Science.gov

Sample records for mass properties testing

  1. NASA Dryden: Flight Loads Lab Capabilities and Mass Properties Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, David Michael; Bakalyar, John A.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation covers the basic capabilities of the Dryden Flight Loads Lab. It also covers in detail the mass properties capabilities of the loads lab, focusing on the recent mass properties testing of the X-48B, and the recent tests of the Dynamic Inertia Measurement method (DIMM). Presentation focuses on the test methods and issues discovered during the mass properties testing of the X-48B leading to the requirement of new instrumentation on all conventional mass properties testing. Presentation also focuses on development of DIMM for replacement of conventional mass properties tests.

  2. Frequency Shift During Mass Properties Testing Using Compound Pendulum Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, David; Regan, Chris

    2012-01-01

    During mass properties testing on the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft (The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, large inertia measurement errors were observed in results from compound pendulum swings when compared to analytical models. By comparing periods of oscillations as measured from an average over the test period versus the period of each oscillation, it was noticed that the frequency of oscillation was shifting significantly throughout the test. This phenomenon was only noticed during compound pendulum swings, and not during bifilar pendulum swings. The frequency shift was only visible upon extensive data analysis of the frequency for each oscillation, and did not appear in averaged frequency data over the test period. Multiple test articles, test techniques, and hardware setups were used in attempts to eliminate or identify the cause of the frequency shift. Plotting the frequency of oscillation revealed a region of minimal shift that corresponded to a larger amplitude range. This region of minimal shift provided the most accurate results compared to a known test article; however, the amplitudes that produce accurate inertia measurements are amplitudes larger than those generally accepted in mass properties testing. This paper examines two case studies of the frequency shift, using mass properties testing performed on a dummy test article, and on the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft.

  3. Mass properties calibration of the NASA Langley low frequency vibration test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javeed, Mehzad; Russell, James W.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents a description and calibration results of the modified NASA Langley Low Frequency Vibration Test Apparatus. The description includes both the suspension system and the data acquisition system. The test apparatus consists of a 2 inch thick, 21 inch diameter aluminum plate that is suspended from an advanced suspension system using a 40 foot long cable system. The test apparatus employed three orthogonally aligned pairs of Sundstrand QA-700 servo accelerometers that can measure accelerations as low as 1 micro-g. The calibration involved deriving the mass and moments of inertia of the test platform from measured input forces and measured acceleration responses. The derived mass and moments were compared to test platform mass properties obtained initially from measurements with a special mass properties instrument. Results of the calibration tests showed that using the product of the test apparatus mass and the measured accelerations, the disturbance force at the center of gravity (CG) can be determined within 4 percent on all three axes. Similarly the disturbance moments about the X, Y, and Z axes can be determined within 5 percent by using the product of the measured moments of inertia and the angular accelerations about the X, Y, and Z axes.

  4. Apollo Soyuz Test Project Weights and Mass Properties Operational Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. A., Jr.; Hischke, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) Weights and Mass Properties Operational Management System was established to assure a timely and authoritative method of acquiring, controlling, generating, and disseminating an official set of vehicle weights and mass properties data. This paper provides an overview of the system and its interaction with the various aspects of vehicle and component design, mission planning, hardware and software simulations and verification, and real-time mission support activities. The effect of vehicle configuration, design maturity, and consumables updates is discussed in the context of weight control.

  5. Mass Properties Testing and Evaluation for the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Felicione, Frank S.

    2009-12-01

    Mass properties (MP) measurements were performed for the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), serial number (S/N) 0X730401, the power system designated for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Measurements were made using new mounting fixtures at the mass properties testing station in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Space and Security Power Systems Facility (SSPSF). The objective of making mass properties measurements was to determine the generator’s flight configured mass and center of mass or center of gravity (CG). Using an extremely accurate platform scale, the mass of the as-tested generator was determined to be 100.117 ± 0.007 lb. Weight accuracy was determined by checking the platform scale with calibrated weights immediately prior to weighing the MMRTG.a CG measurement accuracy was assessed by surrogate testing using an inert mass standard for which the CG could be readily determined analytically. Repeated testing using the mass standard enabled the basic measurement precision of the system to be quantified in terms of a physical confidence interval about the measured CG position. However, repetitious testing with the MMRTG itself was not performed in deference to the gamma and neutron radiation dose to operators and the damage potential to the flight unit from extra handling operations. Since the mass standard had been specially designed to have a total weight and CG location that closely matched the MMRTG, the uncertainties determined from its testing were assigned to the MMRTG as well. On this basis, and at the 99% confidence level, a statistical analysis found the direct, as-measured MMRTG-MSL CG to be located at 10.816 ± 0.0011 in. measured perpendicular from the plane of the lower surface of the generator’s mounting lugs (Z direction), and offset from the generator’s long axis centerline in the X and Y directions by 0.0968 ± 0.0040 in. and 0.0276 ± 0.0026 in., respectively. These uncertainties are based

  6. Apollo/Soyuz test project operational data book. Volume 2: ASTP mass properties data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Spacecraft mass properties data are provided for use in mission planning, trajectory documentation, mission simulations, and consumable loading. Spacecraft for use in determining locations of spacecraft components and the relationship to coordinate systems in the launch and docked configuration. Mass properties and consumable loading data for the ASTP mission are included along with consumables mass property data and mission independent consumable loading information for the CSM and DM.

  7. Orion Pad Abort 1 Crew Module Mass Properties Test Approach and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Claudia; Harding, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The Flight Loads Laboratory at the Dryden Flight Research Center conducted tests to measure the inertia properties of the Orion Pad Abort 1 (PA-1) Crew Module (CM). These measurements were taken to validate analytical predictions of the inertia properties of the vehicle and assist in reducing uncertainty for derived aero performance coefficients to be calculated post-launch. The first test conducted was to determine the Ixx of the Crew Module. This test approach used a modified torsion pendulum test setup that allowed the suspended Crew Module to rotate about the x axis. The second test used a different approach to measure both the Iyy and Izz properties. This test used a Knife Edge fixture that allowed small rotation of the Crew Module about the y and z axes. Discussions of the techniques and equations used to accomplish each test are presented. Comparisons with the predicted values used for the final flight calculations are made. Problem areas, with explanations and recommendations where available, are addressed. Finally, an evaluation of the value and success of these techniques to measure the moments of inertia of the Crew Module is provided.

  8. Experimental Validation of the Dynamic Inertia Measurement Method to Find the Mass Properties of an Iron Bird Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Alexander W.; Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Fladung, William A.; Cloutier, David

    2015-01-01

    The mass properties of an aerospace vehicle are required by multiple disciplines in the analysis and prediction of flight behavior. Pendulum oscillation methods have been developed and employed for almost a century as a means to measure mass properties. However, these oscillation methods are costly, time consuming, and risky. The NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center has been investigating the Dynamic Inertia Measurement, or DIM method as a possible alternative to oscillation methods. The DIM method uses ground test techniques that are already applied to aerospace vehicles when conducting modal surveys. Ground vibration tests would require minimal additional instrumentation and time to apply the DIM method. The DIM method has been validated on smaller test articles, but has not yet been fully proven on large aerospace vehicles.

  9. A heated flatjack test series to measure the thermomechanical and transport properties of in situ rock masses (heated block test)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, E.; Barton, N.; Lingle, D.; Board, M.; Voegele, M.

    1982-09-01

    An instrumented 8 cu m block of jointed gneiss was subjected to biaxial and uniaxial loading at ambient and elevated temperatures, using flatjacks and a line of borehole heaters. The following rock mass properties were investigated under various conditions of stress (0 to 6.9 MPa, uniaxial and biaxial) and temperature (12 to 74 C mean block temperature): joint permeability, static modulus, dynamic modulus, joint normal and shear stiffness, coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The instrumentation array included multiple position borehole extensometers, DCDT and IRAD surface strainmeters, various borehole stressmeters and deformation gages, numerous thermocouples and Whitemore strain gage measurement points. The coefficient of thermal expansion was found to initially reduce with increasing temperature in the horizontal loaded directions, and to increase in the unloaded vertical direction.

  10. Ballistics/mass properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drendel, Albert S.; Richards, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    The propulsion performance and reconstructed mass properties data from Morton Thiokol's RSRM-4 motors, which were assigned to the STS-30R launch, are presented. The composite type solid propellant burn rates were close to predicted. The performance of the pair of motors were compared to some CEI Specification CPW1-3600 for compliance. Some aspects of the CEI Specification could not be compared because of low sampling of data. The performance of the motors were well within the CEI specification requirements. Post flight reconstructured RSRM mass properties are within expected values for the RSRM quarterweight and halfweight configurations.

  11. Experimental Validation of the Dynamic Inertia Measurement Method to Find the Mass Properties of an Iron Bird Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Alexander; Herrera, Claudia; Spivey, Natalie; Fladung, William; Cloutier, David

    2015-01-01

    This presentation describes the DIM method and how it measures the inertia properties of an object by analyzing the frequency response functions measured during a ground vibration test (GVT). The DIM method has been in development at the University of Cincinnati and has shown success on a variety of small scale test articles. The NASA AFRC version was modified for larger applications.

  12. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  13. ACTOMP - AUTOCAD TO MASS PROPERTIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A.

    1994-01-01

    AutoCAD to Mass Properties was developed to facilitate quick mass properties calculations of structures having many simple elements in a complex configuration such as trusses or metal sheet containers. Calculating the mass properties of structures of this type can be a tedious and repetitive process, but ACTOMP helps automate the calculations. The structure can be modelled in AutoCAD or a compatible CAD system in a matter of minutes using the 3-Dimensional elements. This model provides all the geometric data necessary to make a mass properties calculation of the structure. ACTOMP reads the geometric data of a drawing from the Drawing Interchange File (DXF) used in AutoCAD. The geometric entities recognized by ACTOMP include POINTs, 3DLINEs, and 3DFACEs. ACTOMP requests mass, linear density, or area density of the elements for each layer, sums all the elements and calculates the total mass, center of mass (CM) and the mass moments of inertia (MOI). AutoCAD utilizes layers to define separate drawing planes. ACTOMP uses layers to differentiate between multiple types of similar elements. For example if a structure is made of various types of beams, modeled as 3DLINEs, each with a different linear density, the beams can be grouped by linear density and each group placed on a separate layer. The program will request the linear density of 3DLINEs for each new layer it finds as it processes the drawing information. The same is true with POINTs and 3DFACEs. By using layers this way a very complex model can be created. POINTs are used for point masses such as bolts, small machine parts, or small electronic boxes. 3DLINEs are used for beams, bars, rods, cables, and other similarly slender elements. 3DFACEs are used for planar elements. 3DFACEs may be created as 3 or 4 Point faces. Some examples of elements that might be modelled using 3DFACEs are plates, sheet metal, fabric, boxes, large diameter hollow cylinders and evenly distributed masses. ACTOMP was written in Microsoft

  14. Computing Mass Properties From AutoCAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A.

    1990-01-01

    Mass properties of structures computed from data in drawings. AutoCAD to Mass Properties (ACTOMP) computer program developed to facilitate quick calculations of mass properties of structures containing many simple elements in such complex configurations as trusses or sheet-metal containers. Mathematically modeled in AutoCAD or compatible computer-aided design (CAD) system in minutes by use of three-dimensional elements. Written in Microsoft Quick-Basic (Version 2.0).

  15. Innovative mechanism for measuring the mass properties of an object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolcott, Kedron R.; Graham, Todd A.; Doty, Keith L.

    1994-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Robotics Group recently completed development and testing on a novel approach to measure the mass properties of a rigid body. This unique design can measure the payload's weight, mass center location, and moments of inertia about three orthogonal axes. Furthermore, these measurements only require a single torque sensor and a single angular position sensor.

  16. Celotex Structural Properties Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.C.

    2001-01-26

    In the course of regulatory review of the 9975 packaging, the question of the effects environmental conditions on performance of the packaging was raised. The results of previous tests of the Celotex material, used for impact absorption and thermal insulation, indicated that the effect of temperature variation was small. Accordingly, performance under ambient conditions was judged to be representative of performance under temperature extremes. To extend the database to include other effects, and in response to the questions, a series of materials tests were performed on the Celotex brand cellulose fiberboard material.

  17. NERVA mass properties computer methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, I. K.

    1972-01-01

    The computer codes are presented that were used for the weight, center of gravity, and mass moment of inertia calculations and documentation for the NERVA. The two programs, E15301 and 12001B, are the basic tools used for weights work on the NERVA program. Used in conjunction with one another, they allow for rapid weights estimates for new concepts or changes while allowing for orderly documentation, which is a necessity in any effective weights effort. Program E15301 requires that each component be resolved into a collection of standard shapes. Separate subroutines then process geometric and material density data for each entry. The master program the performs all calculations necessary to combine these results into a total weight, center of gravity, and moment of inertia for the component. Program 12001B accepts previously calculated weight and center of gravity data for individual components. The program sums weights and calculates center of gravities and moments of inertia for systems of up to four levels of assemblies. The output identifies the engine parts in a format usable directly in a formal report.

  18. MASPROP- MASS PROPERTIES OF A RIGID STRUCTURE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    The computer program MASPROP was developed to rapidly calculate the mass properties of complex rigid structural systems. This program's basic premise is that complex systems can be adequately described by a combination of basic elementary structural shapes. Thirteen widely used basic structural shapes are available in this program. They are as follows: Discrete Mass, Cylinder, Truncated Cone, Torus, Beam (arbitrary cross section), Circular Rod (arbitrary cross section), Spherical Segment, Sphere, Hemisphere, Parallelepiped, Swept Trapezoidal Panel, Symmetric Trapezoidal Panels, and a Curved Rectangular Panel. MASPROP provides a designer with a simple technique that requires minimal input to calculate the mass properties of a complex rigid structure and should be useful in any situation where one needs to calculate the center of gravity and moments of inertia of a complex structure. Rigid body analysis is used to calculate mass properties. Mass properties are calculated about component axes that have been rotated to be parallel to the system coordinate axes. Then the system center of gravity is calculated and the mass properties are transferred to axes through the system center of gravity by using the parallel axis theorem. System weight, moments of inertia about the system origin, and the products of inertia about the system center of mass are calculated and printed. From the information about the system center of mass the principal axes of the system and the moments of inertia about them are calculated and printed. The only input required is simple geometric data describing the size and location of each element and the respective material density or weight of each element. This program is written in FORTRAN for execution on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 62K (octal) of 60 bit words. The development of this program was completed in 1978.

  19. Testing Young Children's Ideas of Mass Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheeseman, Jill; McDonough, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    This article reports an innovative use of photographs in a pencil-and-paper test which was developed to assess young children's understanding of mass measurement. Two hundred and ninety-five tests were administered by thirteen teachers of Years 1 and 2 children in 3 urban and rural schools. Many of these children of 6-8 years of age were able to…

  20. Mass Property Measurements of the Mars Science Laboratory Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The NASA/JPL Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft mass properties were measured on a spin balance table prior to launch. This paper discusses the requirements and issues encountered with the setup, qualification, and testing using the spin balance table, and the idiosyncrasies encountered with the test system. The final mass measurements were made in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) at Kennedy Space Center on the fully assembled and fueled spacecraft. This set of environmental tests required that the control system for the spin balance machine be at a remote location, which posed additional challenges to the operation of the machine

  1. Fundamental Properties of Low-Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Michael C.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Allard, France; Blake, Cullen H.; Bonnefoy, M.; Cody, Ann Marie; Kraus, Adam; Day-Jones, A. C.; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes

    2009-02-16

    Precise measurements of the fundamental properties of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs are key to understanding the physics underlying their formation and evolution. While there has been great progress over the last decade in studying the bulk spectrophotometric properties of low-mass objects, direct determination of their masses, radii, and temperatures have been very sparse. Thus, theoretical predictions of low-mass evolution and ultracool atmospheres remain to be rigorously tested. The situation is alarming given that such models are widely used, from the determination of the low-mass end of the initial mass function to the characterization of exoplanets.An increasing number of mass, radius, and age determinations are placing critical constraints on the physics of low-mass objects. A wide variety of approaches are being pursued, including eclipsing binary studies, astrometric-spectroscopic orbital solutions, interferometry, and characterization of benchmark systems. In parallel, many more systems suitable for concerted study are now being found, thanks to new capabilities spanning both the very widest (all-sky surveys) and very narrowest (diffraction-limited adaptive optics) areas of the sky. This Cool Stars 15 splinter session highlighted the current successes and limitations of this rapidly growing area of precision astrophysics.

  2. E-Standards For Mass Properties Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerro, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    A proposal is put forth to promote the concept of a Society of Allied Weight Engineers developed voluntary consensus standard for mass properties engineering. This standard would be an e-standard, and would encompass data, data manipulation, and reporting functionality. The standard would be implemented via an open-source SAWE distribution site with full SAWE member body access. Engineering societies and global standards initiatives are progressing toward modern engineering standards, which become functioning deliverable data sets. These data sets, if properly standardized, will integrate easily between supplier and customer enabling technically precise mass properties data exchange. The concepts of object-oriented programming support all of these requirements, and the use of a JavaTx based open-source development initiative is proposed. Results are reported for activity sponsored by the NASA Langley Research Center Innovation Institute to scope out requirements for developing a mass properties engineering e-standard. An initial software distribution is proposed. Upon completion, an open-source application programming interface will be available to SAWE members for the development of more specific programming requirements that are tailored to company and project requirements. A fully functioning application programming interface will permit code extension via company proprietary techniques, as well as through continued open-source initiatives.

  3. Inflight magnetic characterization of the test masses onboard LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; García-Berro, Enrique; Lobo, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Pathfinder is a science and technology demonstrator of the European Space Agency within the framework of its LISA mission, the latter aiming to be the first space-borne gravitational wave observatory. The payload of LISA Pathfinder is the so-called LISA Technology Package, which is designed to measure relative accelerations between two test masses in nominal free fall. The diagnostics subsystem consists of several modules, one of which is the magnetic diagnostics unit. Its main function is the assessment of the differential acceleration noise between the test masses due to magnetic effects. This subsystem is composed of two onboard coils intended to produce controlled magnetic fields at the location of the test masses. These magnetic fields couple with the remanent magnetic moment and susceptibility and produce forces and torques on the test masses. These, in turn, produce kinematic excursions of the test masses which are sensed by the onboard interferometer. We prove that adequately processing these excursions, the magnetic properties of the test masses can be estimated using classical multiparameter estimation techniques. Moreover, we show that special processing procedures to minimize the effect of the multichannel cross-talks are needed. Finally, we demonstrate that the quality of our estimates is frequency-dependent. We also suggest that using a multiple frequency experiment, the global estimate can be obtained in such a way that the results of the magnetic experiment are more reliable. Finally, using our procedure, we compute the contribution of the magnetic noise to the total proof-mass acceleration noise.

  4. The mass storage testing laboratory at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Ravi; Williams, Joel; Michaud, David; Gu, Heng; Kalluri, Atri; Hariharan, P. C.; Kobler, Ben; Behnke, Jeanne; Peavey, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    Industry-wide benchmarks exist for measuring the performance of processors (SPECmarks), and of database systems (Transaction Processing Council). Despite storage having become the dominant item in computing and IT (Information Technology) budgets, no such common benchmark is available in the mass storage field. Vendors and consultants provide services and tools for capacity planning and sizing, but these do not account for the complete set of metrics needed in today's archives. The availability of automated tape libraries, high-capacity RAID systems, and high- bandwidth interconnectivity between processor and peripherals has led to demands for services which traditional file systems cannot provide. File Storage and Management Systems (FSMS), which began to be marketed in the late 80's, have helped to some extent with large tape libraries, but their use has introduced additional parameters affecting performance. The aim of the Mass Storage Test Laboratory (MSTL) at Goddard Space Flight Center is to develop a test suite that includes not only a comprehensive check list to document a mass storage environment but also benchmark code. Benchmark code is being tested which will provide measurements for both baseline systems, i.e. applications interacting with peripherals through the operating system services, and for combinations involving an FSMS. The benchmarks are written in C, and are easily portable. They are initially being aimed at the UNIX Open Systems world. Measurements are being made using a Sun Ultra 170 Sparc with 256MB memory running Solaris 2.5.1 with the following configuration: 4mm tape stacker on SCSI 2 Fast/Wide; 4GB disk device on SCSI 2 Fast/Wide; and Sony Petaserve on Fast/Wide differential SCSI 2.

  5. Variability in properties of Salado Mass Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Harrington, P.T.; Hansen, F.D.

    1995-08-01

    Salado Mass Concrete (SMC) has been developed for use as a seal component in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This concrete is intended to be mixed from pre-bagged materials, have an initial slump of 10 in., and remain pumpable and placeable for two hours after mixing. It is a mass concrete because it will be placed in monoliths large enough that the heat generated during cement hydration has the potential to cause thermal expansion and subsequent cracking, a phenomenon to avoid in the seal system. This report describes effects on concrete properties of changes in ratio of water to cement, batch size, and variations in characteristics of different lots of individual components of the concrete. The research demonstrates that the concrete can be prepared from laboratory-batched or pre-bagged dry materials in batches from 1.5 ft{sup 3} to 5.0 yd{sup 3}, with no chemical admixtures other than the sodium chloride added to improve bonding with the host rock, at a water-to-cement ratio ranging from 0.36 to 0.42. All batches prepared according to established procedures had adequate workability for at least 1.5 hours, and achieved or exceeded the target compressive strength of 4500 psi at 180 days after casting. Portland cement and fly ash from different lots or sources did not have a measurable effect on concrete properties, but variations in a shrinkage-compensating cement used as a component of the concrete did appear to affect workability. A low initial temperature and the water-reducing and set-retarding functions of the salt are critical to meeting target properties.

  6. Mass Properties for Space Systems Standards Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beech, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Current Verbiage in S-120 Applies to Dry Mass. Mass Margin is difference between Required Mass and Predicted Mass. Performance Margin is difference between Predicted Performance and Required Performance. Performance estimates and corresponding margin should be based on Predicted Mass (and other inputs). Contractor Mass Margin reserved from Performance Margin. Remaining performance margin allocated according to mass partials. Compliance can be evaluated effectively by comparison of three areas (preferably on a single sheet). Basic and Predicted Mass (including historical trend). Aggregate potential changes (threats and opportunities) which gives Mass Forecast. Mass Maturity by category (Estimated/Calculated/Actual).

  7. New Mass Properties Engineers Aerospace Ballasting Challenge Facilitated by the SAWE Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutright, Amanda; Shaughnessy, Brendan

    2010-01-01

    The discipline of Mass Properties Engineering tends to find the engineers; not typically vice versa. In this case, two engineers quickly found their new responsibilities deep in many aspects of mass properties engineering and required to meet technical challenges in a fast paced environment. As part of NASA's Constellation Program, a series of flight tests will be conducted to evaluate components of the new spacecraft launch vehicles. One of these tests is the Pad Abort 1 (PA-1) flight test which will test the Launch Abort System (LAS), a system designed to provide escape for astronauts in the event of an emergency. The Flight Test Articles (FTA) used in this flight test are required to match mass properties corresponding to the operational vehicle, which has a continually evolving design. Additionally, since the structure and subsystems for the Orion Crew Module (CM) FTA are simplified versions of the final product, thousands of pounds of ballast are necessary to achieve the desired mass properties. These new mass properties engineers are responsible for many mass properties aspects in support of the flight test, including meeting the ballasting challenge for the CM Boilerplate FTA. SAWE expert and experienced mass properties engineers, both those that are directly on the team and many that supported via a variety of Society venues, significantly contributed to facilitating the success of addressing this particular mass properties ballasting challenge, in addition to many other challenges along the way. This paper discusses the details regarding the technical aspects of this particular mass properties challenge, as well as identifies recommendations for new mass properties engineers that were learned from the SAWE community along the way.

  8. Mass Properties Measurement in the X-38 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Wayne L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper details the techniques used in measuring the mass properties for the X-38 family of test vehicles. The X-38 Project was a NASA internal venture in which a series of test vehicles were built in order to develop a Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station. Three atmospheric test vehicles and one spaceflight vehicle were built to develop the technologies required for a CRV. The three atmospheric test vehicles have undergone flight-testing by a combined team from the NASA Johnson Space Center and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The flight-testing was performed at Edward's Air Force Base in California. The X-38 test vehicles are based on the X-24A, which flew in the '60s and '70s. Scaled Composites, Inc. of Mojave, California, built the airframes and the vehicles were outfitted at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Mass properties measurements on the atmospheric test vehicles included weight and balance by the three-point suspension method, four-point suspension method, three load cells on jackstands, and on three in-ground platform scales. Inertia measurements were performed as well in which Ixx, Iyy, Izz, and Ixz were obtained. This paper describes each technique and the relative merits of each. The proposed measurement methods for an X-38 spaceflight test vehicle will also be discussed. This vehicle had different measurement challenges, but integrated vehicle measurements were never conducted. The spaceflight test vehicle was also developed by NASA and was scheduled to fly on the Space Shuttle before the project was cancelled.

  9. Survey and Experimental Testing of Nongravimetric Mass Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakey, W. E.; Lorenz, R.

    1977-01-01

    Documentation presented describes the design, testing, and evaluation of an accelerated gravimetric balance, a low mass air bearing oscillator of the spring-mass type, and a centrifugal device for liquid mass measurement. A direct mass readout method was developed to replace the oscillation period readout method which required manual calculations to determine mass. A protoype 25 gram capacity micro mass measurement device was developed and tested.

  10. Testing the correlation between low mass planets and debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalas, Paul

    2014-10-01

    The number of dusty debris disks has increased across all spectral types through recent infrared surveys. This has provided greater overlap with stars known to host extrasolar planets via RV surveys. New studies have therefore investigated how the different properties of host stars, exoplanets, and debris disks may be correlated, with the objective of giving empirical support to competing theories of planet formation and evolution. One such emerging correlation is that stars with only low mass planets are more likely to host prominent debris disks than stars that have at least one giant planet. If true, then M dwarfs should have abundant debris disks given that they more frequently have low mass planetary systems. However, the information needed to critically test these ideas is lacking. For most systems, the presence of an outer planet with >30 Earth masses has not been observationally tested, nor are there many M dwarf debris disks available for detailed scrutiny. Here we propose to use STIS coronagraphy to image for the first time the debris disks around three nearby stars in optical scattered light. Searching for sharp dust belt structures indirectly tests for the existence of outer planets that are otherwise undetectable by RV or adaptive optics planet searches. Moreover, two of our target stars are the most recently discovered M dwarf debris disks, both closer to the Sun than AU Mic. The scattered light observations of these two targets would present a major advance in characterizing how M dwarf debris disks co-evolve with planets under different stellar environments.

  11. Determination of HART I Blade Structural Properties by Laboratory Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Sung N.; Lau, Benton H.

    2012-01-01

    The structural properties of higher harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART I) blades were measured using the original set of blades tested in the German-dutch wind tunnel (DNW) in 1994. the measurements include bending and torsion stiffness, geometric offsets, and mass and inertia properties of the blade. the measured properties were compared to the estimated values obtained initially from the blade manufacturer. The previously estimated blade properties showed consistently higher stiffness, up to 30 percent for the flap bending in the blade inboard root section.

  12. Cytotoxicity Test and Mass Spectrometry of IPMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Kazuto; Kamamichi, Norihiro; Yagi, Tohru; Asaka, Kinji; Mukai, Toshiharu

    Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) is a promising material in biomedical actuators and sensors because IPMC is soft and flexible, leading to the safety of the device itself. The purpose of this study is to investigate the biocompatibility of IPMC by in vitro experiments, in order to evaluate the applicability in biomedical fields. In addition to an IPMC specimen prepared by the conventional “impregnation-reduction method” using cationic gold complexes and reducing agents, two specimens were prepared by processes in addition to that used for the conventional IPMC specimen. One specimen was reduced in Na2SO3 solution and another specimen was cleaned in H2O2 solution. Colony-forming test using Chinese hamster V79 cells shows high cytotoxicity of all IPMC specimens. Examination of direct inlet mass spectrometry (DI-MS) revealed that the peak intensity of gold complex (particularly, m/z=180) was different from that of Nafion film. Monitoring the peak at m/z=180 showed a remnant with the structure of phenanthroline in IPMC specimens which were not cleaned in H2O2 solution.

  13. Common Lunar Lander (CLL) Conceptual Design and Mass Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Shelby

    1991-01-01

    The conceptual design and mass properties are presented for the CLL in viewgraph format. The spacecraft structural mass is given for orbital assembly, thermal insulation, integrated propulsion, power generation, avionics, environment control, and pyrotechnics and landing system. The mass is given of the lander as well as the transfer stage.

  14. SCALING PROPERTIES OF THE TRANSVERSE MASS SPECTRA.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHAFFNER-BIELICH,J.; KHARZEEV,D.; MCLERRAN,L.; VENUGOPALAN,R.

    2002-01-13

    Motivated from the formation of an initial state of gluon-saturated matter, we discuss scaling relations for the transverse mass spectra at BNL's Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). We show on linear plots, that the transverse mass spectra for various hadrons can be described by an universal function in m{sub t}. The transverse mass spectra for different centralities can be rescaled into each other. Finally, we demonstrate that m{sub t}-scaling is also present in proton-antiproton collider data and compare it to m{sub t}-scaling at RHIC.

  15. Optimization of pyrolysis properties using TGA and cone calorimeter test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Won-Hee; Yoon, Kyung-Beom

    2013-04-01

    The present paper describes an optimization work to obtain the properties related to a pyrolysis process in the solid material such as density, specific heat, conductivity of virgin and char, heat of pyrolysis and kinetic parameters used for deciding pyrolysis rate. A repulsive particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to obtain the pyrolysis-related properties. In the previous study all properties obtained only using a cone calorimeter but in this paper both the cone calorimeter and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) are used for precisely optimizing the pyrolysis properties. In the TGA test a very small mass is heated up and conduction and heat capacity in the specimen is negligible so kinetic parameters can first be optimized. Other pyrolysis-related properties such as virgin/char specific heat and conductivity and char density are also optimized in the cone calorimeter test with the already decided parameters in the TGA test.

  16. MASSES, RADII, AND CLOUD PROPERTIES OF THE HR 8799 PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard E-mail: dsaumon@lanl.gov E-mail: andrew.ackerman@nasa.gov E-mail: freedman@darkstar.arc.nasa.gov

    2012-08-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Some studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here, we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against observations of field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike some previous studies, we require mutually consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure thus yields plausible values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends, including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition-some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to whether or not we include the H- and the K-band spectrum in our analysis. Solutions for planets c and d are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that, like in L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present an exploratory evolution calculation that accounts for this effect. Finally we recompute the bolometric luminosity of all three planets.

  17. Mass properties survey of solar array technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, Robert

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the technologies, electrical performance, and mass characteristics of many of the presently available and the more advanced developmental space solar array technologies is presented. Qualitative trends and quantitative mass estimates as total array output power is increased from 1 kW to 5 kW at End of Life (EOL) from a single wing are shown. The array technologies are part of a database supporting an ongoing solar power subsystem model development for top level subsystem and technology analyses. The model is used to estimate the overall electrical and thermal performance of the complete subsystem, and then calculate the mass and volume of the array, batteries, power management, and thermal control elements as an initial sizing. The array types considered here include planar rigid panel designs, flexible and rigid fold-out planar arrays, and two concentrator designs, one with one critical axis and the other with two critical axes. Solar cell technologies of Si, GaAs, and InP were included in the analyses. Comparisons were made at the array level; hinges, booms, harnesses, support structures, power transfer, and launch retention mountings were included. It is important to note that the results presented are approximations, and in some cases revised or modified performance and mass estimates of specific designs.

  18. Users guide for the shuttle mass properties automated system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamil, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    A set of programs developed for use on the JSC Univac 1100 series computers and designed to automate the collection and processing of data into the mass properties section of the shuttle operational data book is described.

  19. IMP: Interactive mass properties program. Volume 1: Program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    A method of computing a weights and center of gravity analysis of a flight vehicle using interactive graphical capabilities of the Adage 340 computer is described. The equations used to calculate area, volume, and mass properties are based on elemental surface characteristics. The input/output methods employ the graphic support of the Adage computer. Several interactive program options are available for analyzing the mass properties of a vehicle. These options are explained.

  20. Mass properties measurement system: Dynamics and statics measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents and interprets experimental data obtained from the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS). Statics measurements yield the center-of-gravity of an unknown mass and dynamics measurements yield its inertia matrix. Observations of the MPMS performance has lead us to specific design criteria and an understanding of MPMS limitations.

  1. Quantitative analysis of LISA pathfinder test-mass noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraioli, Luigi; Congedo, Giuseppe; Hueller, Mauro; Vitale, Stefano; Hewitson, Martin; Nofrarias, Miquel; Armano, Michele

    2011-12-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is a mission aiming to test the critical technology for the forthcoming space-based gravitational-wave detectors. The main scientific objective of the LPF mission is to demonstrate test masses free falling with residual accelerations below 3×10-14ms-2/Hz at 1 mHz. Reaching such an ambitious target will require a significant amount of system optimization and characterization, which will in turn require accurate and quantitative noise analysis procedures. In this paper, we discuss two main problems associated with the analysis of the data from LPF: i) excess noise detection and ii) noise parameter identification. The mission is focused on the low-frequency region ([0.1, 10] mHz) of the available signal spectrum. In such a region, the signal is dominated by the force noise acting on test masses. At the same time, the mission duration is limited to 90 days and typical data segments will be 24 hours in length. Considering those constraints, noise analysis is expected to deal with a limited amount of non-Gaussian data, since the spectrum statistics will be far from Gaussian and the lowest available frequency is limited by the data length. In this paper, we analyze the details of the expected statistics for spectral data and develop two suitable excess noise estimators. One is based on the statistical properties of the integrated spectrum, the other is based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The sensitivity of the estimators is discussed theoretically for independent data, then the algorithms are tested on LPF synthetic data. The test on realistic LPF data allows the effect of spectral data correlations on the efficiency of the different noise excess estimators to be highlighted. It also reveals the versatility of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov approach, which can be adapted to provide reasonable results on correlated data from a modified version of the standard equations for the inversion of the test statistic. Closely related to excess noise detection, the

  2. Geometrical Properties of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, Hebe; Bothmer, Volker

    Based on the SOHO/LASCO dataset, a collection of "structured" coronal mass ejections (CMEs) has been compiled within the period 1996-2002, in order to analyze their three-dimensional configuration. These CME events exhibit white-light fine structures, likely indicative of their possible 3D topology. From a detailed investigation of the associated low coronal and photospheric source regions, a generic scheme has been deduced, which considers the white-light topology of a CME projected in the plane of the sky as being primarily dependent on the orientation and position of the source region's neutral line on the solar disk. The obtained results imply that structured CMEs are essentially organized along a symmetry axis, in a cylindrical manner. The measured dimensions of the cylinder's base and length yield a ratio of 1.6. These CMEs seem to be better approximated by elliptic cones, rather than by the classical ice cream cone, characterized by a circular cross section.

  3. A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

    2014-05-01

    A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

  4. Masses, Radii, and Cloud Properties of the HR 8799 Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have compared the photometric and limited spectral data of the planets to the predictions of various atmosphere and evolution models and concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Most studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike almost all previous studies we specify mutually self-consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure yields plausible and self-consistent values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are in fact not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition, some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to the H and K band spectrum. Solutions for planets c and particularly d are less certain but are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that as for L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present a new evolution calculation that predicts cooling tracks on the near-infrared color

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF OTHER GALAXY PROPERTIES FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Wen Xiaoqing; Xu Jianying; Ding Yingping; Huang Tong

    2010-06-10

    At a stellar mass of 3 x 10{sup 10} M {sub {Theta}} we divide the volume-limited Main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6) into two distinct families and explore the environmental dependence of galaxy properties for High Stellar Mass (HSM) and Low Stellar Mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that for HSM and LSM galaxies, the environmental dependence of some typical galaxy properties, such as color, morphologies, and star formation activities, is still very strong, which at least shows that the stellar mass is not fundamental in correlations between galaxy properties and the environment. We also note that the environmental dependence of the size for HSM and LSM galaxies is fairly weak, which is mainly due to the galaxy size being insensitive to environment.

  6. Compression mass gauge testing in a liquid hydrogen dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, J. M.; Rogers, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes testing that was conducted using a mass gauge in a liquid hydrogen environment. The mass gauge, herein referred to as the 'compressibility gauge,' is being developed as a means to accurately determine the mass of liquid contained in a tank in a low-gravity environment. The concept is based on the thermodynamic principle that the pressure of gas or vapor changes when its volume changes. Previous work has been conducted by Southwest Research Institute in collaboration with NASA Lewis Research Center. This consisted of testing the concept with water and other cryogenic simulant fluids. The purpose of conducting liquid hydrogen tests is to test the concept in actual cryogenic conditions, and address hardware issues that arise in fabricating a test article for use in liquid hydrogen.

  7. High-speed impact test using an inertial mass and an optical interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, T.; Watanabe, K.; Prayogi, I. A.; Takita, A.; Mitatha, S.; Djamal, M.; Jia, H. Z.; Hou, W. M.; Fujii, Y.

    2013-07-01

    A high-speed impact testing method for evaluating mechanical properties of materials is proposed using an inertial mass and a dual beat-frequencies laser Doppler interferometer (DB-LDI). In this method, an inertial mass levitated using an aerostatic linear bearing is made to collide with the material being tested at a high initial velocity. During the collision, the velocity of the mass, which is even higher than the critical velocity (±0.56 m/s) defined by the frequency difference of the Zeeman laser, is accurately measured using the DB-LDI. The position, acceleration, and impact force of the mass are calculated from the measured velocity. Using the proposed method, the mechanical properties of a visco-elastic material under a high-speed impact loading condition can be accurately evaluated.

  8. High-speed impact test using an inertial mass and an optical interferometer.

    PubMed

    Jin, T; Watanabe, K; Prayogi, I A; Takita, A; Mitatha, S; Djamal, M; Jia, H Z; Hou, W M; Fujii, Y

    2013-07-01

    A high-speed impact testing method for evaluating mechanical properties of materials is proposed using an inertial mass and a dual beat-frequencies laser Doppler interferometer (DB-LDI). In this method, an inertial mass levitated using an aerostatic linear bearing is made to collide with the material being tested at a high initial velocity. During the collision, the velocity of the mass, which is even higher than the critical velocity (±0.56 m/s) defined by the frequency difference of the Zeeman laser, is accurately measured using the DB-LDI. The position, acceleration, and impact force of the mass are calculated from the measured velocity. Using the proposed method, the mechanical properties of a visco-elastic material under a high-speed impact loading condition can be accurately evaluated. PMID:23902115

  9. RSRM-3 (360L003) Ballistics/Mass Properties Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubacher, B. A.; Richards, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    The propulsion performance and reconstructed mass properties data from Morton Thiokol's RSRM-3 motors which were assigned to the STS-29 launch are presented. The composite type solid propellant burn rates were close to predicted. The performance of the pair of motors were compared to some CEI Specifications. The performance from each motor as well as matched pair performance values were well within the CEI specification requirements. The nominal thrust time curve and impulse gate information is included. Post flight reconstructed Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) mass properties are within expected values for the lightweight configuration.

  10. Estimation of the mass center and dynamics of a spherical test mass for gravitational reference sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John W.

    Exciting new fields of physics and precision inertial navigation can be realized by reducing test mass disturbances in drag-free spacecraft orders of magnitude below what has currently been demonstrated. The mass center of an ideal drag-free test mass is a reference point traveling along a pure geodesic. The purpose of the drag-free spacecraft is to shield the test mass from all external disturbances, and at the same time, not to introduce additional disturbances. A sphere has the advantage of invariance of orientation. A spherical test mass, therefore, requires no forcing on the part of the spacecraft to control the test mass orientation. With the need for actuation eliminated, the gap between the test mass and spacecraft can be opened up to sizes on the order of the sphere's radius. Elimination of test mass forcing and a large gap reduces, or all together eliminates, the largest disturbances acting on the test mass. Furthermore, spinning the sphere can spectrally shift body-fixed features to frequencies that do-not interfere with the drag-free control or the science mission. The angular momentum vector of the spinning sphere is a quantity that is robust against residual torques providing an orientation reference for the local inertial frame. In this dissertation a generic model for the output of a drag-free sensor with a spinning spherical test mass is developed. A measurable feature of the test mass (surface geometry with respect to the mass center, magnetic potential, etc.) is written as an expansion in spherical harmonics. The rigid body motion of the test mass relative to the sensor is assumed to obey Euler's equations on short time scales, with angular momentum decay and polhode damping due to residual disturbances modeled on longer time scales, greater than say one clay. The validity of this model is demonstrated to approximately 1% using the Gravity Probe B flight data spanning 1 year. The success of this model allows for the prediction of polhode

  11. Derivation of mass and stiffness matrices from dynamic test data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thoren, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    A technique is described by which orthonormal modal vectors, computed from dynamic test response data, are used to derive mass, stiffness, and damping matrices for a discrete model of the distributed elastic system. Matrices thus computed from subsystems tests may be readily incorporated into larger system models. The method has been applied to a test of the Saturn V S-II stage LOX tank-engine support system. The dynamic responses of the discrete model are shown to correlate well with test data throughout the frequency range tested.

  12. RSRM-11 (36OW011) ballistics mass properties (STS-35)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, B. J.; Gruet, L. P.; Richards, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    The propulsion performance and reconstructed mass properties data from Thiolol's RSRM-11 motors which were assigned to the STS-35 launch are contained. The Thiokol manufacturing designations for the motors were 360W011A/360W011B, which are referred to as RSRM-11A and RSRM-B, respectively. The launch of STS-35 occurred on 2 December 1990 at the Eastern Test Range (ETR). The data contained herein was input to the STS-35 Flight Evaluation Report. The SRM propellant, TP-H1148, is a composite type solid propellants, formulated of polybutediene acrylic acid, acryonitrile terpolymer binder, epoxy curing agent, ammonium perchlorate oxidizer, and aluminum powder fuel. A small amount of burning rate catalyst (iron oxide) was added to achieve the desired propellant burn rate. The propellant evaluation and raw material information for the RSRM-11 are included. The ballistic performance presented was based on the Operational Flight Instrumentation (OFI) 12.5 sample per second pressure data for the steady state and tail off portion of the pressure trace. Recent studies have shown that the transducers are affected by the measuring system at KSC and temperature gradients created by the igniter heaters. Therefore, an adjustment to the data from each transducer is made to make the initial reading match the atmospheric pressure at the time of launch.

  13. Investigation of sources, properties and preparation of distillate test fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, J. N.; Erwin, J.

    1983-01-01

    Distillate test fuel blends were generated for prescribed variations in composition and physical properties. Fuels covering a wide range in properties and composition which would provide a matrix of fuels for possible use in future combustion research programs were identified. Except for tetralin the blending components were all from typical refinery streams. Property variation blends span a boiling range within 150 C to 335 C, freezing point -23 C to -43 C, aromatic content 20 to 50 volume percent, hydrogen content 11.8 to 14.2 mass percent, viscosity 4 and 11 cSt (-20 C), and naphthalenes 8 and 16 volume percent. Composition variation blends were made with two base stocks, one paraffinic and the other napthenic. To each base stock was added each of three aromatic type fuels (alkyl benzenes, tetralin, and naphthalenes) for assigned initial boiling point, final boiling point, and hydrogen content. The hydrogen content was 13.5 mass percent for the paraffinic base stock blends and 12.5 mass percent and 11.5 mass percent for the naphthenic base stock blends. Sample 5-gallon quantities of all blends were prepared and analyzed.

  14. Note: Discharging fused silica test masses with ionized nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolini, D.; Funk, Q.; Amen, T.

    2011-04-01

    We have developed a technique for discharging fused silica test masses in a gravitational-wave interferometer with nitrogen ionized by an electron beam. The electrons are produced from a heated filament by thermionic emission in a low-pressure region to avoid contamination and burnout. Some electrons then pass through a small aperture and ionize nitrogen in a higher-pressure region, and this ionized gas is pumped across the test mass surface, neutralizing both polarities of charge. The discharge rate varies exponentially with charge density and filament current, quadratically with filament potential, and has an optimal working pressure of ˜8 mT. Adapting the technique to larger test mass chambers is also discussed.

  15. 240 nm UV LEDs for LISA test mass charge control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olatunde, Taiwo; Shelley, Ryan; Chilton, Andrew; Serra, Paul; Ciani, Giacomo; Mueller, Guido; Conklin, John

    2015-05-01

    Test Masses inside the LISA Gravitational Reference Sensor must maintain almost pure geodesic motion for gravitational waves to be successfully detected. LISA requires residual test mass accelerations below 3 fm/s2/√Hz at all frequencies between 0.1 and 3 mHz. One of the well-known noise sources is associated with the charges on the test masses which couple to stray electrical potentials and external electromagnetic fields. LISA Pathfinder will use Hg-discharge lamps emitting mostly around 254 nm to discharge the test masses via photoemission in its 2015/16 flight. A future LISA mission launched around 2030 will likely replace the lamps with newer UV-LEDs. Presented here is a preliminary study of the effectiveness of charge control using latest generation UV-LEDs which produce light at 240 nm with energy above the work function of pure Au. Their lower mass, better power efficiency and small size make them an ideal replacement for Hg lamps.

  16. Machining as a mechanical property test revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.

    There is much need for data on mechanical behavior of metals at high strains and strain rates. This need is dictated by modeling of processes like forming and machining, wherein the material in the deformation zone is subjected to severe deformation conditions atypical of conventional material property tests such as tension and torsion. Accurate flow stress data is an essential input for robust prediction of process outputs. Similar requirements arise from applications in high speed ballistic penetration and design of materials for armor. Since the deformation zone in cutting of metals is characterized by unique and extreme combinations of strain, strain rate and temperature, an opportunity exists for using plane-strain cutting as a mechanical property test for measuring flow properties of metals. The feasibility of using plane-strain cutting to measure flow properties of metals is revisited in the light of recent data showing controllability of the deformation conditions in chip formation by systematic variation of process input parameters. A method is outlined as to how the deformation conditions can be varied by changing the process parameters. The method is applied to cutting of commercially pure copper (FCC), iron (BCC) and zinc (HCP). Forces and chip geometries are measured, in conjunction with particle image velocimetry characterization of the deformation using high speed image sequences. The flow stresses are estimated from these measurements. The measured flow stress and its dependence on strain are shown to agree well with prior measurements of these parameters using conventional tests, and flow stress inferred from hardness characterization. The method is also demonstrated to be able to measure properties of metals that recrystallize at room temperature (zinc), wherein quasi-static tests predict much lower strength. Sources of variability and uncertainty in the application of this measurement technique are discussed. Future work in the context of further

  17. ESTEC wiring test programme materials related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical wires are considered as EEE parts and are covered within the ESA SCC specification series (ESA SCC 3901/XXX). This specification defines the principal properties of the wires including insulation/lay-up and electrical properties. Some additional space related materials requirements are also included, requirements such as outgassing and silver plating thickness. If a project has additional materials requirements over and above those covered by the relevant SCC specification, then additional testing is required. This is especially true for crewed spacecraft. The following topics are discussed in this context: additional requirements for manned spacecraft; flammability; arc tracking; thermal decomposition; microbial surface growth; and ageing.

  18. Psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test.

    PubMed

    Frankl, My; Philips, Björn; Berggraf, Lene; Ulvenes, Pål; Johansson, Robert; Wennberg, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to make the first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test, using the Swedish translation - a test developed to screen the ability to experience, express and regulate emotions. Data was collected from a clinical sample (N = 82) of patients with depression and/or anxiety participating in randomized controlled trial of Internet-based affect-focused treatment, and a university student sample (N = 197). The internal consistency for the total score was satisfactory (Clinical sample α = 0.88/Student sample α = 0.84) as well as for all the affective domains, except Anger/Assertion (α = 0.44/0.36), Sadness/Grief (α = 0.24/0.46) and Attachment/Closeness (α = 0.67/0.69). Test retest reliability was satisfactory (ICC > 0.77) for the total score and for all the affective domains except for Sadness/Grief (ICC = 0.04). The exploratory factor analysis resulted in a six-factor solution and did only moderately match the test's original affective domains. An empirical cut-off between the clinical and the university student sample were calculated and yielded a cut-off of 72 points. As expected, the Affect Phobia test showed negative significant correlations in the clinical group with measures on depression (rxy  = -0.229; p < 0.01) and anxiety (rxy  = -0.315; p < 0.05). The conclusion is that the psychometric properties are satisfactory for the total score of the Affect Phobia Test but not for some of the test's affective domains. Consequently the domains should not be used as subscales. The test can discriminate between individuals who seek help for psychological problems and those who do not. PMID:27461917

  19. Mass Testing and the Underdevelopment of Inner-City Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesch, Rick

    2000-01-01

    Mass testing as a phenomena of global educational restructuring exacerbates social class differences. This phenomenon is examined via inner-city Winnipeg's experience, cross-cultural educational literature, and the Manitoba government's tendency to reinforce the underdevelopment of core area regions. Emerging resistance to educational…

  20. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  1. Computer program for determining mass properties of a rigid structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R. A.; Gilbert, J. L.; Klich, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program was developed for the rapid computation of the mass properties of complex structural systems. The program uses rigid body analyses and permits differences in structural material throughout the total system. It is based on the premise that complex systems can be adequately described by a combination of basic elemental shapes. Simple geometric data describing size and location of each element and the respective material density or weight of each element were the only required input data. From this minimum input, the program yields system weight, center of gravity, moments of inertia and products of inertia with respect to mutually perpendicular axes through the system center of gravity. The program also yields mass properties of the individual shapes relative to component axes.

  2. Mass-Transport Properties In Growth Of Crystals From Vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemeier, H.

    1992-01-01

    Brief report summarizes results of experimental and theoretical studies of mass-transport properties of GeSe/Gel4 and Hg0.8Cd0.2Te systems in connection with growth of crystals in closed ampoules. Primary emphasis in studies was on thermochemical analyses, on development of mathematical models to predict diffusion-limited mass transport, and on comparison of theoretically predicted with experimental fluxes. Results applied to design, preparation, performance, and analysis of crystal-growth experiments of semiconducting materials on Earth and in outer space. Model extended to predict mass flux and overall composition of transport products of Hg0.8Cd0.2Te transport system.

  3. Two cylindrical masses in orbit for the test of the equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhun, Ratana; Touboul, Pierre; Lebat, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Two pairs of solid test-masses have been considered to perform in space the test of the universality of free fall with an accuracy of at least 10-15. These cylindrical masses are precisely at the heart of the MICROSCOPE mission instrument comprising two differential electrostatic accelerometers. These masses shall exhibit material quality, shapes, positions and alignments in regard to stringent experimental requirements. Indeed the space experiment is based on the control of the two masses submitted to the same gravity acceleration along the same orbit at 810 km altitude with an accuracy of 10-11 m. Thus effects of Earth and satellite gravity gradients shall be contained as well as any other disturbances of the mass motions induced by their magnetic susceptibility or electrical dissymmetries, by outgassing of the materials or radiation emissivity. Furthermore, the electrostatic levitation of the two masses depends dramatically on the mass shapes and electrical properties in particular for the definition of the sensitive axes orientation. All these aspects will be presented from the mass characteristics to the space MICROSCOPE experiment performance.

  4. Two Cylindrical Masses in Orbit for the Test of the Equivalence Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhun, Ratana; Touboul, P.; Lebat, V.

    2009-05-01

    Two pairs of solid test-masses have been considered to perform in space the test of the universality of free fall with an accuracy of at least 10-15. These cylindrical masses are precisely at the heart of the MICROSCOPE mission instrument developed by ONERA, comprising two differential electrostatic accelerometers. These masses shall exhibit material quality, shapes, positions and alignments in regard to stringent experimental requirements. Indeed the space experiment is based on the control of the two masses submitted to the same gravity acceleration along the same orbit at 810km altitude with an accuracy of 10-11m. Thus effects of Earth and satellite gravity gradients shall be contained as well as any other disturbances of the mass motions induced by their magnetic susceptibility or electrical dissymmetries, by outgassing of the materials or radiation emissivity. Furthermore, the electrostatic levitation of the two masses depends dramatically on the mass shapes and electrical properties in particular for the definition of the sensitive axes orientation. All these aspects will be presented from the mass characteristics to the space MICROSCOPE experiment performance.

  5. Validation of a Compression Mass Gauge using ground tests for liquid propellant mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Juan; Chen, Xiaoqian; Huang, Yiyong; Li, Xiaolong

    2014-05-01

    To properly estimate orbital lifetimes and predict the maneuverability of spacecraft, the remaining liquid propellant mass must be accurately known at every moment of a space mission. This paper studies the Compression Mass Gauge (CMG) method to determine the mass of liquid contained in a tank in a low-gravity environment with high accuracy. CMG is a thermodynamic method used to determine the quantity of liquid by measuring the gas pressure change when the tank volume changes, and has been previously theoretically and experimentally studied by researchers. The primary objective of this investigation is to explore the effects of attitude disturbance and the spacecraft thermal environment on the accuracy of the method. A ground test system, consisting of several test apparatuses, was fabricated and described as part of this study. The test results and analyses indicate that the CMG performs well and has an accuracy of ±1%. Additionally, demonstrations were performed to show that measurement errors do not increase drastically or exceed ±1% when the test system is vibrated to simulate the tank being perturbed as a result of an attitude disturbance. Liquid sloshing resonance was found to have a significant effect on the gauging accuracy. Measurements in a real thermal environment in which heat transfers into and out of the propellant tank were also conducted. The results show that the gauging accuracy is acceptable for normal liquid propellant. Furthermore, theoretical research shows that heat leakage has a significant influence on cryogenic propellant mass gauging.

  6. THE MASS OF (15) EUNOMIA FROM 923 TEST BODIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zielenbach, William

    2010-03-15

    The orbits of 923 asteroids that came within 0.1 AU of (15) Eunomia were analyzed to determine its mass and gave a weighted mean mass of (1.62 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -11} M {sub sun}. The process was automated, which forced the use of uniform criteria for selection and weighting of both the observations and the individual solutions. Statistical combination of a large number of cases including numerous implausible individual results, gives reasonable mass values even for subsets of weakly determined individual solutions. This approach mitigates the impact of mismodeling as well as observation errors and/or poor distribution of data that might affect individual test cases.

  7. The core mass-radius relation for giants - A new test of stellar evolution theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.; Rappaport, S.; Lewis, W.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that the measurable properties of systems containing degenerate dwarfs can be used as a direct test of the core mass-radius relation for moderate-mass giants if the final stages of the loss of the envelope of the progenitor giant occurred via stable critical lobe overflow. This relation directly probes the internal structure of stars at a relatively advanced evolutionary state and is only modestly influenced by adjustable parameters. The measured properties of six binary systems, including such diverse systems as Sirius and Procyon and two millisecond pulsars, are utilized to derive constraints on the empirical core mass-radius relation, and the constraints are compared to the theoretical relation. The possibility that the final stages of envelope ejection of the giant progenitor of Sirius B occurred via critical lobe overflow in historical times is considered.

  8. Testing radiative neutrino mass models at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi; Clarke, Jackson D.; Schmidt, Michael A.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2015-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider provides us new opportunities to search for the origin of neutrino mass. Beyond the minimal see-saw models a plethora of models exist which realise neutrino mass at tree- or loop-level, and it is important to be sure that these possibilities are satisfactorily covered by searches. The purpose of this paper is to advance a systematic approach to this problem. Majorana neutrino mass models can be organised by SM-gauge-invariant operators which violate lepton number by two units. In this paper we write down the minimal ultraviolet completions for all of the mass-dimension 7 operators. We predict vector-like quarks, vector-like leptons, scalar leptoquarks, a charged scalar, a scalar doublet, and a scalar quadruplet, whose properties are constrained by neutrino oscillation data. A detailed collider study is presented for and completions with a vector-like quark and a leptoquark . The existing LHC limits extracted from searches for vector-like fermions and sbottoms/stops are m χ ≳ 620 GeV and m ϕ ≳ 600 GeV.

  9. The Wind and Mass-loss Properties of the Most Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestenlehner, Joachim; Vink, Jorick; Gräfener, Götz; Najarro, Francisco

    2013-06-01

    Mass-loss rates play an important role in the evolution of massive stars. The initial, present day and the mass at their end of their lifetime is considerable different as a result of mass loss. Different stages of evolution have different mass-loss rates. The understanding of massive star evolution is tightly connected to the understanding of their mass loss properties. In the context of the VLT-Flames Tarantula Survey I will present the results from our spectral analysis of stars in the transition region from O-stars to very massive WN(h)-stars. WN(h)-stars are very young and massive stars which develop already in the earliest stages of their evolution WR-star like winds. For the analysis we used the non-LTE radiative transfer code CMFGEN to investigate the wind and mass-loss properties of these very massive stars. This analysis also tests theoretical predictions which suggest a notable change of the mass-loss behaviour at a certain Eddington factor in the transition region from O to WN(h)-stars (Bestenlehner et al. 2011, Bestenlehner et al. in prep.)

  10. Force Limited Random Vibration Test of TESS Camera Mass Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlicek, Alexandra; Hwang, James Ho-Jin; Rey, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a spaceborne instrument consisting of four wide field-of-view-CCD cameras dedicated to the discovery of exoplanets around the brightest stars. As part of the environmental testing campaign, force limiting was used to simulate a realistic random vibration launch environment. While the force limit vibration test method is a standard approach used at multiple institutions including Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC), and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), it is still difficult to find an actual implementation process in the literature. This paper describes the step-by-step process on how the force limit method was developed and applied on the TESS camera mass model. The process description includes the design of special fixtures to mount the test article for properly installing force transducers, development of the force spectral density using the semi-empirical method, estimation of the fuzzy factor (C2) based on the mass ratio between the supporting structure and the test article, subsequent validating of the C2 factor during the vibration test, and calculation of the C.G. accelerations using the Root Mean Square (RMS) reaction force in the spectral domain and the peak reaction force in the time domain.

  11. Relation between mass balance aperture and hydraulic properties from field experiments in fractured rock in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjerne, Calle; Nordqvist, Rune

    2014-09-01

    Results from tracer tests are often used to infer connectivity and transport properties in bedrock. However, the amount of site-specific data from tracer tests is often very limited, while data from hydraulic tests are more abundant. It is therefore of great interest for predictive transport modeling to use hydraulic data to infer transport properties. In this study, data from cross-hole tracer tests carried out in crystalline bedrock in Sweden were compiled and analysed. The tests were performed within investigations made by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) between 1978 and 2009 at five different locations. An empirical relationship between mass balance aperture and transmissivity was found and quantified by using 74 observations. The empirical relationship deviates considerably from the cubic law aperture, as mass balance aperture is found to be at least one order of magnitude larger than cubic law aperture. Hence, usage of cubic law aperture, derived from hydraulic testing, for transport predictions is unsuitable, as the advective transport time will be considerably underestimated. Another result, from the data set studied, is that mass balance aperture appears to correlate better to apparent storativity than to transmissivity.

  12. Analysis of borehole expansion and gallery tests in anisotropic rock masses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amadei, B.; Savage, W.Z.

    1991-01-01

    Closed-form solutions are used to show how rock anisotropy affects the variation of the modulus of deformation around the walls of a hole in which expansion tests are conducted. These tests include dilatometer and NX-jack tests in boreholes and gallery tests in tunnels. The effects of rock anisotropy on the modulus of deformation are shown for transversely isotropic and regularly jointed rock masses with planes of transverse isotropy or joint planes parallel or normal to the hole longitudinal axis for plane strain or plane stress condition. The closed-form solutions can also be used when determining the elastic properties of anisotropic rock masses (intact or regularly jointed) in situ. ?? 1991.

  13. Properties of nuclear matter from macroscopic-microscopic mass formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Ou, Li; Zhang, Yingxun

    2015-12-01

    Based on the standard Skyrme energy density functionals together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approach, the properties of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter represented in two macroscopic-microscopic mass formulas: Lublin-Strasbourg nuclear drop energy (LSD) formula and Weizsäcker-Skyrme (WS*) formula, are extracted through matching the energy per particle of finite nuclei. For LSD and WS*, the obtained incompressibility coefficients of symmetric nuclear matter are K∞ = 230 ± 11 MeV and 235 ± 11 MeV, respectively. The slope parameter of symmetry energy at saturation density is L = 41.6 ± 7.6 MeV for LSD and 51.5 ± 9.6 MeV for WS*, respectively, which is compatible with the liquid-drop analysis of Lattimer and Lim [4]. The density dependence of the mean-field isoscalar and isovector effective mass, and the neutron-proton effective masses splitting for neutron matter are simultaneously investigated. The results are generally consistent with those from the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations and nucleon optical potentials, and the standard deviations are large and increase rapidly with density. A better constraint for the effective mass is helpful to reduce uncertainties of the depth of the mean-field potential.

  14. Control System Upgrade for a Mass Property Measurement Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, William; Hinkle, R. Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Mass Property Measurement Facility (MPMF) at the Goddard Space Flight Center has undergone modifications to ensure the safety of Flight Payloads and the measurement facility. The MPMF has been technically updated to improve reliability and increase the accuracy of the measurements. Modifications include the replacement of outdated electronics with a computer based software control system, the addition of a secondary gas supply in case of a catastrophic failure to the gas supply and a motor controlled emergency stopping feature instead of a hard stop.

  15. Variability properties and masses of central black hole for blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Junhui

    2001-06-01

    In this paper, the compiled long-term optical and infrared measurements of some blazars are used to analyze the variation properties, and the optical data are used to search for periodicity evidence in the lightcurve by means of the Jurkevich technique and the discrete correlation function (DCF) method. The periods are found in the range of 1.5 to 19 years. The short time scales are used to estimate the central black hole masses which are found in the range of (3.8 - 130)×107Msolar for the gamma-ray loud blazars. Some discussions are presented.

  16. Kalman Filter for Mass Property and Thrust Identification (MMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queen, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission consists of four identically instrumented, spin-stabilized observatories, elliptically orbiting the Earth in a tetrahedron formation. For the operational success of the mission, on-board systems must be able to deliver high-precision orbital adjustment maneuvers. On MMS, this is accomplished using feedback from on-board star sensors in tandem with accelerometers whose measurements are dynamically corrected for errors associated with a spinning platform. In order to determine the required corrections to the measured acceleration, precise estimates of attitude, rate, and mass-properties is necessary. To this end, both an on-board and ground-based Multiplicative Extended Kalman Filter (MEKF) were formulated and implemented in order to estimate the dynamic and quasi-static properties of the spacecraft.

  17. Testing and Validation of Computational Methods for Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Laurent; Hansen, Kasper D; Hoopmann, Michael R; Hermjakob, Henning; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Beyer, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    High-throughput methods based on mass spectrometry (proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics, etc.) produce a wealth of data that cannot be analyzed without computational methods. The impact of the choice of method on the overall result of a biological study is often underappreciated, but different methods can result in very different biological findings. It is thus essential to evaluate and compare the correctness and relative performance of computational methods. The volume of the data as well as the complexity of the algorithms render unbiased comparisons challenging. This paper discusses some problems and challenges in testing and validation of computational methods. We discuss the different types of data (simulated and experimental validation data) as well as different metrics to compare methods. We also introduce a new public repository for mass spectrometric reference data sets ( http://compms.org/RefData ) that contains a collection of publicly available data sets for performance evaluation for a wide range of different methods. PMID:26549429

  18. Wiring test program insulation material related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reher, Heinz-Josef

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of activities at DASA-RI concerning the testing of wires for manned spacecraft, including test facilities, arc-tracking tests, flammability tests, microgravity tests, and standardization, and outlines future activities.

  19. Properties and clinical implications of body mass indices.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, K P; Lee, J; Lau, S P; Chow, O K; Wong, T W; Davis, D P

    1990-01-01

    The properties of body mass indices were evaluated in a cross sectional study of the weights and heights of 5016 Chinese boys and girls aged between 3 and 18 years. Of the indices examined (weight/height (W/H), weight/height2 (W/H2), weight/height3 (W/H3) and weight/heightp (W/Hp], W/Hp was the only one that consistently showed least correlation with height, and so could be regarded as the optimal body mass index by the criterion of independence of the index from height. The exponent 'p' of W/Hp is, however, highly dependent on age; the value increases steadily between the age of 3 and 7-9 years, and then varies considerably around puberty. Only the age specific exponent ensures a lack of correlation between body mass index (W/Hp) and height. Age specific W/Hp should therefore be used in intrapopulation studies of weight or problems associated with obesity in children. Interpopulation comparison of weight and adiposity by W/H, W/H2, or W/H3 may give misleading results because of their dependence on height. Our results also suggest that the conventional weight for height charts may not be accurate enough for clinical use. PMID:2357091

  20. Experimental study on the mechanical properties of simulated columnar jointed rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wei-min; Deng, Rong-gui; Zhong, Zhi-bin; Fu, Xiao-min; Wang, Cong-yan

    2015-02-01

    Columnar jointed rock mass is a kind of structural rock mass commonly encountered in igneous rocks. Due to the effects of columnar joint networks, anisotropy is the typical mechanical property of columnar jointed rock mass, i.e. deformation and strength varying with loading direction. Correct understanding of the mechanical anisotropy of columnar jointed rock mass is a key problem that should be solved for demonstration and design of large scale rock mass projects such as dams and underground cavern excavations constructed in it. Plaster simulated columnar jointed rock mass specimens at dip angles varying from 0° to 90° with respect to the axial stress were tested under uniaxial compression conditions to investigate the mechanical anisotropy and failure modes. Based on analyses of experimental results, it was found that the strength and deformation of columnar jointed rock masses had pronounced ‘U-shaped’ anisotropy. In the anisotropic curves, the maximum and minimum values occurred at β = 90° and β = 45°, respectively. It was also shown that the lateral strain ratio was relatively high, especially when the dip angle was close to (45° - φj/2), where φj was the joint friction angle. An empirical expression was adopted to predict the ‘U-shaped’ anisotropy of deformation and strength and the predicted anisotropic curves agreed reasonably well with experimental data. Furthermore, four types of failure modes were summarized based on experimental results and corresponding mechanisms were also discussed.

  1. Properties of test metal ceramic titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Akagi, K; Okamoto, Y; Matsuura, T; Horibe, T

    1992-09-01

    Four test alloys were prepared using a high frequency centrifugal casting machine and a ceramic crucible for the development of titanium bonding alloys that can be cast in the ordinary atmosphere. Of these alloys, 10.06% Ti, 78.79% Ni, 9.02% Pd, 1.77% Sn and 9.91% Ti, 78.56% Ni, 9.07% Pd, 1.86% Sn, 0.65% Ir could be cast by the conventional high frequency centrifugal method; however, 89.18% Ti, 8.75% Ni, 1.03% Pd, 0.28% Sn and 89.81% Ti, 8.15% Ni, 1.01% Pd, 0.18% Sn, 0.67% Ir could be cast only by the argon are melting method. The alloys 10.06% Ti, 78.95% Ni, 9.02% Pd, 1.77% Sn and 9.91% Ti, 78.56% Ni, 9.07% Pd, 1.86% Sn, 0.65% Ir showed excellent physical and mechanical properties and bonding strengths, surpassing those of the commercial alloys TPW and Unimetal. Concerning the elution of component elements, the amounts of titanium eluted from these alloys were far smaller than those from pure titanium or a Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and nickel elution, which has become an issue in relation to metal allergy, was almost nil in contrast to Unimetal (Ni-Cr alloy). The alloy 9.91% Ti, 78.56% Ni, 9.07% Pd, 1.86% Sn, 0.65% Ir showed properties that indicated its favorable use as an alloy for the bonding of dental porcelain. PMID:1432762

  2. Method For Testing Properties Of Corrosive Lubricants

    DOEpatents

    Ohi, James; De La Cruz, Jose L.; Lacey, Paul I.

    2006-01-03

    A method of testing corrosive lubricating media using a wear testing apparatus without a mechanical seal. The wear testing apparatus and methods are effective for testing volatile corrosive lubricating media under pressure and at high temperatures.

  3. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  4. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  5. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  6. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  7. SED and Emission Line Properties of Red 2MASS AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Schmidt, Gary; Ghosh, Himel

    2009-09-01

    Radio and far-IR surveys, and modeling of the cosmic X-ray background suggest that a large population of obscured AGN has been missed by traditional, optical surveys. The Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) has revealed a large population (surface density comparable to that of optically selected AGN with Ks<14.5mag) of mostly nearby (median z=0.25), red, moderately obscured AGN, among which 75% are previously unidentified emission-line AGN, with 85% showing broad emission lines. We present the SED and emission line properties of 44 such red (J-Ks>2) 2MASS AGN observed with Chandra. They lie at z<0.37, span a full range of spectral types (Type 1, intermediate, Type 2),Ks-to-X-ray slopes, and polarization (<13%). Their IR-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are red in the near-IR/opt/UV showing little or no blue bump. The optical colors are affected by reddening, host galaxy emission, redshift, and in few, highly polarized objects, also by scattered AGN light. The levels of obscuration obtained from optical, X-rays, and far-IR imply N_H properties shows that, while obscuration/inclination is important, the dominant cause of variance in the sample (eigenvector 1) is the L/L_{edd} ratio (perhaps because the red near-IR selection limits the range of inclination/obscuration values in our sample). This analysis also distinguishes two sources of obscuration: the host galaxy and circumnuclear absorption.

  8. Some attributes of a language for property-based testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Neagoe, Vicentiu; Bishop, Matt

    2004-11-01

    Property-based testing is a testing technique that evaluates executions of a program. The method checks that specifications, called properties, hold throughout the execution of the program. TASpec is a language used to specify these properties. This paper compares some attributes of the language with the specification patterns used for model-checking languages, and then presents some descriptions of properties that can be used to detect common security flaws in programs. This report describes the results of a one year research project at the University of California, Davis, which was funded by a University Collaboration LDRD entitled ''Property-based Testing for Cyber Security Assurance''.

  9. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CORONAL DIMMING AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Reinard, A. A.

    2009-11-01

    Coronal dimmings are closely related to the footpoints of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and, as such, offer information about CME origins and evolution. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between CME and dimming properties. In particular, we compare CME quantities for events with and without associated dimmings. We find that dimming-associated CMEs, on average, have much higher speeds than non-dimming-associated events. In fact, CMEs without an associated dimming do not appear to travel faster than 800 km s{sup -1}, i.e., the fast solar wind speed. Dimming-associated events are also more likely to be associated with flares, and those flares tend to have the highest magnitudes. We propose that each of these phenomena is affected by the energy available in the source region. Highly energetic source regions produce fast CMEs that are accompanied by larger flares and visible dimmings, while less energetic source regions produce slow CMEs that are accompanied by smaller flares and may or may not have dimmings. The production of dimmings in the latter case may depend on a number of factors including initiation height of the CME, source region magnetic configuration, and observational effects. These results have important implications for understanding and predicting CME initiations.

  10. RSRM-9 (360L009): Ballistics mass properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drendel, Albert S.; Richards, M. C.

    1990-01-01

    The propulsion performance and reconstructed mass properties data from Thiokol's RSRM-9 motors which were assigned to the STS-36 launch are presented. The SRM propellant, TP-H1148, is a composite type solid propellant, formulated of polybutadiene acrylic acid acryonitrile terpolymer binder (PBAN), epoxy curing agent, ammonium perchlorate oxidizer and aluminum powder fuel. A small amount of burning rate catalyst (iron oxide) was added to achieve the desired propellant burn rate. The propellant evaluation and raw material information for the RSRM-9 are included. The propellant grain design consists of four segments. There is a forward segment with an eleven point star with a transition into a tapered circular perforated (CP) configuration. There are two center segments that result in a double tapered CP configuration and an aft segment with a triple taper CP configuration and a cutout for the partially submerged nozzle. The ballistic performance presented is based on the Operational Flight Instrumentation (OFI) 12.5 sample per second pressure data for the steady state and tail off portion of the pressure trace. No high sample rate pressure gauges, Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI), were used on this flight and therefore no ignition data is presented.

  11. Human Mars Mission: Weights and Mass Properties. Pt. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brothers, Bobby

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a final report on The Human Mars Mission Weights and Measures. The topics included in this report are: 1) Trans-Earth Injection Storage Human Mars Mission (HMM) Chemical Design Reference Mission (DRM) v4.0a Weight Breakout; 2) Ascent Stage HMM Chemical DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 3) Descent Stages HMM Chemical DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 4) Trans-Mars Injection Stages HMM Chemical DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 5) Trans-Earth Injection Stage HMM Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 6) Ascent Stage HMM SEP DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 7) Descent Stages HMM SEP DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 8) Trans-Mars Injection Stages HMM SEP DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 9) Crew Taxi Stage HMM SEP DRM v4.0 Weight Breakout; 10)Trans-Earth Injection Stage HMM Nuclear DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 11) Ascent Stage HMM Nuclear DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 12) Descent Stages HMM Nuclear DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; 13) Trans-Mars Injection Stages HMM Nuclear DRM v4.0a Weight Breakout; and 14) HMM Mass Properties Coordinate System.

  12. WHAT DO DARK MATTER HALO PROPERTIES TELL US ABOUT THEIR MASS ASSEMBLY HISTORIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Anson W. C.; Taylor, James E. E-mail: taylor@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-09-20

    Individual dark matter halos in cosmological simulations vary widely in their detailed structural properties, properties such as concentration, shape, spin, and degree of internal relaxation. Recent non-parametric (principal component) analyses suggest that a few principal components explain a large fraction of the scatter in these structural properties. The main principal component is closely aligned with concentration, which in turn is known to be related to the mass accretion history (MAH) of the halo, as described by its merger tree. Here, we examine more generally the connection between the MAH and structural parameters. The space of mass accretion histories has principal components of its own. The strongest, accounting for almost 60% of the scatter between individual histories, can be interpreted as the age of the system. We give an analytic fit for this first component, which provides a rigorous way of defining the dynamical age of a halo. The second strongest component, representing acceleration or deceleration of growth at late times, accounts for 25% of the scatter. Relating structural parameters to formation history, we find that concentration correlates strongly with the early history of the halo, while shape and degree of relaxation or dynamical equilibrium correlate with the later history. We examine the inferences about formation history that can be drawn by splitting halos into sub-samples based on observable properties such as concentration and shape. Applications include the definition young and old samples of galaxy clusters in a quantitative way, or empirical tests of environmental processing rates in clusters.

  13. Spacecraft mass property identification with torque-generating control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergmann, E.; Dzielski, J.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that an applied force was necessary to perform in-flight identification of the mass and center of mass of a spacecraft. This paper shows that the mass and center of mass of a rigid spacecraft can be determined using only torque-producing actuators such as control-moment gyros or reaction wheels, and commonly available sensors, e.g., rate gyros and accelerometers. A space-station application is presented.

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Eating Attitudes Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocker, Liette B.; Lam, Eddie T. C.; Jensen, Barbara E.; Zhang, James J.

    2007-01-01

    The study was designed to examine the construct validity and internal consistency reliability of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) using a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Two widely adopted EAT models were tested: three-factor (Dieting, Bulimia and Food Preoccupation, and Oral Control) with 26 items (Garner, Olmsted, Bohr, & Garfinkel, 1982),…

  15. 76 FR 16350 - Medical Devices; Ovarian Adnexal Mass Assessment Score Test System; Labeling; Black Box Restrictions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Medical Devices; Ovarian Adnexal Mass... regulation classifying ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test systems to restrict these devices so that a... mass assessment score test system into class II (special controls). DATES: Submit either electronic...

  16. System for testing properties of a network

    DOEpatents

    Rawle, Michael; Bartholomew, David B.; Soares, Marshall A.

    2009-06-16

    A method for identifying properties of a downhole electromagnetic network in a downhole tool sting, including the step of providing an electromagnetic path intermediate a first location and a second location on the electromagnetic network. The method further includes the step of providing a receiver at the second location. The receiver includes a known reference. The analog signal includes a set amplitude, a set range of frequencies, and a set rate of change between the frequencies. The method further includes the steps of sending the analog signal, and passively modifying the signal. The analog signal is sent from the first location through the electromagnetic path, and the signal is modified by the properties of the electromagnetic path. The method further includes the step of receiving a modified signal at the second location and comparing the known reference to the modified signal.

  17. Correlation of elastomer material properties from small specimen tests and scale-size bearing tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1994-06-01

    Tests were performed on small-size elastomer specimens and scale-size laminated elastomeric bearings to correlate the material properties in shear between the two types of tests. An objective of the tests was to see how well the material properties that were determined from specimen tests could predict the response of scale-size laminated elastomeric bearings. Another objective was to compare the results of specimen test and scale-size bearing test conducted by different testing organizations. A comparison between the test results from different organizations on small specimens showed very good agreement. In contrast, the correlation of scale-size bearing tests showed differences in bearing stiffness.

  18. RAPID DYNAMICAL MASS SEGREGATION AND PROPERTIES OF FRACTAL STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jincheng; Chen Li; De Grijs, Richard

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the evolution of young star clusters using N-body simulations. We confirm that subvirial and fractal-structured clusters will dynamically mass segregate on a short timescale (within 0.5 Myr). We adopt a modified minimum-spanning-tree method to measure the degree of mass segregation, demonstrating that the stars escaping from a cluster's potential are important for the temporal dependence of mass segregation in the cluster. The form of the initial velocity distribution will also affect the degree of mass segregation. If it depends on radius, the outer parts of the cluster would expand without undergoing collapse. In velocity space, we find 'inverse mass segregation', which indicates that massive stars have higher velocity dispersions than their lower-mass counterparts.

  19. Physical properties of the human head: mass, center of gravity and moment of inertia.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Zhang, Jiangyue; Baisden, Jamie L

    2009-06-19

    This paper presents a synthesis of biomedical investigations of the human head with specific reference to certain aspects of physical properties and development of anthropometry data, leading to the advancement of dummies used in crashworthiness research. As a significant majority of the studies have been summarized as reports, an effort has been made to chronologically review the literature with the above objectives. The first part is devoted to early studies wherein the mass, center of gravity (CG), and moment of inertia (MOI) properties are obtained from human cadaver experiments. Unembalmed and preserved whole-body and isolated head and head-neck experiments are discussed. Acknowledging that the current version of the Hybrid III dummy is the most widely used anthropomorphic test device in motor vehicle crashworthiness research for frontal impact applications for over 30 years, bases for the mass and MOI-related data used in the dummy are discussed. Since the development and federalization of the dummy in the United States, description of methods used to arrive at these properties form a part of the manuscript. Studies subsequent to the development of this dummy including those from the US Military are also discussed. As the head and neck are coupled in any impact, and increasing improvements in technology such as advanced airbags, and pre-tensioners and load limiters in manual seatbelts affect the kinetics of the head-neck complex, the manuscript underscores the need to pursue studies to precisely determine all the physical properties of the head. Because the most critical parameters (locations of CG and occipital condyles (OC), mass, and MOI) have not been determined on a specimen-by-specimen basis in any single study, it is important to gather these data in future experiments. These critical data will be of value for improving occupant safety, designing advanced restraint systems, developing second generation dummies, and assessing the injury mitigating

  20. Estimating Mass Properties of Dinosaurs Using Laser Imaging and 3D Computer Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Karl T.; Manning, Phillip L.; Hodgetts, David; Sellers, William I.

    2009-01-01

    biomechanical assessments of extinct taxa should be preceded by a detailed investigation of the plausible range of mass properties, in which sensitivity analyses are used to identify a suite of possible values to be tested as inputs in analytical models. PMID:19225569

  1. Estimating mass properties of dinosaurs using laser imaging and 3D computer modelling.

    PubMed

    Bates, Karl T; Manning, Phillip L; Hodgetts, David; Sellers, William I

    2009-01-01

    biomechanical assessments of extinct taxa should be preceded by a detailed investigation of the plausible range of mass properties, in which sensitivity analyses are used to identify a suite of possible values to be tested as inputs in analytical models. PMID:19225569

  2. A Wald test with enhanced selectivity properties in homogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weijian; Xie, Wenchong; Wang, Yongliang

    2013-12-01

    A Wald test with enhanced selectivity capabilities is proposed in homogeneous environments. At the design stage, we assume that the cell under test contains a noise-like interferer in addition to colored noise and possible signal of interest. We show that the Wald test is equivalent to a recently proposed Rao test. We also observe that this Rao/Wald test possesses constant false alarm rate property in homogeneous environments.

  3. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 4: Detail mass properties data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Mass properties data are presented to describe the characteristics of an expendable second stage with a reusable space shuttle booster. The final mass characteristics of the vehicle configurations for three specified payloads are presented in terms of weight, center of gravity, and mass moments of inertia. Three basic subjects are the integrated vehicle system, the expendable second stage, and the booster modifications.

  4. Concrete Property and Radionuclide Migration Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Powers, Laura; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-10-01

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the DOE Complex. Part of theses services includes safe disposal of LLW and MLLW at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the requirements listed in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, a Performance Assessment (PA) analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires that continuing data collection be conducted to enhance confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied upon to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the Order. One critical assumption is that concrete will frequently be used as waste form or container material to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Data was collected to (1) quantify radionuclide migration through concrete materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the LLBG, (2) measure the properties of the concrete materials, especially those likely to influence radionuclide migration, and (3) quantify the stability of U-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  5. Probing Late Neutrino Mass Properties With SupernovaNeutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Joseph; Goldberg, Haim; Perez, Gilad; Sarcevic, Ina

    2007-08-08

    Models of late-time neutrino mass generation contain new interactions of the cosmic background neutrinos with supernova relic neutrinos (SRNs). Exchange of an on-shell light scalar may lead to significant modification of the differential SRN flux observed at earth. We consider an Abelian U(1) model for generating neutrino masses at low scales, and show that there are cases for which the changes induced in the flux allow one to distinguish the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos, as well as the type of neutrino mass hierarchy (normal or inverted or quasi-degenerate). In some region of parameter space the determination of the absolute values of the neutrino masses is also conceivable. Measurements of the presence of these effects may be possible at the next-generation water Cerenkov detectors enriched with Gadolinium, or a 100 kton liquid argon detector.

  6. Tests of timing properties of silicon photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, A.; Albrow, M.; Byrum, K.; Demarteau, M.; Los, S.; May, E.; Ramberg, A.; Va'vra, J.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez

    2010-03-01

    Timing measurements of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) [1] and [2] at the picosecond level were performed at Fermilab. The core timing resolution of the electronic measurement technique is approximately 2 ps. The single photoelectron time resolution (SPTR) was measured for the signals coming from the SiPM's. A SPTR of about one hundred picoseconds was obtained for SiPM's illuminated by laser pulses. The dependence of the SPTR on applied bias voltage and on the wavelength of the light was measured. A simple model is proposed to explain the difference in the SPTR for blue and red light. A time of flight system based on the SiPM's, with quartz Cherenkov radiators, was tested in a proton beam at Fermilab. The time resolution obtained is 35 ps per SiPM. Finally, requirements for the SiPM's temperature and bias voltage stability to maintain the time resolution are discussed.

  7. Residual Gas Noise in the Test-mass Module for DECIGO Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okutomi, K.; Akutsu, T.; Ando, M.; Nikaido, M.; Tanaka, N.; Torii, Y.; Sato, S.; Izumi, K.; Chen, D.

    2015-05-01

    DECIGO Pathfinder is the first milestone mission for DECIGO, a future gravitational wave antenna. In DPF, residual gas noise acting on the test mass is estimated to increase and exceed the requirement for force noise of 1 × 10-15 N/√Hz due to geometry of the test-mass module. We performed a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the residual gas noise and found that the engineering model of the test-mass module cannnot satisfy the requirement. To reduce the gas noise, we present revised geometry of the test-mass module using comb-like electrodes.

  8. Testing molecular effects for tritium-based neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parno, Diana; Bodine, Laura; Robertson, R. G. Hamish

    2015-10-01

    The upcoming KATRIN experiment will use the kinematics of tritium beta decay to probe the neutrino mass. The tritium source is molecular, however, and one of KATRIN's largest expected systematic uncertainties arises from the population of molecular final states following beta decay. To study this uncertainty, the Tritium Recoil-Ion Mass Spectrometer will measure the dissociation probability of the daughter molecule following beta decay, addressing a discrepancy between modern, high-precision theoretical calculations and two mass spectrometry measurements from the 1950s. We will describe the novel measurement technique and the commissioning of the experiment. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  9. Means for ultrasonic testing when material properties vary

    DOEpatents

    Beller, Laurence S.

    1979-01-01

    A device is provided for maintaining constant sensitivity in an ultrasonic testing device, despite varying attenuation due to the properties of the material being tested. The device includes a sensor transducer for transmitting and receiving a test signal and a monitor transducer positioned so as to receive ultrasonic energy transmitted through the material to be tested. The received signal of the monitor transducer is utilized in analyzing data obtained from the sensor transducer.

  10. Thermophysical property testing using transient techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Shoemaker, R. L.; Stark, J. A.; Koshigoe, L. G.

    1984-06-01

    Transient techniques were applied to the study of energetic materials (AP, HMX, RDX and HTPB) used in solid rocket fuel to carbon/carbon materials used as rocket nozzles. Studies on AP included single crystals, pressed powders and AP/HTPB mixtures. It was found that the conductivity of AP can be considered isotropic, even the orthrohombic phase. The conductivity values for pure AP calculated from the AP/HTPB mixtures were somewhat larger than those measured directly on single crystals due to imperfections in the relatively large single crystals. Conductivity values for Beta HMX obtained on pressed powders are believed to be 20% below those that would be obtained on good single crystals if they were available. Delta phase values are believed representative. Conductivity data useful for modeling AP/binder and HMX/binder fuel from RT to combustion were obtained. Successful techniques for determining in-situ conductivity values for carbon fibers and matrix in c/c composites were developed. The relative roles of the fibers and matrix in c/c subject to transient heat fluxes were delineated. The advantages of off-axis testing were revealed. Diffusivity values corresponding to thermal conductivity results could be obtained. The presence of a surface layer in which interconstituent thermal gradients are important and beyond which they are negligible was demonstrated.

  11. Fiber mass, count and breaking force from Stelometer test

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fundamental understanding of the relationship among cotton fiber mass, count, and breaking force is important, as bundle fiber tenacity, elongation, and linear density can be calculated from these three parameters. In this study, the Stelometer instrument was employed, mostly because it is the tra...

  12. Initial experimental test of a helicon plasma based mass filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, R.; Evans, E. S.; Zweben, S. J.; Fisch, N. J.; Levinton, F.

    2016-06-01

    High throughput plasma mass separation requires rotation control in a high density multi-species plasmas. A preliminary mass separation device based on a helicon plasma operating in gas mixtures and featuring concentric biasable ring electrodes is introduced. Plasma profile shows strong response to electrode biasing. In light of floating potential measurements, the density response is interpreted as the consequence of a reshaping of the radial electric field in the plasma. This field can be made confining or de-confining depending on the imposed potential at the electrodes, in a way which is consistent with single particle orbit radial stability. Concurrent spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements suggest ion separation, with heavy to light ion emission line ratio increasing with radius when a specific potential gradient is applied to the electrodes.

  13. Initial experimental test of a helicon plasma based mass filter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gueroult, R.; Evans, E. S.; Zweben, S. J.; Fisch, N. J.; Levinton, F.

    2016-05-12

    High throughput plasma mass separation requires rotation control in a high density multi-species plasmas. A preliminary mass separation device based on a helicon plasma operating in gas mixtures and featuring concentric biasable ring electrodes is introduced. Plasma profile shows strong response to electrode biasing. In light of floating potential measurements, the density response is interpreted as the consequence of a reshaping of the radial electric field in the plasma. This field can be made confining or de-confining depending on the imposed potential at the electrodes, in a way which is consistent with single particle orbit radial stability. In conclusion, concurrentmore » spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements suggest ion separation, with heavy to light ion emission line ratio increasing with radius when a specific potential gradient is applied to the electrodes.« less

  14. Mass Testing of Individual Writing: The California Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Edward M.

    1978-01-01

    Presents remarks on essay testing made by Edward M. White, an account of procedures for developing essay questions for the California State University and Colleges (CSUC) English Equivalency Examination, the 1974 essay scale with accompanying writing samples, and the questions and scale used in the 1975 test. (RL)

  15. PROPERTIES IMPORTANT TO MIXING FOR WTP LARGE SCALE INTEGRATED TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Martino, C.; Poirier, M.

    2012-04-26

    Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being planned by Bechtel National, Inc. to address uncertainties in the full scale mixing performance of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Testing will use simulated waste rather than actual Hanford waste. Therefore, the use of suitable simulants is critical to achieving the goals of the test program. External review boards have raised questions regarding the overall representativeness of simulants used in previous mixing tests. Accordingly, WTP requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist with development of simulants for use in LSIT. Among the first tasks assigned to SRNL was to develop a list of waste properties that matter to pulse-jet mixer (PJM) mixing of WTP tanks. This report satisfies Commitment 5.2.3.1 of the Department of Energy Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2: physical properties important to mixing and scaling. In support of waste simulant development, the following two objectives are the focus of this report: (1) Assess physical and chemical properties important to the testing and development of mixing scaling relationships; (2) Identify the governing properties and associated ranges for LSIT to achieve the Newtonian and non-Newtonian test objectives. This includes the properties to support testing of sampling and heel management systems. The test objectives for LSIT relate to transfer and pump out of solid particles, prototypic integrated operations, sparger operation, PJM controllability, vessel level/density measurement accuracy, sampling, heel management, PJM restart, design and safety margin, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Verification and Validation (V and V) and comparison, performance testing and scaling, and high temperature operation. The slurry properties that are most important to Performance Testing and Scaling depend on the test objective and rheological classification of the slurry (i

  16. Correlation Results for a Mass Loaded Vehicle Panel Test Article Finite Element Models and Modal Survey Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maasha, Rumaasha; Towner, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    High-fidelity Finite Element Models (FEMs) were developed to support a recent test program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The FEMs correspond to test articles used for a series of acoustic tests. Modal survey tests were used to validate the FEMs for five acoustic tests (a bare panel and four different mass-loaded panel configurations). An additional modal survey test was performed on the empty test fixture (orthogrid panel mounting fixture, between the reverb and anechoic chambers). Modal survey tests were used to test-validate the dynamic characteristics of FEMs used for acoustic test excitation. Modal survey testing and subsequent model correlation has validated the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the FEMs. The modal survey test results provide a basis for the analysis models used for acoustic loading response test and analysis comparisons

  17. Fiber twist test: A new test technique to measure composite interface properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chepolis, W.M.; Ertuerk, T.

    1995-10-01

    This paper discusses the work accomplished, thus far, in the development of the Fiber Twist Test (FTT) as an alternative and improved technique for testing the interface properties of continuous fiber composite materials. The unique features of the fiber twist test include the absence of Poisson effects during testing. This eliminates the nonlinear variation, with changing embedded fiber lengths, of fracture modes and accompanying debond energy, and of friction along the interface. Since the fiber is not removed from its surrounding matrix during testing, the interface area remains constant. This facilitates a more accurate measurement of friction properties at the interface.

  18. Testing General Relativity with Spherical Resonant Mass Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvester, Alex J.

    Gravitational waves in f(R) gravity excite monopole and m = 0+/-2 quadrupole resonance modes of a spherical detector. This document reviews the basic ideas of general relativity and gravitational waves, and then applies those concepts to an f( R) gravitational wave. The acoustic response of a GW incident with a spherical detector is reviewed in detail, and the absorption cross section for an f(R) GW impinging on the spherical detector is calculated. Minimum detectable scalar wave amplitudes are explored for the Mario Schenberg detector. The mass of the scalar mode affects its detectability.

  19. Determination of densified biomass mass properties using 3D laser scanning and image analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass densification is viewed as the indispensable feedstock preprocessing operation for efficient transport, storage, material flow through machines, and handling activities. Accurate mass properties of densified biomass such as surface area, volume, and envelope density form fundamental data for...

  20. Temperature dependent mechanical property testing of nitrate thermal storage salts.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Brian DeVon; Broome, Scott Thomas; Siegel, Nathan Phillip

    2010-08-01

    Three salt compositions for potential use in trough-based solar collectors were tested to determine their mechanical properties as a function of temperature. The mechanical properties determined were unconfined compressive strength, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and indirect tensile strength. Seventeen uniaxial compression and indirect tension tests were completed. It was found that as test temperature increases, unconfined compressive strength and Young's modulus decreased for all salt types. Empirical relationships were developed quantifying the aforementioned behaviors. Poisson's ratio tends to increase with increasing temperature except for one salt type where there is no obvious trend. The variability in measured indirect tensile strength is large, but not atypical for this index test. The average tensile strength for all salt types tested is substantially higher than the upper range of tensile strengths for naturally occurring rock salts.

  1. Cyclic material properties tests supporting elastic-plastic analysis development

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.C.; Minicucci, J.M.

    1996-11-01

    Correlation studies have shown that hardening models currently available in the ABAQUS finite element code (isotropic, kinematic) do not accurately capture the inelastic strain reversals that occur due to structural rebounding from a rapidly applied transient dynamic load. The purpose of the Cyclic Material properties Test program was to obtain response data for the first several cycles of inelastic strain reversal from a cyclic properties test. This data is needed to develop elastic-plastic analysis methods that can accurately predict strains and permanent sets in structures due to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. Test specimens were cycled at inelastic strain levels typical of rapidly applied transient dynamic analyses (0.5% to 4.0%). In addition to the inelastic response data, cyclic material properties for high yield strength (80 ksi) steel were determined including a cyclic stress-strain curve for a stabilized specimen. Two test methods, the Incremental Step method and the Companion specimen Method, were sued to determine cyclic properties. The incrementally decreasing strain amplitudes in the first loading block of the Incremental Step method test is representative of the response of structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loads. The inelastic strain history data generated by this test program will be used to support development of a material model that can accurately predict inelastic material behavior including inelastic strain reversals. Additionally, this data can be used to verify material model enhancements to elastic-plastic finite element analysis codes.

  2. Method for simultaneous measurement of mass loading and fluid property changes using a quartz crystal microbalance

    DOEpatents

    Granstaff, Victoria E.; Martin, Stephen J.

    1993-01-01

    A method, using a quartz crystal microbalance, to obtain simultaneous measurement of solid mass accumulation and changes in liquid density-viscosity product. The simultaneous real-time measurements of electrical parameters yields that changes in surface mass can be differentiated from changes in solution properties. Two methods to obtain the admittance/frequency data are employed.

  3. Method for simultaneous measurement of mass loading and fluid property changes using a quartz crystal microbalance

    DOEpatents

    Granstaff, V.E.; Martin, S.J.

    1993-04-13

    A method is described, using a quartz crystal microbalance, to obtain simultaneous measurement of solid mass accumulation and changes in liquid density-viscosity product. The simultaneous real-time measurements of electrical parameters yields that changes in surface mass can be differentiated from changes in solution properties. Two methods to obtain the admittance/frequency data are employed.

  4. Mass extinctions and cosmic collisions - A lunar test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, F.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility has been considered that some or all major mass extinctions in the geologic record of earth are caused by the collision of massive, cosmic objects. Thus, it has been proposed that the unusual concentration of siderophile elements in strata at which the boundary between the Cretaceous (K) and Tertiary (T) geologic time periods has been placed must represent the remnants of a gigantic meteorite. However, a large 65-m.y.-old crater which could have been the result of the impact of this meteorite is not presently known on earth. One approach to evaluate the merits of the collisional hypothesis considered is based on the study of the probability of collision between a cosmic object of a suitable size and the earth. As moon and earth were subject to the same bombardment history and the preservation of craters on the moon is much better than on earth, a consideration of the lunar cratering record may provide crucial information.

  5. How to test for mass degenerate Higgs resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Yuval; Surujon, Ze'ev; Zupan, Jure

    2013-03-01

    The Higgs-like signal observed at the LHC could be due to several mass degenerate resonances. We show that the number of resonances is related to the rank of a "production and decay" matrix, R if . Each entry in this matrix contains the observed rate in a particular production mode i and final state f. In the case of N non-interfering resonances, the rank of R is, at most, N. If interference plays a role, the maximum rank is generically N 2, or with a universal phase, N( N + 1) /2. As an illustration we use the present experimental data to constrain the rank of the corresponding matrix. We estimate the LHC reach of probing two and three resonances under various speculations on future measurements and uncertainties.

  6. Mass extinctions and cosmic collisions - A lunar test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horz, F.

    The possibility has been considered that some or all major mass extinctions in the geologic record of earth are caused by the collision of massive, cosmic objects. Thus, it has been proposed that the unusual concentration of siderophile elements in strata at which the boundary between the Cretaceous (K) and Tertiary (T) geologic time periods has been placed must represent the remnants of a gigantic meteorite. However, a large 65-m.y.-old crater which could have been the result of the impact of this meteorite is not presently known on earth. One approach to evaluate the merits of the collisional hypothesis considered is based on the study of the probability of collision between a cosmic object of a suitable size and the earth. As moon and earth were subject to the same bombardment history and the preservation of craters on the moon is much better than on earth, a consideration of the lunar cratering record may provide crucial information.

  7. Hanford Apatite Treatability Test Report Errata: Apatite Mass Loading Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.

    2014-05-19

    The objective of this errata report is to document an error in the apatite loading (i.e., treatment capacity) estimate reported in previous apatite treatability test reports and provide additional calculation details for estimating apatite loading and barrier longevity. The apatite treatability test final report (PNNL-19572; Vermeul et al. 2010) documents the results of the first field-scale evaluation of the injectable apatite PRB technology. The apatite loading value in units of milligram-apatite per gram-sediment is incorrect in this and some other previous reports. The apatite loading in units of milligram phosphate per gram-sediment, however, is correct, and this is the unit used for comparison to field core sample measurements.

  8. Numerical Calibration of Mass Flow Plug for Inlet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan; Barnhart, Paul; Davis, David O.

    2015-01-01

    A simple control volume model has been developed to calculate the discharge coefficient through a mass flow plug (MFP) and validated with a calibration experiment. The maximum error of the model within the operating region of the MFP is 0.54%. The control volume analysis developed work is comprised of a sequence of flow calculations through the MFP. The model uses the MFP geometry and operating pressure and temperature to couple continuity, momentum, energy, an equation of state, and wall shear. The discharge coefficient calculation also includes the effects of boundary layer growth, including the reduction in cross-sectional flow area as characterized by the boundary layer displacement thickness. The last calculation in the sequence uses an integral method to calculate the growth of the boundary layer, from which the displacement thickness is then determined. The result of these successive calculations is an accurate one-dimension model of the velocity, pressure, and temperature through the MFP. For comparison, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calibration is shown, which when compared to the presented numerical model, had a lower accuracy with a maximum error of 1.35% in addition to being slower by a factor of 100."

  9. Tests of blending and correlation of distillate fuel properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, J.; Bowden, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a fuel test matrix, results from tests of several blends of distillate aircraft fuels, and the use of correlations in formulation determination during a NASA-sponsored program to identify new aircraft fuels are described. The program was initiated in order to characterize fuel blends which are appropriate for different types of combustors in use and under development. The fuels were required to feature a specified range of properties. Attention is given to fuel volatility, hydrogen content, aromatic content, freezing point, kinematic viscosity, and naphthalene content. Paraffinic and naphtenic base stocks were employed, using alkyl benzene, naphthene benzenes, and naphthalenes to adjust the blend properties. Categories for the test fuels comprised source-controlled and composition controlled fuels. Test results and compositions of various fuels are provided.

  10. The influence of body mass index and gender on the impact attenuation properties of flooring systems.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Shivam; Levine, Iris; Laing, Andrew C

    2013-12-01

    The biomechanical effectiveness of safety floors has never been assessed during sideways falls with human volunteers. Furthermore, the influence of body mass index (BMI) and gender on the protective capacity of safety floors is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test whether safety floors provide greater impact attenuation compared with traditional flooring, and whether BMI and gender modify their impact attenuation properties. Thirty participants (7 men and 7 women of low BMI; 7 men and 9 women of high BMI) underwent lateral pelvis release trials on 2 common floors and 4 safety floors. As a group, the safety floors reduced peak force (by up to 11.7%), and increased the time to peak force (by up to 25.5%) compared with a traditional institutional grade floor. Force attenuation was significantly higher for the low BMI group, and for males. Force attenuation was greatest for the low BMI males, averaging 26.5% (SD = 3.0) across the safety floors. These findings demonstrate an overall protective effect of safety floors during lateral falls on the pelvis, but also suggest augmented benefits for frail older adults (often with low body mass) who are at an increased risk of hip fracture. PMID:23429161

  11. Tracer mass recovery in fractured aquifers estimated from multiple well tests.

    PubMed

    Sanford, William E; Cook, Peter G; Robinson, Neville I; Weatherill, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Forced-gradient tracer tests in fractured aquifers often report low mass recoveries. In fractured aquifers, fractures intersected by one borehole may not be intersected by another. As a result (1) injected tracer can follow pathways away from the withdrawal well causing low mass recovery and (2) recovered water can follow pathways not connected to the injection well causing significant tracer dilution. These two effects occur along with other forms of apparent mass loss. If the strength of the connection between wells and the amount of dilution can be predicted ahead of time, tracer tests can be designed to optimize mass recovery and dilution. A technique is developed to use hydraulic tests in fractured aquifers to calculate the conductance (strength of connection) between well pairs and to predict mass recovery and amount of dilution during forced gradient tracer tests. Flow is considered to take place through conduits, which connect the wells to each other and to distant sources or sinks. Mass recovery is related to the proportion of flow leaving the injection well and arriving at the withdrawal well, and dilution is related to the proportion of the flow from the withdrawal well that is derived from the injection well. The technique can be used to choose well pairs for tracer tests, what injection and withdrawal rates to use, and which direction to establish the hydraulic gradient to maximize mass recovery and/or minimize dilution. The method is applied to several tracer tests in fractured aquifers in the Clare Valley, South Australia. PMID:16857034

  12. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): merging galaxies and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Propris, Roberto; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Driver, Simon P.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee; Loveday, Jon; Phillipps, Steve; Robotham, Aaron S. G.

    2014-11-01

    We derive the close pair fractions and volume merger rates for galaxies in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey with -23 < Mr < -17 (ΩM = 0.27, ΩΛ = 0.73, H0 = 100 km s-1 Mpc-1) at 0.01 < z < 0.22 (look-back time of <2 Gyr). The merger fraction is approximately 1.5 per cent Gyr-1 at all luminosities (assuming 50 per cent of pairs merge) and the volume merger rate is ≈3.5 × 10-4 Mpc-3 Gyr-1. We examine how the merger rate varies by luminosity and morphology. Dry mergers (between red/spheroidal galaxies) are found to be uncommon and to decrease with decreasing luminosity. Fainter mergers are wet, between blue/discy galaxies. Damp mergers (one of each type) follow the average of dry and wet mergers. In the brighter luminosity bin (-23 < Mr < -20), the merger rate evolution is flat, irrespective of colour or morphology, out to z ˜ 0.2. The makeup of the merging population does not appear to change over this redshift range. Galaxy growth by major mergers appears comparatively unimportant and dry mergers are unlikely to be significant in the buildup of the red sequence over the past 2 Gyr. We compare the colour, morphology, environmental density and degree of activity (BPT class, Baldwin, Phillips & Terlevich) of galaxies in pairs to those of more isolated objects in the same volume. Galaxies in close pairs tend to be both redder and slightly more spheroid dominated than the comparison sample. We suggest that this may be due to `harassment' in multiple previous passes prior to the current close interaction. Galaxy pairs do not appear to prefer significantly denser environments. There is no evidence of an enhancement in the AGN fraction in pairs, compared to other galaxies in the same volume.

  13. Rock mass mechanical property estimations for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.; Hardy, M.P.; Bauer, S.J.

    1993-06-01

    Rock mass mechanical properties are important in the design of drifts and ramps. These properties are used in evaluations of the impacts of thermomechanical loading of potential host rock within the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Representative intact rock and joint mechanical properties were selected for welded and nonwelded tuffs from the currently available data sources. Rock mass qualities were then estimated using both the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (Q) and Geomechanics Rating (RMR) systems. Rock mass mechanical properties were developed based on estimates of rock mass quality, the current knowledge of intact properties, and fracture/joint characteristics. Empirical relationships developed to correlate the rock mass quality indices and the rock mass mechanical properties were then used to estimate the range of rock mass mechanical properties.

  14. Chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of, and physical tests on, beryllium oxide powder

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Beryllium oxide is used in the fabrication of nuclear components. In order to be suitable for this purpose, the material must meet certain criteria for impurity content and physical properties. The analytical and physical testing procedures in this standard are designed to show whether or not a given material meets accepted specifications. Test methods described in detail are: total carbon by the combustion-thermal conductivity method; iron by colorimetric (orthophenanthroline) method; nitride nitrogen by the micro Kjeldahl method; chloride by nephelometry; lithium by atomic absorption spectrophotometry; sulfur by combustion-iodometric titration method; beryllium oxide in beryllium oxide powders by impurity correction method; trace elements by the complete-burning spectrochemical method; impurity elements by a spark-source mass spectrographic method; density by toluene displacement method; density (pour and tap) by the tap-pak volumetric method; particle size distribution analysis by the coulter counter method; sieve analysis; bulk and real densities, porosity, and pore size-pore volume distribution mercury-penetration porosimetry; surface area by nitrogen absorption method. (JMT)

  15. Target Capturing Control for Space Robots with Unknown Mass Properties: A Self-Tuning Method Based on Gyros and Cameras.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenyu; Wang, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Satellite capturing with free-floating space robots is still a challenging task due to the non-fixed base and unknown mass property issues. In this paper gyro and eye-in-hand camera data are adopted as an alternative choice for solving this problem. For this improved system, a new modeling approach that reduces the complexity of system control and identification is proposed. With the newly developed model, the space robot is equivalent to a ground-fixed manipulator system. Accordingly, a self-tuning control scheme is applied to handle such a control problem including unknown parameters. To determine the controller parameters, an estimator is designed based on the least-squares technique for identifying the unknown mass properties in real time. The proposed method is tested with a credible 3-dimensional ground verification experimental system, and the experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. PMID:27589748

  16. Estimating flow properties of quasi-newtonian mass-movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Bulmer, M.; Baloga, S.; Glaze, L.

    2001-12-01

    A variety of models exist in the literature to describe the flow behavior and rheological nature of debris flows. These include viscoplastic models, inertial grain flow models, fluid-solid momentum transport models and empirical Chezy-type models. For the purpose of planetary studies, the Chezy-type models have been found very useful. These models make few apriori assumptions on the physical processes ongoing in a debris flow, but rather parameterize the momentum transport and energy dissipation of debris flows with semi-empirical constants. When properly calibrated with appropriate field and laboratory evidence, these constants can provide a first order qualitative view into the behavior and rheological character, particularly water content, of a debris flow. Such a view permits the development and use of the more sophisticated debris flow models mentioned above where the physical processes are explicitly accounted for and from which, in conjunction with observation, quantitative rheological parameters can be determined. The strength of the Chezy-type models lies in that its parameterizing constants can be derived relatively easily from topographic data and airborne or space-based imaging and compared with a large body of terrestrial analogs. In this study, we will use a form of the Chezy model commonly applied to investigate quasi-Newtonian flows that are fast moving fluids bearing various kinds of loading or suspension. We will present a list of the Chezy constants for a wide-range of debris flows, ranging from water to water-rich landslides. This calibration table was determined by completing a literature search where velocity, channel slope, channel cross-sectional area, channel width and rheological characteristics of the debris flows were available. We show how rheological inferences, particularly water- content of one type of mass movement - debris flows - can be constrained using planetary data sets. These inferences are derived through judicious use of

  17. Modelling the post-Newtonian test-mass gravitational wave flux function for compact binary systems using Chebyshev polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Edward K.

    2006-10-01

    We introduce a new method for modelling the gravitational wave flux function of a test-mass particle inspiralling into an intermediate mass Schwarzschild black hole which is based on Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind. It is believed that these intermediate mass ratio inspiral events (IMRI) are expected to be seen in both the ground- and space-based detectors. Starting with the post-Newtonian expansion from black hole perturbation theory, we introduce a new Chebyshev approximation to the flux function, which due to a process called Chebyshev economization gives a model with faster convergence than either post-Newtonian- or Padé-based methods. As well as having excellent convergence properties, these polynomials are also very closely related to the elusive minimax polynomial. We find that at the last stable orbit, the error between the Chebyshev approximation and a numerically calculated flux is reduced, <1.8%, at all orders of approximation. We also find that the templates constructed using the Chebyshev approximation give better fitting factors, in general >0.99, and smaller errors, <1/10%, in the estimation of the chirp mass when compared to a fiducial exact waveform, constructed using the numerical flux and the exact expression for the orbital energy function, again at all orders of approximation. We also show that in the intermediate test-mass case, the new Chebyshev template is superior to both PN and Padé approximant templates, especially at lower orders of approximation.

  18. Summary of the results of the LISA-Pathfinder Test Mass release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanoni, C.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Conklin, J. W.; Köker, I.; Seutchat, B.; Vitale, S.

    2015-05-01

    The challenging goal of LISA-Pathfinder in terms of maximum non-gravitational forces applied on the test mass poses tight constraints on the design of the Gravitational Reference Sensor. In particular, large gaps (3-4 mm) must exist between the test mass and its housing and any system there located must be either gold coated or made of a gold-based material. As a consequence, a significant adhesion may arise between the test mass and the mechanism designed to cage it during the spacecraft launch and to release it to free-fall. The criticality of the latter phase is enhanced by the control force authority exerted to the test mass by the surrounding electrodes. Such a force is limited by the large gaps (order of μN). Since the expected adhesion force between the test mass and its holding devices is much larger than the force authority, a dynamic release must be realized. However, following this procedure adhesion converts into test mass velocity, which can be controlled by the capacitive force only if it is smaller than 5 μm/s. At the University of Trento (Italy) the Transferred Momentum Measurement Facility has been designed and developed to measure the impulse produced by metallic adhesion upon quick rupture, in representative conditions of the LISA-Pathfinder test mass release to free-fall. Large sets of data have been collected and a mathematical model of the in-flight release dynamics has been developed, in order to estimate the test mass release velocity. A summary of the results is presented, together with an overview of the recent developments and a prediction of the in-flight performance.

  19. Heat-flow properties of systems with alternate masses or alternate on-site potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Emmanuel; Santana, Leonardo M.; Ávila, Ricardo

    2011-07-01

    We address a central issue of phononics: the search of properties or mechanisms to manage the heat flow in reliable materials. We analytically study standard and simple systems modeling the heat flow in solids, namely, the harmonic, self-consistent harmonic and also anharmonic chains of oscillators, and we show an interesting insulating effect: While in the homogeneous models the heat flow decays as the inverse of the particle mass, in the chain with alternate masses it decays as the inverse of the square of the mass difference, that is, it decays essentially as the mass ratio (between the smaller and the larger one) for a large mass difference. A similar effect holds if we alternate on-site potentials instead of particle masses. The existence of such behavior in these different systems, including anharmonic models, indicates that it is a ubiquitous phenomenon with applications in the heat flow control.

  20. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  1. Transport processes in partially saturate concrete: Testing and liquid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Chiara

    The measurement of transport properties of concrete is considered by many to have the potential to serve as a performance criterion that can be related to concrete durability. However, the sensitivity of transport tests to several parameters combined with the low permeability of concrete complicates the testing. Gas permeability and diffusivity test methods are attractive due to the ease of testing, their non-destructive nature and their potential to correlate to in-field carbonation of reinforced concrete structures. This work was aimed at investigating the potential of existing gas transport tests as a way to reliably quantify transport properties in concrete. In this study gas permeability and diffusivity test methods were analyzed comparing their performance in terms of repeatability and variability. The influence of several parameters was investigated such as moisture content, mixture proportions and gas flow. A closer look to the influence of pressure revealed an anomalous trend of permeability with respect to pressure. An alternative calculation is proposed in an effort to move towards the determination of intrinsic material properties that can serve as an input for service life prediction models. The impact of deicing salts exposure was also analyzed with respect to their alteration of the degree of saturation as this may affect gas transport in cementitious materials. Limited information were previously available on liquid properties over a wide range of concentrations. To overcome this limitation, this study quantified surface tension, viscosity in presence of deicing salts in a broad concentration range and at different temperatures. Existing models were applied to predict the change of fluid properties during drying. Vapor desorption isotherms were obtained to investigate the influence of deicing salts presence on the non-linear moisture diffusion coefficient. Semi-empirical models were used to quantify the initiation and the rate of drying using liquid

  2. Aircraft Structural Mass Property Prediction Using Conceptual-Level Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexstone, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology that extends the use of the Equivalent LAminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) structural analysis code from conceptual-level aircraft structural analysis to conceptual-level aircraft mass property analysis. Mass property analysis in aircraft structures has historically depended upon parametric weight equations at the conceptual design level and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) at the detailed design level. ELAPS allows for the modeling of detailed geometry, metallic and composite materials, and non-structural mass coupled with analytical structural sizing to produce high-fidelity mass property analyses representing fully configured vehicles early in the design process. This capability is especially valuable for unusual configuration and advanced concept development where existing parametric weight equations are inapplicable and FEA is too time consuming for conceptual design. This paper contrasts the use of ELAPS relative to empirical weight equations and FEA. ELAPS modeling techniques are described and the ELAPS-based mass property analysis process is detailed. Examples of mass property stochastic calculations produced during a recent systems study are provided. This study involved the analysis of three remotely piloted aircraft required to carry scientific payloads to very high altitudes at subsonic speeds. Due to the extreme nature of this high-altitude flight regime, few existing vehicle designs are available for use in performance and weight prediction. ELAPS was employed within a concurrent engineering analysis process that simultaneously produces aerodynamic, structural, and static aeroelastic results for input to aircraft performance analyses. The ELAPS models produced for each concept were also used to provide stochastic analyses of wing structural mass properties. The results of this effort indicate that ELAPS is an efficient means to conduct multidisciplinary trade studies at the conceptual design level.

  3. Aircraft Structural Mass Property Prediction Using Conceptual-Level Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexstone, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology that extends the use of the Equivalent LAminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) structural analysis code from conceptual-level aircraft structural analysis to conceptual-level aircraft mass property analysis. Mass property analysis in aircraft structures has historically depended upon parametric weight equations at the conceptual design level and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) at the detailed design level ELAPS allows for the modeling of detailed geometry, metallic and composite materials, and non-structural mass coupled with analytical structural sizing to produce high-fidelity mass property analyses representing fully configured vehicles early in the design process. This capability is especially valuable for unusual configuration and advanced concept development where existing parametric weight equations are inapplicable and FEA is too time consuming for conceptual design. This paper contrasts the use of ELAPS relative to empirical weight equations and FEA. ELAPS modeling techniques are described and the ELAPS-based mass property analysis process is detailed Examples of mass property stochastic calculations produced during a recent systems study are provided This study involved the analysis of three remotely piloted aircraft required to carry scientific payloads to very high altitudes at subsonic speeds. Due to the extreme nature of this high-altitude flight regime,few existing vehicle designs are available for use in performance and weight prediction. ELAPS was employed within a concurrent engineering analysis process that simultaneously produces aerodynamic, structural, and static aeroelastic results for input to aircraft performance analyses. The ELAPS models produced for each concept were also used to provide stochastic analyses of wing structural mass properties. The results of this effort indicate that ELAPS is an efficient means to conduct multidisciplinary trade studies at the conceptual design level.

  4. On the upscaling of mass transfer rate expressions for interpretation of source zone partitioning tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroumand, Ali; Abriola, Linda M.

    2015-02-01

    Analysis of partitioning tracer tests conducted in dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones relies on conceptual models that describe mass exchange between the DNAPL and aqueous phases. Such analysis, however, is complicated by the complex distribution of entrapped DNAPL mass and formation heterogeneity. Due to parameter uncertainty in heterogeneous regions and the desire to reduce model complexity, the effect of mass transfer limitations is often neglected, and an equilibrium-based model is typically used to interpret test results. This work explores the consequences of that simplifying assumption on test data interpretation and develops an alternative upscaled modeling approach to quantify effective mass transfer rates. To this end, a series of partitioning tracer tests is numerically simulated in heterogeneous two-dimensional PCE-DNAPL source zones, representative of a range of hydraulic conductivity and DNAPL mass distribution characteristics. The effective mass transfer coefficient corresponding to each test is determined by fitting an upscaled model to the simulated data, and regression analysis is performed to explore the correlation between various source zone metrics and the effective mass transfer coefficient. Results suggest that vertical DNAPL spreading, Reynolds number, pool fraction, and the effective organic phase saturation are the most significant parameters controlling tracer partitioning rates. Finally, a correlation for prediction of the effective (upscaled) mass transfer coefficient is proposed and verified using existing experimental data. The developed upscaled model incorporates the influence of physical heterogeneity on the rate of tracer partitioning and, thus, can be used for the estimation of source zone mass distribution characteristics from tracer test results.

  5. Modeling and Simulation of a Spinning Spherical Test Mass for Modular Gravitational Reference Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke-Xun; Conklin, John; Allen, Graham; Buchman, Sasha; Byer, Robert; Debra, Dan

    In a drag-free spacecraft, the spacecraft computer uses input from displacement sensors to fly at a constant distance from a free- floating test mass inside the spcaecraft. Optical sensors offer higher resolution and zero stiffness compared to capacitive sensors, but the small spot size makes them much more sensitive to test mass surface irregularities. Except for these residual geometric irregularities, the sphere is orientation invariant. Consequently, with a spherical test mass, we can eliminate electrostatic suspension for orientation control, which can cause unwanted forcing of the test mass. Spinning a sphere spectrally shifts the surface irregularities as well as the mass center offset from the geometric center out of the desired sensing band. Given that the outof-roundness and mass center offset of a sphere can be 105 larger than the desired resolution, special care must be taken to avoid aliasing spin frequency information into the science band. An analytical model for the output of a drag-free sensor using a spherical test mass including all first order contributions is developed. With this model, we evaluate systematic errors in the mass center measurement due to geometric variations which place requirements on spacecraft attitude and test mass dynamics. We also present a fast and reliable algorithm for recovering the mass center location and spin frequency of the test mass, in real-time, to picometer level from the sensor data. This algorithm involves fitting and removing the spin harmonics from the sensor output and uses the phase of the fitted harmonics to track the test mass spin frequency in real-time. A numerical simulation is developed to compared this algorithm to other possible data processing methods including a straight-forward tuned digital filter and a surface mapping algorithm. The computational complexity of each algorithm is analyzed since in there is limited CPU power on a satellite, and there is insufficient bandwidth for transmitting

  6. Mass Transport Properties in the Matrix of the Barnett Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, A. R.; Cronin, M.; Polito, P. J.; Flemings, P. B.; Bryant, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    We documented multi-scale permeability within Barnett shale samples using pulse decay permeability measurement method. We observe pressure dissipation at two timescales reflecting flow through micro-fractures and flow through the matrix. We estimate matrix permeability to be between 1×10-21 -25×10-21 m2 while the effective permeability of the bulk rock to be on the order of 10-18 m2 parallel to the bedding plane and 10-21 m2 normal to the bedding plane. We find bedding parallel micro-fractures possibly induced due to stress relief and sample preparation to be the dominant pathways for core plugs tested parallel to bedding plane. The Barnett shale core plugs have a porosity of 3-6%, are composed of quartz, calcite and clays, and have a total organic content of ˜4% and a maturity of 1.9 %Ro. The samples were 3.8 cm in diameter and less than 2.5 cm in length, were prepared from cores obtained at a depth of approximately 2330 m from the Mitchel Energy 2 T.P. Sims well. We conducted permeability measurements on core plugs at confining pressures ranging from 10.3 to 41.4 MPa using a hydrostatic pressure cell. We used argon as a pore fluid and kept the pore pressure constant at 6.9 MPa. The permeability anisotropy is normally attributed to preferential flow along bedding planes and any effects of micro-fractures are not properly investigated. By suitable experimental design, this study shows that only a fraction of the anisotropy can be attributed to parallel to bedding flow and to overlook micro-fractures will lead to erroneous interpretations.

  7. The effect of cellulose molar mass on the properties of palmitate esters.

    PubMed

    Willberg-Keyriläinen, Pia; Talja, Riku; Asikainen, Sari; Harlin, Ali; Ropponen, Jarmo

    2016-10-20

    Nowadays one of the growing trends is to replace oil-based products with cellulose-based materials. Currently most cellulose esters require a huge excess of chemicals and have therefore, not been broadly used in the industry. Here, we show that decreasing the molar mass of cellulose by ozone hydrolysis provides cellulose functionalization with less chemical consumption. To reveal the differences in reactivity and chemical consumption, we showed esterification of both native cellulose and ozone treated hydrolyzed cellulose. Based on the results, the molar mass of the starting cellulose has a significant effect on the end product's degree of substitution and properties. Furthermore, molar mass controlled palmitate esters form mechanically strong, flexible and optically transparent films with excellent water barrier properties. We anticipate that molar mass controlled cellulose will provide a starting point for the greater use of cellulose based materials, in various application, such as films and composites. PMID:27474646

  8. Mass transport properties of Pu/DT mixtures from orbital free molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, Joel David; Ticknor, Christopher; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-09-16

    Mass transport properties (shear viscosity and diffusion coefficients) for Pu/DT mixtures were calculated with Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics (OFMD). The results were fitted to simple functions of mass density (for ρ=10.4 to 62.4 g/cm3) and temperature (for T=100 up to 3,000 eV) for Pu/DT mixtures consisting of 100/0, 25/75, 50/50, and 75/25 by number.

  9. Methodology for Mechanical Property Testing of Fuel Cladding Using a Expanded Plug Wedge Test

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John

    2014-01-01

    An expanded plug method was developed earlier for determining the tensile properties of irradiated fuel cladding. This method tests fuel rod cladding ductility by utilizing an expandable plug to radially stretch a small ring of irradiated cladding material. The circumferential or hoop strain is determined from the measured diametrical expansion of the ring. A developed procedure is used to convert the load circumferential strain data from the ring tests into material pseudo-stress-strain curves, from which material properties of the cladding can be extracted. However, several deficiencies existed in this expanded-plug test that can impact the accuracy of test results, such as that the large axial compressive stress resulted from the expansion plug test can potentially induce the shear failure mode of the tested specimen. Moreover, highly nonuniform stress and strain distribution in the deformed clad gage section and significant compressive stresses, induced by bending deformation due to clad bulging effect, will further result in highly nonconservative estimates of the mechanical properties for both strength and ductility of the tested clad. To overcome the aforementioned deficiencies associated with the current expansion plug test, systematic studies have been conducted. By optimizing the specific geometry designs, selecting the appropriate material for the expansion plug, and adding new components into the testing system, a modified expansion plug testing protocol has been developed. A general procedure was also developed to determine the hoop stress in the tested ring specimen. A scaling factor, -factor, was used to convert the ring load Fring into hoop stress , and is written as _ = F_ring/tl , where t is the clad thickness and l is the clad length. The generated stress-strain curve agrees well with the associated tensile test data in both elastic and plastic deformation regions.

  10. Clustering Properties and Halo Masses for Central Galaxies in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lixin; Li, Cheng; Jing, Y. P.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the clustering and dark matter halo mass for a sample of ˜16,000 central galaxies selected from the SDSS/DR7 group catalog. We select subsamples of central galaxies on three two-dimensional planes, each formed by stellar mass (M{}*) and one other property out of optical color (g - r), surface stellar mass density ({μ }*), and central stellar velocity dispersion ({σ }*). For each subsample we measure both the projected cross-correlation function ({w}p({r}p)) relative to a reference galaxy sample, and an average mass of the host dark matter halos (M{}{{h}}). Both {w}p({r}p) and M{}{{h}} show the strongest dependence on M{}*, and there is no clear dependence on the other properties when M{}* is fixed. This result provides strong support to the previously adopted assumption that, for central galaxies, stellar mass is the best indicator of the host dark halo mass. For comparison we have estimated {w}p({r}p) for the full galaxy population and the population of satellite galaxies. Both populations show similar clustering properties in all cases, but they are similar to the centrals only at high masses (M{}* ≳ {10}11 {M}⊙ ). At lower masses, their {w}p({r}p) depends more strongly on {σ }* and g - r than on M{}*. It is thus necessary to consider central and satellite galaxies separately when studying the link between galaxies and dark matter halos. We discuss the implications of our results for the relative roles of halo mass and galaxy structure in quenching the star formation in central galaxies.

  11. Mechanical properties testing and results for thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Johnsen, B. P.; Nagy, A.

    1997-03-01

    Mechanical test data for thermal barrier coatings, including modulus, static strength, and fatigue strength data, are reviewed in support of the development of durability models for heat engine applica-tions. The materials include 7 and 8 wt % yttria partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) as well as a cermet ma-terial (PSZ +10 wt % NiCoCrAlY). Both air plasma sprayed and electron beam physical vapor deposited coatings were tested. The data indicate the basic trends in the mechanical properties of the coatings over a wide range of isothermal conditions. Some of the trends are correlated with material density.

  12. The Evaluation of Flammability Properties Regarding Testing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osvaldová, Linda Makovická; Gašpercová, Stanislava

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we address the historical comparison methods with current methods for the assessment of flammability characteristics for materials an especially for wood, wood components and wooden buildings. Nowadays in European Union brings harmonization in evaluated of standards into each European country and try to make one concept of evaluated the flammability properties. In each European country to the one standard level which will be used by evaluation of materials regarding flammability. In our article we focused mainly on improving the evaluation methods in terms of flammability characteristics of using materials at building industry. In the article we present examples of different assessment methods at their own test methods in terms of fire prevention. On the base of old compared of materials by STN, BS and DIN methods for testing materials on fire and new methods of evaluating the flammability properties regarding EU standards before and after starting the flash over.

  13. Dynamic Modeling Accuracy Dependence on Errors in Sensor Measurements, Mass Properties, and Aircraft Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    A nonlinear simulation of the NASA Generic Transport Model was used to investigate the effects of errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry on the accuracy of dynamic models identified from flight data. Measurements from a typical system identification maneuver were systematically and progressively deteriorated and then used to estimate stability and control derivatives within a Monte Carlo analysis. Based on the results, recommendations were provided for maximum allowable errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry to achieve desired levels of dynamic modeling accuracy. Results using other flight conditions, parameter estimation methods, and a full-scale F-16 nonlinear aircraft simulation were compared with these recommendations.

  14. Mass property identification - A comparison study between extended Kalman filter and neuro-filter approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Quang; Chipman, Richard; Sunkel, John

    1991-01-01

    Two algorithms, extended Kalman filter and neuro-filter, are formulated to perform mass property identification for the Space Station Freedom. Control moment gyros that are part of the Station's basic momentum management system are chosen to provide input excitation in the form of applied torques. These torques together with the measured angular body rate responses are supplied to the filters. From these data, both algorithms are shown to accurately identify the station mass properties when excitation levels are high and balanced between axes. The neuro-filter, however, is shown to be more robust and to perform well even with weakly persistent, unbalanced signals contaminated with noise.

  15. Influence of Primary Glyoxal on Properties of Tested Drilling Mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, K.; Martynova, D.; Knyazev, A.; Zaharov, A.; Shenderova, I.

    2014-08-01

    The research was done to observe the influence of primary glyoxal on properties of tested drilling mud. Glyoxal was used as a reagent to reduce viscosity and stabilize shale. Drilling mud processing parameters were estimated before and after affecting by glyoxal. Suggested is the method of polysaccharide modification by glyoxal for improving its resistance to microorganisms; carried out the research of bio- and thermal resistance of starchy and xanthan reagents.

  16. TESTING THE ASTEROSEISMIC MASS SCALE USING METAL-POOR STARS CHARACTERIZED WITH APOGEE AND KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Courtney R.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Tayar, Jamie; Pinsonneault, Marc; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Chaplin, William J.; Shetrone, Matthew; Mosser, Benoît; Hekker, Saskia; Harding, Paul; Silva Aguirre, Víctor; Basu, Sarbani; Beers, Timothy C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bedding, Timothy R.; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; García, Rafael A.; and others

    2014-04-20

    Fundamental stellar properties, such as mass, radius, and age, can be inferred using asteroseismology. Cool stars with convective envelopes have turbulent motions that can stochastically drive and damp pulsations. The properties of the oscillation frequency power spectrum can be tied to mass and radius through solar-scaled asteroseismic relations. Stellar properties derived using these scaling relations need verification over a range of metallicities. Because the age and mass of halo stars are well-constrained by astrophysical priors, they provide an independent, empirical check on asteroseismic mass estimates in the low-metallicity regime. We identify nine metal-poor red giants (including six stars that are kinematically associated with the halo) from a sample observed by both the Kepler space telescope and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III APOGEE spectroscopic survey. We compare masses inferred using asteroseismology to those expected for halo and thick-disk stars. Although our sample is small, standard scaling relations, combined with asteroseismic parameters from the APOKASC Catalog, produce masses that are systematically higher (<ΔM > =0.17 ± 0.05 M {sub ☉}) than astrophysical expectations. The magnitude of the mass discrepancy is reduced by known theoretical corrections to the measured large frequency separation scaling relationship. Using alternative methods for measuring asteroseismic parameters induces systematic shifts at the 0.04 M {sub ☉} level. We also compare published asteroseismic analyses with scaling relationship masses to examine the impact of using the frequency of maximum power as a constraint. Upcoming APOKASC observations will provide a larger sample of ∼100 metal-poor stars, important for detailed asteroseismic characterization of Galactic stellar populations.

  17. Basic principles on selection and use of diagnostic tests: properties of diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, A V

    2001-12-01

    In clinical practice, in order to design and implement a specific therapeutic plan, as well as communicating an appropriate prognosis, the doctor needs to establish a precise diagnosis of the condition. Sometimes all one needs is a clinical impression. More often, however, the definition of an accurate diagnosis will mandate the interpretation of specific diagnostic tests as well. The rational use of diagnostic tests in cardiology--whether laboratorial or imaging--should be based on three factors: 1) validity of results of studies on the test; 2) diagnostic properties of the test; and 3) applicability of the test in the clinical setting. The rational use and the correct interpretation of diagnostic tests are based on these three factors. In a previous article we presented the basic principles concerning the validity of the results from the study that defined the specific test, and what level of evidence that constitutes. In this article we present the diagnostic properties of tests (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios, odds). Finally, in a forthcoming paper we will discuss the applicability of the test in clinical cardiological practice. PMID:11865687

  18. A non-contacting vertical alignment system for mass properties measuring instruments

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H. III; Suazo, J.E.; Varga, R.C.

    1993-11-01

    A non-contact system for alignment of objects on mass properties measuring instruments is described. Test parts can be aligned to within the capabilities of the user and the fixture to make the adjustments. The current implementation can align objects to less than .001 inches at two points with final requested adjustments of a few ten-thousands of an inch. The non-contact capability allows the alignment of objects which are too compliant or fragile for traditional contacting measurement methods. Also, this system allows the definition of a reference axis on objects which are not perfectly symmetric. The reference axis is defined at the top of the object by an appropriate marker and defined at the bottom by a best fit circle through the surface at a specified height. A general description of the hardware, procedures, and results are presented for the non-user. Appendices which contain a complete description of the software, usage, and mathematical implementation are provided for the reader who is interested in using or further developing the system.

  19. Experimental Testing of the HI Mass Reconstruction Procedure at Lis Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanin, D. V.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Kondtatyev, N. A.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Mishinsky, V. G.; Strekalovsky, O. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Mkaza, N.

    2015-06-01

    Reconstruction of the heavy ion masses in the time-of-flight spectrometry is known to be a complicated task due to distortions both in timing and measuring of the ions energy using PIN diodes. Original procedure which takes into account simultaneously pulse height defect (PHD) and plasma delay for unbiased mass reconstruction was tested in series of experiments at the LIS setup using degrader foils.

  20. VAMP: A computer program for calculating volume, area, and mass properties of aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, P. J.; Glatt, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    A computerized procedure developed for analyzing aerospace vehicles evaluates the properties of elemental surface areas with specified thickness by accumulating and combining them with arbitrarily specified mass elements to form a complete evaluation. Picture-like images of the geometric description are capable of being generated.

  1. Development strategies for herbal products reducing the influence of natural variance in dry mass on tableting properties and tablet characteristics.

    PubMed

    Qusaj, Ylber; Leng, Andreas; Alshihabi, Firas; Krasniqi, Blerim; Vandamme, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    One "Quality by Design" approach is the focus on the variability of the properties of the active substance. This is crucially important for active substances that are obtained from natural resources such as herbal plant material and extracts. In this paper, we present various strategies for the development of herbal products especially taking into account the natural batch-to-batch variability (mainly of the dry mass) of tablets that contain a fixed amount of tincture. The following steps in the development have been evaluated for the outcome of the physico-chemical properties of the resulting tablets and intermediates: concentration of the tincture extracted from Echinacea fresh plant, loading of the concentrate onto an inert carrier, the respective wet granulation and drying step, including milling, and the adjuvant excipients for the tablet compression step. The responses that were investigated are the mean particle size of the dried and milled granulates, compaction properties and disintegration time of the tablets. Increased particle size showed a significant increase of the disintegration time and a decrease of the compaction properties. In addition, our results showed that the particle size has a great dependency on the ratio of liquid to carrier during the wet granulation process. Thus, the variability of the respective parameters tested was influenced by the performed strategies, which is how the tincture correlated to its dry mass and the relation of the amount of carrier used. In order to optimize these parameters, a strategy considering the above-mentioned points has to be chosen. PMID:24300367

  2. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori by carbon-13 urea breath test using a portable mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Sreekumar, J; France, N; Taylor, S; Matthews, T; Turner, P; Bliss, P; Watson, AJM

    2015-01-01

    Context: In the non-invasive detection of markers of disease, mass spectrometry is able to detect small quantities of volatile markers in exhaled air. However, the problem of size, expense and immobility of conventional mass spectrometry equipment has restricted its use. Now, a smaller, less expensive, portable quadrupole mass spectrometer system has been developed. Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the development of chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer. Objectives: To compare the results obtained from the presence of H. pylori by a carbon-13 urea test using a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer system with those from a fixed mass spectrometer in a hospital-based clinical trial. Methods: Following ethical approval, 45 patients attending a gastroenterology clinic at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital exhaled a breath sample into a Tedlar gas sampling bag. They then drank an orange juice containing urea radiolabelled with carbon and 30 min later gave a second breath sample. The carbon-13 content of both samples was measured using both quadrupole mass spectrometer systems. If the post-drink level exceeded the pre-drink level by 3% or more, a positive diagnosis for the presence of H. pylori was made. Results: The findings were compared to the results using conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry using a laboratory-based magnetic sector instrument off-site. The results showed agreement in 39 of the 45 patients. Conclusions: This study suggests that a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer is a potential alternative to the conventional centralised testing equipment. Future development of the portable quadrupole mass spectrometer to reduce further its size and cost is indicated, together with further work to validate this new equipment and to enhance its use in mass spectrometry diagnosis of other medical conditions. PMID:26770764

  3. Measurements of the top-quark mass and properties at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünser, Marc; CMS Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the top-quark mass and other top-quark properties are presented, obtained from the CMS data collected in 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The mass of the top quark is measured using several methods and decay channels. The measurements of the top-quark properties include the W helicity in top-quark decays, the search for anomalous couplings, and the ratio of top-quarks decaying to bW over qW in order to gain information on |Vtb| using both t\\bar t and single-top quark event samples. The results are compared with predictions from the standard model as well as new physics models. The cross section of t\\bar t events produced in association with a W, Z boson or a photon is also measured.

  4. Impact of thermal energy storage properties on solar dynamic space power conversion system mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Coles-Hamilton, Carolyn E.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1987-01-01

    A 16 parameter solar concentrator/heat receiver mass model is used in conjunction with Stirling and Brayton Power Conversion System (PCS) performance and mass computer codes to determine the effect of thermal energy storage (TES) material property changes on overall PCS mass as a function of steady state electrical power output. Included in the PCS mass model are component masses as a function of thermal power for: concentrator, heat receiver, heat exchangers (source unless integral with heat receiver, heat sink, regenerator), heat engine units with optional parallel redundancy, power conditioning and control (PC and C), PC and C radiator, main radiator, and structure. Critical TES properties are: melting temperature, heat of fusion, density of the liquid phase, and the ratio of solid-to-liquid density. Preliminary results indicate that even though overalll system efficiency increases with TES melting temperature up to 1400 K for concentrator surface accuracies of 1 mrad or better, reductions in the overall system mass beyond that achievable with lithium fluoride (LiF) can be accomplished only if the heat of fusion is at least 800 kJ/kg and the liquid density is comparable to that of LiF (1880 kg/cu m.

  5. Impact of thermal energy storage properties on solar dynamic space power conversion system mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Coles-Hamilton, Carolyn E.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1987-01-01

    A 16 parameter solar concentrator/heat receiver mass model is used in conjunction with Stirling and Brayton Power Conversion System (PCS) performance and mass computer codes to determine the effect of thermal energy storage (TES) material property changes on overall PCS mass as a function of steady state electrical power output. Included in the PCS mass model are component masses as a function of thermal power for: concentrator, heat receiver, heat exchangers (source unless integral with heat receiver, heat sink, regenerator), heat engine units with optional parallel redundancy, power conditioning and control (PC and C), PC and C radiator, main radiator, and structure. Critical TES properties are: melting temperature, heat of fusion, density of the liquid phase, and the ratio of solid-to-liquid density. Preliminary results indicate that even though overall system efficiency increases with TES melting temperature up to 1400 K for concentrator surface accuracies of 1 mrad or better, reductions in the overall system mass beyond that achievable with lithium fluoride (LiF) can be accomplished only if the heat of fusion is at least 800 kJ/kg and the liquid density is comparable to that of LiF (1800 kg/cu m).

  6. Improving the repeatability of replicate analyses in the laser mass spectroscopy of powdered geological test samples

    SciTech Connect

    Oksenoid, K.G.; Ramendik, G.I.; Shuranova, N.G.

    1995-11-01

    During laser mass-spectroscopic analysis of powdered geological test samples, the conditions of ion formation vary because the optical units of the source focusing the laser beam onto the test sample become dusty. These variations result in the inadequate repeatability of replicate measurements at different exposures. It is shown that the change in the total number of ions generated changes the shape of the mass-calibration curve of a mass spectrometer, which is among the reasons for variations in the analytical signals of elements in the course of analysis. A technique proposed for the consideration of such ion discriminations is based on the concept of the predominant effect of a scattered magnetic field on their formation. The technique was tested in a set of twelve analyses of the International Geological Standard W-2 (diabase). With the use of this technique, the relative standard deviation was decreased several times to 13% averaged over 30 elements.

  7. A HUPO test sample study reveals common problems in mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bell, Alexander W; Deutsch, Eric W; Au, Catherine E; Kearney, Robert E; Beavis, Ron; Sechi, Salvatore; Nilsson, Tommy; Bergeron, John J M

    2009-06-01

    We performed a test sample study to try to identify errors leading to irreproducibility, including incompleteness of peptide sampling, in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomics. We distributed an equimolar test sample, comprising 20 highly purified recombinant human proteins, to 27 laboratories. Each protein contained one or more unique tryptic peptides of 1,250 Da to test for ion selection and sampling in the mass spectrometer. Of the 27 labs, members of only 7 labs initially reported all 20 proteins correctly, and members of only 1 lab reported all tryptic peptides of 1,250 Da. Centralized analysis of the raw data, however, revealed that all 20 proteins and most of the 1,250 Da peptides had been detected in all 27 labs. Our centralized analysis determined missed identifications (false negatives), environmental contamination, database matching and curation of protein identifications as sources of problems. Improved search engines and databases are needed for mass spectrometry-based proteomics. PMID:19448641

  8. Excess mechanical loss associated with dielectric mirror coatings on test masses in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooks, D. R. M.; Sneddon, P.; Cagnoli, G.; Hough, J.; Rowan, S.; Fejer, M. M.; Gustafson, E.; Route, R.; Nakagawa, N.; Coyne, D.; Harry, G. M.; Gretarsson, A. M.

    2002-03-01

    Interferometric gravitational wave detectors use mirrors whose substrates are formed from materials of low intrinsic mechanical dissipation. The two most likely choices for the test masses in future advanced detectors are fused silica or sapphire (Rowan S et al 2000 Phys. Lett. A 265 5). These test masses must be coated to form mirrors, highly reflecting at 1064 nm. We have measured the excess mechanical losses associated with adding dielectric coatings to substrates of fused silica and calculated the effect of the excess loss on the thermal noise in an advanced interferometer.

  9. Quasi-Uniform High Speed Foam Crush Testing Using a Guided Drop Mass Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa E. (Technical Monitor); Kellas, Sotiris

    2004-01-01

    A relatively simple method for measuring the dynamic crush response of foam materials at various loading rates is described. The method utilizes a drop mass impact configuration with mass and impact velocity selected such that the crush speed remains approximately uniform during the entire sample crushing event. Instrumentation, data acquisition, and data processing techniques are presented, and limitations of the test method are discussed. The objective of the test method is to produce input data for dynamic finite element modeling involving crash and energy absorption characteristics of foam materials.

  10. Methodology for Mechanical Property Testing on Fuel Cladding Using an Expanded Plug Wedge Test

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Jiang, Hao

    2013-08-01

    To determine the tensile properties of irradiated fuel cladding in a hot cell, a simple test was developed at ORNL and is described fully in US Patent Application 20060070455, Expanded plug method for developing circumferential mechanical properties of tubular materials. This method is designed for testing fuel rod cladding ductility in a hot cell utilizing an expandable plug to stretch a small ring of irradiated cladding material. The specimen strain is determined using the measured diametrical expansion of the ring. This method removes many complexities associated with specimen preparation and testing. The advantages are the simplicity of measuring the test component assembly in the hot cell and the direct measurement of specimen strain. It was also found that cladding strength could be determined from the test results. The basic approach of this test method is to apply an axial compressive load to a cylindrical plug of polyurethane (or other materials) fitted inside a short ring of the test material to achieve radial expansion of the specimen. The diameter increase of the specimen is used to calculate the circumferential strain accrued during the test. The other two basic measurements are total applied load and amount of plug compression (extension). A simple procedure is used to convert the load circumferential strain data from the ring tests into material pseudo-stress-strain curves. However, several deficiencies exist in this expanded-plug loading ring test, which will impact accuracy of test results and introduce potential shear failure of the specimen due to inherited large axial compressive stress from the expansion plug test. First of all, the highly non-uniform stress and strain distribution resulted in the gage section of the clad. To ensure reliable testing and test repeatability, the potential for highly non-uniform stress distribution or displacement/strain deformation has to be eliminated at the gage section of the specimen. Second, significant

  11. Mass Transfer Testing of a 12.5-cm Rotor Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    D. H. Meikrantz; T. G. Garn; J. D. Law; N. R. Mann; T. A. Todd

    2008-09-01

    TRUEX mass transfer tests were performed using a single stage commercially available 12.5 cm centrifugal contactor and stable cerium (Ce) and europium (Eu). Test conditions included throughputs ranging from 2.5 to 15 Lpm and rotor speeds of 1750 and 2250 rpm. Ce and Eu extraction forward distribution coefficients ranged from 13 to 19. The first and second stage strip back distributions were 0.5 to 1.4 and .002 to .004, respectively, throughout the dynamic test conditions studied. Visual carryover of aqueous entrainment in all organic phase samples was estimated at < 0.1 % and organic carryover into all aqueous phase samples was about ten times less. Mass transfer efficiencies of = 98 % for both Ce and Eu in the extraction section were obtained over the entire range of test conditions. The first strip stage mass transfer efficiencies ranged from 75 to 93% trending higher with increasing throughput. Second stage mass transfer was greater than 99% in all cases. Increasing the rotor speed from 1750 to 2250 rpm had no significant effect on efficiency for all throughputs tested.

  12. Tester Board for testing mass-produced SMB modules for CMS Preshower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikzhanin, Y. S.; Chou, C. H.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Lee, Y. J.; Shiu, J. G.; Sun, C. D.; Wang, Y. Z.

    2007-09-01

    We have developed a Tester Board to test the electrical characteristics of the System Motherboard (SMB) for the CMS Preshower detector at CERN. The board is designed to test input resistances, output resistances, connections, interconnections and possible short- circuits of a module having up to 640 connector pins. The Tester Board is general-purpose in nature: it could be used to test any electronic module or cable by using dedicated cable sets. The module can detect a variety of problems not detected by either functional tests or the "flying probes" technique. The design, algorithms and results of using the Tester Board during mass production of CMS Preshower SMBs are presented.

  13. Hybrid Residual Flexibility/Mass-Additive Method for Structural Dynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    A large fixture was designed and constructed for modal vibration testing of International Space Station elements. This fixed-base test fixture, which weighs thousands of pounds and is anchored to a massive concrete floor, initially utilized spherical bearings and pendulum mechanisms to simulate Shuttle orbiter boundary constraints for launch of the hardware. Many difficulties were encountered during a checkout test of the common module prototype structure, mainly due to undesirable friction and excessive clearances in the test-article-to-fixture interface bearings. Measured mode shapes and frequencies were not representative of orbiter-constrained modes due to the friction and clearance effects in the bearings. As a result, a major redesign effort for the interface mechanisms was undertaken. The total cost of the fixture design, construction and checkout, and redesign was over $2 million. Because of the problems experienced with fixed-base testing, alternative free-suspension methods were studied, including the residual flexibility and mass-additive approaches. Free-suspension structural dynamics test methods utilize soft elastic bungee cords and overhead frame suspension systems that are less complex and much less expensive than fixed-base systems. The cost of free-suspension fixturing is on the order of tens of thousands of dollars as opposed to millions, for large fixed-base fixturing. In addition, free-suspension test configurations are portable, allowing modal tests to be done at sites without modal test facilities. For example, a mass-additive modal test of the ASTRO-1 Shuttle payload was done at the Kennedy Space Center launch site. In this Technical Memorandum, the mass-additive and residual flexibility test methods are described in detail. A discussion of a hybrid approach that combines the best characteristics of each method follows and is the focus of the study.

  14. Furniture wood wastes: Experimental property characterisation and burning tests

    SciTech Connect

    Tatano, Fabio Barbadoro, Luca; Mangani, Giovanna; Pretelli, Silvia; Tombari, Lucia; Mangani, Filippo

    2009-10-15

    Referring to the industrial wood waste category (as dominant in the provincial district of Pesaro-Urbino, Marche Region, Italy), this paper deals with the experimental characterisation and the carrying out of non-controlled burning tests (at lab- and pilot-scale) for selected 'raw' and primarily 'engineered' ('composite') wood wastes. The property characterisation has primarily revealed the following aspects: potential influence on moisture content of local weather conditions at outdoor wood waste storage sites; generally, higher ash contents in 'engineered' wood wastes as compared with 'raw' wood wastes; and relatively high energy content values of 'engineered' wood wastes (ranging on the whole from 3675 to 5105 kcal kg{sup -1} for HHV, and from 3304 to 4634 kcal kg{sup -1} for LHV). The smoke qualitative analysis of non-controlled lab-scale burning tests has primarily revealed: the presence of specific organic compounds indicative of incomplete wood combustion; the presence exclusively in 'engineered' wood burning tests of pyrroles and amines, as well as the additional presence (as compared with 'raw' wood burning) of further phenolic and containing nitrogen compounds; and the potential environmental impact of incomplete industrial wood burning on the photochemical smog phenomenon. Finally, non-controlled pilot-scale burning tests have primarily given the following findings: emission presence of carbon monoxide indicative of incomplete wood combustion; higher nitrogen oxide emission values detected in 'engineered' wood burning tests as compared with 'raw' wood burning test; and considerable generation of the respirable PM{sub 1} fraction during incomplete industrial wood burning.

  15. Construction and testing of the 2.5m mass driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. R.; Oneill, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are the designs used in the construction of the 2.5 m mass driver and the results of the initial testing program. The mass driver consists of equal length sections of acceleration and deceleration each containing 59 drive coils of 13.1 cm caliber. Intermediate energy storage is provided by sector capacitors which are recharged every half cycle by an external power source. The drive coils are individually energized through SCR's with timing supplied by position sensing optical detectors. The drive consists of two phases which operate in quadrature. The initial bucket to be propelled through the mass driver contains two coils of aluminum wire chilled to liquid nitrogen temperatures to momentarily sustain superconducting field intensities. Magnetic flight is generated by eddy current repulsion from six copper guide strips lining the mass driver. Nominal acceleration is 5000 m/sec per sec giving a maximum bucket velocity of 112 m/s.

  16. Optimal Asteroid Mass Determination from Planetary Range Observations: A Study of a Simplified Test Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchynka, P.; Laskar, J.; Fienga, A.

    2011-01-01

    Mars ranging observations are available over the past 10 years with an accuracy of a few meters. Such precise measurements of the Earth-Mars distance provide valuable constraints on the masses of the asteroids perturbing both planets. Today more than 30 asteroid masses have thus been estimated from planetary ranging data (see [1] and [2]). Obtaining unbiased mass estimations is nevertheless difficult. Various systematic errors can be introduced by imperfect reduction of spacecraft tracking observations to planetary ranging data. The large number of asteroids and the limited a priori knowledge of their masses is also an obstacle for parameter selection. Fitting in a model a mass of a negligible perturber, or on the contrary omitting a significant perturber, will induce important bias in determined asteroid masses. In this communication, we investigate a simplified version of the mass determination problem. Instead of planetary ranging observations from spacecraft or radar data, we consider synthetic ranging observations generated with the INPOP [2] ephemeris for a test model containing 25000 asteroids. We then suggest a method for optimal parameter selection and estimation in this simplified framework.

  17. Collective flow properties of intermediate mass fragments and isospin effects in fragmentation at Fermi energies

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, V.; Zus, R.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.

    2013-11-13

    Within a microscopic transport model (Stochastic Mean Field) we analyze the collective flow properties associated to the intermediate mass fragments produced in nuclear fragmentation. We study the transverse and elliptic flow parameters for each rank in mass hierarchy. The results are plotted for {sup 124}Sn + {sup 124}Sn systems at an energy of 50AMeV and for an impact parameter b=4fm. The correlation with the dynamics of the isospin degree of freedom is also discussed and the results are presented for the same systems.

  18. Developing mass spectrometric techniques for boundary layer measurement in hypersonic high enthalpy test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. M., Jr.; Lewis, B. W.; Nowak, R. J.; Eide, D. G.; Paulin, P. A.; Upchurch, B. T.

    1983-01-01

    Thermodynamic flow properties of gases in the boundary layer or the flowfield have been mainly deduced from pressures and temperatures measured on a model. However, further progress with respect to an understanding of these properties requires a more complete characterization of the layer including determination of the gas composition and chemistry. Most attempts to measure boundary layer chemistry involve the employment of a mass spectrometer and an associated gas sampling system. The three major limiting factors which must be addressed for species measurement in aerothermodynamic investigations on models at reentry stream velocities, are gas sampling effects, instrument limitations, and problems with data acquisition. The present investigation is concerned with a concentrated effort to quantitatively identify and correct for instrument and sampling system effects, and to develop a miniaturized high performance mass spectrometer for on-model real-time analysis of the boundary layer and its associated atmosphere.

  19. Direct measurements of the fundamental properties of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, Trent J.

    2010-10-01

    Detailed theoretical models of stars, developed and observationally tested over the last century, now underlie most of modern astronomy. In contrast, models of lower temperature objects, brown dwarfs and gas giant planets, have only recently been developed and remained largely unconstrained by observations. Despite this lack of empirical validation, these models have become entrenched in many active areas of astronomical research, and thus rigorously testing them is imperative. Dynamical masses from visual binaries are central to this effort, but such measurements have been previously been impeded by observational limitations (ultracool binaries are faint, and their orbital separations are very small). This dissertation presents results from our program to test models using precise dynamical masses (as good as 2%) for ultracool binaries, based on infrared parallaxes, near-infrared spectroscopy, and Keck laser guide star adaptive optics astrometry for a sample of over 30 objects. In just the last 2 years, we have more than tripled the number of ultracool binaries with dynamical masses, extending these measurements to much lower temperatures in previously unexplored areas of parameter space. Our main results are summarized as follows: (1) For most field binaries, based on direct measurements of their luminosities and masses, we find that the temperatures predicted by evolutionary models are discrepant with those derived from fitting the observed spectra with model atmospheres, indicating systematic errors of [approximate]200 K in temperature (or 15%-20% in radius). We have also devised alternative model tests for these systems using their space motion and chromospheric activity to constrain their ages. (2) For the only field binary with an independent age determination from the solar-type primary in its hierarchical triple system (from age-activity-rotation relations), we find that evolutionary models systematically underpredict luminosities by a factor of

  20. Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

  1. Testing Fundamental Properties of Ionic Liquids for Colloid Microthruster Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John R.; Plett, Gary; Anderson, Mark; Ziemer, John

    2006-01-01

    NASA's New Millennium Program is scheduled to test a Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) on Space Technology 7 (ST7) as part of the European Space Agency's (ESA's) LISA Pathfinder Mission in late 2009. Colloid Micronewton Thrusters (CMNTs) will be used to counteract forces, mainly solar photon pressure, that could disturb gravitational reference sensors as part of the DRS. The micronewton thrusters use an ionic liquid, a room temperature molten salt, as propellant. The ionic liquid has a number of unusual properties that have a direct impact on thruster design. One of the most important issues is bubble formation before and during operation, especially during rapid pressure transitions from atmospheric to vacuum conditions. Bubbles have been observed in the feed system causing variations in propellant flow rate that can adversely affect thruster control. Bubbles in the feed system can also increase the likelihood that propellant will spray onto surfaces that can eventually lead to shorting high voltage electrodes. Two approaches, reducing the probability of bubble formation and removing bubbles with a new bubble eliminator device in the flow system, were investigated at Busek Co., Inc. and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to determine the effectiveness of both approaches. Results show that bubble formation is mainly caused by operation at low pressure and volatile contaminants in the propellant coming out of solution. A specification for the maximum tolerable level of contamination has been developed, and procedures for providing system cleanliness have been tested and implemented. The bubble eliminator device has also been tested successfully and has been implemented in recent thruster designs at Busek. This paper focuses on the propellant testing work at JPL, including testing of a breadboard level bubble eliminator device.

  2. The Mass Distribution and Assembly of the Milky Way from the Properties of the Magellanic Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Busha, Michael T.; Marshall, Philip J.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Klypin, Anatoly; Primack, Joel; /UC, Santa Cruz, Phys. Dept.

    2012-02-29

    We present a new measurement of the mass of the Milky Way (MW) based on observed properties of its largest satellite galaxies, the Magellanic Clouds (MCs), and an assumed prior of a {Lambda}CDM universe. The large, high-resolution Bolshoi cosmological simulation of this universe provides a means to statistically sample the dynamical properties of bright satellite galaxies in a large population of dark matter halos. The observed properties of the MCs, including their circular velocity, distance from the center of the MW, and velocity within the MW halo, are used to evaluate the likelihood that a given halo would have each or all of these properties; the posterior probability distribution function (PDF) for any property of the MW system can thus be constructed. This method provides a constraint on the MW virial mass, 1.2{sup +0.7} - {sub 0.4}(stat.){sup +0.3} - {sub 0.3}(sys.) x 10{sup 12} M {circle_dot} (68% confidence), which is consistent with recent determinations that involve very different assumptions. In addition, we calculate the posterior PDF for the density profile of the MW and its satellite accretion history. Although typical satellites of 10{sup 12} M {circle_dot} halos are accreted over a wide range of epochs over the last 10 Gyr, we find a {approx}72% probability that the MCs were accreted within the last Gyr, and a 50% probability that they were accreted together.

  3. Dependence of Dynamic Modeling Accuracy on Sensor Measurements, Mass Properties, and Aircraft Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) nonlinear simulation was used to investigate the effects of errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry on the accuracy of identified parameters in mathematical models describing the flight dynamics and determined from flight data. Measurements from a typical flight condition and system identification maneuver were systematically and progressively deteriorated by introducing noise, resolution errors, and bias errors. The data were then used to estimate nondimensional stability and control derivatives within a Monte Carlo simulation. Based on these results, recommendations are provided for maximum allowable errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry to achieve desired levels of dynamic modeling accuracy. Results using additional flight conditions and parameter estimation methods, as well as a nonlinear flight simulation of the General Dynamics F-16 aircraft, were compared with these recommendations

  4. Conception of a test bench to generate known and controlled conditions of refrigerant mass flow.

    PubMed

    Martins, Erick F; Flesch, Carlos A; Flesch, Rodolfo C C; Borges, Maikon R

    2011-07-01

    Refrigerant compressor performance tests play an important role in the evaluation of the energy characteristics of the compressor, enabling an increase in the quality, reliability, and efficiency of these products. Due to the nonexistence of a refrigerating capacity standard, it is common to use previously conditioned compressors for the intercomparison and evaluation of the temporal drift of compressor performance test panels. However, there are some limitations regarding the use of these specific compressors as standards. This study proposes the development of a refrigerating capacity standard which consists of a mass flow meter and a variable-capacity compressor, whose speed is set based on the mass flow rate measured by the meter. From the results obtained in the tests carried out on a bench specifically developed for this purpose, it was possible to validate the concept of a capacity standard. PMID:21334618

  5. Comparison of DOE-2. 1C prediction with thermal mass test cell measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, B.

    1985-01-10

    This report describes a Comparison of DOE-2.1C Prediction with Thermal Mass Test Cell Measurements performed by the Building Energy Simulation Group of the Applied Science Division (AS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California. It is a companion study to one performed by the Passive Solar Group, ASD, at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Purpose of the study was twofold: first, a comparison was made of simulated results with measured data taken by others from test cells of differing wall constructions at Gaithersburg, MD, and Tesuque Pueblo, NM. Second, a comparison was made of two computer simulations of a prototypical residence when using the programs to characterize the effects of wall thermal mass. The results indicate that the DOE-2 Computer Program for Building Energy Analysis and the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST) programs give similar results and that DOE-2 closes within a reasonable tolerance (+-20%) to measured data from the test cells.

  6. Neutrino mass, proton decay, and neutron oscillations as crucial tests of unification models (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Marshak, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Several crucial tests of three popular unification models (of strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions) are described. The models are SU(5) and SO(10) at the grand unification theory (GUT) level and SU(4)C × SU(2)L × SU(2)R at the partial unification theory (PUT) level. The tests selected for discussion are the finiteness of the neutrino mass in the electron volt region, the decay of protons into antileptons in the range of 1031± yr, and the detectability of neutron oscillations at all. The PUT group can also be tested by establishing the existence of four generations of quarks and leptons.

  7. Properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, M. L. Shlomo, Sh. Tulupov, B. A. Urin, M. H.

    2015-07-15

    The recently developed particle-hole dispersive optical model is applied to describe properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei. In particular, the double transition density averaged over the energy of the isoscalar monopole excitations is considered for {sup 208}Pb in a wide energy interval, which includes the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone. The energy-averaged strength functions of these resonances are also analyzed.

  8. The galaxy-dark matter halo connection: which galaxy properties are correlated with the host halo mass?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, S.; Baugh, C. M.; Norberg, P.; Padilla, N.

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate how the properties of a galaxy depend on the mass of its host dark matter subhalo, using two independent models of galaxy formation. For the cases of stellar mass and black hole mass, the median property value displays a monotonic dependence on subhalo mass. The slope of the relation changes for subhalo masses for which heating by active galactic nuclei becomes important. The median property values are predicted to be remarkably similar for central and satellite galaxies. The two models predict considerable scatter around the median property value, though the size of the scatter is model dependent. There is only modest evolution with redshift in the median galaxy property at a fixed subhalo mass. Properties such as cold gas mass and star formation rate, however, are predicted to have a complex dependence on subhalo mass. In these cases, subhalo mass is not a good indicator of the value of the galaxy property. We illustrate how the predictions in the galaxy property-subhalo mass plane differ from the assumptions made in some empirical models of galaxy clustering by reconstructing the model output using a basic subhalo abundance matching scheme. In its simplest form, abundance matching generally does not reproduce the clustering predicted by the models, typically resulting in an overprediction of the clustering signal. Using the predictions of the galaxy formation model for the correlations between pairs of galaxy properties, the basic abundance matching scheme can be extended to reproduce the model predictions more faithfully for a wider range of galaxy properties. Our results have implications for the analysis of galaxy clustering, particularly for low abundance samples.

  9. Mass spectrometer measurements of test gas composition in a shock tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, K. A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Shock tunnels afford a means of generating hypersonic flow at high stagnation enthalpies, but they have the disadvantage that thermochemical effects make the composition of the test flow different to that of ambient air. The composition can be predicted by numerical calculations of the nozzle flow expansion, using simplified thermochemical models and, in the absence of experimental measurements, it has been necessary to accept the results given by these calculations. This note reports measurements of test gas composition, at stagnation enthalpies up to 12.5 MJ.kg(exp -1), taken with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Limited results have been obtained in previous measurements. These were taken at higher stagnation enthalpies, and used a quadruple mass spectrometer. The time-of-flight method was preferred here because it enabled a number of complete mass spectra to be obtained in each test, and because it gives good mass resolution over the range of interest with air (up to 50 a.m.a.).

  10. Precision Test of the Isobaric Multiplet Mass Equation in the A = 32, T = 2 Quintet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, R.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Bollen, G.; Campbell, C. M.; Folden, C. M., III; Lincoln, D.; Morrissey, D. J.; Pang, G. K.; Prinke, A.; Savory, J.; Schwarz, S.

    2008-10-01

    Masses of the radionuclides ^32,33Si and ^34P and of the stable nuclide ^32S have been measured with the Low Energy Beam and Ion Trap (LEBIT) Penning trap mass spectrometer. Relative mass uncertainties of 3 x 10-8 and better have been achieved. The measured mass value of ^32Si differs from the literature value [1,2] by four standard deviations. The precise mass determination of ^32Si and ^32S have been employed to test the isobaric multiplet mass equation for the A = 32, T= 2 isospin quintet. The experimental results indicate a significant deviation from the quadratic form. This work has been supported by Michigan State University, the NSF under contract number PHY- 0606007, and the DOE under the contract DE-FG02-00ER41144. References: 1. G. Audi, A.H. Wapstra, and C. Thibault, Nucl. Phys. A729 (2003) 337 2. A. Paul, S. R"ottger, A. Zimbal, and U. Keyser, Hyperfine Interact. 132 (2001) 189

  11. TESTING MASS LOSS IN LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD CEPHEIDS USING INFRARED AND OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS. II. PREDICTIONS AND TESTS OF THE OGLE-III FUNDAMENTAL-MODE CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Lester, John B.

    2010-06-20

    In this paper, we test the hypothesis that Cepheids have infrared excesses due to mass loss. We fit a model using the mass-loss rate and the stellar radius as free parameters to optical observations from the OGLE-III survey and infrared observations from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and SAGE data sets. The sample of Cepheids has predicted minimum mass-loss rates ranging from 0 to 10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, where the rates depend on the chosen dust properties. We use the predicted radii to compute the period-radius relation for LMC Cepheids and to estimate the uncertainty caused by the presence of infrared excess for determining angular diameters with the infrared surface brightness technique. Finally, we calculate the linear and nonlinear period-luminosity (P-L) relations for the LMC Cepheids at VIJHK + IRAC wavelengths and find that the P-L relations are consistent with being nonlinear at infrared wavelengths contrary to previous results.

  12. Numerical Tests and Properties of Waves in Radiating Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B M; Klein, R I

    2009-09-03

    We discuss the properties of an analytical solution for waves in radiating fluids, with a view towards its implementation as a quantitative test of radiation hydrodynamics codes. A homogeneous radiating fluid in local thermodynamic equilibrium is periodically driven at the boundary of a one-dimensional domain, and the solution describes the propagation of the waves thus excited. Two modes are excited for a given driving frequency, generally referred to as a radiative acoustic wave and a radiative diffusion wave. While the analytical solution is well known, several features are highlighted here that require care during its numerical implementation. We compare the solution in a wide range of parameter space to a numerical integration with a Lagrangian radiation hydrodynamics code. Our most significant observation is that flux-limited diffusion does not preserve causality for waves on a homogeneous background.

  13. The impact of the dibutyrylchitin molar mass on the bioactive properties of dressings used to treat soft tissue wounds.

    PubMed

    Krucinska, Izabella; Komisarczyk, Agnieszka; Paluch, Danuta; Szymonowicz, Maria; Zywicka, Boguslawa; Pielka, Stanislaw

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we describe a novel technique for producing biocompatible medical products with bioactive properties from the biodegradable polymer dibutyrylchitin (DBC). Materials produced by blowing out polymer solutions have excellent hemostaic properties and are easy to handle during surgery. Biocompatibility studies, encompassing hemostasis and the evaluation of post-implantation reactions, indicate that the biological properties of DBC depend on the molecular mass of the polymer. Lower molecular mass polymers are preferable for use in implanted wound dressings. PMID:22114056

  14. Testes Mass, but Not Sperm Length, Increases with Higher Levels of Polyandry in an Ancient Sex Model

    PubMed Central

    Vrech, David E.; Olivero, Paola A.; Mattoni, Camilo I.; Peretti, Alfredo V.

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence that polyandrous taxa have evolved relatively larger testes than monogamous relatives. Sperm size may either increase or decrease across species with the risk or intensity of sperm competition. Scorpions represent an ancient direct mode with spermatophore-mediated sperm transfer and are particularly well suited for studies in sperm competition. This work aims to analyze for the first time the variables affecting testes mass, ejaculate volume and sperm length, according with their levels of polyandry, in species belonging to the Neotropical family Bothriuridae. Variables influencing testes mass and sperm length were obtained by model selection analysis using corrected Akaike Information Criterion. Testes mass varied greatly among the seven species analyzed, ranging from 1.6±1.1 mg in Timogenes dorbignyi to 16.3±4.5 mg in Brachistosternus pentheri with an average of 8.4±5.0 mg in all the species. The relationship between testes mass and body mass was not significant. Body allocation in testes mass, taken as Gonadosomatic Index, was high in Bothriurus cordubensis and Brachistosternus ferrugineus and low in Timogenes species. The best-fitting model for testes mass considered only polyandry as predictor with a positive influence. Model selection showed that body mass influenced sperm length negatively but after correcting for body mass, none of the variables analyzed explained sperm length. Both body mass and testes mass influenced spermatophore volume positively. There was a strong phylogenetic effect on the model containing testes mass. As predicted by the sperm competition theory and according to what happens in other arthropods, testes mass increased in species with higher levels of sperm competition, and influenced positively spermatophore volume, but data was not conclusive for sperm length. PMID:24736525

  15. Testes mass, but not sperm length, increases with higher levels of polyandry in an ancient sex model.

    PubMed

    Vrech, David E; Olivero, Paola A; Mattoni, Camilo I; Peretti, Alfredo V

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence that polyandrous taxa have evolved relatively larger testes than monogamous relatives. Sperm size may either increase or decrease across species with the risk or intensity of sperm competition. Scorpions represent an ancient direct mode with spermatophore-mediated sperm transfer and are particularly well suited for studies in sperm competition. This work aims to analyze for the first time the variables affecting testes mass, ejaculate volume and sperm length, according with their levels of polyandry, in species belonging to the Neotropical family Bothriuridae. Variables influencing testes mass and sperm length were obtained by model selection analysis using corrected Akaike Information Criterion. Testes mass varied greatly among the seven species analyzed, ranging from 1.6 ± 1.1 mg in Timogenes dorbignyi to 16.3 ± 4.5 mg in Brachistosternus pentheri with an average of 8.4 ± 5.0 mg in all the species. The relationship between testes mass and body mass was not significant. Body allocation in testes mass, taken as Gonadosomatic Index, was high in Bothriurus cordubensis and Brachistosternus ferrugineus and low in Timogenes species. The best-fitting model for testes mass considered only polyandry as predictor with a positive influence. Model selection showed that body mass influenced sperm length negatively but after correcting for body mass, none of the variables analyzed explained sperm length. Both body mass and testes mass influenced spermatophore volume positively. There was a strong phylogenetic effect on the model containing testes mass. As predicted by the sperm competition theory and according to what happens in other arthropods, testes mass increased in species with higher levels of sperm competition, and influenced positively spermatophore volume, but data was not conclusive for sperm length. PMID:24736525

  16. Cost-Effectiveness between Double and Single Fecal Immunochemical Test(s) in a Mass Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shan-Rong; Zhu, Hong-Hong; Huang, Yan-Qin; Li, Qi-Long; Ma, Xin-Yuan; Zhang, Su-Zhan; Zheng, Shu

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the cost-effectiveness between double and single Fecal Immunochemical Test(s) (FIT) in a mass CRC screening. A two-stage sequential screening was conducted. FIT was used as a primary screening test and recommended twice by an interval of one week at the first screening stage. We defined the first-time FIT as FIT1 and the second-time FIT as FIT2. If either FIT1 or FIT2 was positive (+), then a colonoscopy was recommended at the second stage. Costs were recorded and analyzed. A total of 24,419 participants completed either FIT1 or FIT2. The detection rate of advanced neoplasm was 19.2% among both FIT1+ and FIT2+, especially high among men with age ≥55 (27.4%). About 15.4% CRC, 18.9% advanced neoplasm, and 29.9% adenoma missed by FIT1 were detected by FIT2 alone. Average cost was $2,935 for double FITs and $2,121 for FIT1 to detect each CRC and $901 for double FITs and $680 for FIT1 to detect each advanced neoplasm. Double FITs are overall more cost-effective, having significantly higher positive and detection rates with an acceptable higher cost, than single FIT. Double FITs should be encouraged for the first screening in a mass CRC screening, especially in economically and medically underserved populations/areas/countries. PMID:27144171

  17. Mass transfer and interfacial properties in two-phase microchannel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeffrey D.; Hudson, Steven D.

    2009-11-01

    Drop-based microfluidic devices are becoming more common, and molecular mass transfer and drop circulation are issues that often affect the performance of such devices. Moreover, interfacial properties and surfactant mass transfer rates govern emulsion behavior. Since these phenomena depend strongly on drop size, measurement methods using small drops and flow typical of applications are desired. Using mineral oil as a continuous phase, water droplets and an alcohol surfactant, we demonstrate here a microfluidic approach to measure the interrelated phenomena of dynamic interfacial tension, surfactant mass transfer and interfacial retardation that employs droplet flows in a microchannel with constrictions/expansions. Interfacial flow is influenced markedly by adsorption of surfactant: severe interfacial retardation (by a factor of 30) is observed at low surfactant concentrations and interface remobilization is observed at higher surfactant concentrations. The interfacial tension is described by Langmuir kinetics and the parameters for interfaces with mineral oil (studied here) compare closely with those previously found at air interfaces. For the conditions explored, the surfactant mass transfer is described well by a mixed kinetic-diffusion limited model, and the desorption rate coefficients are measured to be both approximately 70 s-1. The transition from a diffusion-controlled to mixed diffusion-kinetic mass transfer mechanism predicted with reducing drop size is verified. This experimental approach (i.e. adjustable geometry and drop size and height) can therefore probe interfacial dynamics in simple and complex flow.

  18. Ethnobotany/ethnopharmacology and mass bioprospecting: issues on intellectual property and benefit-sharing.

    PubMed

    Soejarto, D D; Fong, H H S; Tan, G T; Zhang, H J; Ma, C Y; Franzblau, S G; Gyllenhaal, C; Riley, M C; Kadushin, M R; Pezzuto, J M; Xuan, L T; Hiep, N T; Hung, N V; Vu, B M; Loc, P K; Dac, L X; Binh, L T; Chien, N Q; Hai, N V; Bich, T Q; Cuong, N M; Southavong, B; Sydara, K; Bouamanivong, S; Ly, H M; Thuy, Tran Van; Rose, W C; Dietzman, G R

    2005-08-22

    Ethnobotany/ethnopharmacology has contributed to the discovery of many important plant-derived drugs. Field explorations to seek and document indigenous/traditional medical knowledge (IMK/TMK), and/or the biodiversity with which the IMK/TMK is attached, and its conversion into a commercialized product is known as bioprospecting or biodiversity prospecting. When performed in a large-scale operation, the effort is referred to as mass bioprospecting. Experiences from the mass bioprospecting efforts undertaken by the United States National Cancer Institute, the National Cooperative Drug Discovery Groups (NCDDG) and the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups (ICBG) programs demonstrate that mass bioprospecting is a complex process, involving expertise from diverse areas of human endeavors, but central to it is the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) that recognizes issues on genetic access, prior informed consent, intellectual property and the sharing of benefits that may arise as a result of the effort. Future mass bioprospecting endeavors must take heed of the lessons learned from past and present experiences in the planning for a successful mass bioprospecting venture. PMID:15993554

  19. Negative effect of the arthropod parasite, Sarcoptes scabiei, on testes mass in Iberian ibex, Capra pyrenaica.

    PubMed

    Sarasa, Mathieu; Serrano, Emmanuel; Soriguer, Ramón C; Granados, José-Enrique; Fandos, Paulino; Gonzalez, Georges; Joachim, Jean; Pérez, Jesús M

    2011-02-10

    Testes mass is a key factor in male reproductive success and is potentially exposed to so-called 'parasitic castration'. This is the result of the direct destruction or alteration of reproductive cell lineages (parasitic castration sensu stricto), or the indirect detrimental effects - for example, via body condition - on the ability of progenitors to produce or rear offspring (parasitic castration sensu lato). There are enormous gaps in our knowledge on the effects of parasites on the testes of wild mammals and in an attempt to rectify this dearth of data we examined the relationship between the skin parasite Sarcoptes scabiei and testes mass in Iberian ibex Capra pyrenaica. We considered data from 222 males that were culled in the population from the Sierra Nevada in Spain. Our results provide evidence that sarcoptic mange is associated with reduced size-corrected testes mass in Iberian ibex which supports the hypothesis that parasitism is a determining factor in gonad plasticity in male mammals. We discuss several hypothetical causes of this relationship and highlight the need to deepen the sub-lethal effects of pathogens if we are to accurately understand their modulator effects on host population dynamics. PMID:21074328

  20. Optimization of tuned mass damper for adjacent buildings with equal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekdaş, Gebrail; Nigdeli, Sinan Melih

    2013-10-01

    During earthquakes, adjacent structures may collide to each other because of insufficient seismic gap. By using tuned mass dampers (TMD), the sway of adjacent buildings be reduced and pounding of structures is prevented. In this case, TMDs must be tuned according to the properties of adjacent structures in order to reduce seismic gap (maximum difference of displacements). Also, adjacent structures with equal properties may collide because live-loads on structures is not constant. Change of live-load affects seismic behavior of structures. In this paper, TMDs for adjacent structures with equal properties are optimized by using harmony search algorithm. The approach is effective to reduce the value of seismic gap needed for protection of structures.

  1. Development of Testing Methodologies for the Mechanical Properties of MEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekwaro-Osire, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    This effort is to investigate and design testing strategies to determine the mechanical properties of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) as well as investigate the development of a MEMS Probabilistic Design Methodology (PDM). One item of potential interest is the design of a test for the Weibull size effect in pressure membranes. The Weibull size effect is a consequence of a stochastic strength response predicted from the Weibull distribution. Confirming that MEMS strength is controlled by the Weibull distribution will enable the development of a probabilistic design methodology for MEMS - similar to the GRC developed CARES/Life program for bulk ceramics. However, the primary area of investigation will most likely be analysis and modeling of material interfaces for strength as well as developing a strategy to handle stress singularities at sharp corners, filets, and material interfaces. This will be a continuation of the previous years work. The ultimate objective of this effort is to further develop and verify the ability of the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life (CARES/Life) code to predict the time-dependent reliability of MEMS structures subjected to multiple transient loads.

  2. Development Strategies for Herbal Products Reducing the Influence of Natural Variance in Dry Mass on Tableting Properties and Tablet Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Qusaj, Ylber; Leng, Andreas; Alshihabi, Firas; Krasniqi, Blerim; Vandamme, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    One “Quality by Design” approach is the focus on the variability of the properties of the active substance. This is crucially important for active substances that are obtained from natural resources such as herbal plant material and extracts. In this paper, we present various strategies for the development of herbal products especially taking into account the natural batch-to-batch variability (mainly of the dry mass) of tablets that contain a fixed amount of tincture. The following steps in the development have been evaluated for the outcome of the physico-chemical properties of the resulting tablets and intermediates: concentration of the tincture extracted from Echinacea fresh plant, loading of the concentrate onto an inert carrier, the respective wet granulation and drying step, including milling, and the adjuvant excipients for the tablet compression step. The responses that were investigated are the mean particle size of the dried and milled granulates, compaction properties and disintegration time of the tablets. Increased particle size showed a significant increase of the disintegration time and a decrease of the compaction properties. In addition, our results showed that the particle size has a great dependency on the ratio of liquid to carrier during the wet granulation process. Thus, the variability of the respective parameters tested was influenced by the performed strategies, which is how the tincture correlated to its dry mass and the relation of the amount of carrier used. In order to optimize these parameters, a strategy considering the above-mentioned points has to be chosen. PMID:24300367

  3. TESTING A SCALE-INDEPENDENT METHOD TO MEASURE THE MASS OF BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gliozzi, M.; Titarchuk, L.; Satyapal, S.; Price, D.; Jang, I.

    2011-07-01

    Estimating the black hole mass at the center of galaxies is a fundamental step not only for understanding the physics of accretion, but also for the cosmological evolution of galaxies. Recently, a new method, based solely on X-ray data, was successfully applied to determine the black hole mass in Galactic systems. Since X-rays are thought to be produced via Comptonization process both in stellar and supermassive black holes, in principle, the same method may be applied to estimate the mass in supermassive black holes. In this work we test this hypothesis by performing a systematic analysis of a sample of active galactic nuclei, whose black hole mass has been already determined via reverberation mapping and which possess high-quality XMM-Newton archival data. The good agreement obtained between the black hole masses derived with this novel scaling technique and the reverberation mapping values suggests that this method is robust and works equally well on stellar and supermassive black holes, making it a truly scale-independent technique for black hole determination.

  4. Measurement of internal and external mixtures of test aerosols with a new Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschütz, Anna; Hitzenberger, Regina

    2015-04-01

    The mixing state of atmospheric aerosol particles is a very important property affecting processes such as CCN activation and scattering and absorption of light by the particles, but is challenging to determine. A new Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (LAAPTOF, AeroMegt GmbH) was tested with regards to its capability of measuring internal and external mixture of aerosols using laboratory generated particles. To create the external mixture, solutions of three different salts in deionized water, and a suspension of carbon black (Cabot Corporation) in a mixture of isopropanol and water were nebulized and individually dried, before being passed into a small mixing chamber. To create the internal mixture, equal parts of each solution/suspension were mixed, fed into a single nebulizer, nebulized and dried. The LAAPTOF sampled from the mixing chamber and recorded mass spectra of individual particles. The analysis shows a heterogeneous ensemble of single particle spectra for the external mixture, and a homogeneous ensemble of spectra for the internal mixture. The ability of a fuzzy clustering algorithm to resolve the difference between the two mixing states was also tested.

  5. Physical properties of low-mass star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z <1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, J.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Pacifici, C.; Tresse, L.; Charlot, S.; Gil de Paz, A.; Barro, G.; Villar, V.

    2015-05-01

    In this poster we present the physical properties of a sample of low-mass star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z<1). We selected a population of dwarf galaxies because dwarf galaxies play a key role in galaxy formation and evolution: (1) they resemble the first structures that hierarchical models predict to form first in the Universe (Dekel & Silk 1986) and that are responsible for the reionization process (Bouwens et al. 2012); and (2) the way or epoch they form and how they evolve are still open questions of modern astrophysics. We selected the sample on the CDFS field. Photometry (40 bands, from UV to far-IR) and preliminary photometric redshifts and stellar masses were obtained from RAINBOW database (Pérez-González et al. 2008). Morphology fom Griffith et al. (2012). Main selection was done by stellar mass, selecting those galaxies with stellar mass M_*<10^8 {M}_⊙. Spectroscopic redshifts were obtained from deep (4 h) MOS spectroscopy with the VIMOS spectrograph at VLT. The average spectrum is characterized by a faint, blue and flat continuum and strong emission lines, revealing that the systems are dominated by an undergoing star formation burst. SFRs and stellar masses are consistent with the SF main-squence over a 2 dex range. More massive objects show higher SFRs than low-mass objects, following the SF main sequence. Distant dwarfs and BCDs follow the overall star-forming sequence in the excitation-luminosity diagram, populating the high excitation, low metallicity and high strength region.

  6. Effective-mass model and magneto-optical properties in hybrid perovskites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Z G

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid inorganic-organic perovskites have proven to be a revolutionary material for low-cost photovoltaic applications. They also exhibit many other interesting properties, including giant Rashba splitting, large-radius Wannier excitons, and novel magneto-optical effects. Understanding these properties as well as the detailed mechanism of photovoltaics requires a reliable and accessible electronic structure, on which models of transport, excitonic, and magneto-optical properties can be efficiently developed. Here we construct an effective-mass model for the hybrid perovskites based on the group theory, experiment, and first-principles calculations. Using this model, we relate the Rashba splitting with the inversion-asymmetry parameter in the tetragonal perovskites, evaluate anisotropic g-factors for both conduction and valence bands, and elucidate the magnetic-field effect on photoluminescence and its dependence on the intensity of photoexcitation. The diamagnetic effect of exciton is calculated for an arbitrarily strong magnetic field. The pronounced excitonic peak emerged at intermediate magnetic fields in cyclotron resonance is assigned to the 3D±2 states, whose splitting can be used to estimate the difference in the effective masses of electron and hole. PMID:27338834

  7. Reconnection Properties of Large-scale Current Sheets During Coronal Mass Ejection Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, B. J.; Edmondson, J. K.; Kazachenko, M. D.; Guidoni, S. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the properties of magnetic reconnection at large-scale current sheets (CSs) in a high cadence version of the Lynch & Edmondson 2.5D MHD simulation of sympathetic magnetic breakout eruptions from a pseudostreamer source region. We examine the resistive tearing and break-up of the three main CSs into chains of X- and O-type null points and follow the dynamics of magnetic island growth, their merging, transit, and ejection with the reconnection exhaust. For each CS, we quantify the evolution of the length-to-width aspect ratio (up to ∼100:1), Lundquist number (∼103), and reconnection rate (inflow-to-outflow ratios reaching ∼0.40). We examine the statistical and spectral properties of the fluctuations in the CSs resulting from the plasmoid instability, including the distribution of magnetic island area, mass, and flux content. We show that the temporal evolution of the spectral index of the reconnection-generated magnetic energy density fluctuations appear to reflect global properties of the CS evolution. Our results are in excellent agreement with recent, high-resolution reconnection-in-a-box simulations even though our CSs’ formation, growth, and dynamics are intrinsically coupled to the global evolution of sequential sympathetic coronal mass ejection eruptions.

  8. Effective-mass model and magneto-optical properties in hybrid perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Z. G.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid inorganic-organic perovskites have proven to be a revolutionary material for low-cost photovoltaic applications. They also exhibit many other interesting properties, including giant Rashba splitting, large-radius Wannier excitons, and novel magneto-optical effects. Understanding these properties as well as the detailed mechanism of photovoltaics requires a reliable and accessible electronic structure, on which models of transport, excitonic, and magneto-optical properties can be efficiently developed. Here we construct an effective-mass model for the hybrid perovskites based on the group theory, experiment, and first-principles calculations. Using this model, we relate the Rashba splitting with the inversion-asymmetry parameter in the tetragonal perovskites, evaluate anisotropic g-factors for both conduction and valence bands, and elucidate the magnetic-field effect on photoluminescence and its dependence on the intensity of photoexcitation. The diamagnetic effect of exciton is calculated for an arbitrarily strong magnetic field. The pronounced excitonic peak emerged at intermediate magnetic fields in cyclotron resonance is assigned to the 3D±2 states, whose splitting can be used to estimate the difference in the effective masses of electron and hole. PMID:27338834

  9. Effective-mass model and magneto-optical properties in hybrid perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z. G.

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid inorganic-organic perovskites have proven to be a revolutionary material for low-cost photovoltaic applications. They also exhibit many other interesting properties, including giant Rashba splitting, large-radius Wannier excitons, and novel magneto-optical effects. Understanding these properties as well as the detailed mechanism of photovoltaics requires a reliable and accessible electronic structure, on which models of transport, excitonic, and magneto-optical properties can be efficiently developed. Here we construct an effective-mass model for the hybrid perovskites based on the group theory, experiment, and first-principles calculations. Using this model, we relate the Rashba splitting with the inversion-asymmetry parameter in the tetragonal perovskites, evaluate anisotropic g-factors for both conduction and valence bands, and elucidate the magnetic-field effect on photoluminescence and its dependence on the intensity of photoexcitation. The diamagnetic effect of exciton is calculated for an arbitrarily strong magnetic field. The pronounced excitonic peak emerged at intermediate magnetic fields in cyclotron resonance is assigned to the 3D±2 states, whose splitting can be used to estimate the difference in the effective masses of electron and hole.

  10. Reconnection Properties of Large-scale Current Sheets During Coronal Mass Ejection Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, B. J.; Edmondson, J. K.; Kazachenko, M. D.; Guidoni, S. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the properties of magnetic reconnection at large-scale current sheets (CSs) in a high cadence version of the Lynch & Edmondson 2.5D MHD simulation of sympathetic magnetic breakout eruptions from a pseudostreamer source region. We examine the resistive tearing and break-up of the three main CSs into chains of X- and O-type null points and follow the dynamics of magnetic island growth, their merging, transit, and ejection with the reconnection exhaust. For each CS, we quantify the evolution of the length-to-width aspect ratio (up to ˜100:1), Lundquist number (˜103), and reconnection rate (inflow-to-outflow ratios reaching ˜0.40). We examine the statistical and spectral properties of the fluctuations in the CSs resulting from the plasmoid instability, including the distribution of magnetic island area, mass, and flux content. We show that the temporal evolution of the spectral index of the reconnection-generated magnetic energy density fluctuations appear to reflect global properties of the CS evolution. Our results are in excellent agreement with recent, high-resolution reconnection-in-a-box simulations even though our CSs’ formation, growth, and dynamics are intrinsically coupled to the global evolution of sequential sympathetic coronal mass ejection eruptions.

  11. Testing the Mass Balance of the Laurentide Ice Sheet During the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullman, D. J.; Carlson, A. E.; Legrande, A. N.; Anslow, F. S.; Licciardi, J. M.; Caffee, M. W.

    2010-12-01

    Recent findings have suggested that the global Last Glacial Maximum occurred 26.5-20 ka. During this time, ice sheets were at their maximum extent and eustatic sea level was nearly 130 m lower than present. Such stability of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets suggests a nearly neutral net mass balance. Here we test the mass balance of the Laurentide Ice Sheet at the Last Glacial Maximum using an energy-mass balance model and two different ice sheet configurations. The energy-mass balance model is forced by simulated climate from the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Model E-R, consistent with Last Glacial Maximum conditions. This coupled atmosphere-ocean global climate model contains water isotope tracers throughout the hydrologic cycle, which are used to constrain model skill against water isotopic records. Two model experiments are performed with different Laurentide Ice Sheet configurations: one using the ICE-5G geophysical reconstruction and the other using an alternative reconstruction based on a flow-line model that simulates glacier dynamics over deformable and rigid beds. These two reconstructions have widely contrasting ice sheet geometries at the Last Glacial Maximum, with the ICE-5G reconstruction having a much larger Keewatin Dome over west-central Canada, while the largest mass center according to the flow-line model is in the Labrador Dome over eastern Canada. This disparity in ice sheet geometry may result in large differences in simulated climate and net ice sheet mass balance. Initial results suggest that 1) the ICE-5G ice sheet forces a Last Glacial Maximum climate in conflict with paleoceanographic reconstructions of ocean circulation, whereas the flow-line ice sheet is in better agreement with circulation reconstructions; and 2) the initial increase in boreal summer insolation could trigger a negative mass balance for the Laurentide Ice Sheet by 21 ka, driving ice retreat. We will also compare our mass balance results with existing

  12. Born-Oppenheimer approximation for mass scaling of cold-collision properties

    SciTech Connect

    Falke, Stephan; Tiemann, Eberhard; Lisdat, Christian

    2007-07-15

    Asymptotic levels of the A {sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +} state of the two isotopomers {sup 39}K{sub 2} and {sup 39}K{sup 41}K up to the dissociation limit are investigated with a Doppler-free high resolution laser-spectroscopic experiment in a molecular beam. The observed level structure can be reproduced correctly only if a mass dependent correction term is introduced for the interaction potential. The applied relative correction in the depth of the potential is 10{sup -6}, which is in the order of magnitude expected for corrections of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. A similar change in ground state potentials might lead to significant changes of mass-scaled properties describing cold collisions like the s-wave scattering length.

  13. Active and passive seismic methods for characterization and monitoring of unstable rock masses: field surveys, laboratory tests and modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombero, Chiara; Baillet, Laurent; Comina, Cesare; Jongmans, Denis; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate characterization and monitoring of potentially unstable rock masses may provide a better knowledge of the active processes and help to forecast the evolution to failure. Among the available geophysical methods, active seismic surveys are often suitable to infer the internal structure and the fracturing conditions of the unstable body. For monitoring purposes, although remote-sensing techniques and in-situ geotechnical measurements are successfully tested on landslides, they may not be suitable to early forecast sudden rapid rockslides. Passive seismic monitoring can help for this purpose. Detection, classification and localization of microseismic events within the prone-to-fall rock mass can provide information about the incipient failure of internal rock bridges. Acceleration to failure can be detected from an increasing microseismic event rate. The latter can be compared with meteorological data to understand the external factors controlling stability. On the other hand, seismic noise recorded on prone-to-fall rock slopes shows that the temporal variations in spectral content and correlation of ambient vibrations can be related to both reversible and irreversible changes within the rock mass. We present the results of the active and passive seismic data acquired at the potentially unstable granitic cliff of Madonna del Sasso (NW Italy). Down-hole tests, surface refraction and cross-hole tomography were carried out for the characterization of the fracturing state of the site. Field surveys were implemented with laboratory determination of physico-mechanical properties on rock samples and measurements of the ultrasonic pulse velocity. This multi-scale approach led to a lithological interpretation of the seismic velocity field obtained at the site and to a systematic correlation of the measured velocities with physical properties (density and porosity) and macroscopic features of the granitic cliff (fracturing, weathering and anisotropy). Continuous

  14. Design of virtual display and testing system for moving mass electromechanical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhigang; Geng, Keda; Zhou, Jun; Li, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Aiming at the problem of control, measurement and movement virtual display of moving mass electromechanical actuator(MMEA), the virtual testing system of MMEA was developed based on the PC-DAQ architecture and the software platform of LabVIEW, and the comprehensive test task such as drive control of MMEA, tests of kinematic parameter, measurement of centroid position and virtual display of movement could be accomplished. The system could solve the alignment for acquisition time between multiple measurement channels in different DAQ cards, then on this basis, the researches were focused on the dynamic 3D virtual display by the LabVIEW, and the virtual display of MMEA were realized by the method of calling DLL and the method of 3D graph drawing controls. Considering the collaboration with the virtual testing system, including the hardware drive, the measurement software of data acquisition, and the 3D graph drawing controls method was selected, which could obtained the synchronization measurement, control and display. The system can measure dynamic centroid position and kinematic position of movable mass block while controlling the MMEA, and the interface of 3D virtual display has realistic effect and motion smooth, which can solve the problem of display and playback about MMEA in the closed shell.

  15. Vadose Zone VOC Mass Transfer Testing At The SRS Miscellaneous Chemical Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B

    2005-10-30

    will aid in answering the question ''How clean is protective of the environment''? For this study, a field test was developed to measure a mass transfer factor by injecting clean air into the subsurface through a sample port or well and measuring the rebound VOC concentration over time. Interpretation of the he results of these tests will provide a mass transfer rate that will be used to determine the appropriate type of SVE for the area (passive, enhanced or active SVE), a measured field parameter to estimate mass loading to the groundwater, and time frame for cleanup.

  16. The fermionic projector in a time-dependent external potential: Mass oscillation property and Hadamard states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finster, Felix; Murro, Simone; Röken, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We give a non-perturbative construction of the fermionic projector in Minkowski space coupled to a time-dependent external potential which is smooth and decays faster than quadratically for large times. The weak and strong mass oscillation properties are proven. We show that the integral kernel of the fermionic projector is of the Hadamard form, provided that the time integral of the spatial sup-norm of the potential satisfies a suitable bound. This gives rise to an algebraic quantum field theory of Dirac fields in an external potential with a distinguished pure quasi-free Hadamard state.

  17. Laboratory procedures and data reduction techniques to determine rheologic properties of mass flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, R.R., Jr.; Huizinga, R.J.; Brown, S.M.; Jobson, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    Determining the rheologic properties of coarse- grained mass flows is an important step to mathematically simulate potential inundation zones. Using the vertically rotating flume designed and built by the U.S. Geological Survey, laboratory procedures and subsequent data reduction have been developed to estimate shear stresses and strain rates of various flow materials. Although direct measurement of shear stress and strain rate currently (1992) are not possible in the vertically rotating flume, methods were derived to estimate these values from measurements of flow geometry, surface velocity, and flume velocity.

  18. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith; Sweetkind, Don; Fenelon, Joe

    2016-02-01

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity (K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks provide the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. Testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.

  19. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith J.; Sweetkind, Donald; Fenelon, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity (K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks provide the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. Testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.

  20. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith; Sweetkind, Don; Fenelon, Joe

    2016-08-01

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity ( K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks provide the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. Testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.

  1. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith J.; Sweetkind, Donald; Fenelon, Joseph M.

    2016-02-18

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity (K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks providemore » the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. As a result, testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.« less

  2. The X-Ray Properties of Million Solar Mass Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, Richard. M.; Gallo, Elena; Haardt, Francesco; Miller, Brendan P.; Wood, Callum J. L.; Reines, Amy E.; Wu, Jianfeng; Greene, Jenny E.

    2016-07-01

    We present new Chandra X-ray observations of seven low-mass black holes ({M}{{BH}}≈ {10}6 {M}ȯ ) accreting at low-bolometric Eddington ratios between -2.0≲ {log}{L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}}≲ -1.5. We compare the X-ray properties of these seven low-mass active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to a total of 73 other low-mass AGNs in the literature with published Chandra observations (with Eddington ratios extending from -2.0≲ {log}{L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}}≲ -0.1). We do not find any statistical differences between the low and high Eddington ratio low-mass AGNs in the distributions of their X-ray to ultraviolet luminosity ratios ({α }{{ox}}), or in their X-ray spectral shapes. Furthermore, the {α }{{ox}} distribution of low-{L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}} AGNs displays an X-ray weak tail that is also observed within high-{L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}} objects. Our results indicate that between -2≲ {log}{L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}}≲ -0.1, there is no systematic change in the structure of the accretion flow for active galaxies hosting {10}6 {M}ȯ black holes. We examine the accuracy of current bolometric luminosity estimates for our low-{L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}} objects with new Chandra observations, and it is plausible that their Eddington ratios could be underestimated by up to an order of magnitude. If so, then in analogy with weak emission line quasars, we suggest that accretion from a geometrically thick, radiatively inefficient “slim disk” could explain their diverse properties in {α }{{ox}}. Alternatively, if current Eddington ratios are correct (or overestimated), then the X-ray weak tail would imply that there is diversity in disk/corona couplings among individual low-mass objects. Finally, we conclude by noting that the {α }{{ox}} distribution for low-mass black holes may have favorable consequences for the epoch of cosmic reionization being driven by AGN.

  3. Test Sample for the Spatially Resolved Quantification of Illicit Drugs on Fingerprints Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Shin; Forbes, Thomas P; van Asten, Arian C; Gillen, Greg

    2015-01-01

    A novel test sample for the spatially resolved quantification of illicit drugs on the surface of a fingerprint using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was demonstrated. Calibration curves relating the signal intensity to the amount of drug deposited on the surface were generated from inkjet-printed arrays of cocaine, methamphetamine, and heroin with a deposited-mass ranging nominally from 10 pg to 50 ng per spot. These curves were used to construct concentration maps that visualized the spatial distribution of the drugs on top of a fingerprint, as well as being able to quantify the amount of drugs in a given area within the map. For the drugs on the fingerprint on silicon, ToF-SIMS showed great success, as it was able to generate concentration maps of all three drugs. On the fingerprint on paper, only the concentration map of cocaine could be constructed using ToF-SIMS and DESI-MS, as the signals of methamphetamine and heroin were completely suppressed by matrix and substrate effects. Spatially resolved quantification of illicit drugs using imaging mass spectrometry is possible, but the choice of substrates could significantly affect the results. PMID:25915085

  4. Diagnostic Characteristics of Tests for Ocular Chlamydia after Mass Azithromycin Distributions

    PubMed Central

    See, Craig W.; Moncada, Jeanne; Ayele, Berhan; Gebre, Teshome; Stoller, Nicole E.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Porco, Travis C.; Gaynor, Bruce D.; Emerson, Paul M.; Schachter, Julius; Lietman, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Although trachoma control programs frequently use the World Health Organization (WHO) simplified grading system for trachoma to monitor the clinical response after repeated mass azithromycin treatments, the programmatic relevance of this evaluation after multiple rounds of antibiotic treatments is unclear. Methods. Three rounds of annual mass azithromycin were distributed to 12 villages in Ethiopia. Twelve months after the third treatment, children were assessed for follicular trachomatous inflammation (TF) and intense trachomatous inflammation (TI) using the WHO simplified grading system and for ocular chlamydial infection using DNA-based and RNA-based tests. Test characteristics for predicting chlamydial infection were computed assuming a chlamydial RNA-based gold standard. As a secondary analysis, test characteristics were also assessed using a latent class analysis. Results. The prevalence of RNA evidence of ocular chlamydia was 7.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.7–17.4). A DNA-based test and TF had sensitivities of 61.0% (95% CI, 47.1–73.3) and 65.9% (95% CI, 41.6–83.9), specificities of 100% (95% CI, 99.3–100) and 67.5% (95% CI, 61.0–73.5), and positive predictive values of 100% (95% CI, 86.3–100) and 13.4% (95% CI, 5.5–29.3) compared with an RNA-based gold standard. The latent class analysis confirmed that the RNA-based test was a reasonable choice for a gold standard, with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 67.1–100) and specificity of 99.6% (95% CI, 98.1–100). Conclusions. Basing treatment decisions after mass azithromycin distributions on the WHO simplified grading system will maximize the treatment of infected persons compared with a DNA-based test but will also result in more uninfected persons being treated. The RNA-based test was considerably more sensitive, and almost equivalently specific, compared with a DNA-based test. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00322972.) PMID:22159017

  5. Beta-decay properties of neutron-rich medium-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarriguren, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    β-decay properties of even-even and odd-A neutron-rich Ge, Se, Kr, Sr, Zr, Mo, Ru, and Pd isotopes involved in the astrophysical rapid neutron capture process are studied within a microscopic proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The underlying mean field is based on a self-consistent Skyrme Hartree-Fock + BCS calculation that includes deformation as a key ingredient. The isotopic evolution of the various nuclear equilibrium shapes and the corresponding charge radii are investigated in all the isotopic chains. The energy distributions of the Gamow-Teller strength, as well as the β-decay half-lives are discussed and compared with the available experimental information. It is shown that nuclear deformation plays a significant role in the description of the decay properties in this mass region. Reliable predictions of the strength distributions are essential to evaluate decay rates in astrophysical scenarios.

  6. A new class of equivalence principle test masses, with application to SR-POEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    We describe a new class of test masses (TMs) for use in a Galilean test of the equivalence principle, principally in space. These TMs have n\\geqslant 2 vertical bars that are joined by an off-center connector. A pair of TMs will be positioned to have interleaved bars. For n\\geqslant 3, the principal moments of inertia of a TM can be made equal. With their centers of mass aligned, a TM pair shows decreasing susceptibility to differential acceleration from local mass as n increases. For the Sounding Rocket based Principle Of Equivalence Measurement (SR-POEM), the mission requirements are well met with n=3, but not met with n=2. For a 1 kg SR-POEM TM, vibration frequencies can be made to be above 1 kHz and thus not interfere with the operation of the TM suspension system. The SR-POEM housing supports electrodes for a set of capacitance gauges that observes all six kinematic degrees of freedom of each TM.

  7. The evaluation of properties of coal mass from the viewpoint of environment

    SciTech Connect

    Foniok, R.; Lukes, M.

    1995-12-01

    This paper deals with the evaluation of several various coal kinds from the Czech coalfields from the viewpoint of the development of thermal processes in coal mass due to their tendency towards self- ignition during storing. In such a case that no self-ignition during storing occurs, gaseous products are liberated into air, the quantity and composition of which depend upon fuel type and its temperature as well. From the environmental viewpoint, substances washed from stored coal are of a certain interest, too. In accordance with this fact, the importance of measures against self-heating of stored coal mass and the importance of a detailed observation of coal quality are concluded. The tables, which compare various coal kinds from the viewpoint of their behavior at self-ignition processes, are the integral part of this presented paper. Our greatest attention is paid to both the quantity and composition of gases being liberated in dependence upon the temperature of coal mass, and at its crushing with regard to selected methods and means of milling circuits before and explosion. Oxygen sorption by means of coal mass is also observed, being of a great importance for self-inertization of closed tanks. All the above-mentioned processes are demonstrated in form of graphic plots. Qualitative signs of coal mass are the basic means for its assessment from the viewpoint of emissions at burning/combustion, and the evaluation of explosive properties. A great attention is paid to explosion-proof means being produced in the Czech Republic. These means can be used for protection of milling circuits of power plants and heating plants or for safety systems of combustion chamber by means of insulation to secondary air main. Explosion-proof quci-acting valves, a special type of safety membrane and device for explosion suppression nip in the bud do represent the latest explosion-proof means.

  8. Analgesic properties of Epilobium angustifolium, evaluated by the hot plate test and the writhing test.

    PubMed

    Tita, B; Abdel-Haq, H; Vitalone, A; Mazzanti, G; Saso, L

    2001-01-01

    The analgesic properties of Epilobium angustifolium (Ea), a plant containing flavonoids with anti-inflammatory activity, have not been sufficiently studied so far. Thus, we decided to evaluate, by the classical hot plate test and the writhing test, the analgesic effect of a dry extract of Ea obtained by evaporating a commercially available mother tincture. In the former assay, the effect of Ea (380 mg/kg) was slightly lower than that of morphine (10 mg/kg s.c.). In the writhing test, which is more sensitive for non-steroidal analgesics, the effect of Ea was already significant (P < 0.05) at 95 mg/kg while at doses > or = 190 mg/kg, its activity was similar to that of lysine acetylsalicylate (300 mg/kg). The LD50 of this dry extract of Ea was 1.4+/-0.1 g/kg. Further studies are necessary for the identification of the active principles and the elucidation of their mechanism of action. PMID:11482754

  9. Higher Doses of Bisphosphonates Further Improve Bone Mass, Architecture, and Strength but Not the Tissue Material Properties in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shahnazari, Mohammad; Yao, Wei; Dai, WeiWei; Wang, Bob; Ionova-Martin, Sophi S.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Heeren, Daniel; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Nicolella, Daniel P.; Kimiecik, Michael G.; Lane, Nancy E.

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of a series of experiments designed to determine the effects of ibandronate (Ibn) and risedronate (Ris) on a number of bone quality parameters in aged osteopenic rats to explain how bone material and bone mass may be affected by the dose of bisphosphonates (BP) and contribute to their anti-fracture efficacy. Eighteen-month old female rats underwent either ovariectomy or sham surgery. The ovariectomized (OVX) groups were left untreated for 2 months to develop osteopenia. Treatments started at 20 months of age as follows: sham and OVX control (treated with saline), OVX+risedronate 30 and 90 (30 or 90 μg/kg/dose), and OVX+ibandronate 30 and 90 (30 or 90 μg/kg/dose). The treatments were given monthly for four months by subcutaneous injection. At sacrifice at 24 months of age the 4th lumbar vertebra was used for μCT scans (bone mass, architecture, and degree of mineralization of bone, DMB) and histomorphometry, and the 6th lumbar vertebra, tibia, and femur were collected for biomechanical testing to determine bone structural and material strength, cortical fracture toughness, and tissue elastic modulus. The compression testing of the vertebral bodies (LVB6) was simulated using finite-element analysis (FEA) to also estimate the bone structural stiffness. Both Ibn and Ris dose-dependently increased bone mass and improved vertebral bone microarchitecture and mechanical properties compared to OVX control. Estimates of vertebral maximum stress from FEA were correlated with vertebral maximum load (r=0.5, p<0.001) and maximum stress (r=0.4, p<0.005) measured experimentally. Tibial bone bending modulus and cortical strength increased compared to OVX with both BP but no dose-dependent effect was observed. DMB and elastic modulus of trabecular bone were improved with Ibn30 compared to OVX but were not affected in other BP-treated groups. DMB of tibial cortical bone showed no change with BP treatments. The fracture toughness examined in midshaft femurs did

  10. Development of an Organic Lateral Resolution Test Device for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An organic lateral resolution test device has been developed to measure the performance of imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) systems. The device contains periodic gratings of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and lipid bars covering a wide range of spatial frequencies. Microfabrication technologies were employed to produce well-defined chemical interfaces, which allow lateral resolution to be assessed using the edge-spread function (ESF). In addition, the design of the device allows for the direct measurement of the modulation transfer function (MTF) to assess image quality. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) were used to characterize the device. TOF-SIMS imaging was used to measure the chemical displacement of biomolecules in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) matrix crystals. In a proof-of-concept experiment, the platform was also used to evaluate MALDI matrix application methods, specifically aerosol spray and sublimation methods. PMID:25137365

  11. Trampoline Resonator Fabrication for Tests of Quantum Mechanics at High Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Matthew; Pepper, Brian; Sonin, Petro; Eerkens, Hedwig; Buters, Frank; de Man, Sven; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2014-03-01

    There has been much interest recently in optomechanical devices that can reach the ground state. Two requirements for achieving ground state cooling are high optical finesse in the cavity and high mechanical quality factor. We present a set of trampoline resonator devices using high stress silicon nitride and superpolishing of mirrors with sufficient finesse (as high as 60,000) and quality factor (as high as 480,000) for ground state cooling in a dilution refrigerator. These devices have a higher mass, between 80 and 100 ng, and lower frequency, between 200 and 500 kHz, than other devices that have been cooled to the ground state, enabling tests of quantum mechanics at a larger mass scale.

  12. The global chemical properties of high-mass star forming clumps at different evolutionary stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Jun; Esimbek, Jarken; He, Yu-Xin; Li, Da-Lei; Tang, Xin-Di; Ji, Wei-Guang; Yuan, Ye; Guo, Wei-Hua

    2016-06-01

    A total of 197 relatively isolated high-mass star-forming clumps were selected from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) survey data and their global chemical evolution investigated using four molecular lines, N2H+ (1--0), HCO+ (1--0), HCN (1-0), and HNC (1-0). The results suggest that the global averaged integrated intensity ratios I(HCO+)/I(HNC), I(HCN)/I(HNC), I(N2H+)/I(HCO+), and I(N2H+)/ I(HCN) are promising tracers for evolution of high-mass star-forming clumps. The global averaged column densities and abundances of N2H+, HCO+, HCN, and HNC increase as clumps evolve. The global averaged abundance ratios X(HCN)/X(HNC) could be used to trace evolution of high-mass star forming clumps, X(HCO+)/X(HNC) is more suitable for distinguishing high-mass star-forming clumps in prestellar (stage A) from those in protostellar (stage B) and HII/PDR region (stage C). These results suggest that the global averaged integrated intensity ratios between HCN (1-0), HNC (1-0), HCO+ (1--0) and N2H+ (1--0) are more suitable for tracing the evolution of high-mass star forming clumps. We also studied the chemical properties of the target high-mass star-forming clumps in each spiral arm of the Galaxy, and got results very different from those above. This is probably due to the relatively small sample in each spiral arm. For high-mass star-forming clumps in Sagittarius arm and Norma-Outer arm, comparing two groups located on one arm with different Galactocentric distances, the clumps near the Galactic Center appear to be younger than those far from the Galactic center, which may be due to more dense gas concentrated near the Galactic Center, and hence more massive stars being formed there.

  13. Mapping the mechanical properties of rocks using automated microindentation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Yder; Pride, Steven R.

    2015-10-01

    A microindentation scanner is constructed that measures the spatial fluctuation in the elastic properties of natural rocks. This novel instrument performs automated indentation tests on the surface of a rock slab and outputs 2-D maps of the indentation modulus at submillimeter resolution. Maps obtained for clean, well-consolidated, sandstone are presented and demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument. We observe that the elastic structure of sandstones correlates well with their visual appearance. Further, we show that the probability distribution of the indentation modulus fluctuations across the slab surfaces can be modeled using a lognormal probability density function. To illustrate possible use of the data obtained with the microindentation scanner, we use roughly 10 cm × 10 cm scans with millimeter resolution over four sandstone planar slabs to numerically compute the overall drained elastic moduli for each sandstone sample. We show that such numerically computed moduli are well modeled using the multicomponent form of the Hashin-Shtrikman lower bound that employs the observed lognormal probability distribution for the mesoscopic-scale moduli (the geometric mean works almost the same). We also compute the seismic attenuation versus frequency associated with wave-induced fluid flow between the heterogeneities in the scanned sandstones and observe relatively small values for the inverse quality factor (Q-1<10-2) in the seismic frequency band 102 Hz

  14. Novel models on fluid's variable thermo-physical properties for extensive study on convection heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, De-Yi; Zhong, Liang-Cai

    2016-04-01

    Our novel models for fluid's variable physical properties are improved and reported systematically in this work for enhancement of theoretical and practical value on study of convection heat and mass transfer. It consists of three models, namely (1) temperature parameter model, (2) polynomial model, and (3) weighted-sum model, respectively for treatment of temperature-dependent physical properties of gases, temperature-dependent physical properties of liquids, and concentration- and temperature-dependent physical properties of vapour-gas mixture. Two related components are proposed, and involved in each model for fluid's variable physical properties. They are basic physic property equations and theoretical similarity equations on physical property factors. The former, as the foundation of the latter, is based on the typical experimental data and physical analysis. The latter is built up by similarity analysis and mathematical derivation based on the former basic physical properties equations. These models are available for smooth simulation and treatment of fluid's variable physical properties for assurance of theoretical and practical value of study on convection of heat and mass transfer. Especially, so far, there has been lack of available study on heat and mass transfer of film condensation convection of vapour-gas mixture, and the wrong heat transfer results existed in widespread studies on the related research topics, due to ignorance of proper consideration of the concentration- and temperature-dependent physical properties of vapour-gas mixture. For resolving such difficult issues, the present novel physical property models have their special advantages.

  15. Field testing of lake water chemistry with a portable and an AUV-based mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hemond, Harry F; Mueller, Amy V; Hemond, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Two mass spectrometers (MS) are tested for the measurement of volatile substances, such as hydrocarbons and metabolic gases, in natural waters. KOALA is a backpackable MS operated from above the water surface, in which samples are pumped through a flow cell using a syringe. NEREUS is an underwater instrument hosted by an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) that is linked to a communications network to provide chemical data in real time. The mass analyzers of the two MS are nearly identical cycloids, and both use flat-plate membrane inlets. Testing took place in an eutrophic, thermally stratified lake exhibiting steep chemical gradients and significant levels of methane. KOALA provided rapid multispecies analysis of dissolved gases, with a detection limit for methane of 0.1 ppm (readily extendable to 0.01 ppm) and savings of time of at least a factor of 10 compared to that of conventional analysis. The AUV-mounted NEREUS additionally provided rapid spatial coverage and the capability of performing chemical surveys autonomously. Tests demonstrated the need for temperature control of a membrane inlet when steep thermal gradients are present in a water body, as well as the benefits of co-locating all sensors on the AUV to avoid interference from chemically different waters entering and draining from the free-flooding outer hull. The ability to measure dissolved volatiles provided by MS offers potential for complementarity with ionic sensors in the study of natural waters, such as in the case of the carbonate system. PMID:18468452

  16. Influence of air mass origin on aerosol properties at a remote Michigan forest site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanReken, T. M.; Mwaniki, G. R.; Wallace, H. W.; Pressley, S. N.; Erickson, M. H.; Jobson, B. T.; Lamb, B. K.

    2015-04-01

    The northern Great Lakes region of North America is a large, relatively pristine area. To date, there has only been limited study of the atmospheric aerosol in this region. During summer 2009, a detailed characterization of the atmospheric aerosol was conducted at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) as part of the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX). Measurements included particle size distribution, water-soluble composition, and CCN activity. Aerosol properties were strongly dependent on the origin of the air masses reaching the site. For ∼60% of the study period, air was transported from sparsely populated regions to the northwest. During these times aerosol loadings were low, with mean number and volume concentrations of 1630 cm-3 and 1.91 μm3 cm-3, respectively. The aerosol during clean periods was dominated by organics, and exhibited low hygroscopicities (mean κ = 0.18 at s = 0.3%). When air was from more populated regions to the east and south (∼29% of the time), aerosol properties reflected a stronger anthropogenic influence, with 85% greater particle number concentrations, 2.5 times greater aerosol volume, six times more sulfate mass, and increased hygroscopicity (mean k = 0.24 at s = 0.3%). These trends are have the potential to influence forest-atmosphere interactions and should be targeted for future study.

  17. Comparing interferometry techniques for multi-degree of freedom test mass readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isleif, Katharina-Sophie; Gerberding, Oliver; Mehmet, Moritz; Schwarze, Thomas S.; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2016-05-01

    Laser interferometric readout systems with 1pm/Hz precision over long time scales have successfully been developed for LISA and LISA Pathfinder. Future gravitational physics experiments, for example in the fields of gravitational wave detection and geodesy, will potentially require similar levels of displacement and tilt readouts of multiple test masses in multiple degrees of freedom. In this article we compare currently available classic interferometry schemes with new techniques using phase modulations and complex readout algorithms. Based on a simple example we show that the new techniques have great potential to simplify interferometric readouts.

  18. Reassessing rock mass properties and slope instability triggering conditions in Valles Marineris, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni Battista; Utili, Stefano; De Blasio, Fabio Vittorio; Castellanza, Riccardo

    2014-02-01

    The rock walls of the Valles Marineris valleys (VM) in the equatorial area of Mars exhibit several gravitational failures which resulted in a series of large landslides up to several hundred cubic kilometers in volume. Questions arise as to forces at play and rock strength in the stability of the walls of VM. In this work we address the stability analysis of the walls of VM by considering the strength of the materials of the walls and the causes of landslides. Using finite element calculations and the limit analysis upper bound method, we explore the range of cohesion and friction angle values associated with realistic failure geometries, and compare predictions with the more classical Culmann's translational failure model. Our analysis is based both on synthetic, simplified slope profiles, and on the real shape of the walls of VM taken from the MOLA topographic data. Validation of the calibrated cohesion and friction angle values is performed by comparing the computed unstable cross sectional areas with the observed pre- and post-failure profiles, the estimated failure surface geometry and ridge crest retreat. This offers a link between rock mass properties, slope geometry and volume of the observed failure, represented in dimensionless charts. The role of groundwater flow and seismic action on the decrease of slope stability is also estimated. Pseudo-static seismic analyses provide another set of dimensionless charts and show that low seismicity events induced by meteoroid impacts, consistent with the size of craters, could be a cause for some of the observed landslides, if poor rock properties for VM are assumed. Analyses suggest that rock mass properties are more similar to their earth equivalents with respect to what has been previously supposed.

  19. Mass spectrometric analysis and aerodynamic properties of various types of combustion-related aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J.; Weimer, S.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Helas, G.; Gwaze, P.; Schmid, O.; Andreae, M. O.; Kirchner, U.

    2006-12-01

    Various types of combustion-related particles in the size range between 100 and 850 nm were analyzed with an aerosol mass spectrometer and a differential mobility analyzer. The measurements were performed with particles originating from biomass burning, diesel engine exhaust, laboratory combustion of diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as from spark soot generation. Physical and morphological parameters like fractal dimension, effective density, bulk density and dynamic shape factor were derived or at least approximated from the measurements of electrical mobility diameter and vacuum aerodynamic diameter. The relative intensities of the mass peaks in the mass spectra obtained from particles generated by a commercial diesel passenger car, by diesel combustion in a laboratory burner, and by evaporating and re-condensing lubrication oil were found to be very similar. The mass spectra from biomass burning particles show signatures identified as organic compounds like levoglucosan but also others which are yet unidentified. The aerodynamic behavior yielded a fractal dimension (Df) of 2.09 +/- 0.06 for biomass burning particles from the combustion of dry beech sticks, but showed values around three, and hence more compact particle morphologies, for particles from combustion of more natural oak. Scanning electron microscope images confirmed the finding that the beech combustion particles were fractal-like aggregates, while the oak combustion particles displayed a much more compact shape. For particles from laboratory combusted diesel fuel, a Df value of 2.35 was found, for spark soot particles, Df [approximate] 2.10. The aerodynamic properties of fractal-like particles from dry beech wood combustion indicate an aerodynamic shape factor [chi] that increases with electrical mobility diameter, and a bulk density of 1.92 g cm-3. An upper limit of [chi] [approximate] 1.2 was inferred for the shape factor of the more compact particles from oak combustion.

  20. Subsurface mass transport affects the radioxenon signatures that are used to identify clandestine nuclear tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deinert, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Underground nuclear tests produce anthropogenic isotopes that provide the only definitive means by which to determine whether a nuclear explosion has taken place. Verification of a suspected test under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty often relies on ratios of radioxenon isotopes. Gas samples are gathered either on-site or off-site with certain ranges of xenon isotope ratios considered to be a signature of a weapons test. It is well established that below ground transport can affect the rate at which Noble gasses will reach the surface. However, the relative abundance of anthropogenic isotopes is has long been assumed to rely solely on fission yield and decay rate. By including in subsurface transport models the effects of mass dependent diffusion, and a time dependent source term for the decay of radioiodine precursors, we show here that this assumption is not true. In fact, certain combinations of geology and atmospheric conditions can alter xenon isotope ratios sufficiently for a weapons test going unconfirmed under the current standards.

  1. Estimating initial contaminant mass based on fitting mass-depletion functions to contaminant mass discharge data: Testing method efficacy with SVE operations data.

    PubMed

    Mainhagu, J; Brusseau, M L

    2016-09-01

    The mass of contaminant present at a site, particularly in the source zones, is one of the key parameters for assessing the risk posed by contaminated sites, and for setting and evaluating remediation goals and objectives. This quantity is rarely known and is challenging to estimate accurately. This work investigated the efficacy of fitting mass-depletion functions to temporal contaminant mass discharge (CMD) data as a means of estimating initial mass. Two common mass-depletion functions, exponential and power functions, were applied to historic soil vapor extraction (SVE) CMD data collected from 11 contaminated sites for which the SVE operations are considered to be at or close to essentially complete mass removal. The functions were applied to the entire available data set for each site, as well as to the early-time data (the initial 1/3 of the data available). Additionally, a complete differential-time analysis was conducted. The latter two analyses were conducted to investigate the impact of limited data on method performance, given that the primary mode of application would be to use the method during the early stages of a remediation effort. The estimated initial masses were compared to the total masses removed for the SVE operations. The mass estimates obtained from application to the full data sets were reasonably similar to the measured masses removed for both functions (13 and 15% mean error). The use of the early-time data resulted in a minimally higher variation for the exponential function (17%) but a much higher error (51%) for the power function. These results suggest that the method can produce reasonable estimates of initial mass useful for planning and assessing remediation efforts. PMID:27494132

  2. Estimating initial contaminant mass based on fitting mass-depletion functions to contaminant mass discharge data: Testing method efficacy with SVE operations data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainhagu, J.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2016-09-01

    The mass of contaminant present at a site, particularly in the source zones, is one of the key parameters for assessing the risk posed by contaminated sites, and for setting and evaluating remediation goals and objectives. This quantity is rarely known and is challenging to estimate accurately. This work investigated the efficacy of fitting mass-depletion functions to temporal contaminant mass discharge (CMD) data as a means of estimating initial mass. Two common mass-depletion functions, exponential and power functions, were applied to historic soil vapor extraction (SVE) CMD data collected from 11 contaminated sites for which the SVE operations are considered to be at or close to essentially complete mass removal. The functions were applied to the entire available data set for each site, as well as to the early-time data (the initial 1/3 of the data available). Additionally, a complete differential-time analysis was conducted. The latter two analyses were conducted to investigate the impact of limited data on method performance, given that the primary mode of application would be to use the method during the early stages of a remediation effort. The estimated initial masses were compared to the total masses removed for the SVE operations. The mass estimates obtained from application to the full data sets were reasonably similar to the measured masses removed for both functions (13 and 15% mean error). The use of the early-time data resulted in a minimally higher variation for the exponential function (17%) but a much higher error (51%) for the power function. These results suggest that the method can produce reasonable estimates of initial mass useful for planning and assessing remediation efforts.

  3. Truth in Testing Legislation and Private Property Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Daniel J.

    1981-01-01

    Truth in testing laws are subject to challenge on the grounds that they invade federally protected rights and interests of the test-makers through the due process clauses of the Constitution and federal copyright protections. (Author/MLF)

  4. Properties of the Fast Forward Shock Driven by the July 23 2012 Extreme Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Pete; Giacalone, Joe; Liu, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Late on July 23, 2012, the STEREO-A spacecraft encountered a fast forward shock driven by a coronal mass ejection launched earlier that same day. The estimated travel time of the disturbance, together with the massive magnetic field strengths measured within the ejecta, made it one of the most extreme events observed during the space era. In this study, we examine the properties of the shock wave. Because an instrument malfunction limited the available plasma measurements during the interval surrounding the CME, our approach has been modified to capitalize on the available measurements and suitable proxies, where possible. We were able to infer the following properties. First, the shock normal, n, was pointing predominantly in the radial direction (0.97,-0.09,-0.23). Second, the angle between n and the upstream magnetic field, theta-Bn, was estimated to be ~34 Deg., making the shock "quasi-parallel," and consistent with there being an earlier "preconditioning" ICME. Third, the shock speed was estimated to be between ~2700 and ~3300 km/s, depending on the technique employed. Finally, in contrast to an earlier study, we found no evidence that the properties of the shock were modified by energetic particles: The change in ram pressure upstream of the shock was ~5 times larger than the pressure from the energetic particles.

  5. Concentration Dependent Speciation and Mass Transport Properties of Switchable Polarity Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron D. Wilson; Christopher J. Orme

    2014-12-01

    Tertiary amine switchable polarity solvents (SPS) consisting of predominantly water, tertiary amine, and tertiary ammonium and bicarbonate ions were produced at various concentrations for three different amines: N,N-dimethylcyclohexylamine, N,N-dimethyloctylamine, and 1 cyclohexylpiperidine. For all concentrations, physical properties were measured including viscosity, molecular diffusion coefficients, freezing point depression, and density. Based on these measurements a variation on the Mark Houwink equation was developed to predict the viscosity of any tertiary amine SPS as a function of concentration using the amine’s molecular mass. The observed physical properties allowed the identification of solution state speciation of non-osmotic SPS, where the amine to carbonic acid ratio is significantly greater than one. These results indicate that at most concentrations the stoichiometric excess amine is involved in solvating a proton with two amines. The physical properties of osmotic SPS have consistent concentration dependence behavior over a wide range of concentrations; this consistence suggests osmotic pressures based on low concentrations freezing point studies can be reliably extrapolated to higher concentrations.

  6. Testing the hydrologic utility of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across large scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirus, B. B.; Halford, K. J.; Sweetkind, D. S.; Fenelon, J.

    2014-12-01

    The utility of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivities to length scales that are commensurate with hydraulic data has been assessed at the Nevada National Security Site in highly-faulted volcanic rocks. Observed drawdowns from eight, large-scale, aquifer tests on Pahute Mesa provided the necessary constraints to test assumed relations between hydraulic conductivity and interpretations of the geology. The investigated volume of rock encompassed about 40 cubic miles where drawdowns were detected more than 2 mi from pumping wells and traversed major fault structures. Five sets of hydraulic conductivities at about 500 pilot points were estimated by simultaneously interpreting all aquifer tests with a different geologic framework for each set. Each geologic framework was incorporated as prior information that assumed homogeneous hydraulic conductivities within each geologic unit. Complexity of the geologic frameworks ranged from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 unique geologic units. Analysis of the model calibrations showed that a maximum of four geologic units could be differentiated where each was hydraulically unique as defined by the mean and standard deviation of log-hydraulic conductivity. Consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation were evaluated qualitatively with maps of transmissivity. Distributions of transmissivity were similar within the investigated extents regardless of geologic framework except for a transmissive streak along a fault in the Fault-Structure framework. Extrapolation was affected by underlying geologic frameworks where the variability of transmissivity increased as the number of units increased.

  7. Cerumen of Australian stingless bees ( Tetragonula carbonaria): gas chromatography-mass spectrometry fingerprints and potential anti-inflammatory properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, Flavia Carmelina; Brooks, Peter Richard; Wallace, Helen Margaret; Russell, Fraser Donald

    2011-04-01

    Cerumen, or propolis, is a mixture of plant resins enriched with bee secretions. In Australia, stingless bees are important pollinators that use cerumen for nest construction and possibly for colony's health. While extensive research attests to the therapeutic properties of honeybee ( Apis mellifera) propolis, the biological and medicinal properties of Australian stingless bee cerumen are largely unknown. In this study, the chemical and biological properties of polar extracts of cerumen from Tetragonula carbonaria in South East Queensland, Australia were investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses and in vitro 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) cell-free assays. Extracts were tested against comparative (commercial tincture of A. mellifera propolis) and positive controls (Trolox and gallic acid). Distinct GC-MS fingerprints of a mixed diterpenic profile typical of native bee cerumen were obtained with pimaric acid (6.31 ± 0.97%, w/w), isopimaric acid (12.23 ± 3.03%, w/w), and gallic acid (5.79 ± 0.81%, w/w) tentatively identified as useful chemical markers. Characteristic flavonoids and prenylated phenolics found in honeybee propolis were absent. Cerumen extracts from T. carbonaria inhibited activity of 5-LOX, an enzyme known to catalyse production of proinflammatory mediators (IC50 19.97 ± 2.67 μg/ml, mean ± SEM, n = 4). Extracts had similar potency to Trolox (IC50 12.78 ± 1.82 μg/ml), but were less potent than honeybee propolis (IC50 5.90 ± 0.62 μg/ml) or gallic acid (IC50 5.62 ± 0.35 μg/ml, P < 0.001). These findings warrant further investigation of the ecological and medicinal properties of this stingless bee cerumen, which may herald a commercial potential for the Australian beekeeping industry.

  8. Model Test of Anchoring Effect on Zonal Disintegration in Deep Surrounding Rock Masses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu-Guang; Zhang, Qiang-Yong; Wang, Yuan; Liu, De-Jun; Zhang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The deep rock masses show a different mechanical behavior compared with the shallow rock masses. They are classified into alternating fractured and intact zones during the excavation, which is known as zonal disintegration. Such phenomenon is a great disaster and will induce the different excavation and anchoring methodology. In this study, a 3D geomechanics model test was conducted to research the anchoring effect of zonal disintegration. The model was constructed with anchoring in a half and nonanchoring in the other half, to compare with each other. The optical extensometer and optical sensor were adopted to measure the displacement and strain changing law in the model test. The displacement laws of the deep surrounding rocks were obtained and found to be nonmonotonic versus the distance to the periphery. Zonal disintegration occurs in the area without anchoring and did not occur in the model under anchoring condition. By contrasting the phenomenon, the anchor effect of restraining zonal disintegration was revealed. And the formation condition of zonal disintegration was decided. In the procedure of tunnel excavation, the anchor strain was found to be alternation in tension and compression. It indicates that anchor will show the nonmonotonic law during suppressing the zonal disintegration. PMID:23997683

  9. Interpolation of the magnetic field at the test masses in eLISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, I.; Díaz-Aguiló, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.; García-Berro, E.; Lobo, A.

    2015-08-01

    A feasible design for a magnetic diagnostics subsystem for eLISA will be based on that of its precursor mission, LISA Pathfinder. Previous experience indicates that magnetic field estimation at the positions of the test masses has certain complications. This is due to two reasons. The first is that magnetometers usually back-act due to their measurement principles (i.e., they also create their own magnetic fields), while the second is that the sensors selected for LISA Pathfinder have a large size, which conflicts with space resolution and with the possibility of having a sufficient number of them to properly map the magnetic field around the test masses. However, high-sensitivity and small-sized sensors that significantly mitigate the two aforementioned limitations exist, and have been proposed to overcome these problems. Thus, these sensors will be likely selected for the magnetic diagnostics subsystem of eLISA. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the new magnetic subsystem, as it is currently conceived, and assess the feasibility of selecting these sensors in the final configuration of the magnetic diagnostic subsystem.

  10. Model test of anchoring effect on zonal disintegration in deep surrounding rock masses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu-Guang; Zhang, Qiang-Yong; Wang, Yuan; Liu, De-Jun; Zhang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The deep rock masses show a different mechanical behavior compared with the shallow rock masses. They are classified into alternating fractured and intact zones during the excavation, which is known as zonal disintegration. Such phenomenon is a great disaster and will induce the different excavation and anchoring methodology. In this study, a 3D geomechanics model test was conducted to research the anchoring effect of zonal disintegration. The model was constructed with anchoring in a half and nonanchoring in the other half, to compare with each other. The optical extensometer and optical sensor were adopted to measure the displacement and strain changing law in the model test. The displacement laws of the deep surrounding rocks were obtained and found to be nonmonotonic versus the distance to the periphery. Zonal disintegration occurs in the area without anchoring and did not occur in the model under anchoring condition. By contrasting the phenomenon, the anchor effect of restraining zonal disintegration was revealed. And the formation condition of zonal disintegration was decided. In the procedure of tunnel excavation, the anchor strain was found to be alternation in tension and compression. It indicates that anchor will show the nonmonotonic law during suppressing the zonal disintegration. PMID:23997683