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Sample records for mass spectrometric mapping

  1. Mass spectrometric map of neuropeptide expression in Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Yew, Joanne Y; Kutz, Kimberly K; Dikler, Sergei; Messinger, Lynn; Li, Lingjun; Stretton, Antony O

    2005-08-01

    A mass spectrometric method was used for the localization and sequence characterization of peptides in the nervous system of the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum. Mass spectrometric techniques utilizing MALDI-TOF, MALDI-TOF/TOF, and MALDI-FT instruments were combined with in situ chemical derivatization to examine the expression of known and putative neuropeptides in the A. suum nervous system. This first attempt at peptidomic characterization in A. suum mapped the expression of 39 neuropeptides, 17 of which are considered to be novel and whose expression has not been previously reported. These analyses also revealed that the peptide expression profile is unique to each nervous structure and that the majority of peptides observed belong to the RFamide family of neuropeptides. In addition, four new peptide sequences with a shared C-terminal PNFLRFamide motif are proposed based on in situ sequencing with mass spectrometry. PMID:15973679

  2. Mass spectrometric protein maps for biomarker discovery and clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yansheng; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Collins, Ben; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2013-01-01

    Among the wide range of proteomic technologies, targeted mass spectrometry (MS) has shown great potential for biomarker studies. To extend the degree of multiplexing achieved by selected reaction monitoring (SRM), we recently developed SWATH MS. SWATH MS is a variant of the emerging class of data-independent acquisition (DIA) methods and essentially converts the molecules in a physical sample into perpetually re-usable digital maps. The thus generated SWATH maps are then mined using a targeted data extraction strategy, allowing us to profile disease-related proteomes at a high degree of reproducibility. The successful application of both SRM and SWATH MS requires the a priori generation of reference spectral maps that provide coordinates for quantification. Herein, we demonstrate that the application of the mass spectrometric reference maps and the acquisition of personalized SWATH maps hold a particular promise for accelerating the current process of biomarker discovery. PMID:24138574

  3. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W.; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2005-12-13

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  4. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2007-12-04

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  5. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2013-07-16

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  6. CLPM: A Cross-Linked Peptide Mapping Algorithm for Mass Spectrometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yong; Chen, Yingfeng; Lichti, Cheryl F; Hall, Roger A; Raney, Kevin D; Jennings, Steven F

    2005-01-01

    Background Protein-protein, protein-DNA and protein-RNA interactions are of central importance in biological systems. Quadrapole Time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometry is a sensitive, promising tool for studying these interactions. Combining this technique with chemical crosslinking, it is possible to identify the sites of interactions within these complexes. Due to the complexities of the mass spectrometric data of crosslinked proteins, new software is required to analyze the resulting products of these studies. Result We designed a Cross-Linked Peptide Mapping (CLPM) algorithm which takes advantage of all of the information available in the experiment including the amino acid sequence from each protein, the identity of the crosslinker, the identity of the digesting enzyme, the level of missed cleavage, and possible chemical modifications. The algorithm does in silico digestion and crosslinking, calculates all possible mass values and matches the theoretical data to the actual experimental data provided by the mass spectrometry analysis to identify the crosslinked peptides. Conclusion Identifying peptides by their masses can be an efficient starting point for direct sequence confirmation. The CLPM algorithm provides a powerful tool in identifying these potential interaction sites in combination with chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry. Through this cost-effective approach, subsequent efforts can quickly focus attention on investigating these specific interaction sites. PMID:16026606

  7. Protein surface topology-probing by selective chemical modification and mass spectrometric peptide mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Suckau, D; Mak, M; Przybylski, M

    1992-01-01

    Aminoacetylation of lysine residues and the modification of arginine by 1,2-cyclohexanedione to N7,N8-(dihydroxy-1,2-cyclohexylidene)arginine were used for probing the surface topology of hen-eggwhite lysozyme as a model protein. The molecular identification of lysine and arginine modification sites was provided by molecular weight determinations of modified and unmodified tryptic peptide mixtures (peptide mapping) using 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry. At conditions of limited chemical modification, mass-spectrometric peptide-mapping analyses of lysozyme derivatives enabled the direct assignment of relative reactivities of lysine and arginine residues at different reaction times and reagent concentrations. The relative reactivities of lysine residues showed a direct correlation with their surface accessibilities from x-ray structure data. For the reaction with 1,2-cyclohexanedione, a selective modification at Arg-5, -125, -112, and -73 was identified, and an inverse correlation of relative reactivities with the surface accessibility ratios of the N7- and the N8-guanidino functions was obtained. By examination of the x-ray structural data of lysozyme, this selective modification was attributed to intramolecular catalysis because of the presence of neighboring proton acceptor groups, such as the Asp-119 carboxylate group for Arg-125 and the Trp-123 and Arg-125 carbonyl groups for Arg-5. PMID:1608973

  8. A complete mass spectrometric map for the analysis of the yeast proteome and its application to quantitative trait analysis

    PubMed Central

    Picotti, Paola; Clement-Ziza, Mathieu; Lam, Henry; Campbell, David S.; Schmidt, Alexander; Deutsch, Eric W.; Röst, Hannes; Sun, Zhi; Rinner, Oliver; Reiter, Lukas; Shen, Qin; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Frei, Andreas; Alberti, Simon; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Wollscheid, Bernd; Moritz, Robert; Beyer, Andreas; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2013-01-01

    Complete reference maps or datasets, like the genomic map of an organism, are highly beneficial tools for biological and biomedical research. Attempts to generate such reference datasets for a proteome so far failed to reach complete proteome coverage, with saturation apparent at approximately two thirds of the proteomes tested, even for the most thoroughly characterized proteomes. Here, we used a strategy based on high-throughput peptide synthesis and mass spectrometry to generate a close to complete reference map (97% of the genome-predicted proteins) of the S. cerevisiae proteome. We generated two versions of this mass spectrometric map one supporting discovery- (shotgun) and the other hypothesis-driven (targeted) proteomic measurements. The two versions of the map, therefore, constitute a complete set of proteomic assays to support most studies performed with contemporary proteomic technologies. The reference libraries can be browsed via a web-based repository and associated navigation tools. To demonstrate the utility of the reference libraries we applied them to a protein quantitative trait locus (pQTL) analysis, which requires measurement of the same peptides over a large number of samples with high precision. Protein measurements over a set of 78 S. cerevisiae strains revealed a complex relationship between independent genetic loci, impacting on the levels of related proteins. Our results suggest that selective pressure favors the acquisition of sets of polymorphisms that maintain the stoichiometry of protein complexes and pathways. PMID:23334424

  9. Rapid mass spectrometric conversion of tissue biopsy samples into permanent quantitative digital proteome maps

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tiannan; Kouvonen, Petri; Koh, Ching Chiek; Gillet, Ludovic C; Wolski, Witold E; Röst, Hannes L; Rosenberger, George; Collins, Ben C; Blum, Lorenz C; Gillessen, Silke; Joerger, Markus; Jochum, Wolfram; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-01-01

    Clinical specimens are each inherently unique, limited and non-renewable. As such, small samples such as tissue biopsies are often completely consumed after a limited number of analyses. Here we present a method that enables fast and reproducible conversion of a small amount of tissue (approximating the quantity obtained by a biopsy) into a single, permanent digital file representing the mass spectrometry-measurable proteome of the sample. The method combines pressure cycling technology (PCT) and SWATH mass spectrometry (MS), and the resulting proteome maps can be analyzed, re-analyzed, compared and mined in silico to detect and quantify specific proteins across multiple samples. We used this method to process and convert 18 biopsy samples from 9 renal cell carcinoma patients into SWATH-MS fragment ion maps. From these proteome maps we detected and quantified more than 2,000 proteins with a high degree of reproducibility across all samples. The identified proteins clearly separated tumorous kidney tissues from healthy tissue, and differentiated distinct histomorphological kidney cancer subtypes. PMID:25730263

  10. Constraining geochemistry and biological primary productivity in hydrothermal systems via in situ mass spectrometric geochemical mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidoudez, Charles; Marcon, Yann; Bach, Wolfgang; Lebris, Nadine; Dubilier, Nicole; Girguis, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermal vent ecosystems are biological hot spots, supported by chemoautotrophic primary productivity and achieving densities comparable to rainforests. Nevertheless, our understanding of the geochemical factors that govern the distribution of animals and microbes within vents is limited. It is well known that vent endemic organisms are found in specific vent "microenvironments", and that these microenvironments are distributed -coarsely speaking- in predictable patterns within a vent field. However, the relative differences in activity among these faunal patches, and their role in influencing geochemical flux remains largely unknown due to historical limitations in our ability to sample and quantify geochemical constituents with fine spatial resolution. In particular, the distribution of biologically important volatiles around vent fields is poorly constrained, as is the degree to which their distribution influences the destiny and distribution of organisms. To characterize the relationship between the distribution of volatiles, chemosynthetic microbes, and chemosynthetic symbioses, we generated detailed geo-referenced maps of methane, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and oxygen (four of the key volatiles that are both vent- and seawater derived) using an in situ mass spectrometer (ISMS). We characterized these concentrations in over 130 spots across three vent sites associated with the mid-Atlantic ridge in the Menez Gwen vent field. We quantified gases in sites ranging from hot fluids to mussel beds, and found notable relationships between the distribution and consumption of hydrogen sulfide and methane and the animal and microbial communities. Finally, we also developed a metabolic energy "map", which enables us to constrain both the potential energy that is available to these communities as well as the extent to which it is being used, and places constraints on the extent of primary production that can be supported by the realized use of these volatiles.

  11. Mass Spectrometric Radionuclide Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wacker, John F.; Eiden, Greg C.; Lehn, Scott A.

    2006-02-01

    Measurement of ionized atoms by mass spectrometry is an alternative to radiation detection for measuring radioactive isotopes. These systems are large and complex; they require trained operators and extensive maintenance. They began as research systems but have been developed commercially for measuring amounts of radioactive isotopes and their atom ratios to other isotopes. Several types of mass spectrometer systems are in use. This chapter covers the basics of mass spectrometry and surveys the application of these instruments for radionuclide detection and discusses the circumstances under which use of mass spectrometers is advantageous, the type of mass spectrometer used for each purpose, and the conditions of sample preparation, introduction and analysis.

  12. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.W.; Krone, J.R.; Bieber, A.L.; Williams, P.

    1995-04-01

    A new, general method of immunoassay is demonstrated. The approach is based on the microscale immunoaffinity capture of target antigens followed by mass-specific identification and quantitation using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Immunoaffinity capture of antigens effectively overcomes signal suppression effects typically encountered during traditional matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization analysis of complex biological mixtures while simultaneously concentrating the analyte into a small volume. Sample incubation and processing methods were such that a typical analysis could be performed in less than 1 h while subnanomolar sensitivities were maintained. The technique has been used for the rapid, selective, and quantitative screening of human blood for the presence of myotoxin a, and Mojave toxin from the venoms of the prairie rattlesnake, Crotalus virdis virdis, and the Mojave rattlesnake, Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  13. The analysis of comet mass spectrometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balm, S. P.; Hare, J. P.; Kroto, H. W.

    1991-04-01

    The mass spectra from the Giotto PICCA experiment have been studied using computer simulations based on tabulated mass spectrometric data. It is shown that random mixtures of organic compounds give rise to mass spectra with peaks at about 45, 60, 75, and 90 amu; i.e., separated by about 15 amu. In particular it is shown that the products of Urey-Miller type experiments give mass spectra which can match the observed Giotto data closely. The analysis indicates that the material consists mainly of C/H/O/N (i.e., it is organic), but that the assignment to any well defined organic material is less certain. It is not clear that mass spectrometric studies of complex mixtures have the prospect of yielding this type of information without some form of preseparation.

  14. Mass Spectrometric Mapping of the DNA Adductome as a Means to Study Genotoxin Exposure, Metabolism, and Effect.

    PubMed

    Hemeryck, Lieselot Y; Moore, Sharon A; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2016-08-01

    Covalent binding of endo- or exogenous chemicals to DNA results in the formation of DNA adducts which are reflective of exposure of the human body to DNA-damaging molecules and their metabolic pathways. The study of DNA adduct types and levels in human tissue therefore offers an interesting tool in several fields of research, including toxicology and cancer epidemiology. Over the years, a range of techniques and methods have been developed to study the formation of endo- and exogenous DNA adducts. However, for the simultaneous detection, identification and quantification of both known and unknown DNA adducts, mass spectrometry (MS) is deemed to be the most promising technique. In this perspective, we focus on the analysis of multiple DNA adducts within a sample with the emphasis on untargeted analysis. The advantageous use of MS methodologies for DNA adductome mapping is discussed comprehensively with relevant field examples. In addition, several aspects of study design, sample pretreatment, and analysis are addressed as these factors significantly affect the reliability of DNA adductomics studies. PMID:27362284

  15. Mass Spectrometric Studies of Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2012-01-01

    Current studies at NASA Glenn on oxide thermodynamics are discussed. Previous studies on the vaporization of B2O3 in reducing atmospheres led to inconsistent studies when B was used as a reductant. It is shown that liquid B2O3 does not wet B and a clear phase separation was noted in the Knudsen cell. This problem was solved by using FeB and Fe2B to supply a different and constant activity of B. The thermodynamic data thus derived are compared to quantum chemical composite calculations. A major problem in high temperature mass spectrometry is the determination of accurate ionization cross sections, particularly for molecules. The method of Deutsch and Mark shows promise and some sample calculations are discussed. Finally current studies on the thermodynamics of rare earth silicates are discussed. Here the problems are obtaining a measurable signal from SiO2 vaporization and non-equilibrium vaporization. The use of a Ta reducing agent provides a stronger signal, which is related to silica activity. The Whitman-Motzfeld relation adapted to KEMS measurements is applied to obtain equilibrium pressures.

  16. Challenges and recent advances in mass spectrometric imaging of neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Gemperline, Erin; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that grants the ability to investigate a broad mass range of molecules, from small molecules to large proteins, by creating detailed distribution maps of selected compounds. To date, MSI has demonstrated its versatility in the study of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides of different classes toward investigation of neurobiological functions and diseases. These studies have provided significant insight in neurobiology over the years and current technical advances are facilitating further improvements in this field. neurotransmitters, focusing specifically on the challenges and recent Herein, we advances of MSI of neurotransmitters. PMID:24568355

  17. FINAL REPORT. HIGH TEMPERATURE CONDENSED PHASE MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project was funded by the EM Science Program for the development of an integrated mass spectrometric analysis system capable of analyzing materials from room up to high temperatures, with the practical upper temperature limit to be experimentally determined. A primary object...

  18. Mass spectrometric detection, identification, and fragmentation of arseno-phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Schmied-Tobies, Maria I H; Arroyo-Abad, Uriel; Mattusch, Jürgen; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2014-11-01

    Phytochelatins (PC) are cystein-rich oligopeptides in plants for coordination with toxic metals and metalloids via their thiol groups. The composition, structure, and mass spectrometric fragmentation of arseno-PC (As-PC) with PC of different degree of oligomerization (PC2-PC5) in solution were studied using liquid chromatography coupled in parallel to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. As-PC were detected from As(PC2) to As(PC5) with an increasing number of isomers that differ in the position of thiol groups bound to As. Thermodynamic modeling supported the identification process in case of these isomers. Mass spectrometric fragmentation of the As-PC does not follow the established pattern of peptides but is governed by the formation of series of As-containing annular cations, which coordinate to As via S, N, or O. Structure proposals for 30 As-PC fragment ions in the range m/z 147.92 to m/z 1290.18 are elaborated. Many of these fragment ions are characteristic to several As-PC and may be suited for a screening for As-PC in plant extracts. The mass spectrometric data offer the perspective for a future more sensitive determination of As-PC by means of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with multiple reaction monitoring. PMID:25395130

  19. Thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass-spectrometric analysis of geochemical samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Johnson, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass-spectrometric-analysis techniques can be used to study a wide variety of problems involving decomposition processes and identification of released volatile components. A recording vacuum thermoanalyzer has been coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The rapid scan capabilities of the quadrupole mass spectrometer are used to identify the gaseous components released. The capability of the thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass spectrometer to provide analytical data for identification of the released volatile components, for determination of their sequence of release and for correlation of thermal-decomposition studies is illustrated by an analysis of the Orgueil carbonaceous chondrite.

  20. Chemical cross-linking with thiol-cleavable reagents combined with differential mass spectrometric peptide mapping--a novel approach to assess intermolecular protein contacts.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, K. L.; Kussmann, M.; Björk, P.; Godzwon, M.; Mikkelsen, M.; Sørensen, P.; Roepstorff, P.

    2000-01-01

    The intermolecular contact regions between monomers of the homodimeric DNA binding protein ParR and the interaction between the glycoproteins CD28 and CD80 were investigated using a strategy that combined chemical cross-linking with differential MALDI-MS analyses. ParR dimers were modified in vitro with the thiol-cleavable cross-linker 3,3'-dithio-bis(succinimidylproprionate) (DTSSP), proteolytically digested with trypsin and analyzed by MALDI-MS peptide mapping. Comparison of the peptide maps obtained from digested cross-linked ParR dimers in the presence and absence of a thiol reagent strongly supported a "head-to-tail" arrangement of the monomers in the dimeric complex. Glycoprotein fusion constructs CD28-IgG and CD80-Fab were cross-linked in vitro by DTSSP, characterized by nonreducing SDS-PAGE, digested in situ with trypsin and analyzed by MALDI-MS peptide mapping (+/- thiol reagent). The data revealed the presence of an intermolecular cross-link between the receptor regions of the glycoprotein constructs, as well as a number of unexpected but nonetheless specific interactions between the fusion domains of CD28-IgG and the receptor domain of CD80-Fab. The strategy of chemical cross-linking combined with differential MALDI-MS peptide mapping (+ thiol reagent) enabled localization of the interface region(s) of the complexes studied and clearly demonstrates the utility of such an approach to obtain structural information on interacting noncovalent complexes. PMID:10975572

  1. Mass spectrometric measurements of atmospheric composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a magnetic sector field analyzer for continuous sampling and measurement of outer planetary atmospheres is discussed. Special features of the analyzer include a dynamic range of 10 to the minus 7th power, a mass range from 1 to 48 AMU, two ion sensitivities, a special scan time of 35 sec at 14 BPS, and the use of ion counting techniques for analysis.

  2. Mass spectrometric analysis of monolayer protected nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhengjiang

    Monolayer protected nanoparticles (NPs) include an inorganic core and a monolayer of organic ligands. The wide variety of core materials and the tunable surface monolayers make NPs promising materials for numerous applications. Concerns related to unforeseen human health and environmental impacts of NPs have also been raised. In this thesis, new analytical methods based on mass spectrometry are developed to understand the fate, transport, and biodistributions of NPs in the complex biological systems. A laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) method has been developed to characterize the monolayers on NP surface. LDI-MS allows multiple NPs taken up by cells to be measured and quantified in a multiplexed fashion. The correlations between surface properties of NPs and cellular uptake have also been explored. LDI-MS is further coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to quantitatively measure monolayer stability of gold NPs (AuNPs) and quantum dots (QDs), respectively, in live cells. This label-free approach allows correlating monolayer structure and particle size with NP stability in various cellular environments. Finally, uptake, distribution, accumulation, and excretion of NPs in higher order organisms, such as fish and plants, have been investigated to understand the environmental impact of nanomaterials. The results indicate that surface chemistry is a primary determinant. NPs with hydrophilic surfaces are substantially less toxic and present a lower degree of bioaccumulation, making these nanomaterials attractive for sustainable nanotechnology.

  3. Mass spectrometric studies on porphyrins and geoporphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Quirke, J.; Martin, E.; Yost, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    Porphyrins are among the more important compound classes, playing significant roles in such diverse areas as medicine, material sciences, catalysis and the petroleum industry. The most valuable property of the porphyrin macrocycle is its ability to chelate with any metallic element. In organic geochemistry, geologically-occurring porphyrins, geoporphyrins, are of both academic and commercial consequence. Geoporphyrins occur as complicated mixtures of nickel(II) and vanadyl(II) [VO(II)] complexes in a wide range of sedimentary environments. They are believed to be formed by transformation of the functional groups of biologically-occurring cyclic tetrapyrroles, especially chlorophyll a into alkyl or hydrogen substituents coupled with the oxidation of the chlorin (dihydroporphyin) to the porphyrinic system. This proposal, the Treibs` hypothesis, is the cornerstone of molecular organic geochemistry. The precise composition of geoporphyrin mixtures varies from crude oil to crude oil. For this reason, analysis of geoporphyrin mixtures is a valuable tool for the correlation of crude oils with other oils and/or source rocks. Less happily, the geoporphyrins, especially the vanadyl complexes, poison catalysts in cracking of crude oil and industrial processes. Mass spectrometry is perhaps the most valuable too for analysis of geoporphyrin mixtures. Such analyses present the mass spectrometrist with several challenging problems. Geoporphyrin mixtures are composed of overlapping pseudohomologous series least nine skeletal types. Carbon number ranges of C{sub 28}-C{sub 50} are not uncommon. The upper limit of the carbon number range is still unclear.

  4. Mass spectrometric thermodynamic studies of oxide systems and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyarova, V. L.

    2016-01-01

    Progress in methods of synthesis of advanced materials as well as utilization of such materials at high temperatures requires information on the vaporization processes and thermodynamic properties of oxide systems. The optimal experimental method for these purposes is high-temperature mass spectrometry. This review summarizes and classifies experimental results obtained in mass spectrometric studies of the high-temperature thermodynamic properties of oxide systems and materials carried out in the last two decades. Published data on the vaporization processes and thermodynamic properties of oxide materials for high-temperature technologies are discussed from the standpoint of acid-base concept and model approaches including statistical thermodynamic methods. The bibliography includes 248 references.

  5. Mass spectrometric studies of trimethylindium pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchan, N. I.; Larsen, C. A.; Stringfellow, G. B.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of the pyrolysis of trimethylindium (TMIn) in He, D2, and H2 carriers was investigated using the atmospheric pressure flow-tube apparatus described by Larsen et al. (1987) and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The rate constant for the pyrolysis of TMIn in He was found to be comparable to that found by Jacko and Price (1964) for TMIn in toluene carrier (a radical scavenger), indicating that TMIn decomposes in He not by radical attack of methyl groups, but by homolytic fission. The decomposition of TMIn is enhanced in D2 and H2 carriers, where the principal products are CH3D and C2H6, and CH4 and C2H6, respectively, indicating that the reaction pathway in these carriers is different from those in He and toluene. The pyrolysis in H2 and D2 is attributed to a radical attack by H or D on TMIn. A reaction mechanism involving a short-lived hypervalent DTMIn species was proposed and was tested using numerical modeling techniques.

  6. Mass-spectrometric monitoring of the stress reaction during anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Levshankov, A. I.; Faizov, I. I.; Shchegolev, A. V.

    2013-10-01

    Clinical testing data for a mass-spectrometric method of estimating the patient's stress reaction to an injury done during anesthesia are presented. The essence of the method is monitoring the respiratory coefficient, which is defined as ratio N of the expiratory mass concentration of CO2 to the inspiratory mass concentration of O2 at each breathing cycle. For on-line monitoring of N, an electron ionization mass spectrometer connected to the breathing circuit of an inhalational anesthesia machine is used. Estimates of the anesthesia adequacy obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the method that analyzes induced acoustic encephalographic potentials. It is shown that the method suggested is more sensitive to the level of the patient's stress reaction during anesthesia than the induced potential method.

  7. Complexity reduction of clinical samples for routine mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Mesmin, Cédric; van Oostrum, Jan; Domon, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The precise measurement of protein abundance levels in highly complex biological samples such as plasma remains challenging. The wide range of protein concentrations impairs the detection of low-abundant species and the high number of peptide components to analyze results in interferences leading to erroneous quantitative results. The advances in MS instrumentation, with improved selectivity and sensitivity, partially address these issues, but sample preparation techniques remain the pivotal element to obtain robust routine mass spectrometric assays with a low LOD. A number of methodologies have been proposed and refined over the past two decades to reduce the range of protein concentrations and the number of peptide components. Whereas most of the methods have proven their utility for discovery studies, only a few are actually applicable to routine quantitative studies. In this account, common protein- and peptide-based fractionation methods are discussed, and illustrated with practical examples, with a focus on methods suited for clinical samples scheduled for biomarker validation assays and subsequent routine clinical mass spectrometric analyses. PMID:26680238

  8. A high pressure modulated molecular beam mass spectrometric sampling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.; Miller, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The current state of understanding of free-jet high pressure sampling is critically reviewed and modifications of certain theoretical and empirical considerations are presented. A high pressure, free-jet expansion, modulated molecular beam, mass spectrometric sampling apparatus was constructed and this apparatus is described in detail. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the apparatus can be used to sample high temperature systems at pressures up to one atmosphere. Condensible high temperature gaseous species have been routinely sampled and the mass spectrometric detector has provided direct identification of sampled species. System sensitivity is better than one tenth of a part per million. Experimental results obtained with argon and nitrogen beams are presented and compared to theoretical predictions. These results and the respective comparison are taken to indicate acceptable performance of the sampling apparatus. Results are also given for two groups of experiments related to hot corrosion studies. The formation of gaseous sodium sulfate in doped methane-oxygen flames was characterized and the oxidative vaporization of metals was studied in an atmospheric pressure flowing gas system to which gaseous salt partial pressures were added.

  9. Mass spectrometric detection of protein-based toxins.

    PubMed

    Tevell Åberg, Annica; Björnstad, Kristian; Hedeland, Mikael

    2013-09-01

    This review focuses on mass spectrometric detection of protein-based toxins, which are among the most toxic substances known. Special emphasis is given to the bacterial toxins botulinum neurotoxin from Clostridium botulinum and anthrax toxins from Bacillus anthracis as well as the plant toxin ricin produced by Ricinus communis. A common feature, apart from their extreme toxicity, is that they are composed of 2 polypeptide chains, one of which is responsible for cell uptake and another that has enzymatic function with the ability to destroy basic cellular functions. These toxins pose a threat, both regarding natural spread and from a terrorism perspective. In order for public health and emergency response officials to take appropriate action in case of an outbreak, whether natural or intentional, there is a need for fast and reliable detection methods. Traditionally, large molecules like proteins have been detected using immunological techniques. Although sensitive, these methods suffer from some drawbacks, such as the risk of false-positives due to cross-reactions and detection of inactive toxin. This article describes recently developed instrumental methods based on mass spectrometry for the reliable detection of botulinum neurotoxins, anthrax toxins, and ricin. Unequivocal identification of a protein toxin can be carried out by mass spectrometry-based amino acid sequencing. Furthermore, in combination with antibody affinity preconcentration and biochemical tests with mass spectrometric detection demonstrating the toxin's enzymatic activity, very powerful analytical methods have been described. In conclusion, the advent of sensitive, easily operated mass spectrometers provides new possibilities for the detection of protein-based toxins. PMID:23971809

  10. Mass spectrometric determination of early and advanced glycation in biology.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Naila; Ashour, Amal; Thornalley, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Protein glycation in biological systems occurs predominantly on lysine, arginine and N-terminal residues of proteins. Major quantitative glycation adducts are found at mean extents of modification of 1-5 mol percent of proteins. These are glucose-derived fructosamine on lysine and N-terminal residues of proteins, methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone on arginine residues and N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine residues mainly formed by the oxidative degradation of fructosamine. Total glycation adducts of different types are quantified by stable isotopic dilution analysis liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Metabolism of glycated proteins is followed by LC-MS/MS of glycation free adducts as minor components of the amino acid metabolome. Glycated proteins and sites of modification within them - amino acid residues modified by the glycating agent moiety - are identified and quantified by label-free and stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) high resolution mass spectrometry. Sites of glycation by glucose and methylglyoxal in selected proteins are listed. Key issues in applying proteomics techniques to analysis of glycated proteins are: (i) avoiding compromise of analysis by formation, loss and relocation of glycation adducts in pre-analytic processing; (ii) specificity of immunoaffinity enrichment procedures, (iii) maximizing protein sequence coverage in mass spectrometric analysis for detection of glycation sites, and (iv) development of bioinformatics tools for prediction of protein glycation sites. Protein glycation studies have important applications in biology, ageing and translational medicine - particularly on studies of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, renal failure, neurological disorders and cancer. Mass spectrometric analysis of glycated proteins has yet to find widespread use clinically. Future use in health screening, disease diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring, and

  11. Mass spectrometric searches for superheavy elements in terrestrial matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korschinek, Gunther; Kutschera, Walter

    2015-12-01

    Recent searches for traces of long-lived superheavy elements (SHEs) in terrestrial materials by mass spectrometric means are reviewed. Positive evidence for long-lived neutron-deficient Th isotopes in Th and Rg isotopes in Au, and a possible A = 292, Z ∼ 122 nuclide in Th was reported from experiments with Inductively Coupled Plasma Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP-SF-MS). These findings were not confirmed with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), with abundance limits lower by several orders of magnitude. In addition, the extensive AMS searches for 42 SHE nuclides (A = 288- 310) around the much discussed "island of stability" (Z = 114, N = 184) in natural Pt, Au, Pb, Bi materials are reviewed. Due to the flatness of the mass distribution and the relatively large bandwidth of the mass acceptance in AMS searches, an effectively much larger number of SHE nuclides was scanned in the respective materials. No positive evidence for the existence of long-lived SHEs (t1/2 >108 yr) with abundance limits of 10-12 to 10-16 was found.

  12. A tandem mass spectrometric method for singlet oxygen measurement.

    PubMed

    Karonen, Maarit; Mattila, Heta; Huang, Ping; Mamedov, Fikret; Styring, Stenbjörn; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2014-01-01

    Singlet oxygen, a harmful reactive oxygen species, can be quantified with the substance 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (TEMP) that reacts with singlet oxygen, forming a stable nitroxyl radical (TEMPO). TEMPO has earlier been quantified with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In this study, we designed an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS) quantification method for TEMPO and showed that the method based on multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used for the measurements of singlet oxygen from both nonbiological and biological samples. Results obtained with both UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS and EPR methods suggest that plant thylakoid membranes produce 3.7 × 10(-7) molecules of singlet oxygen per chlorophyll molecule in a second when illuminated with the photosynthetic photon flux density of 2000 μmol m(-2 ) s(-1). PMID:24849296

  13. PULSED POSITIVE ION NEGATIVE ION CHEMICAL IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPLICATONS TO ENVIRONMENTAL AND HAZARDOUS WASTE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The simultaneous acquisition of both positive ion and negative ion data under chemical ionization mass spectrometric conditions can aid in the confirmation of assignments made by electron impact gas chromatography mass spectrometry or electron capture gas chromatography. Pulsed p...

  14. Determination of iodine to compliment mass spectrometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1994-11-01

    The dose of iodine-129 to facility personnel and the general public as a result of past, present, and future activities at DOE sites is of continuing interest, WINCO received about 160 samples annually in a variety of natural matrices, including snow, milk, thyroid tissue, and sagebrush, in which iodine-129 is determined in order to evaluate this dose, Currently, total iodine and the isotopic ratio of iodine-127 to iodine-129 are determined by mass spectrometry. These two measurements determine the concentration of iodine-129 in each sample, These measurements require at least 16 h of mass spectrometer operator time for each sample. A variety of methods are available which concentrate and determine small quantities of iodine. Although useful, these approaches would increase both time and cost. The objective of this effort was to determine total iodine by an alternative method in order to decrease the load on mass spectrometry by 25 to 50%. The preparation of each sample for mass spectrometric analysis involves a common step--collection of iodide on an ion exchange bed. This was the focal point of the effort since the results would be applicable to all samples.

  15. Surface acoustic wave nebulization facilitating lipid mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Huang, Yue; Edgar, J Scott; Ting, Ying S; Heron, Scott R; Kao, Yuchieh; Li, Yanyan; Masselon, Christophe D; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2012-08-01

    Surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) is a novel method to transfer nonvolatile analytes directly from the aqueous phase to the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The lower ion energetics of SAWN and its planar nature make it appealing for analytically challenging lipid samples. This challenge is a result of their amphipathic nature, labile nature, and tendency to form aggregates, which readily precipitate clogging capillaries used for electrospray ionization (ESI). Here, we report the use of SAWN to characterize the complex glycolipid, lipid A, which serves as the membrane anchor component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and has a pronounced tendency to clog nano-ESI capillaries. We also show that unlike ESI SAWN is capable of ionizing labile phospholipids without fragmentation. Lastly, we compare the ease of use of SAWN to the more conventional infusion-based ESI methods and demonstrate the ability to generate higher order tandem mass spectral data of lipid A for automated structure assignment using our previously reported hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. The ease of generating SAWN-MS(n) data combined with HiTMS interpretation offers the potential for high throughput lipid A structure analysis. PMID:22742654

  16. Rapid identification of viridans streptococci by mass spectrometric discrimination.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, C; Rodloff, A C; Chhatwal, G S; Schellenberger, W; Eschrich, K

    2007-08-01

    Viridans streptococci (VS) are responsible for several systemic diseases, such as endocarditis, abscesses, and septicemia. Unfortunately, species identification by conventional methods seems to be more difficult than species identification of other groups of bacteria. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for the rapid identification of 10 different species of VS. A total of 99 VS clinical isolates, 10 reference strains, and 20 strains from our in-house culture collection were analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS. To evaluate the mass-spectrometric discrimination results, all strains were identified in parallel by phenotypic and genotypic methods. MALDI-TOF-MS identified 71 isolates as the mitis group, 23 as the anginosus group, and 5 as Streptococcus salivarius. Comparison of the species identification results obtained by the MALDI-TOF-MS analyses and with the phenotypic/genotypic identification systems showed 100% consistency at the species level. Thus, MALDI-TOF-MS seems to be a rapid and reliable method for the identification of species of VS from clinical samples. PMID:17553974

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ELECTROSPRAY MASS SPECTROMETRIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An electrospray mass spectrometric method has been developed for application to agricultural and horticultural fertilizers to determine perchlorate. After fertilizers are leached or dissolved in water, the method relies on the formation of stable ion pair complex of the perchlor...

  18. Status of mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection at ETHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Martin; Maxeiner, Sascha; Wacker, Lukas; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of a mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection instrument without accelerator stage was built for the first time and set into operation at ETH Zurich. The system is designed as an experimental platform to optimize performance of 14C detection at low ion energies and to study the most relevant processes that may limit system performance. The optimized stripper unit incorporates differential pumping to maintain a low gas outflow and a revised tube design to better match the phase space volume of the ion beam at low energies. The system is fully operational and has demonstrated true radiocarbon dating capabilities. The overall beam transmission through the stripper tube is about 40% for the 1+ charge state. Radiocarbon analyses with an overall precision of 0.6% were obtained on a single sample under regular measurement conditions. By analyzing multiple targets of the same sample material an uncertainty level of 0.3% has been reached. The background level corresponds to a radiocarbon age of 40,000 years.

  19. Single hair cocaine consumption monitoring by mass spectrometric imaging.

    PubMed

    Porta, Tiffany; Grivet, Chantal; Kraemer, Thomas; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2011-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI) was used to image the distribution of cocaine and its metabolites in intact single hair samples from chronic users down to a concentration of 5 ng/mg. Acquisitions were performed in rastering mode, at a speed of 1 mm/s and in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode on a MALDI triple quadrupole linear ion trap fitted with a high repetition rate laser (1 kHz). Compared to traditional methods based on LC-MS/MS or GC-MS(/MS) which require to segment the hair to obtain spatial resolution, MALDI-MSI, with a straightforward sample preparation beforehand, allowed obtaining a spatial resolution of 1 mm and thus the chronological information about cocaine consumption contained in a single intact hair over several months could be monitored. The analysis time of an intact single hair sample of 6 cm is approximately of 6 min. Cocaine and its metabolites benzoylecgonine, ethylcocaine, and norcocaine were investigated in nine sets of hair samples for forensic purposes. The analyses were accomplished by spraying α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), 4-chloro-α-cyano-cinnamic acid (Cl-CCA), or (E)-2-cyano-3-(naphthalen-2-yl)acrylic acid (NpCCA) as MALDI matrices. We also propose a rapid strategy for sensitive confirmatory analyses with both MS/MS and MS(3) experiments performed directly on intact hair samples. Since only part of the hair strand is analyzed, additional analyses are possible at any time on the remaining hair from the strand. PMID:21510611

  20. Combined chromatographic and mass spectrometric toolbox for fingerprinting migration from PET tray during microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Alin, Jonas; Hakkarainen, Minna

    2013-02-13

    A combined chromatographic and mass spectrometric toolbox was utilized to determine the interactions between poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) food packaging and different food simulants during microwave heating. Overall and specific migration was determined by combining weight loss measurements with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). This allowed mapping of low molecular weight migrants in the molecular range up to 2000 g/mol. Microwave heating caused significantly faster migration of cyclic oligomers into ethanol and isooctane as compared to migration during conventional heating at the same temperature. This effect was more significant at lower temperature at which diffusion rates are generally lower. It was also shown that transesterification took place between PET and ethanol during microwave heating, leading to formation of diethyl terephthalate. The detected migrants included cyclic oligomers from dimer to hexamer, in most cases containing extra ethylene glycol units, and oxidized Irgafos 168. ESI-MS combined with CID MS-MS was an excellent tool for structural interpretation of the nonvolatile compounds migrating to the food simulants. The overall migration was below the overall migration limit of 10 mg/dm(2) set by the European commission after 4 h of microwave heating at 100 °C in all studied food simulants. PMID:23343184

  1. Mass spectrometric analysis of isotope effects in bioconversion of benzene to cyclohexanone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, In-Hyun; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Kim, Young-Mo; Yang, In-Hee; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2006-06-01

    Pseudomonas veronii strain PH-03 has been shown to convert benzene to cyclohexanone through phenol. Mass spectrometry results revealed that unusual isotopic effects have been occurred in the transformation product, cyclohexanone. The isotopic composition was strongly depends on the compound specific hydrogen or oxygen source. The exchange of labile deuterium atoms has been investigated through electrospray ionization liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The mass spectrometric analysis of biotransformation products enabled the proposal of a corresponding bioconversion pathway.

  2. Mass spectrometric methods for the direct elemental and isotopic analysis of solid material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, A. A.; Gubal, A. R.; Potapov, S. V.; Agafonova, N. N.; Nemets, V. M.

    2016-04-01

    Methods for the direct analysis of solids have a number of undeniable advantages over the methods that require preliminary dissolution of samples. High sensitivity and selectivity make the direct mass spectrometric techniques the most in-demand. The review concerns spark source mass spectrometry, laser ionization mass spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, secondary neutral mass spectrometry and glow discharge mass spectrometry. Basic principles, analytical characteristics and trends in the development of these techniques are discussed. Particular attention is given to applications of the techniques as well as to their competitive advantages and drawbacks. The bibliography includes 123 references.

  3. QuEChERS sample preparation approach for mass spectrometric analysis of pesticide residues in foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes an easy, rapid, and low-cost sample preparation approach for the determination of pesticide residues in foods using gas and/or liquid chromatographic (GC and/or LC) analytical separation and mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The approach is known as QuEChERS, which stands fo...

  4. Differentiating organic from conventional peppermints using chromatographic and flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprints

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprinting techniques were tested for their potential in differentiating organic and conventional peppermint samples. Ten organic and ten conventional peppermint samples were examined using HPLC-UV and FI...

  5. Purification and mass spectrometric analysis of the kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Wannemacher, Kenneth M; Terskiy, Alexandra; Bian, Shengjie; Yadav, Prem N; Li, Hong; Howells, Richard D

    2008-09-16

    A clonal human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell line was established that stably expressed the rat kappa-opioid receptor (rKOR) with a FLAG epitope at the amino terminus. The Kd for [3H]diprenorphine was 1.1+/-0.2 nM, and the Bmax was 2.6+/-0.4 pmol/mg. Dynorphin A (1-13), U69,593 and naloxone competitively inhibited [3H]diprenorphine binding with Ki values of 2.0, 18 and 18 nM, respectively, in good agreement with previously reported affinities for the unmodified receptor. U69,593 stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in a concentration-dependent manner and caused phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, indicating that the activated epitope-tagged receptor triggered appropriate signaling pathways. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that two immunoreactive receptor species with apparent molecular masses of 42 and 52 kDa were expressed. Previous studies indicated that the 42 kDa protein was localized intracellularly and was a precursor of the 52 kDa receptor, which was present at the cell surface. rKOR was extracted from transfected HEK 293 cell membranes with n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltopyranoside. Sequential use of wheat germ agglutinin chromatography, Sephacryl S300 gel filtration chromatography, anti-FLAG immunoaffinity chromatography and SDS/PAGE permitted purification of the 52 kDa receptor. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to identify peptides derived from rKOR following sequential in-gel digestion with trypsin and cyanogen bromide. Eighteen rKOR peptides were detected, corresponding to 27.1% coverage of the receptor. Precursor-selective MS/MS confirmed the identity of most of these peptides. In addition, we have identified heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) as a rKOR-interacting protein. PMID:18656460

  6. Purification and Mass Spectrometric Analysis of the κ Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wannemacher, Kenneth M.; Terskiy, Alexandra; Bian, Shengjie; Yadav, Prem N.; Li, Hong; Howells, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    A clonal human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell line was established that stably expressed the rat κ-opioid receptor (rKOR) with a FLAG epitope at the amino terminus. The Kd for [3H]diprenorphine was 1.1 ± 0.2 nM, and the Bmax was 2.6 ± 0.4 pmoles/mg. Dynorphin A (1–13), U69,593 and naloxone competitively inhibited [3H]diprenorphine binding with Ki values of 2.0, 18 and 18 nM, respectively, in good agreement with previously reported affinities for the unmodified receptor. U69,593 stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in a concentration-dependent manner and caused phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, indicating that the activated epitope-tagged receptor triggered appropriate signaling pathways. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that two immunoreactive receptor species with apparent molecular masses of 42 and 52 kDa were expressed. Previous studies indicated that the 42 kDa protein was localized intracellularly and was a precursor of the 52 kDa receptor, which was present at the cell surface. rKOR was extracted from transfected HEK 293 cell membranes with n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside. Sequential use of wheat germ agglutinin chromatography, Sephacryl S300 gel filtration chromatography, anti-FLAG immunoaffinity chromatography and SDS/PAGE permitted purification of the 52 kDa receptor. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to identify peptides derived from rKOR following sequential in-gel digestion with trypsin and cyanogen bromide. Eighteen rKOR peptides were detected, corresponding to 27.1% coverage of the receptor. Precursor-selective MS/MS confirmed the identity of most of these peptides. In addition, we have identified heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) as a rKOR-interacting protein. PMID:18656460

  7. Mass Spectrometric Approaches to Study Protein Structure and Interactions in Lyophilized Powders

    PubMed Central

    Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange (ssHDX-MS) and side-chain photolytic labeling (ssPL-MS) followed by mass spectrometric analysis can be valuable for characterizing lyophilized formulations of protein therapeutics. Labeling followed by suitable proteolytic digestion allows the protein structure and interactions to be mapped with peptide-level resolution. Since the protein structural elements are stabilized by a network of chemical bonds from the main-chains and side-chains of amino acids, specific labeling of atoms in the amino acid residues provides insight into the structure and conformation of the protein. In contrast to routine methods used to study proteins in lyophilized solids (e.g., FTIR), ssHDX-MS and ssPL-MS provide quantitative and site-specific information. The extent of deuterium incorporation and kinetic parameters can be related to rapidly and slowly exchanging amide pools (Nfast, Nslow) and directly reflects the degree of protein folding and structure in lyophilized formulations. Stable photolytic labeling does not undergo back-exchange, an advantage over ssHDX-MS. Here, we provide detailed protocols for both ssHDX-MS and ssPL-MS, using myoglobin (Mb) as a model protein in lyophilized formulations containing either trehalose or sorbitol. PMID:25938927

  8. Mass spectrometric analysis of the volatiles released by heating or crushing rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, C.; Sommer, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Vacuum extraction with subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of evolved volatiles was selected as the analytical procedure. The high-vacuum gas-handling system was constructed of stainless steel. The system was completely free from mercury, grease, or volatile organic materials. The furnace for heating the samples is discussed together with the high-vacuum crusher, the mass spectrometer, and approaches for water determination. The analytical procedure is considered, giving attention to the extraction of volatiles, adsorption studies, and the analysis of volatiles.

  9. Remote mass spectrometric sampling of electrospray- and desorption electrospray-generated ions using an air ejector.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R Brent; Bereman, Michael S; Muddiman, David C; Hawkridge, Adam M

    2007-10-01

    A commercial air ejector was coupled to an electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ) to transport remotely generated ions from both electrospray (ESI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. We demonstrate the remote analysis of a series of analyte ions that range from small molecules and polymers to polypeptides using the AE-LTQ interface. The details of the ESI-AE-LTQ and DESI-AE-LTQ experimental configurations are described and preliminary mass spectrometric data are presented. PMID:17716909

  10. Remote Mass Spectrometric Sampling of Electrospray- and Desorption Electrospray-Generated Ions Using an Air Ejector

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, R. Brent; Bereman, Michael S.; Muddiman, David C.; Hawkridge, Adam M.

    2007-01-01

    A commercial air ejector was coupled to an electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ) to transport remotely generated ions from both electrospray (ESI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. We demonstrate the remote analysis of a series of analyte ions that range from small molecules and polymers to polypeptides using the AE-LTQ interface. The details of the ESI-AE-LTQ and DESI-AE-LTQ experimental configurations are described and preliminary mass spectrometric data is presented. PMID:17716909

  11. Mass spectrometric studies on the interaction of cisplatin and insulin.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yue, Lei; Liu, Yaqin; Yin, Xinchi; Yin, Qi; Pan, Yuanjiang; Yang, Lirong

    2016-04-01

    The interaction of antitumor drug, cisplatin (cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2], CDDP) with insulin from porcine pancreas has been investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and high resolution hybrid ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALIDI-TOF/TOF-MS and ESI-IT/TOF MS). The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS results demonstrated that the presence of cisplatin complex resulted in the reduction of the disulfide bond in porcine pancreas after the incubations of the two substances were performed in vitro. It indicated that the presence of cisplatin would destroy the native configuration of insulin, which may lead to the inactivation of insulin. High resolution mass values and the characteristic isotopic pattern of the platinated insulin ions allowed the analysis of platinated mono-, di- and triadducts of cisplatin and insulin in the incubations under different conditions. The laser-induced dissociation of the monoadduct obtained in MALDI source was carried out and one platinum was found to bind to insulin B chain was determined. The platinum binding sites were further identified to be the N terminus (B chain), cysteine 7 (B chain) and cysteine 19 (B chain) residues by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The identification of the interaction between insulin and cisplatin broadens the horizon of the knowledge in the interaction of the proteins and metallodrugs. PMID:26724920

  12. Mass Spectrometric Approaches to Detecting and Quantifying Prions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Until recently, the use of mass spectrometry has been limited to identifying covalent posttranslational modifications of PrPSc and PrPC. These efforts support the hypothesis that PrPC and PrPSc possess identical covalent posttranslational modifications. Technical advances in instrumentation now all...

  13. Mass Spectrometric Monitoring of Animal Feed for BSE Spread

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    The researchers in London have developed an emerging technology that utilizes mass spectrometry to detect processed animal protein (PAP) in animal feed. The amount of animal protein in the feed can be determined by the ratio of the hydrolyzed gelatine signal at m/z 1044 to an internal standard signal at m/z 556.

  14. Extending the frontiers of mass spectrometric instrumentation and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schieffer, Gregg Martin

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation is two-fold: developing novel analysis methods using mass spectrometry and the implementation and characterization of a novel ion mobility mass spectrometry instrumentation. The novel mass spectrometry combines ion trap for ion/ion reactions coupled to an ion mobility cell. The long term goal of this instrumentation is to use ion/ion reactions to probe the structure of gas phase biomolecule ions. The three ion source - ion trap - ion mobility - qTOF mass spectrometer (IT - IM - TOF MS) instrument is described. The analysis of the degradation products in coal (Chapter 2) and the imaging plant metabolites (Appendix III) fall under the methods development category. These projects use existing commercial instrumentation (JEOL AccuTOF MS and Thermo Finnigan LCQ IT, respectively) for the mass analysis of the degraded coal products and the plant metabolites, respectively. The coal degradation paper discusses the use of the DART ion source for fast and easy sample analysis. The sample preparation consisted of a simple 50 fold dilution of the soluble coal products in water and placing the liquid in front of the heated gas stream. This is the first time the DART ion source has been used for analysis of coal. Steven Raders under the guidance of John Verkade came up with the coal degradation projects. Raders performed the coal degradation reactions, worked up the products, and sent them to me. Gregg Schieffer developed the method and wrote the paper demonstrating the use of the DART ion source for the fast and easy sample analysis. The plant metabolite imaging project extends the use of colloidal graphite as a sample coating for atmospheric pressure LDI. DC Perdian and I closely worked together to make this project work. Perdian focused on building the LDI setup whereas Schieffer focused on the MSn analysis of the metabolites. Both Perdian and I took the data featured in the paper. Perdian was the primary writer of the paper and used it as a

  15. A mass spectrometric analysis of {gamma}-GPS films

    SciTech Connect

    Dillingham, R.G.; Boerio, F.J.; Bertelsen, C.; Savina, M.R.; Lykke, K.R.; Calaway, W.F.

    1996-06-01

    {gamma}-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane ({gamma}-GPS) is used for pre-treatment of grit-blasted aluminum before adhesive bonding. This paper discusses analysis of non-reflective grit-blasted surfaces using mass spectrometry of species that were either sputtered off using an ion beam or thermally desorbed as neutrals using a pulsed laser and then post-ionized using a secondary laser. Results show that fragmentation is excessive and structural information is difficult to obtain from the spectra.

  16. Mass spectrometric analysis of the composition of shale tar

    SciTech Connect

    Brodskii, E.S.; Lukashenko, I.M.; Rang, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The composition of the 170-250/sup 0/C fraction of the generator tar from Estonian combustible shales after separation with the aid of thin-layer chromatography and complex-formation with urea has been studied by low-resolution mass spectrometry. Normal alkanes and cycloalkanes containing from one to four rings, alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic and aromatic oxygen-containing compounds have been identified and determined quantitatively.

  17. Mass spectrometric detection of solid and vapor explosive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, William R.; Green, D.; Mercado, Alvaro G.

    1994-10-01

    The detection by chemical sensors of explosive devices in a terrorist or contraband scenario usually involves the acquisition of material in the vapor or solid form. Whether in the vapor form in ambient air or in solid form in a matrix of innocuous material, the chemical compounds may be present at very low concentrations or may be present in concentrations higher by orders of magnitude. In this study, a characterization of a tandem mass spectrometer detection system has been made to evaluate a variety of parameters as it relates to explosive chemicals in both the vapor and solid phases. In particular, a range of concentrations of standard solutions of RDX, PETN and TNT have been injected in determine the sensitivity, dynamic range, and lower level of detection of the SCIEX contraband tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer. Techniques for the introduction of samples include heated nebulization and direct injection/thermal desorption from a real time sampler belt. As well, explosive vapors produced by a special generator were injected in a 1 l/min stream of room air and used to characterize instrumental performance. Solid material was presented in a form simulating fingerprint material and then transferred to the detector using a real time sampling system and then thermally desorbed into the mass spectrometer ionization chamber.

  18. Mass Spectrometric Measurement of Martian Krypton and Xenon Isotopic Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.; Mauersberger, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Viking gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment provided significant data on the atmospheric composition at the surface of Mars, including measurements of several isotope ratios. However, the limited dynamic range of this mass spectrometer resulted in marginal measurements for the important Kr and Xe isotopic abundance. The Xe-129 to Xe-132 ratio was measured with an uncertainty of 70%, but none of the other isotope ratios for these species were obtained. Accurate measurement of the Xe and Kr isotopic abundance in this atmosphere provides an important data point in testing theories of planetary formation and atmospheric evolution. The measurement is also essential for a stringent test for the Martian origin of the SNC meteorites, since the Kr and Xe fractionation pattern seen in gas trapped in glassy nodules of an SNC (EETA 79001) is unlike any other known solar system resevoir. Current flight mass spectrometer designs combined with the new technology of a high-performance vacuum pumping system show promise for a substantial increase in gas throughput and the dynamic range required to accurately measure these trace species. Various aspects of this new technology are discussed.

  19. QUANTITATIVE MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF GLYCOPROTEINS COMBINED WITH ENRICHMENT METHODS

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies. © 2014 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec Rev 34:148–165, 2015. PMID:24889823

  20. Mass-spectrometric observation of ion ejection from clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrikov, A. A.; Dubov, D. Iu.; Gileva, V. P.

    1989-08-01

    Results of mass spectrometry measurements in clustered molecular beams of water and nitrogen oxide are reported. The clusters were formed under conditions of free expansion of N2O and superheated steam through a sonic nozzle. It is found that, for a mean cluster size of less than 100, the true cluster concentration in the beam is distorted by the evaporation of molecules from ionized clusters. The evaporation intensity depends to a large degree on the ionizing electron energy. For the cluster sizes investigated (100 or less), the observed density of the microcluster ions is found to be related to ion ejection from the clusters.

  1. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Cytokinins in Plant Tissues 1

    PubMed Central

    Palni, Lok Man S.; Summons, Roger E.; Letham, David S.

    1983-01-01

    The cytokinin complex of Datura innoxia Mill. crown gall tissue was purified by ion exchange, Sephadex LH-20 chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using 2H-labeled compounds, the following cytokinins were identified in the basic fraction eluting from a cation exchange column: zeatin, zeatin riboside, dihydrozeatin, dihydrozeatin riboside, their corresponding O-glucosides, 7- and 9-glucosides of zeatin, 9-glucoside of dihydrozeatin, isopentenyladenine, and isopentenyladenosine. Zeatin riboside 5′-monophosphate was the major cytokinin nucleotide in the tissue. In addition, dihydrozeatin riboside and isopentenyladenosine were identified in the nucleotide fraction following enymic degradation. PMID:16663099

  2. Synthesis and Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Organic Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünert, A.; Woidich, S.; Ballschmiter, K.

    2003-04-01

    Organic nitrates, as trace constituents in urban air, can be analyzed by adsorptive low volume sampling (LVS) as well as by adsorptive high volume sampling (HVS). Air samples ranging from 25 L to 100 L for the LVS and 100 m3 to 500 m3 for the (HVS) were collected, respectively. Analysis is performed by thermodesorption (LVS) or solvent elution combined with group separation (HVS) using normal-phase HPLC and high resolution capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detection (HRGC-ECD) and mass selective detection (HRGC-MSD). For identification and quantification available reference compounds are required for both methods (1;2). Following numbers of congeners of organic nitrate have been synthesized: 77 monoalkyl nitrates (C1-C16), 43 dialkyl nitrates (C2-C10), 37 hydroxy alkyl nitrates (C2-C8) and 41 carbonyl alkyl nitrates (C3-C12). Alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, ketones and halocarbons have been used as precursors. Characterisation of the reference compounds by retention-data and mass-spectra was performed by high resolution capillary gas chromatography with mass selective detection in the EI- and the NCI (CH4) mode (1-3). EI-ionization leads to the dominating indicator ion NO2+ for organic nitrates with m/z = 46 u. The characteristic fragments with NCI (CH4) show ions at m/z = 46 u and m/z = 62 u, corresponding to NO2- and NO3-. The use of flame ionisation detection (HRGC-FID) and the principle of the molar response for carbon allows the quantitation of reference solutions as the final tool for the determination of the levels and patterns of organic nitrates in urban air samples. (1) J. Kastler: "Analytik, Massenspektrometrie und Vorkommen multifunktioneller Alkylnitrate in belasteter und unbelasteter Atmosphäre" Dr.rer.nat.-Thesis, University of Ulm (1999) (2) G. Werner, J. Kastler, R. Looser, K. Ballschmiter: "Organic Nitrates of Isoprenes as Atmospheric Trace Compounds" Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. (1999) 38(11): 1634-1637 (3) S.Woidich, O. Froscheis, O

  3. Mass Spectrometric Analyses of Organophosphate Insecticide Oxon Protein Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Charles M.; Prins, John M.; George, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Organophosphate (OP) insecticides continue to be used to control insect pests. Acute and chronic exposures to OP insecticides have been documented to cause adverse health effects, but few OP-adducted proteins have been correlated with these illnesses at the molecular level. Our aim was to review the literature covering the current state of the art in mass spectrometry (MS) used to identify OP protein biomarkers. Data sources and extraction We identified general and specific research reports related to OP insecticides, OP toxicity, OP structure, and protein MS by searching PubMed and Chemical Abstracts for articles published before December 2008. Data synthesis A number of OP-based insecticides share common structural elements that result in predictable OP–protein adducts. The resultant OP–protein adducts show an increase in molecular mass that can be identified by MS and correlated with the OP agent. Customized OP-containing probes have also been used to tag and identify protein targets that can be identified by MS. Conclusions MS is a useful and emerging tool for the identification of proteins that are modified by activated organophosphate insecticides. MS can characterize the structure of the OP adduct and also the specific amino acid residue that forms the key bond with the OP. Each protein that is modified in a unique way by an OP represents a unique molecular biomarker that with further research can lead to new correlations with exposure. PMID:20056576

  4. Mass spectrometric identification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored peptides.

    PubMed

    Masuishi, Yusuke; Nomura, Ayako; Okayama, Akiko; Kimura, Yayoi; Arakawa, Noriaki; Hirano, Hisashi

    2013-10-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring is a post-translational modification widely observed among eukaryotic membrane proteins. GPI anchors are attached to proteins via the carboxy-terminus in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane, where GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) perform important functions as coreceptors and enzymes. Precursors of GPI-APs (Pre-GPI-APs) contain a C-terminal hydrophobic sequence that is involved in cleavage of the signal sequence from the protein and addition of the GPI anchor by the transamidase complex. In order to confirm that a given protein contains a GPI anchor, it is essential to identify the C-terminal peptide containing the GPI-anchor modification site (ω-site). Previously, efficient identification of GPI-anchored C-terminal peptides by mass spectrometry has been difficult, in part because of complex structure of the GPI-anchor moiety. We developed a method to experimentally identify GPI-APs and their ω-sites. In this method, a part of GPI-anchor moieties are removed from GPI-anchored peptides using phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF), and peptide sequence is then determined by mass spectrometry. Using this method, we successfully identified 10 GPI-APs and 12 ω-sites in the cultured ovarian adenocarcinoma cells, demonstrating that this method is useful for identifying efficiently GPI-APs. PMID:24001144

  5. A membrane-separator interface for mass-spectrometric analysis of blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Gerasimov, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of rapid mass-spectrometric determination of the content of anesthetic agents in blood plasma with the aid of a membrane-separator interface. The interface employs a hydrophobic selective membrane that is capable of separating various anesthetic drugs (including inhalation anesthetic sevofluran, noninhalation anesthetic thiopental, hypnotic propofol, and opioid analgesic fentanyl) from the blood plasma and introducing samples into a mass spectrometer. Analysis of the blood plasma was not accompanied by the memory effect and did not lead to membrane degradation. Results of clinical investigation of the concentration of anesthetics in the blood plasma of patients are presented.

  6. Development and application of a mass spectrometric system to study volatile components of fluid inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, R.C. Jr.

    1992-06-01

    A quadrupole mass spectrometric system coupled with mechanical decrepitation was constructed and calibrated to study fluid inclusions from an active geothermal system. Fluid inclusions in Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project well cores and ejects from flow tests were analyzed. Ion currents from selected mass/charge ratio numbers were measured for gases from ruptured inclusions in epidote, calcite, and hematite vein minerals from different depths. Water, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, and C1{minus}C4+ hydrocarbons and free nitrogen were analyzed.

  7. Direct MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric peptide profiling of neuroendocrine tissue of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Christian; Neupert, Susanne; Predel, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Direct MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric peptide profiling is increasingly used to analyze the peptide complement in the nervous system of a variety of invertebrate animals, from leech to Aplysia and many arthropod species, especially insects and crustaceans. Proper sample preparation is often the most crucial step to obtain the necessary data. Here, we describe protocols for the use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to directly analyze the peptidome of neuroendocrine tissues of insects, particularly Drosophila melanogaster, by MALDI-TOF MS. PMID:20013204

  8. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Nanoparticle Host–Guest Interactions in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic host–guest chemistry is a versatile tool for biomedical applications. Characterization and detection of host–guest complexes in biological systems, however, is challenging due to the complexity of the biological milieu. Here, we describe and apply a mass spectrometric method to monitor the association and dissociation of nanoparticle (NP)-based host–guest interactions that integrates NP-assisted laser desorption/ionization (LDI) and matrix assisted laser desoption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. This LDI/MALDI approach reveals how NP surface functionality affects host–guest interactions in cells, information difficult to achieve using other techniques. PMID:24873526

  9. Ambient aerodynamic ionization source for remote analyte sampling and mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R Brent; Sampson, Jason S; Hawkridge, Adam M; Muddiman, David C

    2008-07-01

    The use of aerodynamic devices in ambient ionization source development has become increasingly prevalent in the field of mass spectrometry. In this study, an air ejector has been constructed from inexpensive, commercially available components to incorporate an electrospray ionization emitter within the exhaust jet of the device. This novel aerodynamic device, herein termed remote analyte sampling, transport, and ionization relay (RASTIR) was used to remotely sample neutral species in the ambient and entrain them into an electrospray plume where they were subsequently ionized and detected using a linear ion trap Fourier transform mass spectrometer. Two sets of experiments were performed in the ambient environment to demonstrate the device's utility. The first involved the remote (approximately 1 ft) vacuum collection of pure sample particulates (i.e., dry powder) from a glass slide, entrainment and ionization at the ESI emitter, and mass spectrometric detection. The second experiment involved the capture (vacuum collection) of matrix-assisted laser desorbed proteins followed by entrainment in the ESI emitter plume, multiple charging, and mass spectrometric detection. This approach is in principle a RASTIR-assisted matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization source (Sampson, J. S.; Hawkridge, A. M.; Muddiman, D. C. J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 2006, 17, 1712-1716; Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2007, 21, 1150-1154.). A detailed description of the device construction, operational parameters, and preliminary small molecule and protein data are presented. PMID:18529018

  10. Mass spectrometric measurements of the isotopic anatomies of molecules (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, J. M.; Krumwiede, D.; Schlueter, H.

    2013-12-01

    Site-specific and multiple isotopic substitutions in molecular structures potentially provide an extraordinarily rich set of constraints on their sources, conditions of formation, reaction and transport histories, and perhaps other issues. Examples include carbonate ';clumped isotope' thermometry, clumped isotope measurements of CO2, O2, and, recently, methane, ethane and N2O; site-specific 15N measurements in N2O and 13C and D analyses of fatty acids, sugars, cellulose, food products, and, recently, n-alkanes. Extension of the principles behind these tools to the very large number of isotopologues of complex molecules could potentially lead to new uses of isotope chemistry, similar to proteomics, metabolomics and genomics in their complexity and depth of detail (';isotomics'?). Several technologies are potentially useful for this field, including ';SNIF-NMR', gas source mass spectrometry and IR absorption spectroscopy. However, all well established methods have restrictive limits in the sizes of samples, types of analyzes, and the sorts of isotopologues that can be measured with useful precision. We will present an overview of several emerging instruments and techniques of high-resolution gas source mass spectrometry that may enable study of a large proportion of the isotopologues of a wide range of volatile and semi-volatile compounds, including many organics, with precisions and sample sizes suitable for a range of applications. A variety of isotopologues can be measured by combining information from the Thermo 253 Ultra (a new high resolution, multi-collector gas source mass spectrometer) and the Thermo DFS (a very high resolution single collector, but used here on a novel mode to achieve ~per mil precision ratio measurements), sometimes supplemented by conventional bulk isotopic measurements. It is possible to design methods in which no one of these sources of data meaningfully constrain abundances of specific isotopologues, but their combination fully and

  11. Mass spectrometric studies of coals and coal macerals

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper will explore the characterization of coal-derived materials by High Resolution Mass Spectroscopy (HRMS). Coals are very complex and heterogeneous on both a microscopic and molecular level. The microscopic heterogeneity can be reduced by working with macerals separated from the whole coal. Macerals are the microscopically identifiable plant remains which make up the organic portion of coals. The molecular make up of the various macerals can be traced back to the original biomolecules and biomacromolecules. The extent of alteration depends on both the rank of the coal and the type of maceral, some of which are more resistant than others. Data from the analysis of whole coals and separated coals will be discussed. 22 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Imaging Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Neurotransmitters: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Perez, Gustavo A.; Takei, Shiro; Yao, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a toolbox of versatile techniques that enable us to investigate analytes in samples at molecular level. In recent years, IMS, and especially matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI), has been used to visualise a wide range of metabolites in biological samples. Simultaneous visualisation of the spatial distribution of metabolites in a single sample with little tissue disruption can be considered as one important advantage of MALDI over other techniques. However, several technical hurdles including low concentrations and rapid degradation rates of small molecule metabolites, matrix interference of signals and poor ionisation, need to be addressed before MALDI can be considered as a reliable tool for the analysis of metabolites such as neurotransmitters in brain tissues from different sources including humans. In the present review we will briefly describe current MALDI IMS techniques used to study neurotransmitters and discuss their current status, challenges, as well as future prospects. PMID:26819893

  13. Next generation of food allergen quantification using mass spectrometric systems.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Martina; Clarke, Dean; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-08-01

    Food allergies are increasing worldwide and becoming a public health concern. Food legislation requires detailed declarations of potential allergens in food products and therefore an increased capability to analyze for the presence of food allergens. Currently, antibody-based methods are mainly utilized to quantify allergens; however, these methods have several disadvantages. Recently, mass spectrometry (MS) techniques have been developed and applied to food allergen analysis. At present, 46 allergens from 11 different food sources have been characterized using different MS approaches and some specific signature peptides have been published. However, quantification of allergens using MS is not routinely employed. This review compares the different aspects of food allergen quantification using advanced MS techniques including multiple reaction monitoring. The latter provides low limits of quantification for multiple allergens in simple or complex food matrices, while being robust and reproducible. This review provides an overview of current approaches to analyze food allergens, with specific focus on MS systems and applications. PMID:24824675

  14. Automated mass spectrometric sequence determination of cyclic peptide library members.

    PubMed

    Redman, James E; Wilcoxen, Keith M; Ghadiri, M Reza

    2003-01-01

    Cyclic peptides have come under scrutiny as potential antimicrobial therapeutic agents. Combinatorial split-and-pool synthesis of cyclic peptides can afford single compound per well libraries for antimicrobial screening, new lead identification, and construction of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). Here, we report a new sequencing protocol for rapid identification of the members of a cyclic peptide library based on automated computer analysis of mass spectra, obviating the need for library encoding/decoding strategies. Furthermore, the software readily integrates with common spreadsheet and database packages to facilitate data visualization and archiving. The utility of the new MS-sequencing approach is demonstrated using sonic spray ionization ion trap MS and MS/MS spectrometry on a single compound per bead cyclic peptide library and validated with individually synthesized pure cyclic D,L-alpha-peptides. PMID:12523832

  15. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of glycoproteins combined with enrichment methods.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies. PMID:24889823

  16. Mass spectrometric methods for monitoring redox processes in electrochemical cells

    PubMed Central

    Oberacher, Herbert; Pitterl, Florian; Erb, Robert; Plattner, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemistry (EC) is a mature scientific discipline aimed to study the movement of electrons in an oxidation–reduction reaction. EC covers techniques that use a measurement of potential, charge, or current to determine the concentration or the chemical reactivity of analytes. The electrical signal is directly converted into chemical information. For in-depth characterization of complex electrochemical reactions involving the formation of diverse intermediates, products and byproducts, EC is usually combined with other analytical techniques, and particularly the hyphenation of EC with mass spectrometry (MS) has found broad applicability. The analysis of gases and volatile intermediates and products formed at electrode surfaces is enabled by differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). In DEMS an electrochemical cell is sampled with a membrane interface for electron ionization (EI)-MS. The chemical space amenable to EC/MS (i.e., bioorganic molecules including proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, and drugs) was significantly increased by employing electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS. In the simplest setup, the EC of the ESI process is used to analytical advantage. A limitation of this approach is, however, its inability to precisely control the electrochemical potential at the emitter electrode. Thus, particularly for studying mechanistic aspects of electrochemical processes, the hyphenation of discrete electrochemical cells with ESI-MS was found to be more appropriate. The analytical power of EC/ESI-MS can further be increased by integrating liquid chromatography (LC) as an additional dimension of separation. Chromatographic separation was found to be particularly useful to reduce the complexity of the sample submitted either to the EC cell or to ESI-MS. Thus, both EC/LC/ESI-MS and LC/EC/ESI-MS are common. PMID:24338642

  17. Sonochemical transformation of thymidine: A mass spectrometric study.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Jisha; Aravind, Usha K; Aravindakumar, C T

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound is extensively used in medical field for a number of applications including targeted killing of cancer cells. DNA is one of the most susceptible entities in any kind of free radical induced reactions in living systems. In the present work, the transformation of thymidine (dT) induced by ultrasound (US) was investigated using high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-Q-ToF-MS). dT was subjected to sonolysis under four different frequencies (200, 350, 620 and 1000 kHz) and at three power densities (10.5, 24.5 and 42 W/mL) in aerated as well as argon saturated conditions. A total of twenty modified nucleosides including non-fully characterized dT dimeric compounds were detected by LC-Q-ToF-MS. Out of these products, seven were obtained only in the argon atmosphere and two only in the aerated conditions. Among the identified products, there were base modified products and sugar modified products. The products were formed by the reaction of hydroxyl radical and hydrogen atom. Under aerated conditions, the reactions proceed via the formation of hydroperoxides, while in argon atmosphere disproportionation and radical recombinations predominate. The study provides a complete picture of sonochemical transformation pathways of dT which has relevance in DNA damage under ultrasound exposure. PMID:26186835

  18. A Mass Spectrometric-Derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P.; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L.; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments. PMID:25894527

  19. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometric study of cyclohexene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Cao, Maoqi; Wei, Bin; Ding, Mengmeng; Shan, Xiaobin; Liu, Fuyi; Sheng, Liusi

    2016-02-01

    In this work, photoionization and dissociation of cyclohexene have been studied by means of coupling a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer with the tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The adiabatic ionization energy of cyclohexene as well as the appearance energies of its fragment ions C6 H9 (+) , C6 H7 (+) , C5 H7 (+) , C5 H5 (+) , C4 H6 (+) , C4 H5 (+) , C3 H5 (+) and C3 H3 (+) were derived from the onset of the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves. The optimized structures for the transition states and intermediates on the ground state potential energy surfaces related to photodissociation of cyclohexene were characterized at the ωB97X-D/6-31+g(d,p) level. The coupled cluster method, CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ, was employed to calculate the corresponding energies with the zero-point energy corrections by the ωB97X-D/6-31+g(d,p) approach. Combining experimental and theoretical results, possible formation pathways of the fragment ions were proposed and discussed in detail. The retro-Cope rearrangement was found to play a crucial role in the formation of C4 H6 (+) , C4 H5 (+) and C3 H5 (+) . Intramolecular hydrogen migrations were observed as dominant processes in most of the fragmentation pathways of cyclohexene. The present research provides a clear picture of the photoionization and dissociation processes of cyclohexene in the 8- to 15.5-eV photon energy region. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26889934

  20. Electrospray tandem mass spectrometric analysis of a dimeric conjugate, salvialeriafone and related compounds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Electrospray tandem mass spectrometry approach is widely used for the rapid characterization of natural products. This paper describes the gas-phased ESI-MS/MS fragmentation of abietane-type diterpenoids and their novel dimeric conjugate, salvialeriafone (1) using both positive and negative ion electrospray ionization quadropole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-QqTOF-MS/MS) hybrid instrument. Diterpenoids are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom and posses interesting biological activities. Results ESI-QqTOF-MS (positive ion mode) of diterpenoids 1–6 under collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometric analysis (CID-MS/MS) showed the characteristic losses of water, carbonmonoxide and propene molecules, while analysis in negative ion mode showed the characteristic losses of water, carbon monoxide, methane molecules and methyl radical. Results demonstrated the differences in the product ions and base peaks due to the differences in the skeleton. A novel dimeric conjugate, salvialeriafone (1) showed characteristic fragmentation pattern and was found to be more prone to form radical ions, as compared to monomeric diterpenoids. The fragmentation pathways of characteristic fragments were proposed with the aid of HRESIMS. Conclusions Extensive tandem mass spectrometric studies of salvialeriafone (1) and related diterpenoids 2–6 were conducted and their characteristic fragments were identified. The knowledge of the fragmentation pattern of these diterpenoids will be useful for the characterization of new dimers of this class of compounds. PMID:23079186

  1. Compound and metabolite distribution measured by MALDI mass spectrometric imaging in whole-body tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckli, Markus; Staab, Dieter; Schweitzer, Alain

    2007-02-01

    The determination of the compound distribution in laboratory animal tissue in early development is a standard process in pharmaceutical research. While this information is traditionally obtained by means of whole-body autoradiography using radiolabeled compounds, this technology does not distinguish between metabolites and parent compound. The technique described in this article, termed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric imaging, can fill this gap by simultaneously measuring compound and multiple metabolites distributed in whole-body tissue sections, using non-labeled compounds.

  2. Tandem mass spectrometric fragmentation patterns of known and new steviol glycosides with structure proposals.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Benno F

    2011-06-15

    Stevia rebaudiana contains several steviol glycosides that have a sweet flavor. They are up to 450 times sweeter than sucrose, but some have an undesirable aftertaste. Up to 2010, ten different steviol glycosides have been described from the leaves or purified extracts of S. rebaudiana. In this paper, the tandem mass spectrometric fragmentation patterns of these ten compounds are compiled, along with a scheme for structural elucidation. This scheme is then applied to 12 steviol glycosides that have not yet been described. The proposed structures of five steviol glycosides have been confirmed by other authors. PMID:21594932

  3. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Bacterial Protein Toxins and Their Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Suzanne R.; Boyer, Anne E.; Barr, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has recently become a powerful technique for bacterial identification. Mass spectrometry approaches generally rely upon introduction of the bacteria into a matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer with mass spectrometric recognition of proteins specific to that organism that form a reliable fingerprint. With some bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium botulinum, the health threat posed by these organisms is not the organism itself, but rather the protein toxins produced by the organisms. One such example is botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), a potent neurotoxin produced by C. botulinum. There are seven known serotypes of BoNT, A–G, and many of the serotypes can be further differentiated into toxin variants, which are up to 99.9% identical in some cases. Mass spectrometric proteomic techniques have been established to differentiate the serotype or toxin variant of BoNT produced by varied strains of C. botulinum. Detection of potent biological toxins requires high analytical sensitivity and mass spectrometry based methods have been developed to determine the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal toxins produced by B. anthracis. This enzymatic activity, unique for each toxin, is assessed with detection of the toxin-induced cleavage of strategically designed peptide substrates by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry offering unparalleled specificity. Furthermore, activity assays allow for the assessment of the biological activity of a toxin and its potential health risk. Such methods have become important diagnostics for botulism and anthrax. Here, we review mass spectrometry based methods for the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal factor toxin. PMID:26404376

  4. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Bacterial Protein Toxins and Their Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Boyer, Anne E; Barr, John R

    2015-09-01

    Mass spectrometry has recently become a powerful technique for bacterial identification. Mass spectrometry approaches generally rely upon introduction of the bacteria into a matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer with mass spectrometric recognition of proteins specific to that organism that form a reliable fingerprint. With some bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium botulinum, the health threat posed by these organisms is not the organism itself, but rather the protein toxins produced by the organisms. One such example is botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), a potent neurotoxin produced by C. botulinum. There are seven known serotypes of BoNT, A-G, and many of the serotypes can be further differentiated into toxin variants, which are up to 99.9% identical in some cases. Mass spectrometric proteomic techniques have been established to differentiate the serotype or toxin variant of BoNT produced by varied strains of C. botulinum. Detection of potent biological toxins requires high analytical sensitivity and mass spectrometry based methods have been developed to determine the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal toxins produced by B. anthracis. This enzymatic activity, unique for each toxin, is assessed with detection of the toxin-induced cleavage of strategically designed peptide substrates by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry offering unparalleled specificity. Furthermore, activity assays allow for the assessment of the biological activity of a toxin and its potential health risk. Such methods have become important diagnostics for botulism and anthrax. Here, we review mass spectrometry based methods for the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal factor toxin. PMID:26404376

  5. Mass spectrometric characterization of human hemoglobin adducts formed in vitro by hexahydrophthalic anhydride.

    PubMed

    Kristiansson, Monica H; Jönsson, Bo A G; Lindh, Christian H

    2002-04-01

    Primary structural information of anhydride binding to endogenous proteins is of interest in order to determine the mechanism causing the type-I allergy seen in many anhydride-exposed workers. In addition, studies on specific protein adducts may generate new methods for biological monitoring. In this study, the binding of hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA) to human hemoglobin (Hb) in vitro was investigated. The in vitro synthesized conjugates were analyzed using a hybrid quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (Q-TOF) with electrospray ionization (ESI) to determine the number of HHPA adducts per Hb molecule. Structural information on the locations of the adducts was obtained through nanospray Q-TOF, liquid chromatography-ESI mass spectrometric analysis, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of Pronase E and tryptic digests. Up to six adducts were found on the alpha-chain and five on the beta-chain. The HHPA-adducts were localized to the N-terminal valine of the alpha- and beta-chains of Hb and to lysine residues at positions 7, 11, 16, and 40 of the alpha-chain and 8, 17, 59, 66, and 144 of the beta-chain. These results will constitute a basis for studies on structure-activity relationships as well as for development of methods for biological monitoring of acid anhydrides. PMID:11952343

  6. Middle-down and Top-down mass spectrometric analysis of co-occurring histone modifications

    PubMed Central

    Molden, Rosalynn C; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2014-01-01

    Histones are chromatin proteins that are highly modified with many different types of post-translational modifications. These modifications act in concert to regulate a number of chromatin-related processes. However, identification and quantification of co-occurring histone post-translational modifications is challenging because there are many potential combinations of modifications and because the commonly used strategy of fragmenting proteins using trypsin or an alternative protease prior to LC-MS/MS analysis results in the loss of connectivity between modifications on different peptides. In this unit mass spectrometric methods to analyze combinatorial histone modifications on histone tails (Middle-down mass spectrometry) and on intact histones (Top-down mass spectrometry) are described. PMID:25081742

  7. Mass-spectrometric determination of trace elements in aqueous media without preconcentration

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, G. O.

    1981-10-01

    Feasibility of using a low pressure glow discharge as an ion source for the mass spectrometric determination of trace elements in aqueous media was investigated. A cryogenically cooled hollow cathode ion source was developed to analyze aqueous samples without external preconcentration. Aqueous solutions containing seventy elements were analyzed and the detection limits, sensitivity factors, and linear regression correlation coefficients were determined. A standard test solution of trace elements in water was analyzed and the concentrations of trace elements were calculated using the sensitivity factors determined previously. The results compared favorably within the error limits predicted by the semiquantitative survey methods used. Tap water and natural lake water samples were examined and minimal interference effects due to organic compounds and biological compounds were noted. A research ion optical system (RIOS) was developed as a flexible mass analyzer for the development of new ion sources. The RIOS is a double focussing mass analyzer designed utilizing the Mattauch-Herzog geometry with externally adjustable slit assemblies.

  8. Mass-spectrometric study of the electron-impact-induced fragmentation of the tryptophan molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukstich, V. S.; Romanova, L. G.; Megela, I. G.; Snegursky, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    The formation of ion products upon single and dissociative electron-impact ionization of the tryptophan (C11H12N2O2) molecule has been studied using mass-spectrometric techniques. The mass-spectrum of tryptophan has been obtained and interpreted, and the near-threshold ion yields from the initial molecule and the main products of its electron-impact ionization have been measured. The absolute values of ionization energy of the initial tryptophan molecule and the appearance potentials of its main fragment ions have been determined. The influence of exposure to a high-energy beam of accelerated electrons on the resulting mass spectra of initial molecule has been studied.

  9. Mass spectrometric assay for analysis of haptoglobin fucosylation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhenxin; Simeone, Diane M; Anderson, Michelle A; Brand, Randall E; Xie, Xiaolei; Shedden, Kerby A; Ruffin, Mack T; Lubman, David M

    2011-05-01

    A mass spectrometric method was developed to elucidate the N-glycan structures of serum glycoproteins and utilize fucosylated glycans as potential markers for pancreatic cancer. This assay was applied to haptoglobin in human serum where N-glycans derived from the serum of 16 pancreatic cancer patients were compared with those from 15 individuals with benign conditions (5 normals, 5 chronic pancreatitis, and 5 type II diabetes). This assay used only 10 μL of serum where haptoglobin was extracted using a monoclonal antibody and quantitative permethylation was performed on desialylated N-glycans followed by MALDI-QIT-TOF MS analysis. Eight desialylated N-glycan structures of haptoglobin were identified where a bifucosylated triantennary structure was reported for the first time in pancreatic cancer samples. Both core and antennary fucosylation were elevated in pancreatic cancer samples compared to samples from benign conditions. Fucosylation degree indices were calculated and show a significant difference between pancreatic cancer patients of all stages and the benign conditions analyzed. This study demonstrates that a serum assay based on haptoglobin fucosylation patterns using mass spectrometric analysis may serve as a novel method for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. PMID:21417406

  10. Chromatographic and mass spectrometric fingerprinting analyses of Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels-derived dietary supplements

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Sun, Jianghao; Yu, Liangli (Lucy); Chen, Pei

    2013-01-01

    Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels (“Danggui” in Chinese) is one of the most commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs). It has been used to invigorate blood circulation for the treatment of anemia, hypertension, chronic bronchitis, asthma, rheumatism and cardiovascular diseases. There are a number of A. sinensis-derived dietary supplements in the U. S. markets. However, no study has been conducted to investigate the quality of these dietary supplements. In this paper, high-performance liquid chromatographic and flow-injection mass spectrometric fingerprints were both evaluated to assess the consistency of A. sinensis-derived dietary supplements. Similarity analysis was carried out on the high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) fingerprints. Meanwhile, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on the data obtained from flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprints, which cananalyze each sample in 2 min, compared to 30 min required for the chromatographic fingerprint. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the FIMS fingerprints was performed. Both methods show significant chemical differences between samples that may be due to differences in growing locations, growing conditions, harvesting times, and/or botanical processing. The loading plots obtained from PCA singled out the discriminatory ions that were responsible for chemical differences of A. sinensis-derived dietary supplements. PMID:23314619

  11. The Bremen mass spectrometric facility for the measurement of helium isotopes, neon, and tritium in water.

    PubMed

    Sültenfuss, Jürgen; Roether, Wolfgang; Rhein, Monika

    2009-06-01

    We describe the mass spectrometric facility for measuring helium isotopes, neon, and tritium that has been operative at this institute since 1989, and also the sampling and sample preparation steps that precede the mass spectrometric analysis. For water samples in a near-equilibrium with atmospheric air, the facility achieves precision for (3)He/(4)He ratios of+/-0.4% or better, and+/-0.8 % or better for helium and neon concentrations. Tritium precision is typically+/-3 % and the detection limit 10 mTU ( approximately 1.2.10(-3) Bq/kg of pure water). Sample throughputs can reach some thousands per year. These achievements are enabled, among other features, by automation of the measurement procedure and by elaborate calibration, assisted by continual development in detail. To date, we have measured more than 15,000 samples for tritium and 23,000 for helium isotopes and neon, mostly in the context of oceanographic and hydrologic work. Some results of such work are outlined. Even when atmospheric tritium concentrations have become rather uniform, tritium provides water ages if (3)He data are taken concurrently. The technique can resolve tritium concentrations in waters of the pre-nuclear era. PMID:20183223

  12. A Mass Spectrometric Assay for Analysis of Haptoglobin Fucosylation in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhenxin; Simeone, Diane M.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Brand, Randall E.; Xie, Xiaolei; Shedden, Kerby A.; Ruffin, Mack T.; Lubman, David M.

    2011-01-01

    A mass spectrometric method was developed to elucidate the N-glycan structures of serum glycoproteins and utilize fucosylated glycans as potential markers for pancreatic cancer. This assay was applied to haptoglobin in human serum where N-glycans derived from the serum of 16 pancreatic cancer patients were compared with those from 15 individuals with benign conditions (5 normals, 5 chronic pancreatitis, and 5 type II diabetes). This assay used only 10uL of serum where haptoglobin was extracted using a monoclonal antibody and quantitative permethylation was performed on desialylated N-glycans followed by MALDI-QIT-TOF MS analysis. Eight desialylated N-glycan structures of haptoglobin were identified where a bifucosylated tri-antennary structure was reported for the first time in pancreatic cancer samples. Both core and antennary fucosylation were elevated in pancreatic cancer samples compared to samples from benign conditions. Fucosylation degree indices were calculated and show a significant difference between pancreatic cancer patients of all stages and the benign conditions analyzed. This study demonstrates that a serum assay based on haptoglobin fucosylation patterns using mass spectrometric analysis may serve as a novel method for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. PMID:21417406

  13. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging meets "omics": recent advances in the fruitful marriage.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, A C; Schubert, U S; von Eggeling, F

    2015-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI MSI) is a method that allows the investigation of the molecular content of surfaces, in particular, tissues, within its morphological context. The applications of MALDI MSI in the field of large-scale mass spectrometric studies, which are typically denoted by the suffix "omics", are steadily increasing. This is because, on the one hand, technical advances regarding sample collection and preparation, matrix application, instrumentation, and data processing have enhanced the molecular specificity and sensitivity of MALDI MSI; on the other hand, the focus of the "omics" community has moved from establishing an inventory of certain compound classes to exploring their spatial distribution to gain novel insights. Thus, the aim of this mini-review is twofold, to display the state-of-the-art in terms of technical aspects in MALDI MSI and to highlight selected applications in the last two years, which either have significantly advanced a certain "omics" field or have introduced a new one through pioneering efforts. PMID:26161715

  14. Highly sensitive immunoassay based on immunogold-silver amplification and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Liu, Xing; Tang, Yurong; Wu, Li; Hou, Xiandeng; Lv, Yi

    2011-03-15

    In this work, we demonstrated a highly sensitive inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICPMS) method for the determination of human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), which combined the inherent high sensitivity of elemental mass spectrometric measurement with the signal amplification of catalytic silver deposition on immunogold tags. The silver amplification procedure was easy to handle and required cheap reagents, and the sensitivity was greatly enhanced to 60-fold after a 15 min silver amplification procedure. The experimental conditions, including detection of gold and silver by ICPMS, immunoassay parameters, silver amplification parameters, analytical performance, and clinical serum samples analysis, were investigated. The ICPMS Ag signal intensity depends linearly on the logarithm of the concentration of human CEA over the range of 0.07-1000 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection (LOD, 3σ) of 0.03 ng mL(-1) (i.e., 0.15 pM). The LOD of the proposed method is around 2 orders of magnitude lower than that by the widely used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and 1 order of magnitude lower than that by clinical routine chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) or time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TRFIA) and conventional ICPMS immunoassay. The present strategy was applied to the determination of human CEA in clinical human serum samples, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained by chemiluminescence immunoassay. PMID:21348438

  15. Mass-spectrometric online monitoring of metabolism for estimation of adequacy of anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Levshankov, A. I.; Faizov, I. I.; Shchegolev, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    The possibility of using a mass-spectrometric method for estimation of the adequacy of anesthesia has been demonstrated. The method is based on online monitoring of metabolism by determining the CO2/O2 concentration ratio during expiration in each breathing cycle, which allows the patient's response to surgical injury in the course of total anesthesia to be evaluated. The proposed method has been clinically tested using an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer connected to the breathing circuit of an inhalation anesthesia machine. It is shown that, using this technique, the time of the patient's organism response to drug correction of the adequacy of lung ventilation during anesthesia can be monitored online.

  16. Photoaffinity labeling combined with mass spectrometric approaches as a tool for structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Robinette, David; Neamati, Nouri; Tomer, Kenneth B; Borchers, Christoph H

    2006-08-01

    Protein chemistry, such as crosslinking and photoaffinity labeling, in combination with modern mass spectrometric techniques, can provide information regarding protein-protein interactions beyond that normally obtained from protein identification and characterization studies. While protein crosslinking can make tertiary and quaternary protein structure information available, photoaffinity labeling can be used to obtain structural data about ligand-protein interaction sites, such as oligonucleotide-protein, drug-protein and protein-protein interaction. In this article, we describe mass spectrometry-based photoaffinity labeling methodologies currently used and discuss their current limitations. We also discuss their potential as a common approach to structural proteomics for providing 3D information regarding the binding region, which ultimately will be used for molecular modeling and structure-based drug design. PMID:16901199

  17. Identification of volatiles by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin; Kahl, Joseph H

    2013-10-01

    Volatiles are frequently abused as inhalants. The methods used for identification are generally nonspecific if analyzed concurrently with ethanol or require an additional analytical procedure that employs mass spectrometry. A previously published technique utilizing a capillary flow technology splitter to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation was evaluated for the detection of inhalants. Methanol, isopropanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, isoamyl alcohol, isobutyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, 1,1-difluoroethane, 1,1,1-trifluoroethane, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (Norflurane, HFC-134a), chloroethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-11), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-12), dichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-21), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-22) and 1,2-dichlorotetrafluoroethane (Freon®-114) were validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validation for qualitative identification included evaluation of matrix effects, sensitivity, carryover, specificity, repeatability and ruggedness/robustness. PMID:24005155

  18. On-line mass spectrometric monitoring of the polymerization of a phenolic-resin-based material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikens, D. A.; Wood, G. M.; Upchurch, B. T.

    1975-01-01

    Polymerization of phenolic-resin-based materials requires elevated temperatures. The low thermal conductivity of these materials has led to the use of dielectric heating techniques in lieu of standard convection oven heating to obtain a satisfactory cure. The curing rate and therefore the quality of the cured material depends on the heating rate and maximum temperature attained, parameters which are extremely difficult to measure in dielectric heating units. The dielectric curing of these materials was monitored by using a mass spectrometer to measure the partial pressure of phenol in the gas evolved during polymerization. The resulting plots of phenol partial pressure as a function of time have a characteristic shape, and these may be used to indicate the attainment of complete curing. The validity of the mass spectrometric technique was confirmed by chemical analysis of the polymerized samples.

  19. A HIGH THROUGHPUT MASS SPECTROMETRIC ASSAY FOR DISCOVERY OF HUMAN LIPOXYGENASE INHIBITORS AND ALLOSTERIC EFFECTORS

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, J. Brian; Kenyon, Victor; Holman, Theodore R.

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOX) regulate inflammation through the production of a variety of molecules whose specific downstream effects are not entirely understood due to the complexity of the inflammation pathway. The generation of these biomolecules can potentially be inhibited and/or allosterically regulated by small synthetic molecules. The current work describes the first mass spectrometric, high throughput method for identifying small molecule LOX inhibitors and LOX allosteric effectors, which change the substrate preference of human lipoxygenase enzymes. Using a volatile buffer and an acid-labile detergent, enzymatic products can be directly detected using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), without the need of organic extraction. The method also reduces the required enzyme concentration compared to traditional UV absorbance methods by approximately 30-fold, allowing accurate binding affinity measurements for inhibitors with nanomolar affinity. The procedure was validated using known LOX inhibitors and the allosteric effector, 13(S)-hydroxy-9Z,11E-octadecadienoic acid (13-HODE). PMID:25712042

  20. Mass spectrometric behaviour of carboxylated polyethylene glycols and carboxylated octylphenol ethoxylates.

    PubMed

    Frańska, Magdalena; Zgoła, Agnieszka; Rychłowska, Joanna; Szymański, Andrzej; Łukaszewski, Zenon; Frański, Rafał

    2003-01-01

    Mass spectrometric behaviour of mono- and di-carboxylated polyethylene glycols (PEGCs and CPEGCs) and carboxylated octylphenol ethoxylates (OPECs) are discussed. The tendency for ionisation (deprotonation, protonation and cationisation by alkali metal cations) of carboxylated PEGs was compared with that of non-carboxylated correspondents by using both secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and electrospray ionisation (ESI). The fragmentation of the PEGCs and CPEGCs is discussed and also compared with their neutral correspondents, PEGs. The B/E mass spectra were recorded, using secondary ion mass spectrometry as a method for generation, for deprotonated and protonated molecules and molecules cationised by alkali metal cations. The fragmentation behaviour of PEGs is found to be different from that of CPEGCs, The presence of carboxylic groups may be confirmed not only by the determination of molecular weights of the ethoxylates studied, but also on the basis of the fragment ions formed. The metastable decomposition of the [OPEC-H](-) ions proceed through the cleavage of the bond between the octylphenol moiety and the ethoxylene chain leading to the octylphenoxy anions. It permits determination of the mass of the hydrophobic moiety of the studied carboxylated alkylphenol ethoxylate. ESI mass spectra recorded in the negative ion mode were found to be more suitable for the determination of the average molecular weight of carboxylated ethoxylates than SI mass spectra. PMID:12939494

  1. Cu2+-assisted two dimensional charge-mass double focusing gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis of histone variants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyang; Tang, Xuemei; Ding, Mengjie; Zhong, Hongying

    2014-12-10

    Abundant isoforms and dynamic posttranslational modifications cause the separation and identification of histone variants to be experimentally challenging. To meet this need, we employ two-dimensional electrophoretic gel separation followed by mass spectrometric detection which takes advantage of the chelation of Cu(2+) with amino acid residues exposed on the surfaces of the histone proteins. Acid-extracted rat liver histones were first mixed with CuSO4 solution and then separated in one dimension with triton-acid-urea (TAU) gel electrophoresis and in a second dimension using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The separations result from both the changes in charge and mass upon Cu(2+) chelation. Identities of each separated gel bands were obtained by using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). It was found that the migration of H3 histone isoforms of rat liver is markedly affected by the use of Cu(2+) ions. PMID:25441888

  2. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of rufinamide in low volume plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Gáll, Zsolt; Vancea, Szende; Dogaru, Maria T; Szilágyi, Tibor

    2013-12-01

    Quantification of rufinamide in plasma was achieved using a selective and sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a reversed phase column (Zorbax SB-C18 100mm×3mm, 3.5μm) under isocratic conditions. The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of water containing 0.1% formic acid and methanol (50:50, v/v). The mass spectrometric detection of the analyte was in multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM) using an electrospray positive ionization (ESI positive). The monitored ions were 127m/z derived from 239m/z rufinamide and 108m/z derived from 251m/z the internal standard (lacosamide). Protein precipitation with methanol was applied for sample preparation using only 50μl aliquots. The concentration range was 40-2000ng/ml for rufinamide in plasma. The limit of detection was 1.25ng/ml and the lower limit of quantification was established at 5ng/ml rufinamide concentration. Selectivity and matrix effect was verified using individual human, rat and rabbit plasma samples. Short-term, post-preparative and freeze-thaw stability was also investigated. The proposed method provides accuracy, precision and high-throughput (short runtime 4.5min) for quantitative determination of rufinamide in plasma. This is the first reported liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for analysis of rufinamide from low volume plasma samples. The LC-MS/MS method was validated according to the current official guidelines and can be applied to accurately measure rufinamide level of large number of plasma samples from clinical studies or therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:24140655

  3. Increased Protein Structural Resolution from Diethylpyrocarbonate-based Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometric Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Covalent labeling and mass spectrometry are seeing increased used together as a way to obtain insight into the 3-dimensional structure of proteins and protein complexes. Several amino acid specific (e.g. diethylpyrocarbonate) and non-specific (e.g. hydroxyl radicals) labeling reagents are available for this purpose. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) is a promising labeling reagent because it can potentially probe up to 30% of the residues in the average protein and gives only one reaction product, thereby facilitating mass spectrometric analysis. It was recently reported, though, that DEPC modifications are labile for some amino acids. Here, we show that label loss is more significant and widespread than previously thought, especially for Ser, Thr, Tyr, and His residues, when relatively long protein digestion times are used. Such label loss ultimately decreases the amount of protein structural information that is obtainable with this reagent. We find, however, that the number of DEPC modified residues, and thus protein structural information, can be significantly increased by decreasing the time between the covalent labeling reaction and the mass spectrometric analysis. This is most effectively accomplished using short (e.g. 2 h) proteolytic digestions with enzymes such as immobilized chymotrypsin or Glu-C rather than using methods (e.g. microwave or ultrasonic irradiation) that accelerate proteolysis in other ways. Using short digestion times, we show that the percentage of solvent accessible residues that can be modified by DEPC increases from 44% to 67% for cytochrome c, 35% to 81% for myoglobin, and 76% to 95% for β-2-microglobulin. In effect, these increased numbers of modified residues improve the protein structural resolution available from this covalent labeling method. As compared to typical overnight digestion conditions, the short digestion times decrease the average distance between modified residues from 11 Å to 7 Å for myoglobin, 13 Å to 10 Å for

  4. Increased Protein Structural Resolution from Diethylpyrocarbonate-based Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometric Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W.

    2012-04-01

    Covalent labeling and mass spectrometry are seeing increased use together as a way to obtain insight into the 3-dimensional structure of proteins and protein complexes. Several amino acid specific (e.g., diethylpyrocarbonate) and non-specific (e.g., hydroxyl radicals) labeling reagents are available for this purpose. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) is a promising labeling reagent because it can potentially probe up to 30% of the residues in the average protein and gives only one reaction product, thereby facilitating mass spectrometric analysis. It was recently reported, though, that DEPC modifications are labile for some amino acids. Here, we show that label loss is more significant and widespread than previously thought, especially for Ser, Thr, Tyr, and His residues, when relatively long protein digestion times are used. Such label loss ultimately decreases the amount of protein structural information that is obtainable with this reagent. We find, however, that the number of DEPC modified residues and, thus, protein structural information, can be significantly increased by decreasing the time between the covalent labeling reaction and the mass spectrometric analysis. This is most effectively accomplished using short (e.g., 2 h) proteolytic digestions with enzymes such as immobilized chymotrypsin or Glu-C rather than using methods (e.g., microwave or ultrasonic irradiation) that accelerate proteolysis in other ways. Using short digestion times, we show that the percentage of solvent accessible residues that can be modified by DEPC increases from 44% to 67% for cytochrome c, 35% to 81% for myoglobin, and 76% to 95% for β-2-microglobulin. In effect, these increased numbers of modified residues improve the protein structural resolution available from this covalent labeling method. Compared with typical overnight digestion conditions, the short digestion times decrease the average distance between modified residues from 11 to 7 Å for myoglobin, 13 to 10 Å for

  5. Computer-assisted mass spectrometric analysis of naturally occurring and artificially introduced cross-links in proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Leo J; Kasper, Piotr T; Back, Jaap Willem; Nessen, Merel A; Vanrobaeys, Frank; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Gherardi, Ermanno; de Koster, Chris G; de Jong, Luitzen

    2006-01-01

    A versatile software tool, VIRTUALMSLAB, is presented that can perform advanced complex virtual proteomic experiments with mass spectrometric analyses to assist in the characterization of proteins. The virtual experimental results allow rapid, flexible and convenient exploration of sample preparation strategies and are used to generate MS reference databases that can be matched with the real MS data obtained from the equivalent real experiments. Matches between virtual and acquired data reveal the identity and nature of reaction products that may lead to characterization of post-translational modification patterns, disulfide bond structures, and cross-linking in proteins or protein complexes. The most important unique feature of this program is the ability to perform multistage experiments in any user-defined order, thus allowing the researcher to vary experimental approaches that can be conducted in the laboratory. Several features of VIRTUALMSLAB are demonstrated by mapping both disulfide bonds and artificially introduced protein cross-links. It is shown that chemical cleavage at aspartate residues in the protease resistant RNase A, followed by tryptic digestion can be optimized so that the rigid protein breaks up into MALDI-MS detectable fragments, leaving the disulfide bonds intact. We also show the mapping of a number of chemically introduced cross-links in the NK1 domain of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The VIRTUALMSLAB program was used to explore the limitation and potential of mass spectrometry for cross-link studies of more complex biological assemblies, showing the value of high performance instruments such as a Fourier transform mass spectrometer. The program is freely available upon request. PMID:16403016

  6. EVALUATION OF THE BASIC GC/MS (GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC/MASS SPECTROMETRIC) COMPUTER ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE FOR POLLUTANT ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The basic gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric/computer technique for the analysis of vapor-phase organic compounds collected on a solid sorbent was evaluated. Emphasis was placed on the assessment of performance and improvement in techniques in the following areas: (1) wide-bo...

  7. Method and apparatus for enhanced sequencing of complex molecules using surface-induced dissociation in conjunction with mass spectrometric analysis

    DOEpatents

    Laskin, Julia [Richland, WA; Futrell, Jean H [Richland, WA

    2008-04-29

    The invention relates to a method and apparatus for enhanced sequencing of complex molecules using surface-induced dissociation (SID) in conjunction with mass spectrometric analysis. Results demonstrate formation of a wide distribution of structure-specific fragments having wide sequence coverage useful for sequencing and identifying the complex molecules.

  8. Differentiation of whole grain and refined wheat (T. aestivum) flour using a fuzzy mass spectrometric fingerprinting and chemometric approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fuzzy mass spectrometric (MS) fingerprinting method combined with chemometric analysis was established to provide rapid discrimination between whole grain and refined wheat flour. Twenty one samples, including thirteen samples from three cultivars and eight from local grocery store, were studied....

  9. XMS: Cross-Platform Normalization Method for Multimodal Mass Spectrometric Tissue Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golf, Ottmar; Muirhead, Laura J.; Speller, Abigail; Balog, Júlia; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Kumar, Sacheen; Mróz, Anna; Veselkov, Kirill; Takáts, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a proof of concept cross-platform normalization approach to convert raw mass spectra acquired by distinct desorption ionization methods and/or instrumental setups to cross-platform normalized analyte profiles. The initial step of the workflow is database driven peak annotation followed by summarization of peak intensities of different ions from the same molecule. The resulting compound-intensity spectra are adjusted to a method-independent intensity scale by using predetermined, compound-specific normalization factors. The method is based on the assumption that distinct MS-based platforms capture a similar set of chemical species in a biological sample, though these species may exhibit platform-specific molecular ion intensity distribution patterns. The method was validated on two sample sets of (1) porcine tissue analyzed by laser desorption ionization (LDI), desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), and rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometric (REIMS) in combination with Fourier transformation-based mass spectrometry; and (2) healthy/cancerous colorectal tissue analyzed by DESI and REIMS with the latter being combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We demonstrate the capacity of our method to reduce MS-platform specific variation resulting in (1) high inter-platform concordance coefficients of analyte intensities; (2) clear principal component based clustering of analyte profiles according to histological tissue types, irrespective of the used desorption ionization technique or mass spectrometer; and (3) accurate "blind" classification of histologic tissue types using cross-platform normalized analyte profiles.

  10. Proteome-wide drug screening using mass spectrometric imaging of bead-arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Liu, Ziying; Rothschild, Kenneth J.; Lim, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in the drug discovery process is to develop compounds with high efficacy and minimal side-effects. We describe a new approach to proteome-wide drug screening for detection of on- and off-target binding which combines the advantages of mass spectrometry with microarray technology. The method involves matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI) of agarose micro-beads randomly arrayed at high-density in custom micro-well plates. Each bead carries a unique protein target and a corresponding photocleavable mass-tag for coding (PC-Mass-Tag). Compounds bound to specific protein beads and a photo-released coding PC-Mass-Tag are detected simultaneously using MALDI-MSI. As an initial demonstration of this approach, two kinase-targeted drugs, Dasatinib and Brigatinib (AP26113), were simultaneously screened against a model 50-member kinase-bead library. A MALDI-MSI scan performed at the equivalent density of 495,000 beads in the footprint of a microscope slide yielded 100% sensitivity for detecting known strong interactions with no false positives. PMID:27194112

  11. Proteome-wide drug screening using mass spectrometric imaging of bead-arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Liu, Ziying; Rothschild, Kenneth J; Lim, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in the drug discovery process is to develop compounds with high efficacy and minimal side-effects. We describe a new approach to proteome-wide drug screening for detection of on- and off-target binding which combines the advantages of mass spectrometry with microarray technology. The method involves matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI) of agarose micro-beads randomly arrayed at high-density in custom micro-well plates. Each bead carries a unique protein target and a corresponding photocleavable mass-tag for coding (PC-Mass-Tag). Compounds bound to specific protein beads and a photo-released coding PC-Mass-Tag are detected simultaneously using MALDI-MSI. As an initial demonstration of this approach, two kinase-targeted drugs, Dasatinib and Brigatinib (AP26113), were simultaneously screened against a model 50-member kinase-bead library. A MALDI-MSI scan performed at the equivalent density of 495,000 beads in the footprint of a microscope slide yielded 100% sensitivity for detecting known strong interactions with no false positives. PMID:27194112

  12. Considerations for quantification of lipids in nerve tissue using MALDI mass spectrometric imaging

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, Rachelle R.; Garrett, Timothy J.; Prieto Conaway, Maria C.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Yost, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    MALDI mass spectrometric imaging is a technique that provides the ability to identify and characterize endogenous and exogenous compounds spatially within tissue with relatively little sample preparation. While it is a proven methodology for qualitative analysis, little has been reported for its utility in quantitative measurements. In the current work, inherent challenges in MALDI quantification are addressed. Signal response is monitored over successive analyses of a single tissue section to minimize error due to variability in the laser, matrix application, and sample inhomogeneity. Methods for the application of an internal standard to tissue sections are evaluated and used to quantify endogenous lipids in nerve tissue. A precision of 5% or less standard error was achieved, illustrating that MALDI imaging offers a reliable means of in situ quantification for microgram-sized samples and requires minimal sample preparation. PMID:21953974

  13. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis and subsequent quality improvement of plastic infusion packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Z; Rófusz, T; Angyal, V; Szabó-Révész, P; Aigner, Z

    2014-08-01

    Although the opalescence of sterile transparent plastic materials utilized for the packaging of parenteral infusion drugs is a serious quality problem, most suppliers do not report the exact compositions of such polymers, and no literature data are available. Similarly, no information is available as concerns the potential incompatibility of the inner bag and the overpouch. Our gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric study revealed that the cause of the opalescence is the presence of a low-molecular-weight slip additive, 13-docosenamide (erucamide), which is transferred into the primary infusion bag from the overpouch during the heat-sterilization process. Autoclaving trials confirmed the analytical results. In view of these findings, a new slip additive-free overpouch has been produced as secondary packaging material, which does not give rise to opalescence. PMID:24863371

  14. Regime Transition in Electromechanical Fluid Atomization and Implications to Analyte Ionization for Mass Spectrometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Thomas P.; Degertekin, F. Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    The physical processes governing the transition from purely mechanical ejection to electromechanical ejection to electrospraying are investigated through complementary scaling analysis and optical visualization. Experimental characterization and visualization are performed with the ultrasonically-driven array of micromachined ultrasonic electrospray (AMUSE) ion source to decouple the electrical and mechanical fields. A new dimensionless parameter, the Fenn number, is introduced to define a transition between the spray regimes, in terms of its dependence on the characteristic Strouhal number for the ejection process. A fundamental relationship between the Fenn and Strouhal numbers is theoretically derived and confirmed experimentally in spraying liquid electrolytes of different ionic strength subjected to a varying magnitude electric field. This relationship and the basic understanding of the charged droplet generation physics have direct implications on the optimal ionization efficiency and mass spectrometric response for different types of analytes. PMID:20729096

  15. Quantitative Mass Spectrometric Immunoassay for the Chemokine RANTES and its Variants

    PubMed Central

    Trenchevska, Olgica; Sherma, Nisha D.; Oran, Paul E.; Reaven, Peter D.; Nelson, Randall W.; Nedelkov, Dobrin

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine RANTES plays a key role in inflammation, cell recruitment and T cell activation. RANTES is heterogenic and exists as multiple variants in vivo. Herein we describe the development and characterization of a fully quantitative mass spectrometric immunoassay (MSIA) for analysis of intact RANTES and its proteoforms in human serum and plasma samples. The assay exhibits linearity over a wide concentration range (1.56 – 200 ng/mL), intra- and inter-assay precision with CVs <10%, and good linearity and recovery correlations. The assay was tested in different biological matrices, and it was benchmarked against an existing RANTES ELISA. The new RANTES MSIA was used to analyze RANTES and its proteoforms in a small clinical cohort, revealing the quantitative distribution and frequency of the native and truncated RANTES proteoforms. PMID:25549571

  16. The good, the bad, the ugly: validating the mass spectrometric analysis of modified peptides.

    PubMed

    Beck, Florian; Lewandrowski, Urs; Wiltfang, Matthias; Feldmann, Ingo; Geiger, Jörg; Sickmann, Albert; Zahedi, René Peiman

    2011-03-01

    Mass spectrometric characterization of protein modifications is usually based on single peptides. With the advent of large-scale PTM-focussed MS studies, vast amounts of data are generated continuously, providing biologists extremely valuable and virtually never-ending sources for targeted functional research. However, even more than for proteomics in general, appropriate strategies for quality control of the different steps of the analytical strategy are imperative to prevent functional researchers from doing Sisyphos work on false-positive and unconfident PTM assignments. Here, we describe strategies to address the important issue of quality control for PTM analysis on various levels of the analytical pipeline: sample preparation/processing, analysis/identification and finally data interpretation, for qualitative as well as quantitative studies. PMID:21298789

  17. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis and post-extraction stability assessment of the euglenoid toxin euglenophycin.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Danielle B; Rafalski, Alexandra; Beauchesne, Kevin; Moeller, Peter D; Triemer, Richard E; Zimba, Paul V

    2013-09-01

    Euglenophycin is a recently discovered toxin produced by at least one species of euglenoid algae. The toxin has been responsible for several fish mortality events. To facilitate the identification and monitoring of euglenophycin in freshwater ponds, we have developed a specific mass spectrometric method for the identification and quantitation of euglenophycin. The post-extraction stability of the toxin was assessed under various conditions. Euglenophycin was most stable at room temperature. At 8 °C there was a small, but statistically significant, loss in toxin after one day. These methods and knowledge of the toxin's stability will facilitate identification of the toxin as a causative agent in fish kills and determination of the toxin's distribution in the organs of exposed fish. PMID:24051554

  18. Mass spectrometric imaging of flavonoid glycosides and biflavonoids in Ginkgo biloba L.

    PubMed

    Beck, Sebastian; Stengel, Julia

    2016-10-01

    Ginkgo biloba L. is known to be rich in flavonoids and flavonoid glycosides. However, the distribution within specific plant organs (e.g. within leaves) is not known. By using HPLC-MS and MS/MS we have identified a number of previously known G. biloba flavonoid glycosides and biflavonoids from leaves. Namely, kaempferol, quercetin, isorhamnetin, myricetin, laricitrin/mearnsetin and apigenin glycosides were identified. Furthermore, biflavonoids like ginkgetin/isoginkgetin were also detected. The application of MALDI mass spectrometric imaging, enabled the compilation of concentration profiles of flavonoid glycosides and biflavonoids in G. biloba L. leaves. Both, flavonoid glycosides and biflavonoids show a distinct distribution in leaf thin sections of G. biloba L. PMID:27233155

  19. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometric studies of the aluminim chloride/n-butylpyridinium chloride molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, B.L.; Tsarbopoulos, A.; Allison, J.

    1985-07-01

    A fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometric analysis of the aluminum chloride N-n-butyl-pyridinium chloride molten salt system (AlCl/sub 3//BPCl) which is an ionic (ion-paired) liquid formed by mixing its two solid components, AlCl/sub 3/ and BPCl is reported. This system has received considerable attention recently since it is a melt at room temperature in contrast to the more commonly studied molten salt systems of the type AlCl/sub 3//MX (M is an alkali metal), which exist as melts at elevated temperatures (greater than or equal to150/sup 0/C). Results for the positive ions obtained from fast atom bombardment of a series of AlCl/sub 3//BPCl mixtures varying in composition are presented. The data obtained by FAB-MS are then discussed in light of the results previously obtained by other analytical techniques commonly used to characterize molten salts. 18 references, 2 figures.

  20. Quantitative Mass Spectrometric Analysis and Post-Extraction Stability Assessment of the Euglenoid Toxin Euglenophycin

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Danielle B.; Rafalski, Alexandra; Beauchesne, Kevin; Moeller, Peter D.; Triemer, Richard E.; Zimba, Paul V.

    2013-01-01

    Euglenophycin is a recently discovered toxin produced by at least one species of euglenoid algae. The toxin has been responsible for several fish mortality events. To facilitate the identification and monitoring of euglenophycin in freshwater ponds, we have developed a specific mass spectrometric method for the identification and quantitation of euglenophycin. The post-extraction stability of the toxin was assessed under various conditions. Euglenophycin was most stable at room temperature. At 8 °C there was a small, but statistically significant, loss in toxin after one day. These methods and knowledge of the toxin’s stability will facilitate identification of the toxin as a causative agent in fish kills and determination of the toxin’s distribution in the organs of exposed fish. PMID:24051554

  1. Direct Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometric Profiling of Real-World Samples via a Solid Sampling Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhan; Chen, Lee Chuin; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-10-01

    This study presents a novel direct analysis strategy for rapid mass spectrometric profiling of biochemicals in real-world samples via a direct sampling probe (DSP) without sample pretreatments. Chemical modification is applied to a disposable stainless steel acupuncture needle to enhance its surface area and hydrophilicity. After insertion into real-world samples, biofluid can be attached on the DSP surface. With the presence of a high DC voltage and solvent vapor condensing on the tip of the DSP, analyte can be dissolved and electrosprayed. The simplicity in design, versatility in application aspects, and other advantages such as low cost and disposability make this new method a competitive tool for direct analysis of real-world samples.

  2. iPE-MMR: An integrated approach to accurately assign monoisotopic precursor masses to tandem mass spectrometric data

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hee-Jung; Purvine, Samuel O.; Kim, Hokeun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Hyung, Seok-Won; Monroe, Matthew E.; Mun, Dong-Gi; Kim, Kyong-Chul; Park, Jong-Moon; Kim, Su-Jin; Tolic, Nikola; Slysz, Gordon W.; Moore, Ronald J.; Zhao, Rui; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Lee, Hookeun; Camp, David G.; Yu, Myeong-Hee; Smith, Richard D.; Lee, Sang-Won

    2010-01-01

    Accurate assignment of monoisotopic precursor masses to tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) data is a fundamental and critically important step for successful peptide identifications in mass spectrometry based proteomics. Here we describe an integrated approach that combines three previously reported methods of treating MS/MS data for precursor mass refinement. This combined method, “integrated Post-Experiment Monoisotopic Mass Refinement” (iPE-MMR), integrates steps: 1) generation of refined MS/MS data by DeconMSn; 2) additional refinement of the resultant MS/MS data by a modified version of PE-MMR; 3) elimination of systematic errors of precursor masses using DtaRefinery. iPE-MMR is the first method that utilizes all MS information from multiple MS scans of a precursor ion including multiple charge states, in an MS scan, to determine precursor mass. By combining these methods, iPE-MMR increases sensitivity in peptide identification and provides increased accuracy when applied to complex high-throughput proteomics data. PMID:20863060

  3. A novel mass spectrometric strategy “BEMAP” reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G.; Larsen, Martin R.; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen. PMID:27562176

  4. A novel mass spectrometric strategy "BEMAP" reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G; Larsen, Martin R; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen. PMID:27562176

  5. Use of mass spectrometric methods for field screening of VOC`s

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    While mass spectrometric (MS) methods of chemical analysis, particularly gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), have been the mainstay of environmental organic analytical techniques in the laboratory through the use of EPA and other standard methods, field implementation is relatively rare. Instrumentation and methods now exist for utilizing MS and GC/MS techniques in the field for analysis of VOC`s in gas phase, aqueous, and soil media. Examples of field investigations utilizing HP 5971A and Viking SpectraTrak systems for analysis of VOC`s in all three media will be presented. Mass spectral methods were found to offer significant advantages in terms of speed of analysis and reliability of compound identification over field gas chromatography (GC) methods while preserving adequate levels of detection sensitivity. The soil method in particular provides a method for rapid in-field analysis of methanol preserved samples thus minimizing the problem of volatiles loss which typically occurs with routine use of the EPA methods and remote analysis. The high cost of MS instrumentation remains a major obstacle to more widespread use.

  6. Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls in human placenta and cord blood

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, M.; Saito, H.; Wakisaka, I.

    1986-10-01

    Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in placenta, maternal blood, cord blood, and milk were carried out. Trichlorobiphenyl, tetrachlorobiphenyl, pentachlorobiphenyls, and hexachlorobiphenyls were identified by the mass chromatogram and the mass spectra. Some minor peaks of PCBs were identified by gas chromatography. The relationship between the PCB concentration in placenta and that in milk is different in each PCB congener. The higher the chlorine content of the PCB congener, the more significant the correlation. No significant but a low negative correlation exists between the concentration of some PCB congeners in the placenta and that in cord blood. On the other hand, a significant linear correlation exists between the concentration of hexachlorobenzene in the placenta and that in cord blood. The transplacental transport of each PCB congener varied depending upon its chemical nature. Trichlorobiphenyl and tetrachlorobiphenyl were more transferable than hexachlorobiphenyls. The results show that the placenta and cord blood are useful human samples to analyze the body burden of environmental pollutants and to estimate their transfer from mother to fetus.

  7. Mass spectrometric survey of peptides in cephalopods with an emphasis on the FMRFamide-related peptides.

    PubMed

    Sweedler, J V; Li, L; Floyd, P; Gilly, W

    2000-12-01

    A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric (MS) survey of the major peptides in the stellar, fin and pallial nerves and the posterior chromatophore lobe of the cephalopods Sepia officinalis, Loligo opalescens and Dosidicus gigas has been performed. Although a large number of putative peptides are distinct among the three species, several molecular masses are conserved. In addition to peptides, characterization of the lipid content of the nerves is reported, and these lipid peaks account for many of the lower molecular masses observed. One conserved set of peaks corresponds to the FMRFamide-related peptides (FRPs). The Loligo opalescens FMRFa gene has been sequenced. It encodes a 331 amino acid residue prohormone that is processed into 14 FRPs, which are both predicted by the nucleotide sequence and confirmed by MALDI MS. The FRPs predicted by this gene (FMRFa, FLRFa/FIRFa and ALSGDAFLRFa) are observed in all three species, indicating that members of this peptide family are highly conserved across cephalopods. PMID:11060217

  8. Isolation and characterization of related substances in alogliptin benzoate by LC-QTOF mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuting; Yang, Danyi; Li, Zhiyu; Hang, Taijun; Song, Min

    2016-09-01

    A highly specific and efficient LC-QTOF mass spectrometric method was developed for the separation and characterization of process related substances and the major degradation products in alogliptin benzoate and its tablets. The separation was performed on Phenomenex Gemini-NX C18 column (250mm×4.6mm, 5μm) using 0.2% formic acid-0.2% ammonium acetate in water as mobile phase A, acetonitrile and methanol (60:40, v/v) as mobile phase B in linear gradient elution mode. Forced degradation studies were also conducted under ICH prescribed stress conditions. Alogliptin benzoate and its tablets were tending to degrade under acid, alkaline, oxidative and thermal stresses, while relatively stable to photolytic stress. A total of seven related substances were detected and characterized through liquid chromatography-high resolution QTOF mass spectrometry techniques, including process related substances and degradation products, and two of them were further synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy. Based on the related substances elucidation and the plausible formation mechanisms, efficient approaches were proposed to reduce or eliminate related substances, and in consequence the quality of alogliptin benzoate and its tablets have been promoted obviously. Therefore, the impurity profiles obtained are critical to the quality control and manufacturing processes optimization and monitoring of alogliptin benzoate and its tablets. PMID:27281581

  9. Molecular assessment of surgical-resection margins of gastric cancer by mass-spectrometric imaging.

    PubMed

    Eberlin, Livia S; Tibshirani, Robert J; Zhang, Jialing; Longacre, Teri A; Berry, Gerald J; Bingham, David B; Norton, Jeffrey A; Zare, Richard N; Poultsides, George A

    2014-02-18

    Surgical resection is the main curative option for gastrointestinal cancers. The extent of cancer resection is commonly assessed during surgery by pathologic evaluation of (frozen sections of) the tissue at the resected specimen margin(s) to verify whether cancer is present. We compare this method to an alternative procedure, desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric imaging (DESI-MSI), for 62 banked human cancerous and normal gastric-tissue samples. In DESI-MSI, microdroplets strike the tissue sample, the resulting splash enters a mass spectrometer, and a statistical analysis, here, the Lasso method (which stands for least absolute shrinkage and selection operator and which is a multiclass logistic regression with L1 penalty), is applied to classify tissues based on the molecular information obtained directly from DESI-MSI. The methodology developed with 28 frozen training samples of clear histopathologic diagnosis showed an overall accuracy value of 98% for the 12,480 pixels evaluated in cross-validation (CV), and 97% when a completely independent set of samples was tested. By applying an additional spatial smoothing technique, the accuracy for both CV and the independent set of samples was 99% compared with histological diagnoses. To test our method for clinical use, we applied it to a total of 21 tissue-margin samples prospectively obtained from nine gastric-cancer patients. The results obtained suggest that DESI-MSI/Lasso may be valuable for routine intraoperative assessment of the specimen margins during gastric-cancer surgery. PMID:24550265

  10. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Interactions with Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thammaporn, Ratsupa; Ishii, Kentaro; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Uchiyama, Susumu; Hannongbua, Supa; Kato, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) have been developed for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV-1 RT binding to NNRTIs has been characterized by various biophysical techniques. However, these techniques are often hampered by the low water solubility of the inhibitors, such as the current promising diarylpyrimidine-based inhibitors rilpivirine and etravirine. Hence, a conventional and rapid method that requires small sample amounts is desirable for studying NNRTIs with low water solubility. Here we successfully applied a recently developed mass spectrometric technique under non-denaturing conditions to characterize the interactions between the heterodimeric HIV-1 RT enzyme and NNRTIs with different inhibitory activities. Our data demonstrate that mass spectrometry serves as a semi-quantitative indicator of NNRTI binding affinity for HIV-1 RT using low and small amounts of samples, offering a new high-throughput screening tool for identifying novel RT inhibitors as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26934936

  11. Targeted Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometric Immunoassay for Insulin-like Growth Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Niederkofler, Eric E.; Phillips, David A.; Krastins, Bryan; Kulasingam, Vathany; Kiernan, Urban A.; Tubbs, Kemmons A.; Peterman, Scott M.; Prakash, Amol; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.; Lopez, Mary F.; Nedelkov, Dobrin

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) is an important biomarker of human growth disorders that is routinely analyzed in clinical laboratories. Mass spectrometry-based workflows offer a viable alternative to standard IGF1 immunoassays, which utilize various pre-analytical preparation strategies. In this work we developed an assay that incorporates a novel sample preparation method for dissociating IGF1 from its binding proteins. The workflow also includes an immunoaffinity step using antibody-derivatized pipette tips, followed by elution, trypsin digestion, and LC-MS/MS separation and detection of the signature peptides in a selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The resulting quantitative mass spectrometric immunoassay (MSIA) exhibited good linearity in the range of 1 to 1,500 ng/mL IGF1, intra- and inter-assay precision with CVs of less than 10%, and lowest limits of detection of 1 ng/mL. The linearity and recovery characteristics of the assay were also established, and the new method compared to a commercially available immunoassay using a large cohort of human serum samples. The IGF1 SRM MSIA is well suited for use in clinical laboratories. PMID:24278387

  12. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Benzoxazinoid Glycosides from Rhizopus-Elicited Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Seedlings.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, Wouter J C; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Duran, Katharina; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-08-17

    Benzoxazinoids function as defense compounds and have been suggested to possess health-promoting effects. In this work, the mass spectrometric behavior of benzoxazinoids from the classes benzoxazin-3-ones (with subclasses lactams, hydroxamic acids, and methyl derivatives) and benzoxazolinones was studied. Wheat seeds were germinated with simultaneous elicitation by Rhizopus. The seedling extract was screened for the presence of benzoxazinoid (glycosides) using reversed-phase ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection coupled in line to multiple-stage mass spectrometry (RP-UHPLC-PDA-MS(n)). Benzoxazin-3-ones from the different subclasses showed distinctly different ionization and fragmentation behaviors. These features were incorporated into a newly proposed decision guideline to aid the classification of benzoxazinoids. Glycosides of the methyl derivative 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one were tentatively identified for the first time in wheat. We conclude that wheat seedlings germinated with simultaneous fungal elicitation contain a diverse array of benzoxazinoids, mainly constituted by benzoxazin-3-one glycosides. PMID:27431363

  13. Mass spectrometric imaging - Quantification strategies for created bio-images measured by LA-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Johannes; Zitek, Andreas; Tschegg, Stefanie; Mingler, Bernhard; Weinberg, Annelie; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) using laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been an emerging methodology in the analysis of biological matrices. A challenging step is the quantification and data processing to generate quantitative displays (bio-images) by avoiding analytical artefacts derived from image processing. Moreover, the procedure gets more challenging when features to be monitored are in the range or even smaller as compared to the size of the laser spot as the spatial resolution of the laser ablation system typically lies in the µm range (2 - 300 µm spot size). Here, we present the application of LA-ICP-MSI to biological tissues (bones) for the investigation of the distribution of alloying elements in bone material after the implantation of a Mg-based pin into the femur of rats. For the quantification of the elemental content, in-house standards were prepared by co-precipitation of the alloying elements (Mg, Ca, P, Mn, Zn, Zr, and Yb) in a hydroxyapatite matrix. The capability of this quantification approach was validated by comparative measurements of certified reference materials (SRM 1486, pressed into pellets for direct LA-ICP-MS analysis). ArcGIS® was used for the first time as standard tool for the spatially distinct statistical analysis of chemical data in so called "zones of interest".

  14. The biochemical and mass spectrometric profiling of the dystrophin complexome from skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sandra; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2015-01-01

    The development of advanced mass spectrometric methodology has decisively enhanced the analytical capabilities for studies into the composition and dynamics of multi-subunit protein complexes and their associated components. Large-scale complexome profiling is an approach that combines the systematic isolation and enrichment of protein assemblies with sophisticated mass spectrometry-based identification methods. In skeletal muscles, the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin of 427 kDa forms tight interactions with a variety of sarcolemmal, cytosolic and extracellular proteins, which in turn associate with key components of the extracellular matrix and the intracellular cytoskeleton. A major function of this enormous assembly of proteins, including dystroglycans, sarcoglycans, syntrophins, dystrobrevins, sarcospan, laminin and cortical actin, is postulated to stabilize muscle fibres during the physical tensions of continuous excitation-contraction-relaxation cycles. This article reviews the evidence from recent proteomic studies that have focused on the characterization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and its central role in the establishment of the cytoskeleton-sarcolemma-matrisome axis. Proteomic findings suggest a close linkage of the core dystrophin complex with a variety of protein species, including tubulin, vimentin, desmin, annexin, proteoglycans and collagens. Since the almost complete absence of dystrophin is the underlying cause for X-linked muscular dystrophy, a more detailed understanding of the composition, structure and plasticity of the dystrophin complexome may have considerable biomedical implications. PMID:26793286

  15. Mass spectrometric imaging of red fluorescent protein in breast tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chughtai, Kamila; Jiang, Lu; Post, Harm; Winnard, Paul T; Greenwood, Tiffany R; Raman, Venu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Heeren, Ron M A; Glunde, Kristine

    2013-05-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in combination with electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for visualization and identification of a variety of different biomolecules directly from thin tissue sections. As commonly used tools for molecular reporting, fluorescent proteins are molecular reporter tools that have enabled the elucidation of a multitude of biological pathways and processes. To combine these two approaches, we have performed targeted MS analysis and MALDI-MSI visualization of a tandem dimer (td)Tomato red fluorescent protein, which was expressed exclusively in the hypoxic regions of a breast tumor xenograft model. For the first time, a fluorescent protein has been visualized by both optical microscopy and MALDI-MSI. Visualization of tdTomato by MALDI-MSI directly from breast tumor tissue sections will allow us to simultaneously detect and subsequently identify novel molecules present in hypoxic regions of the tumor. MS and MALDI-MSI of fluorescent proteins, as exemplified in our study, is useful for studies in which the advantages of MS and MSI will benefit from the combination with molecular approaches that use fluorescent proteins as reporters. PMID:23184411

  16. Capillary column gas chromatographic determination of dicamba in water, including mass spectrometric confirmation.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, N C; Atallah, Y H; Bade, T R

    1989-01-01

    A sensitive method is described for determining dicamba at low micrograms/L levels in ground waters by capillary column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC-EC); compound identity is confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using selected ion monitoring. Dicamba residue is hydrolyzed in KOH to form the potassium salt. The sample is then extracted with ethyl ether which is discarded. The aqueous phase is acidified to pH less than 1 and extracted twice with ethyl ether. The combined ethyl ether extracts are concentrated, and the residue is methylated using diazomethane to form the corresponding dicamba ester. The derivatized sample is cleaned up on a deactivated silica gel column. The methylated dicamba is separated on an SE-30 capillary column and quantitated by electron-capture or mass spectrometric detection. Average recoveries (X +/- SD) for ground water samples fortified with 0.40 microgram/L of dicamba are 86 +/- 5% by GC-EC and 97 +/- 7% by GC-MS detections. The EDL (estimated detection limit) for this method is 0.1 microgram dicamba/L water (ppb). PMID:2808247

  17. Filter-Aided N-Glycan Separation (FANGS): A Convenient Sample Preparation Method for Mass Spectrometric N-Glycan Profiling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a simple method for the release and isolation of glycoprotein N-glycans from whole-cell lysates using less than a million cells, for subsequent implementation with mass spectrometric analysis. Cellular protein extracts prepared using SDS solubilization were sequentially treated in a membrane filter device to ultimately release glycans enzymatically using PNGase F in the volatile buffer ammonium bicarbonate. The released glycans are recovered in the filtrate following centrifugation and typically permethylated prior to mass spectrometric analysis. We call our method “filter-aided N-glycan separation” and have successfully applied it to investigate N-glycan profiles of wild-type and mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells. This method is readily multiplexed and, because of the small numbers of cells needed, is compatible with the analysis of replicate samples to assess the true nature of glycan variability in tissue culture samples. PMID:24450425

  18. Mass spectrometric identification of an azobenzene derivative produced by smectite-catalyzed conversion of 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Rutherford, D.W.; Rostad, C.E.; Garbarino, J.R.; Ferrer, I.; Kennedy, K.R.; Momplaisir, G.-M.; Grange, A.

    2003-01-01

    The compound 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (3-amino-HPAA) reacts with smectite to form a soluble azobenzene arsonic acid compound. This reaction is of particular interest because it provides a possible mechanism for the formation of a new type of arsenic compound in natural water systems. 3-Amino-HPAA is a degradation product excreted by chickens that are fed rations amended with roxarsone. Roxarsone is used to control coccidial intestinal parasites in most of the broiler chickens grown in the United States. The structure of the azobenzene arsonic acid compound was first inferred from negative-ion and positive-ion low-resolution mass-spectrometric analyses of the supernatant of the smectite suspension. Elemental composition of the parent ion determined by high-resolution positive-ion mass spectrometric measurements was consistent with the proposed structure of the azobenzene arsonic acid compound. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Mass spectrometric studies of cocaine disposition in animals and humans using stable isotope-labeled analogues.

    PubMed

    Jindal, S P; Lutz, T

    1989-12-01

    Ion cluster technique in conjunction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for the identification and quantitation of major metabolites of cocaine (1a) in rat and humans. In a typical experiment, a female rat weighing 250 gm was intraperitoneally administered a 20-mg/kg mixture of 1a, NCD3-cocaine (1b), OCD3-cocaine (1c), and 4T2-cocaine (1d). The urine was collected, extracted with organic solvents, and separated into several fractions using TLC and HPLC techniques. Tritium radioactivity in a metabolically stable position in 1d was useful in the separation of metabolites, while the deuterium labeled 1(b + c), creating an artificial isotopic cluster, provided specific identification of metabolites by mass spectrometric interpretation. Norcocaine (2), benzoylnorecgonine (3), N-hydroxynorcocaine (4), methylecgonidine (5), benzoylecgonine (11), ecgonine methyl ester (9), hydroxycocaine (7), hydroxymethoxycocaine (10), and dimethoxyhydroxycocaine (6) were found to be the major metabolites of 1a in the rat urine as well as in plasma. The whole brain analysis showed significant amounts of unmetabolized 1a and 2, and minor concentrations of 9, 5, 7, and 10, and traces of 6. Some of these metabolites have been reported earlier by us as well as other investigators and are unequivocally confirmed in this work. Unmetabolized 1a, its pharmacologically active metabolite 2, and other major metabolites were quantitated in the rat brain, plasma, and urine using stable isotope-labeled analogues as internal standards and selected ion monitoring (SIM) mass spectrometry. The pharmacokinetic profiles of 1a and 2 indicate half-lives of less than 20 min in the brain and plasma. These data are in good agreement with widely reported short-lived behavioral effects of cocaine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2614690

  20. Mass spectrometric profiling of valepotriates possessing various acyloxy groups from Valeriana jatamansi.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng; Ye, Ji; Liang, Xu; Zhang, Xi; Su, Juan; Fu, Peng; Lv, Di-Ya; Shan, Lei; Shen, Yun-Heng; Li, Hui-Liang; Yang, Xian-Wen; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Valepotriates, plant secondary metabolites of the family Valerianaceae, contain various acyloxy group linkages to the valepotriate nucleus and exhibit significant biological activities. Identification of valepotriates is important to uncover potential lead compounds for the development of new sedative and antitumor drugs. However, making their structure elucidation by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments is too difficult to be realized because of the overlapped carbonyl carbon signals of acyloxy groups substituted at different positions. Thus, the mass spectrometric profiling of these compounds in positive ion mode was developed to unveil the exact linkage of acyloxy group and the core of valepotriate. In this study, electrospray ionization tandem multistage mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS(n)) in ion trap and collision-induced dissociation tandem MS were used to investigate the fragmentation pathways of four types of valepotriates in Valeriana jatamansi, including 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrovaltrate hydrin (5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrovaltrate chlorohydrin), 5,6-dihydrovaltrate hydrin (5,6-dihydrovaltrate chlorohydrin), 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrovaltrate and valtrate hydrin (valtrate chlorohydrin). The high-resolution mass spectrum (HRMS) data of all the investigated valepotriates from quadrupole time-of-flight MS/MS were used as a supportive of the fragmentation rules we hypothesized from ion-trap stepwise MS(n). As a result, the loss sequence of acyloxy groups and the abundance of key product ions, in combination with the characteristic product ions corresponding to the valepotriate nucleus, could readily differentiate the four different types of valepotriates. The summarized fragmentation rules were also successfully exploited for the structural characterization of three new trace valepotriates from V. jatamansi. The results indicated that the developed analytical method could be employed as a rapid, effective technique for structural characterization of valepotriates

  1. Chemical Nature Of Titan’s Organic Aerosols Constrained from Spectroscopic and Mass Spectrometric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanaka, Hiroshi; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2012-10-01

    The Cassini-Huygens observations greately extend our knowledge about Titan’s organic aerosols. The Cassini INMS and CAPS observations clearly demonstrate the formation of large organic molecules in the ionosphere [1, 2]. The VIMS and CIRS instruments have revealed spectral features of the haze covering the mid-IR and far-IR wavelengths [3, 4, 5, 6]. This study attempts to speculate the possible chemical nature of Titan’s aerosols by comparing the currently available observations with our laboratory study. We have conducted a series of cold plasma experiment to investigate the mass spectrometric and spectroscopic properties of laboratory aerosol analogs [7, 8]. Titan tholins and C2H2 plasma polymer are generated with cold plasma irradiations of N2/CH4 and C2H2, respectively. Laser desorption mass spectrum of the C2H2 plasma polymer shows a reasonable match with the CAPS positive ion mass spectrum. Furthermore, spectroscopic features of the the C2H2 plasma polymer in mid-IR and far-IR wavelegths qualitatively show reasonable match with the VIMS and CIRS observations. These results support that the C2H2 plasma polymer is a good candidate material for Titan’s aerosol particles at the altitudes sampled by the observations. We acknowledge funding supports from the NASA Cassini Data Analysis Program, NNX10AF08G, and from the NASA Exobiology Program, NNX09AM95G, and the Cassini Project. [1] Waite et al. (2007) Science 316, 870-875. [2] Crary et al. (2009) Planet. Space Sci. 57, 1847-1856. [3] Bellucci et al. (2009) Icarus 201, 198-216. [4] Anderson and Samuelson (2011) Icarus 212, 762-778. [5] Vinatier et al. (2010) Icarus 210, 852-866. [6] Vinatier et al. (2012) Icarus 219, 5-12. [7] Imanaka et al. (2004) Icarus 168, 344-366. [8] Imanaka et al. (2012) Icarus 218, 247-261.

  2. Dependence of Mass Spectrometric Fragmentation on the Bromine Substitution Pattern of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hua; Zhang, Siyu; Wang, Yawei; Wang, Ying; Li, An; Negrusz, Adam; Yu, Gang

    2014-06-01

    This study investigates the link between the bromine substitution and the mass spectrometric fragmentation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The mass spectra of 180 PBDEs were obtained in both electron impact (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using a single quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) as well as EI using a tandem MS (MS/MS). The major ions are M+, [M-2Br]+, [M-2Br]2+ and [M-nBr-28]+ in EI, and Br-, [HBr2]- and [C6BrnO]- in ECNI. In EI-MS, congeners without ortho bromine or having 2,3 substitution on one ring and no ortho bromines on the other were more robust than the others in each homolog. These congeners generated low [M-2Br]+ but relatively high [M-2Br]2+ in EI-MS and negligible [HBr2]- in ECNI-MS. In EI-MS/MS, the molecular ions of these congeners required higher collision energy to debrominate, and produced additional ions of [M-nBr]+ and [M-nBr-28]+. Full ortho substitution promotes C-O cleavage forming [C6BrnO]- in ECNI for congeners with >5 bromines. The relationship between the abundance of M+ and collision energy of the EI-MS/MS was well characterized with a logistic regression model. Principle component analysis found associations between the inflection point collision energy and a few molecular descriptors. Quantum chemistry simulations revealed different EI-induced fragmentation mechanisms among four dibrominated congeners, supporting the hypothesized formation of a stable dibenzofuran-like intermediate during the fragmentation of some congeners but not of others.

  3. Dependence of mass spectrometric fragmentation on the bromine substitution pattern of polybrominated diphenyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hua; Zhang, Siyu; Wang, Yawei; Wang, Ying; Li, An; Negrusz, Adam; Yu, Gang

    2014-06-01

    This study investigates the link between the bromine substitution and the mass spectrometric fragmentation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The mass spectra of 180 PBDEs were obtained in both electron impact (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using a single quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) as well as EI using a tandem MS (MS/MS). The major ions are M(+), [M-2Br](+), [M-2Br](2+) and [M-nBr-28](+) in EI, and Br(-), [HBr2](-) and [C6BrnO](-) in ECNI. In EI-MS, congeners without ortho bromine or having 2,3 substitution on one ring and no ortho bromines on the other were more robust than the others in each homolog. These congeners generated low [M-2Br](+) but relatively high [M-2Br](2+) in EI-MS and negligible [HBr2](-) in ECNI-MS. In EI-MS/MS, the molecular ions of these congeners required higher collision energy to debrominate, and produced additional ions of [M-nBr](+) and [M-nBr-28](+). Full ortho substitution promotes C-O cleavage forming [C6BrnO](-) in ECNI for congeners with >5 bromines. The relationship between the abundance of M(+) and collision energy of the EI-MS/MS was well characterized with a logistic regression model. Principle component analysis found associations between the inflection point collision energy and a few molecular descriptors. Quantum chemistry simulations revealed different EI-induced fragmentation mechanisms among four dibrominated congeners, supporting the hypothesized formation of a stable dibenzofuran-like intermediate during the fragmentation of some congeners but not of others. PMID:24692043

  4. Precise timing of the last interglacial period from mass spectrometric determination of thorium-230 in corals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Ku, T.-L.; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    The development of mass spectrometric techniques for determination of Th-230 abundance has made it possible to reduce analytical errors in (U-238)-(U-234)-(Th-230) dating of corals even with very small samples. Samples of 6 x 10 to the 8th atoms of Th-230 can be measured to an accuracy of + or - 3 percent (2sigma), and 3 x 10 to the 10th atoms of Th-230 can be measured to an accuracy of + or - 0.2 percent. The time range over which useful age data on corals can be obtained now ranges from about 50 to about 500,000 years. For young corals, this approach may be preferable to C-14 dating. The precision with which the age of a coral can now be determined should make it possible to critically test the Milankovitch hypothesis concerning Pleistocene climate fluctuations. Analyses of a number of corals that grew during the last interglacial period yield ages of 122,000 to 130,000 years. The ages coincide with, or slightly post-date, the summer solar insolation high at 65 deg N latitude which occurred 128,000 years ago. This supports the idea that changes in Pleistocene climate can be the result of variations in the distribution of solar insolation caused by changes in the geometry of the earth's orbit and rotation axis.

  5. MALDI-Mass Spectrometric Imaging for the Investigation of Metabolites in Medicago truncatula Root Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Gemperline, Erin; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Most techniques used to study small molecules, such as pharmaceutical drugs or endogenous metabolites, employ tissue extracts which require the homogenization of the tissue of interest that could potentially cause changes in the metabolic pathways being studied1. Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful analytical tool that can provide spatial information of analytes within intact slices of biological tissue samples1-5. This technique has been used extensively to study various types of compounds including proteins, peptides, lipids, and small molecules such as endogenous metabolites. With matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-MSI, spatial distributions of multiple metabolites can be simultaneously detected. Herein, a method developed specifically for conducting untargeted metabolomics MSI experiments on legume roots and root nodules is presented which could reveal insights into the biological processes taking place. The method presented here shows a typical MSI workflow, from sample preparation to image acquisition, and focuses on the matrix application step, demonstrating several matrix application techniques that are useful for detecting small molecules. Once the MS images are generated, the analysis and identification of metabolites of interest is discussed and demonstrated. The standard workflow presented here can be easily modified for different tissue types, molecular species, and instrumentation. PMID:24637669

  6. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric determination of patulin in apple juice using atmospheric pressure photoionization.

    PubMed

    Takino, Masahiko; Daishima, Shigeki; Nakahara, Taketoshi

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a comparison between atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and the recently introduced atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) technique for the liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric (LC/MS) determination of patulin in clear apple juice. A column switching technique for on-line extraction of clear apple juice was developed. The parameters investigated for the optimization of APPI were the ion source parameters fragmentor voltage, capillary voltage, and vaporizer temperature, and also mobile phase composition and flow rate. Furthermore, chemical noise and signal suppression of analyte signals due to sample matrix interference were investigated for both APCI and APPI. The results indicated that APPI provides lower chemical noise and signal suppression in comparison with APCI. The linear range for patulin in apple juice (correlation coefficient >0.999) was 0.2-100 ng mL(-1). Mean recoveries of patulin in three apple juices ranged from 94.5 to 103.2%, and the limit of detection (S/N = 3), repeatability and reproducibility were 1.03-1.50 ng mL(-1), 3.9-5.1% and 7.3-8.2%, respectively. The total analysis time was 10.0 min. PMID:12913860

  7. Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Pesticides by Capillary GC with Mass Spectrometric Detection

    PubMed Central

    Matisová, Eva; Hrouzková, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals, among them many pesticides, alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans at very low concentration levels. Therefore, the importance of method development for their analysis in food and the environment is increasing. This also covers contributions in the field of ultra-trace analysis of multicomponent mixtures of organic pollutants in complex matrices. With this fact conventional capillary gas chromatography (CGC) and fast CGC with mass spectrometric detection (MS) has acquired a real importance in the analysis of endocrine disrupting pesticide (EDP) residues. This paper provides an overview of GC methods, including sample preparation steps, for analysis of EDPs in a variety of matrices at ultra-trace concentration levels. Emphasis is put on separation method, mode of MS detection and ionization and obtained limits of detection and quantification. Analysis time is one of the most important aspects that should be considered in the choice of analytical methods for routine analysis. Therefore, the benefits of developed fast GC methods are important. PMID:23202677

  8. Determination of ractopamine in pig hair using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junlin; Liu, Xiaoyun; Peng, Yunping

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative analytical procedure for the determination of ractopamine in pig hair has been developed and validated. The hair samples were washed and incubated at 75°C with isoxuprine and hair extraction buffer. The drug present was quantified using mixed solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection. The limit of quantization (LOQ) was 10pg/mg and the intra-day precision at 25pg/mg and 750pg/mg was 0.49% and 2.8% respectively. Inter-day precision was 0.88% and 3.52% at the same concentrations. The hair extraction percentage recovery at 25pg/mg and 50ng/mL was 99.47% and 103.83% respectively. The extraction percentage recovery at 25pg/mg and 50ng/mg was 93.52% and 100.26% respectively. Our results showed that ractopamine residues persist in hair in 24days of withdrawal and also showed the possibility to test ractopamine from pig hair samples. PMID:24548851

  9. Mass spectrometric analysis of HOCl- and free-radical-induced damage to lipids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Andrew R; Spickett, Corinne M

    2008-10-01

    In inflammatory diseases, release of oxidants leads to oxidative damage to biomolecules. HOCl (hypochlorous acid), released by the myeloperoxidase/H2O2/Cl- system, can cause formation of phospholipid chlorohydrins, or alpha-chloro-fatty aldehydes from plasmalogens. It can attack several amino acid residues in proteins, causing post-translational oxidative modifications of proteins, but the formation of 3-chlorotyrosine is one of the most stable markers of HOCl-induced damage. Soft-ionization MS has proved invaluable for detecting the occurrence of oxidative modifications to both phospholipids and proteins, and characterizing the products generated by HOCl-induced attack. For both phospholipids and proteins, the application of advanced mass spectrometric methods such as product or precursor ion scanning and neutral loss analysis can yield information both about the specific nature of the oxidative modification and the biomolecule modified. The ideal is to be able to apply these methods to complex biological or clinical samples, to determine the site-specific modifications of particular cellular components. This is important for understanding disease mechanisms and offers potential for development of novel biomarkers of inflammatory diseases. In the present paper, we review some of the progress that has been made towards this goal. PMID:18793192

  10. Mass spectrometric and high-performance liquid chromatographic studies of medroxyprogesterone acetate metabolites in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Sturm, G; Häberlein, H; Bauer, T; Plaum, T; Stalker, D J

    1991-01-01

    Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) treatment has been shown to exert several beneficial effects in cancer patients. It has been suggested that such effects are due in part to the metabolites derived from MPA in vivo. The first results are reported on the identification of 2 alpha-hydroxy- and 21-hydroxy-MPA, 20-dihydro-MPA, 17 alpha-acetoxy-2 alpha,3 beta-dihydroxy-6 alpha-methylpregn-1,4-dien-20-one and two X,21-dihydroxy-MPAs, one of them presumably being 6 alpha-hydroxymethyl-21-hydroxy-MPA, in patient's plasma by high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC), gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric and NMR methods. Additionally, the presence of other metabolites such as di- and tetrahydro-MPAs and 6,21-dihydroxy-MPA, found in urine and other samples, was demonstrated in plasma. For routine clinical examinations an HPLC method is described for determination of, e.g., the unreduced MPA metabolite group in Sep-Pak-ODS column extracts of patients' plasma. PMID:1827448

  11. Mass spectrometric identification of boric acid in fluid inclusions in pegmatite minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.E.; Taylor, M.C.

    1996-09-01

    Direct, on-line mass spectrometric analyses were performed on volatiles released from microscopic fluid inclusions in quartz, feldspar, and tourmaline from the miarolitic Belo Horizonte No. 1 pegmatite in the San Jacinto district, and Himalaya pegmatite dike system in the Mesa Grande district of southern California. These analyses are the first inclusion volatile studies to indicate the presence of significant and variable concentrations of B compounds in pegmatite formation fluids. Boron appears as boric acid B(OH){sub 3}, which is found at levels ranging from less than detection limit (<10{sup {minus}7} mole fraction) to as high as 10{sup {minus}4} mole fraction. High B concentrations are seen in inclusion fluids from miarolite filling quartz, cleavelandite variety albite feldspar, and schorl tourmaline from the Belo Horizonte No. 1, while negligible amounts appear in late-stage green/pink-zoned gem elbaite tourmalines from that mine. Fluid inclusions in quartz, as well as grey and pink tourmaline form the miarolites in the Himalaya mine, have undetectable levels of B compounds. In addition to confirming the presence of very high boric acid concentrations in some pegmatite forming solutions, observations of large variations in abundance may provide new constraints on fluid chemical evolution trends during the genesis of these regionally and paragenetically complex gem deposits. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Overview of software options for processing, analysis and interpretation of mass spectrometric proteomic data.

    PubMed

    Haga, Steve W; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Recently, the interests in proteomics have been intensively increased, and the proteomic methods have been widely applied to many problems in cell biology. If the age of 1990s is considered to be a decade of genomics, we can claim that the following years of the new century is a decade of proteomics. The rapid evolution of proteomics has continued through these years, with a series of innovations in separation techniques and the core technologies of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MS. Both technologies are fueled by automation and high throughput computation for profiling of proteins from biological systems. As Patterson ever mentioned, 'data analysis is the Achilles heel of proteomics and our ability to generate data now outstrips our ability to analyze it'. The development of automatic and high throughput technologies for rapid identification of proteins is essential for large-scale proteome projects and automatic protein identification and characterization is essential for high throughput proteomics. This review provides a snap shot of the tools and applications that are available for mass spectrometric high throughput biocomputation. The review starts with a brief introduction of proteomics and MS. Computational tools that can be employed at various stages of analysis are presented, including that for data processing, identification, quantification, and the understanding of the biological functions of individual proteins and their dynamic interactions. The challenges of computation software development and its future trends in MS-based proteomics have also been speculated. PMID:25303385

  13. Precise timing of the last interglacial period from mass spectrometric determination of thorium-230 in corals

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.L.; Chen, J.H.; Ku, T.L.; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1987-06-19

    The development of mass spectrometric techniques for determination of STTh abundance has made it possible to reduce analytical errors in STYU-STUU-STTh dating of corals even with very small samples. Samples of 6 x 10Y atoms of STTh can be measured to an accuracy of +/- 3% (2sigma) and 3 x 10 atoms of STTh can be measured to an accuracy of +/- 0.2%. The time range over which useful age data on corals can be obtained now ranges from about 50 to about 500,000 years. For young corals, this approach may be preferable to UC dating. The precision should make it possible to critically test the Milankovitch hypothesis concerning Pleistocene climate fluctuations. Analyses of a number of corals that grew during the last interglacial period yield ages of 122,000 to 130,000 years. The ages coincide with, or slightly postdate, the summer solar insolation high at 65N latitude which occurred 128,000 years ago. This supports the idea that changes in Pleistocene climate can be the result of variations in the distribution of solar insolation caused by changes in the geometry of the earth's orbit and rotation axis.

  14. Mass spectrometric detection of the amino acid sequence polymorphism of the hepatitis C virus antigen.

    PubMed

    Kaysheva, A L; Ivanov, Yu D; Frantsuzov, P A; Krohin, N V; Pavlova, T I; Uchaikin, V F; Konev, V А; Kovalev, O B; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-03-01

    A method for detection and identification of the hepatitis C virus antigen (HCVcoreAg) in human serum with consideration for possible amino acid substitutions is proposed. The method is based on a combination of biospecific capturing and concentrating of the target protein on the surface of the chip for atomic force microscope (AFM chip) with subsequent protein identification by tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analysis. Biospecific AFM-capturing of viral particles containing HCVcoreAg from serum samples was performed by use of AFM chips with monoclonal antibodies (anti-HCVcore) covalently immobilized on the surface. Biospecific complexes were registered and counted by AFM. Further MS/MS analysis allowed to reliably identify the HCVcoreAg in the complexes formed on the AFM chip surface. Analysis of MS/MS spectra, with the account taken of the possible polymorphisms in the amino acid sequence of the HCVcoreAg, enabled us to increase the number of identified peptides. PMID:26773170

  15. Mass spectrometric analysis of muscle samples to detect potential antibiotic growth promoter misuse in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Gibson, R; Cooper, K M; Kennedy, D G; Elliott, C T

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods were developed and validated for the analysis in chicken muscle of a range of antibiotic growth promoters: spiramycin, tylosin, virginiamycin and bacitracin, and separately for two marker metabolites of carbadox (quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid and 1,4-bisdesoxycarbadox), and a marker metabolite of olaquindox (3-methyl-quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid). The use of these compounds as antibiotic growth promoters has been banned by the European Commission. This study aimed to develop methods to detect their residues in muscle samples as a means of checking for the use of these drugs during the rearing of broiler chickens. When fed growth-promoting doses for 6 days, spiramycin (31.4 µg kg(-1)), tylosin (1.0 µg kg(-1)), QCA (6.5 µg kg(-1)), DCBX (71.2 µg kg(-1)) and MQCA (0.2 µg kg(-1)) could be detected in the muscle 0 days after the withdrawal of fortified feed. Only spiramycin could consistently be detected beyond a withdrawal period of 1 day. All analytes showed stability to a commercial cooking process, therefore raw or cooked muscle could be used for monitoring purposes. PMID:22784097

  16. Mass Spectrometric and Spectrofluorometric Studies of the Interaction of Aristolochic Acids with Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiwei; Hu, Qin; Chan, Wan

    2015-10-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent carcinogen and nephrotoxin and is associated with the development of “Chinese herb nephropathy” and Balkan endemic nephropathy. Despite decades of research, the specific mechanism of the observed nephrotoxicity has remained elusive and the potential effects on proteins due to the observed toxicity of AA are not well-understood. To better understand the pharmacotoxicological features of AA, we investigated the non-covalent interactions of AA with proteins. The protein-binding properties of AA with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme were characterized using spectrofluorometric and mass spectrometric (MS) techniques. Moreover, the protein-AA complexes were clearly identified by high-resolution MS analyses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence of non-covalently bound protein-AA complexes. An analysis of the spectrofluorometric data by a modified Stern-Volmer plot model also revealed that both aristolochic acid I (AAI) and aristolochic acid II (AAII) were bound to BSA and lysozyme in 1:1 stoichiometries. A significantly stronger protein binding property was observed in AAII than in AAI as evidenced by the spectrofluorometric and MS analyses, which may explain the observed higher mutagenicity of AAII.

  17. Mass Spectrometric and Spectrofluorometric Studies of the Interaction of Aristolochic Acids with Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiwei; Hu, Qin; Chan, Wan

    2015-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent carcinogen and nephrotoxin and is associated with the development of “Chinese herb nephropathy” and Balkan endemic nephropathy. Despite decades of research, the specific mechanism of the observed nephrotoxicity has remained elusive and the potential effects on proteins due to the observed toxicity of AA are not well-understood. To better understand the pharmacotoxicological features of AA, we investigated the non-covalent interactions of AA with proteins. The protein-binding properties of AA with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme were characterized using spectrofluorometric and mass spectrometric (MS) techniques. Moreover, the protein-AA complexes were clearly identified by high-resolution MS analyses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence of non-covalently bound protein-AA complexes. An analysis of the spectrofluorometric data by a modified Stern−Volmer plot model also revealed that both aristolochic acid I (AAI) and aristolochic acid II (AAII) were bound to BSA and lysozyme in 1:1 stoichiometries. A significantly stronger protein binding property was observed in AAII than in AAI as evidenced by the spectrofluorometric and MS analyses, which may explain the observed higher mutagenicity of AAII. PMID:26471474

  18. Quantum dots assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection of carbohydrates: qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Aisha; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-04-01

    A quantum dots (QDs) assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (QDA-LDI-MS) strategy was proposed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of a series of carbohydrates. The adsorption of carbohydrates on the modified surface of different QDs as the matrices depended mainly on the formation of hydrogen bonding, which led to higher MS intensity than those with conventional organic matrix. The effects of QDs concentration and sample preparation method were explored for improving the selective ionization process and the detection sensitivity. The proposed approach offered a new dimension to the application of QDs as matrices for MALDI-MS research of carbohydrates. It could be used for quantitative measurement of glucose concentration in human serum with good performance. The QDs served as a matrix showed the advantages of low background, higher sensitivity, convenient sample preparation and excellent stability under vacuum. The QDs assisted LDI-MS approach has promising application to the analysis of carbohydrates in complex biological samples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27041659

  19. Mass spectrometric methods for studying nutrient mineral and trace element absorption and metabolism in humans using stable isotopes. A review.

    PubMed

    Crews, H M; Ducros, V; Eagles, J; Mellon, F A; Kastenmayer, P; Luten, J B; McGaw, B A

    1994-11-01

    Mass spectrometric methods for determining stable isotopes of nutrient minerals and trace elements in human metabolic studies are described and discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of the techniques of electron ionization, fast atom bombardment, thermal ionization, and inductively coupled plasma and gas chromatography mass spectrometry are evaluated with reference to their accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and convenience, and the demands of human nutrition research. Examples of specific applications are described and the significance of current developments in mass spectrometry are discussed with reference to present and probable future research needs. PMID:7872491

  20. Metabolism of boldione in humans by mass spectrometric techniques: detection of pseudoendogenous metabolites.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Xavier; Curcio, Davide; Colamonici, Cristiana; Molaioni, Francesco; Botrè, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Boldione is an anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) related to boldenone, androstenedione, and testosterone bearing two double bonds in C1 and C4 positions. Boldione is rapidly transformed to the well-known AAS boldenone, being both compounds included in the list of prohibited substances and methods published yearly by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). After the administration of boldione to a male volunteer, the already described urinary metabolites of boldenone produced after reduction in C4, oxydoreduction in C3 and C17, and hydroxylation have been detected. In addition, minor new metabolites have been detected and their structure postulated after mass spectrometric analyses. Finally, the reduction of the double bound in C1 produces metabolites identical to the endogenously produced ones. A method based on gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) after a urine sample purification by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) permitted to confirm the main synthetic like boldione/boldenone metabolite (17β-hydroxy-5β-androst-1-en-3-one) and boldenone at trace levels (< 5 ng/mL) and then to establish its synthetic or endogenous origin, and to determine the exogenous origin of metabolites with the same chemical structure of the endogenous ones. The detection of pseudoendogenous androgens of synthetic origin partially overlapped boldenone and its main metabolite detection, being an additional proof of synthetic steroids misuse. By the use of IRMS, the correct evaluation of the modifications of the steroid profile after the administration of synthetic AAS that could be converted into endogenous like ones is possible. PMID:24259377

  1. Rapid Mass Spectrometric Analysis of a Novel Fucoidan, Extracted from the Brown Alga Coccophora langsdorfii

    PubMed Central

    Anastyuk, Stanislav D.; Imbs, Tatyana I.; Dmitrenok, Pavel S.; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N.

    2014-01-01

    The novel highly sulfated (35%) fucoidan fraction Cf2 , which contained, along with fucose, galactose and traces of xylose and uronic acids was purified from the brown alga Coccophora langsdorfii. Its structural features were predominantly determined (in comparison with fragments of known structure) by a rapid mass spectrometric investigation of the low-molecular-weight fragments, obtained by “mild” (5 mg/mL) and “exhaustive” (maximal concentration) autohydrolysis. Tandem matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectra (MALDI-TOF/TOFMS) of fucooligosaccharides with even degree of polymerization (DP), obtained by “mild” autohydrolysis, were the same as that observed for fucoidan from Fucus evanescens, which have a backbone of alternating (1 → 3)- and (1 → 4) linked sulfated at C-2 and sometimes at C-4 of 3-linked α-L-Fucp residues. Fragmentation patterns of oligosaccharides with odd DP indicated sulfation at C-2 and at C-4 of (1 → 3) linked α-L-Fucp residues on the reducing terminus. Minor sulfation at C-3 was also suggested. The “exhaustive” autohydrolysis allowed us to observe the “mixed” oligosaccharides, built up of fucose/xylose and fucose/galactose. Xylose residues were found to occupy both the reducing and nonreducing termini of FucXyl disaccharides. Nonreducing galactose residues as part of GalFuc disaccharides were found to be linked, possibly, by 2-type of linkage to fucose residues and were found to be sulfated, most likely, at position C-2. PMID:24578675

  2. Mass spectrometric detection of CYP450 adducts following oxidative desulfuration of methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Patrick B; Smith, Stanley V; Baker, Rodney C; Kramer, Robert E

    2013-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated desulfuration of methyl parathion results in mechanism-based inhibition of the enzyme. Although previous data suggest that reactive sulfur is released and binds to the apoprotein, the identities of neither the adduct(s) nor the affected amino acid(s) have been clearly determined. In this study, nanospray tandem mass spectroscopy was used to analyze peptide digests of CYP resolved by SDS-PAGE from liver microsomes of male rats following incubation in the absence or presence of methyl parathion. Oxidative desulfuration was confirmed by measurement of methyl paraoxon, and inhibition of specific CYP isozymes was determined by measurement of testosterone hydroxylation. Total CYP content was quantified spectrophotometrically. Incubation of microsomes with methyl parathion decreased CYP content by 58%. This effect was not associated with a comparable increase in absorbance at 420 nm, suggesting the displacement of heme from the apoprotein. Rates of testosterone 2β- and 6β-hydroxylation, respectively, were reduced to 8 and 2%, implicating CYP3A and CYP2C11 in the oxidative desulfuration of methyl parathion. Mass spectrometric analysis identified 96 amu adducts to cysteines 64 and 378 of CYP3A1. In addition, a peptide containing cysteine 433 that coordinates with heme was possibly modified as it was detected in control, but not methyl parathion samples. A comparison of rat CYP3A1 with human CYP3A4 suggests that cysteines 64 and 378 reside along the substrate channel, remote from the active site. Alteration of these residues might modulate substrate entry to the binding pocket of the enzyme. PMID:22271348

  3. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Neuropeptides Using Affinity-Enhanced Microdialysis with Antibody-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Schmerberg, Claire M.; Li, Lingjun

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) is a useful sampling tool for many applications due to its ability to permit sampling from an animal concurrent with normal activity. MD is of particular importance in the field of neuroscience, in which it is used to sample neurotransmitters (NTs) while the animal is behaving in order to correlate dynamic changes in NTs with behavior. One important class of signaling molecules, the neuropeptides (NPs), however, presented significant challenges when studied with MD, due to the low relative recovery (RR) of NPs by this technique. Affinity-enhanced microdialysis (AE-MD) has previously been used to improve recovery of NPs and similar molecules. For AE-MD, an affinity agent (AA), such as an antibody-coated particle or free antibody, is added to the liquid perfusing the MD probe. This AA provides an additional mass transport driving force for analyte to pass through the dialysis membrane, and thus increases the RR. In this work, a variety of AAs have been investigated for AE-MD of NPs in vitro and in vivo, including particles with C18 surface functionality and antibody-coated particles. Antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles (AbMnP) provided the best RR enhancement in vitro, with statistically significant (p<0.05) enhancements for 4 out of 6 NP standards tested, and RR increases up to 41-fold. These particles were then used for in vivo MD in the Jonah crab, Cancer borealis, during a feeding study, with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. 31 NPs were detected in a 30 min collection sample, compared to 17 when no AA was used. The use of AbMnP also increased the temporal resolution from 4–18 hrs in previous studies to just 30 min in this study. The levels of NPs detected were also sufficient for reliable quantitation with the MS system in use, permitting quantitative analysis of the concentration changes for 7 identified NPs on a 30 min time course during feeding. PMID:23249250

  4. Mass spectrometric monitoring of Sr-enriched bone cements--from in vitro to in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rohnke, Marcus; Henss, Anja; Kokesch-Himmelreich, Julia; Schumacher, Matthias; Ray, Seemun; Alt, Volker; Gelinsky, Michael; Janek, Juergen

    2013-11-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a well-established technique in materials science, but is now increasingly applied also in the life sciences. Here, we demonstrate the potential of this analytical technique for use in the development of new bone implant materials. We tracked strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cements, which were developed for the treatment of osteoporotic bone, from in vitro to in vivo. Essentially, the spatial distribution of strontium in two different types of strontium-modified calcium phosphate cements is analysed by SIMS depth profiling. To gain information about the strontium release kinetics, the cements were immersed for 3, 7, 14 and 21 days in α-MEM and tris(hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane solution and analysed afterwards by ToF-SIMS depth profiling. For cements stored in α-MEM solution an inhibited strontium release was observed. By using principal component analysis to evaluate TOF-SIMS surface spectra, we are able to prove the adsorption of proteins on the cement surface, which inhibit the release kinetics. Cell experiments with human osteoblast-like cells cultured on the strontium-modified cements and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of the mineralised extracellular matrix (mECM) prove clearly that strontium is incorporated into the mECM of the osteoblast-like cells. Finally, in an animal experiment, the strontium-doped cements are implanted into the femur of osteoporotic rats. After 6 weeks, only a slight release of strontium was found in the vicinity of the implant material. By using ToF-SIMS, it is proven that strontium is localised in regions of newly formed bone but also within the pre-existing tissue. PMID:24026517

  5. Skeletal muscle fiber analysis by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging at high mass and high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Garrett, Timothy J; Carter, Christy S; Spengler, Bernhard; Yost, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous muscle fibers with various fiber types. These fibers can be classified into different classes based on their different characteristics. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has been applied to study and visualize different metabolomics profiles of different fiber types. Here, skeletal muscles were analyzed by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe MALDI-MSI at high spatial and high mass resolution. PMID:27198224

  6. Critical comparison of radiometric and mass spectrometric methods for the determination of radionuclides in environmental, biological and nuclear waste samples.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2008-02-11

    The radiometric methods, alpha (alpha)-, beta (beta)-, gamma (gamma)-spectrometry, and mass spectrometric methods, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, accelerator mass spectrometry, thermal ionization mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and glow discharge mass spectrometry are reviewed for the determination of radionuclides. These methods are critically compared for the determination of long-lived radionuclides important for radiation protection, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, repository of nuclear waste, tracer application in the environmental and biological researches, these radionuclides include (3)H, (14)C, (36)Cl, (41)Ca, (59,63)Ni, (89,90)Sr, (99)Tc, (129)I, (135,137)Cs, (210)Pb, (226,228)Ra, (237)Np, (241)Am, and isotopes of thorium, uranium and plutonium. The application of on-line methods (flow injection/sequential injection) for separation of radionuclides and automated determination of radionuclides is also discussed. PMID:18215644

  7. Capillary liquid chromatography using laser-based and mass spectrometric detection. [Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE); micellar electrokinetic capillary kchromatography (MECC)

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M.J.; Cook, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    In the years following the 1986 seminal paper (J. Chromatogr. Sci., 24, 347-352) describing modern capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), the prominence of capillary electrokinetic separation techniques has grown. A related electrochromatographic technique is micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC). This report presents a brief synopsis of research efforts during the current 3-year period. In addition to a description of analytical separations-based research, results of efforts to develop and expand spectrometric detection for the techniques is reviewed. Laser fluorometric detection schemes have been successfully advanced. Mass spectrometric research was less fruitful, largely owing to personnel limitations. A regenerable fiber optic sensor was developed that can be used to remotely monitor chemical carcinogens, etc. (DLC)

  8. High-speed tandem mass spectrometric in situ imaging by nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin; Thomas, Mathew; Short, Joshua; Carson, James P; Cha, Jeeyeon; Dey, Sudhansu K; Yang, Pengxiang; Prieto Conaway, Maria C; Laskin, Julia

    2013-10-15

    Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), high-resolution mass analysis of the fragment ions (m/Δm = 17 500 at m/z 200), and rapid spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous imaging and identification of a large number of metabolites and lipids from 92 selected m/z windows (±1 Da) with a spatial resolution of better than 150 μm. Mouse uterine sections of implantation sites on day 6 of pregnancy were analyzed in the ambient environment without any sample pretreatment. MS/MS imaging was performed by scanning the sample under the nano-DESI probe at 10 μm/s, while higher-energy collision-induced dissociation (HCD) spectra were acquired for a targeted inclusion list of 92 m/z values at a rate of ∼6.3 spectra/s. Molecular ions and their corresponding fragments, separated by high-resolution mass analysis, were assigned on the basis of accurate mass measurement. Using this approach, we were able to identify and image both abundant and low-abundance isobaric and isomeric species within each m/z window. MS/MS analysis enabled efficient separation and identification of isomeric and isobaric phospholipids that are difficult to separate in full-scan mode. Furthermore, we identified several metabolites associated with early pregnancy and obtained the first 2D images of these molecules. PMID:24040919

  9. High-Speed Tandem Mass Spectrometric in Situ Imaging by Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Thomas, Mathew; Short, Joshua TL; Carson, James P.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Yang, Pengxiang; Prieto Conaway, Maria C.; Laskin, Julia

    2013-10-15

    Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), high-resolution mass analysis (m/m=17,500 at m/z 200), and rapid spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous imaging and identification of more than 300 molecules from 92 selected m/z windows (± 1 Da) with a spatial resolution of better than 150 um. Uterine sections of implantation sites on day 6 of pregnancy were analyzed in the ambient environment without any sample pre-treatment. MS/MS imaging was performed by scanning the sample under the nano-DESI probe at 10 um/s while acquiring higher-energy collision-induced dissociation (HCD) spectra for a targeted inclusion list of 92 m/z values at a rate of ~6.3 spectra/s. Molecular ions and their corresponding fragments, separated using high-resolution mass analysis, were assigned based on accurate mass measurement. Using this approach, we were able to identify and image both abundant and low-abundance isobaric species within each m/z window. MS/MS analysis enabled efficient separation and identification of isobaric sodium and potassium adducts of phospholipids. Furthermore, we identified several metabolites associated with early pregnancy and obtained the first 2D images of these molecules.

  10. Analysis of colorectal adenocarcinoma tissue by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric imaging.

    PubMed

    Gerbig, Stefanie; Golf, Ottmar; Balog, Julia; Denes, Julia; Baranyai, Zsolt; Zarand, Attila; Raso, Erzsebet; Timar, Jozsef; Takats, Zoltan

    2012-06-01

    Negative ion desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was used for the analysis of an ex vivo tissue sample set comprising primary colorectal adenocarcinoma samples and colorectal adenocarcinoma liver metastasis samples. Frozen sections (12 μm thick) were analyzed by means of DESI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) with spatial resolution of 100 μm using a computer-controlled DESI imaging stage mounted on a high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometer. DESI-IMS data were found to predominantly feature complex lipids, including phosphatidyl-inositols, phophatidyl-ethanolamines, phosphatidyl-serines, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine plasmalogens, phosphatidic acids, phosphatidyl-glycerols, ceramides, sphingolipids, and sulfatides among others. Molecular constituents were identified based on their exact mass and MS/MS fragmentation spectra. An identified set of molecules was found to be in good agreement with previously reported DESI imaging data. Different histological tissue types were found to yield characteristic mass spectrometric data in each individual section. Histological features were identified by comparison to hematoxylin-eosin stained neighboring sections. Ions specific to certain histological tissue types (connective tissue, smooth muscle, healthy mucosa, healthy liver parenchyma, and adenocarcinoma) were identified by semi-automated screening of data. While each section featured a number of tissue-specific species, no potential global biomarker was found in the full sample set for any of the tissue types. As an alternative approach, data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) which resulted in efficient separation of data points based on their histological types. A pixel-by-pixel tissue identification method was developed, featuring the PCA/LDA analysis of authentic data set, and localization of unknowns in the resulting 60D, histologically assigned LDA space. Novel approach was found to yield results which are

  11. Electrochemical, spectroscopic, and mass spectrometric studies of the interaction of silver species with polyamidoamine dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fu-Ren F; Mazzitelli, Carolyn L; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Bard, Allen J

    2005-07-15

    Electrochemical, spectroscopic, and mass spectrometric (MS) methods were used to probe the interaction (complexation) of silver ions and zerovalent silver species with polyamidoamine generation 1 amine-terminated (PAMAMG1NH2) and generation 2 hydroxy-terminated (PAMAMG2OH) dendrimers (DDMs). Stability constants (Kq+) and stoichiometries (q) (i.e., the number of silver ions complexed per DDM molecule) were determined from the voltammetric data, that is, shifts in potential and changes in peak or limiting current with addition of DDM. When the mole ratio of DDM to Ag+ is > or = 1, Ag+ binds with PAMAMG2OH to form a dominant 1:1 complex with a value of 1.1 x 10(7) M(-1). Under similar conditions, Ag+ binds with PAMAMG1NH2, yielding a 1:1 complex with = 4 x 10(9) M(-1), which is consistent with the finding of the MS experiments. When the mole ratio is < 1, q > or = 2. The E0' of the Ag-PAMAMG1NH2(+/0) couple shifted to a more negative value than that of the Ag(+/0) couple. The negative shift in the halfwave potential also suggests that DDM binds more strongly with Ag+ than with zerovalent silver species. Spectroscopic results suggest that hydroxyl-terminated PAMAMG2OH favors the formation of small zerovalent silver clusters after reduction while amine-terminated PAMAMG1NH2 allows for simultaneous formation of both clusters and larger nanoparticles at similar conditions. Other quantities, such as diffusion coefficients of the complexes and molar absorptivity of the Ag+ DDMs, are also reported. PMID:16013854

  12. Evaluation of serum phosphopeptides as potential cancer biomarkers by mass spectrometric absolute quantification.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Guijin; Wu, Xiaoyan; Luo, Qun; Wu, Kui; Zhao, Yao; Liu, Jianan; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Feng, Yu-Qi; Yang, Liping; Wang, Fuyi

    2014-07-01

    Mass spectrometric quantification of phosphopeptides is a challenge due to the ion suppression effect of highly abundant non-phosphorylated peptides in complex samples such as serum. Several strategies for relative quantification of serum phosphopeptides based on MS have been developed, but the power of relative quantities was limited when making direct comparisons between two groups of samples or acting as a clinical examination index. Herein, we describe an MS absolute quantification strategy combined with Titania Coated Magnetic Hollow Mesoporous Silica Microspheres (TiO2/MHMSM) enrichment and stable isotopic acetyl labeling for phosphopeptides in human serum. Four endogenous serum phosphopeptides generated by degradation of fibrinogen were identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS following TiO2/MHMSM enrichment. The ESI-MS signal intensity ratios of the four phosphopeptide standards labeled with N-acetoxy-H3-succinimide (H3-NAS) and N-acetoxy-D3-succinimide (D3-NAS), following TiO2/MHMSM capture are linearly correlated with the molar ratios of the "light" to "heavy" phosphopeptides over the range of 0.1-4 with an r(2) of up to 0.998 and a slope of close to 1. The recovery of the four phosphopeptides spiked at low, medium and high levels in human sera were 98.4-111.9% with RSDs ranging 2.0-10.1%. The absolute quantification of the phosphopeptides in serum samples of 20 healthy persons and 20 gastric cancer patients by the developed method demonstrated that 3 out of the 4 phosphopeptides showed remarkable variation in serum level between healthy and cancer groups, and the phosphopeptide DpSGEGDFLAEGGGVR is significantly down-regulated in the serum of patients, being a potential biomarker for gastric cancer diagnosis. PMID:24840465

  13. Solid-state UV-MALDI mass spectrometric quantitation of fluroxypyr and triclopyr in soil.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The work presented here refers firstly to solid-state UV-MALDI-Orbitrap-mass spectrometric analysis of fluroxypyr (A) and triclopyr (B) in soils under laboratory conditions. The experimental design has involved the following: (a) determination of analytes A and B in polycrystalline composites of organic materials 1-7, based on 2-piperidine (pyrrolidine or piperazine)-1-yl-ethyl ammonium salts in order to determine the effect of sample preparation techniques on method performance using commercial herbicide formulations and (b) analysis of non-(X j,k,l (i) ) and sterilized (Y j,k,l (i) ) soil samples (i-fold rate 1, 10, 100, or 1,000; j-pesticide type A or B; k-time (0, 5, 10, 20, and 50 days) and l = 1-3 replicated samples) having clay content ∈ 5.0-12.0 %, silt ∈ 23.0-51.1 %, sand ∈ 7.2-72.0 %, and pH ∈ 4.0-8.1. In order to obtain a high representativeness of the data toward real-field experiments, the pollution scheme has involved 1-, 10-, 100-, and 1,000-fold rates. The firstfold rate has concentration of pollutant A of 2.639 × 10(-4) g in 625 cm(2) soil horizon of 0-25 cm(2) (5 cm depth) according to registration report (PSM-Zulassungbericht) of German Federal Office of Consumer Protection and Food Safety (Bundesamt für Verbraucherschutz und Lebensmittelsicherheit) 6337/26.10.2009. The experimental design has involved quincunx systematic statistical approach for collection of soil samples. The performance has been compared with the corresponding statistical variable obtained, using an independent HPLC-ESI-(APCI-)-MS/MS analysis. PMID:25555463

  14. A capillary electrophoretic-mass spectrometric method for the assessment of octreotide stability under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Tamizi, Elnaz; Yang, Yuanzhong; Jouyban, Abolghasem; Kelso, Geoffrey F; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2016-01-15

    A capillary zone electrophoretic-electrospray ion trap mass spectrometric method has been developed to assess the stability and pathways of degradation of the cancer therapeutic octapeptide, octreotide. As a somatostatin analogue, octreotide contains a single disulphide bond linking Cys(2)-Cys(7) with the structure of NH2-D-Phe-[Formula: see text]-Thr-OH. Resolution of octreotide from its degradation products was achieved using a capillary zone electrophoretic method with bare fused silica capillaries, a 10mM ammonium formate buffer, pH 3.20, at 25 °C and an applied voltage of 25 kV. An ion trap low energy collision induced dissociation procedure was applied for the characterization of the chemical structures of the degradation products derived from an acidic, alkaline, neutral and thermal solution treatment of octreotide. The results so obtained indicated that linear octreotide degradation products were formed under acidic and alkaline conditions, due to the hydrolysis of a ring amide bond and a hitherto unknown desulfurization of the Cys-Cys disulfide bond, respectively. Degradation under neutral conditions occurred via cleavage of the exocyclic N-((2R,3R)-1,3-dihydroxybutan-2-yl) amide bond which also preceded the ring amide hydrolysis under acidic conditions. The developed method was further successfully applied to assess the kinetics of these octreotide degradations. Overall, this method is suitable for the rapid and precise assessment of the stability and quality control of octreotide as a synthetic peptide-based pharmaceutical product, and has led to the discovery of a new Cys-Cys disulfide degradation pathway. PMID:26739913

  15. Mass Spectrometric Studies of Non-Covalent Binding Interactions Between Metallointercalators and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urathamakul, Thitima; Talib, Jihan; Beck, Jennifer L.; Ralph, Stephen F.

    Over the past 2 decades there has been increasing interest in metal complexes that bind non-covalently to DNA, driven in part by a host of potential applications for molecules that can accomplish this task with high affinity and selectivity. As a result many workers have used a wide variety of experimental techniques, several of which are discussed in other chapters of this book, to unravel the details of the precise intermolecular interactions involved. Here we discuss one of the most recent additions to the armory of techniques used by chemists to interrogate metal complex/DNA interactions. For the majority of its existence mass spectrometry (MS) has proven to be of enormous advantage to chemists by virtue of its ability to provide the molecular weights of compounds as well as structural information via fragmentation patterns. However, the high energies associated with many earlier MS techniques which result in fragmentation of covalent bonds, prevent its application for studying weaker intermolecular interactions. The advent of soft ionisation methods such as matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation (MALDI) and electrospray ionisation (ESI) has revolutionised mass spectrometric analysis of biomolecules, by allowing these normally fragile molecules to be introduced into the gas phase for analysis with minimal, if any, fragmentation. It was then recognised that ESI-MS, in particular, might be suitable for investigating non-covalent interactions between small molecules and either proteins or nucleic acids. This was confirmed by a number of early studies involving organic intercalators and minor groove binding ligands, prompting our interest in evaluating ESI-MS as a tool for studying non-covalent interactions between metal complexes and DNA. This chapter contains a discussion of the basic principles behind ESI-MS that enable it to introduce representative samples of solutions containing metal complexes and DNA into the gas phase for analysis. This will be

  16. Lipopeptides from the Banyan Endophyte, Bacillus subtilis K1: Mass Spectrometric Characterization of a Library of Fengycins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Khyati V.; Keharia, Haresh; Gupta, Kallol; Thakur, Suman S.; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2012-10-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of a banyan endophyte, Bacillus subtilis K1, extract showing broad spectrum antifungal activity revealed a complex mixture of lipopeptides, iturins, surfactins, and fengycins. Fractionation by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) facilitated a detailed analysis of fengycin microheterogeneity. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometric studies permitted the identification of several new fengycin variants. Four major sites of heterogeneity are identified: (1) N-terminus β-hydroxy fatty acid moiety, where chain length variation and the presence of unsaturation occur, (2) position 6 (Ala/Val/Ile/Leu), (3) position 10 (Val/Ile) within the macrocyclic ring, and (4) Gln to Glu replacement at position 8, resulting in fengycin variants that differ in mass by 1 Da. Diagnostic fragment ions provide a quick method for localizing the sites of variation in the macrocycle or the linear segment. Subsequent establishment of the sequences is achieved by MS/MS analysis of linear fengycin species produced by hydrolysis of the macrocyclic lactone. Unsaturation in the fatty acid chain and the presence of linear precursors in the B. subtilis K1 extract are also established by mass spectrometry. The anomalous distribution of intensities within isotopic multiplets is a diagnostic for Gln/Glu replacements. High resolution mass spectrometry facilitates the identification of fengycin species differing by 1 Da by localizing the variable position (Gln8/Glu8) in the fengycin variants.

  17. Mass spectrometric characterization of tamoxifene metabolites in human urine utilizing different scan parameters on liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mazzarino, Monica; de la Torre, Xavier; Di Santo, Roberto; Fiacco, Ilaria; Rosi, Federica; Botrè, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    Different liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) scanning techniques were considered for the characterization of tamoxifene metabolites in human urine for anti-doping purpose. Five different LC/MS/MS scanning methods based on precursor ion scan (precursor ion scan of m/z 166, 152 and 129) and neutral loss scan (neutral loss of 72 Da and 58 Da) in positive ion mode were assessed to recognize common ions or common losses of tamoxifene metabolites. The applicability of these methods was checked first by infusion and then by the injection of solution of a mixture of reference standards of four tamoxifene metabolites available in our laboratory. The data obtained by the analyses of the mixture of the reference standards showed that the five methods used exhibited satisfactory results for all tamoxifene metabolites considered at a concentration level of 100 ng/mL, whereas the analysis of blank urine samples spiked with the same tamoxifene metabolites at the same concentration showed that the neutral loss scan of 58 Da lacked sufficient specificity and sensitivity. The limit of detection in urine of the compounds studied was in the concentration range 10-100 ng/mL, depending on the compound structure and on the selected product ion. The suitability of these approaches was checked by the analysis of urine samples collected after the administration of a single dose of 20 mg of tamoxifene. Six metabolites were detected: 4-hydroxytamoxifene, 3,4-dihydroxytamoxifene, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxytamoxifene, N-demethyl-4-hydroxytamoxifene, tamoxifene-N-oxide and N-demethyl-3-hydroxy-4-methoxytamoxifene, which is in conformity to our previous work using a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer in full scan acquisition mode. PMID:20187079

  18. Biochemical Individuality Reflected in Chromatographic, Electrophoretic and Mass-Spectrometric Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Milos V.; Soini, Helena A.; Mechref, Yehia

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses the current trends in molecular profiling for the emerging systems biology applications. Historically, the methodological developments in separation science were coincident with the availability of new ionization techniques in mass spectrometry. Coupling miniaturized separation techniques with technologically-advanced MS instrumentation and the modern data processing capabilities are at the heart of current platforms for proteomics, glycomics and metabolomics. These are being featured here by the examples from quantitative proteomics, glycan mapping and metabolomic profiling of physiological fluids. PMID:18551752

  19. Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometric Imaging of the Distribution of Rohitukine in the Seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. F

    PubMed Central

    Mohana Kumara, Patel; Srimany, Amitava; Arunan, Suganya; Ravikanth, Gudasalamani; Uma Shaanker, Ramanan; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2016-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometric imaging of all parts of the seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. f (Meliaceae) was performed to reconstruct the molecular distribution of rohitukine (Rh) and related compounds. The species accumulates Rh, a prominent chromone alkaloid, in its seeds, fruits, and stem bark. Rh possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and immuno-modulatory properties. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI MSI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis detected Rh as well as its glycosylated, acetylated, oxidized, and methoxylated analogues. Rh was predominantly distributed in the main roots, collar region of the stem, and young leaves. In the stem and roots, Rh was primarily restricted to the cortex region. The identities of the metabolites were assigned based on both the fragmentation patterns and exact mass analyses. We discuss these results, with specific reference to the possible pathways of Rh biosynthesis and translocation during seedling development in D. binectariferum. PMID:27362422

  20. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analyses of unknown analytical response in imported Fava beans: 4-chloro-6-methoxyindole.

    PubMed

    Petzinger, G; Barry, T L; Roach, J A; Musser, S M; Sphon, J

    1995-01-01

    A halogenated unidentified analytical response (UAR) was encountered in a number of imported Fava bean samples during the Food and Drug Administration's routine pesticide-monitoring program. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) analyses identified the halogenated component as 4-chloro-6-methoxyindole, a naturally occurring promutagen in Fava beans that has been linked to incidents of gastric cancer. Data from electron impact, positive and negative chemical ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and deuteration studies of this compound are presented, along with GC retention time data. PMID:7756907

  1. Characterizing nitrous oxide sources by mass spectrometric analyses of several isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyar, P.; Orphan, V. J.; Eiler, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide can be produced by a broad range of processes under various environmental conditions, making it generally difficult to establish the sources of N2O. We have developed high resolution mass spectrometric techniques to provide six-dimensional isotopic fingerprints of N2O. On a single sample, we measure δ15N, δ18O, ∆17O, 15N site preference ('SP'), and the clumped isotopologues 14N15N18O and 15N14N18O. The relative abundance of these clumped isotopologues is expressed as (1) a 15N site preference for 18O-containing isotopologues ('SP18') and (2) an overall preference for clumped isotopologues, ∆(14N15N18O+15N14N18O), over the expectation for a random distribution of isotopes among isotopologues. Each of these six isotopic parameters distinctively combines information about substrates, equilibrium exchange reactions, diffusive transport, mixing, and the kinetics of production and consumption mechanisms. We will describe the preliminary characterization of N2O produced by various biotic and abiotic sources. In particular, nitrous oxide from a genetic mutant of the denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 that lacks the ability to reduce N2O to N2 is shown to have a site preference consistent with past measurements of denitrifiers. Its clumped isotopic composition is also distinct from predicted values for equilibrium and provides a signature for N2O production by a denitrifier. Measurements of ∆17O from two experiments with different starting nitrate ∆17O can be used to determine both the effective 18O/16O fractionation factor for reduction of nitrate to N2O (37±4‰), as well as the fraction of O atoms exchanged with water for this organism (52±6%). N2O collected from Lake Vida, Antarctica, has a site preference and clumped isotope composition distinct from that produced by P. aeruginosa. Also, both SP and ∆(14N15N18O+15N14N18O) in Lake Vida N2O are negative, which places constraints on its production and processing, and

  2. Development of a combined chemical and enzymatic approach for the mass spectrometric identification and quantification of aberrant N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Wang, Fangjun; Tan, Yexiong; Sun, Zhen; Song, Chunxia; Ye, Mingliang; Wang, Hongyang; Zou, Hanfa

    2012-02-16

    Direct mass spectrometric analysis of aberrant protein glycosylation is a challenge to the current analytical techniques. Except lectin affinity chromatography, no other glycosylation enrichment techniques are available for analysis of aberrant glycosylation. In this study, we developed a combined chemical and enzymatic strategy as an alternative for the mass spectrometric analysis of aberrant glycosylation. Sialylated glycopeptides were enriched with reverse glycoblotting, cleaved by endoglycosidase F3 and analyzed by mass spectrometry with both neutral loss triggered MS(3) in collision induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Interestingly, a great part of resulted glycopeptides were found with fucose attached to the N-acetylglucosamine (N-GlcNAc), which indicated that the aberrant glycosylation that is carrying both terminal sialylation and core fucosylation was identified. Totally, 69 aberrant N-glycosylation sites were identified in sera samples from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Following the identification, quantification of the level of this aberrant glycosylation was also carried out using stable isotope dimethyl labeling and pooled sera sample from liver cirrhosis and HCC was compared. Six glycosylation sites demonstrated elevated level of aberrancy, which demonstrated that our developed strategy was effective in both qualitative and quantitative studies of aberrant glycosylation. PMID:22202184

  3. Investigation of the mouse cerebellum using STIM and μ-PIXE spectrometric and FTIR spectroscopic mapping and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, M. J.; Siegele, R.; El-Assaad, F.; McQuillan, J. A.; Aitken, J. B.; Carter, E. A.; Grau, G. E.; Hunt, N. H.; Cohen, D.; Lay, P. A.

    2011-10-01

    The cerebral biochemistry associated with the development of many neurological diseases remains poorly understood. In particular, incomplete understanding of the mechanisms through which vascular inflammation manifests in tissue damage and altered brain function is a significant hindrance to the development of improved patient therapies. To this extent, a combination of spectrometric/spectroscopic mapping/imaging methods with an inherent ability to provide a wealth of biochemical and physical information have been investigated to understand further the pathogenesis of brain disease. In this study, proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) mapping was combined with scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) mapping and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) imaging of the same tissue sample to study directly the composition of the murine (mouse) cerebellum. The combination of the elemental, density and molecular information provided by these techniques enabled differentiation between four specific tissue types within the murine cerebellum (grey matter, white matter, molecular layer and micro blood vessels). The results presented are complementary, multi-technique measurements of the same tissue sample. They show elemental, density and molecular differences among the different tissue types.

  4. High Throughput In Situ DDA Analysis of Neuropeptides by Coupling Novel Multiplex Mass Spectrometric Imaging (MSI) with Gas-Phase Fractionation.

    PubMed

    OuYang, Chuanzi; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2015-12-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool to map the spatial distribution of biomolecules on tissue sections. Recent developments of hybrid MS instruments allow combination of different types of data acquisition by various mass analyzers into a single MSI analysis, which reduces experimental time and sample consumptions. Here, using the well-characterized crustacean nervous system as a test-bed, we explore the utility of high resolution and accurate mass (HRAM) MALDI Orbitrap platform for enhanced in situ characterization of the neuropeptidome with improved chemical information. Specifically, we report on a multiplex-MSI method, which combines HRAM MSI with data dependent acquisition (DDA) tandem MS analysis in a single experiment. This method enables simultaneous mapping of neuropeptide distribution, sequence validation, and novel neuropeptide discovery in crustacean neuronal tissues. To enhance the dynamic range and efficiency of in situ DDA, we introduced a novel approach of fractionating full m/z range into several sub-mass ranges and embedding the setup using the multiplex-DDA-MSI scan events to generate pseudo fractionation before MS/MS scans. The division of entire m/z into multiple segments of m/z sub-ranges for MS interrogation greatly decreased the complexity of molecular species from tissue samples and the heterogeneity of the distribution and variation of intensities of m/z peaks. By carefully optimizing the experimental conditions such as the dynamic exclusion, the multiplex-DDA-MSI approach demonstrates better performance with broader precursor coverage, less biased MS/MS scans towards high abundance molecules, and improved quality of tandem mass spectra for low intensity molecular species. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26438126

  5. High Throughput In Situ DDA Analysis of Neuropeptides by Coupling Novel Multiplex Mass Spectrometric Imaging (MSI) with Gas-Phase Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OuYang, Chuanzi; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2015-12-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool to map the spatial distribution of biomolecules on tissue sections. Recent developments of hybrid MS instruments allow combination of different types of data acquisition by various mass analyzers into a single MSI analysis, which reduces experimental time and sample consumptions. Here, using the well-characterized crustacean nervous system as a test-bed, we explore the utility of high resolution and accurate mass (HRAM) MALDI Orbitrap platform for enhanced in situ characterization of the neuropeptidome with improved chemical information. Specifically, we report on a multiplex-MSI method, which combines HRAM MSI with data dependent acquisition (DDA) tandem MS analysis in a single experiment. This method enables simultaneous mapping of neuropeptide distribution, sequence validation, and novel neuropeptide discovery in crustacean neuronal tissues. To enhance the dynamic range and efficiency of in situ DDA, we introduced a novel approach of fractionating full m/z range into several sub-mass ranges and embedding the setup using the multiplex-DDA-MSI scan events to generate pseudo fractionation before MS/MS scans. The division of entire m/z into multiple segments of m/z sub-ranges for MS interrogation greatly decreased the complexity of molecular species from tissue samples and the heterogeneity of the distribution and variation of intensities of m/z peaks. By carefully optimizing the experimental conditions such as the dynamic exclusion, the multiplex-DDA-MSI approach demonstrates better performance with broader precursor coverage, less biased MS/MS scans towards high abundance molecules, and improved quality of tandem mass spectra for low intensity molecular species.

  6. Evaluation of mass spectrometric data using principal component analysis for determination of the effects of organic lakes on protein binder identification.

    PubMed

    Hrdlickova Kuckova, Stepanka; Rambouskova, Gabriela; Hynek, Radovan; Cejnar, Pavel; Oltrogge, Doris; Fuchs, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry is commonly used for the identification of proteinaceous binders and their mixtures in artworks. The determination of protein binders is based on a comparison between the m/z values of tryptic peptides in the unknown sample and a reference one (egg, casein, animal glues etc.), but this method has greater potential to study changes due to ageing and the influence of organic/inorganic components on protein identification. However, it is necessary to then carry out statistical evaluation on the obtained data. Before now, it has been complicated to routinely convert the mass spectrometric data into a statistical programme, to extract and match the appropriate peaks. Only several 'homemade' computer programmes without user-friendly interfaces are available for these purposes. In this paper, we would like to present our completely new, publically available, non-commercial software, ms-alone and multiMS-toolbox, for principal component analyses of MALDI-TOF MS data for R software, and their application to the study of the influence of heterogeneous matrices (organic lakes) for protein identification. Using this new software, we determined the main factors that influence the protein analyses of artificially aged model mixtures of organic lakes and fish glue, prepared according to historical recipes that were used for book illumination, using MALDI-TOF peptide mass mapping. PMID:26505772

  7. The mechanism of 2-furaldehyde formation from D-xylose dehydration in the gas phase. A tandem mass spectrometric study.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Andreina; Piccolella, Simona; Pepi, Federico; Garzoli, Stefania; Giacomello, Pierluigi

    2013-07-01

    The mechanism of reactions occurring in solution can be investigated also in the gas phase by suited mass spectrometric techniques, which allow to highlight fundamental mechanistic features independent of the influence of the medium and to clarifying controversial hypotheses proposed in solution studies. In this work, we report a gas-phase study performed by electrospray triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-TSQ/MS) on the dehydration of D-xylose, leading mainly to the formation of 2-furaldehyde (2-FA). It is generally known in carbohydrate chemistry that the thermal acid catalyzed dehydration of pentoses leads to the formation of 2-FA, but several aspects on the solution-phase mechanism are controversial. Here, gaseous reactant ions corresponding to protonated xylose molecules obtained from ESI of a solution containing D-xylose and ammonium acetate as protonating reagent were allowed to undergo collisionally activated decomposition (CAD) into the triple stage quadrupole analyzer. The product ion mass spectra of protonated xylose are characterized by the presence of ionic intermediates arising from xylose dehydration, which were structurally characterized by their fragmentation patterns. As expected, the xylose triple dehydration leads to the formation of the ion at m/z 97, corresponding to protonated 2-FA. On the basis of mass spectrometric evidences, we demonstrated that in the gas phase, the formation of 2-FA involves protonation at the OH group bound to the C1 atom of the sugar, the first ionic intermediate being characterized by a cyclic structure. Finally, energy resolved product ion mass spectra allowed to obtain information on the energetic features of the D-xylose→2-FA conversion. ᅟ PMID:23690250

  8. In Situ Probing of Cholesterol in Astrocytes at the Single Cell Level using Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometric Imaging with Colloidal Silver

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, D.C.; Cha, Sangwon; Oh, Jisun; Sakaguchi, Donald S.; Yeung, Edward S.; and Lee, Young Jin

    2010-03-18

    Mass spectrometric imaging has been utilized to localize individual astrocytes and to obtain cholesterol populations at the single-cell level in laser desorption ionization (LDI) with colloidal silver. The silver ion adduct of membrane-bound cholesterol was monitored to detect individual cells. Good correlation between mass spectrometric and optical images at different cell densities indicates the ability to perform single-cell studies of cholesterol abundance. The feasibility of quantification is confirmed by the agreement between the LDI-MS ion signals and the results from a traditional enzymatic fluorometric assay. We propose that this approach could be an effective tool to study chemical populations at the cellular level.

  9. A 193 nm laser photofragmentation time-of-flight mass spectrometric study of chloroiodomethane

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Tao; Ng, C.Y.; Qi Fei; Lam, C.-S.; Li, W.-K.

    2005-11-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of chloroiodomethane (CH{sub 2}ICl) at 193 nm has been investigated by employing the photofragment time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometric method. Using tunable vacuum ultraviolet undulator synchrotron radiation for photoionization sampling of nascent photofragments, we have identified four primary dissociation product channels: CH{sub 2}Cl+I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})/I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}), CH{sub 2}I+Cl({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})/Cl({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}), CHI+HCl, and CH{sub 2}+ICl. The state-selective detection of I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) has allowed the estimation of the branching ratio for I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}):I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) to be 0.73: 0.27. Theoretical calculations based on the time-dependent density-functional theory have been also made to investigate excited electronic potential-energy surfaces, plausible intermediates, and transition structures involved in these photodissociation reactions. The translation energy distributions derived from the TOF measurements suggest that at least two dissociation mechanisms are operative for these photodissociation processes. One involves the direct dissociation from the 2 {sup 1}A{sup '} state initially formed by 193 nm excitation, leading to significant kinetic-energy releases. For the I-atom and Cl-atom elimination channels, the fragment kinetic-energy releases observed via this direct dissociation mechanism are consistent with those predicted by the impulsive dissociation models. Other mechanisms are likely predissociative or statistical in nature from the lower 1 {sup 1}A{sup '} and 1 {sup 1}A{sup ''} states and/or the ground X-tilde {sup 1}A{sup '} state populated by internal conversion from the 2 {sup 1}A{sup '} state. On the basis of the maximum kinetic-energy release for the formation of CH{sub 2}Cl+I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}), we have obtained a value of 53{+-}2 kcal/mol for the 0 K bond dissociation energy of I-CH{sub 2}Cl. The intermediates and transition structures for the CHI

  10. Direct tandem mass spectrometric analysis of amino acids in plasma using fluorous derivatization and monolithic solid-phase purification.

    PubMed

    Tamashima, Erina; Hayama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Imakyure, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Nohta, Hitoshi

    2015-11-10

    In this study, we developed a novel direct tandem mass spectrometric method for rapid and accurate analysis of amino acids utilizing a fluorous derivatization and purification technique. Amino acids were perfluoroalkylated with 2H,2H,3H,3H-perfluoroundecan-1-al in the presence of 2-picoline borane via reductive amination. The derivatives were purified by perfluoroalkyl-modified silica-based monolithic solid-phase extraction (monolithic F-SPE), and directly analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization without liquid chromatographic separation. The perfluoroalkyl derivatives could be sufficiently distinguished from non-fluorous compounds, i.e. the biological matrix, due to their fluorous interaction. Thus, rapid and accurate determination of amino acids was accomplished. The method was validated with human plasma samples and applied to the analysis of amino acids in the plasma of mice with maple syrup urine disease or phenylketonuria. PMID:26222276

  11. Derivatization and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric detection of anabolic steroid residues isolated from edible muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Daeseleire, E; De Guesquière, A; Van Peteghem, C

    1991-01-01

    A method was developed for the detection of anabolic steroid residues in edible muscle tissues. After enzymic digestion of the tissue and purification on disposable C18 solid-phase extraction columns, the extract was injected onto a C18 reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic column. Three fractions or windows were collected, each containing specific analytes. After evaporation to dryness, the residues were subjected to a derivatization procedure which yielded suitable derivatives. After gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis, both gas chromatographic retention data and mass spectral data were used for the detection and identification of nortestosterone, testosterone, estradiol, ethinylestradiol, trenbolone, methyltestosterone, chlormadinone acetate, medroxyprogesterone acetate and megestrol acetate. PMID:2026730

  12. Thermodynamic properties of the UO 2ZrO 2 system studied by the isothermal mass spectrometric vaporization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyarova, Valentina; Shilov, Andrei; Shultz, Mikhail

    1997-08-01

    The Knudsen effusion high-temperature mass spectrometric method was used to study the vaporization processes and thermodynamic properties of the UO 2ZrO 2 System in the temperature range 2200-2650 K. The work was carried out with the MS 1301 mass spectrometer developed for studies of physico-chemical properties of inorganic substances at high temperatures. Vaporization of the solid solutions containing 0.02-0.45 mol fractions of U0 2 was done using tungsten cells. The vaporization processes and the chemical potentials of ZrO 2 in the U0 2Zr0 2 system and in the Y 2O 3ZrO 2, Lu 2O 3ZrO 2 and HfO 2ZrO 2 systems, available in the literature, were discussed from the point of view of the acid-base concept.

  13. Vitamin D-metabolites from human plasma and mass spectrometric analysis by fast heavy ion induced desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fohlman, J.; Peterson, P. A.; Kamensky, I.; Håkansson, P.; Sundqvist, B.

    1982-07-01

    D-vitamin metabolites have been isolated from human serum employing chromatographic techniques. The serum carrier protein for vitamin D (DBP) was first isolated by immunosorbent chromatography. Lipid ligands associated with DBP were then extracted with hexane and separated by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Detection of vitamin D metabolites by their absorbance of ultraviolet light is not sufficiently sensitive to monitor all vitamin D derivatives from a few millilitres of serum. Therefore, further analyses are necessary to quantitate these compounds. We have begun to develop a mass spectrometric method to achieve a reliable, quantitative procedure. As a first step towards this goal a number of pure samples of vitamin D compounds have been studied in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on fast heavy ion induced desorption. All vitamin D compounds examined could be detected and identified by their molecular ion and fragment spectra.

  14. Ultraviolet irradiation-induced substitution of fluorine with hydroxyl radical for mass spectrometric analysis of perfluorooctane sulfonyl fluoride.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Kang, Jie; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-01-28

    A rapid and solvent free substitution reaction of a fluorine atom in perfluorooctane sulfonyl fluoride (PFOSF) with a hydroxyl radical is reported. Under irradiation of ultraviolet laser on semiconductor nanoparticles or metal surfaces, hydroxyl radicals can be generated through hole oxidization. Among all fluorine atoms of PFOSF, highly active hydroxyl radicals specifically substitute the fluorine of sulfonyl fluoride functional group. Resultant perfluorooctane sulfonic acid is further ionized through capture of photo-generated electrons that switch the neutral molecules to negatively charged odd electron hypervalent ions. The unpaired electron subsequently initiates α O-H bond cleavage and produces perfluorooctane sulfonate negative ions. Hydroxyl radical substitution and molecular dissociation of PFOSF have been confirmed by masses with high accuracy and resolution. It has been applied to direct mass spectrometric imaging of PFOSF adsorbed on surfaces of plant leaves. PMID:26755143

  15. Texture mapping via optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for texture mapping of closed surfaces. Our method is based on the technique of optimal mass transport (also known as the "earth-mover's metric"). This is a classical problem that concerns determining the optimal way, in the sense of minimal transportation cost, of moving a pile of soil from one site to another. In our context, the resulting mapping is area preserving and minimizes angle distortion in the optimal mass sense. Indeed, we first begin with an angle-preserving mapping (which may greatly distort area) and then correct it using the mass transport procedure derived via a certain gradient flow. In order to obtain fast convergence to the optimal mapping, we incorporate a multiresolution scheme into our flow. We also use ideas from discrete exterior calculus in our computations. PMID:20224137

  16. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Crustacean Neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    OuYang, Chuanzi; Liang, Zhidan; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides represent one of the largest classes of signaling molecules used by nervous systems to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Over the past several years, mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategies have revolutionized the discovery of neuropeptides in numerous model organisms, especially in decapod crustaceans. Here, we focus our discussion on recent advances in the use of MS-based techniques to map neuropeptides in spatial domain and monitoring their dynamic changes in temporal domain. These MS-enabled investigations provide valuable information about the distribution, secretion and potential function of neuropeptides with high molecular specificity and sensitivity. In situ MS imaging and in vivo microdialysis are highlighted as key technologies for probing spatio-temporal dynamics of neuropeptides in the crustacean nervous system. This review summarizes the latest advancement in MS-based methodologies for neuropeptide analysis including typical workflow and sample preparation strategies as well as major neuropeptide families discovered in decapod crustaceans. PMID:25448012

  17. Utility of spatially-resolved atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques as alternatives to mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in drug metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Blatherwick, Eleanor Q.; Van Berkel, Gary J; Pickup, Kathryn; Johansson, Maria K.; Beaudoin, Marie-Eve; Cole, Roderic; Day, Jennifer M.; Iverson, Suzanne; Wilson, Ian D.; Scrivens, James H.; Weston, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    1. Tissue distribution studies of drug molecules play an essential role in the pharmaceutical industry and are commonly undertaken using quantitative whole body autoradiography (QWBA) methods. 2. The growing need for complementary methods to address some scientific gaps around radiography methods has led to increased use of mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) technology over the last 5 to 10 years. More recently, the development of novel mass spectrometric techniques for ambient surface sampling has redefined what can be regarded as fit-for-purpose for MSI in a drug metabolism and disposition arena. 3. Together with a review of these novel alternatives, this paper details the use of two liquid microjunction (LMJ)- based mass spectrometric surface sampling technologies. These approaches are used to provide qualitative determination of parent drug in rat liver tissue slices using liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) and to assess the performance of a LMJ surface sampling probe (LMJ-SSP) interface for quantitative assessment of parent drug in brain, liver and muscle tissue slices. 4. An assessment of the utility of these spatially-resolved sampling methods is given, showing interdependence between mass spectrometric and QWBA methods, in particular there emerges a reason to question typical MSI workflows for drug metabolism; suggesting the expedient use of profile or region analysis may be more appropriate, rather than generating time-intensive molecular images of the entire tissue section.

  18. Differentiation of the two major species of Echinacea (E. augustifolia and E. purpurea) using a flow injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprinting method and chemometric analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid, simple, and reliable flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) method was developed to discriminate two major Echinacea species (E. purpurea and E. angustifolia) samples. Fifty-eight Echinacea samples collected from United States were analyzed using FIMS. Principle component analysis (PCA) a...

  19. Differentiation of the four major types (C. Burmannii, C. Verum, C. cassia, And C. Loureiroi) of cinnamons using a flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprinting method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple and efficient flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) method was developed to differentiate cinnamon (Cinnamomum) bark (CB) samples of the four major species (C. burmannii, C. verum, C. aromaticum, and C. loureiroi) of cinnamon. Fifty cinnamon samples collected from China, Vietnam, Indon...

  20. INTERLABORATORY STUDY OF A THERMOSPRAY-LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC/MASS SPECTROMETRIC METHOD FOR SELECTED N-METHYL CARBAMATES, N-METHYL CARBAMOYLOXIMES, AND SUBSTITUTED UREA PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermospray-liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric (TS-LC/MS) method was evaluated in an interlaboratory study for determining 3 N-methyl carbamates (bendiocarb, carbaryl, and carbofuran), 3-N-methyl carbamoyloximes (aldicarb, methomyl, and oxamyl), 2 substituted urea pestic...

  1. Large-scale mass spectrometric detection of variant peptides resulting from non-synonymous nucleotide differences

    PubMed Central

    Sheynkman, Gloria M.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Frey, Brian L.; Scalf, Mark; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2013-01-01

    Each individual carries thousands of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs) in their genome, each corresponding to a single amino acid polymorphism (SAP) in the encoded proteins. It is important to be able to directly detect and quantify these variations at the protein level in order to study post-transcriptional regulation, differential allelic expression, and other important biological processes. However, such variant peptides are not generally detected in standard proteomic analyses, due to their absence from the generic databases that are employed for mass spectrometry searching. Here, we extend previous work that demonstrated the use of customized SAP databases constructed from sample-matched RNA-Seq data. We collected deep coverage RNA-Seq data from the Jurkat cell line, compiled the set of nsSNVs that are expressed, used this information to construct a customized SAP database, and searched it against deep coverage shotgun MS data obtained from the same sample. This approach enabled detection of 421 SAP peptides mapping to 395 nsSNVs. We compared these peptides to peptides identified from a large generic search database containing all known nsSNVs (dbSNP) and found that more than 70% of the SAP peptides from this dbSNP-derived search were not supported by the RNA-Seq data, and thus are likely false positives. Next, we increased the SAP coverage from the RNA-Seq derived database by utilizing multiple protease digestions, thereby increasing variant detection to 695 SAP peptides mapping to 504 nsSNV sites. These detected SAP peptides corresponded to moderate to high abundance transcripts (30+ transcripts per million, TPM). The SAP peptides included 192 allelic pairs; the relative expression levels of the two alleles were evaluated for 51 of those pairs, and found to be comparable in all cases. PMID:24175627

  2. High-resolution mass spectrometric determination of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans using an alternative lockmass system

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, V.Y.; Reiner, E.J.; Wang, D.T.; Meresz, O.; Hallas, B.

    1988-07-15

    A high-resolution mass spectrometric selected ion monitoring (HRMS-SIM) methodology for the analysis of all tetra-through octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (Cl/sub x/DD, x = 4-8) and dibenzofurans (Cl/sub x/DF, x = 4-8) utilizing an alternative lockmass system has been developed at the Ministry of the Environment (MOE). Incorporation of the MOE lockmass system gives an enhancement in sensitivity, easier control of the lockmass concentration in the ion source, and greater resolution between the lockmass and the sample ion signals than dose the conventional perfluorokerosene (PFK) lockmass system. In addition, the method can be adapted to any sector instrument having a similar lockmass facility and to any HRMS-SIM analysis with the appropriate choice of reference standards. A comparison of the MOE and PFK systems is reported.

  3. Mass-spectrometric monitoring of the intravenous anesthetic concentration in the breathing circuit of an anesthesia machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Levshankov, A. I.

    2011-04-01

    Interaction between inhalational anesthetic sevoflurane and an absorber of CO2 (soda lime) in the breathing circuit of an anesthesia machine during low-flow anesthesia (0.5 l of a fresh gaseous mixture per minute) is studied with the mass-spectrometric method. Monitoring data for the concentration of sevoflurane and three toxic products of sevoflurane decompositions (substances A, B, and C) during anesthesia in the inspiration-expiration regime are presented. The highest concentration of substance A is found to be 65 ppm. The biochemical blood analysis before and after anesthesia shows that nephropathy is related to the function of liver toxicity. It is found that inhalational anesthetic sevoflurane influences the concentration of intravenous hypnotic propofol in blood.

  4. Global whole-cell FTICR mass spectrometric proteomics analysis of the heat shock response in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Amy K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2005-05-01

    Despite intense interest in the response to radiation in D. radiodurans, little is known about how the organism responds to other stress factors. Our previous studies indicated that D. radiodurans mounts a regulated protective response to heat shock, and that expression of the groESL and dnaKJ operons are induced in response to elevated temperature. In order to gain greater insight into the heat shock response of D. radiodurans on a more global scale, we undertook the study reported here. Using whole-cell semiquantitative mass spectrometric proteomics integrated with global transcriptome microarray analyses, we have determined a core set of highly induced heat shock genes whose expression correlates well at the transcriptional and translational levels. In addition, we observed that the higher the absolute expression of a given gene at physiological conditions, the better the quantitative correlation between RNA and protein expression levels.

  5. A microchip electrophoresis-mass spectrometric platform with double cell lysis nano-electrodes for automated single cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangtang; Zhao, Shulin; Hu, Hankun; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2016-06-17

    Capillary electrophoresis-based single cell analysis has become an essential approach in researches at the cellular level. However, automation of single cell analysis has been a challenge due to the difficulty to control the number of cells injected and the irreproducibility associated with cell aggregation. Herein we report the development of a new microfluidic platform deploying the double nano-electrode cell lysis technique for automated analysis of single cells with mass spectrometric detection. The proposed microfluidic chip features integration of a cell-sized high voltage zone for quick single cell lysis, a microfluidic channel for electrophoretic separation, and a nanoelectrospray emitter for ionization in MS detection. Built upon this platform, a microchip electrophoresis-mass spectrometric method (MCE-MS) has been developed for automated single cell analysis. In the method, cell introduction, cell lysis, and MCE-MS separation are computer controlled and integrated as a cycle into consecutive assays. Analysis of large numbers of individual PC-12 neuronal cells (both intact and exposed to 25mM KCl) was carried out to determine intracellular levels of dopamine (DA) and glutamic acid (Glu). It was found that DA content in PC-12 cells was higher than Glu content, and both varied from cell to cell. The ratio of intracellular DA to Glu was 4.20±0.8 (n=150). Interestingly, the ratio drastically decreased to 0.38±0.20 (n=150) after the cells are exposed to 25mM KCl for 8min, suggesting the cells released DA promptly and heavily while they released Glu at a much slower pace in response to KCl-induced depolarization. These results indicate that the proposed MCE-MS analytical platform may have a great potential in researches at the cellular level. PMID:27207575

  6. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometric study of bis(imidazole-1-carboxylate) endfunctionalized polymers,.

    PubMed

    Kéki, Sándor; Nagy, Miklós; Deák, György; Zsuga, Miklós; Herczegh, Pál

    2003-02-01

    A detailed Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometric (MALDI-TOF MS) investigation of polyethylene glycol (PEG), polypropylene glycol (PPG) and polyisobutylene (PIB) bis(imidazole-1-carboxylate) esters is reported. The MS spectra of PPG and PIBb is (imidazole-1-carboxylate) esters recorded in the reflectron mode showed the presence of two additional series of peaks compared to those recorded in the linear mode, while in the case of PEG bis(imidazole-1-carboxylate) only one additional peak series appeared in the reflectron MS spectra. These additional series were attributed to the formation of fragment ions by the loss of one and two end groups in the first field-free region of the instrument. The neutral losses for the three polymers were also supported by using the post-source decay method (PSD). The observation of decreasing mass difference between the adjacent peaks from two series of polymeric ions with the increase of oligomer mass indicates the presence of PSD ions in a reflectron MALDI spectrum. The relationship between the mass of the precursor ions and those of the PSD ions and neutral loss are also discussed. PMID:12596703

  7. Application of mass spectrometric techniques for the trace analysis of short-lived iodine-containing volatiles emitted by seaweed.

    PubMed

    Kundel, Michael; Thorenz, Ute R; Petersen, Jan H; Huang, Ru-Jin; Bings, Nicolas H; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge of the composition and emission rates of iodine-containing volatiles from major widespread seaweed species is important for modeling the impact of halogens on gas-phase atmospheric chemistry, new particle formation, and climate. In this work, we present the application of mass spectrometric techniques for the quantification of short-lived iodine-containing volatiles emitted by eight different seaweeds from the intertidal zone of Helgoland, Germany. A previously developed online time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometric method was used to determine I(2) emission rates and investigate temporally resolved emission profiles. Simultaneously, iodocarbons were preconcentrated on solid adsorbent tubes and quantified offline using thermodesorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The total iodine content of the seaweeds was determined using microwave-assisted tetramethylammonium hydroxide extraction followed by inductively coupled-plasma mass spectrometry analysis. The highest total iodine content was found in the Laminariales, followed by the brown algae Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus vesiculosus, Fucus serratus, and both red algae Chondrus crispus and Delesseria sanguinea. Laminariales were found to be the strongest I(2) emitters. Time series of the iodine release of Laminaria digitata and Laminaria hyperborea showed a strong initial I(2) emission when first exposed to air followed by an exponential decline of the release rate. For both species, I(2) emission bursts were observed. For Laminaria saccharina und F. serratus, a more continuous I(2) release profile was detected, however, F. serratus released much less I(2). A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus showed a completely different emission behavior. The I(2) emission rates of these species were slowly increasing with time during the first 1 to 2 h until a more or less stable I(2) emission rate was reached. The lowest I(2) emission rates were detected for the red algae C. crispus and D. sanguinea. Total iodocarbon

  8. Can density functional theory (DFT) be used as an aid to a deeper understanding of tandem mass spectrometric fragmentation pathways?

    PubMed

    Alex, Alexander; Harvey, Sophie; Parsons, Teresa; Pullen, Frank S; Wright, Patricia; Riley, Jo-Anne

    2009-09-01

    Prediction of tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) fragmentation for non-peptidic molecules based on structure is of immense interest to the mass spectrometrist. If a reliable approach to MS/MS prediction could be achieved its impact within the pharmaceutical industry could be immense. Many publications have stressed that the fragmentation of a molecular ion or protonated molecule is a complex process that depends on many parameters, making prediction difficult. Commercial prediction software relies on a collection of general heuristic rules of fragmentation, which involve cleaving every bond in the structure to produce a list of 'expected' masses which can be compared with the experimental data. These approaches do not take into account the thermodynamic or molecular orbital effects that impact on the molecule at the point of protonation which could influence the potential sites of bond cleavage based on the structural motif. A series of compounds have been studied by examining the experimentally derived high-resolution MS/MS data and comparing it with the in silico modelling of the neutral and protonated structures. The effect that protonation at specific sites can have on the bond lengths has also been determined. We have calculated the thermodynamically most stable protonated species and have observed how that information can help predict the cleavage site for that ion. The data have shown that this use of in silico techniques could be a possible way to predict MS/MS spectra. PMID:19637184

  9. Distribution of coniferin in differentiating normal and compression woods using MALDI mass spectrometric imaging coupled with osmium tetroxide vapor treatment.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Arata; Kamitakahara, Hiroshi; Takabe, Keiji

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI) was employed to detect monolignol glucosides in differentiating normal and compression woods of two Japanese softwoods, Chamaecyparis obtusa and Cryptomeria japonica Comparison of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry collision-induced dissociation fragmentation analysis and structural time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF CID-FAST) spectra between coniferin and differentiating xylem also confirmed the presence of coniferin in differentiating xylem. However, as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and MALDI-TOF CID-FAST spectra of sucrose were similar to those of coniferin, it was difficult to distinguish the distribution of coniferin and sucrose using MALDI-MSI and collision-induced dissociation measurement only. To solve this problem, osmium tetroxide vapor was applied to sections of differentiating xylem. This vapor treatment caused peak shifts corresponding to the introduction of two hydroxyl groups to the C=C double bond in coniferin. The treatment did not cause a peak shift for sucrose, and therefore was effective in distinguishing coniferin and sucrose. Thus, it was found that MALDI-MSI combined with osmium tetroxide vapor treatment is a useful method to detect coniferin in differentiating xylem. PMID:26507270

  10. A review of recent advances in mass spectrometric methods for gas-phase chiral analysis of pharmaceutical and biological compounds.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lianming; Vogt, Frederick G

    2012-10-01

    Chirality has been of great interest in pharmaceutical and biological sciences. The capabilities of mass spectrometry (MS) for rapid analysis of complex mixtures have encouraged its exploration for gas-phase chiral differentiation. Although particular instances of successful discrimination between enantiomers have been reported over the past three decades, a general method of quantitative chiral analysis by MS has only been demonstrated recently. This review describes the current state of the chiral MS methods without chiral chromatographic separation, which fall into five main categories: (1) the kinetic method, (2) host-guest (H-G) diastereomeric adduct formation, (3) ion/molecule (equilibrium) reactions, (4) collision-induced dissociation (CID) of diastereomeric adducts, and (5) the emerging technique for gas-phase separation using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). It emphasizes tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), which provides several unique analytical advantages for quantitative chiral analysis. These include intrinsically high sensitivity, molecular specificity, and tolerance to impurities as well as the simplicity and speed of the mass spectrometric measurements. Practical prospects and current challenges in quantitative chiral MS techniques for QbD (quality-by-design)-based pharmaceutical applications are also discussed. PMID:22579598

  11. MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF KEPONE IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND HUMAN SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A specific portion of our environment has been contaminated with Kepone, or chlordecone. Additionally, some specific human exposures to high concentrations of Kepone have been confirmed. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry involving chemical ionization and high resolution mass s...

  12. Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Ji Hyun

    2012-01-01

    High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 μm) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 μm was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial

  13. A NEW MASS SPECTROMETRIC TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING TRACE-LEVEL ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory



    Most organic compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and cannot be easily identified from low resolution mass spectra. Ion Composition Elucidation (ICE) utilizes selected ion recording with a double focusing mass spectrometer in a new way to determine exact mas...

  14. A tandem mass spectrometric study of the N-oxides, quinoline N-oxide, carbadox, and olaquindox, carried out at high mass accuracy using electrospray ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xiu-Sheng; March, Raymond E.; Metcalfe, Chris D.

    2003-12-01

    A mass spectrometric study of three N-oxides, quinoline N-oxide, and the synthetic antibiotics carbadox and olaquindox, was carried out with a hybrid quadrupole/time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer coupled with electrospray (ES) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) sources. The full scan mass spectra of the N-oxides obtained with ES are similar to those obtained with APCI, and the characteristic fragment ions corresponding to [M+H-O]+[radical sign] were observed in the full scan mass spectrum of each N-oxide examined. The protonated molecule of each N-oxide was subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID) and accurate mass measurements were made of each fragment ion so as to determine its elemental composition. Fragment ions generated at enhanced cone voltages upstream of the first mass-resolving element were subjected to CID so as to identify the direct product ion-precursor ion relationship. Plausible structures have been proposed for most of the fragment ions observed. Elimination of OH[radical sign] radicals generated from the N-->O functional group is a characteristic fragmentation pathway of the N-oxides. The expulsion of radicals and small stable molecules is accompanied by formation and subsequent contraction of heterocyclic rings.

  15. Determination of corilagin in rat plasma using a liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian Qian; Guo, Jianru; Fan, Hongyan; Wang, Caiyun; Xu, Fengguo; Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    A sensitive and simple liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (HPLC-MS/MS) method for the determination of corilagin in rat plasma has been developed. Samples were prepared with protein precipitation method and analyzed with a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer. We employed negative electrospray ionization as the ionization source and the analytes were detected in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Separation was achieved on a C8 column eluted with mobile phase consisting of methanol-0.1% formic acid in a gradient mode at the flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. The total run time was 7.0 min.This method was proved to have good linearity in the concentration range of 2.5-1000.0 ng/mL. The lower limit of quantification of corilagin was 2.5 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviationa across three validation runs for four concentration levels were both <9.8%. The relative error was within ±6.0%. This assay offers advantages in terms of expediency and suitability for the analysis of corilagin in rat plasma. The practical utility of this new HPLC-MS/MS method was confirmed in pilot plasma concentration studies in rats following oral administration. PMID:25808247

  16. High performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric determination of rupatadine in human plasma and its pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Jingjing; Lin, Hui; Liang, Jiabi; Zhang, Zunjian; Chen, Yun

    2008-08-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive and selective liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantification of rupatadine in human plasma using estazolam as internal standard (IS). Following liquid-liquid extraction, the analytes were separated using a mobile phase of methanol-ammonium acetate (pH 2.2; 5mM) (50:50, v/v) on a reverse phase C18 column and analyzed by a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer in the positive ion and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, m/z 416-->309 for rupatadine and m/z 295-->267 for the IS. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.1-100 ng/ml for rupatadine in human plasma. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 0.1 ng/ml with a relative standard deviation of less than 20%. Acceptable precision and accuracy were obtained for concentrations over the standard curve range. The validated LC-MS/MS method has been successfully applied to study the pharmacokinetics of rupatadine in healthy volunteers. PMID:18472381

  17. MALDI Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Cardiac Tissue Following Myocardial Infarction in a Rat Coronary Artery Ligation Model

    PubMed Central

    Menger, Robert F.; Stutts, Whitney L.; Anbukumar, Dhanam S.; Bowden, John A.; Ford, David A.; Yost, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Although acute myocardial infarction (MI) is consistently among the top causes of death in the United States, the spatial distribution of lipids and metabolites following MI remains to be elucidated. This work presents the investigation of an in vivo rat model of MI using mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and multivariate data analysis. MSI was conducted on cardiac tissue following a 24-hour left anterior descending coronary artery ligation in order to analyze multiple compound classes. First, the spatial distribution of a small metabolite, creatine, was used to identify areas of infarcted myocardium. Second, multivariate data analysis and tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify phospholipid (PL) markers of MI. A number of lysophospholipids demonstrated increased ion signal in areas of infarction. In contrast, select intact PLs demonstrated decreased ion signal in the area of infarction. The complementary nature of these two lipid classes suggest increased activity of phospholipase A2, an enzyme that has been implicated in coronary heart disease and inflammation. PMID:22141424

  18. Mono-, di- and trimethylated homologues of isoprenoid tetraether lipid cores in archaea and environmental samples: mass spectrometric identification and significance.

    PubMed

    Knappy, Chris; Barillà, Daniela; Chong, James; Hodgson, Dominic; Morgan, Hugh; Suleman, Muhammad; Tan, Christine; Yao, Peng; Keely, Brendan

    2015-12-01

    Higher homologues of widely reported C(86) isoprenoid diglycerol tetraether lipid cores, containing 0-6 cyclopentyl rings, have been identified in (hyper)thermophilic archaea, representing up to 21% of total tetraether lipids in the cells. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry confirms that the additional carbon atoms in the C(87-88) homologues are located in the etherified chains. Structures identified include dialkyl and monoalkyl ('H-shaped') tetraethers containing C(40-42) or C(81-82) hydrocarbons, respectively, many representing novel compounds. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of hydrocarbons released from the lipid cores by ether cleavage suggests that the C(40) chains are biphytanes and the C(41) chains 13-methylbiphytanes. Multiple isomers, having different chain combinations, were recognised among the dialkyl lipids. Methylated tetraethers are produced by Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus in varying proportions depending on growth conditions, suggesting that methylation may be an adaptive mechanism to regulate cellular function. The detection of methylated lipids in Pyrobaculum sp. AQ1.S2 and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius represents the first reported occurrences in Crenarchaeota. Soils and aquatic sediments from geographically distinct mesotemperate environments that were screened for homologues contained monomethylated tetraethers, with di- and trimethylated structures being detected occasionally. The structural diversity and range of occurrences of the C(87-89) tetraethers highlight their potential as complementary biomarkers for archaea in natural environments. PMID:26634977

  19. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assay for the light sensitive survivin suppressant sepantronium bromide (YM155) in mouse plasma.

    PubMed

    Dolman, M Emmy M; den Hartog, Ilona J M; Molenaar, Jan J; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Sparidans, Rolf W

    2014-04-01

    A quantitative bioanalytical liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) assay for sepantronium bromide (YM155), an inhibitor of survivin, was developed and validated. Under reduced light exposure, plasma samples were pre-treated using protein precipitation with acetonitrile containing AT7519 as internal standard. After dilution with water, the extract was directly injected into the reversed-phase liquid chromatographic system. The eluate was transferred into the electrospray interface with positive ionization and compounds detected in the selected reaction monitoring mode of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The assay was validated in a 0.5-100ng/ml calibration range with r(2)=0.9981±0.0007 using double logarithmic calibration (n=5). Within day precisions (n=6) were 3.6-8.8% and between day (3 days; n=18) precisions 6.5-11.1%. Accuracies were between 92 and 111% for the whole calibration range. The light sensitive drug sepantronium was sufficiently stable under all relevant analytical conditions. Finally, the assay was successfully used to determine plasma drug levels in mice after administration of sepantronium bromide by continuous infusion from subcutaneously implanted osmotic pumps. PMID:24518133

  20. Investigation of signaling molecules and metabolites found in crustacean hemolymph via in vivo microdialysis using a multifaceted mass spectrometric platform.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Liang, Zhidan; Hao, Ling; Li, Lingjun

    2016-04-01

    Neurotransmitters (NTs) are endogenous signaling molecules that play an important role in regulating various physiological processes in animals. Detection of these chemical messengers is often challenging due to their low concentration levels and fast degradation rate in vitro. In order to address these challenges, herein we employed in vivo microdialysis (MD) sampling to study NTs in the crustacean model Cancer borealis. Multifaceted separation tools, such as CE and ion mobility mass spectrometry (MS) were utilized in this work. Small molecules were separated by different mechanisms and detected by MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI). Performance of this separation-based MSI platform was also compared to LC-ESI-MS. By utilizing both MALDI and ESI-MS, a total of 208 small molecule NTs and metabolites were identified, of which 39 were identified as signaling molecules secreted in vivo. In addition, the inherent property of sub microscale sample consumption using CE enables shorter time of MD sample collection. Temporal resolution of MD was improved by approximately tenfold compared to LC-ESI-MS, indicating the significant advantage of applying separation-assisted MALDI-MS imaging platform. PMID:26691021

  1. QuEChERS multiresidue method validation and mass spectrometric assessment for the novel anthranilic diamide insecticides chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Timo; Snow, Timothy A; Santee, Christopher J; Mulligan, Christopher C; Class, Thomas; Wadsley, Michael P; Nanita, Sergio C

    2011-02-01

    The gas-phase dissociation reactions of chlorantraniliprole (Rynaxypyr) and cyantraniliprole (Cyazypyr) have been studied in triple-quadrupole, ion trap, and orbitrap mass spectrometers equipped with electrospray and desorption electrospray ion sources, revealing the formation of odd-electron fragment ions, the structures of which were elucidated. The odd-electron fragments were unusually abundant, and their formation is proposed to occur via a tricyclic intermediate. The applicability of the QuEChERS multiresidue method for the quantitation of chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole was also assessed in this study. Four matrices representative of oily, watery, acidic, and dry crop groups were tested, with a targeted limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 0.01 mg/kg. Average recoveries ranged between 87 and 107%, with relative standard deviations (RSD) of ≤ 8%. Linear calibration functions with correlation coefficients r > 0.99 were obtained. The study provides an expansion of the QuEChERS method to include anthranilic diamides and a mass spectrometric assessment for these two novel agrochemical active ingredients. PMID:21194212

  2. Piezoelectric inkjet assisted rapid electrospray ionization mass spectrometric analysis of metabolites in plant single cells via a direct sampling probe.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhan; Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2014-11-21

    Direct sampling probe mass spectrometry (DSP-MS) enables fast and direct profiling of metabolites in biological samples. However, because the solvent amount for the online dissolution of acquired analytes is difficult to control, the detection sensitivity is not satisfactory. In this study, we present a modified version of the DSP-MS system for direct mass spectrometric profiling of metabolites in plant single cells. Two major improvements are introduced in this work, including a pointed-tip probe with high surface wetting properties, which is ten times finer than the previous version, and a piezoelectric inkjet system working as the auxiliary solvent delivery means. The probe tip can be controlled to insert into a cell through the cell wall. Metabolites loaded on the tip surface can be extracted by the auxiliary solvent and electrosprayed after applying a high direct current voltage. The unique features such as low cost, disposability and versatility make this technique a competitive tool for single cell analysis. PMID:25262850

  3. Advanced Mass Spectrometric Methods for the Rapid and Quantitative Characterization of Proteomes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Progress is reviewedmore » towards the development of a global strategy that aims to extend the sensitivity, dynamic range, comprehensiveness and throughput of proteomic measurements based upon the use of high performance separations and mass spectrometry. The approach uses high accuracy mass measurements from Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR) to validate peptide ‘accurate mass tags’ (AMTs) produced by global protein enzymatic digestions for a specific organism, tissue or cell type from ‘potential mass tags’ tentatively identified using conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). This provides the basis for subsequent measurements without the need for MS/ MS. High resolution capillary liquid chromatography separations combined with high sensitivity, and high resolution accurate FTICR measurements are shown to be capable of characterizing peptide mixtures of more than 10 5 components. The strategy has been initially demonstrated using the microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Deinococcus radiodurans. Advantages of the approach include the high confidence of protein identification, its broad proteome coverage, high sensitivity, and the capability for stableisotope labeling methods for precise relative protein abundance measurements. Abbreviations : LC, liquid chromatography; FTICR, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance; AMT, accurate mass tag; PMT, potential mass tag; MMA, mass measurement accuracy; MS, mass spectrometry; MS/MS, tandem mass spectrometry; ppm, parts per million.« less

  4. Mass Spectrometric and Synchrotron Radiation based techniques for the identification and distribution of painting materials in samples from paints of Josep Maria Sert

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Establishing the distribution of materials in paintings and that of their degradation products by imaging techniques is fundamental to understand the painting technique and can improve our knowledge on the conservation status of the painting. The combined use of chromatographic-mass spectrometric techniques, such as GC/MS or Py/GC/MS, and the chemical mapping of functional groups by imaging SR FTIR in transmission mode on thin sections and SR XRD line scans will be presented as a suitable approach to have a detailed characterisation of the materials in a paint sample, assuring their localisation in the sample build-up. This analytical approach has been used to study samples from Catalan paintings by Josep Maria Sert y Badía (20th century), a muralist achieving international recognition whose canvases adorned international buildings. Results The pigments used by the painter as well as the organic materials used as binders and varnishes could be identified by means of conventional techniques. The distribution of these materials by means of Synchrotron Radiation based techniques allowed to establish the mixtures used by the painter depending on the purpose. Conclusions Results show the suitability of the combined use of SR μFTIR and SR μXRD mapping and conventional techniques to unequivocally identify all the materials present in the sample and their localization in the sample build-up. This kind of approach becomes indispensable to solve the challenge of micro heterogeneous samples. The complementary interpretation of the data obtained with all the different techniques allowed the characterization of both organic and inorganic materials in the samples layer by layer as well as to establish the painting techniques used by Sert in the works-of-art under study. PMID:22616949

  5. Synthesis, purification and mass spectrometric characterisation of a fluorescent Au9@BSA nanocluster and its enzymatic digestion by trypsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Iglesias, Nerea; Bettmer, Jörg

    2013-12-01

    Nanoclusters of noble metals like Ag and Au have attracted great attention as they form a missing link between isolated metal atoms and nanoparticles. Their particular properties like luminescence in the visible range and nontoxicity make them attractive for bioimaging and biolabelling purposes, especially with use of proteins as stabilising agents. In this context, this study intends the synthesis of a specific Au nanocluster covered by bovine serum albumin (BSA). It is shown that size-exclusion chromatography is feasible for the purification and isolation of the nanocluster. A mass spectrometric characterisation, preferably by ESI-MS, indicates the presence of an Au9@BSA nanocluster. Enzymatic digestion of the nanocluster with trypsin results in a significant increase of the fluorescence intensity at 650 and 710 nm, whereas complementary MALDI-MS studies are presented for the identification of generated peptides and show a distinctive pattern in comparison to the pure protein. It can be concluded that Au9@BSA might be, in future, an interesting candidate for in vitro studies of protease activities.Nanoclusters of noble metals like Ag and Au have attracted great attention as they form a missing link between isolated metal atoms and nanoparticles. Their particular properties like luminescence in the visible range and nontoxicity make them attractive for bioimaging and biolabelling purposes, especially with use of proteins as stabilising agents. In this context, this study intends the synthesis of a specific Au nanocluster covered by bovine serum albumin (BSA). It is shown that size-exclusion chromatography is feasible for the purification and isolation of the nanocluster. A mass spectrometric characterisation, preferably by ESI-MS, indicates the presence of an Au9@BSA nanocluster. Enzymatic digestion of the nanocluster with trypsin results in a significant increase of the fluorescence intensity at 650 and 710 nm, whereas complementary MALDI-MS studies are presented

  6. Peculiarities of beryllium atomization in a gasdynamic mass-spectrometric interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, A. N.; Gall, L. N.; Masyukevich, S. V.; Berdnikov, A. S.; Gall, N. R.

    2015-04-01

    We have studied physical processes involved in electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry with controlled ion fragmentation and atomization in an IESAP (ion extraction from solutions at atmospheric pressure) source, which lead to the observed shape of mass spectra that can be used for determining trace amounts of beryllium. These mass spectra contain only the peak of beryllium atomic ion at 9 amu in a region that is free of background, which ensures high-sensitivity detection of this element. This mass spectrum is well reproduced in a broad range of beryllium concentrations and conditions of ESI measurements.

  7. Application of mass spectrometric methods to analysis of xenobiotics in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Gross, M L

    1982-01-01

    Tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin (TCDD) has been identified and quantitated at the parts-per-trillion level in three studies involving tissue. The first was an analysis of human milk from mothers in forest areas of the USA where herbicides containing 2,3,7,8-TCDD had been used. The second concerned US veterans of the Vietnam war who may have been exposed to 2,3,7,8-TCDD via contact with the defoliant, Agent Orange. The third was a controlled investigation of the fate of 2,3,7,8-TCDD in the tissue of an exposed rhesus monkey. Mass spectrometry has also been used to develop new methods for trace analysis. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, negative chemical ionization, mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry and Fourier transform mass spectrometry are described as examples. PMID:7152620

  8. Mass spectrometric quantification of amino acid oxidation products in proteins: insights into pathways that promote LDL oxidation in the human artery wall.

    PubMed

    Heinecke, J W

    1999-07-01

    Oxidatively damaged low density lipoprotein (LDL) may play an important role in atherogenesis, but the physiologically relevant pathways have proved difficult to identify. Mass spectrometric quantification of stable compounds that result from specific oxidation reactions represents a powerful approach for investigating such mechanisms. Analysis of protein oxidation products isolated from atherosclerotic lesions implicates tyrosyl radical, reactive nitrogen species, and hypochlorous acid in LDL oxidation in the human artery wall. These observations provide chemical evidence for the reaction pathways that promote LDL oxidation and lesion formation in vivo.--Heinecke, J. W. Mass spectrometric quantification of amino acid oxidation products in proteins: insights into pathways that promote LDL oxidation in the human artery wall. PMID:10385603

  9. Differentiation of Aurantii Fructus Immaturus from Poniciri Trifoliatae Fructus Immaturus using Flow- injection Mass spectrometric (FIMS) Metabolic Fingerprinting Method Combined with Chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Chen, Pei

    2015-01-01

    A flow-injection mass spectrometric metabolic fingerprinting method in combination with chemometrics was used to differentiate Aurantii Fructus Immaturus from its counterfeit Poniciri Trifoliatae Fructus Immaturus. Flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprints of 9 Aurantii Fructus Immaturus samples and 12 Poniciri Trifoliatae Fructus Immaturus samples were acquired and analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA). The authentic herbs were differentiated from their counterfeits easily. Eight characteristic components which were responsible for the difference between the samples were tentatively identified. Furthermore, three out of the eight components, naringin, hesperidin, and neohesperidin, were quantified. The results are useful to help identify the authenticity of Aurantii Fructus Immaturus. PMID:25622204

  10. Studies of the acidic components of the Colorado Green River formation oil shale-Mass spectrometric identification of the methyl esters of extractable acids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, P.; Schnoes, H. K.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    Study of solvent extractable acidic constituents of oil shale from the Colorado Green River Formation. Identification of individual components is based on gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric data obtained for their respective methyl esters. Normal acids, isoprenoidal acids, alpha, omega-dicarboxylic acids, mono-alpha-methyl dicarboxylic acids and methyl ketoacids were identified. In addition, the presence of monocyclic, benzoic, phenylalkanoic and naphthyl-carboxylic acids, as well as cycloaromatic acids, is demonstrated by partial identification.

  11. Mass spectrometric quantification of the adaptations in the wall proteome of Candida albicans in response to ambient pH.

    PubMed

    Sosinska, Grazyna J; de Koning, Leo J; de Groot, Piet W J; Manders, Erik M M; Dekker, Henk L; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; de Koster, Chris G; Klis, Frans M

    2011-01-01

    The mucosal layers colonized by the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans differ widely in ambient pH. Because the properties and functions of wall proteins are probably pH dependent, we hypothesized that C. albicans adapts its wall proteome to the external pH. We developed an in vitro system that mimics colonization of mucosal surfaces by growing biomats at pH 7 and 4 on semi-solid agarose containing mucin as the sole nitrogen source. The biomats expanded radially for at least 8 days at a rate of ~30 μm h(-1). At pH 7, hyphal growth predominated and growth was invasive, whereas at pH 4 only yeast and pseudohyphal cells were present and growth was noninvasive. Both qualitative mass spectrometric analysis of the wall proteome by tandem mass spectrometry and relative quantification of individual wall proteins (pH 7/pH 4), using Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FT-MS) and a reference mixture of (15)N-labelled yeast and hyphal walls, identified similar sets of >20 covalently linked wall proteins. The adhesion proteins Als1 and Als3, Hyr1, the transglucosidase Phr1, the detoxification enzyme Sod5 and the mammalian transglutaminase substrate Hwp1 (immunological detection) were only present at pH 7, whereas at pH 4 the level of the transglucosidase Phr2 was >35-fold higher than at pH 7. Sixteen out of the 22 proteins identified by FT-MS showed a greater than twofold change. These results demonstrate that ambient pH strongly affects the wall proteome of C. albicans, show that our quantitative approach can give detailed insights into the dynamics of the wall proteome, and point to potential vaccine targets. PMID:20864472

  12. Metallomics investigations on potential binding partners of methylmercury in tuna fish muscle tissue using complementary mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Daniel J; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Bettmer, Jörg

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the binding behaviour of methylmercury (MeHg(+)) towards proteins is investigated. Free sulfhydryl groups in cysteine residues are known to be the most likely binding partners, due to the high affinity of mercury to sulphur. However, detailed knowledge about discrete binding sites in living organisms has been so far scarce. A metallomics approach using different methods like size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as well as complementary mass spectrometric techniques (electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry, ESI-MS/MS) are combined to sequence and identify possible target proteins or peptides after enzymatic digestion. Potential targets for MeHg(+) in tuna fish muscle tissue are investigated using the certified reference material CRM464 as a model tissue. Different extraction procedures appropriate for the extraction of proteins are evaluated for their efficiency using isotope dilution analysis for the determination of total Hg in the extracts. Due to the high chemical stability of the mercury-sulphur bond, the bioconjugate can be quantitatively extracted with a combination of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (TRIS) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). Using different separation techniques such as SEC and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) it can be shown that major binding occurs to a high-molecular weight protein (M(w) > 200 kDa). A potential target protein, skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain, could be identified after tryptic digestion and capillary LC-ESI-MS/MS. PMID:22699869

  13. Capillary gas chromatography of amino acids, including asparagine and glutamine: sensitive gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric and selected ion monitoring gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric detection of the N,O(S)-tert.-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chaves Das Neves, H J; Vasconcelos, A M

    1987-04-17

    Amino acids and the amino acid amides glutamine and asparagine can be simultaneously derivatized to the corresponding N,O(S)-tert.-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives in a one-step reaction with N-methyl-N-(tert.-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide in acetonitrile. The solution is used directly for gas chromatography (GC). Losses due to evaporation steps are avoided. Except for the more basic amino acids, derivatization occurs at room temperature. Lysine, arginine and histidine require additional heating at 150 degrees C for 2.5 h in order to complete derivatization. The derivatization has high reproducibility. The response factors relative to norvaline or cycloleucine lie between 0.40 and 1.30. Arginine is the most difficult amino acid to derivatize. The size of the tert.-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) group prevents multiple silylation of the nitrogen atoms. Only a single peak is observed for each compound. Twenty-seven amino acid (and glutamine and asparagine) derivatives were simultaneously chromatographed and well separated in a single run on a 25 m X 0.20 mm I.D. glass capillary column coated with OV-1. The TBDMS derivatives possess very characteristic EI mass spectra at 70 eV, with intense diagnostic ions. This makes them very appropriate for GC-mass spectrometric (MS) work and selected ion monitoring GC-MS at the picomole level. The detection limit for arginine as the TBDMS derivative is less than 0.3 ng. The usefulness of the method is illustrated by the detection of amino acids in a peptide hydrolysate obtained from 1 microgram of bovin insulin B-chain. PMID:3597576

  14. Mass spectrometrical analysis of the processed metastasis-inducing anterior gradient protein 2 homolog reveals 100% sequence coverage.

    PubMed

    Myung, J-K; Frischer, T; Afjehi-Sadat, L; Pollak, A; Lubec, G

    2008-08-01

    Anterior gradient protein 2 homolog is a metastasis-inducing protein in a rat model of rat breast cancer and prognostic for outcome in hormonally treated breast cancer patients. Carrying out protein profiling in several mammalian cells and tissues, we detected this protein (synonym: secreted cement gland protein XAG-2 homolog) that was originally described in toad skin, in human bronchial epithelia. Tissues obtained from biopsies were homogenised and extracted proteins were run on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Following in-gel digestion with proteases trypsin, AspN, LysC and chymotrypsin, mass spectrometrical analysis was carried out by MALDI-TOF/TOF. The use of MS following multi-enzyme digestion of the protein resulted into 100% sequence coverage. MS/MS analysis enabled sequencing of 87% of the protein structure. This percentage does not include the signal peptide that was not observed in our protein due to processing. No posttranslational modifications were detectable and no sequence conflicts were observed. Complete analysis, unambiguous identification and characterisation of this biologically important protein could be shown, which is relevant for the definition of a marker protein that has been described so far by immunochemical methods only. Complete analysis is of importance as it forms the basis for all future work on this protein and, moreover, may serve as an analytical tool for further studies. PMID:17497304

  15. Mass Spectrometric-Based Selected Reaction Monitoring of Protein Phosphorylation during Symbiotic Signaling in the Model Legume, Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the major cereal crops corn, rice, and wheat, leguminous plants such as soybean and alfalfa can meet their nitrogen requirement via endosymbiotic associations with soil bacteria. The establishment of this symbiosis is a complex process playing out over several weeks and is facilitated by the exchange of chemical signals between these partners from different kingdoms. Several plant components that are involved in this signaling pathway have been identified, but there is still a great deal of uncertainty regarding the early events in symbiotic signaling, i.e., within the first minutes and hours after the rhizobial signals (Nod factors) are perceived at the plant plasma membrane. The presence of several protein kinases in this pathway suggests a mechanism of signal transduction via posttranslational modification of proteins in which phosphate is added to the hydroxyl groups of serine, threonine and tyrosine amino acid side chains. To monitor the phosphorylation dynamics and complement our previous untargeted 'discovery' approach, we report here the results of experiments using a targeted mass spectrometric technique, Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) that enables the quantification of phosphorylation targets with great sensitivity and precision. Using this approach, we confirm a rapid change in the level of phosphorylation in 4 phosphosites of at least 4 plant phosphoproteins that have not been previously characterized. This detailed analysis reveals aspects of the symbiotic signaling mechanism in legumes that, in the long term, will inform efforts to engineer this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in important non-legume crops such as rice, wheat and corn. PMID:27203723

  16. Application of a sensitive liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric method to pharmacokinetic study of nalmefene in humans.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Chen, Xiaoyan; Dai, Xiaojian; Wen, Aidong; Zhang, Yifan; Zhong, Dafang

    2007-06-01

    A sensitive, specific and rapid liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) method was developed and validated for quantification of nalmefene in human plasma. An aliquot of 200 microL plasma sample was simply precipitated by 400 microL methanol. Separation of nalmefene and the internal standard hydromorphone from the interferences was achieved on a C(18) column followed by MS/MS detection. The analytes were monitored in the positive ionization mode with a TurboIonspray source. The method had a total chromatographic run time of 4.5 min and linear calibration curves over the concentration range of 10-5000 pg/mL. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 10 pg/mL. The intra- and inter-day precision was less than 10.1% determined from QC samples at concentrations of 30, 300 and 4500 pg/mL, and the accuracy was within +/-3.4%. As the method was more sensitive (10 times higher) than those reported previously, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of nalmefene in healthy volunteers after a single intravenous injection of low dose (30 microg) of nalmefene hydrochloride for the first time. PMID:17329173

  17. Direct analysis of nine pharmaceuticals in culture media by use of cartridge separation with electrospray mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Fang; Ma, Mingsheng; Tam, Yun K

    2002-09-01

    A 2-cm cartridge has been used for separation before electrospray mass spectrometric analysis of pharmaceutical compounds in cell culture media, alleviating the need for sample extraction and desalting procedures. Nine representative pharmaceuticals listed in the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) were chosen as the candidate compounds and Hank's balanced salt solution with Hepes buffer (HBSS-Hepes buffer) was used as the cell-culture medium in an effort to study permeability of chemicals through cell monolayers. Effects of several conditions, e.g. pH and buffer concentration in the mobile phase, flow rate, and temperature on separation efficiency were examined. The nine pharmaceuticals were separated within 2 min by use of a 2-cm C(8) cartridge. Relative standard deviations (RSD) from repeated analysis within the same day or over five days were 0.03-0.2% for retention times and 0.6-5.3% for peak areas; antipyrine was used as internal standard. Calibration curves based on peak-area measurements were linear over the range 0.1-20 micro mol L(-1). The HBSS-Hepes buffer did not interfere with separation and detection; identical separation and peak intensity were obtained when the samples were separately prepared in distilled water or in the culture medium. PMID:12207243

  18. A Review of the Different Methods to Quantify Tritium Inside Waste Drums via Helium-3 Mass Spectrometric Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Demange, D.; Varescon, M.; Le Gal, P.; Daclin, J.P.; Hubinois, J.C.; Douche, C.; Lattaud, C

    2005-07-15

    This work deals with an indirect and non destructive measurement of tritium in solids. Instead of measuring tritium, we propose to measure the production rate of the decay product: {sup 3}He.The amount of tritium enclosed inside a waste drum can be determined with an adapted {sup 3}He ingrowth method that takes into account the leak rate of the drum. The model leads to different ways to quantify tritium in the drum. It is confirmed using reference drums that measuring the {sup 3}He leak by confining the drum during its equilibrium state gives the same result as sampling the drum atmosphere at the beginning of the storage. For each method, the appropriate apparatus, experimental procedures and calculation of tritium activity from mass spectrometric {sup 3}He measurements are detailed. Performances of these techniques are studied and discussed.In addition, we describe a novel and fully automated apparatus based on the confinement method that makes it possible to achieve a close tritium inventory of all the waste drums stored or produced at CEA Valduc.

  19. Nuclear transition protein 1 from ram elongating spermatids. Mass spectrometric characterization, primary structure and phosphorylation sites of two variants.

    PubMed

    Chirat, F; Martinage, A; Briand, G; Kouach, M; Van Dorsselaer, A; Loir, M; Sautière, P

    1991-05-23

    The ram transition protein 1 (TP1) is present in spermatid cell nuclei in the nonphosphorylated, monophosphorylated and diphosphorylated forms. Its primary structure was determined by automated Edman degradation of S-carboxamidomethylated protein and of peptides generated by cleavage with thermolysin and endoproteinase Lys-C. The ram TP1 is a small basic protein of 54 residues and structurally very close to other mammalian TP1. The mass spectrometric data obtained from the protein and its fragments reveal that ram TP1 is indeed a mixture (approximately 5:1) of two structural variants (Mr 6346 and 6300). These variants differ only by the nature of the residue at position 27 (Cys in the major variant and Gly in the minor variant). The study of phosphorylation sites has shown that four different serine residues could be phosphorylated in the monophosphorylated TP1, at positions 8, 35, 36 or 39. From previous physical studies, it has been postulated that the Tyr32 surrounded by two highly conserved basic clusters was responsible for the destabilization of chromatin by intercalation of its phenol ring between the bases of double-stranded DNA. The presence of three phosphorylatable serine residues in the very conserved sequence 29-42 is another argument for the involvement of this region in the interaction with DNA. PMID:2040274

  20. Selective isolation of hydrophobin SC3 by solid-phase extraction with polytetrafluoroethylene microparticles and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kupčík, Rudolf; Zelená, Miroslava; Řehulka, Pavel; Bílková, Zuzana; Česlová, Lenka

    2016-02-01

    Hydrophobins are small proteins that play a role in a number of processes during the filamentous fungi growth and development. These proteins are characterized by the self-assembly of their molecules into an amphipathic membrane at hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces. Isolation and purification of hydrophobins generally present a challenge in their analysis. Hydrophobin SC3 from Schizophyllum commune was selected as a representative of class I hydrophobins in this work. A novel procedure for selective and effective isolation of hydrophobin SC3 based on solid-phase extraction with polytetrafluoroethylene microparticles loaded in a small self-made microcolumn is reported. The tailored binding of hydrophobins to polytetrafluoroethylene followed by harsh elution conditions resulted in a highly specific isolation of hydrophobin SC3 from the model mixture of ten proteins. The presented isolation protocol can have a positive impact on the analysis and utilization of these proteins including all class I hydrophobins. Hydrophobin SC3 was further subjected to reduction of its highly stable disulfide bonds and to chymotryptic digestion followed by mass spectrometric analysis. The isolation and digestion protocols presented in this work make the analysis of these highly hydrophobic and compact proteins possible. PMID:26608781

  1. A molecular beam mass spectrometric study of the formation and photolysis of C(lc)lO dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Frank T.; Robaugh, David A.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the chlorine oxides present at temperatures and pressures typical of the Antarctic stratosphere was carried out. A series of low temperature flow reactors was constructed and used in conjunction with molecular beam mass spectrometric techniques to identify species and characterize their kinetic behavior at temperatures of -20 to -70 C and pressures of from 30 to 130 Torr. It was found that the gas phase chlorine-oxygen system was quite complex at low temperatures. ClO dimer was identified and found to be thermodynamically very stable under stratospheric conditions. It was also found that any system which contained ClO also contained a larger oxide. The oxide was identified as Cl2O3. A survey of possible higher oxides, which have been postulated as possible chlorine sinks in the stratosphere, was also carried out. The rate of formation of ClO dimer was measured as a function of temperature and pressure. Measurements were made of both the decay of ClO and the formation of the dimer. By comparing these rates it was determined that virtually all of the ClO was converted to the dimer under stratospheric conditions, and that the other ClO reactions were not important under these conditions.

  2. Combining Mass Spectrometric Metabolic Profiling with Genomic Analysis: A Powerful Approach for Discovering Natural Products from Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kleigrewe, Karin; Almaliti, Jehad; Tian, Isaac Yuheng; Kinnel, Robin B.; Korobeynikov, Anton; Monroe, Emily A.; Duggan, Brendan M.; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Sherman, David H.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H.

    2015-01-01

    An innovative approach was developed for the discovery of new natural products by combining mass spectrometric metabolic profiling with genomic analysis, and resulted in the discovery of the columbamides, a new class of di- and tri-chlorinated acyl amides with cannabinomimetic activity. Three species of cultured marine cyanobacteria, Moorea producens 3L, Moorea producens JHB and Moorea bouillonii PNG, were subjected to genome sequencing and analysis for their recognizable biosynthetic pathways, and this information was then compared with their respective metabolomes as detected by MS-profiling. By genome analysis, a presumed regulatory domain was identified upstream of several previously described biosynthetic gene clusters in two of these cyanobacteria, M. producens 3L and M. producens JHB. A similar regulatory domain was identified in the M. bouillonii PNG genome, and a corresponding downstream biosynthetic gene cluster was located and carefully analyzed. Subsequently, MS-based molecular networking identified a series of candidate products, and these were isolated and their structures rigorously established. Based on their distinctive acyl amide structure, the most prevalent metabolite was evaluated for cannabinomimetic properties and found to be a moderate affinity ligand for CB1. PMID:26149623

  3. Spatially resolved analysis of small molecules by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI).

    PubMed

    Peukert, Manuela; Matros, Andrea; Lattanzio, Giuseppe; Kaspar, Stephanie; Abadía, Javier; Mock, Hans-Peter

    2012-02-01

    • Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI) of tissues provides the means to analyse the spatial distributions of small molecules and proteins within tissues. This imaging technique is commonplace in medicinal and pharmaceutical research, but its application in plant science is very recent. Broader introduction requires specific adaptations for plant tissues. Sample preparation is of paramount importance in order to obtain high-quality spectra providing sufficient spatial resolution for compounds. Optimization is required for sectioning, choice of matrix and means of matrix deposition. • Here, we present our current protocols for the detection of small molecules in cryodissected immature barley (Hordeum vulgare) grains and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) roots. • Examples of MALDI-MSI measurements are provided, and the level of reproducibility across biological replicates is addressed. Furthermore, our approaches for the validation of distribution patterns and for the identification of molecules are described. • Finally, we discuss how MALDI-MSI can contribute to applied plant research. PMID:22126099

  4. Development and validation of a liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric method for determination of eleven coccidiostats in milk.

    PubMed

    Nász, Szilárd; Debreczeni, Lajos; Rikker, Tamás; Eke, Zsuzsanna

    2012-07-15

    A reversed phase liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric method with simple solvent extraction and purification by solid phase extraction (SPE) has been developed for the determination of coccidiostats in milk. For sample preparation matrix solid phase dispersion, extraction by organic solvent and SPE with different cartridges were also tested. The compounds determined include lasalocid, narasin, salinomycin, monensin, semduramicin, maduramicin, robenidine, decoquinate, halofuginone, nicarbazin and diclazuril. Main steps of the method are addition of acetonitrile to the milk samples, centrifugation, removal of matrix by SPE, concentration by evaporation and LC-MS-MS determination. During a 15 min time segmented chromatographic run compounds are ionised either positively or negatively. Calculated recoveries range between 77.1% and 118.2%. Maximum levels are in the range of 1-20 μg/kg. The developed method was validated in line with the requirements of Commission Decision 2002/657/EC (2002). It is applicable for control of coccidiostat residues in milk as indicated in Regulation 124/2009/EC (2009). PMID:25683430

  5. A simplified electrospray ionization source based on electrostatic field induction for mass spectrometric analysis of droplet samples.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaohui; Chen, Hong; Li, Xiang; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Xin

    2012-12-21

    A simplified electrospray ionization source based on electrostatic field induction is introduced in this paper. The electrostatic field induced spray ionization, termed EFISI, is easily performed using a needle electrode and a capillary, and it does not require heat, gas, a syringe pump or any other equipment. A high voltage is applied to a needle electrode which does not contact the sample. The capillary is used as a sample spray emitter without any electrical contact or tip modification. As only a 1 μL sample droplet is needed for analysis with no or little pretreatment, the EFISI source is particularly suitable for the mass spectrometric analysis of microlitre volume samples. The change of charge distribution in the droplet solution, by the induction of an external electrostatic field from the needle electrode, is proposed to be the main cause of ion formation. We demonstrate its feasibility for the characterization of a wide range of organic compounds and biomolecules in pure solutions or complex matrices. The influence of sample capillary length and droplet solvent composition on the ionization process are also discussed. PMID:23095821

  6. Abortion after deliberate Arthrotec® addition to food. Mass spectrometric detection of diclofenac, misoprostol acid, and their urinary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Watzer, Bernhard; Lusthof, Klaas J; Schweer, Horst

    2015-07-01

    Arthrotec(®) (AT) is a combination of diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and misoprostol (MP), a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). MP is a lipophilic methyl ester prodrug. It is readily metabolized to the biologically active misoprostol acid (MPA). During the last few years, medical studies exhibited MP to be an excellent abortive. In this paper, we describe a rare criminal case of MP abortion, initiated by the expectant father. After the abortion, samples of vomit and urine were collected. Systemic exposure to MP is difficult to prove, because both MP and the active metabolite MPA are hardly excreted in urine. Therefore, in addition to routine toxicological analysis, we used slightly modified, well-established liquid and gas chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS and GC/MS/MS) methods, for the direct and the indirect detection of MPA and its metabolites. In this case, we were able to demonstrate the presence of the major MP metabolites 2,3-dinor-MPA and 2,3,4,5-tetranor-MPA in the urine of the victim. We also detected paracetamol, 3-methoxyparacetamol and diclofenac-glucuronide in the urine. In the vomit of the victim, we detected diclofenac and MPA. These results, combined with the criminal investigations, showed that the accused had mixed MP into the food of his pregnant girlfriend. Finally, these investigations contributed to a confession of the accused. PMID:25524762

  7. Mass Spectrometric-Based Selected Reaction Monitoring of Protein Phosphorylation during Symbiotic Signaling in the Model Legume, Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Van Ness, Lori K; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Maeda, Junko; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A; Sussman, Michael R; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the major cereal crops corn, rice, and wheat, leguminous plants such as soybean and alfalfa can meet their nitrogen requirement via endosymbiotic associations with soil bacteria. The establishment of this symbiosis is a complex process playing out over several weeks and is facilitated by the exchange of chemical signals between these partners from different kingdoms. Several plant components that are involved in this signaling pathway have been identified, but there is still a great deal of uncertainty regarding the early events in symbiotic signaling, i.e., within the first minutes and hours after the rhizobial signals (Nod factors) are perceived at the plant plasma membrane. The presence of several protein kinases in this pathway suggests a mechanism of signal transduction via posttranslational modification of proteins in which phosphate is added to the hydroxyl groups of serine, threonine and tyrosine amino acid side chains. To monitor the phosphorylation dynamics and complement our previous untargeted 'discovery' approach, we report here the results of experiments using a targeted mass spectrometric technique, Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) that enables the quantification of phosphorylation targets with great sensitivity and precision. Using this approach, we confirm a rapid change in the level of phosphorylation in 4 phosphosites of at least 4 plant phosphoproteins that have not been previously characterized. This detailed analysis reveals aspects of the symbiotic signaling mechanism in legumes that, in the long term, will inform efforts to engineer this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in important non-legume crops such as rice, wheat and corn. PMID:27203723

  8. Mass spectrometric gas composition measurements associated with jet interaction tests in a high-enthalpy wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Brown, K. G.; Wood, G. M., Jr.; Puster, R. L.; Paulin, P. A.; Fishel, C. E.; Ellerbe, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of test gas composition is important in wind-tunnel experiments measuring aerothermodynamic interactions. This paper describes measurements made by sampling the top of the test section during runs of the Langley 7-Inch High-Temperature Tunnel. The tests were conducted to determine the mixing of gas injected from a flat-plate model into a combustion-heated hypervelocity test stream and to monitor the CO2 produced in the combustion. The Mass Spectrometric (MS) measurements yield the mole fraction of N2 or He and CO2 reaching the sample inlets. The data obtained for several tunnel run conditions are related to the pressures measured in the tunnel test section and at the MS ionizer inlet. The apparent distributions of injected gas species and tunnel gas (CO2) are discussed relative to the sampling techniques. The measurements provided significant real-time data for the distribution of injected gases in the test section. The jet N2 diffused readily from the test stream, but the jet He was mostly entrained. The amounts of CO2 and Ar diffusing upward in the test section for several run conditions indicated the variability of the combustion-gas test-stream composition.

  9. Highly selective enrichment of phosphopeptides with high-index facets exposed octahedral tin dioxide nanoparticles for mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rongna; Hu, Junjie; Cai, Zongwei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-02-01

    High-index facets exposed octahedral tin dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticles were successfully synthesized and applied to selectively enrich phosphopeptides for mass spectrometric analysis. The high selectivity and capacity of the octahedral SnO2 nanoparticles were demonstrated by effectively enriching phosphopeptides from digests of phosphoprotein (α- or β-casein), protein mixtures of β-casein and bovine serum albumin, milk, and human serum samples. The unique octahedral SnO2 with abundant unsaturated coordination Sn atoms exhibited enhanced affinity and selective coordination ability with phosphopeptides due to their high chemical activity. The strong affinity led to highly selective capture and enrichment of phosphopeptides for sensitive detection through the bidentate bonds formed between surface atoms and phosphate. The phosphopeptides could be detected in β-casein down to 4 × 10(-9)M or in the mixture of β-casein and BSA with a molar ratio of even 1:100. The performance in selective enrichment of phosphopeptides from drinking milk and human serum showed powerful evidence of high selectivity and efficiency in identifying the low-abundant phosphopeptides from complicated biological samples. This work provided a way to improve the physical and chemical properties of materials by tailoring their exposed facets for selective enrichment of phosphopeptides. PMID:24401440

  10. Mass spectrometric sup 230 Th- sup 234 U- sup 238 U dating of the Devils Hole calcite vein

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, K.R.; Simmons, K.R.; Szabo, B.J.; Riggs, A.C. ); Winograd, I.J.; Landwehr, J.M. ); Hoffman, R.J. )

    1992-10-09

    The Devils Hole calcite vein contains a long-term climatic record, but requires accurate chronologic control for its interpretation. Mass-spectrometric U-series ages for samples from core DH-11 yielding {sup 230}Th ages with precisions ranging from less than 1,000 years (2{sigma}) for samples younger than {approximately}140 ka (thousands of years ago) to less than 50,000 years for the oldest samples ({approximately}566 ka). The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ages could be determined to a precision of {approximately}20,000 years for all ages. Calcite accumulated continuously from 566 ka until {approximately}60 ka at an average rate of 0.7 millimeter per 10{sup 3} years. The precise agreement between replicate analyses and the concordance of the {sup 230}Th/{sup 238}U and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ages for the oldest samples indicate that the DH-11 samples were closed systems and validate the dating technique in general.