of nanoconfined fluids at solid-liquid interfaces: from atomistic simulations to continuum models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morciano, Matteo; Fasano, Matteo; Nold, Andreas; Correia Braga, Carlos; Yatsyshin, Petr; Sibley, David; Goddard, Benjamin; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro; Kalliadasis, Serafim; multi-Scale ModeLing Laboratory Team; Complex Multiphase Systems Team

    2015-11-01

    At the nanoscale, traditional continuum models are not sufficient to describe fluid flow. For example, the no-slip assumption may not be valid for nanoscale flows, where interface effects dominate transport phenomena. Hence, classic boundary conditions should take into account possible interplays between fluid velocity, shear stress, surface chemistry and roughness. Unlike hydrodynamics, in molecular dynamics (MD), the boundary conditions are not specified a priori but arise naturally from computations. Here, mass transfer properties for a Lennard-Jones fluid confined in a nanochannel are studied by MD. Density, stress and velocity profiles within the fluid are evaluated with different nanoconfined conditions, shear rates and surface hydrophilicity. Our results show a strong anisotropic behavior of fluid properties along the channel section. Shear rates and velocity profiles allow calculating the spatial distribution of viscosity along the channel. We also observe that hydrophilic surfaces lead to increased viscosity. Our findings may have a potential impact on the design of nanofluidic devices for either engineering or biomedical applications.

  20. Properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, M. L. Shlomo, Sh. Tulupov, B. A. Urin, M. H.

    2015-07-15

    The recently developed particle-hole dispersive optical model is applied to describe properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei. In particular, the double transition density averaged over the energy of the isoscalar monopole excitations is considered for {sup 208}Pb in a wide energy interval, which includes the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone. The energy-averaged strength functions of these resonances are also analyzed.

  1. First-principles investigation of electronic structure, effective carrier masses, and optical properties of ferromagnetic semiconductor CdCr2S4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu-Hui, Zhu; Xiang-Rong, Chen; Bang-Gui, Liu

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structures, the effective masses, and optical properties of spinel CdCr2S4 are studied by using the full-potential linearized augmented planewave method and a modified Becke–Johnson exchange functional within the density-functional theory. Most importantly, the effects of the spin–orbit coupling (SOC) on the electronic structures and carrier effective masses are investigated. The calculated band structure shows a direct band gap. The electronic effective mass and the hole effective mass are analytically determined by reproducing the calculated band structures near the BZ center. SOC substantially changes the valence band top and the hole effective masses. In addition, we calculated the corresponding optical properties of the spinel structure CdCr2S4. These should be useful to deeply understand spinel CdCr2S4 as a ferromagnetic semiconductor for possible semiconductor spintronic applications. Project supported by the Joint Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. U1430117 and U1230201).

  2. Understanding properties of engineered catalyst supports using contact angle measurements and X-Ray reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amama, Placidus B.; Islam, Ahmad E.; Saber, Sammy M.; Huffman, Daniel R.; Maruyama, Benji

    2016-01-01

    There is significant interest in broadening the type of catalyst substrates that support the growth of high-quality carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets. In this study, ion beam bombardment has been utilized to modify catalyst substrates for CNT carpet growth. Using a combination of contact angle measurements (CAMs) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) for the first time, new correlations between the physicochemical properties of pristine and engineered catalyst substrates and CNT growth behavior have been established. The engineered surfaces obtained after exposure to different degrees of ion beam damage have distinct physicochemical properties (porosity, layer thickness, and acid-base properties). The CAM data were analyzed using the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model, enabling the determination of the acid-base properties of the substrate surfaces. For the XRR data, a Fourier analysis of the interference patterns enabled extraction of layer thickness, while the atomic density and interfacial roughness were extracted by analyzing the amplitude of the interference oscillations. The dramatic transformation of the substrate from ``inactive'' to ``active'' is attributed to a combined effect of substrate porosity or damage depth and Lewis basicity. The results reveal that the efficiency of catalyst substrates can be further improved by increasing the substrate basicity, if the minimum surface porosity is established. This study advances the use of a non-thermochemical approach for catalyst substrate engineering, as well as demonstrates the combined utility of CAM and XRR as a powerful, nondestructive, and reliable tool for rational catalyst design.There is significant interest in broadening the type of catalyst substrates that support the growth of high-quality carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets. In this study, ion beam bombardment has been utilized to modify catalyst substrates for CNT carpet growth. Using a combination of contact angle measurements (CAMs) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) for the

  3. The galaxy-dark matter halo connection: which galaxy properties are correlated with the host halo mass?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, S.; Baugh, C. M.; Norberg, P.; Padilla, N.

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate how the properties of a galaxy depend on the mass of its host dark matter subhalo, using two independent models of galaxy formation. For the cases of stellar mass and black hole mass, the median property value displays a monotonic dependence on subhalo mass. The slope of the relation changes for subhalo masses for which heating by active galactic nuclei becomes important. The median property values are predicted to be remarkably similar for central and satellite galaxies. The two models predict considerable scatter around the median property value, though the size of the scatter is model dependent. There is only modest evolution with redshift in the median galaxy property at a fixed subhalo mass. Properties such as cold gas mass and star formation rate, however, are predicted to have a complex dependence on subhalo mass. In these cases, subhalo mass is not a good indicator of the value of the galaxy property. We illustrate how the predictions in the galaxy property-subhalo mass plane differ from the assumptions made in some empirical models of galaxy clustering by reconstructing the model output using a basic subhalo abundance matching scheme. In its simplest form, abundance matching generally does not reproduce the clustering predicted by the models, typically resulting in an overprediction of the clustering signal. Using the predictions of the galaxy formation model for the correlations between pairs of galaxy properties, the basic abundance matching scheme can be extended to reproduce the model predictions more faithfully for a wider range of galaxy properties. Our results have implications for the analysis of galaxy clustering, particularly for low abundance samples.

  4. Understanding the microstructure and properties of components fabricated by laser engineered net shaping (LENS)

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFITH,MICHELLE L.; ENSZ,MARK T.; PUSKAR,JOSEPH D.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; BROOKS,JOHN A.; PHILLIBER,JOEL A.; SMUGERESKY,JOHN E.; HOFMEISTER,W.H.

    2000-05-18

    Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS) is a novel manufacturing process for fabricating metal parts directly from Computer Aided Design (CAD) solid models. The process is similar to rapid prototyping technologies in its approach to fabricate a solid component by layer additive methods. However, the LENS technology is unique in that fully dense metal components with material properties that are similar to that of wrought materials can be fabricated. The LENS process has the potential to dramatically reduce the time and cost required realizing functional metal parts. In addition, the process can fabricate complex internal features not possible using existing manufacturing processes. The real promise of the technology is the potential to manipulate the material fabrication and properties through precision deposition of the material, which includes thermal behavior control, layered or graded deposition of multi-materials, and process parameter selection. This paper describes the authors' research to understand solidification aspects, thermal behavior, and material properties for laser metal deposition technologies.

  5. Development of Chitosan Scaffolds with Enhanced Mechanical Properties for Intestinal Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zakhem, Elie; Bitar, Khalil N.

    2015-01-01

    Massive resections of segments of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract lead to intestinal discontinuity. Functional tubular replacements are needed. Different scaffolds were designed for intestinal tissue engineering application. However, none of the studies have evaluated the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. We have previously shown the biocompatibility of chitosan as a natural material in intestinal tissue engineering. Our scaffolds demonstrated weak mechanical properties. In this study, we enhanced the mechanical strength of the scaffolds with the use of chitosan fibers. Chitosan fibers were circumferentially-aligned around the tubular chitosan scaffolds either from the luminal side or from the outer side or both. Tensile strength, tensile strain, and Young’s modulus were significantly increased in the scaffolds with fibers when compared with scaffolds without fibers. Burst pressure was also increased. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was maintained as demonstrated by the adhesion of smooth muscle cells around the different kinds of scaffolds. The chitosan scaffolds with fibers provided a better candidate for intestinal tissue engineering. The novelty of this study was in the design of the fibers in a specific alignment and their incorporation within the scaffolds. PMID:26473937

  6. Fuel Properties Improvement of Jatropha Oil using Exhaust Heat of Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raheman, H.; Pradhan, P.

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to design a helical coil heat exchanger to extract waste heat from exhaust gas of a diesel engine to improve the fuel properties of high viscous crude Jatropha oil (CJO). A detailed designed procedure of helical coil heat exchanger was reported in this paper. The results showed that the fuel properties like density and viscosity reduced by 2.13 and 48.76 % respectively by gaining temperature from exhaust gas. Finally preheated Jatropha oil (PJO) fueled to the 5.5 kW diesel engine and it operated smoothly with a maximum brake thermal efficiency of 29.15 % as compared to 29.88 and 28.33 % for HSD and CJO, respectively. The brake specific energy consumption of CJO and PJO was found to be only 2.84 and 5.47 % higher than that of HSD, respectively. Efficiency of the heat exchanger was found to be varying between 19 and 26 % with engine load.

  7. Fuel properties and engine performance of biodiesel from waste cooking oil collected in Dhaka city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, R. B.; Islam, R.; Uddin, M. N.; Ehsan, Md.

    2016-07-01

    Waste cooking oil can be a potential source of biodiesel that has least effect on the edible oil consumption. Increasing number of hotel-restaurants and more active monitoring by health authorities have increased the generation of waste cooking oil significantly in densely populated cities like Dhaka. If not used or disposed properly, waste cooking oil itself may generate lot of environmental issues. In this work, waste cooking oils from different restaurants within Dhaka City were collected and some relevant properties of these waste oils were measured. Based on the samples studied one with the highest potential as biodiesel feed was identified and processed for engine performance. Standard trans-esterification process was used to produce biodiesel from the selected waste cooking oil. Biodiesel blends of B20 and B40 category were made and tested on a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine. Engine performance parameters included - bhp, bsfc and exhaust emission for rated and part load conditions. Results give a quantitative assessment of the potential of using biodiesel from waste cooking oil as fuel for diesel engines in Bangladesh.

  8. Emissions of NOx, particle mass and particle numbers from aircraft main engines, APU's and handling equipment at Copenhagen Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winther, Morten; Kousgaard, Uffe; Ellermann, Thomas; Massling, Andreas; Nøjgaard, Jacob Klenø; Ketzel, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed emission inventory for NOx, particle mass (PM) and particle numbers (PN) for aircraft main engines, APU's and handling equipment at Copenhagen Airport (CPH) based on time specific activity data and representative emission factors for the airport. The inventory has a high spatial resolution of 5 m × 5 m in order to be suited for further air quality dispersion calculations. Results are shown for the entire airport and for a section of the airport apron area ("inner apron") in focus. The methodology presented in this paper can be used to quantify the emissions from aircraft main engines, APU and handling equipment in other airports. For the entire airport, aircraft main engines is the largest source of fuel consumption (93%), NOx, (87%), PM (61%) and PN (95%). The calculated fuel consumption [NOx, PM, PN] shares for APU's and handling equipment are 5% [4%, 8%, 5%] and 2% [9%, 31%, 0%], respectively. At the inner apron area for handling equipment the share of fuel consumption [NOx, PM, PN] are 24% [63%, 75%, 2%], whereas APU and main engines shares are 43% [25%, 19%, 54%], and 33% [11%, 6%, 43%], respectively. The inner apron NOx and PM emission levels are high for handling equipment due to high emission factors for the diesel fuelled handling equipment and small for aircraft main engines due to small idle-power emission factors. Handling equipment is however a small PN source due to the low number based emission factors. Jet fuel sulphur-PM sensitivity calculations made in this study with the ICAO FOA3.0 method suggest that more than half of the PM emissions from aircraft main engines at CPH originate from the sulphur content of the fuel used at the airport. Aircraft main engine PN emissions are very sensitive to the underlying assumptions. Replacing this study's literature based average emission factors with "high" and "low" emission factors from the literature, the aircraft main engine PN emissions were estimated to change with a

  9. The impact of the dibutyrylchitin molar mass on the bioactive properties of dressings used to treat soft tissue wounds.

    PubMed

    Krucinska, Izabella; Komisarczyk, Agnieszka; Paluch, Danuta; Szymonowicz, Maria; Zywicka, Boguslawa; Pielka, Stanislaw

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we describe a novel technique for producing biocompatible medical products with bioactive properties from the biodegradable polymer dibutyrylchitin (DBC). Materials produced by blowing out polymer solutions have excellent hemostaic properties and are easy to handle during surgery. Biocompatibility studies, encompassing hemostasis and the evaluation of post-implantation reactions, indicate that the biological properties of DBC depend on the molecular mass of the polymer. Lower molecular mass polymers are preferable for use in implanted wound dressings. PMID:22114056

  10. Mass transfer and interfacial properties in two-phase microchannel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeffrey D.; Hudson, Steven D.

    2009-11-01

    Drop-based microfluidic devices are becoming more common, and molecular mass transfer and drop circulation are issues that often affect the performance of such devices. Moreover, interfacial properties and surfactant mass transfer rates govern emulsion behavior. Since these phenomena depend strongly on drop size, measurement methods using small drops and flow typical of applications are desired. Using mineral oil as a continuous phase, water droplets and an alcohol surfactant, we demonstrate here a microfluidic approach to measure the interrelated phenomena of dynamic interfacial tension, surfactant mass transfer and interfacial retardation that employs droplet flows in a microchannel with constrictions/expansions. Interfacial flow is influenced markedly by adsorption of surfactant: severe interfacial retardation (by a factor of 30) is observed at low surfactant concentrations and interface remobilization is observed at higher surfactant concentrations. The interfacial tension is described by Langmuir kinetics and the parameters for interfaces with mineral oil (studied here) compare closely with those previously found at air interfaces. For the conditions explored, the surfactant mass transfer is described well by a mixed kinetic-diffusion limited model, and the desorption rate coefficients are measured to be both approximately 70 s-1. The transition from a diffusion-controlled to mixed diffusion-kinetic mass transfer mechanism predicted with reducing drop size is verified. This experimental approach (i.e. adjustable geometry and drop size and height) can therefore probe interfacial dynamics in simple and complex flow.

  11. Ethnobotany/ethnopharmacology and mass bioprospecting: issues on intellectual property and benefit-sharing.

    PubMed

    Soejarto, D D; Fong, H H S; Tan, G T; Zhang, H J; Ma, C Y; Franzblau, S G; Gyllenhaal, C; Riley, M C; Kadushin, M R; Pezzuto, J M; Xuan, L T; Hiep, N T; Hung, N V; Vu, B M; Loc, P K; Dac, L X; Binh, L T; Chien, N Q; Hai, N V; Bich, T Q; Cuong, N M; Southavong, B; Sydara, K; Bouamanivong, S; Ly, H M; Thuy, Tran Van; Rose, W C; Dietzman, G R

    2005-08-22

    Ethnobotany/ethnopharmacology has contributed to the discovery of many important plant-derived drugs. Field explorations to seek and document indigenous/traditional medical knowledge (IMK/TMK), and/or the biodiversity with which the IMK/TMK is attached, and its conversion into a commercialized product is known as bioprospecting or biodiversity prospecting. When performed in a large-scale operation, the effort is referred to as mass bioprospecting. Experiences from the mass bioprospecting efforts undertaken by the United States National Cancer Institute, the National Cooperative Drug Discovery Groups (NCDDG) and the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups (ICBG) programs demonstrate that mass bioprospecting is a complex process, involving expertise from diverse areas of human endeavors, but central to it is the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) that recognizes issues on genetic access, prior informed consent, intellectual property and the sharing of benefits that may arise as a result of the effort. Future mass bioprospecting endeavors must take heed of the lessons learned from past and present experiences in the planning for a successful mass bioprospecting venture. PMID:15993554

  12. WHAT DO DARK MATTER HALO PROPERTIES TELL US ABOUT THEIR MASS ASSEMBLY HISTORIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Anson W. C.; Taylor, James E. E-mail: taylor@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-09-20

    Individual dark matter halos in cosmological simulations vary widely in their detailed structural properties, properties such as concentration, shape, spin, and degree of internal relaxation. Recent non-parametric (principal component) analyses suggest that a few principal components explain a large fraction of the scatter in these structural properties. The main principal component is closely aligned with concentration, which in turn is known to be related to the mass accretion history (MAH) of the halo, as described by its merger tree. Here, we examine more generally the connection between the MAH and structural parameters. The space of mass accretion histories has principal components of its own. The strongest, accounting for almost 60% of the scatter between individual histories, can be interpreted as the age of the system. We give an analytic fit for this first component, which provides a rigorous way of defining the dynamical age of a halo. The second strongest component, representing acceleration or deceleration of growth at late times, accounts for 25% of the scatter. Relating structural parameters to formation history, we find that concentration correlates strongly with the early history of the halo, while shape and degree of relaxation or dynamical equilibrium correlate with the later history. We examine the inferences about formation history that can be drawn by splitting halos into sub-samples based on observable properties such as concentration and shape. Applications include the definition young and old samples of galaxy clusters in a quantitative way, or empirical tests of environmental processing rates in clusters.

  13. Engineering the Mechanical Properties of Monolayer Graphene Oxide at the Atomic Level.

    PubMed

    Soler-Crespo, Rafael A; Gao, Wei; Xiao, Penghao; Wei, Xiaoding; Paci, Jeffrey T; Henkelman, Graeme; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2016-07-21

    The mechanical properties of graphene oxide (GO) are of great importance for applications in materials engineering. Previous mechanochemical studies of GO typically focused on the influence of the degree of oxidation on the mechanical behavior. In this study, using density functional-based tight binding simulations, validated using density functional theory simulations, we reveal that the deformation and failure of GO are strongly dependent on the relative concentrations of epoxide (-O-) and hydroxyl (-OH) functional groups. Hydroxyl groups cause GO to behave as a brittle material; by contrast, epoxide groups enhance material ductility through a mechanically driven epoxide-to-ether functional group transformation. Moreover, with increasing epoxide group concentration, the strain to failure and toughness of GO significantly increases without sacrificing material strength and stiffness. These findings demonstrate that GO should be treated as a versatile, tunable material that may be engineered by controlling chemical composition, rather than as a single, archetypical material. PMID:27356465

  14. Electrospun polycaprolactone matrices with tensile properties suitable for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Elamparithi, Anuradha; Punnoose, Alan M; Kuruvilla, Sarah; Ravi, Maddaly; Rao, Suresh; Paul, Solomon F D

    2016-05-01

    The extracellular environment is a complex network of functional and structural components that impart chemical and mechanical stimuli that affect cellular function and fate. Cell differentiation on three dimensional scaffolds is also determined by the modulus of the substrate. Electrospun PCL nanofibers, which mimic the extra cellular matrix, have been developed with a wide variety of solvents and their combinations. The various studies have revealed that the solvents used influence the physical and mechanical properties, resulting in scaffolds with Young's modulus in the range of 1.8-15.4 MPa, more suitable for engineering of hard tissue like bone. The current study describes the use of benign binary solvent-generated fibrous scaffolds with a Young's modulus of 36.05 ± 13.08 kPa, which is almost 50 times lower than that of scaffolds derived from the commonly used solvents, characterized with myoblast, which can be further explored for applications in muscle and soft tissue engineering. PMID:25619755

  15. Optimization of tuned mass damper for adjacent buildings with equal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekdaş, Gebrail; Nigdeli, Sinan Melih

    2013-10-01

    During earthquakes, adjacent structures may collide to each other because of insufficient seismic gap. By using tuned mass dampers (TMD), the sway of adjacent buildings be reduced and pounding of structures is prevented. In this case, TMDs must be tuned according to the properties of adjacent structures in order to reduce seismic gap (maximum difference of displacements). Also, adjacent structures with equal properties may collide because live-loads on structures is not constant. Change of live-load affects seismic behavior of structures. In this paper, TMDs for adjacent structures with equal properties are optimized by using harmony search algorithm. The approach is effective to reduce the value of seismic gap needed for protection of structures.

  16. Chondroprotective supplementation promotes the mechanical properties of injectable scaffold for human nucleus pulposus tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Foss, Berit L; Maxwell, Thomas W; Deng, Ying

    2014-01-01

    A result of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, the nucleus pulposus (NP) is no longer able to withstand applied load leading to pain and disability. The objective of this study is to fabricate a tissue-engineered injectable scaffold with chondroprotective supplementation in vitro to improve the mechanical properties of a degenerative NP. Tissue-engineered scaffolds were fabricated using different concentrations of alginate and calcium chloride and mechanically evaluated. Fabrication conditions were based on structural and mechanical resemblance to the native NP. Chondroprotective supplementation, glucosamine (GCSN) and chondroitin sulfate (CS), were added to scaffolds at concentrations of 0:0µg/mL (0:0-S), 125:100µg/mL (125:100-S), 250:200µg/mL (250:200-S), and 500:400µg/mL (500:400-S), GCSN and CS, respectively. Scaffolds were used to fabricate tissue-engineered constructs through encapsulation of human nucleus pulposus cells (HNPCs). The tissue-engineered constructs were collected at days 1, 14, and 28 for biochemical and biomechanical evaluations. Confocal microscopy showed HNPC viability and rounded morphology over the 28 day period. MTT analysis resulted in significant increases in cell proliferation for each group. Collagen type II ELISA quantification and compressive aggregate moduli (HA) showed increasing trends for both 250:200-S and the 500:400-S groups on Day 28 with significantly greater HA compared to 0:0-S group. Glycosaminoglycan and water content decreased for all groups. Results indicate the increased mechanical properties of the 250:200-S and the 500:400-S was due to production of a functional matrix. This study demonstrated potential for a chondroprotective supplemented injectable scaffold to restore biomechanical function of a degenerative disc through the production of a mechanically functional matrix. PMID:24055794

  17. Synthesis and Engineering Materials Properties of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Westman, Matthew P.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high practical hydrogen content of 14-16 wt%. This material is selected as a surrogate chemical for a hydrogen storage system. For easier transition to the existing infrastructure, a fluid phase hydrogen storage material is very attractive and thus, we investigated the engineering materials properties of AB in liquid carriers for a chemical hydrogen storage slurry system. Slurries composed of AB and high temperature liquids were prepared by mechanical milling and sonication in order to obtain stable and fluidic properties. Volumetric gas burette system was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the AB slurry and neat AB. Viscometry and microscopy were employed to further characterize slurries engineering properties. Using a tip-sonication method we have produced AB/silicone fluid slurries at solid loadings up to 40wt% (6.5wt% H2) with viscosities less than 500cP at 25°C.

  18. Fuel property effects on USAF gas turbine engine combustors and afterburners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, the cost and availability of aircraft fuel have changed drastically. These problems prompted a program to evaluate the effects of broadened specification fuels on current and future aircraft engine combustors employed by the USAF. Phase 1 of this program was to test a set of fuels having a broad range of chemical and physical properties in a select group of gas turbine engine combustors currently in use by the USAF. The fuels ranged from JP4 to Diesel Fuel number two (DF2) with hydrogen content ranging from 14.5 percent down to 12 percent by weight, density ranging from 752 kg/sq m to 837 kg/sq m, and viscosity ranging from 0.830 sq mm/s to 3.245 sq mm/s. In addition, there was a broad range of aromatic content and physical properties attained by using Gulf Mineral Seal Oil, Xylene Bottoms, and 2040 Solvent as blending agents in JP4, JP5, JP8, and DF2. The objective of Phase 2 was to develop simple correlations and models of fuel effects on combustor performance and durability. The major variables of concern were fuel chemical and physical properties, combustor design factors, and combustor operating conditions.

  19. Metrological traceability of the measured values of properties of engineering materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roebben, G.; Linsinger, T.; Lamberty, A.; Emons, H.

    2010-04-01

    Global comparability of the measured values of material properties is based on some fundamental metrological concepts. These concepts are either already widely implemented in current procedures for materials testing or they are being further developed and increasingly accepted and used. An important aspect of the comparability of measurement results is metrological traceability. This paper aims at illustrating with practical examples how to apply the concept of metrological traceability as defined in ISO/IEC Guide 99:2007, known also as the VIM (International Vocabulary of Metrology), in the field of engineering material properties. VIM distinguishes three different types of references for traceability: either to a system of units, such as the SI, to a measurement procedure or to a physical measurement standard. For each approach, an example is given in the field of engineering material properties, including appropriate traceability statements and means to achieve the traceability. The role of certified reference materials is highlighted, as well as practical consequences of traceability requirements for the design of reference material certification projects.

  20. Engineering properties of high-refractive index optical gels for photonic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, David S.; Connor, Samantha R.

    2000-04-01

    We have investigated a new class of high refractive index, non-yellowing, viscoelastic optical gels. Refractive indices for these materials can be adjusted from that needed to match fused silica to above nD equals 1.6 to match the higher index engineering glasses, plastics, and semiconductors. These materials are designed for permanent optically clear encapsulation in devices where severe mechanical shock or differential thermal expansion, such as occurs during PCB soldering operations, may render conventional high strength optical epoxies unusable. These low shear stress gels can also be customized to exhibit a wide range of rheological 'stiffness'. We have demonstrated quasi-fluid versions with apparent viscosities of 500,000 cP to hard-rubber-like consistencies registering on the high end of the Shore 00 durometer scale. In this paper, we present measurements of engineering properties on both elastometer-like curing optical gels, and thixotropic non- curing optical gels for: a) optical properties from near UV to near IR: refractive index over temperature, dispersion, and optical absorption; b) rheological properties: viscosity vs. shear rate, Shore hardness and cone penetration. Validation of ultra-low volatility and high temperature thermo oxidative stability required for long-lived photonic devices is discussed. Use of gel technology in fiber splices and photonic devices is described.

  1. High-performance hardware implementation of a parallel database search engine for real-time peptide mass fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Bogdán, István A.; Rivers, Jenny; Beynon, Robert J.; Coca, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) is a method for protein identification in which a protein is fragmented by a defined cleavage protocol (usually proteolysis with trypsin), and the masses of these products constitute a ‘fingerprint’ that can be searched against theoretical fingerprints of all known proteins. In the first stage of PMF, the raw mass spectrometric data are processed to generate a peptide mass list. In the second stage this protein fingerprint is used to search a database of known proteins for the best protein match. Although current software solutions can typically deliver a match in a relatively short time, a system that can find a match in real time could change the way in which PMF is deployed and presented. In a paper published earlier we presented a hardware design of a raw mass spectra processor that, when implemented in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) hardware, achieves almost 170-fold speed gain relative to a conventional software implementation running on a dual processor server. In this article we present a complementary hardware realization of a parallel database search engine that, when running on a Xilinx Virtex 2 FPGA at 100 MHz, delivers 1800-fold speed-up compared with an equivalent C software routine, running on a 3.06 GHz Xeon workstation. The inherent scalability of the design means that processing speed can be multiplied by deploying the design on multiple FPGAs. The database search processor and the mass spectra processor, running on a reconfigurable computing platform, provide a complete real-time PMF protein identification solution. Contact: d.coca@sheffield.ac.uk PMID:18453553

  2. Estimating Mass Properties of Dinosaurs Using Laser Imaging and 3D Computer Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Karl T.; Manning, Phillip L.; Hodgetts, David; Sellers, William I.

    2009-01-01

    Body mass reconstructions of extinct vertebrates are most robust when complete to near-complete skeletons allow the reconstruction of either physical or digital models. Digital models are most efficient in terms of time and cost, and provide the facility to infinitely modify model properties non-destructively, such that sensitivity analyses can be conducted to quantify the effect of the many unknown parameters involved in reconstructions of extinct animals. In this study we use laser scanning (LiDAR) and computer modelling methods to create a range of 3D mass models of five specimens of non-avian dinosaur; two near-complete specimens of Tyrannosaurus rex, the most complete specimens of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis and Strutiomimum sedens, and a near-complete skeleton of a sub-adult Edmontosaurus annectens. LiDAR scanning allows a full mounted skeleton to be imaged resulting in a detailed 3D model in which each bone retains its spatial position and articulation. This provides a high resolution skeletal framework around which the body cavity and internal organs such as lungs and air sacs can be reconstructed. This has allowed calculation of body segment masses, centres of mass and moments or inertia for each animal. However, any soft tissue reconstruction of an extinct taxon inevitably represents a best estimate model with an unknown level of accuracy. We have therefore conducted an extensive sensitivity analysis in which the volumes of body segments and respiratory organs were varied in an attempt to constrain the likely maximum plausible range of mass parameters for each animal. Our results provide wide ranges in actual mass and inertial values, emphasizing the high level of uncertainty inevitable in such reconstructions. However, our sensitivity analysis consistently places the centre of mass well below and in front of hip joint in each animal, regardless of the chosen combination of body and respiratory structure volumes. These results emphasize that future

  3. Estimating mass properties of dinosaurs using laser imaging and 3D computer modelling.

    PubMed

    Bates, Karl T; Manning, Phillip L; Hodgetts, David; Sellers, William I

    2009-01-01

    Body mass reconstructions of extinct vertebrates are most robust when complete to near-complete skeletons allow the reconstruction of either physical or digital models. Digital models are most efficient in terms of time and cost, and provide the facility to infinitely modify model properties non-destructively, such that sensitivity analyses can be conducted to quantify the effect of the many unknown parameters involved in reconstructions of extinct animals. In this study we use laser scanning (LiDAR) and computer modelling methods to create a range of 3D mass models of five specimens of non-avian dinosaur; two near-complete specimens of Tyrannosaurus rex, the most complete specimens of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis and Strutiomimum sedens, and a near-complete skeleton of a sub-adult Edmontosaurus annectens. LiDAR scanning allows a full mounted skeleton to be imaged resulting in a detailed 3D model in which each bone retains its spatial position and articulation. This provides a high resolution skeletal framework around which the body cavity and internal organs such as lungs and air sacs can be reconstructed. This has allowed calculation of body segment masses, centres of mass and moments or inertia for each animal. However, any soft tissue reconstruction of an extinct taxon inevitably represents a best estimate model with an unknown level of accuracy. We have therefore conducted an extensive sensitivity analysis in which the volumes of body segments and respiratory organs were varied in an attempt to constrain the likely maximum plausible range of mass parameters for each animal. Our results provide wide ranges in actual mass and inertial values, emphasizing the high level of uncertainty inevitable in such reconstructions. However, our sensitivity analysis consistently places the centre of mass well below and in front of hip joint in each animal, regardless of the chosen combination of body and respiratory structure volumes. These results emphasize that future

  4. Constraining properties of GRB magnetar central engines using the observed plateau luminosity and duration correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlinson, A.; Gompertz, B. P.; Dainotti, M.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2014-09-01

    An intrinsic correlation has been identified between the luminosity and duration of plateaus in the X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; Dainotti et al. 2008), suggesting a central engine origin. The magnetar central engine model predicts an observable plateau phase, with plateau durations and luminosities being determined by the magnetic fields and spin periods of the newly formed magnetar. This paper analytically shows that the magnetar central engine model can explain, within the 1σ uncertainties, the correlation between plateau luminosity and duration. The observed scatter in the correlation most likely originates in the spread of initial spin periods of the newly formed magnetar and provides an estimate of the maximum spin period of ˜35 ms (assuming a constant mass, efficiency and beaming across the GRB sample). Additionally, by combining the observed data and simulations, we show that the magnetar emission is most likely narrowly beamed and has ≲20 per cent efficiency in conversion of rotational energy from the magnetar into the observed plateau luminosity. The beaming angles and efficiencies obtained by this method are fully consistent with both predicted and observed values. We find that short GRBs and short GRBs with extended emission lie on the same correlation but are statistically inconsistent with being drawn from the same distribution as long GRBs, this is consistent with them having a wider beaming angle than long GRBs.

  5. Biomechanical evaluation of suture holding properties of native and tissue engineered articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    DuRaine, GD; Arzi, B; Lee, JK; Lee, CA; Responte, DJ; Hu, JC; Athanasiou, KA

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine suture-holding properties of tissue engineered neocartilage relative to native articular cartilage. To this end, suture pull-out strength was quantified for native articular cartilage and for neocartilages possessing various mechanical properties. Methods Suture holding properties were examined in vitro and in vivo. Neocartilage from bovine chondrocytes was engineered using two sets of exogenous stimuli resulting in neotissue of different biochemical compositions. Compressive and tensile properties and glycosaminoglycan, collagen, and pyridinoline cross-link contents were assayed (study 1). Suture pull-out strength was compared between neocartilage constructs, and bovine and leporine native cartilage. Uniaxial pull-out test until failure was performed after passing 6-0 Vicryl through each tissue (study 2). Subsequently, neocartilage was implanted into a rabbit model to examine short-term suture holding ability in vivo (study 3). Results Neocartilage glycosaminoglycan and collagen content per wet weight reached 4.55% ± 1.62% and 4.21 ± 0.77%, respectively. Tensile properties for neocartilage constructs reached 2.6 ± 0.77 MPa for Young’s modulus and 1.39 ± 0.63 MPa for ultimate tensile strength. Neocartilage reached ~33% of suture pull-out strength of native articular cartilage. Neocartilage cross-link content reached 50% of native values, and suture pull-out strength correlated positively with cross-link content (R2=0.74). Neocartilage sutured into rabbit osteochondral defects was successfully maintained for 3 weeks. Conclusion This study shows that pyridinoline cross-links in neocartilage may be vital in controlling suture pull-out strength. Neocartilage produced in vitro with one-third of native tissue pull-out strength appears sufficient for construct suturing and retention in vivo. PMID:24848644

  6. Engineering biodegradable polyester elastomers with antioxidant properties to attenuate oxidative stress in tissues

    PubMed Central

    van Lith, R.; Gregory, E.K.; Yang, J.; Kibbe, M.R.; Ameer, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the limited biological compatibility of many biomaterials due to inflammation, as well as in various pathologies including atherosclerosis and restenosis as a result of vascular interventions. Engineering antioxidant properties into a material is therefore a potential avenue to improve the biocompatibility of materials, as well as to locally attenuate oxidative stress-related pathologies. Moreover, biodegradable polymers that have antioxidant properties built into their backbone structure have high relative antioxidant content and may provide prolonged, continuous attenuation of oxidative stress while the polymer or its degradation products are present. In this report, we describe the synthesis of poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate-co-ascorbate) (POCA), a citric-acid based biodegradable elastomer with native, intrinsic antioxidant properties. The in vitro antioxidant activity of POCA as well as its effects on vascular cells in vitro and in vivo were studied. Antioxidant properties investigated included scavenging of free radicals, iron chelation and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. POCA reduced reactive oxygen species generation in cells after an oxidative challenge and protected cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death. Importantly, POCA antioxidant properties remained present upon degradation. Vascular cells cultured on POCA showed high viability, and POCA selectively inhibited smooth muscle cell proliferation, while supporting endothelial cell proliferation. Finally, preliminary data on POCA-coated ePTFE grafts showed reduced intimal hyperplasia when compared to standard ePTFE grafts. This biodegradable, intrinsically antioxidant polymer may be useful for tissue engineering application where oxidative stress is a concern. PMID:24976244

  7. Mass Properties Testing and Evaluation for the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Felicione, Frank S.

    2009-12-01

    Mass properties (MP) measurements were performed for the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), serial number (S/N) 0X730401, the power system designated for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Measurements were made using new mounting fixtures at the mass properties testing station in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Space and Security Power Systems Facility (SSPSF). The objective of making mass properties measurements was to determine the generator’s flight configured mass and center of mass or center of gravity (CG). Using an extremely accurate platform scale, the mass of the as-tested generator was determined to be 100.117 ± 0.007 lb. Weight accuracy was determined by checking the platform scale with calibrated weights immediately prior to weighing the MMRTG.a CG measurement accuracy was assessed by surrogate testing using an inert mass standard for which the CG could be readily determined analytically. Repeated testing using the mass standard enabled the basic measurement precision of the system to be quantified in terms of a physical confidence interval about the measured CG position. However, repetitious testing with the MMRTG itself was not performed in deference to the gamma and neutron radiation dose to operators and the damage potential to the flight unit from extra handling operations. Since the mass standard had been specially designed to have a total weight and CG location that closely matched the MMRTG, the uncertainties determined from its testing were assigned to the MMRTG as well. On this basis, and at the 99% confidence level, a statistical analysis found the direct, as-measured MMRTG-MSL CG to be located at 10.816 ± 0.0011 in. measured perpendicular from the plane of the lower surface of the generator’s mounting lugs (Z direction), and offset from the generator’s long axis centerline in the X and Y directions by 0.0968 ± 0.0040 in. and 0.0276 ± 0.0026 in., respectively. These uncertainties are based

  8. Crescendo: A Protein Sequence Database Search Engine for Tandem Mass Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianqi; Zhang, Yajie; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-07-01

    A search engine that discovers more peptides reliably is essential to the progress of the computational proteomics. We propose two new scoring functions (L- and P-scores), which aim to capture similar characteristics of a peptide-spectrum match (PSM) as Sequest and Comet do. Crescendo, introduced here, is a software program that implements these two scores for peptide identification. We applied Crescendo to test datasets and compared its performance with widely used search engines, including Mascot, Sequest, and Comet. The results indicate that Crescendo identifies a similar or larger number of peptides at various predefined false discovery rates (FDR). Importantly, it also provides a better separation between the true and decoy PSMs, warranting the future development of a companion post-processing filtering algorithm.

  9. The Transport of Mass, Energy, and Entropy in Cryogenic Support Struts for Engineering Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchert, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Engineers working to understand and reduce cryogenic boil-off must solve a. variety of transport problems. An important class of nonlinear problems involves the thermal and mechanical design of cryogenic struts. These classic problems are scattered about the literature and typically require too many resources to obtain. So, to save time for practicing engineers, the author presents this essay. Herein, a variety of new, old, and revisited analytical and finite difference solutions of the thermal problem are covered in this essay, along with commentary on approach and assumptions, This includes a few thermal radiation and conduction combined mode solution with a discussion on insulation, optimum emissivity, and geometrical phenomenon. Solutions to cooling and heat interception problems are also presented, including a discussion of the entropy generation. And the literature on the combined mechanical and thermal design of cryogenic support struts is reviewed with an introduction to the associated numerical methods.

  10. The Transport of Mass, Energy, and Entropy in Cryogenic Support Struts for Engineering Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchert, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Engineers working to understand and reduce cryogenic boil-off must solve a variety of transport problems. An important class of nonlinear problems involves the thermal and mechanical design of cryogenic struts. These classic problems are scattered about the literature and typically require too many resources to obtain. So, to save time for practicing engineers, the author presents this essay. Herein, a variety of new, old, and revisited analytical and finite difference solutions of the thermal problem are covered in this essay, along with commentary on approach and assumptions. This includes a few thermal radiation and conduction combined mode solutions with a discussion on insulation, optimum emissivity, and geometrical phenomenon. Solutions to cooling and heat interception problems are also presented, including a discussion of the entropy generation. The literature on the combined mechanical and thermal design of cryogenic support struts is reviewed with an introduction to the associated numerical methods.