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Sample records for mass spectrometer system

  1. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  2. Automated mass spectrometer analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuppermann, Aron (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor); Giffin, Charles E. (Inventor); Boettger, Heinz G. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An automated mass spectrometer analysis system is disclosed, in which samples are automatically processed in a sample processor and converted into volatilizable samples, or their characteristic volatilizable derivatives. Each volatilizable sample is sequentially volatilized and analyzed in a double focusing mass spectrometer, whose output is in the form of separate ion beams all of which are simultaneously focused in a focal plane. Each ion beam is indicative of a different sample component or different fragments of one or more sample components and the beam intensity is related to the relative abundance of the sample component. The system includes an electro-optical ion detector which automatically and simultaneously converts the ion beams, first into electron beams which in turn produce a related image which is transferred to the target of a vilicon unit. The latter converts the images into electrical signals which are supplied to a data processor, whose output is a list of the components of the analyzed sample and their abundances. The system is under the control of a master control unit, which in addition to monitoring and controlling various power sources, controls the automatic operation of the system under expected and some unexpected conditions and further protects various critical parts of the system from damage due to particularly abnormal conditions.

  3. Automated mass spectrometer analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettger, Heinz G. (Inventor); Giffin, Charles E. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor); Kuppermann, Aron (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An automated mass spectrometer analysis system is disclosed, in which samples are automatically processed in a sample processor and converted into volatilizable samples, or their characteristic volatilizable derivatives. Each volatizable sample is sequentially volatilized and analyzed in a double focusing mass spectrometer, whose output is in the form of separate ion beams all of which are simultaneously focused in a focal plane. Each ion beam is indicative of a different sample component or different fragments of one or more sample components and the beam intensity is related to the relative abundance of the sample component. The system includes an electro-optical ion detector which automatically and simultaneously converts the ion beams, first into electron beams which in turn produce a related image which is transferred to the target of a vidicon unit. The latter converts the images into electrical signals which are supplied to a data processor, whose output is a list of the components of the analyzed sample and their abundances. The system is under the control of a master control unit, which in addition to monitoring and controlling various power sources, controls the automatic operation of the system under expected and some unexpected conditions and further protects various critical parts of the system from damage due to particularly abnormal conditions.

  4. Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E; Ladner, Edward P

    2003-12-30

    The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

  5. Evaluation of Small Mass Spectrometer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Griffin, Timothy P.; Ottens, Andrew K.; Diaz, Jorge A.; Follistein, Duke W.; Adams, Fredrick W.; Helms, William R.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Various mass analyzer systems were evaluated. Several systems show promise, including the Stanford Research Systems RGA-100, Inficon XPR-2, the University of Florida's Ion Trap, and the Compact Double Focus Mass Spectrometer. Areas that need improvement are the response time, recovery time, system volume, and system weight. Future work will investigate techniques to improve systems and will evaluate engineering challenges.

  6. Expert overseer for mass spectrometer system

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.; Rankin, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    An expert overseer for the operation and real-time management of a mass spectrometer and associated laboratory equipment. The overseer is a computer-based expert diagnostic system implemented on a computer separate from the dedicated computer used to control the mass spectrometer and produce the analysis results. An interface links the overseer to components of the mass spectrometer, components of the laboratory support system, and the dedicated control computer. Periodically, the overseer polls these devices and as well as itself. These data are fed into an expert portion of the system for real-time evaluation. A knowledge base used for the evaluation includes both heuristic rules and precise operation parameters. The overseer also compares current readings to a long-term database to detect any developing trends using a combination of statistical and heuristic rules to evaluate the results. The overseer has the capability to alert lab personnel whenever questionable readings or trends are observed and provide a background review of the problem and suggest root causes and potential solutions, or appropriate additional tests that could be performed. The overseer can change the sequence or frequency of the polling to respond to an observation in the current data.

  7. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Coutts, G.W.; Bushman, J.F.; Alger, T.W.

    1996-07-23

    A vacuum housing and pumping system is described for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof. 7 figs.

  8. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Coutts, Gerald W.; Bushman, John F.; Alger, Terry W.

    1996-01-01

    A vacuum housing and pumping system for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof.

  9. Evaluation of Small Mass Spectrometer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Griffin, Timothy P.; Ottens, Andrew K.; Diaz, Jorge A.; Follistein, Duke W.; Adams, Fredrick W.; Helms, William R.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This work is aimed at understanding the aspects of designing a miniature mass spectrometer (MS) system. A multitude of commercial and government sectors, such as the military, environmental agencies and industrial manufacturers of semiconductors, refrigerants, and petroleum products, would find a small, portable, rugged and reliable MS system beneficial. Several types of small MS systems are evaluated and discussed, including linear quadrupole, quadrupole ion trap, time of flight and sector. The performance of each system in terms of accuracy, precision, limits of detection, response time, recovery time, scan rate, volume and weight is assessed. A performance scale is setup to rank each systems and an overall performance score is given to each system. All experiments involved the analysis of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon in a nitrogen background with the concentrations of the components of interest ranging from 0-5000 part-per-million (ppm). The relative accuracies of the systems vary from < 1% to approx. 40% with an average below 10%. Relative precisions varied from 1% to 20%, with an average below 5%. The detection limits had a large distribution, ranging from 0.2 to 170 ppm. The systems had a diverse response time ranging from 4 s to 210 s as did the recovery time with a 6 s to 210 s distribution. Most instruments had scan times near, 1 s, however one instrument exceeded 13 s. System weights varied from 9 to 52 kg and sizes from 15 x 10(exp 3)cu cm to 110 x 10(exp 3) cu cm.

  10. MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    White, F.A.

    1960-08-23

    A mass spectrometer is designed with a first adjustable magnetic field for resolving an ion beam into beams of selected masses, a second adjustable magnetic field for further resolving the ion beam from the first field into beams of selected masses, a thin foil disposed in the path of the beam between the first and second magnets to dissociate molecular ions incident thereon, an electrostatic field for further resolving the ion beam from the second field into beams of selected masses, and a detector disposed adjacent to the electrostatic field to receive the ion beam.

  11. Dual Source Mass Spectrometer and Sample Handling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cornish, T. J.; Cheng, A. F.; Niemann, H. B.; Harpold, D. N.; Gorevan, S. P.; Rafeek, S.; Yucht, D.

    2002-01-01

    We present details of a miniature integrated time-of-flight mass spectrometer and sample handling system under development to address some of the needs for in situ sample analysis on landed missions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Mass spectrometer. [On Space Transportation System 2 Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.; Carignan, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The quadrupole Mass Spectrometer of the Induced Environment Contamination Monitor (IECM) operates in the range from 2 to 150 amu. It is pointed out that the Mass Spectrometer on STS-2 performed very well. It was found that the column density of H2O effluent from the Shuttle reached a maximum of 1 x 10 to the 13th per sq cm at 7 hr, 30 min and decreased by a factor of 7.5 during the subsequent 40 hrs. The count rate response of H2O could be correlated with mission-related events, taking into account the dumping of supply water, the operation of the Flash Evaporator System, and the firing of a primary reaction control system engine.

  13. A microelectromechanical systems-enabled, miniature triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Wright, Steven; Malcolm, Andrew; Wright, Christopher; O'Prey, Shane; Crichton, Edward; Dash, Neil; Moseley, Richard W; Zaczek, Wojciech; Edwards, Peter; Fussell, Richard J; Syms, Richard R A

    2015-03-17

    Miniaturized mass spectrometers are becoming increasingly capable, enabling the development of many novel field and laboratory applications. However, to date, triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometers, the workhorses of quantitative analysis, have not been significantly reduced in size. Here, the basis of a field-deployable triple quadrupole is described. The key development is a highly miniaturized ion optical assembly in which a sequence of six microengineered components is employed to generate ions at atmospheric pressure, provide a vacuum interface, effect ion guiding, and perform fragmentation and mass analysis. Despite its small dimensions, the collision cell efficiently fragments precursor ions and yields product ion spectra that are very similar to those recorded using conventional instruments. The miniature triple quadrupole has been used to detect thiabendazole, a common pesticide, in apples at a level of 10 ng/g. PMID:25708099

  14. Mass Spectrometers in Space!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Exploration of our solar system over several decades has benefitted greatly from the sensitive chemical analyses offered by spaceflight mass spectrometers. When dealing with an unknown environment, the broadband detection capabilities of mass analyzers have proven extremely valuable in determining the composition and thereby the basic nature of space environments, including the outer reaches of Earth s atmosphere, interplanetary space, the Moon, and the planets and their satellites. Numerous mass analyzer types, including quadrupole, monopole, sector, ion trap, and time-of-flight have been incorporated in flight instruments and delivered robotically to a variety of planetary environments. All such instruments went through a rigorous process of application-specific development, often including significant miniaturization, testing, and qualification for the space environment. Upcoming missions to Mars and opportunities for missions to Venus, Europa, Saturn, Titan, asteroids, and comets provide new challenges for flight mass spectrometers that push to state of the art in fundamental analytical technique. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on the recently-launch Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission incorporates a quadrupole analyzer to support direct evolved gas as well as gas chromatograph-based analysis of martian rocks and atmosphere, seeking signs of a past or present habitable environment. A next-generation linear ion trap mass spectrometer, using both electron impact and laser ionization, is being incorporated into the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) instrument, which will be flown to Mars in 2018. These and other mass spectrometers and mission concepts at various stages of development will be described.

  15. Lunar orbital mass spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, W. P.

    1971-01-01

    The design, development, manufacture, test and calibration of five lunar orbital mass spectrometers with the four associated ground support equipment test sets are discussed. A mass spectrometer was installed in the Apollo 15 and one in the Apollo 16 Scientific Instrument Module within the Service Module. The Apollo 15 mass spectrometer was operated with collection of 38 hours of mass spectra data during lunar orbit and 50 hours of data were collected during transearth coast. The Apollo 16 mass spectrometer was operated with collection of 76 hours of mass spectra data during lunar orbit. However, the Apollo 16 mass spectrometer was ejected into lunar orbit upon malfunction of spacecraft boom system just prior to transearth insection and no transearth coast data was possible.

  16. Automated transportable mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echo, M. W.

    1981-09-01

    The need was identified for a mass spectrometer (MS) which can be conveniently transported among several facilities for rapid verification of the isotopic composition of special nuclear material. This requirement for a light weight, transportable MS for U and Pu mass analysis was met by deleting the gas chromograph (GC) portions of a Hewlett-Packard Model 5992 Quadrupole GCMS and substituting a vacuum lock sample entry system. A programmable power supply and vacuum gauge were added and circuitry modifications were made to enable use of the supplied software.

  17. The Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheson, E.; Harris, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of a quadrupole mass spectrometer for experiments in an advanced-teaching laboratory. Discusses the theory of operation of the spectrometer and the factors affecting the resolution. Some examples of mass spectra obtained with this instrument are presented and discussed. (LC)

  18. Cyclotrons as mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.

    1984-04-01

    The principles and design choices for cyclotrons as mass spectrometers are described. They are illustrated by examples of cyclotrons developed by various groups for this purpose. The use of present high energy cyclotrons for mass spectrometry is also described. 28 references, 12 figures.

  19. A computer controlled mass spectrometer system for investigating the decomposition of non-metallic materials under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A PDP 11/23 quadrupole mass spectrometer system was coupled to a nondiscriminating gas inlet system permitting gases at atmospheric pressure to be admitted into a high vacuum chamber containing the ion source of the mass spectrometer without separation of the gaseous components. The resolution of related software problems has resulted in a convenient computer-mass spectrometer system capable of generating masses, relative intensities and related data on the gaseous products resulting from the atmospheric thermal decomposition of nonmetallic materials.

  20. Measuring Transmission Efficiencies Of Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Santosh K.

    1989-01-01

    Coincidence counts yield absolute efficiencies. System measures mass-dependent transmission efficiencies of mass spectrometers, using coincidence-counting techniques reminiscent of those used for many years in calibration of detectors for subatomic particles. Coincidences between detected ions and electrons producing them counted during operation of mass spectrometer. Under certain assumptions regarding inelastic scattering of electrons, electron/ion-coincidence count is direct measure of transmission efficiency of spectrometer. When fully developed, system compact, portable, and used routinely to calibrate mass spectrometers.

  1. Operation of a microchannel plate counting system in a mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. M.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    A multiplier detector system has been developed as part of a mass spectrometer in an ion counting mode. During its operation ions striking a microchannel plate release pulses of electrons which are accelerated to a phosphor layer. The resulting flash of light is carried by a fiber-optic bundle to a photodiode array. The detector simultaneously counts ions throughout a mass spectrum covering more than 30 amu. It extends the mass spectrometer's operation toward low count rates for trace gas analysis. Each mass peak can be independently measured at count rates between 0.1 and 1000 counts/s. Higher rates on a few peaks do not blind the entire detector. The detector's capabilities have been demonstrated by measuring Kr and Xe isotopes in air at natural abundances. The mass spectrometer, detector, and readout electronics are sufficiently compact to permit use in a balloon-borne experiment.

  2. Volcanic Gas Emissions Mapping Using a Mass Spectrometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Timothy P.; Diaz, J. Andres

    2008-01-01

    The visualization of hazardous gaseous emissions at volcanoes using in-situ mass spectrometry (MS) is a key step towards a better comprehension of the geophysical phenomena surrounding eruptive activity. In-Situ gas data consisting of helium, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and other gas species, were acquired with an MS system. MS and global position system (GPS) data were plotted on ground imagery, topography, and remote sensing data collected by a host of instruments during the second Costa Rica Airborne Research and Technology Applications (CARTA) mission This combination of gas and imaging data allowed 3-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the volcanic plume end the mapping of gas concentration at several volcanic structures and urban areas This combined set of data has demonstrated a better tool to assess hazardous conditions by visualizing and modeling of possible scenarios of volcanic activity. The MS system is used for in-situ measurement of three-dimensional gas concentrations at different volcanic locations with three different transportation platforms, aircraft, auto, and hand carried. The demonstration for urban contamination mapping is also presented as another possible use for the MS system.

  3. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  4. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  5. Field-deployed underwater mass spectrometers for investigations of transient chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Kibelka, Gottfried P G; Timothy Short, R; Toler, Strawn K; Edkins, John E; Byrne, Robert H

    2004-11-15

    The mass spectrometer developments and underwater deployments described in this work are directed toward observations of important reactive and influential inorganic and organic chemicals. Mass spectrometer systems for measurement of dissolved gases and volatile hydrocarbons were created by coupling a membrane analyte-introduction system with linear quadrupole and ion trap mass analyzers. For molecular masses up to 100amu, the in situ quadrupole system has detection limits on the order of 1-5ppb. For masses up to approximately 300amu, the underwater ion trap system detects many volatile hydrocarbons at concentrations below 1ppb. Both instruments can function autonomously or via interactive communications from a remote control site. Continuous operations can be sustained for up to approximately 12 days. Deployments have initially involved shallow water proof-of-concept operations at depths less than 30m. Future modifications are planned that will allow operational depths to 200m. PMID:18969697

  6. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  7. Ion mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M. (Inventor); Clay, D. R.; Goldstein, B. E.; Goldstein, R.

    1984-01-01

    An ion mass spectrometer is described which detects and indicates the characteristics of ions received over a wide angle, and which indicates the mass to charge ratio, the energy, and the direction of each detected ion. The spectrometer includes a magnetic analyzer having a sector magnet that passes ions received over a wide angle, and an electrostatic analyzer positioned to receive ions passing through the magnetic analyzer. The electrostatic analyzer includes a two dimensional ion sensor at one wall of the analyzer chamber, that senses not only the lengthwise position of the detected ion to indicate its mass to charge ratio, but also detects the ion position along the width of the chamber to indicate the direction in which the ion was traveling.

  8. Mass spectrometers: instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooks, R. G.; Hoke, S. H., II; Morand, K. L.; Lammert, S. A.

    1992-09-01

    Developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation over the past three years are reviewed. The subject is characterized by an enormous diversity of designs, a high degree of competition between different laboratories working with either different or similar techniques and by extremely rapid progress in improving analytical performance. Instruments can be grouped into genealogical charts based on their physical and conceptual interrelationships. This is illustrated using mass analyzers of different types. The time course of development of particular instrumental concepts is illustrated in terms of the s-curves typical of cell growth. Examples are given of instruments which are at the exponential, linear and mature growth stages. The prime examples used are respectively: (i) hybrid instruments designed to study reactive collisions of ions with surfaces: (ii) the Paul ion trap; and (iii) the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the area of ion/surface collisions, reactive collisions such as hydrogen radical abstraction from the surface by the impinging ion are studied. They are shown to depend upon the chemical nature of the surface through the use of experiments which utilize self-assembled monolayers as surfaces. The internal energy deposited during surface-induced dissociation upon collision with different surfaces in a BEEQ instrument is also discussed. Attention is also given to a second area of emerging instrumentation, namely technology which allows mass spectrometers to be used for on-line monitoring of fluid streams. A summary of recent improvements in the performance of the rapidly developing quadrupole ion trap instrument illustrates this stage of instrument development. Improvements in resolution and mass range and their application to the characterization of biomolecules are described. The interaction of theory with experiment is illustrated through the role of simulations of ion motion in the ion trap. It is emphasized that mature instruments play a

  9. Systems, methods, and apparatus of a low conductance silicon micro-leak for mass spectrometer inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, Dan N. (Inventor); Niemann, Hasso B. (Inventor); Jamieson, Brian G. (Inventor); Lynch, Bernard A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments a mass spectrometer micro-leak includes a number of channels fabricated by semiconductor processing tools and that includes a number of inlet holes that provide access to the channels.

  10. Systems, Methods, and Apparatus of a Low Conductance Silicon Micro-Leak for Mass Spectrometer Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, Dan N. (Inventor); Niemann, Hasso B. (Inventor); Jamieson, Brian G. (Inventor); Lynch, Bernard A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments a mass spectrometer micro-leak includes a number of channels fabricated by semiconductor processing tools and that includes a number of inlet holes that provide access to the channels.

  11. Development of a high vacuum sample preparation system for helium mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Das, N. K.; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    A high vacuum sample preparation system for the 3He/4He ratio mass spectrometer (Helix SFT) has been developed to remove all the gaseous constituents excluding helium from the field gases. The sample preparation system comprises of turbo molecular pump, ion pump, zirconium getter, pipettes and vacuum gauges with controller. All these are fitted with cylindrical SS chamber using all metal valves. The field samples are initially treated with activated charcoal trap immersed in liquid nitrogen to cutoff major impurities and moisture present in the sample gas. A sample of 5 ml is collected out of this stage at a pressure of 10-2 mbar. This sample is subsequently purified at a reduced pressure of 10-7 mbar before it is injected into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. The sample pressure was maintained below 10-7 mbar with turbo molecular vacuum pumps and ion pumps. The sample gas passes through several getter elements and a cold finger with the help of manual high vacuum valves before it is fed to the mass spectrometer. Thus the high vacuum sample preparation system introduces completely clean, dry and refined helium sample to the mass spectrometer for best possible analysis of isotopic ratio of helium.

  12. Automated mass spectrometer/analysis system: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettger, H. G.; Giffin, C. E.; Dreyer, W. J.; Kuppermann, A.

    1975-01-01

    System performs rapid multiple analyses of entire compound classes or individual compounds on small amounts of sample and reagent. Method will allow screening of large populations for metabolic disorders and establishment of effective-but-safe levels of therapeutic drugs in body fluids and tissues.

  13. Elimination of ``memory`` from sample handling and inlet system of a mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Chastgner, P.

    1991-05-08

    This paper describes a method for preparing the sample handling and inlet system of a mass spectrometer for analysis of a subsequent sample following analysis of a previous sample comprising the flushing of the system interior with supercritical CO{sub 2} and venting the interior. The method eliminates the effect of system ``memory`` on the subsequent analysis, especially following persistent samples such as xenon and krypton.

  14. Toward a Micro Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiberg, D. V.; Eyre, F. B.; Orient, O.; Chutjian, A.; Garkarian, V.

    2001-01-01

    Miniature mass filters (e.g., quadrupoles, ion traps) have been the subject of several miniaturization efforts. A project is currently in progress at JPL to develop a miniaturized Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) system, incorporating and/or developing miniature system components including turbomolecular pumps, scroll type roughing pump, quadrupole mass filter, gas chromatograph, precision power supply and other electronic components. The preponderance of the system elements will be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques. The quadrupole mass filter will be fabricated using an X-ray lithography technique producing high precision, 5x5 arrays of quadrupoles with pole lengths of about 3 mm and a total volume of 27 cubic mm. The miniature scroll pump will also be fabricated using X-ray lithography producing arrays of scroll stages about 3 mm in diameter. The target detection range for the mass spectrometer is 1 to 300 atomic mass units (AMU) with are solution of 0.5 AMU. This resolution will allow isotopic characterization for geochronology, atmospheric studies and other science efforts dependant on the understanding of isotope ratios of chemical species. This paper will discuss the design approach, the current state-of-the art regarding the system components and the progress toward development of key elements. The full system is anticipated to be small enough in mass, volume and power consumption to allow in situ chemical analysis on highly miniaturized science craft for geochronology, atmospheric characterization and detection of life experiments applicable to outer planet roadmap missions.

  15. A cometary ion mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, E. G.; Simpson, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The development of flight suitable analyzer units for that part of the GIOTTO Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) experiment designated the High Energy Range Spectrometer (HERS) is discussed. Topics covered include: design of the total ion-optical system for the HERS analyzer; the preparation of the design of analyzing magnet; the evaluation of microchannel plate detectors and associated two-dimensional anode arrays; and the fabrication and evaluation of two flight-suitable units of the complete ion-optical analyzer system including two-dimensional imaging detectors and associated image encoding electronics.

  16. Method for calibrating mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2002-12-24

    A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

  17. A molecular beam/quadrupole mass spectrometer system with synchronized beam modulation and digital waveform analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Adams, B. R.

    1983-01-01

    A performance evaluation is conducted for a molecular beam/mass spectrometer (MB/MS) system, as applied to a 1-30 torr microwave-discharge flow reactor (MWFR) used in the formation of the methylperoxy radical and a study of its subsequent destruction in the presence or absence of NO(x). The modulated MB/MS system is four-staged and differentially pumped. The results obtained by the MWFR study is illustrative of overall system performance, including digital waveform analysis; significant improvements over previous designs are noted in attainable S/N ratio, detection limit, and accuracy.

  18. A Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer System for UltraLow-Emission Combustor Exhaust Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.; Wey, Chowen Chou

    1996-01-01

    A gas chromatograph (GC)/mass spectrometer (MS) system that allows the speciation of unburnt hydrocarbons in the combustor exhaust has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Combustion gas samples are withdrawn through a water-cooled sampling probe which, when not in use, is protected from contamination by a high-pressure nitrogen purge. The sample line and its connecting lines, filters, and valves are all ultraclean and are heated to avoid condensation. The system has resolution to the parts-per-billion (ppb) level.

  19. Networking mass spectrometer data systems for improved productivity and electronic archiving of data.

    PubMed

    Hayward, M J; Robandt, P V; Meek, J T; Thomson, M L

    1993-09-01

    Several Finngan-MAT mass spectrometer data systems were networked together to achieve the following two primary objectives: (1) to allow access to mass spectrometry data and data processing functions from remote locations without affecting simultaneous data acquisition at the instruments, and (2) to electronically archive mass spectrometry data at a central location on a high-capacity, fast-access device that allows rapid retrieval of archived data for all data processing operations at all locations. UNIX workstations, IBM PC/AT-compatible computers, and Data General Nova minicomputers were connected via Ethernet interfaces to allow rapid data transfer among all systems as well as X-Windows access to UNIX-based systems. Bridging techniques were used to isolate possible high-traffic areas of the network and to enable security measures for adequate protection of files. Additionally, serial connections were made through a Northern Telecom phone system to provide remote terminal access to the Data General Nova-based systems. Use of these connectivity techniques significantly improved productivity by allowing retrieval, processing, and printing of data from remote locations, such as office areas, without affecting data acquisition, processing, and printing performed simultaneously at the instruments. For archival purposes, data files are electronically stored on high-capacity magneto-optical disks for rapid retrieval. A highcapacity fixed disk is also available for centralized temporary data file storage. A Digital Equipment Corporation DECstation 2100 UNIX workstation was used as the file server for centralized data storage while being simultaneously utilized as the data system computer for one of the mass spectrometers. Utilization of this UNIX-based file server system in conjunction with Ethernet connectivity techniques provides a centralized, rapid-access, high-capacity, cost- and space-efficient method for electronic archival of mass spectrometry raw data recorded

  20. Application of a trochoidal electron monochromator/mass spectrometer system to the study of environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Laramee, J.A.; Kocher, C.A.; Deinzer, M.L. )

    1992-10-15

    A trochoidal electron monochromator has been interfaced to a mass spectrometer to perform electron capture negative ion mass spectrometric (ECNIMS) analyses of environmentally relevant chemicals. The kinetic energy of the electron beam can be varied from 0.025 to 30 eV under computer control. No reagent gas is used to moderate the electron energies. An electron energy spread of +/- 0.1 to +/- 0.4 eV full width at half-maximum (fwhm) can readily be obtained at a transmitted current of 2 x 10(-6) A, improving to +/- 0.07 eV at 5 x 10(-7) A. Comparisons of ECNI results from the electron monochromator/mass spectrometer system with those from a standard instrument that uses a moderating gas show similar spectra for heptachlor but not for the s-triazine herbicides, as for example, atrazine. This compound shows numerous adduct ions by standard ECNIMS that are eliminated by using the electron monochromator to generate the mass spectra. Isomeric tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxins show distinct differences in the electron energies needed to produce the maximum amount of parent and fragment anions. Multiple resonance states resulting in stable radical anions (M.-) are easily observed for nitrobenzene and for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Ionic products of dissociative electron capture invariably occur from several resonance states.

  1. Laboratory automation of a quadrupole mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. M.

    1983-12-01

    Efforts directed toward interfacing an LSI II bus of a PDP 11/23 desktop computer with a quadrupole mass spectrometer for the purpose of providing a convenient system whereby mass spectral data, of the products of thermal decomposition, may be rapidly acquired and processed under programmed conditions are described. The versatility and operations of the quadrupole mass spectrometer are discussed as well as the procedure for configurating the LSI II bus of the PDP 11/23 desktop computer for interfacing with the quadrupole mass spectrometer system. Data from the mass filter and other units of the spectrometer are digitally transferred to the computer whereupon mass spectral data and related data are generated.

  2. Laboratory Automation of a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Efforts directed toward interfacing an LSI II bus of a PDP 11/23 desktop computer with a quadrupole mass spectrometer for the purpose of providing a convenient system whereby mass spectral data, of the products of thermal decomposition, may be rapidly acquired and processed under programmed conditions are described. The versatility and operations of the quadrupole mass spectrometer are discussed as well as the procedure for configurating the LSI II bus of the PDP 11/23 desktop computer for interfacing with the quadrupole mass spectrometer system. Data from the mass filter and other units of the spectrometer are digitally transferred to the computer whereupon mass spectral data and related data are generated.

  3. Mass-spectrometer-based continuous emissions monitoring system for acid-gas emissions and DRE demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartman, Candace D.; Connolly, Erin; Renfroe, Jim; Harlow, George

    1993-03-01

    The objective of the work presented here was to develop a technology for continuous measurement of stack gas emissions for compounds such as HCl, SO2, and NOx that was also capable of monitoring toxic hydrocarbons. The goal was to assure operators and local communities that the emission source is routinely operating in compliance with and well within the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. A mass spectrometer-based continuous emissions monitoring system (CEMS) and its sample extraction system developed as a result of this work are described. Results of calibration drift, linearity, and accuracy tests for HCl, SO2, and NOx are presented. Results of CEMS tests are described that show the system has the performance capabilities necessary for a relatively inexpensive and frequent DRE demonstration.

  4. Miniaturized system of a gas chromatograph coupled with a Paul ion trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortt, B. J.; Darrach, M. R.; Holland, Paul M.; Chutjian, A.

    2005-01-01

    Miniature gas chromatography (GC) and miniature mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation has been developed to identify and quantify the chemical compounds present in complex mixtures of gases. The design approach utilizes micro-GC components coupled with a Paul quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometer. Inherent to the system are high sensitivity, good dynamic range, good QIT resolution, low GC flow-rates to minimize vacuum requirements and the need for consumables; and the use of a modular approach to adapt to volatile organic compounds dissolved in water or present in sediment. Measurements are reported on system response to gaseous species at concentrations varying over four orders of magnitude. The ability of the system to deal with complicated mixtures is demonstrated, and future improvements are discussed. The GC/QIT system described herein has a mass, volume and power that are, conservatively, one-twentieth of those of commercial off-the-shelf systems. Potential applications are to spacecraft cabin-air monitoring, robotic planetary exploration and trace-species detection for residual gas analysis and environmental monitoring.

  5. Design of Portable Mass Spectrometers with Handheld Probes: Aspects of the Sampling and Miniature Pumping Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hsun; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Kline-Schoder, Robert; Sorensen, Paul; Cooks, R. Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Miniature mass spectrometry analytical systems of backpack configuration fitted with sampling probes could potentially be of significant interest for in-field, real-time chemical analysis. In this study, various configurations were explored in which a long narrow tube was used to connect the turbo and backing pumps used to create and maintain vacuum. Also, for the first time we introduced two new types of pumps for miniature mass spectrometers, the Creare 130g drag pump and Creare 350g scroll backing pump. These pumps, along with another Creare 550 turbo pump and the commercially available Pfeiffer HiPace 10 turbo and KnF diaphragm backing pumps, were tested with the backpack configurations. The system performance, especially the scan time, was characterized when used with a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface (DAPI) for ion introduction. The pumping performance in the pressure region above 1 mtorr is critical for DAPI operation. The 550g turbo pump was shown to have a relatively higher pumping speed above 1 mtorr and gave a scan time of 300 ms, almost half the value obtained with the larger, heavier HiPace 10 often used with miniature mass spectrometers. The 350 g scroll pump was also found to be an improvement over the diaphragm pumps generally used as backing pumps. With a coaxial low temperature plasma ion source, direct analysis of low volatility compounds glass slides was demonstrated, including 1 ng DNP (2,4-Dinitrophenol) and 10ng TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) with Creare 550g turbo pump as well as 10 ng cocaine and 20 ng DNP with Creare 130g drag pump. PMID:25404157

  6. Design of Portable Mass Spectrometers with Handheld Probes: Aspects of the Sampling and Miniature Pumping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Hsun; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Kline-Schoder, Robert; Sorensen, Paul; Cooks, R. Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2015-02-01

    Miniature mass spectrometry analytical systems of backpack configuration fitted with sampling probes could potentially be of significant interest for in-field, real-time chemical analysis. In this study, various configurations were explored in which a long narrow tube was used to connect the turbo and backing pumps used to create and maintain vacuum. Also, for the first time we introduced two new types of pumps for miniature mass spectrometers, the Creare 130 g drag pump and Creare 350 g scroll backing pump. These pumps, along with another Creare 550 turbo pump and the commercially available Pfeiffer HiPace 10 turbo and KnF diaphragm backing pumps, were tested with the backpack configurations. The system performance, especially the scan time, was characterized when used with a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface (DAPI) for ion introduction. The pumping performance in the pressure region above 1 mtorr is critical for DAPI operation. The 550 g turbo pump was shown to have a relatively higher pumping speed above 1 mtorr and gave a scan time of 300 ms, almost half the value obtained with the larger, heavier HiPace 10 often used with miniature mass spectrometers. The 350 g scroll pump was also found to be an improvement over the diaphragm pumps generally used as backing pumps. With a coaxial low temperature plasma ion source, direct analysis of low volatility compounds glass slides was demonstrated, including 1 ng DNP (2,4-Dinitrophenol) and 10 ng TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) with Creare 550 g turbo pump as well as 10 ng cocaine and 20 ng DNP with Creare 130 g drag pump.

  7. Design of portable mass spectrometers with handheld probes: aspects of the sampling and miniature pumping systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hsun; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Kline-Schoder, Robert; Sorensen, Paul; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2015-02-01

    Miniature mass spectrometry analytical systems of backpack configuration fitted with sampling probes could potentially be of significant interest for in-field, real-time chemical analysis. In this study, various configurations were explored in which a long narrow tube was used to connect the turbo and backing pumps used to create and maintain vacuum. Also, for the first time we introduced two new types of pumps for miniature mass spectrometers, the Creare 130 g drag pump and Creare 350 g scroll backing pump. These pumps, along with another Creare 550 turbo pump and the commercially available Pfeiffer HiPace 10 turbo and KnF diaphragm backing pumps, were tested with the backpack configurations. The system performance, especially the scan time, was characterized when used with a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface (DAPI) for ion introduction. The pumping performance in the pressure region above 1 mtorr is critical for DAPI operation. The 550 g turbo pump was shown to have a relatively higher pumping speed above 1 mtorr and gave a scan time of 300 ms, almost half the value obtained with the larger, heavier HiPace 10 often used with miniature mass spectrometers. The 350 g scroll pump was also found to be an improvement over the diaphragm pumps generally used as backing pumps. With a coaxial low temperature plasma ion source, direct analysis of low volatility compounds glass slides was demonstrated, including 1 ng DNP (2,4-Dinitrophenol) and 10 ng TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) with Creare 550 g turbo pump as well as 10 ng cocaine and 20 ng DNP with Creare 130 g drag pump. PMID:25404157

  8. Expert systems technology applied to instrument operation and data acquisition of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (TQMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    This presentation covers the work done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by some computer programmers and analytical chemists specializing in mass spectrometry to develop an expert system for real-time tuning and optimization of operations of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (TQMS). This capability is important to increase the sensitivity possible for selected compounds throughout the entire mass range of the instrument, rather than settling for the traditional normalized calibration which lowers sensitivity at both ends of the mass scale.

  9. Unmanned Aerial Mass Spectrometer Systems for In-Situ Volcanic Plume Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Jorge Andres; Pieri, David; Wright, Kenneth; Sorensen, Paul; Kline-Shoder, Robert; Arkin, C. Richard; Fladeland, Matthew; Bland, Geoff; Buongiorno, Maria Fabrizia; Ramirez, Carlos; Corrales, Ernesto; Alan, Alfredo; Alegria, Oscar; Diaz, David; Linick, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Technology advances in the field of small, unmanned aerial vehicles and their integration with a variety of sensor packages and instruments, such as miniature mass spectrometers, have enhanced the possibilities and applications of what are now called unmanned aerial systems (UAS). With such technology, in situ and proximal remote sensing measurements of volcanic plumes are now possible without risking the lives of scientists and personnel in charge of close monitoring of volcanic activity. These methods provide unprecedented, and otherwise unobtainable, data very close in space and time to eruptions, to better understand the role of gas volatiles in magma and subsequent eruption products. Small mass spectrometers, together with the world's smallest turbo molecular pump, have being integrated into NASA and University of Costa Rica UAS platforms to be field-tested for in situ volcanic plume analysis, and in support of the calibration and validation of satellite-based remote sensing data. These new UAS-MS systems are combined with existing UAS flight-tested payloads and assets, such as temperature, pressure, relative humidity, SO2, H2S, CO2, GPS sensors, on-board data storage, and telemetry. Such payloads are capable of generating real time 3D concentration maps of the Turrialba volcano active plume in Costa Rica, while remote sensing data are simultaneously collected from the ASTER and OMI space-borne instruments for comparison. The primary goal is to improve the understanding of the chemical and physical properties of emissions for mitigation of local volcanic hazards, for the validation of species detection and abundance of retrievals based on remote sensing, and to validate transport models.

  10. Unmanned aerial mass spectrometer systems for in-situ volcanic plume analysis.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jorge Andres; Pieri, David; Wright, Kenneth; Sorensen, Paul; Kline-Shoder, Robert; Arkin, C Richard; Fladeland, Matthew; Bland, Geoff; Buongiorno, Maria Fabrizia; Ramirez, Carlos; Corrales, Ernesto; Alan, Alfredo; Alegria, Oscar; Diaz, David; Linick, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Technology advances in the field of small, unmanned aerial vehicles and their integration with a variety of sensor packages and instruments, such as miniature mass spectrometers, have enhanced the possibilities and applications of what are now called unmanned aerial systems (UAS). With such technology, in situ and proximal remote sensing measurements of volcanic plumes are now possible without risking the lives of scientists and personnel in charge of close monitoring of volcanic activity. These methods provide unprecedented, and otherwise unobtainable, data very close in space and time to eruptions, to better understand the role of gas volatiles in magma and subsequent eruption products. Small mass spectrometers, together with the world's smallest turbo molecular pump, have being integrated into NASA and University of Costa Rica UAS platforms to be field-tested for in situ volcanic plume analysis, and in support of the calibration and validation of satellite-based remote sensing data. These new UAS-MS systems are combined with existing UAS flight-tested payloads and assets, such as temperature, pressure, relative humidity, SO2, H2S, CO2, GPS sensors, on-board data storage, and telemetry. Such payloads are capable of generating real time 3D concentration maps of the Turrialba volcano active plume in Costa Rica, while remote sensing data are simultaneously collected from the ASTER and OMI space-borne instruments for comparison. The primary goal is to improve the understanding of the chemical and physical properties of emissions for mitigation of local volcanic hazards, for the validation of species detection and abundance of retrievals based on remote sensing, and to validate transport models. PMID:25588720

  11. High-resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollnik, Hermann

    2015-11-01

    Discussed are different types of high resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers. In detail outlined are (1) magnetic and electric sector field mass spectrographs, which are the oldest systems, (2) Penning Trap mass spectrographs and spectrometers, which have achieved very high mass-resolving powers, but are technically demanding (3) time-of-flight mass spectrographs using high energy ions passing through accelerator rings, which have also achieved very high mass-resolving powers and are equally technically demanding, (4) linear time-of-flight mass spectrographs, which have become the most versatile mass analyzers for low energy ions, while the even higher performing multi-pass systems have only started to be used, (5) orbitraps, which also have achieved remarkably high mass-resolving powers for low energy ions.

  12. A five-collector system for the simultaneous measurement of argon isotope ratios in a static mass spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Sherrill, N.D.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Lanphere, M.A.; Carpenter, N.V.

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that utilizes five separate Faraday-cup collector assemblies, aligned along the focal plane of a mass spectrometer, to collect simultaneous argon ion beams at masses 36-40. Each collector has its own electrometer amplifier and analog-to-digital measuring channel, the outputs of which are processed by a minicomputer that also controls the mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer utilizes a 90?? sector magnetic analyzer with a radius of 23 cm, in which some degree of z-direction focussing is provided for all the ion beams by the fringe field of the magnet. Simultaneous measurement of the ion beams helps to eliminate mass-spectrometer memory as a significant source of measurement error during an analysis. Isotope ratios stabilize between 7 and 9 s after sample admission into the spectrometer, and thereafter changes in the measured ratios are linear, typically to within ??0.02%. Thus the multi-collector arrangement permits very short extrapolation times for computation of initial ratios, and also provides the advantages of simultaneous measurement of the ion currents in that errors due to variations in ion beam intensity are minimized. A complete analysis takes less than 10 min, so that sample throughput can be greatly enhanced. In this instrument, the factor limiting analytical precision now lies in short-term apparent variations in the interchannel calibration factors. ?? 1981.

  13. Mass spectrometers and atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunton, D. E.; Trzcinski, E.; Cross, J. B.; Spangler, L. H.; Hoffbauer, M. H.; Archuleta, F. H.; Visentine, J. T.

    1987-01-01

    The likely role of atmospheric atomic oxygen in the recession of spacecraft surfaces and in the shuttle glow has revived interest in the accurate measurement of atomic oxygen densities in the upper atmosphere. The Air Force Geophysics Laboratory is supplying a quadrupole mass spectrometer for a materials interactions flight experiment being planned by the Johnson Space Center. The mass spectrometer will measure the flux of oxygen on test materials and will also identify the products of surface reactions. The instrument will be calibrated at a new facility for producing high energy beams of atomic oxygen at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The plans for these calibration experiments are summarized.

  14. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOEpatents

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-29

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  15. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOEpatents

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2010-06-01

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  16. High sensitivity pulse-counting mass spectrometer system for noble gas analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenberg, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    A pulse-counting mass spectrometer is described which is comprised of a new ion source of cylindrical geometry, with exceptional optical properties (the Baur source), a dual focal plane externally adjustable collector slits, and a 17-stage Allen-type electron multiplier, all housed in a metal 21 cm radius, 90 deg magnetic sector flight tube. Mass discrimination of the instrument is less than 1 per mil per mass unit; the optical transmission is more than 90%; the source sensitivity (Faraday collection) is 4 ma/torr at 250 micron emission; and the abundance sensitivity is 30,000.

  17. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H.

    1984-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  18. A new mass spectrometer system for investigating laser-induced vaporization phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, K. A.

    1974-01-01

    A laser has been combined with a mass spectrometer in a new configuration developed for studies of high-temperature materials. A vacuum-lock, solid-sample inlet is mounted at one end of a cylindrical, high-vacuum chamber one meter in length with a nude ion-source, time-of-flight mass spectrometer at the opposite end. The samples are positioned along the axis of the chamber at distances up to one meter from the ion source, and their surfaces are vaporized by a pulsed laser beam entering via windows on one side of the chamber. The instrumentation along with its capabilities is described, and results from laser-induced vaporization of several graphites are presented.

  19. ELECTRONICS UPGRADE OF HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mcintosh, J; Joe Cordaro, J

    2008-03-10

    High resolution mass spectrometers are specialized systems that allow researchers to determine the exact mass of samples to four significant digits by using magnetic and electronic sector mass analyzers. Many of the systems in use today at research laboratories and universities were designed and built more than two decades ago. The manufacturers of these systems have abandoned the support for some of the mass spectrometers and parts to power and control them have become scarce or obsolete. The Savannah River National Laboratory has been involved in the upgrade of the electronics and software for these legacy machines. The Electronics Upgrade of High Resolution Mass Spectrometers consists of assembling high-end commercial instrumentation from reputable manufacturers with a minimal amount of customization to replace the electronics for the older systems. By taking advantage of advances in instrumentation, precise magnet control can be achieved using high resolution current sources and continuous feedback from a high resolution hall-effect probe. The custom equipment include a precision voltage divider/summing amplifier chassis, high voltage power supply chassis and a chassis for controlling the voltage emission for the mass spectrometer source tube. The upgrade package is versatile enough to interface with valve control, vacuum and other instrumentation. Instrument communication is via a combination of Ethernet and traditional IEEE-488 GPIB protocols. The system software upgrades include precision control, feedback and spectral waveform analysis tools.

  20. MEMS mass spectrometers: the next wave of miniaturization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syms, Richard R. A.; Wright, Steven

    2016-02-01

    This paper reviews mass spectrometers based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. The MEMS approach to integration is first briefly described, and the difficulties of miniaturizing mass spectrometers are outlined. MEMS components for ionization and mass filtering are then reviewed, together with additional components for ion detection, vacuum pressure measurement and pumping. Mass spectrometer systems containing MEMS sub-components are then described, applications for miniaturized and portable systems are discussed, and challenges and opportunities are presented.

  1. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1998-07-21

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high (n,f) reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  2. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1998-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  3. Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Chastagner, P.

    2001-08-01

    This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

  4. The ion mass spectrometer on Giotto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsiger, H.; Altwegg, K.; Buehler, F.; Fischer, J.; Geiss, J.; Benson, J.; Hemmerich, P.; Goldstein, B. E.; Goldstein, R.; Neugebauer, M.

    1987-01-01

    The design of the Giotto ion mass spectrometer (IMS) system, its calibration, and the initial flight performance are discussed. The IMS system consists of two sensors: one optimized for the outer coma, the other for the inner coma, with each sensor obtaining complementary information in the region for which it was not optimized. Both sensors feature mass-imaging characteristics, permitting simultaneous measurements of several ion species by means of multi-detector arrays, with resultant mass per charge resolution of not less than 20. In addition to mass per charge, the energy per charge and the elevation and azimuth of the incident ions were measured during the Giotto flight.

  5. Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    SciTech Connect

    Hunka Deborah Elaine; Austin, Daniel E.

    2005-07-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400). Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS) is described. The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.

  6. Ion Mobility Spectrometer / Mass Spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    SciTech Connect

    Hunka, Deborah E; Austin, Daniel

    2005-10-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400).Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS)The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.3 AcronymsIMSion mobility spectrometryMAAMaterial Access AreaMSmass spectrometryoaTOForthogonal acceleration time

  7. Mass spectrometer for quantification and characterization of DNA damage in mammalian and human systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The instrument grant was used to purchase a Finnigan TSQ 7000 tandem quadruple mass spectrometer with electrospray and atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization ion sources for the amount of the grant, $371,857. MIT contributed $50,000 in refurbishing costs for the laboratory in which the instrument is used. This mass spectrometer has been in operation since July, 1995 in professor Steven Tannenbaum`s Laboratory in the MIT Division of Toxicology, under the direct supervision of Dr. John S. Wishnok. Its current location is in MIT Building 56, room 747. It is in good operating condition, and is being actively used. Since the original purchase, the instrument has been upgraded by the addition of a (1) dedicated high-performance liquid chromatograph with an autosampler and (2) a nanoelectrospray ion source. The instrument has been used in a number of research projects including the identification of proteins and oligonucleotides, identification of PAH-DNA and PAH-protein adducts, quantitation of food-related carcinogens, and characterization of nitric oxide- and peroxynitrite-related DNA damage.

  8. The effect of the earth's and stray magnetic fields on mobile mass spectrometer systems.

    PubMed

    Bell, Ryan J; Davey, Nicholas G; Martinsen, Morten; Short, R Timothy; Gill, Chris G; Krogh, Erik T

    2015-02-01

    Development of small, field-portable mass spectrometers has enabled a rapid growth of in-field measurements on mobile platforms. In such in-field measurements, unexpected signal variability has been observed by the authors in portable ion traps with internal electron ionization. The orientation of magnetic fields (such as the Earth's) relative to the ionization electron beam trajectory can significantly alter the electron flux into a quadrupole ion trap, resulting in significant changes in the instrumental sensitivity. Instrument simulations and experiments were performed relative to the earth's magnetic field to assess the importance of (1) nonpoint-source electron sources, (2) vertical versus horizontal electron beam orientation, and (3) secondary magnetic fields created by the instrument itself. Electron lens focus effects were explored by additional simulations, and were paralleled by experiments performed with a mass spectrometer mounted on a rotating platform. Additionally, magnetically permeable metals were used to shield (1) the entire instrument from the Earth's magnetic field, and (2) the electron beam from both the Earth's and instrument's magnetic fields. Both simulation and experimental results suggest the predominant influence on directionally dependent signal variability is the result of the summation of two magnetic vectors. As such, the most effective method for reducing this effect is the shielding of the electron beam from both magnetic vectors, thus improving electron beam alignment and removing any directional dependency. The improved ionizing electron beam alignment also allows for significant improvements in overall instrument sensitivity. PMID:25527328

  9. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Eckels, Joel D.; Kimmons, James F.; Myers, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  10. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmons, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1996-06-11

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) is described for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units. 4 figs.

  11. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmins, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  12. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Alan G.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometry has been revolutionized by access to instruments of increasingly high mass-resolving power. For small molecules up to ˜400 Da (e.g., drugs, metabolites, and various natural organic mixtures ranging from foods to petroleum), it is possible to determine elemental compositions (CcHhNnOoSsPp…) of thousands of chemical components simultaneously from accurate mass measurements (the same can be done up to 1000 Da if additional information is included). At higher mass, it becomes possible to identify proteins (including posttranslational modifications) from proteolytic peptides, as well as lipids, glycoconjugates, and other biological components. At even higher mass (˜100,000 Da or higher), it is possible to characterize posttranslational modifications of intact proteins and to map the binding surfaces of large biomolecule complexes. Here we review the principles and techniques of the highest-resolution analytical mass spectrometers (time-of-flight and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass analyzers) and describe some representative high-resolution applications.

  13. Automated mass spectrometer grows up

    SciTech Connect

    McInteer, B.B.; Montoya, J.G.; Stark, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    In 1980 we reported the development of an automated mass spectrometer for large scale batches of samples enriched in nitrogen-15 as ammonium salts. Since that time significant technical progress has been made in the instrument. Perhaps more significantly, administrative and institutional changes have permitted the entire effort to be transferred to the private sector from its original base at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This has ensured the continuance of a needed service to the international scientific community as revealed by a development project at a national laboratory, and is an excellent example of beneficial technology transfer to private industry.

  14. A study of the feasibility of mechanical pumps for use with the Pioneer-Venus probe mass spectrometer inlet system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, N. C.; Crosmer, W. E.; Nowak, D.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of mechanical vacuum pumps was completed. A small Roots blower for flight mass spectrometer applications was evaluated with respect to system operating parameters in a number of different modes of operation. The survey indicated that a metal bellows pump might be a viable alternative for the systems requirements. The results of the study are given, including current status of possible flight-type pumps, a systems analysis using available pumps, and recommendations for fabrication and tests of a potential flight-type pump.

  15. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    A moving belt interface for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer.

  16. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1989-09-19

    A moving belt interface is described for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer. 8 figs.

  17. Fourier Transform Spectrometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) data acquisition system includes an FTS spectrometer that receives a spectral signal and a laser signal. The system further includes a wideband detector, which is in communication with the FTS spectrometer and receives the spectral signal and laser signal from the FTS spectrometer. The wideband detector produces a composite signal comprising the laser signal and the spectral signal. The system further comprises a converter in communication with the wideband detector to receive and digitize the composite signal. The system further includes a signal processing unit that receives the composite signal from the converter. The signal processing unit further filters the laser signal and the spectral signal from the composite signal and demodulates the laser signal, to produce velocity corrected spectral data.

  18. High-throughput operando Raman-quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system to screen catalytic systems.

    PubMed

    García-Casado, Manuel; Prieto, José; Vico-Ruiz, Emilio; Lozano-Diz, Enrique; Goberna-Selma, Consuelo; Bañares, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and setup of a high-throughput Raman system for an array of eight parallel catalytic reactors during reaction conditions. The "operando" methodology combines in situ spectroscopy during catalytic reaction with a simultaneous activity measurement. The high-throughput operando Raman system, multi-operando, is a device that automates this operando methodology for several catalyst samples at the same time, all samples being in the same reaction conditions. We describe how the system is made, how Raman system positions and acquires spectra, and how each reactor outlet gas is selected and analyzed. PMID:24405956

  19. A Fully Redundant On-Line Mass Spectrometer System Used to Monitor Cryogenic Fuel Leaks on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Timothy P.; Naylor, Guy R.; Haskell, William D.; Breznik, Greg S.; Mizell, Carolyn A.; Helms, William R.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An on-line gas monitoring system was developed to replace the older systems used to monitor for cryogenic leaks on the Space Shuttles before launch. The system uses a mass spectrometer to monitor multiple locations in the process, which allows the system to monitor all gas constituents of interest in a nearly simultaneous manner. The system is fully redundant and meets all requirements for ground support equipment (GSE). This includes ruggedness to withstand launch on the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP), ease of operation, and minimal operator intervention. The system can be fully automated so that an operator is notified when an unusual situation or fault is detected. User inputs are through personal computer using mouse and keyboard commands. The graphical user for detecting cryogenic leaks, many other gas constituents could be monitored using the Hazardous Gas Detection System (HGDS) 2000.

  20. Compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A.S.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.F.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper describes a time-of-flight mass spectrometer developed for measuring the parameters of a pulsed hydrogen beam. The duration of an electron-beam current pulse in the ionizer of the mass spectrometer can be varied within 2-20 usec, the pulse electron current is 0.6 mA, and the electron energy is 250 eV. The time resolution of the mass spectrometer is determined by the repetition period of the electron-beam current pulses and is 40 usec. The mass spectrometer has 100% transmission in the direction of motion of molecular-beam particles. The dimension of the mass spectrometer is 7 cm in this direction. The mass resolution is sufficient for determination of the composition of the hydrogen beam.

  1. Onsite well screening with a transportable gas chromatography/mass spectrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Eckenrode, B.A.; Owens, B.

    1992-10-15

    The number of hazardous waste site operations continue to multiply. The requirements for efficient chemical assessment and monitoring of these sites become more stringent daily. As more samples are required, the time required for cleanup operations also increases and may make analytical costs prohibitive. Thus improvements in operation efficiency and reduction of cost in evaluating specific sites to minimize or eliminate their toxic effects on the surrounding environment are critical. For many years a formal policy did not exist for the disposal of waste solvents and other chemicals, thus many of these compounds were disposed of ensite. So long as these materials were contained onsite they were not considered to pose a threat to the surrounding environment. We have since determined that many of these compounds found their way into the groundwater. Contaminants such as trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene, which were heavily used for cleaning and degreasing purposes, must be monitored. Groundwater wells can be used to define the location and extent of the migration of any contaminant plume and aid in the determination of required cleanup. The major problem is that monitoring of hundreds of wells may be necessary, requiring several hundred samples on a quarterly basis to characterize the degree and extent of any contamination. Onsite analysis of monitoring wells for this characterization of waste operations could provide time savings and significant cost reduction. Field analyses can provide the required analytical results quickly and at a reduced cost without compromising either sample integrity or data quality. By using onsite analytical instrumentation, such as a field-transportable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), screening analyses can be performed to eliminate retturning to the laboratory with meaningless samples. Onsite GC/MS will provide qualitative or semi-quantitative information that can significantly simplify subsequent laboratory analyses.

  2. A Mass Spectrometer Simulator in Your Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Introduced to study components of ionized gas, the mass spectrometer has evolved into a highly accurate device now used in many undergraduate and research laboratories. Unfortunately, despite their importance in the formation of future scientists, mass spectrometers remain beyond the financial reach of many high schools and colleges. As a result,…

  3. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  4. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  5. Silicon Microleaks for Inlets of Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, Dan; Hasso, Niemann; Jamieson, Brian G.; Lynch, Bernard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microleaks for inlets of mass spectrometers used to analyze atmospheric gases can be fabricated in silicon wafers by means of photolithography, etching, and other techniques that are commonly used in the manufacture of integrated circuits and microelectromechanical systems. The microleaks serve to limit the flows of the gases into the mass-spectrometer vacuums to specified very small flow rates consistent with the capacities of the spectrometer vacuum pumps. There is a need to be able to precisely tailor the dimensions of each microleak so as to tailor its conductance to a precise low value. (As used here, "conductance" signifies the ratio between the rate of flow in the leak and the pressure drop from the upstream to the downstream end of the leak.) To date, microleaks have been made, variously, of crimped metal tubes, pulled glass tubes, or frits. Crimped-metal and pulled-glass-tube microleaks cannot readily be fabricated repeatably to precise dimensions and are susceptible to clogging with droplets or particles. Frits tend to be differentially chemically reactive with various gas constituents and, hence, to distort the gas mixtures to be analyzed. The present approach involving microfabrication in silicon largely overcomes the disadvantages of the prior approaches.

  6. Modeling and measurement of the performance of a branched conduit sampling system in a mass spectrometer leak detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John M.

    1994-01-01

    In the leak testing of a large engineering system, one may distinguish three stages, namely leakage measurement by an overall enclosure, leak location, and leakage measurement by a local enclosure. Sniffer probes attached to helium mass spectrometer leak detectors are normally designed for leak location, a qualitative inspection technique intended to pinpoint where a leak is but not to quantify its rate of discharge. The main conclusion of the present effort is that local leakage measurement by a leak detector with a sniffer probe is feasible provided one has: (1) quantitative data on the performance of the mass separator cell (a device interior to the unit where the stream of fluid in the sample line branches); and (2) a means of stabilizing the mass transfer boundary layer that is created near a local leak site when a sniffer probe is placed in its immediate vicinity. Theoretical models of the mass separator cell are provided and measurements of the machine-specific parameters in the formulas are presented. A theoretical model of a porous probe end for stabilizing the mass transfer boundary is also presented.

  7. AFE ion mass spectrometer design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Willie

    1989-01-01

    This final technical report covers the activities engaged in by the University of Texas at Dallas, Center for Space Sciences in conjunction with the NASA Langley Research Center, Systems Engineering Division in design studies directed towards defining a suitable ion mass spectrometer to determine the plasma parameter around the Aeroassisted Flight Experiment vehicle during passage through the earth's upper atmosphere. Additional studies relate to the use of a Langmuir probe to measure windward ion/electron concentrations and temperatures. Selected instrument inlet subsystems were tested in the NASA Ames Arc-Jet Facility.

  8. Electrospray Ionization/Ion Mobility Spectrometer/Cylindrical Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer System for In-Situ Detection of Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanik, I.; Johnson, P. V.; Beegle, L. W.; Cooks, R. G.; Laughlin, B. C.; Hill, H. H.

    2003-01-01

    The potential of an Electrospray Ionization/Ion Mobility Spectrometer/Cylindrical Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (ESI/IMS/CIT-MS) as an analytical instrument for analyzing material extracted from rock and soil samples as part of a suite of instruments on the proposed 2009 Mars Science Lander (MSL) will be demonstrated. This instrument will be able to identify volatile compounds as well as resident organic molecules on the parts-per-billion (ppb) level. Also, it will be able to obtain an inventory of chemical species on the surface of Mars which will result in a better understanding of ongoing surface chemistry. Finally, questions relevant to biological processes will be answered with the complete inventory of surface and near surface organic molecules that the ESI/IMS/CIT is capable of performing.

  9. Mass Spectrometer for Airborne Micro-Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Bacteria and other micro-organisms identified continously with aid of new technique for producing samples for mass spectrometer. Technique generates aerosol of organisms and feeds to spectrometer. Given species of organism produces characteristic set of peaks in mass spectrum and thereby identified. Technique useful for monitoring bacterial makeup in environmental studies and in places where cleanliness is essential, such as hospital operating rooms, breweries, and pharmaceutical plants.

  10. Design and Analysis of a Getter-Based Vacuum Pumping System for a Rocket-Borne Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, E. A.; Syrstad, E. A.; Dyer, J. S.

    2010-12-01

    The mesosphere / lower thermosphere (MLT) is a transition region where the turbulent mixing of earth’s lower atmosphere gives way to the molecular diffusion of space. This region hosts a rich array of chemical processes and atmospheric phenomena, and serves to collect and distribute particles of all sizes in thin layers. Spatially resolved in situ characterization of these layers is very difficult, due to the elevated pressure of the MLT, limited access via high-speed sounding rockets, and the enormous variety of charged and neutral species that range in size from atoms to smoke and dust particles. In terrestrial applications, time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) is the technique of choice for performing fast, sensitive composition measurements with extremely large mass range. However, because of its reliance on high voltages and microchannel plate (MCP) detectors prone to discharge at elevated pressures, TOF-MS has rarely been employed for measurements of the MLT, where ambient pressures approach 10 mTorr. We present a novel, compact mass spectrometer design appropriate for deployment aboard sounding rockets. This Hadamard transform time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HT-TOF-MS) applies a multiplexing technique through pseudorandom beam modulation and spectral deconvolution to achieve very high measurement duty cycles (50%), with a theoretically unlimited mass range. The HT-TOF-MS employs a simple, getter-based vacuum pumping system and pressure-tolerant MCP to allow operation in the MLT. The HT-TOF-MS must provide sufficient vacuum pumping to 1) maintain a minimum mean free path inside the instrument, to avoid spectral resolution loss, and 2) to avoid MCP failure through electrostatic discharge. The design incorporates inexpensive, room temperature tube getters loaded with nano-structured barium to meet these pumping speed requirements, without the use of cryogenics or mechanical pumping systems. We present experimental results for gettering rates and

  11. Water Mass Map from Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 8, 2003

    This map shows the estimated lower limit of the water content of the upper meter of Martian soil. The estimates are derived from the hydrogen abundance measured by the neutron spectrometer component of the gamma ray spectrometer suite on NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

    The highest water-mass fractions, exceeding 30 percent to well over 60 percent, are in the polar regions, beyond about 60 degrees latitude north or south. Farther from the poles, significant concentrations are in the area bound in longitude by minus 10 degrees to 50 degrees and in latitude by 30 degrees south to 40 degrees north, and in an area to the south and west of Olympus Mons (30 degrees to 0 degrees south latitude and minus 135 degrees to 110 degrees longitude).

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for the NASA Office of Space Science in Washington. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL.

  12. Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; McComas, David J.; Scime, Earl E.

    1996-01-01

    The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

  13. Portable Mass Spectrometer System for in-situ Environmental Gas Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conejo, E.; Griffin, T. P.; Diaz, J. A.; Arkin, C. R.; Soto, C.; Naylor, G. R.; Curley, C.; Floyd, D.

    2005-01-01

    A system developed by NASA has been used for monitoring air quality around different locations. The system was designed for aircraft applications but has proven to be very useful as a portable gas analyzer. The system has been used to monitor air quality around volcanoes, cities, and the surrounding areas. The transport of the system has been via aircraft, car, and hand carried.

  14. Interfacing an aspiration ion mobility spectrometer to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Adamov, Alexey; Viidanoja, Jyrki; Kaerpaenoja, Esko; Paakkanen, Heikki; Ketola, Raimo A.; Kostiainen, Risto; Sysoev, Alexey; Kotiaho, Tapio

    2007-04-15

    This article presents the combination of an aspiration-type ion mobility spectrometer with a mass spectrometer. The interface between the aspiration ion mobility spectrometer and the mass spectrometer was designed to allow for quick mounting of the aspiration ion mobility spectrometer onto a Sciex API-300 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The developed instrumentation is used for gathering fundamental information on aspiration ion mobility spectrometry. Performance of the instrument is demonstrated using 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine and dimethyl methylphosphonate.

  15. Data acquisition techniques for exploiting the uniqueness of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer: Application to sampling pulsed gas systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Mass spectra are produced in most mass spectrometers by sweeping some parameter within the instrument as the sampled gases flow into the ion source. It is evident that any fluctuation in the gas during the sweep (mass scan) of the instrument causes the output spectrum to be skewed in its mass peak intensities. The time of flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) with its fast, repetitive mode of operation produces spectra without skewing or varying instrument parameters and because all ion species are ejected from the ion source simultaneously, the spectra are inherently not skewed despite rapidly changing gas pressure or composition in the source. Methods of exploiting this feature by utilizing fast digital data acquisition systems, such as transient recorders and signal averagers which are commercially available are described. Applications of this technique are presented including TOFMS sampling of vapors produced by both pulsed and continuous laser heating of materials.

  16. Improved multisphere spectrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; Schwahn, S.O.; Rogers, P.E.; Misko, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    Shonka Research Associated undertook a research program to improve the capabilities and ease of use of the Bonner sphere spectrometer system. Two key elements formed the heart of this research: replacement of the lithium iodide (LiI(Eu)) detector normally used in the spectrometer system with a spherical boron triflouride (BF{sub 3}) proportional counter and exploitation of an optimized set of nested polyethylene spheres, including boron-loaded spherical shells. Use of a spherical BF{sub 3} detector offers many advantages over the LiI(Eu) crystal. The BF{sub 3} detectors are insensitive to gamma radiation. Lack of gamma sensitivity permits acquiring data with simple electronics and allows determination of neutron spectra and dose in lower neutron-to-gamma ratio fields, including background terrestrial radiation fields. The importance of the lack of gamma sensitivity is underscored by the pending changes in neutron quality factors. The nearly perfect spherical symmetry offers advantages for BF{sub 3} over LiI(Eu) detectors as well. A light pipe, which perturbs measurements, is not needed. The bare BF{sub 3} detector response is not affected by the moderation of neutrons as is the case of the organic light pipe used with LiI(Eu). The spherical symmetry permits the use of smaller diameter shells, which add to the number of response functions.

  17. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  18. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  19. Synopsis of a computer program designed to interface a personal computer with the fast data acquisition system of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, R. D.; Mateos, M. A.; Lincoln, K. A.

    1988-01-01

    Briefly described are the essential features of a computer program designed to interface a personal computer with the fast, digital data acquisition system of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The instrumentation was developed to provide a time-resolved analysis of individual vapor pulses produced by the incidence of a pulsed laser beam on an ablative material. The high repetition rate spectrometer coupled to a fast transient recorder captures complete mass spectra every 20 to 35 microsecs, thereby providing the time resolution needed for the study of this sort of transient event. The program enables the computer to record the large amount of data generated by the system in short time intervals, and it provides the operator the immediate option of presenting the spectral data in several different formats. Furthermore, the system does this with a high degree of automation, including the tasks of mass labeling the spectra and logging pertinent instrumental parameters.

  20. Halo ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Austin, Daniel E; Wang, Miao; Tolley, Samuel E; Maas, Jeffrey D; Hawkins, Aaron R; Rockwood, Alan L; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Edgar D; Lee, Milton L

    2007-04-01

    We describe a novel radio frequency ion trap mass analyzer based on toroidal trapping geometry and microfabrication technology. The device, called the halo ion trap, consists of two parallel ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are imprinted with sets of concentric ring electrodes. Radii of the imprinted rings range from 5 to 12 mm, and the spacing between the plates is 4 mm. Unlike conventional ion traps, in which hyperbolic metal electrodes establish equipotential boundary conditions, electric fields in the halo ion trap are established by applying different radio frequency potentials to each ring. The potential on each ring can be independently optimized to provide the best trapping field. The halo ion trap features an open structure, allowing easy access for in situ ionization. The toroidal geometry provides a large trapping and analyzing volume, increasing the number of ions that can be stored and reducing the effects of space-charge on mass analysis. Preliminary mass spectra show resolution (m/Deltam) of 60-75 when the trap is operated at 1.9 MHz and 500 Vp-p. PMID:17335180

  1. Mass measurements with a Penning trap mass spectrometer at ISOLDE

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, G.; Ames, F.; Schark, E.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Saint Simon, M. de; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kohl, A.; Schwarz, S.; Moore, R. B.; Szerypo, J.

    1998-12-21

    Penning trap mass measurements on radioactive isotopes are performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. In the last years the applicability of the spectrometer has been considerably extended. The most recent measurements were carried out on isotopes of rare earth elements and on isotopes with Z=80-85. An accuracy of {delta}m/m{approx_equal}1{center_dot}10{sup -7} was achieved.

  2. A miniature mass spectrometer for hydrazine detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Sinha, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    A Miniature Mass Spectrometer (MMS) with a focal plane (Mattauch-Herzog) geometry has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The MMS has the potential to meet the NASA requirements of 10 parts per billion sensitivity for Hydrazine detection, as well as the requirements for instant response, portability, and low maintenance.

  3. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Witten, William B.; Kornienko, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  4. Autonomously Calibrating a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; Bornstein, Benjamin J.

    2009-01-01

    A computer program autonomously manages the calibration of a quadrupole ion mass spectrometer intended for use in monitoring concentrations and changes in concentrations of organic chemicals in the cabin air of the International Space Station. The instrument parameters calibrated include the voltage on a channel electron multiplier, a discriminator threshold, and an ionizer current. Calibration is achieved by analyzing the mass spectrum obtained while sweeping the parameter ranges in a heuristic procedure, developed by mass spectrometer experts, that involves detection of changes in signal trends that humans can easily recognize but cannot necessarily be straightforwardly codified in an algorithm. The procedure includes calculation of signal-to-noise ratios, signal-increase rates, and background-noise-increase rates; finding signal peaks; and identifying peak patterns. The software provides for several recovery-from-error scenarios and error-handling schemes. The software detects trace amounts of contaminant gases in the mass spectrometer and notifies associated command- and-data-handling software to schedule a cleaning. Furthermore, the software autonomously analyzes the mass spectrum to determine whether the parameters of a radio-frequency ramp waveform are set properly so that the peaks of the mass spectrum are at expected locations.

  5. Miniature Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karmon, D.; Darrech, M.; Chutjian, A.; Jan, D.

    1999-01-01

    JPL is funded by Code U to develop a Miniature QMSA for an EVA flight test. The initial intent was to fly an experiment internal to the astronaut suit during a shuttle EVA. Following discussions with JSC the suit application was abandoned in favor of other more urgent needs. The JSC EVA office was particularly interested in hydrazine detection on the astronaut suit. While discussing and exploring the implementation of such an experiment, managers at JSC suggested combining the interests of two JSC groups. The Life Support and Thermal Systems Branch, Crew and Thermal Systems Division has a need for an ammonia detection instrument, while the EVA office has a need for hydrazine detection. The two groups were pursuing separate single-purpose solutions. Instead, the JPL QMSA offers a single instrument solution via a portable instrument to be used by an astronaut on an EVA. Such an instrument would serve both the ammonia leak detection and the hydrazine contamination needs. The need for the QMSA was defined as urgent and targeted for a January 1999 flight. While the original JPL task (as funded by Code U) was for an experiment flight with JPL delivery in October 1998, this task was for a qualified flight instrument with a planned JPL delivery in August 1998. This schedule was very demanding and dictated a fast-tract implementation.

  6. Molecular beam mass spectrometer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, F. J.; Hueser, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical model, based on the kinetics theory of a drifting Maxwellian gas is used to determine the nonequilibrium molecular density distribution within a hemispherical shell open aft with its axis parallel to its velocity. The concept of a molecular shield in terrestrial orbit above 200 km is also analyzed using the kinetic theory of a drifting Maxwellian gas. Data are presented for the components of the gas density within the shield due to the free stream atmosphere, outgassing from the shield and enclosed experiments, and atmospheric gas scattered off a shield orbiter system. A description is given of a FORTRAN program for computating the three dimensional transition flow regime past the space shuttle orbiter that employs the Monte Carlo simulation method to model real flow by some thousands of simulated molecules.

  7. 21 CFR 862.2860 - Mass spectrometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mass spectrometer for clinical use. 862.2860... Instruments § 862.2860 Mass spectrometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A mass spectrometer for... by means of an electrical and magnetic field according to their mass. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. 21 CFR 862.2860 - Mass spectrometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mass spectrometer for clinical use. 862.2860... Instruments § 862.2860 Mass spectrometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A mass spectrometer for... by means of an electrical and magnetic field according to their mass. (b) Classification. Class...

  9. 21 CFR 862.2860 - Mass spectrometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mass spectrometer for clinical use. 862.2860... Instruments § 862.2860 Mass spectrometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A mass spectrometer for... by means of an electrical and magnetic field according to their mass. (b) Classification. Class...

  10. 21 CFR 862.2860 - Mass spectrometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mass spectrometer for clinical use. 862.2860... Instruments § 862.2860 Mass spectrometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A mass spectrometer for... by means of an electrical and magnetic field according to their mass. (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 862.2860 - Mass spectrometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mass spectrometer for clinical use. 862.2860... Instruments § 862.2860 Mass spectrometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A mass spectrometer for... by means of an electrical and magnetic field according to their mass. (b) Classification. Class...

  12. A Mass Spectrometer Simulator in Your Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Michel

    2012-12-01

    Introduced to study components of ionized gas, the mass spectrometer has evolved into a highly accurate device now used in many undergraduate and research laboratories. Unfortunately, despite their importance in the formation of future scientists, mass spectrometers remain beyond the financial reach of many high schools and colleges. As a result, it is not possible for instructors to take full advantage of this equipment. Therefore, to facilitate accessibility to this tool, we have developed a realistic computer-based simulator. Using this software, students are able to practice their ability to identify the components of the original gas, thereby gaining a better understanding of the underlying physical laws. The software is available as a free download.

  13. Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J.

    1982-01-01

    The deuterium hydrogen abundance ratio in the Venus atmosphere was measured while the inlets to the Pioneer Venus large probe mass spectrometer were coated with sulfuric acid from Venus' clouds. The ratio is (1.6 + or - 0.2) x 10 to the minus two power. It was found that the 100 fold enrichment of deuterium means that Venus outgassed at least 0.3% of a terrestrial ocean and possibly more.

  14. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOEpatents

    D'Silva, Arthur

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conducts is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer.

  15. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOEpatents

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  16. Extending the isotopically resolved mass range of Orbitrap mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jared B; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2013-09-01

    The routine analysis of large biomolecules (greater than 30 kDa) has been a challenge for Orbitrap mass spectrometers due to the relatively high kinetic energy of ions entering and within the Orbitrap mass analyzer. This characteristic results in rapid signal decay for large biomolecules due to energetic collisions with background gas molecules. Here, we report a method to significantly enhance the analysis of large biomolecules in an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The combination of reduced C-trap and higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD) cell bath gas pressures, using helium as the bath gas and trapping ions in the HCD cell prior to mass analysis, greatly increased sensitivity and reduced signal decay for large protein ions. As a result, isotopic resolution of monoclonal immunoglobulin G was achieved, and we have established a new high-mass record for which accurate mass measurement and isotopic resolution have been achieved. PMID:23909473

  17. Differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Benjamin C.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.

    2015-10-20

    The present disclosure provides a new tandem mass spectrometer and methods of using the same for analyzing charged particles. The differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of the present disclose includes a combination of two linear quadrupole (LQIT) mass spectrometers with differentially pumped vacuum chambers.

  18. Miniature Mass Spectrometers on Space and Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, William

    2008-01-01

    Space flight mass spectrometers contribute our understanding of the origin and evolution of our solar system and even of life itself. This fundamental role has motivated increasing interest in miniature mass spectrometry for planetary missions. Several remarkable new instruments are en route or under development to investigate the composition of planetary bodies such as Mars and comets. For instance, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite on the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission includes a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a sophisticated gas processing system as well as pyrolysis and chemical derivatization protocols for solid samples. Future missions will require even lighter, lower power, and yet more capable mass spectrometers, particularly to analyze samples in situ on planetary surfaces. We have been developing laser-based mass spectrometers for elemental and organic/molecular analysis of rock, ice, or fine particle samples. These typically use time-of-flight (TOF) mass analyzers, which are readily miniaturized and can detect both atomic species and complex organics that occur in a variety of planetary materials. For example, nonvolatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and kerogen-like macromolecular carbon are found in some carbonaceous meteorites, which derived from asteroid parent bodies. A single focused laser pulse is able to volatilize and ionize some of these compounds for direct TOF analysis. While this is possible without any sample preparation or contact, sensitivity and quantitative performance can improve significantly with some sample handling. As such we have also been examining robotic mechanisms and protocols to accompany space flight mass spectrometers. In addition, sensors in early development may significantly improve these capabilities, via use of techniques such as switchable polarity, ambient pressure, or resonant ionization; tandem mass spectrometry (TOF or ion trap); and chemical imaging.

  19. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-06-11

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last few years. This technique uses H₃Oþ as a chemical ionization (CI) reagent to measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. Mass spectra acquired with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) are simple because proton transfer chemical ionization is ‘soft’ and results in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, peak identification can still be difficult due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). The use of an ITMS is appealing because of its ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates are possible that will allow for detection of multiple compounds. Here we present the first results from a proton transfer reaction ion trap mass spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype instrument in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second-generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low-ppbv to high-pptv range. Furthermore, the applicability of MS/MS in differentiating between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making differentiation possible, even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. However, MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular masses but with different intensity ratios

  20. Panoramic imaging mass-spectrometer for planetary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaisberg, O.; Berthelier, J.; Torkar, K.; Leblanc, F.; Escoubet, P.; Woch, J.; Baumjohann, W.; Avanov, L.; Burch, J.; McComas, D.; Delcourt, D.; Wurz, P.; Grishin, V.; Smirnov, V.; Babkin, V.; Szego, K.

    2004-12-01

    Plasma diagnostics can provide extremely useful information for solar system studies. Neutral and ion sputtering from the surface leads to the formation of neutral and ion exospheres with compositions that reflect the surface composition modified by ionization and transport processes around the body. Measurements of ion composition and velocity distributions provide important information about surface composition and its recycling. Plasma measurements from low altitude spacecraft and landers on planetary bodies without atmospheres can be used to map the surface composition, while spectrometers onboard spacecraft orbiting planets with atmosphere are used for study of planetary losses, mass-exchange with the solar wind, and the long-term evolution of their environment. To perform reliable measurements of planetary plasmas a complete 3-dimensional velocity distributions of various ion species is necessary. In addition, if fast measurements of the major ion species are the main goal of plasma physics studies, precise measurements of the minor ion composition are often essential to unveil important properties of the atmosphere or the surface. Therefore ion mass spectrometers for solar system missions require both the capability of making fast measurements of the 3D-velocity distribution of ions and high mass resolution for detailed composition studies. We describe a novel type of miniature panoramic ion mass-spectrometer suitable for making such 3-dimensional measurements of ion components with high mass resolution. The feeding electron optics of our plasma analyzer (CAMERA) allows for fast measurements within an instantaneous 2p field of view, which has no gaps and can be accomplished on either stabilized or rotating spacecraft, or landers. It is followed by a time-of-flight mass-spectrometer that retains imaging capabilities of the feeding optics and provides mass-resolution M/ΔM in excess of 100. Our spectrometer also provides flexible control of the energy

  1. Analysis of solid uranium samples using a small mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahr, Michael S.; Abney, Kent D.; Olivares, José A.

    2001-07-01

    A mass spectrometer for isotopic analysis of solid uranium samples has been constructed and evaluated. This system employs the fluorinating agent chlorine trifluoride (ClF 3) to convert solid uranium samples into their volatile uranium hexafluorides (UF 6). The majority of unwanted gaseous byproducts and remaining ClF 3 are removed from the sample vessel by condensing the UF 6 and then pumping away the unwanted gases. The UF 6 gas is then introduced into a quadrupole mass spectrometer and ionized by electron impact ionization. The doubly charged bare metal uranium ion (U 2+) is used to determine the U 235/U 238 isotopic ratio. Precision and accuracy for several isotopic standards were found to be better than 12%, without further calibration of the system. The analysis can be completed in 25 min from sample loading, to UF 6 reaction, to mass spectral analysis. The method is amenable to uranium solid matrices, and other actinides.

  2. Atmospheric pressure sample inlet for mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dheandhanoo, Seksan; Ciotti, Ralph J.; Ketkar, Suhas N.

    2000-12-01

    An inlet for a mass spectrometer has been developed for direct sampling of gases over a wide range of pressure (1-760 Torr). The sample inlet is composed of two small orifices that form a pressure reduction region. These orifices are used to limit the flow of sample gas into the mass spectrometer. The pressure inside the pressure reduction region is regulated by a needle valve and a vacuum pump. The flow of gas through the orifices is viscous. The inlet is made of stainless steel and operated at high temperature to prevent surface adsorption and corrosion. Its adaptability to a wide range of pressures is very useful for monitoring process gases during manufacturing processes of microelectronic devices. This inlet can be used for effluent gas analysis at 760 Torr as well as for in situ monitoring of the semiconductor equipment at pressures less than 5 Torr. The inlet provides a fast response to changes in the constituents of gas samples without memory effects. The sample inlet has been tested extensively in the laboratory as well as in field environments.

  3. An electrostatic autoresonant ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ermakov, A. V.; Hinch, B. J.

    2010-01-15

    A new method for ion extraction from an anharmonic electrostatic trap is introduced. Anharmonicity is a common feature of electrostatic traps which can be used for small scale spatial confinement of ions, and this feature is also necessary for autoresonant ion extraction. With the aid of ion trajectory simulations, novel autoresonant trap mass spectrometers (ART-MSs) have been designed based on these very simple principles. A mass resolution {approx}60 is demonstrated for the prototypes discussed here. We report also on the pressure dependencies, and the (mV) rf field strength dependencies of the ART-MS sensitivity. Importantly the new MS designs do not require heavy magnets, tight manufacturing tolerances, introduction of buffer gases, high power rf sources, nor complicated electronics. The designs described here are very inexpensive to implement relative to other instruments, and can be easily miniaturized. Possible applications are discussed.

  4. Miniature Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potember, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    Major advances must occur to protect astronauts from prolonged periods in near-zero gravity and high radiation associated with extended space travel. The dangers of living in space must be thoroughly understood and methods developed to reverse those effects that cannot be avoided. Six of the seven research teams established by the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) are studying biomedical factors for prolonged space travel to deliver effective countermeasures. To develop effective countermeasures, each of these teams require identification of and quantitation of complex pharmacological, hormonal, and growth factor compounds (biomarkers) in humans and in experimental animals to develop an in-depth knowledge of the physiological changes associated with space travel. At present, identification of each biomarker requires a separate protocol. Many of these procedures are complicated and the identification of each biomarker requires a separate protocol and associated laboratory equipment. To carry all of this equipment and chemicals on a spacecraft would require a complex clinical laboratory; and it would occupy much of the astronauts time. What is needed is a small, efficient, broadband medical diagnostic instrument to rapidly identify important biomarkers for human space exploration. The Miniature Time-Of- Flight Mass Spectrometer Project in the Technology Development Team is developing a small, high resolution, time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) to quantitatively measure biomarkers for human space exploration. Virtues of the JHU/APL TOFMS technologies reside in the promise for a small (less than one cubic ft), lightweight (less than 5 kg), low-power (less than 50 watts), rugged device that can be used continuously with advanced signal processing diagnostics. To date, the JHU/APL program has demonstrated mass capability from under 100 to beyond 10,000 atomic mass units (amu) in a very small, low power prototype for biological analysis. Further

  5. Use of the ECL-CAMAC trigger processor system for recoil missing mass triggers at the Tagged Photon Spectrometer at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Bracker, S.; Hartner, G.; Appel, J.; Nash, T.

    1981-05-01

    A trigger processor in operation since May 1980 at the Tagged Photon Spectrometer at Fermilab will be described. The processor, based on the Fermilab ECL-CAMAC system, allows fast selection of high mass diffractive events from the total hadronic cross section. Data from a recoil detector, consisting of 3 wire chambers and 4 layers of scintillator concentric about a 1.5 m liquid hydrogen target, is digitized and presented to the processor within 3 sec. From the chamber data are found the vertices and angles of all recoiling tracks.

  6. Development of an Accelerator Mass Spectrometer based on a Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dogyun; Bhang, Hyeongchan; Kim, Jongwon

    2011-12-13

    An accelerator mass spectrometer based on a cyclotron has been developed, and a prototype of the injection beam line has been constructed. Mass resolution of the cyclotron is designed to be over 4000. A sawtooth RF buncher in the beam line and a flat-topping RF system for the cyclotron were utilized to enhance beam transmission efficiency, which is a primary factor for improvement compared to previous cyclotron mass spectrometers. The injection beam line comprises an ion source, Einzel lens, RF buncher, 90 deg. dipole magnet and a slit box containing beam diagnostic devices. A carbon beam was measured at the location of the slit box, and beam phase spaces will be measured. The design of a cyclotron magnet was done, and orbit tracking was carried out using cyclotron optics codes. A scheme of radial injection was chosen to place a beam on the equilibrium orbit of the cyclotron. The injection scheme will be optimized after the beam measurements are completed.

  7. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-07-07

    Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last several years. This technique uses H3O+ as a chemical ionization (CI) agent for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) - parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. PTR-MS mass spectra are simple because the ionization method of proton transfer is “soft”, resulting in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, the simplicity of the mass spectra can cause problems in peak identification due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). ITMS is appealing because of the ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates can be realized for detection of multiple compounds. We present here the first results from a Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype interface in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated for the PTR-ITMS. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low ppbv to pptv range. Furthermore the applicability of MS/MS to differentiate between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making a differentiation possible even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular weight but different ratios, allowing quantitative distinction only if one species

  8. Tracking System for Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.; Webster, C. R.; Menzies, R. T.; Morrison, G. B.; Riccio, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Visible laser tracking system for infrared laser spectometer keeps probe infrared laser beam aimed at moving reflector, thereby keeping reflector image and return laser beam within spectrometer field of view. System includes tracking mirror tilted by stepping motors under microprocessor control to deflect beams toward continually changing reflector position.

  9. Rapid discrimination of bacteria using a miniature mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Pulliam, Christopher J; Wei, Pu; Snyder, Dalton T; Wang, Xiao; Ouyang, Zheng; Pielak, Rafal M; Graham Cooks, R

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria colonies were analyzed using paper spray ionization coupled with a portable mass spectrometer. The spectra were averaged and processed using multivariate analysis to discriminate between different species of bacteria based on their unique phospholipid profiles. Full scan mass spectra and product ion MS/MS data were compared to those recorded using a benchtop linear ion trap mass spectrometer. PMID:26844973

  10. Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer Measurements from Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. H., Jr.; Niemann, H.; Yelle, R. V.; Kasprzak, W.; Cravens, T.; Luhmann, J.; McNutt, R.; Ip, W.-H.; Gell, D.; Muller-Wordag, I. C. F.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) aboard the Cassini orbiter has obtained the first in situ composition measurements of the neutral densities of molecular nitrogen, methane, argon, and a host of stable carbon-nitrile compounds in its first flyby of Titan. The bulk composition and thermal structure of the moon s upper atmosphere do not appear to be changed since the Voyager flyby in 1979. However, the more sensitive techniques provided by modern in-situ mass spectrometry also give evidence for large-spatial-scale large-amplitude atmospheric waves in the upper atmosphere and for a plethora of stable carbon-nitrile compounds above 1174 km. Furthermore, they allow the first direct measurements of isotopes of nitrogen, carbon, and argon, which provide interesting clues about the evolution of the atmosphere. The atmosphere was first accreted as ammonia and ammonia ices from the Saturn sub-nebula. Subsequent photochemistry likely converted the atmosphere into molecular nitrogen. The early atmosphere was 1.5 to 5 times more substantial and was lost via escape over the intervening 4.5 billion years due to the reduced gravity associated with the relatively small mass of Titan. Carbon in the form of methane has continued to outgas over time from the interior with much of it being deposited in the form of complex hydrocarbons on the surface and some of it also being lost to space.

  11. Panoramic imaging mass-spectrometer for planetary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaisberg, O.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Torkar, K.; Leblanc, F.; Woch, J.; Avanov, L.; Skalski, A.; Delcourt, D.; Smirnov, V.; Koinash, G.

    Plasma diagnostics can provide extremely useful information for solar system studies. Neutral and ion sputtering from the surface leads to the formation of neutral and ion exospheres with compositions that reflect the surface composition modified by ionization and transport processes around the body. Measurements of ion composition and velocity distributions provide important information about surface composition and its recycling. Plasma measurements from low altitude spacecraft and landers on planetary bodies without atmospheres can be used to map the surface composition, while spectrometers onboard spacecraft orbiting planets with atmosphere are used for study of planetary losses, mass-exchange with the solar wind, and the long-term evolution of their environment. To perform reliable measurements of planetary plasmas a complete 3-dimensional velocity distributions of various ion species is necessary. In addition, if fast measurements of the major ion species are the main goal of plasma physics studies, precise measurements of the minor ion composition are often essential to unveil important properties of the atmosphere or the surface. Therefore ion mass spectrometers for solar system missions require both the capability of making fast measurements of the 3D-velocity distribution of ions and high mass resolution for detailed composition studies. We describe a novel type of miniature panoramic ion mass-spectrometer suitable for making such 3-dimensional measurements of ion components with high mass resolution. The feeding electron optics of our plasma analyzer (CAMERA) allows for fast measurements within an instantaneous 2π field of view, which has no gaps and can be accomplished on either stabilized or rotating spacecraft, or landers. It is followed by a time-of-flight mass-spectrometer that retains imaging capabilities of the feeding optics and provides mass-resolution M/?M in excess of 100. Our spectrometer also provides flexible control of the energy

  12. Characterization of a turbomolecular-pumped magnetic sector mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Narinder K.

    1988-10-01

    A Perkin Elmer MGA-1200, turbomolecular-pumped, magnetic sector, multiple gas analyzer mass spectrometer with modified inlet for fast response was characterized for the analysis of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon in nitrogen and helium background gases. This instrument was specially modified for the Vanderberg AFB SLC-6 Hydrogen Disposal Test Program, as a part of the Hydrogen Sampling System (H2S2). Linearity, precision, drift, detection limits and accuracy among other analytical parameters for each of the background gas were studied to evaluate the performance of the instrument. The result demonstrates that H2S2 mass spectrometer is a stable instrument and can be utilized for the quantitative analytical determination of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon in nitrogen and helium background gases.

  13. Characterization of a turbomolecular-pumped magnetic sector mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Narinder K.

    1988-01-01

    A Perkin Elmer MGA-1200, turbomolecular-pumped, magnetic sector, multiple gas analyzer mass spectrometer with modified inlet for fast response was characterized for the analysis of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon in nitrogen and helium background gases. This instrument was specially modified for the Vanderberg AFB SLC-6 Hydrogen Disposal Test Program, as a part of the Hydrogen Sampling System (H2S2). Linearity, precision, drift, detection limits and accuracy among other analytical parameters for each of the background gas were studied to evaluate the performance of the instrument. The result demonstrates that H2S2 mass spectrometer is a stable instrument and can be utilized for the quantitative analytical determination of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon in nitrogen and helium background gases.

  14. The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer for the Huygens Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Bauer, S. J.; Biemann, K.; Block, B.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Frost, R. L.; Gautier, D.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D.; Hunten, D. M.; Israel, G.; Lunine, J. I.; Mauersberger, K.; Owen, T. C.; Raulin, F.; Richards, J. E.; Way, S. H.

    2002-07-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) on the Huygens Probe will measure the chemical composition of Titan's atmosphere from 170 km altitude (˜1 hPa) to the surface (˜1500 hPa) and determine the isotope ratios of the major gaseous constituents. The GCMS will also analyze gas samples from the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) and may be able to investigate the composition (including isotope ratios) of several candidate surface materials. The GCMS is a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns. The mass spectrometer employs five ion sources sequentially feeding the mass analyzer. Three ion sources serve as detectors for the GC columns and two are dedicated to direct atmosphere sampling and ACP gas sampling respectively. The instrument is also equipped with a chemical scrubber cell for noble gas analysis and a sample enrichment cell for selective measurement of high boiling point carbon containing constituents. The mass range is 2 to 141 Dalton and the nominal detection threshold is at a mixing ratio of 10- 8. The data rate available from the Probe system is 885 bit/s. The weight of the instrument is 17.3 kg and the energy required for warm up and 150 minutes of operation is 110 Watt-hours.

  15. The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer for the Huygens Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Bauer, S. J.; Biemann, K.; Block, B.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Frost, R. L.; Gautier, D.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D.; Hunten, D. M.; Israel, G.; Lunine, J. I.; Mauersberger, K.; Owen, T. C.; Raulin, F.; Richards, J. E.; Way, S. H.

    2002-07-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) on the Huygens Probe will measure the chemical composition of Titan's atmosphere from 170 km altitude (~1 hPa) to the surface (~1500 hPa) and determine the isotope ratios of the major gaseous constituents. The GCMS will also analyze gas samples from the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) and may be able to investigate the composition (including isotope ratios) of several candidate surface materials. The GCMS is a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns. The mass spectrometer employs five ion sources sequentially feeding the mass analyzer. Three ion sources serve as detectors for the GC columns and two are dedicated to direct atmosphere sampling and ACP gas sampling respectively. The instrument is also equipped with a chemical scrubber cell for noble gas analysis and a sample enrichment cell for selective measurement of high boiling point carbon containing constituents. The mass range is 2 to 141 Dalton and the nominal detection threshold is at a mixing ratio of 10- 8. The data rate available from the Probe system is 885 bit/s. The weight of the instrument is 17.3 kg and the energy required for warm up and 150 minutes of operation is 110 Watt-hours.

  16. Quadrupole mass spectrometer driver with higher signal levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Aalami, Dean (Inventor); Darrach, Murray (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Driving a quadrapole mass spectrometer includes obtaining an air core transformer with a primary and a secondary, matching the secondary to the mass spectrometer, and driving the primary based on first and second voltage levels. Driving of the primary is via an isolating stage that minimizes low level drive signal coupling.

  17. Open-split interface for mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Diehl, John W.

    1991-01-01

    An open-split interface includes a connector body having four leg members projecting therefrom within a single plane, the first and third legs being coaxial and the second and fourth legs being coaxial. A tubular aperture extends through the first and third legs and a second tubular aperture extends through the second and fourth legs, connecting at a juncture within the center of the connector body. A fifth leg projects from the connector body and has a third tubular aperture extending therethrough to the juncture of the first and second tubular apertures. A capillary column extends from a gas chromatograph into the third leg with its end adjacent the juncture. A flow restrictor tube extends from a mass spectrometer through the first tubular aperture in the first and third legs and into the capillary columnm end, so as to project beyond the end of the third leg within the capillary column. An annular gap between the tube and column allows excess effluent to pass to the juncture. A pair of short capillary columns extend from separate detectors into the second tubular aperture in the second and fourth legs, and are oriented with their ends spaced slightly from the first capillary column end. A sweep flow tube is mounted in the fifth leg so as to supply a helium sweep flow to the juncture.

  18. Radiation Design of Ion Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Ed; Cooper, John; Christian, Eric; Moore, Tom; Sturner, Steve; Paschalidis, Nick

    2011-01-01

    In the harsh radiation environment of Jupiter and with the JUpiter ICy moon Explorer (JUICE) mission including two Europa flybys where local intensities are approx. 150 krad/month behind 100 mils of Al shielding, so background from penetrating radiation can be a serious issue for detectors inside an Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS). This can especially be important for minor ion detection designs. Detectors of choice for time-of-flight (TOF) designs are microchannel plates (MCP) and some designs may include solid state detectors (SSD). The standard approach is to use shielding designs so background event rates are low enough that the detector max rates and lifetimes are first not exceeded and then the more stringent requirement that the desired measurement can successfully be made (i.e., desired signal is sufficiently greater than background noise after background subtraction is made). GEANT codes are typically used along with various electronic techniques, but such designs need to know how the detectors will respond to the simulated primary and secondary radiations produced within the instrument. We will be presenting some preliminary measurements made on the response of MCPs to energetic electrons (20 ke V to 1400 ke V) using a Miniature TOF (MTOF) device and the High Energy Facility at Goddard Space Flight Center which has a Van de Graaff accelerator.

  19. THOR Ion Mass Spectrometer instrument - IMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retinò, Alessandro; Kucharek, Harald; Saito, Yoshifumi; Fraenz, Markus; Verdeil, Christophe; Leblanc, Frederic; Techer, Jean-Denis; Jeandet, Alexis; Macri, John; Gaidos, John; Granoff, Mark; Yokota, Shoichiro; Fontaine, Dominique; Berthomier, Matthieu; Delcourt, Dominique; Kistler, Lynn; Galvin, Antoniette; Kasahara, Satoshi; Kronberg, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. Specifically, THOR will study how turbulent fluctuations at kinetic scales heat and accelerate particles in different turbulent environments within the near-Earth space. To achieve this goal, THOR payload is being designed to measure electromagnetic fields and particle distribution functions with unprecedented resolution and accuracy. Here we present the Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) instrument that will measure the full three-dimensional distribution functions of near-Earth main ion species (H+, He+, He++ and O+) at high time resolution (~ 150 ms for H+ , ~ 300 ms for He++) with energy resolution down to ~ 10% in the range 10 eV/q to 30 keV/q and angular resolution ~ 10°. Such high time resolution is achieved by mounting multiple sensors around the spacecraft body, in similar fashion to the MMS/FPI instrument. Each sensor combines a top-hat electrostatic analyzer with deflectors at the entrance together with a time-of-flight section to perform mass selection. IMS electronics includes a fast sweeping high voltage board that is required to make measurements at high cadence. Ion detection includes Micro Channel Plates (MCP) combined with Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) for charge amplification, discrimination and time-to-digital conversion (TDC). IMS is being designed to address many of THOR science requirements, in particular ion heating and acceleration by turbulent fluctuations in foreshock, shock and magnetosheath regions. The IMS instrument is being designed and will be built by an international consortium of scientific institutes with main hardware contributions from France, USA, Japan and Germany.

  20. Augmenting Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers Using a Frequency Modulated Drift Tube Ion Mobility Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Kelsey A; Siems, William F; Clowers, Brian H

    2016-03-15

    Historically, high pressure ion mobility drift tubes have suffered from low ion duty cycles and this problem is magnified when such instrumentation is coupled with ion trap mass spectrometers. To significantly alleviate these issues, we outline the result from coupling an atmospheric pressure, dual-gate drift tube ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) to a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LIT-MS) via modulation of the ion beam with a linear frequency chirp. The time-domain ion current, once Fourier transformed, reveals a standard ion mobility drift spectrum that corresponds to the standard mode of mobility analysis. By multiplexing the ion beam, it is possible to successfully obtain drift time spectra for an assortment of simple peptide and protein mixtures using an LIT-MS while showing improved signal intensity versus the more common signal averaging technique. Explored here are the effects of maximum injection time, solution concentration, total experiment time, and frequency swept on signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and resolving power. Increased inject time, concentration, and experiment time all generally led to an improvement in SNR, while a greater frequency swept increases the resolving power at the expense of SNR. Overall, chirp multiplexing of a dual-gate IMS system coupled to an LIT-MS improves ion transmission, lowers analyte detection limits, and improves spectral quality. PMID:26854901

  1. The successful implementation of a licensed data management interface between a Sunquest® laboratory information system and an AB SCIEX™ mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    French, Deborah; Terrazas, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interfacing complex laboratory equipment to laboratory information systems (LIS) has become a more commonly encountered problem in clinical laboratories, especially for instruments that do not have an interface provided by the vendor. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is a great example of such complex equipment, and has become a frequent addition to clinical laboratories. As the testing volume on such instruments can be significant, manual data entry will also be considerable and the potential for concomitant transcription errors arises. Due to this potential issue, our aim was to interface an AB SCIEX™ mass spectrometer to our Sunquest® LIS. Materials and Methods: We licensed software for the data management interface from the University of Pittsburgh, but extended this work as follows: The interface was designed so that it would accept a text file exported from the AB SCIEX™ × 5500 QTrap® mass spectrometer, pre-process the file (using newly written code) into the correct format and upload it into Sunquest® via file transfer protocol. Results: The licensed software handled the majority of the interface tasks with the exception of converting the output from the Analyst® software to the required Sunquest® import format. This required writing of a “pre-processor” by one of the authors which was easily integrated with the supplied software. Conclusions: We successfully implemented the data management interface licensed from the University of Pittsburgh. Given the coding that was required to write the pre-processor, and alterations to the source code that were performed when debugging the software, we would suggest that before a laboratory decides to implement such an interface, it would be necessary to have a competent computer programmer available. PMID:23599901

  2. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  3. A high efficiency thermal ionization source adapted to mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlin, E.P.; Olivares, J.A.

    1994-07-01

    The high-temperature ion source used on the isotope separators at Los Alamos is unsuitable for mass spectrometry use, because it is bulky, expensive to fabricate, requires careful assembly, etc. A modified source was designed, using the following objectives: reduced number of parts and complexity, one-piece crucible, modular construction, little or no water cooling. The source is shown mounted on a quadrupole mass spectrometer; the ion beam is matched into a sector-type mass spectrometer.

  4. Double focusing ion mass spectrometer of cylindrical symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coplan, M. A.; Moore, J. H.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    A mass spectrometer consisting of an electric sector followed by a magnetic sector is described. The geometry is a cylindrically symmetric generalization of the Mattauch-Herzog spectrometer (1934). With its large annular entrance aperture and a position-sensitive detector, the instrument provides a large geometric factor and 100-percent duty factor, making it appropriate for spacecraft experiments.

  5. Method for increasing the dynamic range of mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Belov, Mikhail; Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.

    2004-09-07

    A method for enhancing the dynamic range of a mass spectrometer by first passing a sample of ions through the mass spectrometer having a quadrupole ion filter, whereupon the intensities of the mass spectrum of the sample are measured. From the mass spectrum, ions within this sample are then identified for subsequent ejection. As further sampling introduces more ions into the mass spectrometer, the appropriate rf voltages are applied to a quadrupole ion filter, thereby selectively ejecting the undesired ions previously identified. In this manner, the desired ions may be collected for longer periods of time in an ion trap, thus allowing better collection and subsequent analysis of the desired ions. The ion trap used for accumulation may be the same ion trap used for mass analysis, in which case the mass analysis is performed directly, or it may be an intermediate trap. In the case where collection is an intermediate trap, the desired ions are accumulated in the intermediate trap, and then transferred to a separate mass analyzer. The present invention finds particular utility where the mass analysis is performed in an ion trap mass spectrometer or a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

  6. A shock tube with a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer for investigations of complex reaction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürrstein, Steffen H.; Aghsaee, Mohammad; Jerig, Ludger; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof

    2011-08-01

    A conventional membrane-type stainless steel shock tube has been coupled to a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HRR-TOF-MS) to be used to study complex reaction systems such as the formation of pollutants in combustion processes or formation of nanoparticles from metal containing organic compounds. Opposed to other TOF-MS shock tubes, our instrument is equipped with a modular sampling unit that allows to sample with or without a skimmer. The skimmer unit can be mounted or removed in less than 10 min. Thus, it is possible to adjust the sampling procedure, namely, the mass flux into the ionization chamber of the HRR-TOF-MS, to the experimental situation imposed by species-specific ionization cross sections and vapor pressures. The whole sampling section was optimized with respect to a minimal distance between the nozzle tip inside the shock tube and the ion source inside the TOF-MS. The design of the apparatus is presented and the influence of the skimmer on the measured spectra is demonstrated by comparing data from both operation modes for conditions typical for chemical kinetics experiments. The well-studied thermal decomposition of acetylene has been used as a test system to validate the new setup against kinetics mechanisms reported in literature.

  7. A shock tube with a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer for investigations of complex reaction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Duerrstein, Steffen H.; Aghsaee, Mohammad; Jerig, Ludger; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof

    2011-08-15

    A conventional membrane-type stainless steel shock tube has been coupled to a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HRR-TOF-MS) to be used to study complex reaction systems such as the formation of pollutants in combustion processes or formation of nanoparticles from metal containing organic compounds. Opposed to other TOF-MS shock tubes, our instrument is equipped with a modular sampling unit that allows to sample with or without a skimmer. The skimmer unit can be mounted or removed in less than 10 min. Thus, it is possible to adjust the sampling procedure, namely, the mass flux into the ionization chamber of the HRR-TOF-MS, to the experimental situation imposed by species-specific ionization cross sections and vapor pressures. The whole sampling section was optimized with respect to a minimal distance between the nozzle tip inside the shock tube and the ion source inside the TOF-MS. The design of the apparatus is presented and the influence of the skimmer on the measured spectra is demonstrated by comparing data from both operation modes for conditions typical for chemical kinetics experiments. The well-studied thermal decomposition of acetylene has been used as a test system to validate the new setup against kinetics mechanisms reported in literature.

  8. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonks, James P.; Galloway, Ewan C.; King, Martin O.; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F.

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  9. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Tonks, James P; Galloway, Ewan C; King, Martin O; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques. PMID:27587173

  10. Performance characteristics of an automated gas chromatograph-ion trap mass spectrometer system used for the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study field investigation in Nashville, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daughtrey, E. Hunter; Adams, Jeffrey R.; Oliver, Karen D.; Kronmiller, Keith G.; McClenny, William A.

    1998-09-01

    A trailer-deployed automated gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (autoGC-MS) system capable of making continuous hourly measurements was used to determine volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air at New Hendersonville, Tennessee, and Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, in 1995. The system configuration, including the autoGC-MS, trailer and transfer line, siting, and sampling plan and schedule, is described. The autoGC-MS system employs a pair of matched sorbent traps to allow simultaneous sampling and desorption. Desorption is followed by Stirling engine cryofocusing and subsequent GC separation and mass spectral identification and quantification. Quality control measurements described include evaluating precision and accuracy of replicate analyses of independently supplied audit and round-robin canisters and determining the completeness of the data sets taken in Tennessee. Data quality objectives for precision (±10%) and accuracy (±20%) of 10- to 20-ppbv audit canisters and a completeness of >75% data capture were met. Quality assurance measures used in reviewing the data set include retention time stability, calibration checks, frequency distribution checks, and checks of the mass spectra. Special procedures and tests were used to minimize sorbent trap artifacts, to verify the quality of a standard prepared in our laboratory, and to prove the integrity of the insulated, heated transfer line. A rigorous determination of total system blank concentration levels using humidified scientific air spiked with ozone allowed estimation of method detection limits, ranging from 0.01 to 1.0 ppb C, for most of the 100 target compounds, which were a composite list of the target compounds for the Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Station network, those for Environmental Protection Agency method TO-14, and selected oxygenated VOCs.

  11. Mass spectrometer having a derivatized sample presentation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W.

    2000-07-25

    A mass spectrometer having a derivatized sample presentation apparatus is provided. The sample presentation apparatus has a complex bound to the surface of the sample presentation apparatus. This complex includes a molecule which may chemically modify a biomolecule.

  12. Comparative performance of double-focus and quadrupole mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. K.

    1972-01-01

    Light-weight flight type double focus and quadruple mass spectrometer models were compared. Data cover size, weight, and power sensitivity required to achieve same resolution sensitivity at given mass number. Comparison was made using mathematical relationships. Analysis was confined to equal ion source area sensitivity variations not more than 40% over mass range.

  13. Diagnostics aid for mass spectrometer trouble-shooting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filby, E. E.; Rankin, R. A.; Webb, G. W.

    The MS Expert system provides problem diagnostics for instruments used in the Mass Spectrometry Laboratory (MSL). The most critical results generated on these mass spectrometers are the uranium concentration and isotopic content data used for process control and materials accountability at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The two purposes of the system are: (1) to minimize instrument downtime and thereby provide the best possible support to the Plant, and (2) to improve long-term data quality. This system combines the knowledge of several experts on mass spectrometry to provide a diagnostic tool, and can make these skills available on a more timely basis. It integrates code written in the Pascal language with a knowledge base entered into a commercial expert system shell. The user performs some preliminary status checks, and then selects from among several broad diagnostic categories. These initial steps provide input to the rule base. The overall analysis provides the user with a set of possible solutions to the observed problems, graded as to their probabilities. Besides the trouble-shooting benefits expected from this system, it will also provide structures diagnostic training for lab personnel. In addition, development of the system knowledge base has already produced a better understanding of instrument behavior. Two key findings are that a good user interface is necessary for full acceptance of the tool, and a development system should include standard programming capabilities as well as the expert system shell.

  14. The NA62 spectrometer acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorskiy, N.; Ceccucci, A.; Bendotti, J.; Danielsson, H.; Degrange, J.; Dixon, N.; Elsha, V.; Enik, T.; Glonti, L.; Gusakov, Y.; Kakurin, S.; Kekelidze, V.; Kislov, E.; Kolesnikov, A.; Koval, M.; Lichard, P.; Madigozhin, D.; Morant, J.; Movchan, S.; Perez Gomez, F.; Palladino, V.; Polenkevich, I.; Potrebenikov, Y.; Ruggiero, G.; Samsonov, V.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Sotnikov, A.

    2016-02-01

    The NA62 low mass spectrometer consists of 7000 straw tubes operating in vacuum. The front-end electronics is directly mounted on the detector and connected by a flexible PCB. The front-end board provides the amplification, shaping, discrimination and time measurements of the analogue signals from 16 channels. After digitisation the data is sent to a VME 9U read-out board. The data, once matched with the trigger, is sent to the next step and used by the trigger level 1 algorithm. The front-end and read-out systems of the detector will be presented along with the first results of the detector performances.

  15. Spacecraft Applications of Compact Optical and Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davinic, N. M.; Nagel, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Optical spectrometers, and mass spectrometers to a lesser extent, have a long and rich history of use aboard spacecraft. Space mission applications include deep space science spacecraft, earth orbiting satellites, atmospheric probes, and surface landers, rovers, and penetrators. The large size of capable instruments limited their use to large, expensive spacecraft. Because of the novel application of micro-fabrication technologies, compact optical and mass spectrometers are now available. The new compact devices are especially attractive for spacecraft because of their small mass and volume, as well as their low power consumption. Dispersive optical multi-channel analyzers which cover the 0.4-1.1 micrometer wavelength are now commercially available in packages as small as 3 x 6 x 18 mm exclusive of drive and recording electronics. Mass spectrometers as small as 3 x 3 mm, again without electronics, are under development. A variety of compact optical and mass spectrometers are reviewed in this paper. A number of past space applications are described, along with some upcoming opportunities that are likely candidate missions to fly this new class of compact spectrometers.

  16. Design and operational characteristics of a cast steel mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Blantocas, Gene Q.; Ramos, Henry J.; Wada, Motoi

    2004-09-01

    A cast steel magnetic sector mass analyzer is developed for studies of hydrogen and helium ion beams generated by a gas discharge compact ion source. The optimum induced magnetic flux density of 3500 G made it possible to scan the whole spectrum of hydrogen and helium ion species. Analysis of beam characteristics shows that the mass spectrometer sensitivity, and resolving power are approximately inversely proportional. The resolution is enhanced at higher pressures and lower current discharges. In contrast, the instrument sensitivity increased at higher current discharges and decreased at higher pressures. Calculations of the ultimate resolving power with reference to analyzer dimensions yield a numerical value of 30. System anomaly in the form of spherical aberrations was also analyzed using the paraxial beam envelope equation. Beam divergence is most significant at high discharge conditions where angular spread reaches an upper limit of 8.6 deg.

  17. A mass spectrometer based explosives trace detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilkov, Andrey; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Hanold, Karl; Syage, Jack A.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we describe the application of mass spectrometry (MS) to the detection of trace explosives. We begin by reviewing the issue of explosives trace detection (ETD) and describe the method of mass spectrometry (MS) as an alternative to existing technologies. Effective security screening devices must be accurate (high detection and low false positive rate), fast and cost effective (upfront and operating costs). Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the most commonly deployed method for ETD devices. Its advantages are compact size and relatively low price. For applications requiring a handheld detector, IMS is an excellent choice. For applications that are more stationary (e.g., checkpoint and alternatives to IMS are available. MS is recognized for its superior performance with regard to sensitivity and specificity, which translate to lower false negative and false positive rates. In almost all applications outside of security where accurate chemical analysis is needed, MS is usually the method of choice and is often referred to as the gold standard for chemical analysis. There are many review articles and proceedings that describe detection technologies for explosives. 1,2,3,4 Here we compare MS and IMS and identify the strengths and weaknesses of each method. - Mass spectrometry (MS): MS offers high levels of sensitivity and specificity compared to other technologies for chemical detection. Its traditional disadvantages have been high cost and complexity. Over the last few years, however, the economics have greatly improved and MS is now capable of routine and automated operation. Here we compare MS and IMS and identify the strengths and weaknesses of each method. - Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS): 5 MS-ETD Screening System IMS is similar in concept to MS except that the ions are dispersed by gas-phase viscosity and not by molecular weight. The main advantage of IMS is that it does not use a vacuum system, which greatly reduces the size, cost, and complexity

  18. Higher Order Parametric Excitation Modes for Spaceborne Quadrupole Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershman, D. J.; Block, B. P.; Rubin, M.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to significantly improve upon the mass peak shape and mass resolution of spaceborne quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMSs) through higher order auxiliary excitation of the quadrupole field. Using a novel multiresonant tank circuit, additional frequency components can be used to drive modulating voltages on the quadrupole rods in a practical manner, suitable for both improved commercial applications and spaceflight instruments. Auxiliary excitation at frequencies near twice that of the fundamental quadrupole RF frequency provides the advantages of previously studied parametric excitation techniques, but with the added benefit of increased sensed excitation amplitude dynamic range and the ability to operate voltage scan lines through the center of upper stability islands. Using a field programmable gate array, the amplitudes and frequencies of all QMS signals are digitally generated and managed, providing a robust and stable voltage control system. These techniques are experimentally verified through an interface with a commercial Pfeiffer QMG422 quadrupole rod system.When operating through the center of a stability island formed from higher order auxiliary excitation, approximately 50% and 400% improvements in 1% mass resolution and peak stability were measured, respectively, when compared with traditional QMS operation. Although tested with a circular rod system, the presented techniques have the potential to improve the performance of both circular and hyperbolic rod geometry QMS sensors.

  19. Higher order parametric excitation modes for spaceborne quadrupole mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, D. J.; Block, B. P.; Rubin, M.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-12-15

    This paper describes a technique to significantly improve upon the mass peak shape and mass resolution of spaceborne quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMSs) through higher order auxiliary excitation of the quadrupole field. Using a novel multiresonant tank circuit, additional frequency components can be used to drive modulating voltages on the quadrupole rods in a practical manner, suitable for both improved commercial applications and spaceflight instruments. Auxiliary excitation at frequencies near twice that of the fundamental quadrupole RF frequency provides the advantages of previously studied parametric excitation techniques, but with the added benefit of increased sensed excitation amplitude dynamic range and the ability to operate voltage scan lines through the center of upper stability islands. Using a field programmable gate array, the amplitudes and frequencies of all QMS signals are digitally generated and managed, providing a robust and stable voltage control system. These techniques are experimentally verified through an interface with a commercial Pfeiffer QMG422 quadrupole rod system. When operating through the center of a stability island formed from higher order auxiliary excitation, approximately 50% and 400% improvements in 1% mass resolution and peak stability were measured, respectively, when compared with traditional QMS operation. Although tested with a circular rod system, the presented techniques have the potential to improve the performance of both circular and hyperbolic rod geometry QMS sensors.

  20. Construction of a wireless communication contact closure system for liquid chromatography with multiple parallel mass spectrometers and other detectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A contact closure system has been constructed and implemented that utilizes two contact closure sender boards that communicate wirelessly to four contact closure receiver boards to distribute start signals from two or three liquid chromatographs to fourteen instruments, pumps, detectors, or other co...

  1. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks on the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.

  2. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks onmore » the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.« less

  3. Fast scan control for deflection type mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, P. R.; Gaetano, G.; Hughes, D. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A high speed scan device is reported that allows most any scanning sector mass spectrometer to measure preselected gases at a very high sampling rate. The device generates a rapidly changing staircase output which is applied to the accelerator of the spectrometer and it also generates defocusing pulses that are applied to one of the deflecting plates of the spectrometer which when shorted to ground deflects the ion beam away from the collector. A defocusing pulse occurs each time there is a change in the staircase output.

  4. Miniature Focusing Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanik, Isik; Srivastava, Santosh

    2005-01-01

    An improved miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been developed in a continuing effort to minimize the sizes, weights, power demands, and costs of mass spectrometers for such diverse applications as measurement of concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere, detecting poisonous gases in mines, and analyzing exhaust gases of automobiles. Advantageous characteristics of this mass spectrometer include the following: It is simple and rugged. Relative to prior mass spectrometers, it is inexpensive to build. There is no need for precise alignment of its components. Its mass range is practically unlimited Relative to prior mass spectrometers, it offers high sensitivity (ability to measure relative concentrations as small as parts per billion). Its resolution is one dalton (one atomic mass unit). An entire mass spectrum is recorded in a single pulse. (In a conventional mass spectrometer, a spectrum is recorded mass by mass.) The data-acquisition process takes only seconds. It is a lightweight, low-power, portable instrument. Although time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MSs) have been miniaturized previously, their performances have not been completely satisfactory. An inherent adverse effect of miniaturization of a TOF-MS is a loss of resolution caused by reduction of the length of its flight tube. In the present improved TOF-MS, the adverse effect of shortening the flight tube is counteracted by (1) using charged-particle optics to constrain ion trajectories to the flight-tube axis while (2) reducing ion velocities to increase ion flight times. In the present improved TOF-MS, a stream of gas is generated by use of a hypodermic needle. The stream of gas is crossed by an energy-selected, pulsed beam of electrons (see Figure 1). The ions generated by impingement of the electrons on the gas atoms are then focused by three cylindrical electrostatic lenses, which constitute a segmented flight tube. After traveling along the flight tube, the ions enter a charged

  5. EXTENDING THE USEFUL LIFE OF OLDER MASS SPECTROMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.; Cordaro, J.; Holland, M.; Jones, V.

    2010-06-17

    Thermal ionization and gas mass spectrometers are widely used across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and contractor laboratories. These instruments support critical missions, where high reliability and low measurement uncertainty are essential. A growing number of these mass spectrometers are significantly older than their original design life. The reality is that manufacturers have declared many of the instrument models obsolete, with direct replacement parts and service no longer available. Some of these obsolete models do not have a next generation, commercially available replacement. Today's budget conscious economy demands for the use of creative funds management. Therefore, the ability to refurbish (or upgrade) these valuable analytical tools and extending their useful life is a cost effective option. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has the proven expertise to breathe new life into older mass spectrometers, at a significant cost savings compared to the purchase and installation of new instruments. A twenty-seven year old Finnigan MAT-261{trademark} Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS), located at the SRS F/H Area Production Support Laboratory, has been successfully refurbished. Engineers from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) fabricated and installed the new electronics. These engineers also provide continued instrument maintenance services. With electronic component drawings being DOE Property, other DOE Complex laboratories have the option to extend the life of their aged Mass Spectrometers.

  6. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOEpatents

    Tuszewski, M.G.

    1997-07-22

    A mass spectrometer and methods are disclosed for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector. 7 figs.

  7. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOEpatents

    Tuszewski, Michel G.

    1997-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

  8. Glow discharge electron impact ionization source for miniature mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Song, Qingyu; Noll, Robert J; Duncan, Jason; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2007-05-01

    A glow discharge electron impact ionization (GDEI) source was developed for operation using air as the support gas. An alternative to the use of thermoemission from a resistively heated filament electron source for miniature mass spectrometers, the GDEI source is shown to have advantages of long lifetime under high-pressure operation and low power consumption. The GDEI source was characterized using our laboratory's handheld mass spectrometer, the Mini 10. The effects of the discharge voltage and pressure were investigated. Design considerations are illustrated with calculations. Performance is demonstrated in a set of experimental tests. The results show that the low power requirements, mechanical ruggedness, and quality of the data produced using the small glow discharge ion source make it well-suited for use with a portable handheld mass spectrometer. PMID:17441220

  9. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus.

  10. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-21

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus. 5 figures.

  11. Mass spectrometer experiments for the European space probe Giotto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, G.

    The Particulate Impact Analyzer (PIA) and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) experiments to be carried on board the Giotto cometary probe are presented. The NMS is designed to determine the chemical composition of gases and ions in the coma of Halley's Comet based on the ue of two spectrometers: an electrostatic parallel-plate analyzer, and a similar analyzer coupled with a magnetic analyzer with double-focusing geometry. The sensor structure consists of a monolithic multi-rib milled body with integral fixation points, with provisions for electromagnetic and thermal isolation, and dust protection. The PIA is intended for the measurement of the physical and chemical characteristics of cometary dust particles. It is based on an instrument comprising an entrance baffle and shutter unit, a target unit at which the dust is ionized, a light flash detector marking the flash of ionization, an acceleration grid sending the ions into the time-of-flight unit, and a multiplier unit for recording the time of flight spectrum. A microprocessor-based electronics system housed in a separate case next to the sensor performs tasks of power supply, signal processing, data processing and flow control.

  12. A retarding ion mass spectrometer for the Dynamics Explorer-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, W.

    1985-01-01

    The Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) for Dynamics Explorer-1 is an instrument designed to measure the details of the thermal plasma distribution. It combines the ion temperature determining capability of the retarding potential analyzer with the compositional capabilities of the mass spectrometer and adds multiple sensor heads to sample all directions relative to the spacecraft ram direction. This manual provides a functional description of the RIMS, the instrument calibration, and a description of the commands which can be stored in the instrument logic to control its operation.

  13. Development of an advanced spacecraft tandem mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drew, Russell C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to apply current advanced technology in electronics and materials to the development of a miniaturized Tandem Mass Spectrometer that would have the potential for future development into a package suitable for spacecraft use. The mass spectrometer to be used as a basis for the tandem instrument would be a magnetic sector instrument, of Nier-Johnson configuration, as used on the Viking Mars Lander mission. This instrument configuration would then be matched with a suitable second stage MS to provide the benefits of tandem MS operation for rapid identification of unknown organic compounds. This tandem instrument is configured with a newly designed GC system to aid in separation of complex mixtures prior to MS analysis. A number of important results were achieved in the course of this project. Among them were the development of a miniaturized GC subsystem, with a unique desorber-injector, fully temperature feedback controlled oven with powered cooling for rapid reset to ambient conditions, a unique combination inlet system to the MS that provides for both membrane sampling and direct capillary column sample transfer, a compact and ruggedized alignment configuration for the MS, an improved ion source design for increased sensitivity, and a simple, rugged tandem MS configuration that is particularly adaptable to spacecraft use because of its low power and low vacuum pumping requirements. The potential applications of this research include use in manned spacecraft like the space station as a real-time detection and warning device for the presence of potentially harmful trace contaminants of the spacecraft atmosphere, use as an analytical device for evaluating samples collected on the Moon or a planetary surface, or even use in connection with monitoring potentially hazardous conditions that may exist in terrestrial locations such as launch pads, environmental test chambers or other sensitive areas. Commercial development of the technology

  14. A feasibility study of ion implantation techniques for mass spectrometer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koslin, M. E.; Krycuk, G. A.; Schatz, J. G., Jr.; White, F. A.; Wood, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to examine the feasibility of using ion-implanted filaments doped with either an alkali metal or noble gas for in situ recalibration of onboard mass spectrometers during extended space missions. Implants of rubidium and krypton in rhenium ribbon filaments were subsequently tested in a bakeable 60 deg sector mass spectrometer operating in the static mode. Surface ionization and electron impact ion sources were both used, each yielding satisfactory results. The metallic implant with subsequent ionization provided a means of mass scale calibration and determination of system operating parameters, whereas the noble gas thermally desorbed into the system was more suited for partial pressure and sensitivity determinations.

  15. Application of an atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer to chlorination reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure mass spectrometric sampling system, based on a free jet expansion was used to study certain M-Cl-O reactions at high temperatures. The apparatus enables the volatile species from a 1-atm chemical process to be directly identified with a mass spectrometer which operates at approx. 10 to the minus 8th power torr. Studies for both pure metals and alloys are discussed. It is shown that this mass spectrometer system aids in identifying the volatile species, and provides fundamental information on the reaction mechanism.

  16. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori by carbon-13 urea breath test using a portable mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Sreekumar, J; France, N; Taylor, S; Matthews, T; Turner, P; Bliss, P; Watson, AJM

    2015-01-01

    Context: In the non-invasive detection of markers of disease, mass spectrometry is able to detect small quantities of volatile markers in exhaled air. However, the problem of size, expense and immobility of conventional mass spectrometry equipment has restricted its use. Now, a smaller, less expensive, portable quadrupole mass spectrometer system has been developed. Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the development of chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer. Objectives: To compare the results obtained from the presence of H. pylori by a carbon-13 urea test using a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer system with those from a fixed mass spectrometer in a hospital-based clinical trial. Methods: Following ethical approval, 45 patients attending a gastroenterology clinic at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital exhaled a breath sample into a Tedlar gas sampling bag. They then drank an orange juice containing urea radiolabelled with carbon and 30 min later gave a second breath sample. The carbon-13 content of both samples was measured using both quadrupole mass spectrometer systems. If the post-drink level exceeded the pre-drink level by 3% or more, a positive diagnosis for the presence of H. pylori was made. Results: The findings were compared to the results using conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry using a laboratory-based magnetic sector instrument off-site. The results showed agreement in 39 of the 45 patients. Conclusions: This study suggests that a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer is a potential alternative to the conventional centralised testing equipment. Future development of the portable quadrupole mass spectrometer to reduce further its size and cost is indicated, together with further work to validate this new equipment and to enhance its use in mass spectrometry diagnosis of other medical conditions. PMID:26770764

  17. Combined liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer for involatile biological samples.

    PubMed

    Blakley, C R; Carmody, J C; Vestal, M L

    1980-09-01

    A new liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer has been developed in our laboratory for application to analysis of biological molecules of extremely low volatility. Oxyhydrogen flames rapidly vaporize the total liquid-chromatographic effluent, and molecular and particle beam techniques are used to efficiently transfer the sample to the ionization source of the mass spectrometer. This new instrument is comparable in cost and complexity to a combined gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer, but extends the capabilities of combined chromatography/mass spectrometry to a broad range of compounds not previously accessible. We are currently testing biologically significant samples with this instrument, using reversed-phase liquid-chromatographic separation and both positive and negative ion chemical-ionization mass spectrometry. Results have been obtained from mixtures of nucleic acid components--bases, nucleosides, and nucleotides--and from amino acids, peptides, saccharides, fatty acids, vitamins, and antibiotics. In all cases investigated to date, ions indicative of molecular mass are obtained in at least one of the operating modes available. Detection limits are typically in the 1-10 ng range for full mass scans (about 80-600 amu); sub-nanogram quantities are usually detectable with single-ion monitoring. PMID:7408175

  18. Mass spectrometer and methods of increasing dispersion between ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Olson, John E.; Delmore, James E.

    2006-01-10

    A mass spectrometer includes a magnetic sector configured to separate a plurality of ion beams, and an electrostatic sector configured to receive the plurality of ion beams from the magnetic sector and increase separation between the ion beams, the electrostatic sector being used as a dispersive element following magnetic separation of the plurality of ion beams. Other apparatus and methods are provided.

  19. The History of Planetary Exploration Using Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    At the Planetary Probe Workshop Dr. Paul Mahaffy will give a tutorial on the history of planetary exploration using mass spectrometers. He will give an introduction to the problems and solutions that arise in making in situ measurements at planetary targets using this instrument class.

  20. Design and development of a fast ion mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Two Fast Ion Mass Spectrometers (FIMS A and FIMS B) were developed. The design, development, construction, calibration, integration, and flight of these instruments, along with early results from the data analysis efforts are summarized. A medium energy ion mass spectrometer that covers mass velocity space with significantly higher time resolution, improved mass resolution, (particularly for heavier ions), and wider energy range than existing instruments had achieved was completed. The initial design consisted of a dual channel cylindrical electrostatic analyzer followed by a dual channel cylindrical velocity filter. The gain versus count rate characteristics of the high current channel electron multipliers (CEM's), which were chosen for ion detection, revealed a systematic behavior that can be used as a criterion for selection of CEM's for long counting lifetimes.

  1. MICE Spectrometer Magnet System Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2007-08-27

    The first magnets for the muon ionization cooling experimentwill be the tracker solenoids that form the ends of the MICE coolingchannel. The primary purpose of the tracker solenoids is to provide auniform 4 T field (to better than +-0.3 percent over a volume that is 1meter long and 0.3 meters in diameter) spectrometer magnet field for thescintillating fiber detectors that are used to analyze the muons in thechannel before and after ionization cooling. A secondary purpose for thetracker magnet is the matching of the muon beam between the rest of theMICE cooling channel and the uniform field spectrometer magnet. Thetracker solenoid is powered by three 300 amp power supplies. Additionaltuning of the spectrometer is provided by a pair of 50 amp power suppliesacross the spectrometer magnet end coils. The tracker magnet will becooled using a pair of 4 K pulse tube coolers that each provide 1.5 W ofcooling at 4.2 K. Final design and construction of the tracker solenoidsbegan during the summer of 2006. This report describes the progress madeon the construction of the tracker solenoids.

  2. Development of a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, Joseph Ellis

    Because of its potential to be made portable the quadrupole ion trap (QPIT) is a prime candidate for specialized applications such as atmospheric studies, other field measurements, or measurements anywhere a laboratory instrument would be prohibitively inconvenient. To utilize the QPIT in such ways it is necessary to design and construct custom built instruments. A QPIT mass spectrometer was constructed as the foundation for such future development. Two ionization schemes were employed. Direct electron bombardment was used for in situ ion production, and UV photoionization was used to produce ions external to the trap. Calibration measurements determined that the system performed as theory dictated. It was also demonstrated that the system was capable of sampling the atmosphere and detecting the presence of an atmospheric contaminant. Finally, DC bias foils were invented as a novel approach to mass isolation in the trap. The use of DC bias foils was demonstrated to be an exceptionally easy and inexpensive method of controlling the contents of the QPIT.

  3. The PNL high-transmission three-stage mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, J. J.; Ells, D. R.; Bond, L. A.; Freedman, P. A.; Tattersall, B. N.; Lagergren, C. R.

    1992-12-01

    We have constructed a three-stage isotope-ratio mass spectrometer of unique ion-optical design that achieves high ion transmission efficiency and high abundance sensitivity. The spectrometer has tandem 90 deg deflection magnets with boundaries 18 deg off normal. The magnet drift lengths are 1.48 times the 27-cm radius of deflection. This extended geometry gives a mass dispersion equivalent to a 40-cm-radius magnet with normal boundaries. The first magnet renders the ion beam parallel in the vertical plane and provides a focus in the horizontal plane of mass dispersion. The second magnet brings the beam to a stigmatic focus. This novel ion-optical design gives 100 percent transmission without the need for intermediate focusing lenses. It also provides a 16 percent increase in mass resolution over the traditional tandem geometry with normal magnet boundaries. Complete transmission of ions is maintained through a third-stage cylindrical electric sector of 38-cm radius, which provides increased isotope-abundance sensitivity. The isotope-abundance sensitivity of the new mass spectrometer is an order of magnitude better than similar instruments with normal magnet boundaries. This is because the vertical focusing of the ion beam prevents ion scattering from the top and bottom of the flight tube. The measured values of the isotope-abundance sensitivity one-half mass unit away from the rhenium ion peaks at masses 185 and 187 are M - 1/2 = (6.5 +/- 0.5)(10)(exp -10) and M + 1/2 = (3.1 +/- 0.8)(10)(exp -10). By extrapolation, the uranium isotope-abundance sensitivity is M - 1 = 1(10)(exp -10). Construction of the instrument was facilitated by using standard commercial mass spectrometer components.

  4. A Segmented Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Iga, I.; Rao, M. V. V. S.

    1995-01-01

    The present paper describes the design of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) in which the single flight tube of a conventional TOFMS has been replaced by several cylindrical electrostatic lenses in tandem. By a judicious choice of voltages on these lenses, an improved TOFMS has been realized which has a superior mass and energy resolution, shorter flight lengths, excellent signal-to-noise ratio and less stringent requirements on the bias voltages.

  5. Modifications to the Finnigan MAT 271 mass spectrometer in the Inorganic Gas Analysis Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Reber, S.D.; Cordes, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    This document presents an overview of the modifications that were done to the Finnigan MAT 271 mass spectrometer used in the Dept. 1823 Inorganic Gas Analysis Lab. Among the alterations to the spectrometer were addition of a new computer, interfaces to the power supply, addition of a multimeter and introduction of a Graphical User Interface software system to run the instrument. The impact of these improvements is also discussed. The appendix details a generic procedure for operating the instrument.

  6. Size-exclusion chromatography with organic carbon detection using a mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Warton, Ben; Heitz, Anna; Allpike, Bradley; Kagi, Robert

    2008-10-17

    A novel organic carbon detector for size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is described. The instrument uses the conventional UV-persulfate oxidation method to convert organic carbon to CO(2), which is then detected using a mass spectrometer. This system, using the mass spectrometer, had lower limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) than a previously described system using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy 'lightpipe' detector (i.e. when quantification was based on calibration using phthalate standards). When used to analyse natural organic matter (NOM) in water, it also had a superior signal-to-noise ratio to the previously described system. The use of a mass spectrometer to detect organic carbon (as CO(2)) enables the possibility of further characterisation of NOM by measuring the stable carbon isotope ratios of the various molecular size fractions of organic carbon, as obtained by SEC. PMID:18790486

  7. The method for on-site determination of trace concentrations of methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide in air using a mobile mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, combined with a fast enrichment/separation system.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Andrey S; Makas, Alexey L; Troshkov, Mikhail L; Grachev, Mikhail А; Pod'yachev, Sergey P

    2014-06-01

    A method for fast simultaneous on-site determination of methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide in air was developed. The target compounds were actively collected on silica gel, followed by direct flash thermal desorption, fast separation on a short chromatographic column and detection by means of mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. During the sampling of ambient air, water vapor was removed with a Nafion selective membrane. A compact mass spectrometer prototype, which was designed earlier at Trofimuk Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics, was used. The minimization of gas load of the atmospheric pressure ion source allowed reducing the power requirements and size of the vacuum system and increasing its ruggedness. The measurement cycle is about 3 min. Detection limits in a 0.6 L sample are 1 ppb for methyl mercaptan and 0.2 ppb for dimethyl sulfide. PMID:24725876

  8. Micro mass spectrometer on a chip.

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Dolores Y.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Fleming, James Grant

    2005-11-01

    The design, simulation, fabrication, packaging, electrical characterization and testing analysis of a microfabricated a cylindrical ion trap ({mu}CIT) array is presented. Several versions of microfabricated cylindrical ion traps were designed and fabricated. The final design of the individual trap array element consisted of two end cap electrodes, one ring electrode, and a detector plate, fabricated in seven tungsten metal layers by molding tungsten around silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) features. Each layer of tungsten is then polished back in damascene fashion. The SiO{sub 2} was removed using a standard release processes to realize a free-hung structure. Five different sized traps were fabricated with inner radii of 1, 1.5, 2, 5 and 10 {micro}m and heights ranging from 3-24 {micro}m. Simulations examined the effects of ion and neutral temperature, the pressure and nature of cooling gas, ion mass, trap voltage and frequency, space-charge, fabrication defects, and other parameters on the ability of micrometer-sized traps to store ions. The electrical characteristics of the ion trap arrays were determined. The capacitance was 2-500 pF for the various sized traps and arrays. The resistance was in the order of 1-2 {Omega}. The inductance of the arrays was calculated to be 10-1500 pH, depending on the trap and array sizes. The ion traps' field emission characteristics were assessed. It was determined that the traps could be operated up to 125 V while maintaining field emission currents below 1 x 10{sup -15} A. The testing focused on using the 5-{micro}m CITs to trap toluene (C{sub 7}H{sub 8}). Ion ejection from the traps was induced by termination of the RF voltage applied to the ring electrode and current measured on the collector electrode suggested trapping of ions in 1-10% of the traps. Improvements to the to the design of the traps were defined to minimize voltage drop to the substrate, thereby increasing trapping voltage applied to the ring electrode, and to allow

  9. Reflectron Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (REMAS) Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; McEntire, R. W.; Cheng, A. F.

    2000-01-01

    The restricted mass and power budgets of landed science missions present a challenge to obtaining detailed analyses of planetary bodies. In situ studies, whether alone or as reconnaissance for sample return, must rely on highly miniaturized and autonomous instrumentation. Such devices must still produce useful data sets from a minimum of measurements. The great desire to understand the surfaces and interiors of planets, moons, and small bodies had driven the development of small, robotic techniques with ever-increasing capabilities. One of the most important goals on a surface mission is to study composition in many geological contexts. The mineralogical, molecular, elemental, and isotopic content of near-surface materials (regolith, rocks, soils, dust, etc.) at a variety of sites can complement broader imaging to describe the makeup and formative history of the body in question. Instruments that perform this site-to-site analysis must be highly transportable and work as a suite. For instance, a camera, microscope, spectrophotometer, and mass spectrometer can share several components and operate under a parallel command structure. Efficient use of multiple systems on a small rover has been demonstrated on the Mars Pathfinder mission.

  10. SIEMENS ADVANCED QUANTRA FTICR MASS SPECTROMETER FOR ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION AT LOW MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W; Laura Tovo, L

    2008-07-08

    The Siemens Advanced Quantra Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was evaluated as an alternative instrument to large double focusing mass spectrometers for gas analysis. High resolution mass spectrometers capable of resolving the common mass isomers of the hydrogen isotopes are used to provide data for accurate loading of reservoirs and to monitor separation of tritium, deuterium, and helium. Conventional double focusing magnetic sector instruments have a resolution that is limited to about 5000. The Siemens FTICR instrument achieves resolution beyond 400,000 and could possibly resolve the tritium ion from the helium-3 ion, which differ by the weight of an electron, 0.00549 amu. Working with Y-12 and LANL, SRNL requested Siemens to modify their commercial Quantra system for low mass analysis. To achieve the required performance, Siemens had to increase the available waveform operating frequency from 5 MHz to 40 MHz and completely redesign the control electronics and software. However, they were able to use the previous ion trap, magnet, passive pump, and piezo-electric pulsed inlet valve design. NNSA invested $1M in this project and acquired four systems, two for Y-12 and one each for SRNL and LANL. Siemens claimed a $10M investment in the Quantra systems. The new Siemens Advanced Quantra demonstrated phenomenal resolution in the low mass range. Resolution greater than 400,000 was achieved for mass 2. The new spectrometer had a useful working mass range to 500 Daltons. However, experiments found that a continuous single scan from low mass to high was not possible. Two useful working ranges were established covering masses 1 to 6 and masses 12 to 500 for our studies. A compromise performance condition enabled masses 1 to 45 to be surveyed. The instrument was found to have a dynamic range of about three orders of magnitude and quantitative analysis is expected to be limited to around 5 percent without using complex fitting algorithms

  11. Development of an Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A commercial atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer (APIMS) was purchased from EXTREL Mass Spectrometry, Inc. (Pittsburgh, PA). Our research objectives were to adapt this instrument and develop techniques for real-time determinations of the concentrations of trace species in the atmosphere. The prototype instrument is capable of making high frequency measurements with no sample preconcentrations. Isotopically labeled standards are used as an internal standard to obtain high precision and to compensate for changes in instrument sensitivity and analyte losses in the sampling manifold as described by Bandy and coworkers. The prototype instrument is capable of being deployed on NASA C130, Electra, P3, and DC8 aircraft. After purchasing and taking delivery by June 1994, we assembled the mass spectrometer, data acquisition, and manifold flow control instrumentation in electronic racks and performed tests.

  12. Simulating data processing for an Advanced Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Clowers, Brian H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Belov, Mikhail E.

    2007-11-03

    We have designed and implemented a Cray XD-1-based sim- ulation of data capture and signal processing for an ad- vanced Ion Mobility mass spectrometer (Hadamard trans- form Ion Mobility). Our simulation is a hybrid application that uses both an FPGA component and a CPU-based soft- ware component to simulate Ion Mobility mass spectrome- try data processing. The FPGA component includes data capture and accumulation, as well as a more sophisticated deconvolution algorithm based on a PNNL-developed en- hancement to standard Hadamard transform Ion Mobility spectrometry. The software portion is in charge of stream- ing data to the FPGA and collecting results. We expect the computational and memory addressing logic of the FPGA component to be portable to an instrument-attached FPGA board that can be interfaced with a Hadamard transform Ion Mobility mass spectrometer.

  13. Imaging mass-spectrometer of ions for studying near-planetary plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaisberg, O. L.; Leibov, A. V.; Smirnov, V. N.; Avanov, L. A.; Bertelier, J.-J.; Torcar, K.; Leblan, F.; Babkin, V. F.; Grishin, V. A.; Baumjohann, V.; Escoubet, F.

    2006-05-01

    A numerical model of an ion mass-spectrometer is developed based on the new type of charged-particle analyzer CAMERA suggested previously [1 3]. The spectrometer provides for complete instantaneous imaging of the flux distribution of various ions in a hemisphere. Such a type of the mass-spectrometer is chosen, which allows one to analyze a conelike beam of ions at the exit of the CAMERA. The mathematical model of the CAMERA with this time-of-flight mass-analyzer ensures sufficiently high mass resolution (M/ΔM > 100) at conserved imaging capabilities of the CAMERA. Such an instrument can find a wide application both in magnetospheric studies and in studying various objects of the solar system.

  14. Ion mobility mass spectrometry of proteins in a modified commercial mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalassinos, K.; Slade, S. E.; Jennings, K. R.; Scrivens, J. H.; Giles, K.; Wildgoose, J.; Hoyes, J.; Bateman, R. H.; Bowers, M. T.

    2004-08-01

    Ion mobility has emerged as an important technique for determining biopolymer conformations in solvent free environments. These experiments have been nearly exclusively performed on home built systems. In this paper we describe modifications to a commercial high performance mass spectrometer, the Waters UK "Ultima" Q-Tof, that allows high sensitivity measurement of peptide and protein cross sections. Arrival time distributions are obtained for a series of peptides (bradykinin, LHRH, substance P, bombesin) and proteins (bovine and equine cytochrome c, myoglobin, [alpha]-lactalbumin) with good agreement found with literature cross sections where available. In complex ATD's, mass spectra can be obtained for each feature confirming assignments. The increased sensitivity of the commercial instrument is retained along with the convenience of the data system, crucial features for analysis of protein misfolding systems.

  15. Lens system for a photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1990-11-27

    A lens system in a photo ion spectrometer for manipulating a primary ion beam and ionized atomic component is disclosed. The atomic components are removed from a sample by a primary ion beam using the lens system, and the ions are extracted for analysis. The lens system further includes ionization resistant coatings for protecting the lens system. 8 figs.

  16. Lens system for a photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    A lens system in a photo ion spectrometer for manipulating a primary ion beam and ionized atomic component. The atomic components are removed from a sample by a primary ion beam using the lens system, and the ions are extracted for analysis. The lens system further includes ionization resistant coatings for protecting the lens system.

  17. Delta-Doped CCDs as Detector Arrays in Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Jones, Todd; Jewell, April; Sinha, Mahadeva

    2007-01-01

    In a conventional mass spectrometer, charged particles (ions) are dispersed through a magnetic sector onto an MCP at an output (focal) plane. In the MCP, the impinging charged particles excite electron cascades that afford signal gain. Electrons leaving the MCP can be read out by any of a variety of means; most commonly, they are post-accelerated onto a solid-state detector array, wherein the electron pulses are converted to photons, which, in turn, are converted to measurable electric-current pulses by photodetectors. Each step in the conversion from the impinging charged particles to the output 26 NASA Tech Briefs, February 2007 current pulses reduces spatial resolution and increases noise, thereby reducing the overall sensitivity and performance of the mass spectrometer. Hence, it would be preferable to make a direct measurement of the spatial distribution of charged particles impinging on the focal plane. The utility of delta-doped CCDs as detectors of charged particles was reported in two articles in NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 7 (July 1998): "Delta-Doped CCDs as Low-Energy-Particle Detectors" (NPO-20178) on page 48 and "Delta- Doped CCDs for Measuring Energies of Positive Ions" (NPO-20253) on page 50. In the present developmental miniature mass spectrometers, the above mentioned miniaturization and performance advantages contributed by the use of delta-doped CCDs are combined with the advantages afforded by the Mattauch-Herzog design. The Mattauch- Herzog design is a double-focusing spectrometer design involving an electric and a magnetic sector, where the ions of different masses are spatially separated along the focal plane of magnetic sector. A delta-doped CCD at the focal plane measures the signals of all the charged-particle species simultaneously at high sensitivity and high resolution, thereby nearly instantaneously providing a complete, high-quality mass spectrum. The simultaneous nature of the measurement of ions stands in contrast to that of a

  18. Preliminary results from LADEE's Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benna, Mehdi; Mahaffy, Paul; Hodges, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) of the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Mission is a high sensitivity quadrupole mass spectrometer designed to measure the composition and variability of the tenuous lunar atmosphere. The instrument has been observing the lunar exosphere since 10/17/2013, initially from a near circular 250 km altitude orbit and since 11/11/2013 from an elliptical orbit that reaches to 30-60 km altitude near the sunrise terminator. During its first four months in orbit, the NMS instrument successfully detected exospheric helium, argon and neon and mapped their spatial and temporal variability. Furthermore, the NMS instrument was able to establish new upper limits for many other exospheric species either sputtered or thermally evolved from the lunar surface. This talk will summarize these preliminary results from the NMS measurements.

  19. Loss of atomic oxygen in mass spectrometer ion sources.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, L. R.; Nier, A. O.

    1973-01-01

    A gas beam consisting of a mixture of atomic and molecular oxygen has been directed at the ion source of a mass spectrometer like those used in sounding rockets for determining the neutral composition of the lower thermosphere. The loss of atomic oxygen on mass spectrometer surfaces was evaluated by flagging the beam in several ways and comparing the experimental results with predicted values. The results obtained suggest that in rocket flights using similar instruments the atomic oxygen densities computed assuming no-loss conditions may be low by a factor of 2.5. Studies made using a beam containing tracer O-18 indicate that carbon dioxide observed when atomic oxygen enters the source is formed in a reaction involving atomic oxygen from the beam and carbon monoxide from the surfaces bombarded.

  20. Millimeter-Scale PIG Source for Miniature Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babapour Ghadikolaee, Mohammad Reza

    2012-12-01

    A new millimeter-scale penning ion generator (PIG) ion source has been developed for miniature mass spectrometers. The cathode is a 40 mm diameter × 2 mm long stainless steel cylinder with a hole of 4 mm, the anode with a hole of 12.6 mm and a length of 6.4 mm is made in stainless steel, and the ion emission hole size on the anticathode is 5 mm. Several microamperes of H+ ions can be extracted with less than 10 W discharge power consumption. The PIG ion source is shown to have advantages of long lifetime under high-pressure operation and low power consumption. The ion source is being designed and investigated for use in miniature mass spectrometer; however this ion source is thoroughly described so that it can be easily implemented by other researchers for other applications.

  1. Studies on reducing the scale of a double focusing mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D.M.; Gregg, H.R.; Andresen, B.D.

    1993-05-01

    Several groups have developed miniaturized sector mass spectrometers with the goal of remote sensing in confined spaces or portability. However, these achievements have been overshadowed by more successful development of man-portable quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometers. Despite these accomplishments the development of a reduced-scale sector mass spectrometer remains attractive as a potentially low-cost, robust instrument requiring very simple electronics and low power. Previous studies on miniaturizing sector instruments include the use of a Mattauch-Herzog design for a portable mass spectrograph weighing less than 10 kg. Other work has included the use of a Nier-Johnson design in spacecraft-mountable gas chromatography mass spectrometers for the Viking spacecraft as well as miniature sector-based MS/MS instrument. Although theory for designing an optimized system with high resolution and mass accuracy is well understood, such specifications have not yet been achieved in a miniaturized instrument. To proceed further toward the development of a miniaturized sector mass spectrometer, experiments were conducted to understand and optimize a practical, yet nonideal instrument configuration. The sector mass spectrometer studied in this work is similar to the ones developed for the Viking project, but was further modified to be low cost, simple and robust. Characteristics of this instrument that highlight its simplicity include the use of a modified Varian leak detector ion source, source ion optics that use one extraction voltage, and an unshunted fixed nonhomogeneous magnetic sector. The effects of these design simplifications on ion trajectory were studied by manipulating the ion beam along with the magnetic sector position. This latter feature served as an aid to study ion focusing amidst fringing fields as well as nonhomogeneous forces and permitted empirical realignment of the instrument.

  2. Comet Encke: Meteor metallic ion identification by mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Aikin, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    Positive metallic ions have been measured in the earth's atmosphere between 85 and 120 km, during the period of the beta Taurids meteor shower, which is associated with Comet Encke. The ions originate during and following ablation of extraterrestrial debris by the earth's atmosphere. The enhancement of metal ion density during meteor showers is primary evidence for their extraterrestrial origin. The present results were obtained from a rocket-borne ion mass spectrometer.

  3. High-efficiency electron ionizer for a mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Darrach, Murray R. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides an improved electron ionizer for use in a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The improved electron ionizer includes a repeller plate that ejects sample atoms or molecules, an ionizer chamber, a cathode that emits an electron beam into the ionizer chamber, an exit opening for excess electrons to escape, at least one shim plate to collimate said electron beam, extraction apertures, and a plurality of lens elements for focusing the extracted ions onto entrance apertures.

  4. Multiple gas analyses using a mobile mass spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, J.H., Jr.; Bigelow, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    A truck-mounted mass-spectrometer gas analyzer is described and field examples of its use are given. This unit provides a gas analyzer that can be used in the field to rapidly analyze a large number of gases. It has enabled us to establish that gas anomalies occur over a variety of deposit types and in different environments. Gases may prove to be useful geochemical indicators in exploration for concealed mineral deposits. ?? 1990.

  5. DETERMINING ION COMPOSITIONS USING AN ACCURATE MASS, TRIPLE QUADRUPOLE MASS SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the past decade, we have used double focusing mass spectrometers to determine
    compositions of ions observed in mass spectra produced from compounds introduced by GC
    based on measured exact masses of the ions and their +1 and +2 isotopic profiles arising from atoms of ...

  6. Application of the mass-spectrometer MASHA for mass-spectrometry and laser-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, A. M.; Belozerov, A. V.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Salamatin, V. S.; Stepantsov, S. V.; Vanin, D. V.

    2010-02-01

    We report the present status of the mass-spectrometer MASHA (Mass-Analyzer of Supper Heavy Atoms) designed for determination of the masses of superheavy elements. The mass-spectrometer is connected to the U-400M cyclotron of the Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) JINR, Dubna. The first experiments on mass-measurements for 112 and 114 elements will be performed in the upcoming 2010. For this purpose a hot catcher, based on a graphite stopper, is constructed. The α-decay of the superheavy nuclides or spontaneous fission products will be detected with a silicon 192 strips detector. The experimental program of future investigations using the technique of a gas catcher is discussed. It should be regarded as an alternative of the classical ISOL technique. The possibilities are considered for using this mass-spectrometer for laser spectroscopy of nuclei far off-stability.

  7. A new approach to mass spectrometer measurements of thermospheric density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, L. T., Jr.; Brock, F. J.; Brown, C. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The gas sampling problem in satellite and high velocity probes was investigated by applying the theory of a drifting Maxwellian gas. A lens system using a free stream ion source was developed and experimentally evaluated over the pressure range of 0.00001 to 0.01 N/m sq (approx. 10 to the minus 7th power to 0.0001 torr). The source has high beam transparency, which minimizes gas-surface collisions within, or near, the ionization volume. It is shown that for high ion energy (60 eV), the extracted ion beam has an on-axis energy spread of less than 4 eV, and that 90 percent of the ions are within 2.5 deg of the beam axis. It is concluded that the molecular beam mass spectrometer concept, developed for gas density measurements in the upper atmosphere, substantially reduces gas-surface scattering and gas-surface reactions in the sample, and preserves the integrity of the gas sample during the analysis process. Studies show that both the Scout and Delta launch vehicles have adequate volume, control, velocity, and data acquisition capability necessary to obtain thermospheric number density in real time.

  8. The Galileo probe mass spectrometer: composition of Jupiter's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Hartle, R. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Owen, T. C.; Spencer, N. W.; Way, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    The composition of the jovian atmosphere from 0.5 to 21 bars along the descent trajectory was determined by a quadrupole mass spectrometer on the Galileo probe. The mixing ratio of He (helium) to H2 (hydrogen), 0.156, is close to the solar ratio. The abundances of methane, water, argon, neon, and hydrogen sulfide were measured; krypton and xenon were detected. As measured in the jovian atmosphere, the amount of carbon is 2.9 times the solar abundance relative to H2, the amount of sulfur is greater than the solar abundance, and the amount of oxygen is much less than the solar abundance. The neon abundance compared with that of hydrogen is about an order of magnitude less than the solar abundance. Isotopic ratios of carbon and the noble gases are consistent with solar values. The measured ratio of deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) of (5 +/- 2) x 10(-5) indicates that this ratio is greater in solar-system hydrogen than in local interstellar hydrogen, and the 3He/4He ratio of (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(-4) provides a new value for protosolar (solar nebula) helium isotopes. Together, the D/H and 3He/4He ratios are consistent with conversion in the sun of protosolar deuterium to present-day 3He.

  9. The open-source neutral-mass spectrometer on Atmosphere Explorer-C, -D, and -E.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Potter, W. E.; Hickman, D. R.; Mauersberger, K.

    1973-01-01

    The open-source mass spectrometer will be used to obtain the number densities of the neutral atmospheric gases in the mass range 1 to 48 amu at the satellite location. The ion source has been designed to allow gas particles to enter the ionizing region with the minimum practicable number of prior collisions with surfaces. This design minimizes the loss of atomic oxygen and other reactive species due to reactions with the walls of the ion source. The principal features of the open-source spectrometer and the laboratory calibration system are discussed.

  10. Evaluation of the ion trap mass spectrometer for potential application in the space station

    SciTech Connect

    Glish, G.L.; McLuckey, S.A.

    1988-04-01

    This report describes preliminary experiments with an ion trap mass spectrometer, which were done to evaluate its potential for use in the environmental monitoring system of the proposed space station. The first section of the report describes various modes of operation of the instrument, discusses some of the present limitations, and discusses some of the potential solutions to these limitations. The next section discusses the experimental results obtained on sixteen compounds with particular emphasis on comparing these data to that expected from a standard mass spectrometer. The last section consists of a conclusion and comments on suggested future work. 16 figs.

  11. SCAPS, a two-dimensional ion detector for mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Faraday Cup (FC) and electron multiplier (EM) are of the most popular ion detector for mass spectrometer. FC is used for high-count-rate ion measurements and EM can detect from single ion. However, FC is difficult to detect lower intensities less than kilo-cps, and EM loses ion counts higher than Mega-cps. Thus, FC and EM are used complementary each other, but they both belong to zero-dimensional detector. On the other hand, micro channel plate (MCP) is a popular ion signal amplifier with two-dimensional capability, but additional detection system must be attached to detect the amplified signals. Two-dimensional readout for the MCP signals, however, have not achieve the level of FC and EM systems. A stacked CMOS active pixel sensor (SCAPS) has been developed to detect two-dimensional ion variations for a spatial area using semiconductor technology [1-8]. The SCAPS is an integrated type multi-detector, which is different from EM and FC, and is composed of more than 500×500 pixels (micro-detectors) for imaging of cm-area with a pixel of less than 20 µm in square. The SCAPS can be detected from single ion to 100 kilo-count ions per one pixel. Thus, SCAPS can be accumulated up to several giga-count ions for total pixels, i.e. for total imaging area. The SCAPS has been applied to stigmatic ion optics of secondary ion mass spectrometer, as a detector of isotope microscope [9]. The isotope microscope has capabilities of quantitative isotope images of hundred-micrometer area on a sample with sub-micrometer resolution and permil precision, and of two-dimensional mass spectrum on cm-scale of mass dispersion plane of a sector magnet with ten-micrometer resolution. The performance has been applied to two-dimensional isotope spatial distribution for mainly hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen of natural (extra-terrestrial and terrestrial) samples and samples simulated natural processes [e.g. 10-17]. References: [1] Matsumoto, K., et al. (1993) IEEE Trans. Electron Dev. 40

  12. In Situ Analysis of Organics with a Portable Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soparawalla, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    The search for extra-terrestrial life starts at home. In order to find life on other planets, we start by examining life processes we understand on the earth. Though it may not be possible to see the life in the form of macroscopic organisms, telltale signs of life can exist in the form of small organic molecules such as peptides and amino acids. Our overall goal is to test a portable mass spectrometer (MS) system, the Mini 10.5, for astrobiological applications including in situ hydrocarbon analysis and sediments analysis using an additional automated sample processing system (ASPS). The collaborative research focuses on two current projects in the field of astrobiology. Both projects are geared towards examining organics distributed in extreme environments. One portion of study attempts to qualitatively analyze the effect of volatile organic compounds (VOC) produced by diesel exhaust on lichens growing in the desert. This requires measurements to be taken by bringing the instrument to the Mojave Desert and monitoring atmospheric composition of VOCs in situ. The second project is to evaluate the miniature MS system as a detector for the ASPS extraction system. A major obstacle of any chemometric in situ analysis is the suppression of analyte signal by concomitant signal from the surrounding environment. The ASPS extraction device has been developed at JPL to extract amino acids from sediment samples and elute them in solution. The solution is eluted at a high pH and needs to be conditioned to a more neutral pH so that dissolved amino acids can be readily protonated and subsequently analyzed by electrospray MS.

  13. Acquisition of a Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer System for Laboratory Study of Prebiotic Organic Geochemical Processes on the Early Earth, Mars, and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollom, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    This was a major equipment grant that provided funds ($72K) for purchase of a benchtop gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use in experimental studies of prebiotic organic compounds. An Agilent model 689015973 GC-MS was purchased and installed in the PI's lab in August of 2003. The instrument is now being used for a variety of research projects. The primary use of the instrument is to analyze and quantify organic products of laboratory experiments conducted by the PI. One example is shown, which shows organic products (predominantly n-alkanes) formed during Fischer-Tropsch-type abiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions. The analytical capabilities of the GC- MS allowed identification of the numerous organic products of this as well as other laboratory experiments. A key use of the instrument in this research is that the mass spectrometer capabilities allow use of isotopically labeled reactants to trace the progress of reactions and evaluate background contaminants. collaborative projects with other scientists involved in exobiology & astrobiology research (e.g., Mitch Schulte, NASA Ames; Katrina Edwards, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution). For instance, an analysis of membrane lipids of an lithoautotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria being grown on basalt as a source of metabolic energy, a project where the instrument is being used to evaluate possible biomarker compounds from these organisms is shown. These iron oxidizers are thought to be similar to those living within the ocean crust, and are being investigated as possible analog organisms to those on the early Earth or crust of Mars. The instrument has also been used by an outside investigator (graduate student Brandon Canfeld, Arizona State University) for identification and isotopic characterization of experimental products of abiotic organic synthesis experiments he is conducting with Dr. John Holloway. analysis of quality control samples for other NASA-funded projects. For instance, an

  14. Mass-spectrometer controlled coevaporation of Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films on alumina substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudner, J.; Ohlsén, H.; Stolt, L.

    1988-08-01

    Thin films of YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x have been fabricated by coevaporation utilizing a quadrupole mass spectrometer rate control system. Sintered alumina substrates have been used and the resistivity transition from the normal to the superconducting state has been studied as a function of different heat treatments. A comparison has also been made between sapphire and sintered alumina substrates.

  15. SUMS preliminary design and data analysis development. [shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    The preliminary analysis and data analysis system development for the shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer (SUMS) experiment are discussed. The SUMS experiment is designed to provide free stream atmospheric density, pressure, temperature, and mean molecular weight for the high altitude, high Mach number region.

  16. Probe Heating Method for the Analysis of Solid Samples Using a Portable Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kumano, Shun; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Yamada, Masuyoshi; Nishimura, Kazushige; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on the development of a portable mass spectrometer for the onsite screening of illicit drugs, but our previous sampling system could only be used for liquid samples. In this study, we report on an attempt to develop a probe heating method that also permits solid samples to be analyzed using a portable mass spectrometer. An aluminum rod is used as the sampling probe. The powdered sample is affixed to the sampling probe or a droplet of sample solution is placed on the tip of the probe and dried. The probe is then placed on a heater to vaporize the sample. The vapor is then introduced into the portable mass spectrometer and analyzed. With the heater temperature set to 130°C, the developed system detected 1 ng of methamphetamine, 1 ng of amphetamine, 3 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 1 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 0.3 ng of cocaine. Even from mixtures consisting of clove powder and methamphetamine powder, methamphetamine ions were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. The developed probe heating method provides a simple method for the analysis of solid samples. A portable mass spectrometer incorporating this method would thus be useful for the onsite screening of illicit drugs. PMID:26819909

  17. Probe Heating Method for the Analysis of Solid Samples Using a Portable Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Kumano, Shun; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Yamada, Masuyoshi; Nishimura, Kazushige; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on the development of a portable mass spectrometer for the onsite screening of illicit drugs, but our previous sampling system could only be used for liquid samples. In this study, we report on an attempt to develop a probe heating method that also permits solid samples to be analyzed using a portable mass spectrometer. An aluminum rod is used as the sampling probe. The powdered sample is affixed to the sampling probe or a droplet of sample solution is placed on the tip of the probe and dried. The probe is then placed on a heater to vaporize the sample. The vapor is then introduced into the portable mass spectrometer and analyzed. With the heater temperature set to 130°C, the developed system detected 1 ng of methamphetamine, 1 ng of amphetamine, 3 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 1 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 0.3 ng of cocaine. Even from mixtures consisting of clove powder and methamphetamine powder, methamphetamine ions were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. The developed probe heating method provides a simple method for the analysis of solid samples. A portable mass spectrometer incorporating this method would thus be useful for the onsite screening of illicit drugs. PMID:26819909

  18. Expert system for imaging spectrometer analysis results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchardt, Gary C.

    1985-01-01

    Information on an expert system for imaging spectrometer analysis results is outlined. Implementation requirements, the Simple Tool for Automated Reasoning (STAR) program that provides a software environment for the development and operation of rule-based expert systems, STAR data structures, and rule-based identification of surface materials are among the topics outlined.

  19. Study of a micro chamber quadrupole mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jinchan; Zhang Xiaobing; Mao Fuming; Xiao Mei; Cui Yunkang; Engelsen, Daniel den; Lei Wei

    2008-03-15

    The design of a micro chamber quadrupole mass spectrometer (MCQMS) having a small total volume of only 20 cm{sup 3}, including Faraday cup ion detector and ion source, is described. This MCQMS can resist a vacuum baking temperature of 400-500 deg. C. The quadrupole elements with a hyperbolic surface are made of a ceramic material and coated with a thin metal layer. The quadrupole mass filter has a field radius of 3 mm and a length of 100 mm. Prototypes of this new MCQMS can detect a minimum partial pressure of 10{sup -8} Pa, have a peak width of {delta}M=1 at 10% peak height from mass number 1 to 60, and show an excellent long-term stability. The new MCQMS is intended to be used in residual gas analyses of electron devices during a mutual pumping and baking process.

  20. Laser desorption in an ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, G.C.; Cisper, M.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Hemberger, P.H.; Nogar, N.S.

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption in a ion-trap mass spectrometer shows significant promise for both qualitative and trace analysis. Several aspects of this methodology are discussed in this work. We previously demonstrated the generation of both negative and positive ions by laser desorption directly within a quadrupole ion trap. In the present work, we explore various combinations of d.c., r.f., and time-varying fields in order to optimize laser generated signals. In addition, we report on the application of this method to analyze samples containing compounds such as amines, metal complexes, carbon clusters, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. In some cases the ability to rapidly switch between positive and negative ion modes provides sufficient specificity to distinguish different compounds of a mixture with a single stage of mass spectrometry. In other experiments, we combined intensity variation studies with tandem mass spectrometry experiments and positive and negative ion detection to further enhance specificity.

  1. Characterization and calibration of the EOIM-III flight mass spectrometer in a high velocity oxygen atom beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, S. L.; Cross, J. B.; Hunton, D.; Lan, E.

    1990-01-01

    Calibration and characterization of the quadrupole mass spectrometer component of the Evaluation of Oxygen Effects on Materials III (EOIM-III) space-flight experiment are reported in this paper. A high-velocity atom beam system was used to characterize the response of the flight mass spectrometer to high velocity oxygen atoms as well as the reaction/scattering products formed when the atom beam struck a surface. Carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and water were observed to form in the mass spectrometer whenever high velocity oxygen atoms were present. The major gaseous products formed from high-velocity atom-beam polymer reactions were easily detected and identified.

  2. Development of a dedicated isotope mass spectrometer for the noninvasive diagnostics of humans infected with Helicobacter Pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blashenkov, N. M.; Sheshenya, E. S.; Solov'ev, S. M.; Gall', L. N.; Sachenko, V. M.; Zarutskii, I. V.; Gall', N. R.

    2013-06-01

    A dedicated isotope mass spectrometer for the noninvasive diagnostics of humans infected with Helicobacter Pylori using the isotope respiratory test is developed. A low-aberration mass analyzer is calculated, an input system that makes it possible to eliminate the memory effects is developed, and a small-size ion detector is constructed. The mass spectrometer is created, and the tests are performed. The measurement accuracy of the 13C/12C and 16O/18O isotope ratios are 1.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. Preliminary medical tests show that the spectrometer can be employed for the desired diagnostics.

  3. Mass Spectrometer Output File Format mzML

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is an important technique for analyzing proteins and other biomolecular compounds in biological samples. Each of the vendors of these mass spectrometers uses a different proprietary binary output file format, which has hindered data sharing and the development of open source software for downstream analysis. The solution has been to develop, with the full participation of academic researchers as well as software and hardware vendors, an open XML-based format for encoding mass spectrometer output files, and then to write software to use this format for archiving, sharing, and processing. This chapter presents the various components and information available for this format, mzML. In addition to the XML schema that defines the file structure, a controlled vocabulary provides clear terms and definitions for the spectral metadata, and a semantic validation rules mapping file allows the mzML semantic validator to insure that an mzML document complies with one of several levels of requirements. Complete documentation and example files insure that the format may be uniformly implemented. At the time of release there already existed several implementations of the format and vendors have committed to supporting the format in their products. PMID:20013381

  4. Alfred Nier and the sector field mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    De Laeter, John; Kurz, Mark D

    2006-07-01

    Science and technology are intimately related, and advances in science often become possible with the availability of new instrumentation. This has certainly been the case in mass spectrometry, which is used in so many scientific disciplines. Originally developed as an instrument for research in physics it was used in the discovery of isotopes, their recognition as the fundamental species comprising the elements, and the investigation of elemental isotopic composition. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry is a metrological technique of the highest order, and has been widely used in chemical, biochemical, cosmochemical, environmental, geological, physical, and nuclear research. Mass spectrometry presently plays a key role not only in scientific research, but also in industrial operations. This paper highlights the role that Alfred Otto Carl Nier played in bringing mass spectrometry into the mainstream of science. Nier's career spanned a remarkable period in science, and he made crucial contributions to atomic weights, geochronology, isotope geochemistry, nuclear physics, and space science. He is widely viewed as the 'father of modern mass spectrometry', because of his genius with instrumentation, his innovations, and the generosity with which he shared his ideas and designs. It is timely to remember his fundamental work in mass spectrometry, particularly the development of the sector field mass spectrometer, which is still the instrument of choice for many isotope scientists some 66 years after its first appearance in 1940. PMID:16810642

  5. MEMS Fabrication of Micro Cylindrical Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for CubeSats Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology is used to fabricate arrays of micro Cylindrical Ion Traps (μCIT) which are integrated into a miniaturized mass spectrometer (MS). The micro μCITs are built from silicon wafers and requires high machining precision, smooth surface, and high dimensional uniformity across the array for optimum mass spectrometer performance. In order to build these 3D miniature structures several MEMS processing techniques were explored and a process was developed and tested. By using the developed MEMS process, the required μCIT 4 x 4 arrays were fabricated. This included a chip design variation in which mechanical locking pits and posts were machined in the Ring Electrode (RE) chip and End Plate (EP) chips respectively, for self-assembly. The size of the assembled μCIT is only 12 mm x 12 mm x 1.5 mm. It is a key component for the miniature mass spectrometer. The micro cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometer has the advantages of low-power operation, simpler electronics and less-stringent vacuum system requirements. The MEMS batch production capabilities will also greatly lower the cost. It is a promising candidate for CubeSat and nanoSats applications for exploration of chemical distributions in space.

  6. Characteristics and performance of several mass spectrometer residual gas analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultzman, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    The operation and properties of various mass-spectrometer residual gas analyzers for use in vacuum measurements were analyzed in terms of efficiencies of ion extraction, ion separation and transmission, and ion collection. Types of instruments studied were magnetic sector, omegatron, quadrupole, and monopole. Experimental results presented include absolute sensitivity to argon, relative sensitivity to 10 gases, and cracking patterns for these gases. It is shown that the properties are strongly dependent on instrument range, resolution, and the particular voltages, currents, or field intensities used to control the instrument.

  7. Continuous time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Feldman, William C.

    2004-10-19

    A continuous time-of-flight mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating an electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the electric field. A source of continuous ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between arrival of a secondary electron out of said ionized atoms or molecules at a first predetermined location and arrival of a sample ion out of said ionized atoms or molecules at a second predetermined location.

  8. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer having a cold cathode ionization source

    DOEpatents

    Felter, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    An improved quadrupole mass spectrometer is described. The improvement lies in the substitution of the conventional hot filament electron source with a cold cathode field emitter array which in turn allows operating a small QMS at much high internal pressures then are currently achievable. By eliminating of the hot filament such problems as thermally "cracking" delicate analyte molecules, outgassing a "hot" filament, high power requirements, filament contamination by outgas species, and spurious em fields are avoid all together. In addition, the ability of produce FEAs using well-known and well developed photolithographic techniques, permits building a QMS having multiple redundancies of the ionization source at very low additional cost.

  9. Linear electric field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Feldman, William C.

    2008-06-10

    A linear electric field ion mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating a linear electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the linear electric field. A source of pulsed ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the linear electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between ionization of atoms or molecules and arrival of an ion out of the ionized atoms or molecules at a predetermined position.

  10. Ion mass spectrometer experiment for ISIS-2 spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, John H.

    1987-07-01

    The International Satellite for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program of NASA was the longest duration program in NASA history. A number of satellites were flown under this program, the last being called ISIS-2, which was launched on April 1, 1971 and operated successfully for over 13 years. An experiment called the Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) was flown on the ISIS-2 spacecraft. It operated for 10 years providing a large data base of positive ion composition and ion flow velocities along the orbit of the satellite, the latter being circular at 1400 km with a 90 degree inclination. The data were processed and reside in the National Space Sciences Data Center.

  11. Ion mass spectrometer experiment for ISIS-2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.

    1987-01-01

    The International Satellite for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program of NASA was the longest duration program in NASA history. A number of satellites were flown under this program, the last being called ISIS-2, which was launched on April 1, 1971 and operated successfully for over 13 years. An experiment called the Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) was flown on the ISIS-2 spacecraft. It operated for 10 years providing a large data base of positive ion composition and ion flow velocities along the orbit of the satellite, the latter being circular at 1400 km with a 90 degree inclination. The data were processed and reside in the National Space Sciences Data Center.

  12. Frequency-scanning MALDI linear ion trap mass spectrometer for large biomolecular ion detection.

    PubMed

    Lu, I-Chung; Lin, Jung Lee; Lai, Szu-Hsueh; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2011-11-01

    This study presents the first report on the development of a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) linear ion trap mass spectrometer for large biomolecular ion detection by frequency scan. We designed, installed, and tested this radio frequency (RF) scan linear ion trap mass spectrometer and its associated electronics to dramatically extend the mass region to be detected. The RF circuit can be adjusted from 300 to 10 kHz with a set of operation amplifiers. To trap the ions produced by MALDI, a high pressure of helium buffer gas was employed to quench extra kinetic energy of the heavy ions produced by MALDI. The successful detection of the singly charged secretory immunoglobulin A ions indicates that the detectable mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of this system can reach ~385 000 or beyond. PMID:21932813

  13. Full utilization of a mass spectrometer using on-demand sharing with multiple LC units.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Hao, Qin; Gounarides, John; Wang, Y Karen

    2012-08-01

    The applicability of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is often limited by throughput. The sharing of a mass spectrometer with multiple LCs significantly improves throughput; however, the reported systems have not been designed to fully utilize the MS duty cycle, and as a result to achieve maximum throughput. To fully utilize the mass spectrometer, the number of LC units that a MS will need to recruit is application dependent and could be significantly larger than the current commercial or published implementations. For the example of a single analyte, the number may approach the peak capacity to a first degree approximation. Here, the construction of a MS system that flexibly recruits any number of LC units demanded by the application is discussed, followed by the method to port a previously developed LC/MS method to the system to fully utilize a mass spectrometer. To demonstrate the performance and operation, a prototypical MS system of eight LC units was constructed. When 1-min chromatographic separations were performed in parallel on the eight LCs of the system, the average LC/MS analysis time per sample was 10.5 s when applied to the analysis of samples in 384-well plate format. This system has been successfully used to conduct large-volume biochemical assays with the analysis of a variety of molecular entities in support of drug discovery efforts. Allowing the recruitment of the number of LC units appropriate for a given application, this system has the potential to be a plug-and-play system to fully utilize a mass spectrometer. PMID:22899517

  14. Composition measurements of the topside ionosphere using a magnetic mass spectrometer, ion mass spectrometer on ISIS-2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The ion mass spectrometer (IMS) on the ISIS-II satellite is described; it measures the composition and distribution of positive ions in the earth's ionosphere in the mass range of 1 to 64 atomic mass units. Significant data were received which show a wide variation in ion composition at night near the equator and in the daytime poleward of the plasmapause. It was found that these data enable further study of the polar wind and that the experiment produced timely data during the August, 1972 magnetic storm to show the development of a unique ionosphere above the plasmapause during the period of the storm. The scientific objectives and results of the experiment, the technical description of the instrument, a bibliography with sample papers attached, and a summary of recommendations for further study are presented.

  15. Design of An Improved Miniature Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaminathan, Viji K.; Alig, Roger C.

    1997-01-01

    The ion optics of NASA's Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) sensor was simulated with three dimensional models of the open source, the quadrupole deflector, the exit lens system and the quadrupole mass analyzer to design more compact models with lower weight. Comparison of calculated transmission with experimental results shows good agreement. Transmission analyses with varying geometrical parameters and voltages throw light on possible ways of reducing the size of the sensor. Trajectories of ions of mass 1-99 amu were simulated to analyze and optimize transmission. Analysis of open source transmission with varying angle of attack shows that the angular acceptance can be considerably increased by programming the voltages on the ion trap/ collimator. Analysis of transmission sensitivity to voltages and misalignments of the quadrupole deflector rods indicate that increased transmission is possible with a geometrically asymmetrical deflector and a deflector can be designed with much lower sensitivities of transmission. Bringing the disks closer together can decrease the size of the quadrupole deflector and also increase transmission. The exit lens system can be redesigned to be smaller by eliminating at least one electrode entirely without loss of transmission. Ceramic materials were investigated to find suitable candidates for use in the construction of lighter weight mass spectrometer. A high-sensitivity, high-resolution portable gas chromatograph mass spectrometer with a mass range of 2-700 amu has been built and will be commercialized in Phase 3.

  16. On-line monitoring of continuous flow chemical synthesis using a portable, small footprint mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Tony W T; Ray, Andrew D; O'Kearney-McMullan, Anne; Lim, Louise; McCullough, Bryan; Zammataro, Alessio

    2014-10-01

    For on-line monitoring of chemical reactions (batch or continuous flow), mass spectrometry (MS) can provide data to (1) determine the fate of starting materials and reagents, (2) confirm the presence of the desired product, (3) identify intermediates and impurities, (4) determine steady state conditions and point of completion, and (5) speed up process optimization. Recent developments in small footprint atmospheric pressure ionization portable mass spectrometers further enable this coupling, as the mass spectrometer can be easily positioned with the reaction system to be studied. A major issue for this combination is the transfer of a sample that is representative of the reaction and also compatible with the mass spectrometer. This is particularly challenging as high concentrations of reagents and products can be encountered in organic synthesis. The application of a portable mass spectrometer for on-line characterization of flow chemical synthesis has been evaluated by coupling a Microsaic 4000 MiD to the Future Chemistry Flow Start EVO chemistry system. Specifically, the Hofmann rearrangement has been studied using the on-line mass spectrometry approach. Sample transfer from the flow reactor is achieved using a mass rate attenuator (MRA) and a sampling make-up flow from a high pressure pump. This enables the appropriate sample dilution, transfer, and preparation for electrospray ionization. The capability of this approach to provide process understanding is described using an industrial pharmaceutical process that is currently under development. The effect of a number of key experimental parameters, such as the composition of the sampling make-up flow and the dilution factor on the mass spectrometry data, is also discussed. PMID:25106707

  17. On-line Monitoring of Continuous Flow Chemical Synthesis Using a Portable, Small Footprint Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Tony W. T.; Ray, Andrew D.; O'Kearney-McMullan, Anne; Lim, Louise; McCullough, Bryan; Zammataro, Alessio

    2014-10-01

    For on-line monitoring of chemical reactions (batch or continuous flow), mass spectrometry (MS) can provide data to (1) determine the fate of starting materials and reagents, (2) confirm the presence of the desired product, (3) identify intermediates and impurities, (4) determine steady state conditions and point of completion, and (5) speed up process optimization. Recent developments in small footprint atmospheric pressure ionization portable mass spectrometers further enable this coupling, as the mass spectrometer can be easily positioned with the reaction system to be studied. A major issue for this combination is the transfer of a sample that is representative of the reaction and also compatible with the mass spectrometer. This is particularly challenging as high concentrations of reagents and products can be encountered in organic synthesis. The application of a portable mass spectrometer for on-line characterization of flow chemical synthesis has been evaluated by coupling a Microsaic 4000 MiD to the Future Chemistry Flow Start EVO chemistry system. Specifically, the Hofmann rearrangement has been studied using the on-line mass spectrometry approach. Sample transfer from the flow reactor is achieved using a mass rate attenuator (MRA) and a sampling make-up flow from a high pressure pump. This enables the appropriate sample dilution, transfer, and preparation for electrospray ionization. The capability of this approach to provide process understanding is described using an industrial pharmaceutical process that is currently under development. The effect of a number of key experimental parameters, such as the composition of the sampling make-up flow and the dilution factor on the mass spectrometry data, is also discussed.

  18. High-throughput mass-directed parallel purification incorporating a multiplexed single quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rongda; Wang, Tao; Isbell, John; Cai, Zhe; Sykes, Christopher; Brailsford, Andrew; Kassel, Daniel B

    2002-07-01

    We report on the development of a parallel HPLC/MS purification system incorporating an indexed (i.e., multiplexed) ion source. In the method described, each of the flow streams from a parallel array of HPLC columns is directed toward the multiplexed (MUX) ion source and sampled in a time-dependent, parallel manner. A visual basic application has been developed and monitors in real-time the extracted ion current from each sprayer channel. Mass-directed fraction collection is initiated into a parallel array of fraction collectors specific for each of the spray channels. In the first embodiment of this technique, we report on a four-column semipreparative parallel LC/MS system incorporating MUX detection. In this parallel LC/MS application (in which sample loads between 1 and 10 mg on-column are typically made), no cross talk was observed. Ion signals from each of the channels were found reproducible over 192 injections, with interchannel signal variations between 11 and 17%. The visual basic fraction collection application permits preset individual start collection and end collection thresholds for each channel, thereby compensating for the slight variation in signal between sprayers. By incorporating postfraction collector UV detection, we have been able to optimize the valve-triggering delay time with precut transfer tubing between the mass spectrometer and fraction collectors and achieve recoveries greater than 80%. Examples of the MUX-guided, mass-directed fraction purification of both standards and real library reaction mixtures are presented within. PMID:12141664

  19. Mass- and energy-analyses of ions from plasma by means of a miniature Thomson spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, M. J.; Czaus, K.; Malinowski, K.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Zebrowski, J.

    2009-05-15

    The paper presents an improved version of a miniature mass-spectrometer of the Thomson-type, which has been adopted for ion analysis near the dense plasma region inside a vacuum chamber. Problems connected with the separation of ions from plasma streams are considered. Input diaphragms and pumping systems, needed to ensure good vacuum inside the analyzing region, are described. The application of the miniature Thomson-type analyzer is illustrated by ion parabolas recorded in plasma-focus facility and rod plasma injector experiment. A quantitative analysis of the recorded ion parabolas is presented. Factors influencing accuracy of the ion analysis are discussed and methods of the spectrometer calibration are described.

  20. Mass- and energy-analyses of ions from plasma by means of a miniature Thomson spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, M. J.; Czaus, K.; Malinowski, K.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Zebrowski, J.

    2009-05-01

    The paper presents an improved version of a miniature mass-spectrometer of the Thomson-type, which has been adopted for ion analysis near the dense plasma region inside a vacuum chamber. Problems connected with the separation of ions from plasma streams are considered. Input diaphragms and pumping systems, needed to ensure good vacuum inside the analyzing region, are described. The application of the miniature Thomson-type analyzer is illustrated by ion parabolas recorded in plasma-focus facility and rod plasma injector experiment. A quantitative analysis of the recorded ion parabolas is presented. Factors influencing accuracy of the ion analysis are discussed and methods of the spectrometer calibration are described.

  1. Mass measurements on radioactive isotopes with a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, G.; Ames, F.; Schark, E.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Saint Simon, M. de; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kohl, A.; Schwarz, S.; Moore, R. B.; Szerypo, J.

    1999-01-15

    Penning trap mass measurements on short-lived isotopes are performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at the radioactive beam facility ISOLDE/CERN. In the last years the applicability of the spectrometer has been considerably extended by the installation of an RFQ trap ion beam buncher and a new cooler Penning trap, which is operated as an isobar separator. These improvements allowed for the first time measurements on isotopes of rare earth elements and on isotopes with Z=80-85. In all cases an accuracy of {delta}m/m{approx_equal}1{center_dot}10{sup -7} was achieved.

  2. Light ion mass spectrometer for space-plasma investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Fields, S. A.; Lewter, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Direct satellite measurements and ground-based techniques have given a comprehensive view of the density distribution of the cold plasma population in the earth's magnetosphere. There were, however, no direct measurements of the low-energy plasma mass composition, temperature, density, pitch-angle distribution, or plasma flow velocity. A description is presented of the evolution and development of an instrument, the Light Ion Mass Spectrometer (LIMS), designed to make these low-energy plasma measurements. The instrument was developed for flight on the spacecraft SCA-THA, a satellite to study satellite charging at high altitudes. This satellite, whose primary mission was to study spacecraft-plasma interactions and electrostatic charging, was launched into a near-geosynchronous orbit. The design requirements regarding the instrument are discussed, and attention is given to the calibration procedures, the flight configuration, and some examples of flight data.

  3. Multi-collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer -- Operational Performance Report

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, Anthony D; Olson, John E; Watrous, Matthew G; Ward, Michael B.; Dahl, David A.

    2010-12-01

    This report describes the operational testing of a new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously. The instrument includes a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated sufficiently to allow a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used to measure each isotope beam. The performance of the instrument was measured using SRM 996 (244Pu spike) at loadings of 2.4 and 12 fg on resin beads and with SRM 4350B Columbia River Sediment samples. The measured limit of detection (3s) for 240Pu was 3.4 attograms for SRM 996. The limit of quantitation (LOQ), defined as 10 s, was 11.2 attograms. The measured concentration of 239Pu in the CRS standard was 152 ± 6 fg/g.

  4. Seven Channel Multi-collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony D. Appelhans

    2008-07-01

    A new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously has been designed, constructed and is in preliminary testing. The instrument utilizes a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated sufficiently (35 mm) to allow a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used for each beam. The ion dispersion lens is a two element electrostatic 90 degree sector device that causes the beam-to-beam dispersion to increase faster than the intra-beam dispersion. Each multiplier is contained in an isolated case with a deflector/condenser lens at the entrance. A 9-sample filament cartridge is mounted on a micro-manipulator two-axis stage that enables adjustment of the filament position with 10 micron resolution within the ion lens. Results of initial testing with actinides will be presented.

  5. Low-Pressure, Field-Ionizing Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank; Smith, Steven

    2009-01-01

    A small mass spectrometer utilizing a miniature field ionization source is now undergoing development. It is designed for use in a variety of applications in which there are requirements for a lightweight, low-power-consumption instrument that can analyze the masses of a wide variety of molecules and ions. The device can operate without need for a high-vacuum, carrier-gas feed radioactive ionizing source, or thermal ionizer. This mass spectrometer can operate either in the natural vacuum of outer space or on Earth at any ambient pressure below 50 torr (below about 6.7 kPa) - a partial vacuum that can easily be reached by use of a small sampling pump. This mass spectrometer also has a large dynamic range - from singly charged small gas ions to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments larger than 104 atomic mass units - with sensitivity adequate for detecting some molecules and ions at relative abundances of less than one part per billion. This instrument (see figure) includes a field ionizer integrated with a rotating-field mass spectrometer (RFMS). The field ionizer effects ionization of a type characterized as "soft" in the art because it does not fragment molecules or initiate avalanche arcing. What makes the "soft" ionization mode possible is that the distance between the ionizing electrodes is less than mean free path for ions at the maximum anticipated operating pressure, so that the ionizer always operates on the non-breakdown side of the applicable Paschen curve (a standard plot of breakdown potential on the ordinate and pressure electrode separation on the abscissa). The field ionizer in this instrument is fabricated by micromachining a submicron-thick membrane out of an electrically nonconductive substrate, coating the membrane on both sides to form electrodes, then micromachining small holes through the electrodes and membrane. Because of the submicron electrode separation, even a potential of only 1 V applied between the electrodes gives rise to an electric

  6. Sensing systems using chip-based spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitkowski, Arthur; Preston, Kyle J.; Sherwood-Droz, Nicolás.; Behr, Bradford B.; Bismilla, Yusuf; Cenko, Andrew T.; DesRoches, Brandon; Meade, Jeffrey T.; Munro, Elizabeth A.; Slaa, Jared; Schmidt, Bradley S.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2014-06-01

    Tornado Spectral Systems has developed a new chip-based spectrometer called OCTANE, the Optical Coherence Tomography Advanced Nanophotonic Engine, built using a planar lightwave circuit with integrated waveguides fabricated on a silicon wafer. While designed for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) systems, the same miniaturized technology can be applied to many other spectroscopic applications. The field of integrated optics enables the design of complex optical systems which are monolithically integrated on silicon chips. The form factors of these systems can be significantly smaller, more robust and less expensive than their equivalent free-space counterparts. Fabrication techniques and material systems developed for microelectronics have previously been adapted for integrated optics in the telecom industry, where millions of chip-based components are used to power the optical backbone of the internet. We have further adapted the photonic technology platform for spectroscopy applications, allowing unheard-of economies of scale for these types of optical devices. Instead of changing lenses and aligning systems, these devices are accurately designed programmatically and are easily customized for specific applications. Spectrometers using integrated optics have large advantages in systems where size, robustness and cost matter: field-deployable devices, UAVs, UUVs, satellites, handheld scanning and more. We will discuss the performance characteristics of our chip-based spectrometers and the type of spectral sensing applications enabled by this technology.

  7. High mass resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for measuring products in heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, T.; Jensen, R.; Christensen, M. K.; Pedersen, T.; Hansen, O.; Chorkendorff, I.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a combined microreactor and time of flight system for testing and characterization of heterogeneous catalysts with high resolution mass spectrometry and high sensitivity. Catalyst testing is performed in silicon-based microreactors which have high sensitivity and fast thermal response. Gas analysis is performed with a time of flight mass spectrometer with a modified nude Bayard-Alpert ionization gauge as gas ionization source. The mass resolution of the time of flight mass spectrometer using the ion gauge as ionization source is estimated to m/Δm > 2500. The system design is superior to conventional batch and flow reactors with accompanying product detection by quadrupole mass spectrometry or gas chromatography not only due to the high sensitivity, fast temperature response, high mass resolution, and fast acquisition time of mass spectra but it also allows wide mass range (0-5000 amu in the current configuration). As a demonstration of the system performance we present data from ammonia oxidation on a Pt thin film showing resolved spectra of OH and NH3.

  8. High mass resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for measuring products in heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, T.; Jensen, R.; Christensen, M. K.; Chorkendorff, I.; Pedersen, T.; Hansen, O.

    2012-07-15

    We demonstrate a combined microreactor and time of flight system for testing and characterization of heterogeneous catalysts with high resolution mass spectrometry and high sensitivity. Catalyst testing is performed in silicon-based microreactors which have high sensitivity and fast thermal response. Gas analysis is performed with a time of flight mass spectrometer with a modified nude Bayard-Alpert ionization gauge as gas ionization source. The mass resolution of the time of flight mass spectrometer using the ion gauge as ionization source is estimated to m/{Delta}m > 2500. The system design is superior to conventional batch and flow reactors with accompanying product detection by quadrupole mass spectrometry or gas chromatography not only due to the high sensitivity, fast temperature response, high mass resolution, and fast acquisition time of mass spectra but it also allows wide mass range (0-5000 amu in the current configuration). As a demonstration of the system performance we present data from ammonia oxidation on a Pt thin film showing resolved spectra of OH and NH{sub 3}.

  9. High mass resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for measuring products in heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors.

    PubMed

    Andersen, T; Jensen, R; Christensen, M K; Pedersen, T; Hansen, O; Chorkendorff, I

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a combined microreactor and time of flight system for testing and characterization of heterogeneous catalysts with high resolution mass spectrometry and high sensitivity. Catalyst testing is performed in silicon-based microreactors which have high sensitivity and fast thermal response. Gas analysis is performed with a time of flight mass spectrometer with a modified nude Bayard-Alpert ionization gauge as gas ionization source. The mass resolution of the time of flight mass spectrometer using the ion gauge as ionization source is estimated to m/Δm > 2500. The system design is superior to conventional batch and flow reactors with accompanying product detection by quadrupole mass spectrometry or gas chromatography not only due to the high sensitivity, fast temperature response, high mass resolution, and fast acquisition time of mass spectra but it also allows wide mass range (0-5000 amu in the current configuration). As a demonstration of the system performance we present data from ammonia oxidation on a Pt thin film showing resolved spectra of OH and NH(3). PMID:22852722

  10. Micro-optical-mechanical system photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack; Benett, William J.; Tooker, Angela C.; Alameda, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    All-optical photoacoustic spectrometer sensing systems (PASS system) and methods include all the hardware needed to analyze the presence of a large variety of materials (solid, liquid and gas). Some of the all-optical PASS systems require only two optical-fibers to communicate with the opto-electronic power and readout systems that exist outside of the material environment. Methods for improving the signal-to-noise are provided and enable mirco-scale systems and methods for operating such systems.

  11. Commissioning of the vacuum system of the KATRIN Main Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, M.; Babutzka, M.; Bahr, M.; Barrett, J. P.; Bauer, S.; Beck, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behrens, J.; Bergmann, T.; Besserer, U.; Blümer, J.; Bodine, L. I.; Bokeloh, K.; Bonn, J.; Bornschein, B.; Bornschein, L.; Büsch, S.; Burritt, T. H.; Chilingaryan, S.; Corona, T. J.; De Viveiros, L.; Doe, P. J.; Dragoun, O.; Drexlin, G.; Dyba, S.; Ebenhöch, S.; Eitel, K.; Ellinger, E.; Enomoto, S.; Erhard, M.; Eversheim, D.; Fedkevych, M.; Felden, A.; Fischer, S.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fränkle, F.; Furse, D.; Ghilea, M.; Gil, W.; Glück, F.; Gonzalez Ureña, A.; Görhardt, S.; Groh, S.; Grohmann, S.; Grössle, R.; Gumbsheimer, R.; Hackenjos, M.; Hannen, V.; Harms, F.; Haußmann, N.; Heizmann, F.; Helbing, K.; Herz, W.; Hickford, S.; Hilk, D.; Hillen, B.; Höhn, T.; Holzapfel, B.; Hötzel, M.; Howe, M. A.; Huber, A.; Jansen, A.; Kernert, N.; Kippenbrock, L.; Kleesiek, M.; Klein, M.; Kopmann, A.; Kosmider, A.; Kovalík, A.; Krasch, B.; Kraus, M.; Krause, H.; Krause, M.; Kuckert, L.; Kuffner, B.; La Cascio, L.; Lebeda, O.; Leiber, B.; Letnev, J.; Lobashev, V. M.; Lokhov, A.; Malcherek, E.; Mark, M.; Martin, E. L.; Mertens, S.; Mirz, S.; Monreal, B.; Müller, K.; Neuberger, M.; Neumann, H.; Niemes, S.; Noe, M.; Oblath, N. S.; Off, A.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Osipowicz, A.; Otten, E.; Parno, D. S.; Plischke, P.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prall, M.; Priester, F.; Ranitzsch, P. C.-O.; Reich, J.; Rest, O.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Röllig, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, S.; Ryšavý, M.; Schlösser, K.; Schlösser, M.; Schönung, K.; Schrank, M.; Schwarz, J.; Seiler, W.; Seitz-Moskaliuk, H.; Sentkerestiová, J.; Skasyrskaya, A.; Slezák, M.; Špalek, A.; Steidl, M.; Steinbrink, N.; Sturm, M.; Suesser, M.; Telle, H. H.; Thümmler, T.; Titov, N.; Tkachev, I.; Trost, N.; Unru, A.; Valerius, K.; Vénos, D.; Vianden, R.; Vöcking, S.; Wall, B. L.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weber, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Weiss, C.; Welte, S.; Wendel, J.; Wierman, K. L.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Winzen, D.; Wolf, J.; Wüstling, S.; Zacher, M.; Zadoroghny, S.; Zbořil, M.

    2016-04-01

    The KATRIN experiment will probe the neutrino mass by measuring the β-electron energy spectrum near the endpoint of tritium β-decay. An integral energy analysis will be performed by an electro-static spectrometer (``Main Spectrometer''), an ultra-high vacuum vessel with a length of 23.2 m, a volume of 1240 m3, and a complex inner electrode system with about 120 000 individual parts. The strong magnetic field that guides the β-electrons is provided by super-conducting solenoids at both ends of the spectrometer. Its influence on turbo-molecular pumps and vacuum gauges had to be considered. A system consisting of 6 turbo-molecular pumps and 3 km of non-evaporable getter strips has been deployed and was tested during the commissioning of the spectrometer. In this paper the configuration, the commissioning with bake-out at 300 °C, and the performance of this system are presented in detail. The vacuum system has to maintain a pressure in the 10‑11 mbar range. It is demonstrated that the performance of the system is already close to these stringent functional requirements for the KATRIN experiment, which will start at the end of 2016.

  12. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Crippa, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Evans, G. J.; Wenger, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    Single particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been estimated using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC), organic aerosol (OA), ammonium, nitrate, sulphate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), a thermal/optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC). ATOFMS-derived mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67-0.78), and ten discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. Potassium content was used to identify particles associated with biomass combustion. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorization, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulphate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA) is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA/EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA) was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidized OA (OOA) was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the heterogeneity of primary and

  13. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single-particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Crippa, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Evans, G. J.; Wenger, J. C.

    2013-09-01

    Single-particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single-particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been determined using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC), organic aerosol (OA), ammonium, nitrate, sulfate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), a thermal-optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC). ATOFMS-derived estimated mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67-0.78), and 10 discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorisation, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulfate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA) is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA / EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA) was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidised OA (OOA) was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the range of primary and secondary organic aerosol mixing states in Paris. Examination of the temporal

  14. Sonic spectrometer and treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Slomka, Bogdan J.

    1997-06-03

    A novel system and method for treating an object with sonic waveforms. A traveling broad-band sonic waveform containing a broad-band of sonic frequencies is radiated at the object. A traveling reflected sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies reflected by the object is received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. A traveling transmitted sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies transmitted through the object is also received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. In a resonance mode, the frequency spectra of the broad-band and reflected sonic waveforms is analyzed so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate. An electrical resonance treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object. In an absorption mode, the frequency spectra of the electrical broad-band, reflected, and transmitted sonic waveforms is compared so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object. An electrical absorption treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object.

  15. Sonic spectrometer and treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Slomka, B.J.

    1997-06-03

    A novel system and method is developed for treating an object with sonic waveforms. A traveling broad-band sonic waveform containing a broad-band of sonic frequencies is radiated at the object. A traveling reflected sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies reflected by the object is received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. A traveling transmitted sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies transmitted through the object is also received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. In a resonance mode, the frequency spectra of the broad-band and reflected sonic waveforms is analyzed so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate. An electrical resonance treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object. In an absorption mode, the frequency spectra of the electrical broad-band, reflected, and transmitted sonic waveforms is compared so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object. An electrical absorption treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object. 1 fig.

  16. Cryogenic system for a superconducting spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, J.

    1983-03-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) relies upon superconducting coils of cryostable, pool boiling design to provide a maximum particle bending field of 3 tesla. This paper describes the cryogenic facility including helium refrigeration, gas management, liquid nitrogen system, and the overall control strategy. The system normally operates with a 4 K heat load of 150 watts; the LN/sub 2/ circuits absorb an additional 4000 watts. 80K intercept control is by an LSI 11 computer. Total available refrigeration at 4K is 400 watts using reciprocating expanders at the 20K and 4K level. The minicomputer has the capability of optimizing overall utility input cost by varying operating points. A hybrid of pneumatic, analog, and digital control is successful in providing full time unattended operation. The 7m diameter magnet/cryostat assembly is rotatable through 180 degrees to provide a variety of spectrometer orientations.

  17. Portable gas chromatograph mass spectrometer for on-site chemical analyses

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Bushman, John F.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Eckels, Joel D.

    2002-01-01

    A portable, lightweight (approximately 25 kg) gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, including the entire vacuum system, can perform qualitative and quantitative analyses of all sample types in the field. The GC/MS has a conveniently configured layout of components for ease of serviceability and maintenance. The GC/MS system can be transported under operating or near-operating conditions (i.e., under vacuum and at elevated temperature) to reduce the downtime before samples can be analyzed on-site.

  18. Mars Solar Balloon Landed Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.; Harpold, D.; Niemann, H.; Atreya, S.; Gorevan, S.; Israel, G.; Bertaux, J. L.; Jones, J.; Owen, T.; Raulin, F.

    1999-01-01

    A Mars surface lander Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) is described to measure the chemical composition of abundant and trace volatile species and isotope ratios for noble gases and other elements. These measurements are relevant to the study of atmospheric evolution and past climatic conditions. A Micromission plan is under study where a surface package including a miniaturized GCMS would be delivered to the surface by a solar heated hot air balloon based system. The balloon system would be deployed about 8 km above the surface of Mars, wherein it would rapidly fill with Martian atmosphere and be heated quickly by the sun. The combined buoyancy and parachuting effects of the solar balloon result in a surface package impact of about 5 m/sec. After delivery of the package to the surface, the balloon would ascend to about 4 km altitude, with imaging and magnetometry data being taken for the remainder of the daylight hours as the balloon is blown with the Martian winds. Total atmospheric entry mass of this mission is estimated to be approximately 50 kg, and it can fit as an Ariane 5 piggyback payload. The GCMS would obtain samples directly from the atmosphere at the surface and also from gases evolved from solid phase material collected from well below the surface with a Sample Acquisition and Transport Mechanism (SATM). The experiment envisioned in the Mars Micromission described would obtain samples from a much greater depth of up to one meter below the surface, and would search for organic molecules trapped in ancient stratified layers well below the oxidized surface. Insitu instruments on upcoming NASA missions working in concert with remote sensing measurement techniques have the potential to provide a more detailed investigation of mineralogy and the extent of simple volatiles such as CO2 and H2O in surface and subsurface solid phase materials. Within the context of subsequent mission opportunities such as those provided by the Ariane 5 piggyback

  19. Development and Evaluation of a Variable-Temperature Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkits, David; Wiseman, Alex; Snead, Russell F.; Dows, Martina; Harge, Jasmine; Lamp, Jared A.; Gronert, Scott

    2016-02-01

    A new, variable-temperature mass spectrometer system is described. By applying polyimide heating tape to the end-cap electrodes of a Bruker (Bremen, Germany) Esquire ion trap, it is possible to vary the effective temperature of the system between 40 and 100°C. The modification does not impact the operation of the ion trap and the heater can be used for extended periods without degradation of the system. The accuracy of the ion trap temperatures was assessed by examining two gas-phase equilibrium processes with known thermochemistry. In each case, the variable-temperature ion trap provided data that were in good accord with literature data, indicating the effective temperature in the ion trap environment was being successfully modulated by the changes in the set-point temperatures on the end-cap electrodes. The new design offers a convenient and effective way to convert commercial ion trap mass spectrometers into variable-temperature instruments.

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Variable-Temperature Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Derkits, David; Wiseman, Alex; Snead, Russell F; Dows, Martina; Harge, Jasmine; Lamp, Jared A; Gronert, Scott

    2016-02-01

    A new, variable-temperature mass spectrometer system is described. By applying polyimide heating tape to the end-cap electrodes of a Bruker (Bremen, Germany) Esquire ion trap, it is possible to vary the effective temperature of the system between 40 and 100°C. The modification does not impact the operation of the ion trap and the heater can be used for extended periods without degradation of the system. The accuracy of the ion trap temperatures was assessed by examining two gas-phase equilibrium processes with known thermochemistry. In each case, the variable-temperature ion trap provided data that were in good accord with literature data, indicating the effective temperature in the ion trap environment was being successfully modulated by the changes in the set-point temperatures on the end-cap electrodes. The new design offers a convenient and effective way to convert commercial ion trap mass spectrometers into variable-temperature instruments. PMID:26483183

  1. A specialized isotope mass spectrometer for noninvasive diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori infection in human beings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blashenkov, N. M.; Sheshenya, E. S.; Solov'ev, S. M.; Sachenko, V. D.; Gall, L. N.; Zarutskii, I. V.; Gall, N. R.

    2013-05-01

    A specialized isotope mass spectrometer for noninvasive diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori infection in human beings based on the carbon-13 isotope breath test has been designed and constructed. Important stages of the work included (i) calculating a low-aberration mass analyzer, (ii) manufacturing and testing special gas inlet system, and (iii) creating a small-size collector of ions. The proposed instrument ensures 13C/12C isotopic ratio measurement to within 1.7‰ (pro mille) accuracy, which corresponds to requirements for a diagnostic tool. Preliminary medical testing showed that the mass spectrometer is applicable to practical diagnostics. The instrument is also capable of measuring isotopic ratios of other light elements, including N, O, B (for BF2+ ions), Ar, Cl, and S.

  2. Progress at the Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer ``THe-Trap''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoecker, Martin; Eronen, Tommi; Ketter, Jochen; Streubel, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus; van Dyck, Robert S.

    2012-03-01

    In 2008, the ``University of Washington Penning-Trap Mass Spectrometer'' (UW-PTMS), originally designed and built by the Van Dyck group, was moved to the Max-Planck-Insitute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. It was set up in a dedicated laboratory that meets both the radiation-safety requirements, and the environment-stabilization demands for a high-precision measurement of the tritium/helium-3 mass ratio. Our goal is to measure this mass ratio with a relative uncertainty of 10-11, which would be more than an order of magnitude better than the previous best measurement. It would decrease the uncertainty in the tritium beta decay Q-value (an important parameter in the ongoing search for the neutrino mass by experiments such as KATRIN) by the same factor. In order to emphasize the specialization of our experiment with regard to Tritium and ^3Helium, it was renamed to ``THe-Trap''. THe-Trap features a double Penning-trap for rapid ion exchange, an external ion source to minimize trap contamination, a novel Zener-based voltage source, and active as well as passive stabilization of temperature, pressure and the magnetic field of the superconducting magnet. An overview of the project and a report on the recent progress will be given.

  3. SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer System software design description

    SciTech Connect

    Femec, D.A.; Killian, E.W.

    1994-08-01

    To assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contract-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP), the SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurements and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SGRS system software controls turntable and detector system activities. In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, this software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of-specific interest. This document describes the software design for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  4. Ion Mass Spectrometer for Sporadic-E Rocket Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.; Earle, G. D.; Pfaff, Robert

    2000-01-01

    NASA grant NAG5-5086 provided funding for the William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) to design, fabricate, calibrate, and ultimately fly two ion mass spectrometer instruments on a pair of sounding rocket payloads. Drs. R.A. Heelis and G.D. Earle from UTD were co-investigators on the project. The principal investigator for both rocket experiments was Dr. Robert Pfaff of the Goddard Space Flight Center. The overall project title was "Rocket/Radar Investigation of Lower Ionospheric Electrodynamics Associated with Intense Mid-Latitude Sporadic-E Layers". This report describes the overall objectives of the project, summarizes the instrument design and flight experiment details, and presents representative data obtained during the flights.

  5. Linear electronic field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.

    2010-08-24

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber; a means of introducing an analyte of interest into the first drift region; a pulsed ionization source which produces molecular ions from said analyte of interest; a first foil positioned between the first drift region and the second drift region, which dissociates said molecular ions into constituent atomic ions and emits secondary electrons; an electrode which produces secondary electrons upon contact with a constituent atomic ion in second drift region; a stop detector comprising a first ion detection region and a second ion detection region; and a timing means connected to the pulsed ionization source, to the first ion detection region, and to the second ion detection region.

  6. Development of an ion trap/multi-turn time-of-flight mass spectrometer with potential- lift.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Kenichi; Nagao, Hirofumi; Toyoda, Michisato

    2009-01-01

    An ion trap/multi-turn time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometer with potential-lift has been developed. This system consists of an external ion source, a lens system, an ion trap, a potential-lift, a multi-turn ToF mass spectrometer and a detector. The ion trap consists of hyperbolic electrode cross-sections (Paul trap) and is used as an ion storage device. The potential-lift, which is part of the flight tube, was attached between the ion trap and the multi-turn ToF mass spectrometer. The potential-lift is known to be useful for increasing the kinetic energy of the ions. In order to check the ability of the potential-lift, mass distributions of [(CsI)(n) Cs]+ clusters (n = 1-9) were measured. The relative intensity ratios of the [(CsI)(n)Cs]+ clusters were consistent with the results obtained using other apparatus. To check the properties of the new apparatus, Xe+ isotopes were analyzed using either a linear or multi-turn ToF mass spectrometer. In the linear mode, the mass resolution was 500. In the multi-turn mode, the resolution depended on the number of cycles of the multi-turn ToF mass spectrometer; the mass resolution was 4400 (FWHM) after nine cycles. This new apparatus with a high resolution will be useful for measurements of ion-molecule reactions and photodissociations. PMID:19423910

  7. The Development and Calibration of a New Mass Spectrometer for Upper Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Heidi Lynn Kennedy

    1995-01-01

    Outgassing from satellites has been a concern since the beginning of space exploration. Gases emitted from the spacecraft in earth orbit can collide with ambient gases and may be reflected towards the spacecraft, potentially influencing the operations of on-board instruments. Theoretical models exist to predict the return flux of released particles; the models, however, only have limited experimental testing and thus carry large uncertainties. An experiment has recently been designed to provide atmospheric data on the return flux. A mixture of argon and krypton is released from a Space Shuttle sub-satellite which also carries a unique mass spectrometer. A combination of an energy and mass analyzer is used to determine both the densities and energies of the returned gases. In addition, densities and temperatures of directly entering ambient particles such as O, N_2, and O _2, can be measured, discriminating from those which have accommodated and reacted on ion source walls. Extensive calibrations of the mass spectrometer have been performed on two independent systems. A high -speed beam facility has been employed to calibrate the instrument for high-speed gases. Calibrations of the mass spectrometer's absolute sensitivity have been obtained on a molecular flow calibration system constructed specifically for this experiment. The calibration results show that the instrument has an absolute sensitivity about 7.4 times10^{-6} amp/torr for Ar which is within the design goals. All launch testing and requirements have been met for an anticipated November, 1995 launch.

  8. 10 K Ring Electrode Trap—Tandem Mass Spectrometer for Infrared Spectroscopy of Mass Selected Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebbert, Daniel J.; Meijer, Gerard; Asmis, Knut R.

    2009-03-01

    A novel instrumental setup for measuring infrared photodissociation spectra of buffer gas cooled, mass-selected ions is described and tested. It combines a cryogenically cooled, linear radio frequency ion trap with a tandem mass spectrometer, optimally coupling continuous ion sources to pulsed laser experiments. The use of six independently adjustable DC potentials superimposed over the trapping radio frequency field provides control over the ion distribution within, as well as the kinetic energy distribution of the ions extracted from the ion trap. The scheme allows focusing the ions in space and time, such that they can be optimally irradiated by a pulsed, widely tunable infrared photodissociation laser. Ion intensities are monitored with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer mounted orthogonally to the ion trap axis.

  9. A Novel 9.4 Tesla FTICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Nathan K.; Quinn, John P.; Blakney, Gregory T.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2011-08-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry provides unparalleled mass measurement accuracy and resolving power. However, propagation of the technique into new analytical fields requires continued advances in instrument speed and sensitivity. Here, we describe a substantial redesign of our custom-built 9.4 tesla FTICR mass spectrometer that improves sensitivity, acquisition speed, and provides an optimized platform for future instrumentation development. The instrument was designed around custom vacuum chambers for improved ion optical alignment, minimized distance from the external ion trap to magnetic field center, and high conductance for effective differential pumping. The length of the transfer optics is 30% shorter than the prior system, for reduced time-of-flight mass discrimination and increased ion transmission and trapping efficiency at the ICR cell. The ICR cell, electrical vacuum feedthroughs, and cabling have been improved to reduce the detection circuit capacitance (and improve detection sensitivity) 2-fold. The design simplifies access to the ICR cell, and the modular vacuum flange accommodates new ICR cell technology, including linearized excitation, high surface area detection, and tunable electrostatic trapping potential.

  10. Titan's Topside Ionospheric Composition: Cassini Plasma Spectrometer Ion Mass spectrometer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Ali, A.; Cooper, J. F.; Lipatov, A. S.; Simpson, D. G.; Sarantos, M.; Chornay, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    In [1] the first quantitative evidence of ionospheric outflows (r > 10,000 km) coming from Titan was given using the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) data for the T9 flyby. Later in [2] similar outflows were shown for T63 and T75. In [3] evidence for ionospheric outflows for T15 was given and [4] showed evidence of outflows for T41. Normally, the CAPS IMS cannot be used to measure Titan's relatively dense ionosphere because the IMS has high sensitivity to measure the more tenuous plasmas of Saturn's magnetosphere and its detectors will experience count rates beyond their maximum allowed rates, therefore the IMS is configured not to measure the ionospheric plasma. But, whenever there are high altitude Titan wake flybys the ion densities are low enough so the CAPS IMS can measure these ionospheric outflows and their corresponding composition characteristic of the topside ionosphere (i.e., composition freezes in above the exobase) using its unique compositional capabilities. For example, the IMS can distinguish against specific ion types such as hydrocarbon, nitrile and water group ions due fragmentation of molecular ions within the instrument (i.e., incident ions strikes ultra-thin carbon foils at 14.6 kV or higher with exiting fragments such C+,0,-, N+,0, O+,0,-1). The other ionospheric instruments only measure the ion mass-per-charge (M/Q), while the CAPS IMS measures both the ion M/Q and its fragments. Specific attention will be given to such ions as NH4+, N+, O+, CH4+, C2H5+, HCNH+ and C3H7+. These results may impose important constraints upon Titan's ionospheric water group, hydrocarbon and nitrile ion chemistry. Are NH4+ ions present as indicated by INMS at 1100 km altitude and/or water group ions? Our work has concentrated on the T15 flyby. Estimates of the NH4+, N+ and O+ abundances presently have upper values < 20% of the total ion density with actual abundances and their uncertainties to be given. [1] Sittler, E.C. Jr., et al

  11. The gated electrostatic mass spectrometer (GEMS): definition and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Federico A; Jones, Hollis H; Lee, Jeffrey G

    2008-10-01

    GEMS is a new type of time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on an electrostatic energy analyzer. Mass resolution equals the energy analyzer kinetic energy resolution, which is set by its slit size. In GEMS, monochromatic ions enter the entrance slit at random times, and the gated ion deflection produced by the electrostatic field in the analyzer rejects ions that are inside the analyzer at gate onset, detecting those entering the analyzer after gate onset. This provides mass separation while overcoming the temporal and spatial spread problems typical of TOF applications. Paradoxically, GEMS works because all ion masses follow identical trajectories. GEMS is easily multiplied into two-dimensional arrays to increase sensitivity in space applications, requires relatively low voltages, and uses only a few electrical connections. Thus, it is easy to package GEMS as a small, low-power instrument for applications in harsh environments. A disadvantage of GEMS is that its output is the integral of the TOF spectrum and the derivative of the raw data must be taken, a procedure that is likely to add noise. A version of GEMS detecting un-deflected ions (u-GEMS) has been tested to demonstrate the time-integrated feature of the raw data but without the benefit of energy analysis. This paper describes GEMS implemented with the small deflection energy analyzer (SDEA), a compact version of the parallel plate energy analyzer. SDEA is described both analytically and with ion trajectory simulations using the ion trajectory simulation software SIMION; the results are then used to describe GEMS and compute its performance. PMID:18718764

  12. Miniature Ion Optics Towards a Micro Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Ashish

    This PhD dissertation reports the development of miniature ion optics components of a mass spectrometer (MS) with the ultimate goal to lay the foundation for a compact low-power micromachined MS (microMS) for broad-range chemical analysis. Miniaturization of two specific components a) RF ion traps and b) an ion funnel have been investigated and miniature low-power versions of these components have been developed and demonstrated successfully in lab experiments. Power savings, simpler electronics and packaging schemes required to operate the micro-scale RF cylindrical ion traps have been the key motivation driving this research. Microfabricated cylindrical ion traps (microCITs) and arrays in silicon, silicon-on-insulator and stainless steel substrates have been demonstrated and average power of as low as 55 mW for a low mass range (28 to 136 amu) and mass spectra with better than a unit-mass-resolution have been recorded. For the ion funnel miniaturization effort, simple assembly, small form factor and ease of integration have been emphasized. A simplification of the conventional 3D ion funnel design, called the planar ion funnel, has been developed in a single plate and has been tested to demonstrate ion funneling at medium vacuum levels (1E-5 Torr) using DC voltages and power less than 0.5 W. Miniaturization of these components also enables use of other novel ion optics components, packaging and integration, which will allow a new class of microMS architectures amenable for radical miniaturization.

  13. An aerodynamic assisted miniature mass spectrometer for enhanced volatile sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yanbing; Jiang, Ting; Huang, Guangyan; Wei, Yongzheng; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-21

    Previously, we have reported the development of a miniature mass spectrometer with a continuous atmospheric pressure interface (CAPI), and the use of it for non-volatile sample analysis, such as drugs, peptides and proteins. However due to the diffusion effects in the CAPI, especially stronger for light ions, the instrument shows low detection sensitivities for volatile samples when coupling with an atmosphere pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source (>ppmv). In this study, an in-vacuum plasma ionization source was designed and integrated into the system. By performing ionization in the first vacuum stage, ion transfer loss through the CAPI was minimized and tens of ppbv level detection sensitivities were achieved for volatile samples. Due to its improved sensitivity, chemical source tracing was demonstrated in an indoor environment as a simple proof-of-concept example. Furthermore, an aerodynamic sampling method was developed to facilitate directional sample transfer towards the miniature mass spectrometer in an open environment. By coupling this aerodynamic method with the miniature mass spectrometer, remote chemical source sensing could be achieved at a distance of more than two meters. This aerodynamic sampling method could also be applied to other mass spectrometry instruments for enhanced sample sampling in open environments. PMID:27379359

  14. Quadrupole Ion Mass Spectrometer for Masses of 2 to 50 Da

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, William; Griffin, Timothy P.; Ottens, Andrew; Harrison, Willard

    2005-01-01

    A customized quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometer (QITMS) has been built to satisfy a need for a compact, rugged instrument for measuring small concentrations of hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and argon in a nitrogen atmosphere. This QITMS can also be used to perform quantitative analyses of other gases within its molecular-mass range, which is 2 to 50 daltons (Da). (More precisely, it can be used to perform quantitative analysis of gases that, when ionized, are characterized by m/Z ratios between 2 and 50, where m is the mass of an ion in daltons and Z is the number of fundamental electric charges on the ion.

  15. Resolution of time-of-flight mass spectrometers evaluated for secondary neutral mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Makoto; Mogami, Akinori; Naito, Motohiro; Ichimura, Shingo; Shimizu, Hazime

    1988-09-01

    Mass resolution of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a two-stage electrostatic reflector is calculated for secondary neutral mass spectrometry. The instrument parameters are optimized for energy and space focusing: correcting the flight time difference due to the energy width ΔE of sputtered particles and the spatial width Δs of an ionizing laser beam. The effect of Δs can be compensated by applying an acceleration field to the ionizing region, and the maximum resolution becomes about 1000 for ΔE=10 eV and Δs=1.0 mm.

  16. Accurate mass determination of short-lived isotopes by a tandem Penning-trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stolzenberg, H.; Becker, S.; Bollen, G.; Kern, F.; Kluge, H.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Schweikhard, L. ); Audi, G. ); Moore, R.B. ); The ISOLDE Collaboration

    1990-12-17

    A mass spectrometer consisting of two Penning traps has been set up for short-lived isotopes at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE at CERN. The ion beam is collected and cooled in the first trap. After delivery to the second trap, high-accuracy direct mass measurements are made by determining the cyclotron frequency of the stored ions. Measurements have been performed for {sup 118}Cs--{sup 137}Cs. A resolving power of over 10{sup 6} and an accuracy of 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}7} have been achieved, corresponding to about 20 keV.

  17. A New Multi Collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelhans, A. D.; Olson, J. E.; Ward, M. B.; Dahl, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    With the goal of improving the sensitivity of isotope ratio measurements, particularly for actinides, a new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes up to seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously has been designed, constructed and is in the early stages of testing. The design is based on a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated by 35 mm; this allows a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used for each beam. The ion dispersion lens (US patents 6,297,501 and pending) is a two element electrostatic 90 degree sector device that causes the beam-to-beam dispersion to increase faster than the intra-beam dispersion. Each of the multipliers is housed in an isolated case and is equipped with a deflector/condenser lens at the entrance to optimize pulse generation. The instrument includes a 9-sample filament cartridge mounted on a micro-manipulator X-Y stage that enables adjustment of the filament position with 10 micron resolution within the ion lens. Initial testing has shown that the instrument is performing as predicted by the ion optics model of the design.

  18. Rotary turret and reusable specimen holder for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Banar, Joseph C.; Perrin, Richard E.; Ostrenga, Raymond A.

    1988-01-01

    A sample holder for use in a mass spectrometer is provided for heating a sample to discharge ions through an electrostatic field which focuses and accelerates the ions for analysis. Individual specimen holders form a plurality of filaments for heating the sample materials for ion emission. Mounting devices hold the plurality of filaments at regular spaced apart angles in a closed configuration adjacent the electrostatic field elements. A substantially solid ceramic turret is provided with a plurality of electrical contacts which engage the individual holder means for energizing the filaments and forming a corresponding plurality of radially facing, axially extending first conductive surfaces. A substantially solid stationary turret bearing member is mounted about the rotating turret with a plurality of radially biased second electrical conductive surfaces, mounted to electrically contact facing ones of the plurality of radially facing first conductive surfaces. The assembly provides a large thermal mass for thermal stability and large electrical contact areas for repeatable, stable power input for heating the sample materials. An improved sample holder is also provided having a ceramic body portion for removably engaging conductive wires. The conductive wires are compatible with a selected filament element and the sample material to be analyzed.

  19. STS-46 plasma composition measurements using the EOIM-3 mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hunton, D.E.; Trzcinski, E.; Gosselin, R.; Koontz, S.; Leger, L.; Visentine, J.T.

    1995-02-01

    One of the active instruments incorporated into the Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials - 3 experiment was a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The primary objectives for this instrument, which was built by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and was a veteran of the STS-4 flight in 1982, were to quantify the flux of atomic oxygen striking the test surfaces in the EOIM-3 payload and to detect surface reaction products from the materials in the carousel. Other speakers in this session have covered the results of these experiments. Prior to the 40-hour-long dedicated EOIM-3 mission segment at the end of the STS-46 flight, the authors used the mass spectrometer to make measurements of ion and neutral gas composition in the shuttle environment. About 25 hours of data were collected during a variety of mission events, including Eureca deployment at high altitude and many tethered satellite system operations.

  20. STS-46 plasma composition measurements using the EOIM-3 mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunton, Donald E.; Trzcinski, Edmund; Gosselin, Roger; Koontz, Steven; Leger, Lubert; Visentine, James T.

    1995-01-01

    One of the active instruments incorporated into the Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials - 3 experiment was a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The primary objectives for this instrument, which was built by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and was a veteran of the STS-4 flight in 1982, were to quantify the flux of atomic oxygen striking the test surfaces in the EOIM-3 payload and to detect surface reaction products from the materials in the carousel. Other speakers in this session have covered the results of these experiments. Prior to the 40-hour-long dedicated EOIM-3 mission segment at the end of the STS-46 flight, the authors used the mass spectrometer to make measurements of ion and neutral gas composition in the shuttle environment. About 25 hours of data were collected during a variety of mission events, including Eureca deployment at high altitude and many tethered satellite system operations.

  1. High-precision masses of neutron-deficient rubidium isotopes using a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerbauer, A.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Weber, C.; Yazidjian, C.; Blaum, K.; Bollen, G.; Schwarz, S.; Herlert, A.; Schweikhard, L.

    2007-10-15

    The atomic masses of the neutron-deficient radioactive rubidium isotopes {sup 74-77,79,80,83}Rb have been measured with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. Using the time-of-flight cyclotron resonance technique, relative mass uncertainties ranging from 1.6x10{sup -8} to 5.6x10{sup -8} were achieved. In all cases, the mass precision was significantly improved as compared with the prior Atomic-Mass Evaluation; no significant deviations from the literature values were observed. The exotic nuclide {sup 74}Rb, with a half-life of only 65 ms, is the shortest-lived nuclide on which a high-precision mass measurement in a Penning trap has been carried out. The significance of these measurements for a check of the conserved-vector-current hypothesis of the weak interaction and the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix is discussed.

  2. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Investigation Of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Sushil; Harpold, Dan; Owen, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    A decade ago, on 14 January 2005, the Huygens probe of the Cassini-Huygens mission descended through the smog filled atmosphere of Titan and landed on the surface, revealing for the first time the extraordinary nature of Saturn's largest moon. One of the six payload instruments, the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS), was crucial for measuring the composition of the atmosphere and the surface of Titan [1,2]. Most of the GCMS findings were "firsts", including the first direct identification of molecular nitrogen as the bulk constituent of the atmosphere, first vertical profile of Titan's second most abundant volatile, methane, first determination of primordial and radiogenic argon, first quantification of a number of stable gas isotopes, and the first measurements of the make-up of Titan's surface. These data are key to understanding why Titan is so unique amongst planetary moons in possessing a massive atmosphere [3], how Titan maintains a cycle of methane complete with surface reservoirs, evaporation and condensation like the hydrological cycle on earth [3,4,5], and what is responsible for the photochemical smog on Titan that plays a central role in the very existence of an atmosphere on Titan [3]. This presentation will discuss the GCMS investigation and how it helped shape our current view of Titan. [website for downloading pdf's of relevant papers: www.umich.edu/~atreya] [1] Niemann, H. B. et al., The abundances of constituents of Titan's atmosphere from the GCMS instrument on the Huygens probe, Nature 438, 779-784, 2005. [2] Niemann, H. B. et al., The composition of Titan's lower atmosphere and simple surface volatiles as measured by the Cassini-Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment, J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 115, 12006, 2010. [3] Atreya S. K., R. D. Lorenz and J. H. Waite, Volatile origin and cycles: Nitrogen and methane, in Titan from Cassini-Huygens, R. H. Brown, J. P. Lebreton and J. Waite, (eds.), Springer Dordrecht

  3. Mass Spectrometer Sounding of the Turbopause Region on Commercial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurairajah, B.; Bailey, S. M.; Syrstad, E. A.; Fish, C. S.; Siskind, D. E.; Russell, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The turbopause region near 100 km remains one of the most poorly explored yet crucial regions of the upper atmosphere. In the vicinity of this altitude, the atmosphere reaches its lowest temperature and changes from being well mixed to being in diffusive equilibrium. Dynamical energy in the form of tides as well as gravity and planetary waves propagate from the lower atmosphere up to the ionosphere and thermosphere. Some energy and reactive chemical species are transported down across the turbopause to lower altitudes where the impact is significant. There is a significant dearth of composition observations near the turbopause. Few measurement techniques work well at this altitude, and it is too low for satellite orbits. Amazingly, major species with relatively large abundances such as O2, O, and CO2 are all poorly understood at these attitudes. While there are several experiments that measure temperature, the uncertainties in the temperature measurements are large because the techniques that are used rely on knowledge of CO2 or sometimes of O2. The lack of composition information thus hinders those observations that do occur near the turbopause and mesopause and leaves us with an overall poor understanding of this altitude region. We are soon to enter a new era in space exploration. Routine visits to the 100km region by commercial vehicles are on the verge of becoming a reality. The relevant organizations have expressed a willingness and even enthusiasm for including scientific instrumentation with their tourism and related commercial goals. We propose a major step forward in understanding the turbopause region by developing a mass spectrometer capable of being manifested on these commercial vehicles. Such an implantation could ultimately result in daily sounding of the turbopause region and greatly expand the database of measurements there. Our suggested instrument is a cryogenic time-of-flight mass Spectrometer. This technique has heritage, and our

  4. Comparison of atomic oxygen measurements by incoherent scatter and satellite-borne mass spectrometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Alcayde, D.

    1974-01-01

    Atomic oxygen densities determined by the incoherent scatter technique are compared to densities deduced from satellite-borne mass spectrometer measurements and are found to agree within experimental error. The diurnal variations inferred from the incoherent scatter measurements do show, however, some departure from diurnal variations found by modeling the mass spectrometer results. Some implications of these departures are briefly discussed.

  5. Apparatus and method for characterizing the transmission efficiency of a mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivasytava, Santash (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An electron/ion coincidence technique is employed to characterize the absolute mass dependent transmission efficiency of mass spectrometers. The technique is not dependent upon the partial pressure of the sample beam or the ionization cross sections of calibrant gases.

  6. Enhancing MALDI Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer Performance through Spectrum Averaging

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Morgan; Mali, Sujina; King, Charles C.; Bark, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometers are simple and robust mass spectrometers used for analysis of biologically relevant molecules in diverse fields including pathogen identification, imaging mass spectrometry, and natural products chemistry. Despite high nominal resolution and accuracy, we have observed significant variability where 30–50% of individual replicate measurements have errors in excess of 5 parts-per-million, even when using 5-point internal calibration. Increasing the number of laser shots for each spectrum did not resolve this observed variability. What is responsible for our observed variation? Using a modern MALDI-TOF/TOF instrument, we evaluated contributions to variability. Our data suggest a major component of variability is binning of the raw flight time data by the electronics and clock speed of the analog-to-digital (AD) detection system, which requires interpolation by automated peak fitting algorithms and impacts both calibration and the observed mass spectrum. Importantly, the variation observed is predominantly normal in distribution, which implies multiple components contribute to the observed variation and suggests a method to mitigate this variability through spectrum averaging. Restarting the acquisition impacts each spectrum within the electronic error of the AD detector system and defines a new calibration function. Therefore, averaging multiple independent spectra and not a larger number of laser shots leverages this inherent binning error to mitigate variability in accurate MALDI-TOF mass measurements. PMID:25798583

  7. Enhancing MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometer performance through spectrum averaging.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Morgan; Mali, Sujina; King, Charles C; Bark, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometers are simple and robust mass spectrometers used for analysis of biologically relevant molecules in diverse fields including pathogen identification, imaging mass spectrometry, and natural products chemistry. Despite high nominal resolution and accuracy, we have observed significant variability where 30-50% of individual replicate measurements have errors in excess of 5 parts-per-million, even when using 5-point internal calibration. Increasing the number of laser shots for each spectrum did not resolve this observed variability. What is responsible for our observed variation? Using a modern MALDI-TOF/TOF instrument, we evaluated contributions to variability. Our data suggest a major component of variability is binning of the raw flight time data by the electronics and clock speed of the analog-to-digital (AD) detection system, which requires interpolation by automated peak fitting algorithms and impacts both calibration and the observed mass spectrum. Importantly, the variation observed is predominantly normal in distribution, which implies multiple components contribute to the observed variation and suggests a method to mitigate this variability through spectrum averaging. Restarting the acquisition impacts each spectrum within the electronic error of the AD detector system and defines a new calibration function. Therefore, averaging multiple independent spectra and not a larger number of laser shots leverages this inherent binning error to mitigate variability in accurate MALDI-TOF mass measurements. PMID:25798583

  8. Reproducibility of cardioventilatory measurements using a respiratory mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Narang, Indra; Rosenthal, Mark; Bush, Andrew

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the within subject reproducibility of cardioventilatory measurements and the maximum permitted 'normal' variability over time at rest and exercise using the respiratory mass spectrometer (RMS). Ten subjects underwent an incremental exercise test on three separate occasions utilising rebreathing (RB) and helium dilution mixed expired gas analysis (HME) functions of the RMS. Measurements included heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (V(O2)), carbon dioxide excretion (V(VO2)), effective pulmonary blood flow (Q(eff)), stroke volume (SV), arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVO), transfer factor (Dl(CO)), functional residual capacity (FRC), minute ventilation (VE), tidal volume (VT) and respiratory quotient (RQ). The coefficients of variation for each variable for the 10 subjects were calculated. At rest, the 90th centile variability for measured cardiopulmonary variables (RB only) was <35%. During exercise, the 90th centile for variability for measured cardiopulmonary variables for HME and RB were < or =20 and <40%, respectively. These measurements in healthy adults should inform sample size in research studies. PMID:17188945

  9. "Fast Excitation" CID in Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, J.; Despeyroux, D.; Lammert, Stephen {Steve} A; Stephenson Jr, James {Jim} L; Goeringer, Doug

    2003-01-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is usually performed by applying a small amplitude excitation voltage at the same secular frequency as the ion of interest. Here we disclose studies examining the use of large amplitude voltage excitations (applied for short periods of time) to cause fragmentation of the ions of interest. This process has been examined using leucine enkephalin as the model compound and the motion of the ions within the ion trap simulated using ITSIM. The resulting fragmentation information obtained is identical with that observed by conventional resonance excitation CID. ''Fast excitation'' CID deposits (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a{sub 4}/b{sub 4} ion of leucine enkephalin) approximately the same amount of internal energy into an ion as conventional resonance excitation CID where the excitation signal is applied for much longer periods of time. The major difference between the two excitation techniques is the higher rate of excitation (gain in kinetic energy) between successive collisions with helium atoms with ''fast excitation'' CID as opposed to the conventional resonance excitation CID. With conventional resonance excitation CID ions fragment while the excitation voltage is still being applied whereas for ''fast excitation'' CID a higher proportion of the ions fragment in the ion cooling time following the excitation pulse. The fragmentation of the (M + 17H){sup 17+} of horse heart myoglobin is also shown to illustrate the application of ''fast excitation'' CID to proteins.

  10. Spectrometer system for optical reflectance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R. (Inventor); Phillipps, Patrick G. (Inventor); Parker, Michael S. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A spectrometer system includes a thermal light source for illuminating a sample, where the thermal light source includes a filament that emits light when heated. The system additionally includes a spectrograph for measuring a light spectrum from the sample and an electrical circuit for supplying electrical current to the filament to heat the filament and for controlling a resistance of the filament. The electrical circuit includes a power supply that supplies current to the filament, first electrical components that sense a current through the filament, second electrical components that sense a voltage drop across the filament, third electrical components that compare a ratio of the sensed voltage drop and the sensed current with a predetermined value, and fourth electrical components that control the current through the filament or the voltage drop across the filament to cause the ratio to equal substantially the predetermined value.

  11. Optimisation of the design parameters of a reflection geometry time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sankari, M.; Suryanarayana, M.V.

    1996-12-31

    Optimisation of the design parameters for a reflectron geometry time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOFMS) has been done by a simplex optimisation method based on a Nelder-Mead Algorithm. The space and energy resolutions obtained are 6100 and 7400, respectively, for mass 200 amu. The resolution is quite adequate for all the applications of RIMS. A high resolution reflectron geometry time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOFMS) for resonance ionisation mass spectrometer (RIMS) is being fabricated, based on these optimised design parameters. 19 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Electronics of an ion trap with integrated time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Christian; Schowalter, Steven J.; Yu, Peter; Hudson, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported an ion trap experiment with an integrated time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) [Phys. Rev. Appl. 2, 034013 (2014)] focussing on the improvement of mass resolution and detection limit due to sample preparation at millikelvin temperatures. The system utilizes a radio-frequency (RF) ion trap with asymmetric drive for storing and manipulating laser-cooled ions and features radial extraction into a compact $275$ mm long TOF drift tube. The mass resolution exceeds $m / \\Delta m = 500$, which provides isotopic resolution over the whole mass range of interest in current experiments and constitutes an improvement of almost an order of magnitude over other implementations. In this manuscript, we discuss the experimental implementation in detail, which is comprised of newly developed drive electronics for generating the required voltages to operate RF trap and TOFMS, as well as control electronics for regulating RF outputs and synchronizing the TOFMS extraction.

  13. Solar Wind Compositional Variability and the Need for an Ultra-High Temporal Resolution Mass Spectrometer: Introduction to the Helical Ion Path Spectrometer (HIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, M. L.; Gallagher, D. L.; Sheldon, R. D.; Hamilton, D. C.

    2005-05-01

    Solar wind composition measurements serve as an indicator of the sub-coronal and coronal processes responsible for the formation of these heliospheric features. While current state-of-the-art instrumentation have identified temporal variations in solar wind/CME composition on the order of 10's of minutes, these detections have occurred during relatively quiescent periods when temporal variations of the collective solar wind (including magnetic field variations) occur over periods in excess of the current minimum instrumental duty cycle of 5-minutes. Consequently, the compositional markers of the microphysics responsible for the formation of highly variable solar wind flows and for CME/prominence formation remain overlooked. The development of a novel ultra-high temporal resolution ion mass spectrometer utilizing a helical ion path time-of-flight (TOF) system within a compact, low-mass, low-power instrument has been undertaken in order to address the need for temporally enhanced solar wind composition measurements. The Helical Ion Path Spectrometer (HIPS) is designed specifically to measure solar wind heavy ion plasma from 3He+2 ≤ M/q ≤ Fe+6 and 0.6-20.0 keV/q with an order of magnitude greater geometric factor than current solar wind ion mass spectrometers, and produce 1-10 ms mass spectra with a mass resolution of M/ΔM ~ 200 or greater, all within a duty cycle of ≤ 90-s. The temporal resolution of HIPS is sufficient to probe solar wind and CME spatial/temporal dimensions down to an ion gyroradius in solar wind flow boundaries at 1 AU. We present evidence supporting the need for greater temporal resolution solar wind composition measurement through an overview of solar wind mass spectroscopy results to date, and an introduction to the HIPS mass spectrometer instrument concept.

  14. A remote operation quadrupole mass spectrometer using a custom radio-frequency link approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tashbar, P. W.; Nisen, D. B.; Moore, W. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer (residual gas analyzer, RGA) system has been modified to operate at large separations of its electronics console and sensing head. The methods implemented have made practical applications, as well as operation, of such a system possible for the first time. This advance was stimulated by a need for placing sensors at remote (45 or 60 m) chamber locations for space simulation testing of orbital flight spacecraft. Emphasis is placed on instrument functional requirements and describing the hardware changes and adjustment techniques necessary to assure operation at the extended cable lengths.

  15. Evaluating Mass Analyzers as Candidates for Small, Portable, Rugged Single Point Mass Spectrometers for Analysis of Permanent Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Ottens, Andrew K.; Diaz, Jorge A.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Follestein, Duke; Adams, Fredrick; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For Space Shuttle launch safety, there is a need to monitor the concentration Of H2, He, O2, and Ar around the launch vehicle. Currently a large mass spectrometry system performs this task, using long transport lines to draw in samples. There is great interest in replacing this stationary system with several miniature, portable, rugged mass spectrometers which act as point sensors which can be placed at the sampling point. Five commercial and two non-commercial analyzers are evaluated. The five commercial systems include the Leybold Inficon XPR-2 linear quadrupole, the Stanford Research (SRS-100) linear quadrupole, the Ferran linear quadrupole array, the ThermoQuest Polaris-Q quadrupole ion trap, and the IonWerks Time-of-Flight (TOF). The non-commercial systems include a compact double focusing sector (CDFMS) developed at the University of Minnesota, and a quadrupole ion trap (UF-IT) developed at the University of Florida.

  16. The RPC System for the Opera Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusini, S.

    2006-04-01

    OPERA is one of the two detectors foreseen in the CNGS (CERN Neutrino to Gran Sasso) project, devoted to the detection of νμ ↔ ντ oscillations in the parameter region suggested by SuperKamiokande. The tracking system inside the iron yoke of the muon spectrometer makes use of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) with bakelite electrodes in a large scale application. We present here full design of the project. Four RPC planes were instrumented and the first tests were performed confirming a good behavior of the installed RPCs in terms of intrinsic noise and operating currents and efficiency. In the paper we present also some results on RPC aging studies.

  17. Spectrometer system for diffuse extreme ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labov, Simon E.

    1989-01-01

    A unique grazing incidence spectrometer system has been designed to study diffuse line emission between 80 and 650 A with 10-30 A resolution. The minimum detectable emission line strength during a 5-min observation ranges from 100-2000 ph/sq cm sec str. The instrument uses mechanically ruled reflection gratings placed in front of a linear array of mirrors. These mirrors focus the spectral image on microchannel plate detectors located behind thin filters. The field of view is 40 min of arc by 15 deg, and there is no spatial imaging. This instrument has been fabricated, calibrated, and successfully flown on a sounding rocket to observe the astronomical background radiation.

  18. A Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for Quantitative Analysis of Nitrogen-Purged Compartments within the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottens, Andrew K.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Helms, William R.; Yost, Richard A.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To enter orbit the Space Shuttle burns 1.8 million liters of liquid hydrogen combined with 0.8 million liters of liquid oxygen through three rocket engines mounted in the aft. NASA monitors the nitrogen-purged aft compartment for increased levels of hydrogen or oxygen in order to detect and determine the severity of a cryogenic fuel leak. Current monitoring is accomplished with a group of mass spectrometer systems located as much as 400 feet away from the shuttle. It can take up to 45 seconds for gas to reach the mass spectrometer, which precludes monitoring for leaks in the final moments before liftoff (the orbiter engines are started at T-00:06 seconds). To remedy the situation, NASA is developing a small rugged mass spectrometer to be used as point-sources around the Space Shuttle.

  19. Fundamental studies of MALDI with an orthogonal TOF mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Hui

    The interaction between the matrix and analyte molecules are studied with a high resolution MALDI imaging technique in an orthogonal-injection time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The analyte incorporation and distribution patterns have been clearly demonstrated. Purified protein analytes were found to be homogeneously incorporated in large single crystals of DHB and sinapinic acid matrices, with no evidence for preferred crystal faces. Segregation of some species was observed and appeared to correlate with analyte hydrophobicity, and to a lesser extent analyte mass or mobility. Similar segregation phenomena were observed with confocal laser scanning microscopy of the same analytes labeled with fluorescent dyes in 2,5-DHB single crystals. The above investigations may shed some light on optimizing sample preparation with different matrices. The influence of incident laser parameters on sensitivity in MALDI has been investigated using orthogonal-injection TOF instruments. A qualitative comparison was first made between the beam profiles obtained with a N 2 laser and a Nd:YAG laser using 2-m long optical fibers. The N 2 laser gives better sensitivity, consistent with a more uniform fluence distribution and therefore better coverage of the N2 laser profile. Most of the difference disappears when a 30-m long fiber is used or when the fibers are twisted during irradiation to smooth out the fluence distribution. In more systematic measurements, the total integrated ion yield from a single spot (a measure of sensitivity) was found to increase rapidly with fluence to a maximum, and then saturate or decrease slightly. Thus, the optimum sensitivity is achieved at high fluence. For a fluence near threshold, the integrated yield has a steep (cubic) dependence on the spot size, but the yield saturates at higher fluence for smaller spots. The area dependence is much weaker (close to linear) for fluence values above saturation, with the result that the highest integrated yields

  20. Improvement of filament-protection circuitry in a Finnigan model 251 mass spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildman, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    As delivered from Finnigan MAT, the emission current of the Leybold-Heraeus model IM210 ionization vacuum gage on a model 251 isotope ratio mass spectrometer can turn on as soon as the ' PUMP ON ' switch is depressed, before a good vacuum in the mass spectrometer is attained. The filament in the source of the mass spectrometer may turn on at the same time, thereby shortening its life or burning it out if the vacuum is poor. This design flaw can be corrected by a simple modification of the electronic circuitry. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Large acceptance spectrometers for invariant mass spectroscopy of exotic nuclei and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Kondo, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Large acceptance spectrometers at in-flight RI separators have played significant roles in investigating the structure of exotic nuclei. Such spectrometers are in particular useful for probing unbound states of exotic nuclei, using invariant mass spectroscopy with reactions at intermediate and high energies. We discuss here the key characteristic features of such spectrometers, by introducing the recently commissioned SAMURAI facility at the RIBF, RIKEN. We also investigate the issue of cross talk in the detection of multiple neutrons, which has become crucial for exploring further unbound states and nuclei beyond the neutron drip line. Finally we discuss future perspectives for large acceptance spectrometers at the new-generation RI-beam facilities.

  2. Development of accelerator mass spectrometer based on a compact cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-W.; Kim, D.-G.

    2011-07-01

    A small cyclotron has been designed for accelerator mass spectrometry, and the injection beam line is constructed as part of prototyping. Mass resolution of the cyclotron is estimated to be around 4000. The design of the cyclotron was performed with orbit-tracking computations using 3D magnetic and electric fields, and beam optics of the injection line was calculated using the codes such as IGUN and TRANSPORT. The radial injection scheme is chosen to place a beam on equilibrium orbit of the cyclotron. The injection line includes an ion source, Einzel lens, rf buncher, 90° dipole magnet, and quadrupole triplet magnet. A carbon beam was extracted from the front part of the injection line. An rf cavity system for the cyclotron was built and tested. A multi channel plates (MCP) detector to measure low-current ion beams was also tested. Design considerations are given to analyzing a few different radioisotopes in form of positive ions as well as negative ions.

  3. Miniature Low Power Submillimeter-Wave Spectrometer For Detection of Water in The Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Denning, Richard F.; Janssen, Michael A.; Frerking, Margaret A.

    1997-01-01

    Mass and power for the next generation of NASA's heterodyne spectrometers must be greatly reduced to satisfy the constraints of future small-spacecraft missions. Here we present a new receiver concept for remote sensing in the Solar System, with greatly reduced mass, power, and size compared to instruments implemented in current missions.

  4. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean (Inventor); Brennen, Reid A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and aligrnent for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  5. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean (Inventor); Brennen, Reid A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  6. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean (Inventor); Brennen, Reid A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  7. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Rice, John T. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter, or pole array, for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  8. Development and Deployment of Retrofit PolarisQ Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for Isotope Ratio Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Whitten, William B.

    2015-11-01

    This report describes Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) FY15 progress in support of National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) Portable Mass Spectrometer project. A retrofit PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometer (RPMS) has been assembled from components of two PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometers used in previous isotope ratio programs. The retrofit mass spectrometer includes a custom Hastelloy vacuum chamber which is about ¼ the size of the standard aluminum vacuum chamber and reduces the instrument weight from the original by nine pounds. In addition, the new vacuum chamber can be independently heated to reduce impurities such as water, which reacts with UF6 to produce HF in the vacuum chamber. The analyzer and all components requiring service are mounted on the chamber lid, facilitating quick and easy replacement of consumable components such as the filament and electron multiplier.

  9. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Rice, John T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter, or pole array, for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  10. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Rice, John T. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter, or pole array, for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  11. First Results From the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso B.; Demick, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.; Atreya, S.; Carignan, G.; Bauer, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens Probe of the Cassini Huygens Mission entered the atmosphere of the moon Titan on January 14,2005. The GCMS was part of the instrument complement on the Probe to measure in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and to support the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment by serving as detector for the pyrolization products. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns. The mass spectrometer employed five electron impact ion sources with available electron energies of either 70 or 25 eV. Three ion sources served as detectors for the GC columns and two were dedicated to direct atmosphere sampling and ACP gas sampling, respectively. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and served to evaporate surface constituents after impact.

  12. Are Identical Twins, Truly Identical? A Comparison of Mass Spectra Recorded by "Identical" Mass Spectrometers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappirio, M.; Chornay, D.; Sittler, E. C.; Black, R.; Goldstein, R.; McComas, D. J.; Young, D. T.; Funsten, H. O.; McCabe, K.; Nordholt, J. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Reisenfeld, D.

    2005-05-01

    When the time of flight (TOF) Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) for the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) instrument was launched, the prototype model was upgraded to be identical to the flight model electro-optically and electronically. The primary goal of the upgrade was to have an instrument which could be tested in the laboratory to help analyze and interpret the data being returned from Cassini IMS measurements at Saturn for its four year tour and after a seven year journey. Since launch the prototype model has been used to test the instruments response to a wide variety of ion beam masses, energies, fluxes and compositions, many of which could not be covered during ground calibration of the flight instrument. This testing broadened our understanding of how IMS works and responds beyond what was accomplished before launch. However, when making comparisons between calibration data taken with the flight and the prototype units using beams with the same composition and energy, some systematic differences have been observed. In particular the mass spectra generated by the prototype appear to have a shift in the TOF from that of the flight instrument, the size of which depends on both the energy and mass of the incident ion. The differences will be discussed with particular reference to potential causes. This information is important for understanding the complications in calibrating and comparing the results from instruments that are assumed to function identically, in particular as applied to future constellation missions with instrument of identical design. It may also be useful to others designing similar TOF instruments.

  13. Evaluation of the Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer for the Molecular Fingerprinting Analysis of Natural Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Jeffrey A; Dittmar, Thorsten; Patriarca, Claudia; Tranvik, Lars; Bergquist, Jonas

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the application of the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (LTQ-Velos Pro, Thermo Fisher) for resolving complex mixtures of natural aquatic dissolved organic matter (DOM) and compared this technique to the more established state-of-the-art technique, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS, Bruker Daltonics), in terms of the distribution of molecular masses detected and the reproducibility of the results collected. The Orbitrap was capable of excellent reproducibility: Bray-Curtis dissimilarity between duplicate measurements was 2.85 ± 0.42% (mean ± standard deviation). The Orbitrap was also capable of the detection of most major ionizable organic molecules in typical aquatic mixtures, with the exception of most sulfur and phosphorus containing masses. This result signifies that the Orbitrap is an appropriate technique for the investigation of very subtle biogeochemical processing of bulk DOM. The lower costs (purchase and maintenance) and wider availability of Orbitrap mass spectrometers in university departments means that the tools necessary for research into DOM processing at the molecular level should be accessible to a much wider group of scientists than before. The main disadvantage of the technique is that substantially fewer molecular formulas can be resolved from a complex mixture (roughly one third as many), meaning some loss of information. In balance, most biogeochemical studies that aim at molecularly fingerprinting the source of natural DOM could be satisfactorily carried out with Orbitrap mass spectrometry. For more targeted metabolomic studies where individual compounds are traced through natural systems, FTICR-MS remains advantageous. PMID:27400998

  14. A Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for Quantitative Analysis of Nitrogen-Purged Compartments within the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottens, Andrew K.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Helms, William R.; Yost, Richard A.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To enter orbit, the Space Shuttle burns 1.8 million liters of liquid hydrogen combined with 0.8 million liters of liquid oxygen through three rocket engines mounted in the aft. NASA monitors the nitrogen-purged aft compartment for increased levels of hydrogen or oxygen in order to detect and determine the severity of a cryogenic fuel leak. Current monitoring is accomplished with a group of mass spectrometer systems located as much as 400 feet away from the Shuttle. It can take up to 45 seconds for gas to reach the mass spectrometer, which precludes monitoring for leaks in the final moments before liftoff (the orbiter engines are started at T-00:06 seconds). To remedy the situation, NASA is developing a small rugged mass spectrometer to be used as point-sensors around the Space Shuttle. As part of this project, numerous mass analyzer technologies are being investigated. Presented here are the preliminary results for one such technology, quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (QITMS). A compact QITMS system has been developed in-house at the University of Florida for monitoring trace levels of four primary gases, hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and argon, all in a nitrogen background. Since commercially available QITMS systems are incapable of mass analysis at m/z(exp 2), the home-built system is preferred for the evaluation of QITMS technology.

  15. A COMPARISON OF PARTICLE MASS SPECTROMETERS DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, four particle mass spectrometers were operated together for the first time: NOAA's PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry), U. C. Riverside's ATOFMS (Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry), U. Delaware's RSMS-II (Rapid Si...

  16. Operational Parameters, Considerations, and Design Decisions for Resource-Constrained Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danell, Ryan M.; VanAmerom, Friso H. W.; Pinnick, Veronica; Cotter, Robert J.; Brickerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometers are increasingly finding applications in new and unique areas, often in situations where key operational resources (i.e. power, weight and size) are limited. One such example is the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA). This instrument is a joint venture between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) to develop an ion trap mass spectrometer for chemical analysis on Mars. The constraints on such an instrument are significant as are the performance requirements. While the ideal operating parameters for an ion trap are generally well characterized, methods to maintain analytical performance with limited power and system weight need to be investigated and tested. Methods Experiments have been performed on two custom ion trap mass spectrometers developed as prototypes for the MOMA instrument. This hardware consists of quadrupole ion trap electrodes that are 70% the size of common commercial instrumentation. The trapping RF voltage is created with a custom tank circuit that can be tuned over a range of RF frequencies and is driven using laboratory supplies and amplifiers. The entire instrument is controlled with custom Lab VIEW software that allows a high degree of flexibility in the definition of the scan function defining the ion trap experiment. Ions are typically generated via an internal electron ionization source, however, a laser desorption source is also in development for analysis of larger intact molecules. Preliminary Data The main goals in this work have been to reduce the power required to generate the radio frequency trapping field used in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Generally minimizing the power will also reduce the volume and mass of the electronics to support the instrument. In order to achieve optimum performance, commercial instruments typically utilize RF frequencies in the 1 MHz range. Without much concern for power usage, they simply generate the voltage required to access the mass range of interest. In order to reduce the

  17. A Rugged Miniature Mass-Spectrometer for Aqueous Geochemistry on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockstill, K.; Anderson, F.; Pilger, E.; McMurtry, G.; French, L.

    2005-12-01

    Introduction: We are attempting to miniaturize and shock-harden an electrospray ionization rotating field mass spectrometer (ESI-RFMS) for high precision measurements of aqueous geochemistry on Mars. The design is based on a mass spectrometer system currently being used in situ in deep ocean applications (McMurtry & Smith, 2001). It has the strengths of being small, low power, low mass, requires no precision machining, and is tolerant of moderate vacuum. A prototype RFMS instrument has been shock tested to 1200 without degrading performance. ESI-RFMS is a soft-ionization technique, allowing for the measurement of molecules with large masses, and thus is an attractive experimental methodology for aqueous geochemical analysis enabling in situ measurements of potential chemical, isotopic, and biologic signatures. For example, ESI-RFMS could determine the geochemistry and origin of near-surface deposits of ice, such as those in the northern lowlands of Mars. In addition, ESI-RFMS could examine the record of aqueous alteration contained in the compositions and mineralogy of surface materials and in the compositions of liquid water and ice on Mars. Furthermore, ESI-RFMS analyses of water could detect heavy organic compounds commonly associated with life. Results: Work to date has focused on the development of a vacuum ESI-RFMS to study heavy compounds in water directly. The ESI-RFMS design concept has now been tested under a wide variety of vacuum conditions and sample delivery pressures, as well as under a wide range of electrical conditions and sample chemistries. We have also tested the RFMS mass filter using an off-the-shelf electron impact (EI) ionizer, which has proved the new RFMS concepts of mass filtering and ion beam control, as well as significant advances in noise reduction. A critical issue that evolved from this work is the importance of a well-focused beam of ions for RFMS mass filters versus other similar but less capable spectrometers like the standard

  18. A compact E × B filter: A multi-collector cycloidal focusing mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Blase, Ryan C; Miller, Greg; Westlake, Joseph; Brockwell, Tim; Ostrom, Nathaniel; Ostrom, Peggy H; Waite, J Hunter

    2015-10-01

    A compact E × B mass spectrometer is presented. The mass spectrometer presented is termed a "perfect focus" mass spectrometer as the resolution of the device is independent of both the initial direction and energy of the ions (spatial and energy independent). The mass spectrometer is small in size (∼10.7 in.(3)) and weight (∼2 kg), making it an attractive candidate for portability when using small, permanent magnets. A multi-collector Faraday cup design allows for the detection of multiple ion beams in discrete collectors simultaneously; providing the opportunity for isotope ratio monitoring. The mass resolution of the device is around 400 through narrow collector slits and the sensitivity of the device follows expected theoretical calculations of the ion current produced in the electron impact ion source. Example mass spectra obtained from the cycloidal focusing mass spectrometer are presented as well as information on mass discrimination based on instrumental parameters and isotope ratio monitoring of certain ion signals in separate Faraday cups. PMID:26520982

  19. A compact E × B filter: A multi-collector cycloidal focusing mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Blase, Ryan C. Miller, Greg; Brockwell, Tim; Waite, J. Hunter; Westlake, Joseph; Ostrom, Nathaniel; Ostrom, Peggy H.

    2015-10-15

    A compact E × B mass spectrometer is presented. The mass spectrometer presented is termed a “perfect focus” mass spectrometer as the resolution of the device is independent of both the initial direction and energy of the ions (spatial and energy independent). The mass spectrometer is small in size (∼10.7 in.{sup 3}) and weight (∼2 kg), making it an attractive candidate for portability when using small, permanent magnets. A multi-collector Faraday cup design allows for the detection of multiple ion beams in discrete collectors simultaneously; providing the opportunity for isotope ratio monitoring. The mass resolution of the device is around 400 through narrow collector slits and the sensitivity of the device follows expected theoretical calculations of the ion current produced in the electron impact ion source. Example mass spectra obtained from the cycloidal focusing mass spectrometer are presented as well as information on mass discrimination based on instrumental parameters and isotope ratio monitoring of certain ion signals in separate Faraday cups.

  20. A compact E × B filter: A multi-collector cycloidal focusing mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blase, Ryan C.; Miller, Greg; Westlake, Joseph; Brockwell, Tim; Ostrom, Nathaniel; Ostrom, Peggy H.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2015-10-01

    A compact E × B mass spectrometer is presented. The mass spectrometer presented is termed a "perfect focus" mass spectrometer as the resolution of the device is independent of both the initial direction and energy of the ions (spatial and energy independent). The mass spectrometer is small in size (˜10.7 in.3) and weight (˜2 kg), making it an attractive candidate for portability when using small, permanent magnets. A multi-collector Faraday cup design allows for the detection of multiple ion beams in discrete collectors simultaneously; providing the opportunity for isotope ratio monitoring. The mass resolution of the device is around 400 through narrow collector slits and the sensitivity of the device follows expected theoretical calculations of the ion current produced in the electron impact ion source. Example mass spectra obtained from the cycloidal focusing mass spectrometer are presented as well as information on mass discrimination based on instrumental parameters and isotope ratio monitoring of certain ion signals in separate Faraday cups.

  1. Small-size mass spectrometer for determining gases and volatile compounds in air during breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, V. T.; Kozlenok, A. V.; Chichagov, Yu. V.; Antonov, A. S.; Lebedev, D. S.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Moroshkin, V. S.; Berezina, A. V.; Viktorova-Leclerc, O. S.; Vlasov, S. A.; Tubol'tsev, Yu. V.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an automated mass spectrometer for diagnostics of deceases from the composition of exhaled air. It includes a capillary system, which performs a rapid direct feeding of the sample to the instrument without changing substantially its composition and serves for studying the dynamics of variation of the ratio between various components of exhaled air. The membrane system for introducing the sample is intended for determining low concentrations of volatile organic compounds which are biomarkers of pathologies. It is characterized by selective transmittance and ensures the detection limits of target compounds at the parts per million-parts per billion (ppm-ppb) level. A static mass analyzer operating on permanent magnets possesses advantages important for mobile devices as compared to its dynamic analogs: it is more reliable in operation, has a larger dynamic range, and can be used for determining the concentration of components in the mixture one-by-one or simultaneously. The curvilinear output boundary of the magnetic lens of the mass analyzer makes it possible to reduce its weight and size by 2.5 times without deteriorating the mass resolution. We report on the results of testing of the instrument and consider the possibility of its application for early detection of deceases of respiratory and blood circulation system, gastrointestinal tract, and endocrine system.

  2. Depth profiling and imaging capabilities of an ultrashort pulse laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yang; Moore, Jerry F.; Milasinovic, Slobodan; Liu, Yaoming; Gordon, Robert J.; Hanley, Luke

    2012-01-01

    An ultrafast laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer (AToF-MS) and associated data acquisition software that permits imaging at micron-scale resolution and sub-micron-scale depth profiling are described. The ion funnel-based source of this instrument can be operated at pressures ranging from 10−8 to ∼0.3 mbar. Mass spectra may be collected and stored at a rate of 1 kHz by the data acquisition system, allowing the instrument to be coupled with standard commercial Ti:sapphire lasers. The capabilities of the AToF-MS instrument are demonstrated on metal foils and semiconductor wafers using a Ti:sapphire laser emitting 800 nm, ∼75 fs pulses at 1 kHz. Results show that elemental quantification and depth profiling are feasible with this instrument. PMID:23020378

  3. Manifold and method of batch measurement of Hg-196 concentration using a mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; Evans, Roger

    1991-01-01

    A sample manifold and method of its use has been developed so that milligram quantities of mercury can be analyzed mass spectroscopically to determine the .sup.196 Hg concentration to less than 0.02 atomic percent. Using natural mercury as a standard, accuracy of .+-.0.002 atomic percent can be obtained. The mass spectrometer preferably used is a commercially available GC/MS manufactured by Hewlett Packard. A novel sample manifold is contained within an oven allowing flow rate control of Hg into the MS. Another part of the manifold connects to an auxiliary pumping system which facilitates rapid clean up of residual Hg in the manifold. Sample cycle time is about 1 hour.

  4. Manifold and method of batch measurement of Hg-196 concentration using a mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; Evans, R.

    1991-11-26

    A sample manifold and method of its use has been developed so that milligram quantities of mercury can be analyzed mass spectroscopically to determine the [sup 196]Hg concentration to less than 0.02 atomic percent. Using natural mercury as a standard, accuracy of [+-]0.002 atomic percent can be obtained. The mass spectrometer preferably used is a commercially available GC/MS manufactured by Hewlett Packard. A novel sample manifold is contained within an oven allowing flow rate control of Hg into the MS. Another part of the manifold connects to an auxiliary pumping system which facilitates rapid clean up of residual Hg in the manifold. Sample cycle time is about 1 hour. 8 figures.

  5. An Improvement on Space Focusing Resolution in Two-Field Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Yildirim, M.; Aydin, R.; Akin, U.; Kilic, H. S.; Sise, O.; Ulu, M.; Dogan, M.

    2007-04-23

    Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TOFMS) is a sophisticated device for the mass selective analysis of a variety of samples. The main limitation on TOFMS technique is the obtainable resolution where the two main limiting factors are the initial space and energy spread of particles created in ionization region. Similar charged particles starting at different points will reach the detector at different times. So, this problem makes space focusing is very important subject. We have presented principles of two-fields TOFMS with second-order space focusing both using analytical methods and ray-tracing simulation. This work aims understanding of ion optical system clearly and gives hint of expectation for future developments.

  6. A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer for ion source characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Wan, X; Jin, D Z; Tan, X H; Huang, Z X; Tan, G B

    2015-03-01

    A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer with overall dimension of about 413 × 250 × 414 mm based on orthogonal injection and angle reflection has been developed for ion source characterization. Configuration and principle of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer are introduced in this paper. The mass resolution is optimized to be about 1690 (FWHM), and the ion energy detection range is tested to be between about 3 and 163 eV with the help of electron impact ion source. High mass resolution and compact configuration make this spectrometer useful to provide a valuable diagnostic for ion spectra fundamental research and study the mass to charge composition of plasma with wide range of parameters. PMID:25832275

  7. A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer for ion source characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. Wan, X.; Jin, D. Z.; Tan, X. H.; Huang, Z. X.; Tan, G. B.

    2015-03-15

    A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer with overall dimension of about 413 × 250 × 414 mm based on orthogonal injection and angle reflection has been developed for ion source characterization. Configuration and principle of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer are introduced in this paper. The mass resolution is optimized to be about 1690 (FWHM), and the ion energy detection range is tested to be between about 3 and 163 eV with the help of electron impact ion source. High mass resolution and compact configuration make this spectrometer useful to provide a valuable diagnostic for ion spectra fundamental research and study the mass to charge composition of plasma with wide range of parameters.

  8. Frequency-swept detector for ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wronka, J.; Ridge, D. P.

    1982-04-01

    Design, construction, performance, and use of a frequency-swept bridge detector for ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry are described. Special features include characterization and simple automatic correction of phase shift to allow broadband detection. The result is a detection system that may be used either at constant field or constant frequency. Drift-mode operation is simplified in that it may be satisfactorily used without the various signal modulation schemes used in previous detectors. In the trapped mode the detector may be pulsed to control the timing of ion detection. This detector makes it possible to do frequency-swept double resonance experiments which provide spectra of all the product ions of a given reactant ion. Circuit schematics and typical frequency- and field-swept spectra are shown.

  9. Helium Mass Spectrometer Leak Detection: A Method to Quantify Total Measurement Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    In applications where leak rates of components or systems are evaluated against a leak rate requirement, the uncertainty of the measured leak rate must be included in the reported result. However, in the helium mass spectrometer leak detection method, the sensitivity, or resolution, of the instrument is often the only component of the total measurement uncertainty noted when reporting results. To address this shortfall, a measurement uncertainty analysis method was developed that includes the leak detector unit's resolution, repeatability, hysteresis, and drift, along with the uncertainty associated with the calibration standard. In a step-wise process, the method identifies the bias and precision components of the calibration standard, the measurement correction factor (K-factor), and the leak detector unit. Together these individual contributions to error are combined and the total measurement uncertainty is determined using the root-sum-square method. It was found that the precision component contributes more to the total uncertainty than the bias component, but the bias component is not insignificant. For helium mass spectrometer leak rate tests where unit sensitivity alone is not enough, a thorough evaluation of the measurement uncertainty such as the one presented herein should be performed and reported along with the leak rate value.

  10. Measuring the masses of the charged hadrons using a RICH as a precision velocity spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Peter S.; Engelfried, Jurgen; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2010-08-01

    The Selex experiment measured several billion charged hadron tracks with a high precision magnetic momentum spectrometer and high precision RICH velocity spectrometer. We have analyzed these data to simultaneously measure the masses of all the long lived charged hadrons and anti-hadrons from the {pi} to the {Omega} using the same detector and technique. The statistical precision achievable with this data sample is more than adequate for 0.1% mass measurements. We have used these measurements to develop and understand the systematic effects in using a RICH as a precision velocity spectrometer with the goal of measuring 10 masses with precision ranging from 100 KeV for the lightest to 1000 KeV for the heaviest. This requires controlling the radius measurement of RICH rings to the {approx} 10{sup -4} level. Progress in the mass measurements and the required RICH analysis techniques developed are discussed.

  11. Ion-retarding lens improves the abundance sensitivity of tandem mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, K. A.; Stevens, C. M.

    1969-01-01

    Ion-retarding lens which increases the abundance sensitivity of tandem magnetic-analyzer mass spectrometers measures isotopes of low abundance in mass positions adjacent to isotopes of high abundance. The lens increases the abundance sensitivity for isotopes lying farther from high abundance isotopes than the energy cutoff of the lens.

  12. Performance of and planned improvements to a mountain altitude cosmic ray mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. J.; Barber, H. B.; Bowen, T.; Delise, D. A.; Jenkins, E. W.; Kalbach, R. M.; Pifer, A. E.; Rothschild, R. E.; Thompson, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    A cosmic ray mass spectrometer with superconducting magnet, wire spark chambers, and time-of-flight scintillation counters has been operated at an altitude of 2750 meters. Various specifications of the spectrometer are presented and the method of event analysis described. Corrections to the data, resolutions and efficiencies of the spark chambers, and momentum resolution are discussed. Recent and planned improvements of the apparatus are indicated.

  13. Automatic control of the ion-illumination angle in a spark-source mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Conzemius, R J; Svec, H J

    1973-05-01

    Automatic adjustment of only the spark-gap width in a spark-source mass spectrometer does not ensure that optimum conditions of electrode geometry are maintained with respect to the ion-optics system. A device has been developed which simultaneously maintains a constant gap width and also a more constant z-axis ion-illumination angle. This is the first development to utilize ion-optics parameters to adjust the sparking electrodes automatically. The system maintains the electrodes in an optimum configuration such that higher and more constant instrument sensitivity is maintained automatically. In addition, a significant improvement in the precision of instrumental response is demonstrated. It appears that relative isotopic abundances can be determined directly by the spark-source method which are comparable to those obtained in some cases by surface ionization or by electron bombardment. Results are given that support this contention. PMID:18961307

  14. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ˜0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10-6-5.0 × 10-2 Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (PD2) and helium partial pressure (PHe) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if PD2 > 10-6 Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if PHe/PD2 > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning.

  15. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ∼0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10(-6)-5.0 × 10(-2) Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (PD2 ) and helium partial pressure (PHe) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if PD2 > 10(-6) Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if PHe/PD2 > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning. PMID:27036832

  16. Electro-optical detector for use in a wide mass range mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, Charles E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An electro-optical detector is disclosed for use in a wide mass range mass spectrometer (MS), in the latter the focal plane is at or very near the exit end of the magnetic analyzer, so that a strong magnetic field of the order of 1000G or more is present at the focal plane location. The novel detector includes a microchannel electron multiplier array (MCA) which is positioned at the focal plane to convert ion beams which are focused by the MS at the focal plane into corresponding electron beams which are then accelerated to form visual images on a conductive phosphored surface. These visual images are then converted into images on the target of a vidicon camera or the like for electronic processing. Due to the strong magnetic field at the focal plane, in one embodiment of the invention, the MCA with front and back parallel ends is placed so that its front end forms an angle of not less than several degrees, preferably on the order of 10.degree.-20.degree., with respect to the focal plane, with the center line of the front end preferably located in the focal plane. In another embodiment the MCA is wedge-shaped, with its back end at an angle of about 10.degree.-20.degree. with respect to the front end. In this embodiment the MCA is placed so that its front end is located at the focal plane.

  17. Performance report for the low energy compact radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometer at Uppsala University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehpour, M.; Håkansson, K.; Possnert, G.; Wacker, L.; Synal, H.-A.

    2016-03-01

    A range of ion beam analysis activities are ongoing at Uppsala University, including Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Various isotopes are used for AMS but the isotope with the widest variety of applications is radiocarbon. Up until recently, only the 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator had been used at our site for radiocarbon AMS, ordinarily using 12 MeV 14,13,12C3+ ions. Recently a new radiocarbon AMS system, the Green-MICADAS, developed at the ion physics group at ETH Zurich, was installed. The system has a number of outstanding features which will be described. The system operates at a terminal voltage of 175 kV and uses helium stripper gas, extracting singly charged carbon ions. The low- and high energy mass spectrometers in the system are stigmatic dipole permanent magnets (0.42 and 0.97 T) requiring no electrical power nor cooling water. The system measures both the 14C/12C and the 13C/12C ratios on-line. Performance of the system is presented for both standard mg samples as well as μg-sized samples.

  18. Operation and application of a new time-of-flight e-gas secondary neutral mass spectrometer (ToF-SNMS).

    PubMed

    Kopnarski, M; Lösch, J; Simeonov, L

    2009-04-01

    The low-pressure rf plasma of a secondary neutral mass spectrometer (e-gas SNMS) was connected with a time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometer for the first time. As opposed to ToF-SIMS in e-gas SNMS, the primary ion pulse cannot be used for triggering the flight time measurement. Therefore, an extraction pulse is used which at a defined time loads an ion package from the beam of the post-ionised particles into the ToF spectrometer. The newly developed ToF-SNMS system is described, and first experimental results are presented. PMID:19130045

  19. The application of simple mass spectrometers to planetary sub-surface sampling using penetrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Simon; Morse, Andrew; Bardwell, Max; Barber, Simeon; Wright, Ian

    2010-05-01

    Ptolemy is an ion trap based gas-chromatograph isotope ratio mass spectrometer which is on-board the Rosetta Lander [Wright et al., 2006; Todd et al., 2007]. The instrument uses the principles of MODULUS (Methods of Determining and Understanding Light Elements From Unequivocal Stable Isotope Compositions [Pillinger and Wright, 1993], to enable results obtained in space to be interpreted directly in the context of terrestrial analyses of meteorites and returned samples. MODULUS typically involves use of a complex sample processing system to purify and separate individual species from a complex starting sample, allowing analysis by a relatively simple, low resolution, but stable and precise mass spectrometer instrumentation. A number of exciting future mission opportunities are arising where it is unlikely that it will be feasible to incorporate the full MODULUS-style sample processing system. Of particular interest are missions that offer the opportunity to gain access to surface and sub-surface material through the deployment of mass spectrometers from either high-speed penetrator platforms [Smith et al., 2009] or from sub-surface penetrating mole devices deployed by soft landers [Richter et al., 2003]. We will present work aimed at overcoming the resolution restrictions of ion trap mass spectrometers. It is anticipated that this will enable MODULUS style science return from relatively simple instrumentation which is compatible with the future miniaturised sampling platforms currently under consideration for Mars, asteroids, comets and planetary moons. References: Wright I. P., Barber S. J., Morgan G. H., Morse A. D., Sheridan S., Andrews D. J., Maynard J., Yau D., Evans S. T., Leese M. R., Zarnecki J. C., Kent B. J., Waltham N. R., Whalley M. S., Heys S., Drummond D. L., Edeson R. L., Sawyer E. C., Turner R. F., and Pillinger C. T. (2006). Ptolemy - an instrument to measure stable isotopic ratios of key volatiles on a cometary nucleus. Space Science Reviews, 128

  20. Iodine-xenon studies and the relax mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Ash, R. D.; Lyon, I. C.; Johnston, W. A.; Hutchison, R.; Bridges, J. C.; Turner, G.

    1994-07-01

    RELAX combines a resonance ionization ion source with a cryogenic sample concentrator to achieve ultrasensitivity. Gas is extracted from samples using either a continuous wave laser microprobe based on an argon-ion laser or a filament microfurnace. Recent refinements in the operating procedure have resulted in optimum sensitivities such that detection rates of 1 cps are achieved from fewer than 500 atoms. A Xe-128 spike reservoir has also been added and characterized, allowing accurate determinations of absolute amounts of gas. We have completed a preliminary study of the iodine-xenon system in samples from the Bjurbole and Parnallee meteorites. Bjurbole chondrules ranging in mass from 5.45 mg to 260 micrograms were analyzed by laser microprobe. The results from these samples are consistent with an effectively uniform formation age, suggesting that the use of Bjurbole chondrules for calibration of this chronometer can be extended to samples in this size range. Samples from two chondrules from the Parnallee meteorite have been analyzed to date. An alpha-cristobalite-bearing chondrule (designated CB1) was found to have a formation age 4.62 +/- 0.44 Ma after Bjurboele, while a porphyritic olivine macrochondrule appears to have been reset after the decay of I-129(t1/2 17 Ma). Consideration of these results alongside Ar-Ar data from the macrochondrule and whole rock samples suggests that Parnallee has a complex history: The macrochondrule underwent an early postcrystallization degassing event but appears to have been essentially unaffected by the later (1.9 Ga) partial resetting of the bulk meteorite.

  1. A global thermospheric model based on mass spectrometer and incoherent scatter data MSIS. II - Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Reber, C. A.; Newton, G. P.; Spencer, N. W.; Brinton, H. C.; Mayr, H. G.; Potter, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of O, He, and Ar from neutral gas mass spectrometers on four satellites (Ogo 6, San Marco 3, Aeros A, and AEC-C) and inferred oxygen and hydrogen densities from an ion mass spectrometer on AE-C have been combined with a neutral temperature and nitrogen density model to produce a global model of thermospheric composition in terms of inferred variations at 120 km. The data set covers the time period from mid-1969 to mid-1975. The MSIS (mass spectrometer and incoherent scatter data) model is compared with the Ogo 6 model (Hedin et al., 1974). Ar variations at 120 km tend to be in phase with temperature variations and inverse to the He, O, and H variations.

  2. Resolution of nuclear ground and isomeric states by a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, G.; Kluge, H.; Koenig, M.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Stolzenberg, H. ); Moore, R.B.; Rouleau, G. ); Audi, G. )

    1992-12-01

    Ground and isomeric states of a nucleus have been resolved for the first time by mass spectrometry. Measurements on [sup 78]Rb[sup [ital m],][ital g] and [sup 84]Rb[sup [ital m],][ital g] were performed using a tandem Penning trap mass spectrometer on-line with the isotope separator ISOLDE/CERN. The effects of ion-ion interaction were investigated for two ion species differing in mass and stored simultaneously in the trap.

  3. Evaluating Mass Analyzers as Candidates for Small, Portable, Rugged Single Point Mass Spectrometers for Analysis of Permanent Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Ottens, Andrew K.; Diaz, Jorge A.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Follestein, Duke; Adams, Fredrick; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For Space Shuttle launch safety, there is a need to monitor the concentration of H2, He, O2 and Ar around the launch vehicle. Currently a large mass spectrometry system performs this task, using long transport lines to draw in samples. There is great interest in replacing this stationary system with several miniature, portable, rugged mass spectrometers which act as point sensors which can be placed at the sampling point. Five commercial and two non-commercial analyzers are evaluated. The five commercial systems include the Leybold Inficon XPR-2 linear quadrupole, the Stanford Research (SRS-100) linear quadrupole, the Ferran linear quadrupole array, the ThermoQuest Polaris-Q quadrupole ion trap, and the IonWerks Time-of-Flight (TOF). The non-commercial systems include a compact double focusing sector (CDFMS) developed at the University of Minnesota, and a quadrupole ion trap (UF-IT) developed at the University of Florida. The System Volume is determined by measuring the entire system volume including the mass analyzer, its associated electronics, the associated vacuum system, the high vacuum pump and rough pump. Also measured are any ion gauge controllers or other required equipment. Computers are not included. Scan Time is the time required for one scan to be acquired and the data to be transferred. It is determined by measuring the time required acquiring a known number of scans and dividing by said number of scans. Limit of Detection is determined first by performing a zero-span calibration (using a 10-point data set). Then the limit of detection (LOD) is defined as 3 times the standard deviation of the zero data set. (An LOD of 10 ppm or less is considered acceptable.)

  4. A differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap (DLQIT) mass spectrometer: a mass spectrometer capable of MS(n) experiments free from interfering reactions.

    PubMed

    Owen, Benjamin C; Jarrell, Tiffany M; Schwartz, Jae C; Oglesbee, Rob; Carlsen, Mark; Archibold, Enada F; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2013-12-01

    A novel differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap (DLQIT) mass spectrometer was designed and built to facilitate tandem MS experiments free from interfering reactions. The instrument consists of two differentially pumped Thermo Scientific linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) systems that have been connected via an ion transfer octupole encased in a machined manifold. Tandem MS experiments can be performed in the front trap and then the resulting product ions can be transferred via axial ejection into the back trap for further, independent tandem MS experiments in a differentially pumped area. This approach allows the examination of consecutive collision-activated dissociation (CAD) and ion-molecule reactions without unwanted side reactions that often occur when CAD and ion-molecule reactions are examined in the same space. Hence, it greatly facilitates investigations of ion structures. In addition, the overall lower pressure of the DLQIT, as compared to commercial LQIT instruments, results in a reduction of unwanted side reactions with atmospheric contaminants, such as water and oxygen, in CAD and ion-molecule experiments. PMID:24171553

  5. A prototype mass spectrometer for in situ analysis of cave atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Edward L.; Mandt, Kathleen E.; Mitchell, Evelynn J.; Mitchell, Joseph N.; Younkin, Kerri N.; Seifert, Clarissa M.; Williams, Gregg C.

    2012-10-01

    Research in cave environments has many applications: studying local hydrogeologic activity, paleoclimate studies, analyzing white nose syndrome in bat populations, analogs for underground atmospheres in mining facilities, carbon sequestration efforts, and terrestrial analogs for planetary caves. The atmospheres of many caves contain tracers of current geological and biological activity, but up to this point, in situ studies have been limited to sensors that monitor individual components of the cave atmosphere. A prototype cave mass spectrometer system was assembled from commercial off-the-shelf parts to conduct surveys of atmospheric compositions inside four local Texas caves and to perform atmospheric analysis of two aquifer wellheads to a depth of 60 m. We found increased levels of CO2 in all caves and, surprisingly, increased levels of O2 in Bracken Bat Cave. Aquifer wellhead measurements showed indications of methane, other hydrocarbons, and other constituents not anticipated.

  6. Mobile, outdoor continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer system for automated high-frequency 13C- and 18O-CO2 analysis for Keeling plot applications.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Hans; Schäufele, Rudi; Wenzel, Richard

    2004-01-01

    A continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS, custom-made GasBenchII and Delta(plus)Advantage, ThermoFinnigan) was installed on a grassland site and interfaced with a closed-path infrared gas analyser (IRGA). The CF-IRMS and IRGA were housed in an air-conditioned travel van. Air was sampled at 1.5 m above the 0.07-m tall grassland canopy, drawn through a 17-m long PTFE tube at a rate of 0.25 L s(-1), and fed to the IRGA and CF-IRMS in series. The IRMS was interfaced with the IRGA via a stainless steel capillary inserted 0.5 m into the sample air outlet tube of the IRGA (forming an open split), a gas-tight pump, and a sample loop attached to the eight-port Valco valve of the continuous-flow interface. Air was pumped through the 0.25-mL sample loop at 10 mL s(-1) (a flushing frequency of 40 Hz). Air samples were analysed at intervals of approx. 2.8 min. Whole system precision was tested in the field using air mixed from pure CO2 and CO2-free air by means of mass flow controllers. The standard deviation of repeated single measurements was 0.21-0.07 per thousand for delta13C and 0.34-0.14 per thousand for delta18O of CO2 in air with mixing ratios ranging between 200-800 micromol mol(-1). The CO2 peak area measured by the IRMS was proportional to the CO2 mixing ratio (r2 = 1.00), allowing estimation of sample air CO2 mixing ratio from IRMS data. A 1-day long measurement cycle of CO2, delta13C and delta18O of air sampled above the grassland canopy was used to test the system for Keeling plot applications. Delta18O exhibited a clear diurnal cycle (4 per thousand range), but short-term (1-h interval) variability was small (average SD 0.38 per thousand). Yet, the correlation between delta18O and CO2 mixing ratio was relatively weak, and this was true for both the whole data set and 1-h subsets. Conversely, the delta13C of all 541 samples measured during the 25.2-h interval fitted well the Keeling regression (r2 = 0.99), yielding an intercept of -27.40 per

  7. An online FT-ICR Penning-trap mass spectrometer for the DPS2-F section of the KATRIN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, M.; Ascher, P.; Cakirli, R. B.; Golzke, H.; Rodríguez, D.; Stahl, S.; Ubieto-Díaz, M.; Blaum, K.

    2014-09-01

    Two Fourier-transform ion-cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) Penning-trap mass spectrometers will be installed in the pumping section of the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment. This experiment aims at determining the electron anti-neutrino mass m(νebar) with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV (90% C.L.) by high-resolution tritium β-spectroscopy. The tritium source creates various types of ions, which have to be reduced in order to reach the required low background level. The purpose of the FT-ICR mass spectrometers is the identification of the ion flux components as well as their abundance. Furthermore, the pumping efficiency of the differential pumping section DPS2-F can be determined since these Penning traps will be installed one at the entrance and one at the exit. In this paper the operation of the FT-ICR system is described. Experimental results are presented concerning the cryogenic broad-band amplifier system for the FT-ICR detection as well as the characterisation of the mass spectrometer with respect to, e.g., noise density and detection limit.

  8. Reduction of determinate errors in mass bias-corrected isotope ratios measured using a multi-collector plasma mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, W.

    2015-05-01

    A nebulizer-centric instrument response function model of the plasma mass spectrometer was combined with a signal drift model, and the result was used to identify the causes of the non-spectroscopic determinate errors remaining in mass bias-corrected Pb isotope ratios (Tl as internal standard) measured using a multi-collector plasma mass spectrometer. Model calculations, confirmed by measurement, show that the detectable time-dependent errors are a result of the combined effect of signal drift and differences in the coordinates of the Pb and Tl response function maxima (horizontal offset effect). If there are no horizontal offsets, then the mass bias-corrected isotope ratios are approximately constant in time. In the absence of signal drift, the response surface curvature and horizontal offset effects are responsible for proportional errors in the mass bias-corrected isotope ratios. The proportional errors will be different for different analyte isotope ratios and different at every instrument operating point. Consequently, mass bias coefficients calculated using different isotope ratios are not necessarily equal. The error analysis based on the combined model provides strong justification for recommending a three step correction procedure (mass bias correction, drift correction and a proportional error correction, in that order) for isotope ratio measurements using a multi-collector plasma mass spectrometer.

  9. Instrument manual for the retarding ion mass spectrometer on Dynamics Explorer-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, S. A.; Baugher, C. R.; Chappell, C. R.; Reasoner, D. L.; Hammack, H. D.; Wright, W. W.; Hoffman, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The retarding ion mass spectrometer (RIMS) for Dynamics Explorer-1 is an instrument designed to measure the details of the thermal plasma distribution. It combines the ion temperature determining capability of the retarding potential analyzer with the compositional capabilities of the mass spectrometer and adds multiple sensor heads to sample all directions relative to the spacecraft ram direction. This manual provides a functional description of the RIMS, the instrument calibration, and a description of the commands which can be stored in the instrument logic to control its operation.

  10. Fiber laser FBG sensor system by using a spectrometer demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunjin; Song, Minho

    2011-05-01

    We suggest a spectrometer demodulation method of FBG sensors for the possible uses in wind power generator's blade monitoring. High signal-to-noise ratio outputs and linear demodulation were obtained by combining a fiber laser light source and a spectrometer which used a holographic volume grating and a 512-pixel PD array. Preliminary experimental results are presented to show the feasibility of the suggested FBG demodulation system.

  11. Study of Odor Approximation by Using Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Masashi; Nihei, Yasunori; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2011-09-01

    Since a set of odor components to cover wide range of smells has not been revealed yet, we studied the selection of odor components using essential-oil mass spectrum database. Basis vectors were extracted using non-negative matrix factorization method1 and then non-negative least squares method was used to determine the recipe. The odor approximations of three typical essential oils were confirmed by the sensory test. It was found that the mass spectrum data were correlated with the sensory test result. Moreover, this correlation was remarkable in the high m/z region.

  12. Towards the hand-held mass spectrometer: design considerations, simulation, and fabrication of micrometer-scaled cylindrical ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Matthew G.; Riter, Leah S.; Cruz, Dolores; Austin, Daniel E.; Wu, Guangxiang; Plass, Wolfgang R.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2004-08-01

    Breakthrough improvements in simplicity and reductions in the size of mass spectrometers are needed for high-consequence fieldable applications, including error-free detection of chemical/biological warfare agents, medical diagnoses, and explosives and contraband discovery. These improvements are most likely to be realized with the reconceptualization of the mass spectrometer, rather than by incremental steps towards miniaturization. Microfabricated arrays of mass analyzers represent such a conceptual advance. A massively parallel array of micrometer-scaled mass analyzers on a chip has the potential to set the performance standard for hand-held sensors due to the inherit selectivity, sensitivity, and universal applicability of mass spectrometry as an analytical method. While the effort to develop a complete micro-MS system must include innovations in ultra-small-scale sample introduction, ion sources, mass analyzers, detectors, and vacuum and power subsystems, the first step towards radical miniaturization lies in the design, fabrication, and characterization of the mass analyzer itself. In this paper we discuss design considerations and results from simulations of ion trapping behavior for a micrometer scale cylindrical ion trap (CIT) mass analyzer (internal radius r0 = 1 [mu]m). We also present a description of the design and microfabrication of a 0.25 cm2 array of 106 one-micrometer CITs, including integrated ion detectors, constructed in tungsten on a silicon substrate.

  13. New engineering design, instrument modeling, and data analysis techniques for spaceborne mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Daniel J.

    This work describes technological innovations that can be used to improve upon space-borne mass spectrometers (MS), enabling breakthrough science and the development of the next-generation of sensors. Emphasis is placed on the two classes of MS with the strongest spaceflight heritage: quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MS). For the QMS, higher order auxiliary excitation techniques are modeled and implemented for the first time for both commercial and spaceflight-like sensors. These techniques, through modest modification of instrument electronics, are shown to significantly improve upon the maximum attainable mass resolution, sensitivity, ion rejection efficiency, and stability of measured mass spectra. For the TOF-MS, a complete analysis of instrument noise sources is conducted, and a mathematical framework for instrument measurements is developed. Such a framework results in an end-to-end forward modeling of instrument noise, dataset signal-to-noise estimation, and noise event removal algorithms. The developed noise processing techniques are applied to the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) instrument on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft to enable the first ever mapping of the spatial distribution of heavy ions at Mercury, the first in situ measurements of solar wind heavy ion non-thermal properties in the inner heliosphere, as well as the first in situ measurements made inside of Earth's orbit of ionized helium originating from interstellar space.

  14. High Energy Collisions on Tandem Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotter, Robert J.

    2013-05-01

    Long before the introduction of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), Orbitraps, and any of the other tools that are now used ubiquitously for proteomics and metabolomics, the highest performance mass spectrometers were sector instruments, providing high resolution mass measurements by combining an electrostatic energy analyzer (E) with a high field magnet (B). In its heyday, the four sector mass spectrometer (or EBEB) was the crown jewel, providing the highest performance tandem mass spectrometry using single, high energy collisions to induce fragmentation. During a time in which quadrupole and tandem triple quadrupole instruments were also enjoying increased usage and popularity, there were, nonetheless, some clear advantages for sectors over their low collision energy counterparts. Time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers are high voltage, high vacuum instruments that have much in common with sectors and have inspired the development of tandem instruments exploiting single high energy collisions. In this retrospective, we recount our own journey to produce high performance TOFs and tandem TOFs, describing the basic theory, problems, and the advantages for such instruments. An experiment testing impulse collision theory (ICT) underscores the similarities with sector mass spectrometers where this concept was first developed. Applications provide examples of more extensive fragmentation, side chain cleavages, and charge-remote fragmentation, also characteristic of high energy sector mass spectrometers. Moreover, the so-called curved-field reflectron has enabled the design of instruments that are simpler, collect and focus all of the ions, and may provide the future technology for the clinic, for tissue imaging, and the characterization of microorganisms.

  15. Mass spectrometer for real-time metabolism monitoring during anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Levshankov, A. I.

    2012-06-01

    Mass-spectrometric monitoring of metabolism (CO2/O2) in the inspiration-expiration regime is used to estimate the anesthetic protection of the patient against surgical stimulation during combined anesthesia. A correlation between the anesthetic protection of the patient and the metabolic rate is demonstrated, and the periodic variation of the metabolic rate with time is found. The sevoflurane metabolism products and intravenous analgesic fentanyl are found in the blowing air of the patient during anesthesia.

  16. Data acquisition and instrument control system for neutron spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, S. S.; Kotwal, Ismat; Chandak, R. M.; Gaonkar, V. G.

    2004-08-01

    A personal computer (PC)-based data acquisition and instrument control system has been developed for neutron spectrometers in Dhruva reactor hall and Guide Tube laboratory. Efforts have been made to make the system versatile so that it can be used for controlling various neutron spectrometers using single end-on detector in step scan mode. Commercially available PC add-on cards have been used for input--output and timer-counter operations. An interface card and DC motor driver card have been developed indigenously. Software for the system has been written in Visual C++ language using MS Windows operating system. This data acquisition and instrument control system is successfully controlling four spectrometers at Dhruva reactor.

  17. Deep Space 1 Encounter With Comet Borrelly: Composition Measurements By The Pepe Ion Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisenfeld, D. B.; Nordholt, J. E.; Wiens, R. C.; Gary, S. P.; Steinberg, J. T.; Pepe Ion Mass Spectrometer Team

    On 22 September 2001 Deep Space One (DS1) successfully encountered Comet Bor- relly at a distance of closest approach of 2171 km. DS1 is, after Giotto, the second spacecraft bearing an ion-mass-resolving instrument to explore the plasma environ- ment of a comet. This mass spectrometer, called the Plasma Experiment for Planetary Exploration (PEPE), is capable of resolving the energy, angle of incidence, and mass composition of a wide range of solar system plasmas. Our preliminary analysis indi- cates that the predominant heavy ions observed during the seven minute interval about closest approach included approximately 63% OH+, 25% H2O+, and 8% CH3+. The ions O+, H3O+, and CH+ are likely present, but at abundances below clear detection. Because H3O+ is collisionally produced from H2O+, the relative absence of H3O+ measured by PEPE is consistent with the much lower activity of Borrelly compared with Halley, where H3O+ was the dominant ion at closest approach. Preliminary anal- ysis also shows a surprisingly high nitrogen to carbon ratio in this cometary plasma. Another new PEPE observation at Borrelly was the non-symmetric character of the water-group ion count rate, which varied approximately as r-3 over much of the /2 inbound approach, but scaled as r-1 on the outbound leg.

  18. Method for selective detection of explosives in mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at parts-per-quadrillion level

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2015-09-01

    A method for selective detection of volatile and non-volatile explosives in a mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at a parts-per-quadrillion level without preconcentration is disclosed. The method comprises the steps of ionizing a carrier gas with an ionization source to form reactant ions or reactant adduct ions comprising nitrate ions (NO.sub.3.sup.-); selectively reacting the reactant ions or reactant adduct ions with at least one volatile or non-volatile explosive analyte at a carrier gas pressure of at least about 100 Ton in a reaction region disposed between the ionization source and an ion detector, the reaction region having a length which provides a residence time (tr) for reactant ions therein of at least about 0.10 seconds, wherein the selective reaction yields product ions comprising reactant ions or reactant adduct ions that are selectively bound to the at least one explosive analyte when present therein; and detecting product ions with the ion detector to determine presence or absence of the at least one explosive analyte.

  19. Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer – Operational Performance Report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Watrous; Anthony Appelhans; Robert Hague; John Olson; Tracy Houghton

    2013-06-01

    The INL made an assessment of the commercially available inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers (ICPMS) for actinide analysis; emphasizing low detection limits for plutonium. INL scientists subsequently determined if plutonium was present on a swipe, at a 10 million atom decision level. This report describes the evaluation of ICPMS instruments and the operational testing of a new process for the dissolution, separation and analysis via ICPMS of swipes for plutonium and uranium. The swipe dissolution, plutonium and uranium isolation, separation and purification are wet chemistry methods following established procedures. The ICPMS is a commercially available multi-collector magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes five ion counting detectors operating simultaneously. The instrument includes a sample introduction system allowing for sample volumes of < 1 mL to be reproducibly injected into the instrument with minimal waste of the sample solution, while maximizing the useable signal. The performance of the instrument was measured using SRM 996 (244Pu spike) at concentrations of 12 parts per quadrillion (ppq, fg/mL) and with SRM 4350B Columbia River Sediment samples spiked onto swipes at the 10 million atom level. The measured limit of detection (LOD, defined as 3s) for 239Pu is 310,000 atoms based upon the instrument blank data. The limit of quantification (LOQ defined as 10 s) for 239Pu is 105,000 atoms. The measured limit of detection for 239Pu from the SRM 4350B spiked onto a swipe was 2.7 million atoms with the limit of quantification being 9.0 million atoms.

  20. Portable Mass Spectrometer Applications for In Situ Environmental Gas Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Timothy P.; Diaz, J. Andres; Arkin, C. Richard; Conejo, Elian

    2005-01-01

    Primary Goal of this project is to (1) Design/build a flexible system to monitor air contamination (2) Learn requirements for operating system in low pressure and low temperature environments (3) Design/build system for integration into aircraft and automobiles Secondary Goals/Offshoots are (1) Fly aboard different aircraft (2)Hand-carry unit (3) Drive unit in automobiles.

  1. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.W.; Martin, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer which can be broadly used for biomedical research. Tasks include: pulsed ion extraction to improve resolution; two-component matrices to enhance ionization; and solid phase DNA purification.

  2. AN EVALUATION OF THE HEWLETT-PACKARD 5993B GAS CHROMATOGRAPH-MASS SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives the results of an evaluation of a Hewlett-Packard Model 5993B computerized gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer. The evaluation was done according to the procedures found in EPA research report number EPA-600/4-80-025, 'Performance Tests for the Evaluation of Com...

  3. An ion mobility mass spectrometer for investigating photoisomerization and photodissociation of molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, B. D.; Coughlan, N. J. A.; Markworth, P. B.; Bieske, E. J.; Continetti, R. E.

    2014-12-15

    An ion mobility mass spectrometry apparatus for investigating the photoisomerization and photodissociation of electrosprayed molecular ions in the gas phase is described. The device consists of a drift tube mobility spectrometer, with access for a laser beam that intercepts the drifting ion packet either coaxially or transversely, followed by a quadrupole mass filter. An ion gate halfway along the drift region allows the instrument to be used as a tandem ion mobility spectrometer, enabling mobility selection of ions prior to irradiation, with the photoisomer ions being separated over the second half of the drift tube. The utility of the device is illustrated with photoisomerization and photodissociation action spectra of carbocyanine molecular cations. The mobility resolution of the device for singly charged ions is typically 80 and it has a mass range of 100-440 Da, with the lower limit determined by the drive frequency for the ion funnels, and the upper limit by the quadrupole mass filter.

  4. High precision electric gate for time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Edward C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer having a chamber with electrodes to generate an electric field in the chamber and electric gating for allowing ions with a predetermined mass and velocity into the electric field. The design uses a row of very thin parallel aligned wires that are pulsed in sequence so the ion can pass through the gap of two parallel plates, which are biased to prevent passage of the ion. This design by itself can provide a high mass resolution capability and a very precise start pulse for an ion mass spectrometer. Furthermore, the ion will only pass through the chamber if it is within a wire diameter of the first wire when it is pulsed and has the right speed so it is near all other wires when they are pulsed.

  5. Compositional Variability of the Solar Wind: The Need for an Ultra-High Temporal Resolution Mass Spectrometer for Studies of Solar Wind and Coronal Mass Ejection Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, M. L.; Sheldon, R. B.; Vaisberg, O.; Suess, S. T.; Gallagher, D. L.; Craven, P. D.; Hamilton, D. C.

    2004-05-01

    Current state-of-the-art solar wind mass spectroscopy has clearly demonstrated the compositional uniqueness between slow/fast solar wind streams and slow/fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). As such, solar wind composition measurements serve as an indicator of the sub-coronal and coronal processes responsible for the formation of these heliospheric features. While current instrumentation have identified temporal variations in solar wind/CME composition on the order of 10's of minutes, these detections have occurred during relatively quiescent periods, such as within the magnetic cloud portion of a CME, when temporal variations of the collective solar wind (including magnetic field variations) occur over periods in excess of the current minimum instrumental duty cycle of 5-minutes. Consequently, the compositional markers of the microphysics responsible for the formation of highly variable solar wind flows and for CME/prominence formation remain overlooked. To address the need for greater temporal resolution in solar wind compositional measurements, we have undertaken the development of a novel ultra-high temporal resolution ion mass spectrometer utilizing a helical ion path time-of-flight (TOF) system within a compact, low-mass, low-power instrument. The instrument is designed specifically to measure solar wind 3He+2 < M/q < 56Fe+6 ion plasmas from 0.3-20.0 keV/q with an order of magnitude greater geometric factor than current solar wind ion mass spectrometers, and produce 1-10 ms mass spectra with a mass resolution of M/Δ M ~ 200 or greater, all within a duty cycle of < 90-s. These characteristics achieve a resolution sufficient to probe spatial/temporal dimensions down to an ion gyroradius in solar wind flow boundaries at 1 AU. This paper presents an overview of solar wind mass spectroscopy results to date, justification for solar wind composition measurements of greater temporal resolution, and an introduction to the helical ion path mass spectrometer (HIPS

  6. Extended Evaluations of the Commercial Spectrometer Systems for Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duc T. Vo

    1999-08-01

    Safeguards applications require the best of the spectrometer system with excellent resolution, stability, and throughput. Instruments must perform well in all situations and environments. Data communication to the computer should be convenient, fast, and reliable. The software should have all the necessary tools and be easy to use. Portable systems should be small in size, lightweight, and have a long battery life. Nine commercially available spectrometer systems are tested with five different germanium detectors. Considering the performance of the Digital Signal Processors (DSP), digital-based spectroscope y may become the way of future gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  7. Detection of explosives as negative ions directly from surfaces using a miniature mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Nathaniel L; Kothari, Sameer; Huang, Guangming; Salazar, Gary; Cooks, R Graham

    2010-06-15

    A miniature mass spectrometer was modified by incorporating a conversion dynode detector system and the appropriate electronics to allow the detection of negatively charged ions. The system was fitted with a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface to allow external ionization by desorption electrospray ionization (DESI). It was used to identify the explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl-N-methylnitramine (Tetryl), and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX) present in trace amounts on surfaces (500 pg/cm(2) to 1 microg/cm(2)) both individually and as components of mixtures. Detection of explosives was demonstrated in the presence of an interfering matrix. A large surface (5 cm x15 cm) on which 1 microg/cm(2) samples of TNT, Tetryl, and HMX had been spotted randomly was interrogated in 22 s in the full scan mode, and signals characteristic of each of the explosives were observed in the DESI mass spectrum. PMID:20496904

  8. Hybrid BEEQ tandem mass spectrometer for the study of ion/surface collision processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winger, B. E.; Laue, H.-J.; Horning, S. R.; Julian, R. K., Jr.; Lammert, S. A.; Riederer, D. E., Jr.; Cooks, R. G.

    1992-12-01

    A hybrid mass spectrometer consisting of a magnetic sector, two electric sectors, and a quadrupole mass filter (BEEQ) has been built for the study of polyatomic ion/surface collision phenomena over the energy range of a few electron volts to several keV. Primary ions are generated by electron ionization or by chemical ionization, and the first two sectors are used to deliver a monoenergetic beam of ions, of a selected mass-to-charge m/z ratio, to a decelerator which sets the desired collision energy. The target, which can be introduced into the system without breaking vacuum, is mounted on a goniometer and situated in an electrically shielded region in the center of a large scattering chamber which contains an electric sector and a quadrupole mass analyzer used for kinetic energy and mass measurements on the ejected ions. These analyzers rotate around the scattering center to allow selection of the scattering angle of ions leaving the surface. Ultimate pressures attainable in the main scattering chamber are below 10-9 Torr allowing molecular targets, such as self-assembled monolayers of alkyl thiols on gold, to be examined without surface contamination. Low-energy (20-100 eV) collisions of polyatomic ions are reported, and examples are given of the effects of collision energy and scattering angle on surface induced dissociation mass spectra. The kinetic energy of the inelastically scattered ions is also measured, and in some cases, the internal energy can be estimated, the two measurements together providing information on energy partitioning associated with surface collisions. For example, it is shown that n-butylbenzene molecular ions of 25 eV colliding with ferrocenyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer surfaces, rebound with 10 eV of recoil energy and 3 eV of internal energy. The remainder of the energy goes into the surface. The capability of the BEEQ instrument to provide data on ion/surface reactive collisions is also illustrated with reactions such as alkyl

  9. Ion mobility spectrometer, spectrometer analyte detection and identification verification system, and method

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for ion mobility spectrometry and analyte detection and identification verification system are disclosed. The apparatus is configured to be used in an ion mobility spectrometer and includes a plurality of reactant reservoirs configured to contain a plurality of reactants which can be reacted with the sample to form adducts having varying ion mobilities. A carrier fluid, such as air or nitrogen, is used to carry the sample into the spectrometer. The plurality of reactants are configured to be selectively added to the carrier stream by use inlet and outlet manifolds in communication with the reagent reservoirs, the reservoirs being selectively isolatable by valves. The invention further includes a spectrometer having the reagent system described. In the method, a first reactant is used with the sample. Following a positive result, a second reactant is used to determine whether a predicted response occurs. The occurrence of the second predicted response tends to verify the existence of a component of interest within the sample. A third reactant can also be used to provide further verification of the existence of a component of interest. A library can be established of known responses of compounds of interest with various reactants and the results of a specific multi-reactant survey of a sample can be compared against the library to determine whether a component detected in the sample is likely to be a specific component of interest.

  10. Ray tracing package through a lens system and a spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Zurro, B.; King, P.W.; Lazarus, E.A.

    1980-03-01

    To study the light collection optics of the ISX-B two-dimensional (2-D) Thomson scattering system, we have implemented in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fusion Energy Division (FED) PDP-10 two computer programs, LENS and SPECT, that trace rays through a lens system and a spectrometer, respectively. The lens package follows the path of any kind of ray (meridional or skew) through a centered optical system formed by an arbitrary number of spherical surfaces. The spectrometer package performs geometrical ray tracing through a Czerney-Turner spectrometer and can be easily modified for studying any other configuration. Contained herein is a description of the procedures followed and a listing of the computer programs.

  11. Compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer with Ion Drifts, Temperatures and Neutral Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    In situ measurements of atmospheric neutral and ion composition and density, temperatures, ion drifts and neutral winds, are in high demand to study the dynamics of the ionosphere-theremosphere-mesosphere system. This paper presents a compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) with impended ion drifts and temperature, and neutral winds capability for in situ measurements of ions and neutrals H, He, N, O, N2, O2. The mass resolution M/dM is approximately 10 at an incoming energy range of 0-20eV. The goal is to resolve ion drifts in the range 0 to 3000m/sec with a resolution better than 50m/sec, and neutral winds in the range of 0 to 1000m/sec with similar resolution. For temperatures the goal is to cover a dynamic range of 0 to 5000K. The INMS is based on front end optics for ions and neutrals, pre acceleration, gated time of flight, top hat ESA, MCP detectors and compact electronics. The instrument is redundant for ions and neutrals with the ion and neutral sensor heads on opposite sides and with full electronics in the middle. The ion front end includes RPA for temperature scanning and neutral front end includes angular modulation and thermionic ionization and ion blocking grids. The electronics include fast electric gating, TOF electronics, TOF binning and C&DH digital electronics. The data package includes 400 mass bins each for ions and neutrals and key housekeeping data for instrument health and calibration. The data sampling can be commanded from 0.1 to 10 sec with 1sec nominal setting. The instrument has significant onboard storage capability and a data compression scheme. The mass spectrometer version of the instrument has been flown on the Exocube mission. The instrument occupied 1.5U volume, weighed only 560 g and required nominal power of 1.6W The ExoCube mission was designed to acquire global knowledge of in-situ densities of [H], [He], [O] and H+, He+, O+ in the upper ionosphere and lower exosphere in combination with incoherent scatter radar and

  12. Laser ablation-miniature mass spectrometer for elemental and isotopic analysis of rocks.

    PubMed

    Sinha, M P; Neidholdt, E L; Hurowitz, J; Sturhahn, W; Beard, B; Hecht, M H

    2011-09-01

    A laser ablation-miniature mass spectrometer (LA-MMS) for the chemical and isotopic measurement of rocks and minerals is described. In the LA-MMS method, neutral atoms ablated by a pulsed laser are led into an electron impact ionization source, where they are ionized by a 70 eV electron beam. This results in a secondary ion pulse typically 10-100 μs wide, compared to the original 5-10 ns laser pulse duration. Ions of different masses are then spatially dispersed along the focal plane of the magnetic sector of the miniature mass spectrometer (MMS) and measured in parallel by a modified CCD array detector capable of detecting ions directly. Compared to conventional scanning techniques, simultaneous measurement of the ion pulse along the focal plane effectively offers a 100% duty cycle over a wide mass range. LA-MMS offers a more quantitative assessment of elemental composition than techniques that detect ions directly generated by the ablation process because the latter can be strongly influenced by matrix effects that vary with the structure and geometry of the surface, the wavelength of the laser beam, and the not well characterized ionization efficiencies of the elements in the process. The above problems attendant to the direct ion analysis has been minimized in the LA-MMS by analyzing the ablated neutral species after their post-ionization by electron impaction. These neutral species are much more abundant than the directly ablated ions in the ablated vapor plume and are, therefore, expected to be characteristic of the chemical composition of the solid. Also, the electron impact ionization of elements is well studied and their ionization cross sections are known and easy to find in databases. Currently, the LA-MMS limit of detection is 0.4 wt.%. Here we describe LA-MMS elemental composition measurements of various minerals including microcline, lepidolite, anorthoclase, and USGS BCR-2G samples. The measurements of high precision isotopic ratios including (41)K

  13. DIRECT TRACE ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR USING ION TRAP MASS SPECTROMETERS WITH FILTERED NOISE FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two ion trap mass spectrometers and direct air sampling interfaces are being evaluated in the laboratory for monitoring toxic air pollutants in real time. he mass spectrometers are the large, laboratory-based Finnigan MAT ion trap (ITMS) and the compact, field-deployable Teledyne...

  14. Advanced integrated spectrometer designs for miniaturized optical coherence tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akca, B. I.; Považay, B.; Chang, L.; Alex, A.; Wörhoff, K.; de Ridder, R. M.; Drexler, W.; Pollnau, M.

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has enabled clinical applications that revolutionized in vivo medical diagnostics. Nevertheless, its current limitations owing to cost, size, complexity, and the need for accurate alignment must be overcome by radically novel approaches. Exploiting integrated optics, the central components of a spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) system can be integrated on a chip. Arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) spectrometers with their high spectral resolution and compactness are excellent candidates for on-chip SD-OCT systems. However, specific design-related issues of AWG spectrometers limit the performance of on-chip SD-OCT systems. Here we present advanced AWG designs which could overcome the limitations arising from free spectral range, polarization dependency, and curved focal plane of the AWG spectrometers. Using these advanced AWG designs in an SD-OCT system can provide not only better overall performance but also some unique aspects that a commercial system does not have. Additionally, a partially integrated OCT system comprising an AWG spectrometer and an integrated beam splitter, as well as the in vivo imaging using this system are demonstrated.

  15. Field testing of lake water chemistry with a portable and an AUV-based mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hemond, Harry F; Mueller, Amy V; Hemond, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Two mass spectrometers (MS) are tested for the measurement of volatile substances, such as hydrocarbons and metabolic gases, in natural waters. KOALA is a backpackable MS operated from above the water surface, in which samples are pumped through a flow cell using a syringe. NEREUS is an underwater instrument hosted by an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) that is linked to a communications network to provide chemical data in real time. The mass analyzers of the two MS are nearly identical cycloids, and both use flat-plate membrane inlets. Testing took place in an eutrophic, thermally stratified lake exhibiting steep chemical gradients and significant levels of methane. KOALA provided rapid multispecies analysis of dissolved gases, with a detection limit for methane of 0.1 ppm (readily extendable to 0.01 ppm) and savings of time of at least a factor of 10 compared to that of conventional analysis. The AUV-mounted NEREUS additionally provided rapid spatial coverage and the capability of performing chemical surveys autonomously. Tests demonstrated the need for temperature control of a membrane inlet when steep thermal gradients are present in a water body, as well as the benefits of co-locating all sensors on the AUV to avoid interference from chemically different waters entering and draining from the free-flooding outer hull. The ability to measure dissolved volatiles provided by MS offers potential for complementarity with ionic sensors in the study of natural waters, such as in the case of the carbonate system. PMID:18468452

  16. Broadscale resolving power performance of a high precision uniform field ion mobility-mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    May, Jody C; Dodds, James N; Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Stafford, George C; Fjeldsted, John C; McLean, John A

    2015-10-21

    An extensive study of two current ion mobility resolving power theories ("conditional" and "semi-empirical") was undertaken using a recently developed drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometer. The current study investigates the quantitative agreement between experiment and theory at reduced pressure (4 Torr) for a wide range of initial ion gate widths (100 to 500 μs), and ion mobility values (K0 from 0.50 to 3.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) representing measurements obtained in helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide drift gas. Results suggest that the conditional resolving power theory deviates from experimental results for low mobility ions (e.g., high mass analytes) and for initial ion gate widths beyond 200 μs. A semi-empirical resolving power theory provided close-correlation of predicted resolving powers to experimental results across the full range of mobilities and gate widths investigated. Interpreting the results from the semi-empirical theory, the performance of the current instrumentation was found to be highly linear for a wide range of analytes, with optimal resolving powers being accessible for a narrow range of drift fields between 14 and 17 V cm(-1). While developed using singly-charged ion mobility data, preliminary results suggest that the semi-empirical theory has broader applicability to higher-charge state systems. PMID:26191544

  17. First Signal on the Cryogenic Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng; Mathur, Raman; Aizikov, Kostantin; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    The construction and achievement of the first signal on a cryogenic Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS) are reported here, demonstrating proof-of-concept of this new instrument design. Building the FTICR cell into the cold bore of a superconducting magnet provided advantages over conventional warm bore design. At 4.2 K, the vacuum system cryopumps itself, thus removing the requirement for a large bore to achieve the desired pumping speed for maintaining base pressure. Furthermore, because the bore diameter has been reduced, the amount of magnet wire needed to achieve high field and homogeneity was also reduced, greatly decreasing the cost/Tesla of the magnet. The current instrument implements an actively shielded 14-Tesla magnet of vertical design with an external matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) source. The first signal was obtained by detecting the laser desorbed/ionized (LDI) C60+• ions, with the magnet at 7 Tesla, unshimmed, and the preamplifier mounted outside of the vacuum chamber at room temperature. A subsequent experiment done with the magnet at 14 Tesla and properly shimmed produced a C60 spectrum showing ∼350,000 resolving power at m/z ∼720. Increased magnetic field strength improves many FTMS performance parameters simultaneously, particularly mass resolving power and accuracy. PMID:17931882

  18. A Virtual Research Environment for a Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenbeck, M.; Schäfer, L.; Klump, J.; Galkin, A.

    2013-12-01

    Overview: This poster describes the development of a Virtual Research Environment for the Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) at GFZ Potsdam. Background: Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometers (SIMS) are extremely sensitive instruments for analyzing the surfaces of solid and thin film samples. These instruments are rare, expensive and experienced operators are very highly sought after. As such, measurement time is a precious commodity, until now only accessible to small numbers of researchers. The challenge: The Virtual SIMS Project aims to set up a Virtual Research Environment for the operation of the CAMECA IMS 1280-HR instrument at the GFZ Potsdam. The objective of the VRE is to provide SIMS access not only to researchers locally present in Potsdam but also to scientists working with SIMS cooperation partners in e.g., South Africa, Brazil or India. The requirements: The system should address the complete spectrum of laboratory procedures - from online application for measurement time, to remote access for data acquisition to data archiving for the subsequent publication and for future reuse. The approach: The targeted Virtual SIMS Environment will consist of a: 1. Web Server running the Virtual SIMS website providing general information about the project, lab access proposal forms and calendar for the timing of project related tasks. 2. LIMS Server, responsible for scheduling procedures, data management and, if applicable, accounting and billing. 3. Remote SIMS Tool, devoted to the operation of the experiment within a remote control environment. 4. Publishing System, which supports the publication of results in cooperation with the GFZ Library services. 5. Training Simulator, which offers the opportunity to rehearse experiments and to prepare for possible events such as a power outages or interruptions to broadband services. First results: The SIMS Virtual Research Environment will be mainly based on open source software, the only exception being the CAMECA IMS

  19. Note: A novel dual-channel time-of-flight mass spectrometer for photoelectron imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Zhengbo; Wu Xia; Tang Zichao

    2013-06-15

    A novel dual-channel time-of-flight mass spectrometer (D-TOFMS) has been designed to select anions in the photoelectron imaging measurements. In this instrument, the radiation laser can be triggered precisely to overlap with the selected ion cloud at the first-order space focusing plane. Compared with that of the conventional single channel TOFMS, the in situ mass selection performance of D-TOFMS is significantly improved. Preliminary experiment results are presented for the mass-selected photodetachment spectrum of F{sup -} to demonstrate the capability of the instrument.

  20. A Dual Source Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer of ExoMars 2018

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickerhoff, William B.; vanAmerom, F. H. W.; Danell, R. M.; Arevalo, R.; Atanassova, M.; Hovmand, L.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cotter, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present details on the objectives, requirements, design and operational approach of the core mass spectrometer of the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on the 2018 ExoMars mission. The MOMA mass spectrometer enables the investigation to fulfill its objective of analyzing the chemical composition of organic compounds in solid samples obtained from the near surface of Mars. Two methods of ionization are realized, associated with different modes of MOMA operation, in a single compact ion trap mass spectrometer. The stringent mass and power constraints of the mission have led to features such as low voltage and low frequency RF operation [1] and pulse counting detection.

  1. Design of camera and spectrometer dual-use system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yong-hong; Xue, Bin; Zhao, Yi-yi; Tao, Jin-you

    2013-08-01

    Imaging spectrometers based on prism-grating-prism (PGP) have advantage of direct vision, as a basis for the design of an optical system for a spectrometer and camera dual-use, the system can plug the light splitting element to switch between the spectrometer and camera. This paper has discussed the working principles and structure of the PGP and spectrometer, collimating and focusing lens design principles, then the design result has been presented. The spectral range of the system is 400-800nm, the pixel size of CCD used is 10um × 10um, 1010 × 1018 pixels, the object space numerical aperture is 0.1. In order to reduce the cost and eliminate aberration, collimating lens and focusing lens have symmetric structure, in order to improve the diffraction efficiency, PGP uses the volume phase holographic transmission grating. After optimization the design by ZEMAX software, the whole spectral range resolution is better than 1nm in average, the MTF at Nyquist frequency is greater than 0.7, the length of the whole system is 87mm.

  2. Optical system for high resolution spectrometer/monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Hettrick, Michael C.; Underwood, James H.

    1988-01-01

    An optical system for use in a spectrometer or monochromator employing a mirror which reflects electromagnetic radiation from a source to converge with same in a plane. A straight grooved, varied-spaced diffraction grating receives the converging electromagnetic radiation from the mirror and produces a spectral image for capture by a detector, target or like receiver.

  3. Rocket-borne Ion Mass Spectrometer for the Mesosphere That is Pumped by Rocket Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Smith, Steven; Robertson, Scott

    The mesospheric region close to the mesopause is populated by electrons, ions and aerosol particles. The number density of aerosol particles may exceed that of the background plasma creating conditions where the free electron density is reduced. Understanding the full charge balance of the region requires the simultaneous detection of electrons, charged aerosol particles and ions. Rocket borne instruments for the measurement of electrons and aerosols are readily available. Mass spectrometers for ions have been flown that were evacuated by cryogenic vacuum pumps with liquid helium or neon. There have not been flights since 1993 because these instruments required expensive deliveries of cryogens and frequent refilling. Advances in (1) aerodynamic modeling, (2) mass spectrometer design, and (3) ion detection technology make possible a new approach to mass spectrometry in the mesosphere in which the spectrometer is pumped by the flow around the rocket. A miniature Rotating Field Mass Analyzer (RFMS) is presented that is suitable for the measurement of ions in from 70 km upward. RFMS has a 2 x 2 x 20 mm3 velocity selection cell and utilizes and advanced ion detector that is capable of single ions operation mode at these altitudes. The instrument is pumped by the aerodynamic effect of the supersonic payload. A prototype version of RFMS is under laboratory testing.

  4. Developments of multiplexed and miniature two-dimensional quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Scott A.

    Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (QIT MS) is a powerful and commonly-employed method for the specific analysis of mass, composition, and structure of gas-phase ionic chemical species. Useful for a wide variety of tasks, applications of ion traps include environmental monitoring, surface analysis (including depth profiling and imaging), ion thermochemical property elucidation, protein and DNA sequencing, and high-resolution chemical separations (through ion soft-landing). Though the principles of QIT MS have been known for over half a century, innovations in instrumentation and applications continue. As new needs for specific and sensitive chemical analysis arise, so also do new and more efficient analytical devices and methods of analysis. Such a trend is exemplified through the construction of a dual-source QIT mass spectrometer (described herein) capable of multi-source chemical analyses for the purposes of enhanced proteomic sequence coverage and for the strictly-controlled comparison of the structural differences in ion populations generated by different ionization techniques. Furthermore, as mass spectrometry becomes increasingly commonplace outside the bounds of the analytical laboratory, demand for capable researcher equipment is also increasing. Advances in instrument performance, such as can be had through enhanced power efficiency and the enabling of chemical analysis of high mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) species (e.g., proteins), will open new doors to in situ chemical analysis hand-portable mass spectrometers. Hence, research into new mass analyzer designs and methods of fabrication using stereolithography apparatus (SLA) for the purpose of creating enhanced-performance mass spectrometers are accordingly described in the text of this dissertation.

  5. Study and evaluation of impulse mass spectrometers for ion analysis in the D and E regions of the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical analyses were made of planar, cylindrical and spherical electrode time-of-flight mass spectrometers in order to optimize their operating conditions. A numerical analysis of potential barrier gating in time-of-flight spectrometers was also made. The results were used in the design of several small mass spectrometers. These were constructed and tested in a laboratory space simulator. Detailed experimental studies of a miniature cylindrical electrode time of flight mass spectrometer and of a miniature hemispherical electrode time of flight mass spectrometer were made. The extremely high sensitivity of these instruments and their ability to operate at D region pressures with an open source make them ideal instruments for D region ion composition measurements.

  6. Design of a double Penning-trap mass spectrometer for high-precision mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnayake, Ishara; Bryce, Richard; Hawks, Paul; Hunt, Curtis; Redshaw, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    The mass of an atom plays an important role in various fields throughout science. As such, there is a need for precise mass determinations on a wide range of isotopes. At Central Michigan University we are developing a Penning trap to focus on ultra-high precision measurements of long-lived radioactive isotopes and isotopes that have low natural abundances. The Penning trap we are constructing will consist of a double precision measurement trap structure for simultaneous cyclotron frequency comparisons to eliminate the effect of magnetic field fluctuations. An additional, cylindrical Penning trap will be used to capture ions from external ion sources, eliminate contaminant ions and transfer the ions of interest to the precision traps. In this poster we will present the design of the Penning trap system, and report on the current status of the project. This work supported in part by NSF award no. 1307233.

  7. Insertion of an electron beam ionizer in a quadrupole spectrometer for secondary neutral mass analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameziane, O.; Blanco, J. M.; Serrano, J. J.; Guzmán, B.; Aguilar, M.

    2003-06-01

    An insertable electron beam ionizer into a quadrupole-based secondary ion mass spectrometer instrument has been designed and installed to analyze sputtered neutrals. The optimum design conditions of the ionizer have been obtained by modeling various configurations of the system using a simulation program developed by us. The program has allowed us to compute the potentials and ion trajectories inside the system to test the performance of the ion optics design. We have investigated the advantages of using a large ionization volume with low electron current to minimize the space charge effect in the ionizer, as this is the major problem in this type of instrument. In addition, we have used the simulations to obtain all electrodes voltages which provide an efficient suppression of residual gas and secondary ions. A good useful yield was obtained, even with low electron densities, thanks to the high geometrical acceptance of the ionizer and its large active volume. This configuration implies less thermal radiation in the ionizer and, in addition, a longer life time of the filament. Although the signal of residual gas not suppressed (i.e. in residual gas mode) is two orders of magnitude higher than the signal of sputtered neutrals, we have achieved a good background suppression.

  8. Ultrasensitive leak detection during ultrahigh vacuum evacuation by quadrupole mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xu; Huang Tianbin; Wang Ligong; Jin Qiji; Cha Liangzhen

    2006-01-15

    One must do ultrasensitive leak detection during ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) evacuation, especially just before the device is sealed off from the vacuum system, to guarantee the longevity of the sealed high-vacuum or even UHV devices with small volume. A quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) with an UHV evacuation system can be used under accumulation mode to do the testing. Possible accumulate modes, as well as their advantages and shortcomings, are studied experimentally and discussed in this paper. We found that the opening action of the metal valve during accumulation mode always severely affects the height of the peak indicated by QMS and causes considerable errors. If we determine the leak rate by the peak area instead of the peak height, the situation is much improved. This method has proven quite useful in ensuring the tightness quality for complex sealed UHV devices with small volumes. Ultrasensitive leak detection has been carried out for such real evacuating devices, and a leak rate of 2x10{sup -14} Pa{center_dot}m{sup 3}/s was detected, which is far lower than its dynamic mode and the detection limit of the current advanced commercial leak detectors.

  9. Incorporation of a Flared Inlet Capillary Tube on a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Si; Zhang, Kai; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Bruce, James E.; Prior, David C.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    2006-04-17

    Atmospheric pressure ion sources such as electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (AP-MALDI) are widely used with mass spectrometry for proteomics studies. Other newly developed atmospheric ion sources include desorption electrospray ionization (DESI). For these ionization methods, analyte ions created at atmospheric pressure are transferred to the high vacuum region for mass analysis after several stages of differential pumping. It has been reported that overall charge transmission between the ion source and the first vacuum stage is primarily dependent upon the proximity of the emitter and gas conductance of the interface inlet. We therefore developed an atmospheric pressure interface using flared inlet tubes. This report highlights our results obtained by coupling the customized flared inlet tubes with a Fourier transfer ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICRMS). We have also investigated the new interface with different types of atmospheric pressure ionization methods. For most of the ionization methods we investigated, such as ESI and DESI, increased ion current transmitted from the atmospheric pressure ion source to the first stage vacuum system was observed with the use of our enhanced ion inlet designs. The ion intensity that was detected with the flared inlet tube on a FT-ICRMS was also observed to increase {approx} 2-5 fold using ESI or DESI with the flared tube inlet. Moreover, increased spray tip positional tolerance was observed with implementation of the flared inlet tube. We also include our preliminary results obtained by coupling APMALDI with flared inlet tube in this paper. For AP-MALDI, the measured ion current transferred through the flared inlet tube was about 3 times larger than the ion current through the control non-flared inlet tube.

  10. New mass measurement of {sup 6}Li and ppb-level systematic studies of the Penning trap mass spectrometer TITAN

    SciTech Connect

    Brodeur, M.; Ettenauer, S.; Smith, M.; Dilling, J.; Brunner, T.; Champagne, C.; Lapierre, A.; Ringle, R.; Ryjkov, V. L.; Delheij, P.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.

    2009-10-15

    The frequency ratio of {sup 6}Li to {sup 7}Li was measured using the TITAN Penning trap mass spectrometer. This measurement resolves a 16-ppb discrepancy between the {sup 6}Li mass of 6.015 122 795(16) u from the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2003 (AME03), which is based on a measurement by JILATRAP, and the more recent measurement of 6.015 122 890(40) u by SMILETRAP. Our measurement agrees with SMILETRAP and a more precise mass value for {sup 6}Li of 6.015 122 889(26) u is presented along with systematic evaluations of the measurement uncertainties. This result makes {sup 6}Li a solid anchor point for future mass measurements on highly charged ions with m/q{approx}6.

  11. Research on design method of spaceborne imaging spectrometer system based on telecentric optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaomei; Liu, Hua

    2015-08-01

    Imaging spectrometer is widely applied in the field of space remote sensing. Dispersion imaging spectrometer with prism or grating is developed rapidly and used widely. It is developed to the direction of high performance and miniaturization, such as large field of view, high resolution, small volume, etc. For meeting the demand of the development, by comparing the characteristics and the situation of development and application about the two kinds of spectrometer, based on the imaging theory of telecentric optical system, the article studied a design method of prism dispersion imaging spectrometer with telecentric Off-axis Three-Mirror imaging system. The instrument designed by using this method has smaller volume and weight than traditional instrument. It overcomes the biggest defect that traditional prism dispersion imaging spectrometer is bigger, increases its advantages in actual use in contrast to grating dispersion imaging spectrometer, and promotes the development and application of prism dispersion imaging spectrometer.

  12. Atomic oxygen-metal surface studies as applied to mass spectrometer measurements of upper planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjolander, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of atomic oxygen loss in mass spectrometer ion sources can be reduced to an understanding of the possible surface interactions between oxygen atoms and the metal surface of the ion source. Results are presented for an experimental study in which an atomic oxygen beam apparatus and a mass spectrometer were used to measure the oxygen atom reflection, recombination, general surface reaction, and occlusion probabilities on six different engineering surfaces as a function of atomic oxygen exposure. The materials studied are gold, Nichrome V, aluminum, titanium, silver, and platinum. The variation in measured reflection probability seems to occur with metals that form oxides, Nichrome V being stable in terms of reflection stability. Recombination is observed an all surfaces except aluminum and platinum. Variation in the complete set of measurements in a single experiment is the result of varying surface conditions.

  13. The Multiplexed Chemical Kinetic Photoionization Mass Spectrometer: A New Approach To Isomer-resolved Chemical Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, David L.; Zou, Peng; Johnsen, Howard; Hayden, Carl C.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Knyazev, Vadim D.; North, Simon W.; Peterka, Darcy S.; Ahmed, Musahid; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-08-28

    We have developed a multiplexed time- and photon-energy?resolved photoionizationmass spectrometer for the study of the kinetics and isomeric product branching of gasphase, neutral chemical reactions. The instrument utilizes a side-sampled flow tubereactor, continuously tunable synchrotron radiation for photoionization, a multi-massdouble-focusing mass spectrometer with 100percent duty cycle, and a time- and positionsensitive detector for single ion counting. This approach enables multiplexed, universal detection of molecules with high sensitivity and selectivity. In addition to measurement of rate coefficients as a function of temperature and pressure, different structural isomers can be distinguished based on their photoionization efficiency curves, providing a more detailed probe of reaction mechanisms. The multiplexed 3-dimensional data structure (intensity as a function of molecular mass, reaction time, and photoionization energy) provides insights that might not be available in serial acquisition, as well as additional constraints on data interpretation.

  14. Re-examination of radiofrequency mass spectrometers: Center Director's Discretionary Fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The three-stage, two-cycle, Bennett mass spectrometers in use in space and ground experiments today are of the same physical configuration as developed by Bennett in 1950. Sine-wave radiofrequency (RF) is also still used. The literature indicates that the electronics and physical manufacturing capabilities of 1950 technology may have limited the use of other improvements at that time. Therefore, a study, experimental and analytical, was undertaken to examine previously rejected RF approaches as well as new ones. The results of this study indicate there are other approaches which use fewer grids and square wave or a combination of square-wave and sine-wave RF. In regard to suppression of harmonics, none performed better than the three-stage, two-cycle, Bennett mass spectrometer. Use of square-wave RF in the Bennett approach can provide a slightly more compact configuration but no increase in throughput.

  15. Halley comet dust particle classification according to the data obtained by mass spectrometer Puma-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikov, Yu. P.; Evlanov, E. N.; Fomenkova, M. N.; Mukhin, L. M.; Nazarov, M. A.; Prilutsky, O. F.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Zubkov, B. V.

    Nonzero mode spectra of the dust component of Comet Halley obtained by the dust particle impact mass-spectrometer, Puma-1, on Vega, are used to examine the origin of the mineral phase. The element compositions of 511 cometary particles are studied, using data on ions of Na, Ca, C, H, N, S, Si, Mg, Fe, Cr, and Al. The results are used to determine the mineral composition of the dust of Comet Halley.

  16. SUDA: A Dust Mass Spectrometer for Compositional Surface Mapping for a Mission to Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, S.; Altobelli, N.; Briois, C.; Grün, E.; Horanyi, M.; Postberg, F.; Schmidt, J.; Srama, R.; Sternovsky, Z.; Tobie, G.; Zolotov, M.

    2014-04-01

    We developed a dust mass spectrometer to measure the composition of ballistic dust particles populating the thin exospheres that were detected around each of the Galilean moons. Since these grains are direct samples from the moons' icy surfaces, unique composition data will be obtained that will help to define and constrain the geological activities on and below the moons? surface. The proposed instrument will make a vital contribution to NASA's planned Europa Clipper mission and provide key answers to its main scientific questions about the surface composition, habitability, the icy crust, and exchange processes with the deeper interior of the Jovian icy moon Europa. The SUrface Dust Aanalyser (SUDA) is a time-offlight, reflectron-type impact mass spectrometer, optimised for a high mass resolution which only weakly depends on the impact location. The small size (268×250×171 mm3), low mass (< 4 kg) and large sensitive area (220 cm2) makes the instrument well suited for the challenging demands of the Europa Clipper mission. A full-size prototype SUDA instrument was built in order to demonstrate its performance through calibration experiments at the dust accelerator at NASA's IMPACT institute at Boulder, CO with a variety of cosmochemically relevant dust analogues. The effective mass resolution of m/∆m of 200-250 is achieved for mass range of interest m = 1-250.

  17. Analysis and System Design Framework for Infrared Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, B.J.; Smith, B.W.; Laubscher, B.E.; Villeneuve, P.V.; Briles, S.D.

    1999-04-05

    The authors present a preliminary analysis and design framework developed for the evaluation and optimization of infrared, Imaging Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) electro-optic systems. Commensurate with conventional interferometric spectrometers, SHS modeling requires an integrated analysis environment for rigorous evaluation of system error propagation due to detection process, detection noise, system motion, retrieval algorithm and calibration algorithm. The analysis tools provide for optimization of critical system parameters and components including : (1) optical aperture, f-number, and spectral transmission, (2) SHS interferometer grating and Littrow parameters, and (3) image plane requirements as well as cold shield, optical filtering, and focal-plane dimensions, pixel dimensions and quantum efficiency, (4) SHS spatial and temporal sampling parameters, and (5) retrieval and calibration algorithm issues.

  18. A Compact, Fast, Wide-Field Imaging Spectrometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis; VanGorp, Byron E.; White, Victor E.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Hebert, Daniel; Feldman, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We present test results from a compact, fast (F/1.4) imaging spectrometer system with a 33 degree field of view, operating in the 450-1650 nm wavelength region with an extended response InGaAs detector array. The system incorporates a simple two-mirror telescope and a steeply concave bilinear groove diffraction grating made with gray scale x-ray lithography techniques. High degree of spectral and spatial uniformity (97%) is achieved.

  19. DI-aries panoramic energy-mass spectrometer of ions for the Phobos-Grunt project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaisberg, O. L.; Koinash, G. V.; Moiseev, P. P.; Avanov, L. A.; Smirnov, V. N.; Letunovskii, V. V.; Myagkikh, V. D.; Ton'shev, A. K.; Leibov, A. V.; Skalski, A. A.; Berezanskii, D. P.; Gorn, L. S.; Konovalov, A. A.

    2010-10-01

    One of the main goals of the Phobos-Grunt project is to analyze the surface composition of Phobos. Plasma methods of the studies make it possible to complete direct surface studies with measurements of the minor components of the solar wind, which are produced when a material sputtered from the surface of Phobos is ionized. The surface of Phobos is sputtered under the action of solar wind protons, energetic ions, hard solar radiation, and meteorites. In addition to the studies of Phobos, the experiment also includes the study of the interaction between the solar wind and Mars. An energy-mass spectrometer, which makes it possible to measure instantaneously complete unobscured distribution of the flux of different ions in the hemisphere, has been designed based on the new CAMERA analyzer of charged particles proposed previously (Vaisberg et al., 2001, 2005; Vaisberg, 2003). The instrument’s electro-optics model and the results of the numerical and laboratory tests are described in this paper. Such an instrument can be used in magnetospheric studies and to study different objects of the Solar System.

  20. Mass-spectrometer method for determining helium in the parts-per-million to 10-percent range. Rept. of Investigations/1991

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines has developed a mass spectrometer method for determining helium in the parts-per-million to 10-pct range to an accuracy of + or {minus} 1 pct. The method employs a mass spectrometer, an inlet system utilizing a chromatographic gas-sampling valve, and an activated coconut charcoal trap cooled with liquid nitrogen. Gravimetrically prepared standards of helium in nitrogen were used to demonstrate the linearity of the method over the concentration range of 10 ppm to 10.66 pct helium.

  1. A program for mass spectrometer control and data processing analyses in isotope geology; written in BASIC for an 8K Nova 1120 computer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Hope, J.

    1975-01-01

    A system is described which uses a minicomputer to control a surface ionization mass spectrometer in the peak switching mode, with the object of computing isotopic abundance ratios of elements of geologic interest. The program uses the BASIC language and is sufficiently flexible to be used for multiblock analyses of any spectrum containing from two to five peaks. In the case of strontium analyses, ratios are corrected for rubidium content and normalized for mass spectrometer fractionation. Although almost any minicomputer would be suitable, the model used was the Data General Nova 1210 with 8K memory. Assembly language driver program and interface hardware-descriptions for the Nova 1210 are included.

  2. Direct Analysis of Nonvolatile Chemical Compounds on Surfaces Using a Hand-Held Mass Spectrometer with Synchronized Discharge Ionization Function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Synchronized discharge ionization (SDI) was previously developed for hand-held mass spectrometers with discontinuous atmospheric pressure interfaces. The function of SDI has been demonstrated for analysis of volatile organic compounds in air at high sensitivity, which is attributed to the fact that ions were produced next to the ion trap mass analyzer inside the vacuum manifold. In this study, a simple sampling device was designed and fitted to a hand-held mass spectrometer to characterize its potential in direct analysis of low-volatility chemicals on surfaces. Nine chemicals of vapor pressures ranging from 10(-4) to 10(-8) Torr (at room temperature), including pesticides, illicit drugs, and explosives, were selected to evaluate and demonstrate the analytical capability of the designed system. Compounds of vapor pressures below 10(-7) Torr, such as tetryl, cocaine, and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), have been successfully detected. Direct analysis of pesticides from fruit and explosives from a large surface area has also been demonstrated. Tandem mass analysis was performed, which helped to confirm the analyte identity as well as to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). PMID:26618852

  3. Global model of longitude/UT variations in thermospheric composition and temperature based on mass spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Reber, C. A.; Spencer, N. W.; Brinton, H. C.; Kayser, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of N2, O, He, and Ar densities from neutral gas mass spectrometers on four satellites and inferred O2 and H densities from an ion mass spectrometer have been combined to produce a model of longitude/UT variations in thermospheric neutral composition and temperature. The longitude/UT model is an extension of the mass spectrometer-incoherent scatter thermospheric model (Hedin et al., 1977) and uses spherical harmonic terms dependent on geographic latitude, longitude, and UT. The combined longitude and UT variations reflect the influence of the geomagnetic field but indicate that the variations may not simply be represented in magnetic coordinates.

  4. Ion neutral mass spectrometer results from the first flyby of Titan.

    PubMed

    Waite, J Hunter; Niemann, Hasso; Yelle, Roger V; Kasprzak, Wayne T; Cravens, Thomas E; Luhmann, Janet G; McNutt, Ralph L; Ip, Wing-Huen; Gell, David; De La Haye, Virginie; Müller-Wordag, Ingo; Magee, Brian; Borggren, Nathan; Ledvina, Steve; Fletcher, Greg; Walter, Erin; Miller, Ryan; Scherer, Stefan; Thorpe, Rob; Xu, Jing; Block, Bruce; Arnett, Ken

    2005-05-13

    The Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) has obtained the first in situ composition measurements of the neutral densities of molecular nitrogen, methane, molecular hydrogen, argon, and a host of stable carbon-nitrile compounds in Titan's upper atmosphere. INMS in situ mass spectrometry has also provided evidence for atmospheric waves in the upper atmosphere and the first direct measurements of isotopes of nitrogen, carbon, and argon, which reveal interesting clues about the evolution of the atmosphere. The bulk composition and thermal structure of the moon's upper atmosphere do not appear to have changed considerably since the Voyager 1 flyby. PMID:15890873

  5. Solid Phase Microextraction and Miniature Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, j.m.

    1999-01-26

    A miniature mass spectrometer, based on the time-of-flight principle, has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent precursor molecules. The instrument, with minor modifications, could fulfill many of the needs for sensing organic molecules in various Defense Programs, including Enhanced Surveillance. The basic footprint of the instrument is about that of a lunch box. The instrument has a mass range to about 300, has parts-per-trillion detection limits, and can return spectra in less than a second. The instrument can also detect permanent gases and is especially sensitive to hydrogen. In volume, the device could be manufactured for under $5000.

  6. On-line monitoring of control rod integrity in BWRs using a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, I.; Loner, H.; Ammon, K.; Sihver, L.; Ledergerber, G.

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance of fuel and control rod integrity in the core of a boiling water reactor is essential for maintaining a safe and reliable operation. Control rods of a boiling water reactor are mainly filled with boron carbide as a neutron absorber. Due to the irradiation of boron with neutrons, a continuous production of lithium and helium will occur inside a control rod. Most of the created helium will be retained in the boron carbide lattice; however a small part will escape into the void volume of the control blade. Therefore the integrity of control rods during operation can efficiently be followed by on-line measurements of helium concentration in the reactor off-gas system using a mass spectrometer. Since helium is a fill gas in fuel rods, the same method is a useful early warning system for primary fuel failures. In this paper, we introduce an on-line helium detector system which is installed at the nuclear power plant in Leibstadt. Furthermore the measuring experiences of control rod failure detection at the plant are presented. Different causes of increased helium levels in the off-gas system have been distinguished. There are spontaneous helium releases as well as helium releases caused by changed conditions in the reactor (power reduction, control rod movement, etc.). Helium peaks can also be characterized according to the released amount of helium, the peak shape and the duration of the release, which leads to different interpretations of the release mechanisms. In addition, the measured amount of released helium from a 50 days period (280 l) is also compared to the calculated amount of produced helium from the washed out boron during the same time period (190 l).

  7. A Carbon Nano Tube electron impact ionisation source for low-power, compact spacecraft mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, S.; Bardwell, M. W.; Morse, A. D.; Morgan, G. H.

    2012-04-01

    A novel ionisation source which uses commercially available Carbon Nano Tube devices is demonstrated as a replacement for a filament based ionisation source in an ion trap mass spectrometer. The carbon nanotube ion source electron emission was characterised and exhibited typical emission of 30 ± 1.7 μA with an applied voltage differential of 300 V between the carbon nanotube tips and the extraction grid. The ion source was tested for longevity and operated under a condition of continuous emission for a period of 44 h; there was an observed reduction in emission current of 26.5% during operation. Spectra were generated by installing the ion source into a Finnigan Mat ITD700 ion trap mass spectrometer; the spectra recorded showed all of the characteristic m/z peaks from m/z 69 to m/z 219. Perfluorotributylamine spectra were collected and averaged contiguously for a period of 48 h with no significant signal loss or peak mass allocation shift. The low power requirements and low mass of this novel ionisation source are considered be of great value to future space missions where mass spectrometric technology will be employed.

  8. Laser-based studies with an ion-trap mass spectrometer: Ion tomography and analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. L.; Cisper, M. E.; Hemberger, P. H.; Nogar, N. S.; Williams, J. D.; Syka, J. E. P.

    The iron trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) is an ion storage device which consists of two hyperbolic endcaps and a hyperbolic ring electrode. This forms a trapping cavity having a volume of several cm(sup 3). An RF potential applied to the ring electrode produces a time-varying potential which can be used to trap and/or manipulate ions under controlled conditions. This device has been used in ion trapping studies for a number of years. More recently, a commercial version has been produced and sold which allows for mass-selective ejection of trapped ions, with subsequent detection by an electron multiplier. In this mode, it operates as a compact, high efficiency, high resolution mass spectrometer. The instrument has found applications in GC/MS, in tandem mass spectroscopy and in portable mass spectral analysis. In this manuscript, we present a survey of recent results incorporating laser desorption, ionization, or photodissociation with ITMS. In one instance, we describe the use of laser photodissociation to map the spatial distribution of trapped ions in the ITMS. In this tomographic study, we have parameterized the effects of trapping potential, buffer gas pressure, supplementary RF-potential, and laser intensity. In separate studies, laser desorption was used to generate gas phase ions in the ITMS from a solid probe, by irradiation of both neat and matrix-dissolved samples. The latter experiment produced both high molecular weight ions and significant numbers of negative ions.

  9. In Situ Geochemical Analysis and Age Dating of Rocks Using Laser Ablation-Miniature Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Hurowitz, Joel A.

    2012-01-01

    A miniaturized instrument for performing chemical and isotopic analysis of rocks has been developed. The rock sample is ablated by a laser and the neutral species produced are analyzed using the JPL-invented miniature mass spectrometer. The direct sampling of neutral ablated material and the simultaneous measurement of all the elemental and isotopic species are the novelties of this method. In this laser ablation-miniature mass spectrometer (LA-MMS) method, the ablated neutral atoms are led into the electron impact ionization source of the MMS, where they are ionized by a 70-eV electron beam. This results in a secondary ion pulse typically 10-100 microsecond wide, compared to the original 5-10-nanosecond laser pulse duration. Ions of different masses are then spatially dispersed along the focal plane of the magnetic sector of the miniature mass spectrometer and measured in parallel by a modified CCD (charge-coupled device) array detector capable of detecting ions directly. Compared to conventional scanning techniques, simultaneous measurement of the ion pulse along the focal plane effectively offers a 100% duty cycle over a wide mass range. LAMMS offers a more quantitative assessment of elemental composition than techniques that detect laser-ionized species produced directly in the ablation process because the latter can be strongly influenced by matrix effects that vary with the structure and geometry of the surface, the laser beam, and the ionization energies of the elements. The measurement of high-precision isotopic ratios and elemental composition of different rock minerals by LAMMS method has been demonstrated. The LA-MMS can be applied for the absolute age determination of rocks. There is no such instrument available presently in a miniaturized version that can be used for NASA space missions. Work is in progress in the laboratory for geochronology of rocks using LA-MMS that is based on K-Ar radiogenic dating technique.

  10. 233U mass yield measurements around and within the symmetry region with the ILL Lohengrin spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebboubi, A.; Kessedjian, G.; Sage, C.; Bernard, D.; Blanc, A.; Faust, H.; Köster, U.; Litaize, O.; Mutti, P.; Serot, O.

    2016-03-01

    The study of fission yields has a major impact on the characterization and understanding of the fission process and is mandatory for reactor applications. The LPSC in collaboration with ILL and CEA has developed a measurement program on fission fragment distributions at the Lohengrin spectrometer of the ILL, with a special focus on the masses constituting the heavy peak. We will present in this paper our measurement of the very low fission yields in the symmetry mass region and the heavy mass wing of the distribution for 233U thermal neutron induced fission. The difficulty due to the strong contamination by other masses with much higher yields will be addressed in the form of a new analysis method featuring the required contaminant correction. The apparition of structures in the kinetic energy distributions and possible interpretations will be discussed, such as a possible evidence of fission modes.

  11. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1999-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  12. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1999-02-16

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  13. Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) for the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Benna, Mehdi; King, Todd T.; Hodges, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission currently scheduled for launch in early 2013 aboard a Minotaur V will orbit the moon at a nominal periselene of 50 km to characterized the lunar atmosphere and dust environment. The science instrument payload includes a neutral mass spectrometer as well as an ultraviolet spectrometer and a dust detector. Although to date only He, Ar-40, K, Na and Rn-222 have been firmly identified in the lunar exosphere and arise from the solar wind (He), the lunar regolith (K and Na) and the lunar interior (Ar-40, Rn-222), upper limits have been set for a large number of other species, LADEE Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) observations will determine the abundance of several species and substantially lower the present upper limits for many others. Additionally, LADEE NMS will observe the spatial distribution and temporal variability of species which condense at nighttime and show peak concentrations at the dawn terminator (e,g, Ar-40), possible episodic release from the lunar interior, and the results of sputtering or desorption processes from the regolith. In this presentation, we describe the LADEE NMS hardware and the anticipated science results.

  14. First insights on the organic species from the high resolution mass spectrometer ROSINA DFMS on-board the Rosetta spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, L.; Altwegg, K.; Berthelier, J. J.; Calmonte, U.; Dhooghe, F.; Fiethe, B.; Fuselier, S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Rubin, M.; Tzou, C. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Starting in August 2014, the ROSINA experiment will characterize the composition and dynamics of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's coma. ROSINA consists of a suite of three instruments: a pressure sensor (COPS: COmetary Pressure Sensor) and two mass spectrometers: the Reflectron Time of Flight mass spectrometer (RTOF) and the Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS). Here we will focus on the first results obtained by DFMS, the high-resolution mass spectrometer of ROSINA. DFMS is a traditional magnetic mass spectrometer that combines an electrostatic analyzer for energy analysis with a magnet for momentum analysis. To date, DFMS is the highest mass resolution mass spectrometer in space, with resolution (m/Δm = 3000 at 1% of the peak height at 28 amu/q). It will be able to resolve CO from N2 at m/z= 28 amu/q or 12CH and 13C at m/z= 13 amu/q. We will present the first results of DFMS: the detection of organic species and their implication for the origin of cometary material.

  15. Polarimeters and Energy Spectrometers for the ILC Beam Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Boogert, S.; Hildreth, M.; Kafer, D.; List, J.; Monig, K.; Moffeit, K.C.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Riemann, S.; Schreiber, H.J.; Schuler, P.; Torrence, E.; Woods, M.; /SLAC

    2009-02-24

    This article gives an overview of current plans and issues for polarimeters and energy spectrometers in the Beam Delivery System of the ILC. It is meant to serve as a useful reference for the Detector Letter of Intent documents currently being prepared. Concepts for high precision polarization and energy measurements exist. These concepts have resulted in detailed system layouts that are included in the RDR description for the Beam Delivery System. The RDR includes both upstream and downstream polarimeters and energy spectrometers for both beams. This provides needed complementarity and redundancy for achieving the precision required, with adequate control and demonstration of systematic errors. The BDS polarimeters and energy spectrometers need to be a joint effort of the ILC BDS team and the Detector collaborations, with collaboration members responsible for the performance and accuracy of the measurements. Details for this collaboration and assigning of responsibilities remain to be worked out. There is also a demonstrated need for Detector physicists to play an active role in the design and evaluation of accelerator components that impact beam polarization and beam energy capabilities, including the polarized source and spin rotator systems. A workshop was held in 2008 on ILC Polarization and Energy measurements, which resulted in a set of recommendations for the ILC design and operation. Additional input and action is needed on these from the Detector collaborations, the Research Director and the GDE. Work is continuing during the ILC engineering design phase to further optimize the polarimeter and energy spectrometer concepts and fully implement them in the ILC. This includes consideration for alternative methods, detailed design and cost estimates, and prototype and test beam activities.

  16. USING AN ACCURATE MASS, TRIPLE QUADRUPOLE MASS SPECTROMETER AND AN ION CORRELATION PROGRAM TO IDENTIFY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and must be identified by other means. Often, compound identities can be deduced from the compositions of the ions in their mass spectra and review of the chemical literature. Confirmation is provided by mass spectra and r...

  17. Single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon-interference identification and positive-ionisation characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcken, K. M.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.; Xu, S.; Dougans, A.

    2013-01-01

    A single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer (SSAMS) is a good alternative to conventional spectrometers based on tandem electrostatic acceleration for radiocarbon measurement and permits experimentation with both negative and positive carbon ions. However, such 14C AMS of either polarity ions is limited by an interference. In the case of anion acceleration we have newly determined this to be summed 13C and 16O by improvising an additional Wien filter on our SSAMS deck. Also, 14C AMS might be improved by removing its dependency on negative-ionisation in a sputter ion source. This requires negative-ionisation of sample atoms elsewhere to suppress the 14N interference, which we accomplish by transmitting initially positive ions through a thin membrane. The ionisation dependence on ion-energy is found to be consistent with previous experimentation with vapours and thicker foils.

  18. Determination of the composition of rarefied neutral atmospheres by mass spectrometers carried on high-speed spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A.

    1974-01-01

    The quantitative measurement of atomic and molecular O2 in rarefied atmospheres by mass spectrometers onboard high speed spacecraft is reported. Data are also given on instrument performance in high speed molecular beams and in the fly through mode.

  19. Prototype of the gas chromatograph - mass spectrometer to investigate volatile species in the lunar soil for the Luna-Glob and Luna-Resurs missions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, L.; Lasi, D.; Tulej, M.; Wurz, P.; Cabane, M.; Cosica, D.; Gerasimov, M.; Rodinov, D.

    2013-09-01

    In preparation for the Russian Luna-Glob and Luna-Resurs missions we combined our compact time-offlight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) with a chemical pre-separation of the species by gas chromatography (GC). Combined measurements with both instruments were successfully performed with the laboratory prototype of the mass spectrometer and a flight-like gas chromatograph. Due to its capability to record mass spectra over the full mass range at once with high sensitivity and a dynamic range of up to 106 within 1s, the TOF-MS system is a valuable extension of the GC analysis. The combined GC-MS complex is able to detect concentrations of volatile species in the sample of about 2·10^-9 by mass.

  20. Results from the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H.; Atreya, S.; Demick-Montelara, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Owen, T.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer was one of six instruments on the Cassini-Huygens Probe mission to Titan. The GCMS measured in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and served as the detector for the pyrolization products for the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment to determine the composition of the aerosol particles. The GCMS collected data from an altitude of 146 km to ground impact. The Probe and the GCMS survived impact and collected data for 1 hour and 9 minutes on the surface. Mass spectra were collected during descent and on the ground over a range of m/z from 2 to 141. The major constituents of the lower atmosphere were confirmed to be N2 and CH4. The methane mole fraction was uniform in the stratosphere. It increased below the tropopause, at about 32 km altitude, monotonically toward the surface, reaching a plateau at about 8 km at a level near saturation. After surface impact a steep increase of the methane signal was observed, suggesting evaporation of surface condensed methane due to heating by the GCMS sample inlet heater. The measured mole fraction of Ar-40 is 4.3x10(exp -5) and of Ar-36 is 2.8x10(exp -7). The other primordial noble gases were below 10(exp -8) mole fraction. The isotope ratios of C-12/C-13 determined from methane measurements are 82.3 and of N-14/N-15 determined from molecular nitrogen are 183. The D/H isotope ratio determined from the H2 and HD measurements is 2.3x10(exp -4). Carbon dioxide, methane, acetylene and cyanogen were detected evaporating from the surface in addition to methane. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the

  1. Results from the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso; Atreya, S.; Demick-Monelara, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Owen, T.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer was one of six instruments on the Cassini-Huygens Probe mission to Titan. The GCMS measured in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and served as the detector for the pyrolization products for the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment to determine the composition of the aerosol particles. The GCMS collected data from an altitude of 146 km to ground impact. The Probe and the GCMS survived impact and collected data for 1 hour and 9 minutes on the surface. Mass spectra were collected during descent and on the ground over a range of mlz from 2 to 141. The major constituents of the lower atmosphere were confirmed to be N2 and CH4. The methane mole fraction was uniform in the stratosphere. It increased below the tropopause, at about 32 km altitude, monotonically toward the surface, reaching a plateau at about 8 km at a level near saturation. After surface impact a steep increase of the methane signal was observed, suggesting evaporation of surface condensed methane due to heating by the GCMS sample inlet heater. The measured mole fraction of Ar-40 is 4.3x10(exp -5) and of Ar-36 is 2.8x10(exp -7). The other primordial noble gases were below 10(exp -8) mole fraction. The isotope ratios of C-12/C-13 determined from methane measurements are 82.3 and of N-14/N-15 determined from molecular nitrogen are 183. The D/H isotope ratio determined from the H2 and HD measurements is 2.3x10(exp -4). Carbon dioxide, ethane, acetylene and cyanogen were detected evaporating from the surface in addition to methane. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the

  2. Mass spectrometer measurements of test gas composition in a shock tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, K. A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Shock tunnels afford a means of generating hypersonic flow at high stagnation enthalpies, but they have the disadvantage that thermochemical effects make the composition of the test flow different to that of ambient air. The composition can be predicted by numerical calculations of the nozzle flow expansion, using simplified thermochemical models and, in the absence of experimental measurements, it has been necessary to accept the results given by these calculations. This note reports measurements of test gas composition, at stagnation enthalpies up to 12.5 MJ.kg(exp -1), taken with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Limited results have been obtained in previous measurements. These were taken at higher stagnation enthalpies, and used a quadruple mass spectrometer. The time-of-flight method was preferred here because it enabled a number of complete mass spectra to be obtained in each test, and because it gives good mass resolution over the range of interest with air (up to 50 a.m.a.).

  3. Upgrade of the Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Precise Identification of Failed Fuel in a Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Ito, Chikara; Harano, Hideki; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2011-12-13

    Isotopic analysis of krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is an effective tool for identification of failed fuel in fast reactors to achieve their safety operation and high plant availability. Reliability of the failed fuel detection and location (FFDL) system depends on the precise determination of {sup 78}Kr/{sup 80}Kr, {sup 82}Kr/{sup 80}Kr and {sup 126}Xe/{sup 129}Xe isotopic ratios, which is mainly hampered by statistical errors for detection of the corresponding isotopes except {sup 82}Kr generated in large amounts during operation of fast reactors. In this paper, we report on improvements of the laser optical system of our spectrometer to increase the resonance ionization efficiency of Kr and Xe atoms, focusing on (i) utilization of the uniform YAG laser beam to improve the wavelength conversion efficiency of sum frequency generation and (ii) reflection of the ultraviolet light by a concave mirror to increase the photon density. The results indicate that our upgraded resonance ionization mass spectrometer has enough performance for isotopic analysis of Kr and Xe required in the Monju FFDL system.

  4. Upgrade of the Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Precise Identification of Failed Fuel in a Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Harano, Hideki; Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2011-12-01

    Isotopic analysis of krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is an effective tool for identification of failed fuel in fast reactors to achieve their safety operation and high plant availability. Reliability of the failed fuel detection and location (FFDL) system depends on the precise determination of 78Kr/80Kr, 82Kr/80Kr and 126Xe/129Xe isotopic ratios, which is mainly hampered by statistical errors for detection of the corresponding isotopes except 82Kr generated in large amounts during operation of fast reactors. In this paper, we report on improvements of the laser optical system of our spectrometer to increase the resonance ionization efficiency of Kr and Xe atoms, focusing on (i) utilization of the uniform YAG laser beam to improve the wavelength conversion efficiency of sum frequency generation and (ii) reflection of the ultraviolet light by a concave mirror to increase the photon density. The results indicate that our upgraded resonance ionization mass spectrometer has enough performance for isotopic analysis of Kr and Xe required in the Monju FFDL system.

  5. A quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer for in-situ UHV analyses on Earth and other planetary environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. E.; Madzunkov, S. M.; Simcic, J.; Farley, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The JPL quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer presents an exceptional opportunity for combining cutting edge terrestrial geochemical research with the next generation of extraterrestrial science. The QIT is a small mass spectrometer that filters particles of different mass by electron ionization and subsequent separation with a quadrupole RF field. The latest version is capable of achieving very high resolution (R > 1000) without an increase in power consumption through the addition of a dipole RF to augment the primary quadrupole field. Crucially, we demonstrate the ability to achieve this resolution with high sensitivity (> 1014 cps/Torr), and at UHV without the addition of a cooling gas. In this mode, the high sensitivity and extremely low background allow the measurement of a large number of species in very small samples. Most laboratory instruments are too heavy, large, and energy-intensive to fly on spacecraft in their optimal forms. As a result, instruments for spaceflight have traditionally been heavily-modified versions of terrestrial instruments, designed to be lighter, smaller, and more efficient than their terrestrial counterparts, at the expense of analytical capabilities. The JPL QIT, in contrast, weighs less than 1 kg, is only a few cm in size, and consumes less than 30W. Only the accompanying UHV system and supporting electronics must be extensively redesigned for spaceflight, and NASA already possesses pumps capable of fulfilling this need. The opportunity for parallel development for terrestrial and extraterrestrial labs and the capability of direct comparison between planetary science and terrestrial geochemistry will benefit both fields.

  6. Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer detection limits and thermal energy analyzer interface status report and present capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A.; Andresen, B.; Martin, W.

    1990-10-18

    A new Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer was purchased and installed at LLNL. Over a period of several months the instrument was tested under a variety of conditions utilizing a capillary gas chromatography interface which allowed separated organic compounds to be carried directly into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. This direct interface allowed maximum analytical sensitivity. A variety of critical tests were performed in order to optimize the sensitivity of the system under a variety of analysis conditions. These tests altered the critical time cycles of the ionization, ion trapping, and detection. Various carrier gas pressures were also employed in order to ascertain the overall sensitivity of the instrument. In addition we have also interfaced a thermal energy analyzer (TEA) to the gas chromatograph in order to simultaneously detect volatile nitrogen containing compounds while mass spectral data is being acquired. This is the first application at this laboratory of simultaneous ultra-trace detections while utilizing two orthogonal analytical techniques. In particular, explosive-related compound and/or residues are of interest to the general community in water, soil and gas sampler. In this paper are highlighted a few examples of the analytical power of this new GC-TEA-ITMS technology.

  7. A preliminary report on noble gas isotope analyses using the Helix-MC multi-collector mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Zhang, X.; Phillips, D.; Szczepanski, S.; Deerberg, M.; Hamilton, D.; Krummen, M.; Schwieters, J.

    2013-12-01

    Analyses of noble gas isotopes by multi-collector mass spectrometry substantially improve measurement precision and accuracy, with the potential to revolutionise applications to cosmo-geo-sciences. The Helix-MC noble gas mass spectrometer manufactured by Thermo-Fisher is a 350mm, 120 degree extended geometry, high resolution, multi-collector mass spectrometer for the simultaneous analysis of noble gas isotopes. The detector array includes a fixed axial (Ax) detector, 2 adjustable high mass (H1 and H2) detectors and 2 adjustable low mass (L1 and L2) detectors. Each detector is equipped with a Faraday/ion counting multiplier CFM (Combined Faraday and CDD Multiplier) detector. Mass resolution and mass resolving power on the H2, Ax and L2 detectors of the Helix-MC installed at the Australian National University (ANU) are approximately 1,800 and 8,000, respectively. The noble gas handling system on-line to the Helix-MC consists of: (1) a resistively-heated, double-vacuum, tantalum furnace system, (2) air actuated vacuum crusher, (3) Photon-Machines diode laser heating system, (4) Janis He cryogenic trap assembly, (5) gas purification system and (6) standard gas pipette tanks, which are totally automated and controlled by the Qtegra software platform developed by Thermo-Fisher. Eleven repeat measurements of atmospheric Ar using the H2 Faraday (1E11 ohm resistor) and L2 CDD collectors on the Helix-MC, yield a mean 40Ar/36Ar ratio of 322.09 +- 0.28 (0.089%) with a 4,700 fA 40Ar beam current. This result compares favourably with the precision achieved by the Argus VI at the University of Melbourne (318.12 +- 0.17; 0.052%; n = 10) with a similar beam size of 4,200 fA. The high mass resolution of the L2 collector permits complete separation of the 36Ar and interfering 3 x 12C (required mass resolution (MR) of 1,100) and partial separation of H35Cl (MR = 3,900). This capability enables evaluation of the significance of Ar isotopic interferences related to the correction of

  8. Fast data acquisition system for the spectrometer SMART at RIKEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, H.

    2000-03-01

    A new data acquisition system has been introduced for experiments using the spectrometer SMART at RIKEN. It is about ten times as fast as the previous system based on the standard CAMAC (Ichihara et al., IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 36 (1989) 1628), but is dedicated to the use of LeCroy FERA and FERA-compatible modules. Data are accumulated in a VME memory module through the FERA bus and then DMA-transferred to a personal computer running a free Unix-clone, Linux. Since no CPU or peripheral is required on VME, the system is very cost-effective and suitable for experiments already using FERA.

  9. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer for the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas A.; Beer, Reinhard

    1991-01-01

    A Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) for the Earth Observing System (EOS) series of polar-orbiting platforms is described. TES is aimed at studying tropospheric chemistry, in particular, the exchange of gases between the surface and the atmosphere, urban and regional pollution, acid rain precursors, sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, and the interchange of gases between the troposphere and the stratosphere. TES is a high-resolution (0.025/cm) infrared Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the passive thermal-emission mode in a very wide spectral range (600 to 4350/cm; 2.3 to 16.7 microns). TES has 32 spatial pixels in each of four optically conjugated linear detector arrays, each optimized for a different spectral region.

  10. The Monitor online system of the OPERA muon magnetic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolino, U.; Ambrosio, M.; Acquafredda, R.; Masone, V.

    2008-06-01

    The OPERA muon magnetic spectrometer has been designed for muon detection, tracking and timing. The 44 bakelite Resistive Chambers (RPC) planes, imbibed inside the magnet iron slabs, must provide the tracking of the muon curved in the magnetic field to ease the momentum and charge measurement provided by the HPT. Furthermore, it provides the momentum for muons stopping in the iron. RPC signals will be also used as start of drift tube acquisition thanks to the very good time resolution of RPC detectors. Due to the required performances the tracking detector must be fully efficient and stable. In this conditions an online monitor is mandatory to continuously control stability of run conditions. We report the main characteristics and performances of the monitor system for the OPERA spectrometer and capabilities of the software developed for settings and data acquisition.

  11. Cavity BPM System Tests for the ILC Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, M.

    2007-12-21

    The main physics program of the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires a measurement of the beam energy at the interaction point with an accuracy of 10{sup -4} or better. To achieve this goal a magnetic spectrometer using high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs) has been proposed. This paper reports on the cavity BPM system that was deployed to test this proposal. We demonstrate sub-micron resolution and micron level stability over 20 hours for a 1 m long BPM triplet. We find micron-level stability over 1 hour for 3 BPM stations distributed over a 30 m long baseline. The understanding of the behavior and response of the BPMs gained from this work has allowed full spectrometer tests to be carried out.

  12. DOE/University instrumentation program grant for funding of the high field, high mass, double focusing, high resolution mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This document discusses the research efforts accomplished using the double focusing, high field, high resolution mass spectrometer, Model JMS HX-100HF (JEOL). Installation of this instrument was accomplished during March of 1986 and operation of the instrument for purposes of application to biological and biochemical problems started during the month of April 1986. areas of research include post-translational modifications of rubisco, biosynthesis of abscisic acid, environmental control of plant development, plant cell wall protein, structural studies of thioltransferase and hexokinase and analogs of peptide harmones and neurotransmitters. 1 fig.

  13. Comparing the Performance of Hyperbolic and Circular Rod Quadrupole Mass Spectrometers with Applied Higher Order Auxiliary Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershman, D.J.; Block, B.P.; Rubin, M.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2012-01-01

    This work applies higher order auxiliary excitation techniques to two types of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMSs): commercial systems and spaceborne instruments. The operational settings of a circular rod geometry commercial system and an engineering test-bed for a hyperbolic rod geometry spaceborne instrument were matched, with the relative performance of each sensor characterized with and without applied excitation using isotopic measurements of Kr+. Each instrument was operated at the limit of the test electronics to determine the effect of auxiliary excitation on extending instrument capabilities. For the circular rod sensor, with applied excitation, a doubling of the mass resolution at 1% of peak transmission resulted from the elimination of the low-mass side peak tail typical of such rod geometries. The mass peak stability and ion rejection efficiency were also increased by factors of 2 and 10, respectively, with voltage scan lines passing through the center of stability islands formed from auxiliary excitation. Auxiliary excitation also resulted in factors of 6 and 2 in peak stability and ion rejection efficiency, respectively, for the hyperbolic rod sensor. These results not only have significant implications for the use of circular rod quadrupoles with applied excitation as a suitable replacement for traditional hyperbolic rod sensors, but also for extending the capabilities of existing hyperbolic rod QMSs for the next generation of spaceborne instruments and low-mass commercial systems.

  14. Airborne mass spectrometers: four decades of atmospheric and space research at the Air Force research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, A A; Hunton, D E

    1999-11-01

    Mass spectrometry is a versatile research tool that has proved to be extremely useful for exploring the fundamental nature of the earth's atmosphere and ionosphere and in helping to solve operational problems facing the Air Force and the Department of Defense. In the past 40 years, our research group at the Air Force Research Laboratory has flown quadrupole mass spectrometers of many designs on nearly 100 sounding rockets, nine satellites, three Space Shuttles and many missions of high-altitude research aircraft and balloons. We have also used our instruments in ground-based investigations of rocket and jet engine exhaust, combustion chemistry and microwave breakdown chemistry. This paper is a review of the instrumentation and techniques needed for space research, a summary of the results from many of the experiments, and an introduction to the broad field of atmospheric and space mass spectrometry in general. PMID:10548806

  15. Methane measurement by the Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, T. M.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus Large Probe Mass Spectrometer detected a large quantity of methane as it descended below 20 km in the atmosphere of Venus. Terrestrial methane and Xe-136, both originating in the same container and flowing through the same plumbing, were deliberately released inside the mass spectrometer for instrumental reasons. However, the Xe-136 did not exhibit behavior similar to methane during Venus entry, nor did CH4 in laboratory simulations. The CH4 was deuterium poor compared to Venus water and hydrogen. While the inlet to the mass spectrometer was clogged with sulfuric acid droplets, significant deuteration of CH4 and its H2 progeny was observed. Since the only source of deuterium identifiable was water from sulfuric acid, we have concluded that we should correct the HDO/H2O ratio in Venus water from 3.2 x 10(exp -2) to (5 plus or minus 0.7) x 10(exp -2). When the probe was in the lower atmosphere, transfer of deuterium from Venus HDO and HD to CH4 can account quantitatively for the deficiencies recorded in HDO and HD below 10 km, and consequently, the mysterious gradients in water vapor and hydrogen mixing ratios we have reported. The revision in the D/H ratio reduces the mixing ratio of water vapor (and H2) reported previously by a factor of 3.2/5. We are not yet able to say whether the methane detected was atmospheric or an instrumental artifact. If it was atmospheric, its release must have been episodic and highly localized. Otherwise, the large D/H ratio in Venus water and hydrogen could not be maintained.

  16. Update on the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer measurements during the E21 flyby of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, J. Hunter; Glein, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We report the ongoing analysis of the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer data from the last low-altitude, in situ flyby of the Enceladus spacecraft by the Cassini spacecraft (E21). During previous Cassini flybys of Enceladus, the Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) detected counts at mass channel 2 in closed source neutral mode that are attributed to H2. The signal was enhanced at faster flyby velocities as a result of impact-induced chemistry in the antechamber of the instrument, but up to ~15% H2 was still detected consistently during the slowest flybys. At present, it is unclear if this H2 is native to the plume or an artifact of high-speed sampling of the H2O-rich plume. In an attempt to resolve this question, a search for H2 was performed using the open source neutral beam mode of INMS during the E21 flyby, for which the data are being analyzed. We present the status of this analysis. Furthermore,to assist in the interpretation, we have made three theoretical estimates of how much hydrothermal H2 could be present for different geochemical/geophysical scenarios, which will also be presented.

  17. Implementation of Ultraviolet Photodissociation on a Benchtop Q Exactive Mass Spectrometer and Its Application to Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Fort, Kyle L; Dyachenko, Andrey; Potel, Clement M; Corradini, Eleonora; Marino, Fabio; Barendregt, Arjan; Makarov, Alexander A; Scheltema, Richard A; Heck, Albert J R

    2016-02-16

    Proteomics applications performed on the popular benchtop Q Exactive Orbitrap mass spectrometer have so far relied exclusively on higher collision-energy dissociation (HCD) fragmentation for peptide sequencing. While this fragmentation technique is applicable to a wide range of biological questions, it also has limitations, and all questions cannot be addressed equally well. Here, we demonstrate that the fragmentation capabilities of the Q Exactive mass spectrometer can be extended with ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) fragmentation, complete with synchronization triggering to make it compatible with liquid chromatography (LC)/tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) workflows. We show that UVPD not only is directly compatible with LC/MS workflows but also, when combined with these workflows, can result in higher database scores and increased identification rates for complex samples as compared to HCD methods. UVPD as a fragmentation technique offers prompt, high-energy fragmentation, which can potentially lead to improved analyses of labile post-translational modifications. Techniques like HCD result in substantial amounts of modification losses, competing with fragmentation pathways that provide information-rich ion fragments. We investigate here the utility of UVPD for identification of phosphorylated peptides and find that UVPD fragmentation reduces the extent of labile modification loss by up to ∼60%. Collectively, when integrated into a complete workflow on the Q Exactive Orbitrap, UVPD provides distinct advantages to the analysis of post-translational modifications and is a powerful and complementary addition to the proteomic toolbox. PMID:26760441

  18. Fast neutral beam ion source coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, N.C.; Limbach, P.A.; Shomo, R.E. II; Marshall, A.G. ); Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E. )

    1991-11-01

    The coupling of an autoneutralizing SF{sup {minus}}{sub 6} fast ion-beam gun to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The fast neutral beam provides for secondary-ion-type FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., production of abundant pseudomolecular (M+H){sup +} ions) of involatile samples without the need for external ion injection, since ions are formed at the entrance to the ICR ion trap. The design, construction, and testing of the hybrid instrument are described. The feasibility of the experiment (for both broadband and high-resolution FT/ICR positive-ion mass spectra) is demonstrated with {ital tetra}-butylammonium bromide and a Tylenol{sup ( )} sample. The ability to analyze high molecular weight polymers with high mass resolution is demonstrated for Teflon{sup ( )}. All of the advantages of the fast neutral beam ion source previously demonstrated with quadrupole mass analysis are preserved, and the additional advantages of FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., high mass resolving power, ion trapping) are retained.

  19. Fast neutral beam ion source coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Nicholas C.; Limbach, Patrick A.; Shomo, Ronald E., II; Marshall, Alan G.; Appelhans, Anthony D.; Delmore, James E.

    1991-11-01

    The coupling of an autoneutralizing SF-6 fast ion-beam gun to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The fast neutral beam provides for secondary-ion-type FT/ICR mass analysis [e.g., production of abundant pseudomolecular (M+H)+ ions] of involatile samples without the need for external ion injection, since ions are formed at the entrance to the ICR ion trap. The design, construction, and testing of the hybrid instrument are described. The feasibility of the experiment (for both broadband and high-resolution FT/ICR positive-ion mass spectra) is demonstrated with tetra-butylammonium bromide and a Tylenol■ sample. The ability to analyze high molecular weight polymers with high mass resolution is demonstrated for Teflon■. All of the advantages of the fast neutral beam ion source previously demonstrated with quadrupole mass analysis are preserved, and the additional advantages of FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., high mass resolving power, ion trapping) are retained.

  20. Surface modifications of stainless steel to minimise contamination in mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abda, J.; Douce, D.; Jones, G.; Skeldon, P.; Thompson, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of electrochemically grown and vapour deposited coatings on the build-up of contamination on stainless steel surfaces in the electrospray ionisation source of a mass spectrometer is investigated, together with their influence on the robustness of the instrument response. Quantification of the contamination build-up on flat samples, using white light interferometry, allowed the identification of the most beneficial treatments. Coating with electrochemically-grown anodic oxide and cathodic oxide films and amorphous carbon films doped with silicon or nitrogen resulted in reduced contamination compared with the uncoated stainless steel surface, and provided improved robustness of the instrument response.

  1. Acceleration mass spectrometer of the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastigeev, S. A.; Frolov, A. R.; Goncharov, A. D.; Klyuev, V. F.; Konstantinov, E. S.; Kutnyakova, L. A.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Petrozhitskii, A. V.

    2014-09-01

    An accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) made at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, is installed in the Geochronology of the Cenozoic Era Center for Collective Use for the carbon 14 dating of samples. Distinctive features of the BINP AMS include the use of a middle energy separator of ion beams, magnesium vapor target as a stripping target, and a time-of-flight telescope with thin films for accurate ion selection. Results of experiments measuring the radiocarbon concentration in test samples with radiocarbon labels for biomedical applications are presented.

  2. Accurate mass measurements of short-lived isotopes with the MISTRAL* rf spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Toader, C.; Audi, G.; Doubre, H.; Jacotin, M.; Henry, S.; Kepinski, J.-F.; Le Scornet, G.; Lunney, D.; Monsanglant, C.; Saint Simon, M. de; Thibault, C.; Borcea, C.; Duma, M.; Lebee, G.

    1999-01-15

    The MISTRAL* experiment has measured its first masses at ISOLDE. Installed in May 1997, this radiofrequency transmission spectrometer is to concentrate on nuclides with particularly short half-lives. MISTRAL received its first stable beam in October and first radioactive beam in November 1997. These first tests, with a plasma ion source, resulted in excellent isobaric separation and reasonable transmission. Further testing and development enabled first data taking in July 1998 on neutron-rich Na isotopes having half-lives as short as 31 ms.

  3. Theory of the fly-through mode for neutral mass spectrometers. [on Explorer satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, D. C.; Johnson, L. H.; Potter, W. E.; Nier, A. O.

    1979-01-01

    The Atmosphere Explorer satellites carry a quasi-open source neutral mass spectrometer which has the capability to operate in a nonstagnating or 'fly-through' mode. Technical information on the operating characteristics of fly-through along with considerable scientific data have been acquired in this mode. When the vehicle is spun, the fly-through signal contains information on the kinetic temperature as well as the neutral density. Both quantities can be extracted from the data once the theory of operation is formulated in terms of the ambient gas velocity distribution and the angular response of the instrument.

  4. A global empirical model of thermospheric composition based on OGO-6 mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Mayr, H. G.; Reber, C. A.; Carignan, G. R.; Spencer, N. W.

    1972-01-01

    The analysis of composition measurements made with the neutral mass spectrometer aboard the OGO-6 satellite leads to the following conclusions. The measured atomic oxygen densities are generally in good agreement with those deduced from drag. The molecular nitrogen densities in the annual and semiannual variations depart significantly from those predicted by drag models and suggest similar departures for exospheric temperatures. The helium densities generally tend to vary in an inverse manner to the nitrogen densities. These composition changes are consistent with dynamical processes associated with the global circulation in the thermosphere.

  5. A laser and molecular beam mass spectrometer study of low-pressure dimethyl ether flames

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew McIlroy; Toby D. Hain; Hope A. Michelsen; Terrill A. Cool

    2000-12-15

    The oxidation of dimethyl ether (DME) is studied in low-pressure flames using new molecular beam mass spectrometer and laser diagnostics. Two 30.0-Torr, premixed DME/oxygen/argon flames are investigated with stoichiometries of 0.98 and 1.20. The height above burner profiles of nine stable species and two radicals are measured. These results are compared to the detailed chemical reaction mechanism of Curran and coworkers. Generally good agreement is found between the model and data. The largest discrepancies are found for the methyl radical profiles where the model predicts qualitatively different trends in the methyl concentration with stoichiometry than observed in the experiment.

  6. Variations in thermospheric composition: A model based on mass-spectrometer and satellite-drag data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacchia, L. G.

    1973-01-01

    The seasonal-latitudinal and the diurnal variations of composition observed by mass spectrometers on the OGO 6 satellite are represented by two simple empirical formulae, each of which uses only one numerical parameter. The formulae are of a very general nature and predict the behavior of these variations at all heights and for all levels of solar activity; they yield a satisfactory representation of the corresponding variations in total density as derived from satellite drag. It is suggested that a seasonal variation of hydrogen might explain the abnormally low hydrogen densities at high northern latitudes in July 1964.

  7. Performance of the rebuilt SUERC single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanks, Richard P.; Ascough, Philippa L.; Dougans, Andrew; Gallacher, Paul; Gulliver, Pauline; Rood, Dylan H.; Xu, Sheng; Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.

    2015-10-01

    The SUERC bipolar single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer (SSAMS) has been dismantled and rebuilt to accommodate an additional rotatable pre-accelerator electrostatic spherical analyser (ESA) and a second ion source injector. This is for the attachment of an experimental positive-ion electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source in addition to a Cs-sputter source. The ESA significantly suppresses oxygen interference to radiocarbon detection, and remaining measurement interference is now thought to be from 13C injected as 13CH molecule scattering off the plates of a second original pre-detector ESA.

  8. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2015-01-19

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry provides unparalleled mass accuracy and resolving power.[1],[2] With electrospray ionization (ESI), ions are typically transferred into the mass spectrometer through a skimmer, which serves as a conductance-limiting orifice. However, the skimmer allows only a small fraction of incoming ions to enter the mass spectrometer. An ion funnel, originally developed by Smith and coworkers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)[3-5] provides much more efficient ion focusing and transfer. The large entrance aperture of the ion funnel allows almost all ions emanating from a heated capillary to be efficiently captured and transferred, resulting in nearly lossless transmission.

  9. Moessbauer Spectrometer in the PXI/CompactPCI Modular System

    SciTech Connect

    Pechousek, Jiri; Mashlan, Miroslav; Zboril, Radek

    2005-04-26

    Two commercially available modules, a digital oscilloscope (NI 5102) and a function generator (NI 5401) in the PXI (PCI eXtension for Instrumentation) or PCI standard from National Instruments Inc., supported by the driver software, have been used for building a computer-based Moessbauer spectrometer. The RTSI (Real-Time System Integration) bus is used for synchronizing the accumulation of the detector impulses to the Moessbauer spectrum with velocity of the 'source-sample' relative motion. The amplitude selection of the impulses from the detector output is based on the use of the Waveform Peak Detection.vi function. This function is available in the graphical programming environment LabVIEW 7 Express which serves for an implementation of the virtual instrument of the Moessbauer spectrometer. Moessbauer spectra can be accumulated in the constant and variable velocity modes; moreover, there is a possibility to register gamma-ray spectra in the multichannel analyzer mode. Two types of the detectors (a NaI(Tl) and a resonance scintillation detector) have been used with the new Moessbauer spectrometer.

  10. Determining Solubility and Diffusivity by Using a Flow Cell Coupled to a Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Khodayari, Mehdi; Reinsberg, Philip; Abd-El-Latif, Abd-El-Aziz A; Merdon, Christian; Fuhrmann, Juergen; Baltruschat, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    One of the main challenges in metal-air batteries is the selection of a suitable electrolyte that is characterized by high oxygen solubility, low viscosity, a liquid state and low vapor pressure across a wide temperature range, and stability across a wide potential window. Herein, a new method based on a thin layer flow through cell coupled to a mass spectrometer through a porous Teflon membrane is described that allows the determination of the solubility of volatile species and their diffusion coefficients in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions. The method makes use of the fact that at low flow rates the rate of species entering the vacuum system, and thus the ion current, is proportional to the concentration times the flow rate (c⋅u) and independent of the diffusion coefficient. The limit at high flow rates is proportional to D2/3·c·u1/3 . Oxygen concentrations and diffusion coefficients in aqueous electrolytes that contain Li(+) and K(+) and organic solvents that contain Li(+) , K(+) , and Mg(2+) , such as propylene carbonate, dimethyl sulfoxide tetraglyme, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, have been determined by using different flow rates in the range of 0.1 to 80 μL s(-1) . This method appears to be quite reliable, as can be seen by a comparison of the results obtained herein with available literature data. The solubility and diffusion coefficient values of O2 decrease as the concentration of salt in the electrolyte was increased due to a "salting out" effect. PMID:27017297

  11. Development of Soft Ionization for Particulate Organic Detection with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Trimborn, A; Williams, L R; Jayne, J T; Worsnop, D R

    2008-06-19

    During this DOE SBIR Phase II project, we have successfully developed several soft ionization techniques, i.e., ionization schemes which involve less fragmentation of the ions, for use with the Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS). Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization was demonstrated in the laboratory and deployed in field campaigns. Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization allows better identification of organic species in aerosol particles as shown in laboratory experiments on single component particles, and in field measurements on complex multi-component particles. Dissociative electron attachment with lower energy electrons (less than 30 eV) was demonstrated in the measurement of particulate organics in chamber experiments in Switzerland, and is now a routine approach with AMS systems configured for bipolar, negative ion detection. This technique is particularly powerful for detection of acidic and other highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) chemical functionality. Low energy electron ionization (10 to 12 eV) is also a softer ionization approach routinely available to AMS users. Finally, Lithium ion attachment has been shown to be sensitive to more alkyl-like chemical functionality in SOA. Results from Mexico City are particularly exciting in observing changes in SOA molecular composition under different photochemical/meteorological conditions. More recent results detecting biomass burns at the Montana fire lab have demonstrated quantitative and selective detection of levoglucosan. These soft ionization techniques provide the ToF-AMS with better capability for identifying organic species in ambient atmospheric aerosol particles. This, in turn, will allow more detailed study of the sources, transformations and fate of organic-containing aerosol.

  12. Forward hadron calorimeter of European hybrid spectrometer monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Boratave, M.; Datsko, N.A.; David, J.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.M.; Kistenoev, E.P.; Vlasov, E.V.

    1985-11-01

    The light-monitoring system of the forward neutral-hadron calorimeter of the European hybrid spectrometer is described. A general block diagram of the system, the functional relationships of the modules, and the ideology of the mathematical support are presented. The calorimeter records neutral particles in momentum range of 10-400 MeV/c. The calorimeter consists of 200 identical counters in modules of four each in a 10 X 20 matrix. The counters are made from plastic scintillators interlayed by steel plates. Light is collected by means of a rod reemitter admitted along the counter axis.

  13. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) for the Earth Observing System (EOS) CHEM Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, R.; Glavich, T.; Rider, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an imaging infrared Fourier transform spectrometer scheduled to be launched into polar sun-synchronous orbit on the Earth Observing System (EOS) CHEM satellite in December 2002.

  14. Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) Mass Spectrometer Flight Model and Future Ion Trap-Based Planetary Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; van Amerom, F. H. W.; Danell, R.; Pinnick, V. T.; Arevalo, R. D., Jr.; Li, X.; Grubisic, A.; Getty, S.; Hovmand, L.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on the 2018 ExoMars rover will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. MOMA combines pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) of bulk powder samples and Mars ambient laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) surface analysis, using a single ion trap MS. This dual source design enables MOMA to detect compounds over a wide range of molecular weights and volatilities. The structure of any detected organics may be further examined using MOMA's tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) mode. The flight model (FM) ion trap sensor and electronics have been assembled under the extremely clean and sterile conditions required by ExoMars, and have met or exceeded all performance specifications during initial functional tests. After Mars ambient thermal cycling and calibration, the FM will be delivered as a subsystem of MOMA to rover integration in mid-2016. There MOMA will join complementary rover instruments such as the Raman and MicrOmega spectrometers designed to analyze common drill samples. Following the MOMA design, linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LITMS)-based instruments are under development for future missions. LITMS adds enhanced capabilities such as precision (point-by-point) analysis of drill cores, negative ion detection, a wider mass range, and higher temperature pyrolysis with precision evolved gas analysis, while remaining highly compact and robust. Each of the capabilities of LITMS has been demonstrated on breadboard hardware. The next phase will realize an end-to-end brassboard at flight scale that will meet stringent technology readiness level (TRL) 6 criteria, indicating readiness for development toward missions to Mars, comets, asteroids, outer solar system moons, and beyond.

  15. Highly accurate isotope composition measurements by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer designed for in situ investigations on planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Heredia, B.; Neuland, M. B.; Bieler, A.; Tulej, M.; Leya, I.; Iakovleva, M.; Mezger, K.; Wurz, P.

    2013-10-01

    An experimental procedure for precise and accurate measurements of isotope abundances by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer for space research is described. The measurements were conducted on different untreated NIST standards and galena samples by applying pulsed UV laser radiation (266 nm, 3 ns and 20 Hz) for ablation, atomisation, and ionisation of the sample material. Mass spectra of released ions are measured by a reflectron-type time-of-flight mass analyser. A computer controlled performance optimiser was used to operate the system at maximum ion transmission and mass resolution. At optimal experimental conditions, the best relative accuracy and precision achieved for Pb isotope compositions are at the per mill level and were obtained in a range of applied laser irradiances and a defined number of accumulated spectra. A similar relative accuracy and precision was achieved in the study of Pb isotope compositions in terrestrial galena samples. The results for the galena samples are similar to those obtained with a thermal ionisation mass spectrometer (TIMS). The studies of the isotope composition of other elements yielded relative accuracy and precision at the per mill level too, with characteristic instrument parameters for each element. The relative accuracy and precision of the measurements is degrading with lower element/isotope concentration in a sample. For the elements with abundances below 100 ppm these values drop to the percent level. Depending on the isotopic abundances of Pb in minerals, 207Pb/206Pb ages with accuracy in the range of tens of millions of years can be achieved.

  16. Mass measurement in the fp-shell using the TOFI spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Y.; Vieira, D. J.; Seifert, H. L.; Wouters, J. M.

    1998-12-21

    The masses of 48 neutron-rich nuclei extending from {sup 55}Sc to {sup 75}Cu have been determined from the final set of data to be acquired with the time-of-flight-isochronous (TOFI) spectrometer. The masses of eight isotopes ({sup 68}Fe, {sup 70,71}Co, {sup 73}Ni, and {sup 72-75}Cu) are reported for the first time. The resulting masses now tie in neatly with the masses of previously measured neutron-rich Zn and Ga isotopes determined from fission product {beta}-endpoint measurements. A careful evaluation of the calibration sensitivity is made with respect to inclusion or exclusion of these heavy known species and excellent calibration stability is found. Contrasting these results with previous TOFI measurements, we find that these new results fall between the results of Tu et al. (1) which trend to slightly less bound masses as one proceeds to the most neutron-rich species and Seifert et al. (2) which shows the opposite trend. Good agreement with the predictions of several mass models and Audi-Wapstra systematics are found.

  17. Mass measurement in the fp-shell using the TOFI spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Y.; Vieira, D. J.; Seifert, H. L.; Wouters, J. M.

    1998-12-01

    The masses of 48 neutron-rich nuclei extending from 55Sc to 75Cu have been determined from the final set of data to be acquired with the time-of-flight-isochronous (TOFI) spectrometer. The masses of eight isotopes (68Fe, 70,71Co, 73Ni, and 72-75Cu) are reported for the first time. The resulting masses now tie in neatly with the masses of previously measured neutron-rich Zn and Ga isotopes determined from fission product β-endpoint measurements. A careful evaluation of the calibration sensitivity is made with respect to inclusion or exclusion of these heavy known species and excellent calibration stability is found. Contrasting these results with previous TOFI measurements, we find that these new results fall between the results of Tu et al. (1) which trend to slightly less bound masses as one proceeds to the most neutron-rich species and Seifert et al. (2) which shows the opposite trend. Good agreement with the predictions of several mass models and Audi-Wapstra systematics are found.

  18. Mass measurement in the fp-shell using the TOFI spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Y.; Vieira, D.J.; Seifert, H.L.; Wouters, J.M.; Bai, Y.

    1998-12-01

    The masses of 48 neutron-rich nuclei extending from {sup 55}Sc to {sup 75}Cu have been determined from the final set of data to be acquired with the time-of-flight-isochronous (TOFI) spectrometer. The masses of eight isotopes ({sup 68}Fe, {sup 70,71}Co, {sup 73}Ni, and {sup 72{endash}75}Cu) are reported for the first time. The resulting masses now tie in neatly with the masses of previously measured neutron-rich Zn and Ga isotopes determined from fission product {beta}-endpoint measurements. A careful evaluation of the calibration sensitivity is made with respect to inclusion or exclusion of these heavy known species and excellent calibration stability is found. Contrasting these results with previous TOFI measurements, we find that these new results fall between the results of Tu {ital et al.} (1) which trend to slightly less bound masses as one proceeds to the most neutron-rich species and Seifert {ital et al.} (2) which shows the opposite trend. Good agreement with the predictions of several mass models and Audi-Wapstra systematics are found. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Characterization of the Ion Beam Focusing in a Mass Spectrometer using an IonCCD™ Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Hadjar, Omar; Laskin, Julia

    2011-07-26

    A position sensitive pixel-based detector array, referred to as the IonCCDTM, has been employed to characterize the ion optics and ion beam focusing in a custom built mass spectrometer designed for soft and reactive landing of mass-selected ions onto surfaces. The IonCCDTM was placed at several stages along the path of the ion beam to determine the focusing capabilities of the various ion optics which include an electrodynamic ion funnel, two radiofrequency (RF) only collision quadrupoles, a mass resolving quadrupole, a quadrupole bender, and two Einzel lens assemblies. The focusing capabilities of the RF-only collision quadrupoles and Einzel lenses are demonstrated by large decreases in the diameter of the ion beam. In contrast, the mass resolving quadrupole is shown to significantly defocus the mass-selected ion beam resulting in an expansion of the measured ion beam diameter. Combined with SIMION simulations we demonstrate that the IonCCDTM can identify minor errors in the alignment of charged-particle optics that result in erratic trajectories and significant deflections of the ion beam.. This information can be used to improve the design assembly and maintenance of custom-built mass spectrometry instrumentation.

  20. Characterization of the ion beam focusing in a mass spectrometer using an IonCCD™ detector.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Grant E; Hadjar, Omar; Laskin, Julia

    2011-08-01

    A position sensitive pixel-based detector array, referred to as the IonCCD, has been employed to characterize the ion optics and ion beam focusing in a custom built mass spectrometer designed for soft and reactive landing of mass-selected ions onto surfaces. The IonCCD was placed at several stages along the path of the ion beam to determine the focusing capabilities of the various ion optics, which include an electrodynamic ion funnel, two radiofrequency (rf)-only collision quadrupoles, a mass resolving quadrupole, a quadrupole bender, and two einzel lens assemblies. The focusing capabilities of the rf-only collision quadrupoles and einzel lenses are demonstrated by large decreases in the diameter of the ion beam. In contrast, the mass resolving quadrupole is shown to significantly defocus the mass-selected ion beam resulting in an expansion of the measured ion beam diameter. Combined with SIMION simulations, we demonstrate that the IonCCD can identify minor errors in the alignment of charged-particle optics that result in erratic trajectories and significant deflections of the ion beam. This information may be used to facilitate the design, assembly, and maintenance of custom-built mass spectrometry instrumentation. PMID:21953193

  1. MacMS: A Mass Spectrometer Simulator: Abstract of Issue 9906M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigger, Stephen W.; Craig, Robert A.

    1999-10-01

    MacMS is a program for Mac-OS compatible computers that simulates a magnetic sector mass spectrometer (1-4) designed to operate in the mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio range of 1-200 amu. MacMS has two operational modules. The first module (see Figure 1) is called the "Path" module and enables the user to quantitatively examine the trajectory of an ion of given m/z ratio in the electric and magnetic fields of the simulated "instrument". By systematically measuring a series of trajectories of different ions under different electric and magnetic field conditions, the user can determine how the resolution of the "instrument" is affected by these experimentally variable parameters. The user can thus choose suitable instrumental conditions for scanning a given m/z ratio range with good separation between the peaks. The second module (see Figure 2) is called as the "Spectrometer" module and enables the user to record, under any chosen instrumental conditions, the mass spectrum of (i) the instrumental background, (ii) neon, (iii) methane, or (iv) the parent ion of carbon tetrachloride. Both voltage scanning and magnetic scanning are possible (5). A hard copy of any mass spectrum that has been recorded can also be obtained. MacMS can read ASCII data files containing mass spectral information of compounds other than those that are "built-in" to the simulator. The appropriate format for creating such data files is described in the program documentation. There are a number of instructional exercises that can be conducted using the mass spectral information contained within the simulator. These are included in the program documentation. For example, the intensities of the 20Ne+, 21Ne+, and 22Ne+ species can be determined from hard copies of mass spectra of neon that are obtained under different instrumental sensitivities. The relative abundances of the three isotopes of neon can thus be calculated and compared with the literature values (6). The simulator also includes adjustable

  2. Using metal complex ion-molecule reactions in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer to detect chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Graichen, Adam M; Vachet, Richard W

    2013-06-01

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of coordinatively unsaturated [Ni(L)n](y+) complexes, where L is a nitrogen-containing ligand, with chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer were investigated as part of a new approach to detect CWAs. Results show that upon entering the vacuum system via a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane introduction, low concentrations of several CWA simulants, including dipropyl sulfide (simulant for mustard gas), acetonitrile (simulant for the nerve agent tabun), and diethyl phosphite (simulant for nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX), can react with metal complex ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI), thereby providing a sensitive means of detecting these compounds. The [Ni(L)n](2+) complexes are found to be particularly reactive with the simulants of mustard gas and tabun, allowing their detection at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. These detection limits are well below reported exposure limits for these CWAs, which indicates the applicability of this new approach, and are about two orders of magnitude lower than electron ionization detection limits on the same mass spectrometer. The use of coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes as reagent ions offers the possibility of further tuning the ion-molecule chemistry so that desired compounds can be detected selectively or at even lower concentrations. PMID:23532782

  3. A model-free method for mass spectrometer response correction. [for oxygen consumption and cardiac output calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shykoff, Barbara E.; Swanson, Harvey T.

    1987-01-01

    A new method for correction of mass spectrometer output signals is described. Response-time distortion is reduced independently of any model of mass spectrometer behavior. The delay of the system is found first from the cross-correlation function of a step change and its response. A two-sided time-domain digital correction filter (deconvolution filter) is generated next from the same step response data using a regression procedure. Other data are corrected using the filter and delay. The mean squared error between a step response and a step is reduced considerably more after the use of a deconvolution filter than after the application of a second-order model correction. O2 consumption and CO2 production values calculated from data corrupted by a simulated dynamic process return to near the uncorrupted values after correction. Although a clean step response or the ensemble average of several responses contaminated with noise is needed for the generation of the filter, random noise of magnitude not above 0.5 percent added to the response to be corrected does not impair the correction severely.

  4. Using Metal Complex Ion-Molecule Reactions in a Miniature Rectilinear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer to Detect Chemical Warfare Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graichen, Adam M.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2013-06-01

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of coordinatively unsaturated [Ni(L)n]y+ complexes, where L is a nitrogen-containing ligand, with chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer were investigated as part of a new approach to detect CWAs. Results show that upon entering the vacuum system via a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane introduction, low concentrations of several CWA simulants, including dipropyl sulfide (simulant for mustard gas), acetonitrile (simulant for the nerve agent tabun), and diethyl phosphite (simulant for nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX), can react with metal complex ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI), thereby providing a sensitive means of detecting these compounds. The [Ni(L)n]2+ complexes are found to be particularly reactive with the simulants of mustard gas and tabun, allowing their detection at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. These detection limits are well below reported exposure limits for these CWAs, which indicates the applicability of this new approach, and are about two orders of magnitude lower than electron ionization detection limits on the same mass spectrometer. The use of coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes as reagent ions offers the possibility of further tuning the ion-molecule chemistry so that desired compounds can be detected selectively or at even lower concentrations.

  5. A Compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer for the Exocube Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Paschalidis, N.; Rodriguez, M.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Chornay, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Demand is high for in situ measurements of atmospheric neutral and ion composition and density, not only for studies of the dynamic ionosphere-theremosphere-mesosphere system but simply to define the steady state background atmospheric conditions. The ExoCube mission is designed to acquire global knowledge of in-situ densities of [H], [He], [O] and [H+], [He+], [O+] in the upper ionosphere and lower exosphere in combination with incoherent scatter radar ground stations distributed in the north polar region. The Heliophysic Division of GSFC has developed a compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) for in situ measurements of ions and neutrals H, He, N, O, N2, O2 with M/dM of approximately 10 at an incoming energy range of 0-50eV. The INMS is based on front end optics, post acceleration, gated time of flight, ESA and CEM or MCP detectors. The compact sensor has a dual symmetric configuration with the ion and neutral sensor heads on opposite sides and with full electronics in the middle. The neutral front end optics includes thermionic emission ionization and ion blocking grids, and the ion front end optics includes spacecraft potential compensation grids. The electronics include front end, fast gating, HVPS, ionizer, TOF binning and full bi directional C&DH digital electronics. The data package includes 400 mass bins each for ions and neutrals and key housekeeping data for instrument health and calibration. The data sampling can be commanded as fast as 10 msec per frame (corresponding to ~80 m spatial separation) in burst mode, and has significant onboard storage capability and data compression scheme. Experimental data from instrument testing with both ions and neutrals will be presented. The instrument is successfully integrated in the CubeSat and passed vibration, thermal and shock testing. The ExoCube mission is scheduled to fly in Nov 2014 in a 445 x 670 km polar orbit with the INMS aperture oriented in the ram direction. This miniaturized instrument (1

  6. MOMA Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer onboard the 2018 ExoMars Mission: results and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Pinnick, V. T.; Szopa, C.; Grand, N.; Humeau, O.; van Amerom, F. H.; Danell, R.; Freissinet, C.; Brinckerhoff, W.; Gonnsen, Z.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Coll, P.; Raulin, F.; Goesmann, F.

    2015-10-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) is a dual ion source linear ion trap mass spectrometer that was designed for the 2018 joint ESA-Roscosmos mission to Mars. The main scientific aim of the mission is to search for signs of extant or extinct life in the near subsurface of Mars by acquiring samples from as deep as 2 m below the surface. MOMA will be a key analytical tool in providing chemical (molecular and chiral) information from the solid samples, with particular focus on the characterization of organic content. The MOMA instrument, itself, is a joint venture for NASA and ESA to develop a mass spectrometer capable of analyzing samples from pyrolysis/chemical derivatization gas chromatography (GC) as well as ambient pressure laser desorption ionization (LDI). The combination of the two analytical techniques allows for the chemical characterization of a broad range of compounds, including volatile and non-volatile species. Generally, MOMA can provide information on elemental and molecular makeup, polarity, chirality and isotopic patterns of analyte species. Here we report on the current performance of the MOMA prototype instruments, specifically the demonstration of the gas chromatographymass spectrometry (GC-MS) mode of operation.

  7. Chemical composition measurements of the atmosphere of Jupiter with the Galileo Probe mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Hartle, R. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Owen, T. C.; Spencer, N. W.

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo Probe entered the atmosphere of Jupiter on December 7, 1995. Measurements of the chemical and isotopic composition of the Jovian atmosphere were obtained by the mass spectrometer during the descent over the 0.5 to 21 bar pressure region over a time period of approximately 1 hour. The sampling was either of atmospheric gases directly introduced into the ion source of the mass spectrometer through capillary leaks or of gas, which had been chemically processed to enhance the sensitivity of the measurement to trace species or noble gases. The analysis of this data set continues to be refined based on supporting laboratory studies on an engineering unit. The mixing ratios of the major constituents of the atmosphere hydrogen and helium have been determined as well as mixing ratios or upper limits for several less abundant species including: methane, water, ammonia, ethane, ethylene, propane, hydrogen sulfide, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. Analysis also suggests the presence of trace levels of other 3 and 4 carbon hydrocarbons, or carbon and nitrogen containing species, phosphine, hydrogen chloride, and of benzene. The data set also allows upper limits to be set for many species of interest which were not detected. Isotope ratios were measured for 3He/4He, D/H, 13C/12C, 20Ne/22Ne, 38Ar/36Ar and for isotopes of both Kr and Xe.

  8. Super-Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources: Application and Coupling to API Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Rahman, Md. Matiur; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2014-01-01

    Pressurizing the ionization source to gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a new tactic aimed at further improving the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources. In principle, all API sources, such as ESI, APCI and AP-MALDI, can be operated at pressure higher than 1 atm if suitable vacuum interface is available. The gas pressure in the ion source can have different role for different ionization. For example, in the case of ESI, stable electrospray could be sustained for high surface tension liquid (e.g., pure water) under super-atmospheric pressure, owing to the absence of electric discharge. Even for nanoESI, which is known to work well with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity were found to be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source was pressurized. For the gas phase ionization like APCI, measurement of gaseous compound also showed an increase in ion intensity with the ion source pressure until an optimum pressure at around 4–5 atm. The enhancement was due to the increased collision frequency among reactant ion and analyte that promoted the ion/molecule reaction and a higher intake rate of gas to the mass spectrometer. Because the design of vacuum interface for API instrument is based on the upstream pressure of 1 atm, some coupling aspects need to be considered when connecting the high pressure ion source to the mass spectrometer. Several coupling strategies are discussed in this paper. PMID:26819896

  9. Deep Atmosphere Ammonia Mixing Ratio at Jupiter from the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Niemann, H. B.; Demick, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    New laboratory studies employing the Engineering Unit (EU) of the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer (GPMS) have resulted in a substantial reduction in the previously reported upper limit on the ammonia mixing ratio derived from the GPMS experiment at Jupiter. This measurement is complicated by background ammonia contributions in the GPMS during direct atmospheric sampling produced from the preceding gas enrichment experiments. These backgrounds can be quantified with the data from the EU studies when they are carried out in a manner that duplicates the descent profile of pressure and enrichment cell loading. This background is due to the tendency of ammonia to interact strongly with the walls of the mass spectrometer and on release to contribute to the gas being directly directed into the ion source from the atmosphere through a capillary pressure reduction leak. It is evident from the GPMS and other observations that the mixing ratio of ammonia at Jupiter reaches the deep atmosphere value at substantially higher pressures than previously assumed. This is a likely explanation for the previously perceived discrepancy between ammonia values derived from ground based microwave observations and those obtained from attenuation of the Galileo Probe radio signal.

  10. Chemical composition measurements of the atmosphere of Jupiter with the Galileo Probe mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Niemann, H B; Atreya, S K; Carignan, G R; Donahue, T M; Haberman, J A; Harpold, D N; Hartle, R E; Hunten, D M; Kasprzak, W T; Mahaffy, P R; Owen, T C; Spencer, N W

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo Probe entered the atmosphere of Jupiter on December 7, 1995. Measurements of the chemical and isotopic composition of the Jovian atmosphere were obtained by the mass spectrometer during the descent over the 0.5 to 21 bar pressure region over a time period of approximately 1 hour. The sampling was either of atmospheric gases directly introduced into the ion source of the mass spectrometer through capillary leaks or of gas, which had been chemically processed to enhance the sensitivity of the measurement to trace species or noble gases. The analysis of this data set continues to be refined based on supporting laboratory studies on an engineering unit. The mixing ratios of the major constituents of the atmosphere hydrogen and helium have been determined as well as mixing ratios or upper limits for several less abundant species including: methane, water, ammonia, ethane, ethylene, propane, hydrogen sulfide, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. Analysis also suggests the presence of trace levels of other 3 and 4 carbon hydrocarbons, or carbon and nitrogen containing species, phosphine, hydrogen chloride, and of benzene. The data set also allows upper limits to be set for many species of interest which were not detected. Isotope ratios were measured for 3He/4He, D/H, 13C/12C, 20Ne/22Ne, 38Ar/36Ar and for isotopes of both Kr and Xe. PMID:11541457

  11. Measurement of the tau lepton mass by the Beijing Spectrometer (BES) Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Soderstrom, E.; BES Collaboration

    1992-11-01

    The mass of the {tau} lepton has been measured at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider using the Beijing Spectrometer. A search near threshold for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} was performed. Candidate events were identified by requiring that one {tau} decay via {tau} {yields} e{nu}{bar {nu}}, and the other via {tau} {yields} {mu}{nu}{bar {nu}}. The mass value, obtained from a fit to the energy dependence of the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} cross section, is m{sub {tau}} = 1776.9{sub -0.5}{sup +0.4} {plus_minus} 0.2 MeV.

  12. Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometer (LAMS) as a Standoff Analyzer in Space Missions for Airless Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, X.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Managadze, G. G.; Pugel, D. E.; Corrigan, C. M.; Doty, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    A laser ablation mass spectrometer (LAMS) based on a time-of-flight (TOF) analyzer with adjustable drift length is proposed as a standoff elemental composition sensor for space missions to airless bodies. It is found that the use of a retarding potential analyzer in combination with a two-stage reflectron enables LAMS to be operated at variable drift length. For field-free drift lengths between 33 cm to 100 cm, at least unit mass resolution can be maintained solely by adjustment of internal voltages, and without resorting to drastic reductions in sensitivity. Therefore, LAMS should be able to be mounted on a robotic arm and analyze samples at standoff distances of up to several tens of cm, permitting high operational flexibility and wide area coverage of heterogeneous regolith on airless bodies.

  13. Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam

    DOEpatents

    Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

    2003-10-14

    A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

  14. The Bennett ion-mass spectrometer on Atmosphere Explorer-C and -E.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinton, H. C.; Scott, L. R.; Pharo, M. W., III; Coulson, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    The Bennett spectrometer to be flown on Atmosphere Explorer-C and -E (AE-C and AE-E) is designed to measure, throughout the 120 to 4000-km orbit, the concentrations of all thermal positive ions in the mass range 1 to 72 amu and number density range 5 to 5,000,000 ions per cu cm. To reduce the buildup of ram pressure and facilitate measurements at low altitude, the analyzer is vented, and a multigrid ion-current collector is employed. An extensive command capability permits optimization of instrument parameters for particular measurement objectives; commandable functions include mass-scan range and period, the sensitivity-resolution characteristic of the analyzer, orifice potential, and in-flight calibration.

  15. Bennett ion mass spectrometers on the Pioneer Venus Bus and Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, H. A., Jr.; Brinton, H. C.; Wagner, T. C. G.; Blackwell, B. H.; Cordier, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    Identical Bennett radio-frequency ion mass spectrometer instruments on the Pioneer Venus Bus and Orbiter have provided the first in-situ measurements of the detailed composition of the planet's ionosphere. The sensitivity, resolution, and dynamic range are sufficient to provide measurements of the solar-wind-induced bow-shock, the ionopause, and highly structured distributions of up to 16 thermal ion species within the ionosphere. The use of adaptive scan and detection circuits and servo-controlled logic for ion mass and energy analysis permits detection of ion concentrations as low as 5 ions/cu cm and ion flow velocities as large as 9 km/sec for O(+). A variety of commandable modes provides ion sampling rates ranging from 0.1 to 1.6 sec between measurements of a single constituent. A lightweight sensor and electronics housing are features of a compact instrument package.

  16. Evaluating the Utility of an Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Analyzing Organic Peroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameer, A.; Hastie, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are known to affect the earth's radiation budget through its ability to scatter and absorb radiation. Consequently, the mechanisms and factors that influence SOA composition and formation are poorly understood. However, recent modeling studies coupled with smog chamber experiments suggest that organic peroxides (organic hydroperoxides and peroxyhemiacetals) might be a major component of SOA composition under low NOx conditions. This study utilized an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometer (APCI-MS) in the positive mode to detect organic peroxides. Mass spectra of organic peroxides analyzed in this study show excessive fragmentation during ionization with protonated water clusters. It was believed that intact ions were not found due to decomposition in the ion source. Future work will explore new reagents for ionization to reduce fragmentation during analysis.

  17. A Weld Defects Detection System Based on a Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Bebiano, Daniel; Alfaro, Sadek C. A.

    2009-01-01

    Improved product quality and production methods, and decreased production costs are important objectives of industries. Welding processes are part of this goal. There are many studies about monitoring and controlling welding process. This work presents a non-intrusive on-line monitoriment system and some algorithms capable of detecting GTAW weld defects. Some experiments were made to simulate weld defects by disturbing the electric arc. The data comes from a spectrometer which captures perturbations on the electric arc by the radiation emission of chosen lines. Algorithms based on change detection methods are used to indicate the presence and localization of those defects. PMID:22574049

  18. FTIR spectrometer with solid-state drive system

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Seals, Roland D.; Egert, Charles M.

    1999-01-01

    An FTIR spectrometer (10) and method using a solid-state drive system with thermally responsive members (27) that are subject to expansion upon heating and to contraction upon cooling. Such members (27) are assembled in the device (10) so as to move an angled, reflective surface (22) a small distance. The sample light beam (13) is received at a detector (24) along with a reference light beam (13) and there it is combined into a resulting signal. This allows the "interference" between the two beams to occur for spectral analysis by a processor (29).

  19. High-performance multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometers for research with exotic nuclei and for analytical mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaß, Wolfgang R.; Dickel, Timo; Ayet San Andres, Samuel; Ebert, Jens; Greiner, Florian; Hornung, Christine; Jesch, Christian; Lang, Johannes; Lippert, Wayne; Majoros, Tamas; Short, Devin; Geissel, Hans; Haettner, Emma; Reiter, Moritz P.; Rink, Ann-Kathrin; Scheidenberger, Christoph; Yavor, Mikhail I.

    2015-11-01

    A class of multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometers (MR-TOF-MSs) has been developed for research with exotic nuclei at present and future accelerator facilities such as GSI and FAIR (Darmstadt), and TRIUMF (Vancouver). They can perform highly accurate mass measurements of exotic nuclei, serve as high-resolution, high-capacity mass separators and be employed as diagnostics devices to monitor the production, separation and manipulation of beams of exotic nuclei. In addition, a mobile high-resolution MR-TOF-MS has been developed for in situ applications in analytical mass spectrometry ranging from environmental research to medicine. Recently, the MR-TOF-MS for GSI and FAIR has been further developed. A novel RF quadrupole-based ion beam switchyard has been developed that allows merging and splitting of ion beams as well as transport of ions into different directions. It efficiently connects a test and reference ion source and an auxiliary detector to the system. Due to an increase in the kinetic energy of the ions in the time-of-flight analyzer of the MR-TOF-MS, a given mass resolving power is now achieved in less than half the time-of-flight. Conversely, depending on the time-of-flight, the mass resolving power has been increased by a factor of more than two.

  20. Ambient Aerosol in Southeast Asia: High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements Over Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Dimarco, C.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Farmer, D.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J.

    2008-12-01

    The emission of organic compounds in the troposphere is important factor in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). A very large proportion of organic material emitted globally is estimated to arise from biogenic sources, with almost half coming from tropical and sub-tropical forests. Preliminary analyses of leave cuvette emission studies suggest that oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is a significantly larger source of isoprene than tropical forest. Much larger sources of isoprene over oil palm allied with a larger anthropogenic component of local emissions contrast greatly with the remote tropical forest environment and therefore the character of SOA formed may differ significantly. These issues, allied with the high price of palm oil on international markets leading to increased use of land for oil palm production, could give rise to rapidly changing chemical and aerosol regimes in the tropics. It is therefore important to understand the current emissions and composition of organic aerosol over all important land-uses in the tropical environment. This in turn will lead to a greater understanding of the present, and to an improvement in predictive capacity for the future system. To help address these issues, a high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in the Sabahmas (PPB OIL) oil palm plantation near Lahad Datu, in Eastern Sabah, as part of the field component of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) project, part of the UK NERC APPRAISE program. This project was allied closely with measurements made of similar chemical species and aerosol components at a forest site in the Danum Valley as part of the UK Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest (OP3) project. Measurements of submicron non- refractory aerosol composition are presented along with some preliminary analysis of chemically resolved aerosol fluxes made with a new eddy covariance system, based on the

  1. Development of analytically capable time-of-flight mass spectrometer with continuous ion introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hárs, György; Dobos, Gábor

    2010-03-01

    The present article describes the results and findings explored in the course of the development of the analytically capable prototype of continuous time-of-flight (CTOF) mass spectrometer. Currently marketed pulsed TOF (PTOF) instruments use ion introduction with a 10 ns or so pulse width, followed by a waiting period roughly 100 μs. Accordingly, the sample is under excitation in 10-4 part of the total measuring time. This very low duty cycle severely limits the sensitivity of the PTOF method. A possible approach to deal with this problem is to use linear sinusoidal dual modulation technique (CTOF) as described in this article. This way the sensitivity of the method is increased, due to the 50% duty cycle of the excitation. All other types of TOF spectrometer use secondary electron multiplier (SEM) for detection, which unfortunately discriminates in amplification in favor of the lighter ions. This discrimination effect is especially undesirable in a mass spectrometric method, which targets high mass range. In CTOF method, SEM is replaced with Faraday cup detector, thus eliminating the mass discrimination effect. Omitting SEM is made possible by the high ion intensity and the very slow ion detection with some hundred hertz detection bandwidth. The electrometer electronics of the Faraday cup detector operates with amplification 1010 V/A. The primary ion beam is highly monoenergetic due to the construction of the ion gun, which made possible to omit any electrostatic mirror configuration for bunching the ions. The measurement is controlled by a personal computer and the intelligent signal generator Type Tabor WW 2571, which uses the direct digital synthesis technique for making arbitrary wave forms. The data are collected by a Labjack interface board, and the fast Fourier transformation is performed by the software. Noble gas mixture has been used to test the analytical capabilities of the prototype setup. Measurement presented proves the results of the mathematical

  2. Development of analytically capable time-of-flight mass spectrometer with continuous ion introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hars, Gyoergy; Dobos, Gabor

    2010-03-15

    The present article describes the results and findings explored in the course of the development of the analytically capable prototype of continuous time-of-flight (CTOF) mass spectrometer. Currently marketed pulsed TOF (PTOF) instruments use ion introduction with a 10 ns or so pulse width, followed by a waiting period roughly 100 {mu}s. Accordingly, the sample is under excitation in 10{sup -4} part of the total measuring time. This very low duty cycle severely limits the sensitivity of the PTOF method. A possible approach to deal with this problem is to use linear sinusoidal dual modulation technique (CTOF) as described in this article. This way the sensitivity of the method is increased, due to the 50% duty cycle of the excitation. All other types of TOF spectrometer use secondary electron multiplier (SEM) for detection, which unfortunately discriminates in amplification in favor of the lighter ions. This discrimination effect is especially undesirable in a mass spectrometric method, which targets high mass range. In CTOF method, SEM is replaced with Faraday cup detector, thus eliminating the mass discrimination effect. Omitting SEM is made possible by the high ion intensity and the very slow ion detection with some hundred hertz detection bandwidth. The electrometer electronics of the Faraday cup detector operates with amplification 10{sup 10} V/A. The primary ion beam is highly monoenergetic due to the construction of the ion gun, which made possible to omit any electrostatic mirror configuration for bunching the ions. The measurement is controlled by a personal computer and the intelligent signal generator Type Tabor WW 2571, which uses the direct digital synthesis technique for making arbitrary wave forms. The data are collected by a Labjack interface board, and the fast Fourier transformation is performed by the software. Noble gas mixture has been used to test the analytical capabilities of the prototype setup. Measurement presented proves the results of

  3. Organic chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere and its astrobiological consequences: I. Views towards Cassini plasma spectrometer (CAPS) and ion neutral mass spectrometer (INMS) experiments in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Sittler, E. C.; Chornay, D.; Rowe, B. R.; Puzzarini, C.

    2015-05-01

    The discovery of carbocations and carbanions by Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft in Titan's upper atmosphere is truly amazing for astrochemists and astrobiologists. In this paper we identify the reaction mechanisms for the growth of the complex macromolecules observed by the CAPS Ion Beam Spectrometer (IBS) and Electron Spectrometer (ELS). This identification is based on a recently published paper (Ali et al., 2013. Planet. Space Sci. 87, 96) which emphasizes the role of Olah's nonclassical carbonium ion chemistry in the synthesis of the organic molecules observed in Titan's thermosphere and ionosphere by INMS. The main conclusion of that work was the demonstration of the presence of the cyclopropenyl cation - the simplest Huckel's aromatic molecule - and its cyclic methyl derivatives in Titan's atmosphere at high altitudes. In this study, we present the transition from simple aromatic molecules to the complex ortho-bridged bi- and tri-cyclic hydrocarbons, e.g., CH2+ mono-substituted naphthalene and phenanthrene, as well as the ortho- and peri-bridged tri-cyclic aromatic ring, e.g., perinaphthenyl cation. These rings could further grow into tetra-cyclic and the higher order ring polymers in Titan's upper atmosphere. Contrary to the pre-Cassini observations, the nitrogen chemistry of Titan's upper atmosphere is found to be extremely rich. A variety of N-containing hydrocarbons including the N-heterocycles where a CH group in the polycyclic rings mentioned above is replaced by an N atom, e.g., CH2+ substituted derivative of quinoline (benzopyridine), are found to be dominant in Titan's upper atmosphere. The mechanisms for the formation of complex molecular anions are discussed as well. It is proposed that many closed-shell complex carbocations after their formation first, in Titan's upper atmosphere, undergo the kinetics of electron recombination to form open-shell neutral

  4. SWEPP gamma-ray spectrometer system software user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Femec, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    The SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurement and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contact-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP). In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, the software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of specific interest, and provides controls for SGRS hardware as required. This document serves as a user`s guide for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  5. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Peptide Cations in a Dual Pressure Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Myles W.; Smith, Suncerae I.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Madsen, James A.; Coon, Joshua J.; Schwartz, Jae C.; Stafford, George C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    A dual pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer was modified to permit infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in each of the two cells - the first a high pressure cell operated at nominally 5 × 10-3 Torr and the second a low pressure cell operated at nominally 3 × 10-4 Torr. When IRMPD was performed in the high pressure cell, most peptide ions did not undergo significant photodissociation; however, in the low pressure cell peptide cations were efficiently dissociated with less than 25 ms of IR irradiation regardless of charge state. IRMPD of peptide cations allowed the detection of low m/z product ions including the y1 fragments and immonium ions which are not typically observed by ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID). Photodissociation efficiencies of ~100% and MS/MS (tandem mass spectrometry) efficiencies of greater than 60% were observed for both multiply and singly protonated peptides. In general, higher sequence coverage of peptides was obtained using IRMPD over CID. Further, greater than 90% of the product ion current in the IRMPD mass spectra of doubly charged peptide ions was composed of singly charged product ions compared to the CID mass spectra in which the abundances of the multiply and singly charged product ions were equally divided. Highly charged primary product ions also underwent efficient photodissociation to yield singly charged secondary product ions, thus simplifying the IRMPD product ion mass spectra. PMID:19739654

  6. Advanced Laser Architecture for Two-Step Laser Tandem Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, Molly E.; Li, Steven X.; Yu, Anthony W.; Getty, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Future astrobiology missions will focus on planets with significant astrochemical or potential astrobiological features, such as small, primitive bodies and the icy moons of the outer planets that may host diverse organic compounds. These missions require advanced instrument techniques to fully and unambiguously characterize the composition of surface and dust materials. Laser desorptionionization mass spectrometry (LDMS) is an emerging instrument technology for in situ mass analysis of non-volatile sample composition. A recent Goddard LDMS advancement is the two-step laser tandem mass spectrometer (L2MS) instrument to address the need for future flight instrumentation to deconvolve complex organic signatures. The L2MS prototype uses a resonance enhanced multi-photon laser ionization mechanism to selectively detect aromatic species from a more complex sample. By neglecting the aliphatic and inorganic mineral signatures in the two-step mass spectrum, the L2MS approach can provide both mass assignments and clues to structural information for an in situ investigation of non-volatile sample composition. In this paper we will describe our development effort on a new laser architecture that is based on the previously flown Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) laser transmitter for the L2MS instrument. The laser provides two discrete midinfrared wavelengths (2.8 m and 3.4 m) using monolithic optical parametric oscillators and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength (266 nm) on a single laser bench with a straightforward development path toward flight readiness.

  7. A Data Aquisition System for the Crystal Ball Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, S.

    1997-10-01

    A new Baryon Spectroscopy program has been initiated at the Brookhaven AGS facility with the Crystal Ball Spectrometer. This spectrometer, which consists of 672 NaI(Tl) crystals over most of a 4π geometry, was originally built for studies of the excited charmonium spectrum at SLAC, and also used later at DESY. The readout from all crystals was originally multiplexed through a single ADC, with typical readout rates of about 5 Hz. There were separate digitizations into low-energy and high-energy ranges. For the AGS program, a new data readout system has been designed. The electronic readout of each of the 80 minor triangles of 5 or 9 crystals is now multiplexed through a FERA ADC system into a VME dual-port memory. The software readout and control was done by the CEBAF Online Data Acquisition system (CODA). For a typical event size of 1 kbyte, a maximum readout rate of 1.2 kHz was achieved. An interface with PAW was also implemented for on-line monitoring of the beam, detector, and physics events. A description of these components will be presented.

  8. Study to evaluate the integration of a mass spectrometer with a wet chemistry instrument. [for amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The charactertistics and performance capability of the current Viking '75 Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer Instrument are reviewed and documented for the purpose of possible integration with a wet chemistry instrument. Interface, high mass discrimination, and vacuum requirements were determined in a simulated flight investigation. Suggestions for future investigations, tradeoff studies, and design modifications are presented, along with the results of column bleed measurements. A preliminary design of an integrated Wet Chemistry/Mass Spectrometer instrument for amino acid analysis is shown, including estimates of additional weight, volume, and power requirements.

  9. Miniaturized electronic system for the Planetary Integrated Camera-Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soll, Stanley L.; Graham, Richard; Ramirez, Luis J.

    1994-09-01

    This paper discusses the design, and implementation of a miniaturized electronic system for the Planetary Integrated Camera Spectrometer (PICS). The PICS electronics demonstrate the application of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and of analog hybrid technology to space flight multi-spectral systems. A discussion of the electronic system design illustrates how signals from a multi-sensor instrument containing an UV CCD, two visible CCDs, and a near-IR focal plane assembly can be processed through a common set of electronics. Following the system design discussion, the actual electronic design will be presented. Each miniaturized module will be discussed as to functionality and performance. The test setup for bench checkout of a cooled CCD and an IR FPA, including results with breadboard electronics and with the hybrids are also described.

  10. Systematic examination of the signal area precision of a single quadrupole enhanced low mass option (ELMO) MSQ [corrected] mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Klaus; Höffler, Susanne; Meyer, Axel

    2006-01-01

    To examine the precision of the signal area response of an enhanced low mass option (ELMO) MSQmass spectrometer, operated in the negative electrospray ionization (ESI) mode, extended tests were performed, using flow injection analysis mass spectrometry (FIA-MS). Analytes were nitrate, nitrite, malonic acid, and D,L-mandelic acid. Composition and concentration of injected samples, application of an ASRS anion suppressor and of the cone wash unit, methanol addition to the FIA flow medium, and the voltage bias of the hexapole transfer lens were test variables. Individual test cycles comprised up to 90 injections, processed within 20 h. With a few exceptions the signal response tended to decline over time leading to a loss of more than 80% of the initial signal area in extreme cases. A hexapole radio-frequency (RF) voltage bias of -0.3 V led to an overall low detector response and to high losses of sensitivity over time. Other correlations between the insufficient signal reproducibility and FIA-MS operating conditions could not be established. The test scheme gave hints how to localize the cause of the mass spectrometer malfunction. The repetition of the test scheme after remedying the detected electronic default demonstrated that relative standard deviations less than 5% can be achieved for a sequence of 30 injections if methanol is added to the FIA flow medium and if a suppressor is used. Based on these findings a recommendation is formulated to supplement current test schemes for instrument performance verification by a detector response precision criterion. PMID:16841363

  11. Design of a Portable, Battery-Powered Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer for Real-Time Sampling of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    T. R. Dillingham, T. L. Porter, D. M. Cornelison, R. J. Venedam

    2009-04-01

    We have designed and constructed a low cost, portable, battery-powered quadrupole mass spectrometer for use in the materials analysis of gaseous, liquid or solid field samples. The system may be configured for continuous sampling of ambient gas samples, or for the analysis of small solid, liquid or gas samples in sealed glass vials. The system is capable of measuring partial pressures down to the 10<-10> Torr range, and may be operated on battery power for several hours in a field deployment. Information is presented on the specific design parameters and on the testing of the instrument. Preliminary results are reported for solid dinitrotoluene (DNT) and for chlorinated hydrocarbons and other contaminants in water.

  12. Performance of the MOMA Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer onboard the 2018 ExoMars Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Pinnick, Veronica; Szopa, Cyril; Grand, Noël; Freissinet, Caroline; Danell, Ryan; van Ameron, Friso; Arevalo, Ricardo; Brinckerhoff, William; Raulin, François; Mahaffy, Paul; Goesmann, Fred

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) is a dual ion source linear ion trap mass spectrometer that was designed for the 2018 joint ESA-Roscosmos mission to Mars. The main scientific aim of the mission is to search for signs of extant or extinct life in the near subsurface of Mars by acquir-ing samples from as deep as 2 m below the surface. MOMA will be a key analytical tool in providing chemical (molecular) information from the solid samples, with particular focus on the characterization of organic content. The MOMA instrument, itself, is a joint venture for NASA and ESA to develop a mass spectrometer capable of analyzing samples from pyrolysis gas chromatograph (GC) as well as ambient pressure laser desorption ionization (LDI). The combination of the two analytical techniques allows for the chemical characterization of a broad range of compounds, including volatile and non-volatile species. Generally, MOMA can provide in-formation on elemental and molecular makeup, po-larity, chirality and isotopic patterns of analyte spe-cies. Here we report on the current performance of the MOMA prototype instruments, specifically the demonstration of the gas chromatography-mass spec-trometry (GC-MS) mode of operation. Both instruments have been tested separately first and have been coupled in order to test the efficiency of the future MOMA GC-MS instrument. The main objective of the second step has been to test the quantitative response of both instruments while they are coupled and to characterize the combined instrument detection limit for several compounds. A final experiment has been done in order to test the feasibility of the separation and detection of a mixture contained in a soil sample introduced in the MOMA oven.

  13. Atmospheric amines and ammonia measured with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Y.; Kanawade, V. P.; de Gouw, J. A.; Guenther, A. B.; Madronich, S.; Sierra-Hernández, M. R.; Lawler, M.; Smith, J. N.; Takahama, S.; Ruggeri, G.; Koss, A.; Olson, K.; Baumann, K.; Weber, R. J.; Nenes, A.; Guo, H.; Edgerton, E. S.; Porcelli, L.; Brune, W. H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Lee, S.-H.

    2014-11-01

    We report measurements of ambient amines and ammonia with a fast response chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) in a southeastern US forest and a moderately polluted midwestern site during the summer. At the forest site, mostly C3-amines (from pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 2 ppbv) were detected, and they both showed temperature dependencies. Aerosol-phase amines measured thermal-desorption chemical ionization mass spectrometer (TDCIMS) showed a higher mass fraction in the evening with cooler temperatures and lower in the afternoon with warmer temperatures, a trend opposite to the gas-phase amines. Concentrations of aerosol-phase primary amines measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) from micron and submicron particles were 2 orders of magnitude higher than the gas-phase amines. These results indicate that gas to particle conversion is one of the major processes that control the ambient amine concentrations at this forest site. Temperature dependencies of C3-amines and ammonia also imply reversible processes of evaporation of these nitrogen-containing compounds from soil surfaces in daytime and deposition to soil surfaces at nighttime. During the transported biomass burning plume events, various amines (C1-C6) appeared at the pptv level, indicating that biomass burning is a substantial source of amines in the southeastern US. At the moderately polluted Kent site, there were higher concentrations of C1- to C6-amines (pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 6 ppbv). C1- to C3-amines and ammonia were well correlated with the ambient temperature. C4- to C6-amines showed frequent spikes during the nighttime, suggesting that they were emitted from local sources. These abundant amines and ammonia may in part explain the frequent new particle formation events reported from Kent. Higher amine concentrations measured at the polluted site than at the rural forested site highlight the importance of constraining anthropogenic emission

  14. High-resolution accurate mass measurements of biomolecules using a new electrospray ionization ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Winger, B E; Hofstadler, S A; Bruce, J E; Udseth, H R; Smith, R D

    1993-07-01

    A novel electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer based on a 7-T superconducting magnet was developed for high-resolution accurate mass measurements of large biomolecules. Ions formed at atmospheric pressure using electrospray ionization (ESI) were transmitted (through six differential pumping stages) to the trapped ion cell maintained below 10(-9) torr. The increased pumping speed attainable with cryopumping (> 10(5) L/s) allowed brief pressure excursions to above 10(-4) torr, with greatly enhanced trapping efficiencies and subsequent short pumpdown times, facilitating high-resolution mass measurements. A set of electromechanical shutters were also used to minimize the effect of the directed molecular beam produced by the ES1 source and were open only during ion injection. Coupled with the use of the pulsed-valve gas inlet, the trapped ion cell was generally filled to the space charge limit within 100 ms. The use of 10-25 ms ion injection times allowed mass spectra to be obtained from 4 fmol of bovine insulin (Mr 5734) and ubiquitin (Mr 8565, with resolution sufficient to easily resolve the isotopic envelopes and determine the charge states. The microheterogeneity of the glycoprotein ribonuclease B was examined, giving a measured mass of 14,898.74 Da for the most abundant peak in the isotopic envelope of the normally glycosylated protein (i.e., with five mannose and two N-acetylglucosamine residues (an error of approximately 2 ppm) and an average error of approximately 1 ppm for the higher glycosylated and various H3PO4 adducted forms of the protein. Time-domain signals lasting in excess of 80 s were obtained for smaller proteins, producing, for example, a mass resolution of more than 700,000 for the 4(+) charge state (m/z 1434) of insulin. PMID:24227643

  15. Design and fabrication of a basic mass analyzer and vacuum system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judson, C. M.; Josias, C.; Lawrence, J. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A two-inch hyperbolic rod quadrupole mass analyzer with a mass range of 400 to 200 amu and a sensitivity exceeding 100 packs per billion has been developed and tested. This analyzer is the basic hardware portion of a microprocessor-controlled quadrupole mass spectrometer for a Gas Analysis and Detection System (GADS). The development and testing of the hyperbolic-rod quadrupole mass spectrometer and associated hardware are described in detail.

  16. Hybrid quadrupole mass filter/quadrupole ion trap/time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gulyuz, Kerim; Stedwell, Corey N.; Wang Da; Polfer, Nick C.

    2011-05-15

    We present a laboratory-constructed mass spectrometer optimized for recording infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra of mass-selected ions using a benchtop tunable infrared optical parametric oscillator/amplifier (OPO/A). The instrument is equipped with two ionization sources, an electrospray ionization source, as well as an electron ionization source for troubleshooting. This hybrid mass spectrometer is composed of a quadrupole mass filter for mass selection, a reduced pressure ({approx}10{sup -5} Torr) quadrupole ion trap (QIT) for OPO irradiation, and a reflectron time-of-flight drift tube for detecting the remaining precursor and photofragment ions. A helium gas pulse is introduced into the QIT to temporarily increase the pressure and hence enhance the trapping efficiency of axially injected ions. After a brief pump-down delay, the compact ion cloud is subjected to the focused output from the continuous wave OPO. In a recent study, we implemented this setup in the study of protonated tryptophan, TrpH{sup +}, as well as collision-induced dissociation products of this protonated amino acid [W. K. Mino, Jr., K. Gulyuz, D. Wang, C. N. Stedwell, and N. C. Polfer, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2, 299 (2011)]. Here, we give a more detailed account on the figures of merit of such IRMPD experiments. The appreciable photodissociation yields in these measurements demonstrate that IRMPD spectroscopy of covalently bound ions can be routinely carried out using benchtop OPO setups.

  17. Method for calibrating a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Tolmachev, Aleksey

    2003-08-19

    A method for improving the calibration of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer wherein the frequency spectrum of a sample has been measured and the frequency (f) and intensity (I) of at least three species having known mass to charge (m/z) ratios and one specie having an unknown (m/z) ratio have been identified. The method uses the known (m/z) ratios, frequencies, and intensities at least three species to calculate coefficients A, B, and C, wherein the mass to charge ratio of a least one of the three species (m/z).sub.i is equal to ##EQU1## wherein f.sub.i is the detected frequency of the specie, G(I.sub.i) is a predetermined function of the intensity of the species, and Q is a predetermined exponent. Using the calculated values for A, B, and C, the mass to charge ratio of the unknown specie (m/z).sub.ii is calculated as the sum of ##EQU2## wherein f.sub.ii is the measured frequency of the unknown specie, and (I.sub.ii) is the measured intensity of the unknown specie.

  18. A freshwater bioprobe: Periostracum of the Asian Clam, Corbicula fluminea (Müller) combined with laser microprobe mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, P J; Rollins, H; Sharkey, A G; Prezant, R S; Kim, Y; Hercules, D M

    1993-01-01

    A freshwater bioprobe, combining the Asiatic Clam, Corbicula fluminea (Müller) and the laser microprobe mass spectrometer (LAMMA), can determine anthropogenic chemical contamination of freshwater systems. Laser generated mass spectra from the periostracal layers of clams contaminated with either a salt, potassium bromide, or an aromatic compound, phenol, produce distinctive mass spectral signatures that are different from uncontaminated clams. Uncontaminated clams have characteristic signatures with distinctive spectral peaks less than m/z 41; while exposed clams have many strong peaks well above this m/z. This freshwater bioprobe, using LAMMA to analyze the surface of clams, can be used as a screening tool for monitoring the water-treatment systems, for determining the source of contaminated baseflow and return flow discharge to streams, and for monitoring the water chemistry of a body of water. This system exploits the facility of using the shell instead of soft tissue with the LAMMA and has potential to detect anthropogenically-derived chemical stress. PMID:15091918

  19. High resolution/accurate mass (HRMS) detection of anatoxin-a in lake water using LDTD-APCI coupled to a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Solliec, Morgan; Sinotte, Marc; Deblois, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    A new innovative analytical method combining ultra-fast analysis time with high resolution/accurate mass detection was developed to eliminate the misidentification of anatoxin-a (ANA-a), a cyanobacterial toxin, from the natural amino acid phenylalanine (PHE). This was achieved by using the laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD-APCI) coupled to the Q-Exactive, a high resolution/accurate mass spectrometer (HRMS). This novel combination, the LDTD-APCI-HRMS, allowed for an ultra-fast analysis time (<15 s/sample). A comparison of two different acquisition modes (full scan and targeted ion fragmentation) was made to determine the most rigorous analytical method using the LDTD-APCI interface. Method development focused toward selectivity and sensitivity improvement to reduce the possibility of false positives and to lower detection limits. The Q-Exactive mass spectrometer operates with resolving powers between 17500 and 140000 FWHM (m/z 200). Nevertheless, a resolution of 17500FWHM is enough to dissociate ANA-a and PHE signals. Mass accuracy was satisfactory with values below 1 ppm reaching precision to the fourth decimal. Internal calibration with standard addition was achieved with the isotopically-labeled (D5) phenylalanine with good linearity (R(2)>0.999). Enhancement of signal to noise ratios relative to a standard triple-quadrupole method was demonstrated with lower detection and quantification limit values of 0.2 and 0.6 μg/L using the Q-Exactive. Accuracy and interday/intraday relative standard deviations were below 15%. The new method was applied to 8 different lake water samples with signs of cyanobacterial blooms. This work demonstrates the possibility of using an ultra-fast LDTD-APCI sample introduction system with an HRMS hybrid instrument for quantitative purposes with high selectivity in complex environmental matrices. PMID:25476385

  20. Conversion of an Agilent Chip Cube System and Adaptation of a ROXY EC Potentiostat for the Analysis of Proteolytic and Non-Proteolytic Protein Samples on a Thermo Finnigan LTQ-FT Ultra Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed Central

    Crot, C.; Helseth, L.; Xu, H.; Davis, R.; Schilling, A.

    2010-01-01

    RP-48 High resolution, high mass accuracy analysis of peptide digests and proteins using hybrid instruments such as the Thermo Finnigan LTQ-FT Ultra instrument allow for faster unambiguous computer identification of proteins from peptide digests, accurate measurement of intact protein MW and detection of post translational modifications by top down methods and the use of auxiliary dissociation methods such as ECD to study disulfide bonds and crosslinked peptides as well as post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation. User demand for these instruments remains high in shared facilities like ours and efforts are always being made to improve sample throughput to increase instrument availability. Several vendors have released microfluidic based integrated chromatographic systems in the last few years that allow for relatively easy use in nanospray mode along with reductions in delay volumes and significant improvement in sample throughput and sensitivity. The current work reports on the successful integration of one such system, the Agilent Chip Cube system, originally designed to work only on MS instruments from that manufacturer, so that it will function routinely on the LTQ-FT Ultra MS. Using the chip cube's nanocolumn cartridge “chips”, our facility has been able to significantly shorten runtimes for digest based analyses of simple and complex fractionated samples while obtaining excellent peptide detection using smaller sample injection volumes. Details of the adaptation will be provided and examples will be shown using data from both CID and ECD based proteolytic workflows. In addition, we will present data generated using an online electrochemical potentiostat, the ROXY EC system, along with the chip cube on the LTQ FT Ultra allowing the detection of electrochemically generated peptide fragments from intact proteins as an adjunct/replacement for proteolysis in specific analytical problems where the use of nano-LC/MS/MS proteolytic analysis is