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Sample records for mass spectrometry investigations

  1. Investigation of protein-ligand interactions by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sinz, Andrea

    2007-04-01

    The rate of drug discovery is greatly dependent on the development and improvement of rapid and reliable analytical methods that allow screening for protein-ligand interactions. The solution-based methods for investigating protein-ligand interactions by mass spectrometry (MS), which are discussed in this paper, are hydrogen/deuterium exchange of protein backbone amide hydrogens, and photoaffinity labeling. Moreover, MS analysis of intact noncovalent protein-ligand complexes is described. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) with its ultra-high resolution and excellent mass accuracy is also considered herein as it is gaining increasing popularity for a mass spectrometric investigation of protein-ligand interactions. PMID:17299828

  2. Investigating quantitation of phosphorylation using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Laurie; Engel-Hall, Aaron; Drew, Kevin; Steinhardt, George; Helseth, Donald L.; Jabon, David; McMurry, Timothy; Angulo, David S.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in methods and instrumentation for analysis of phosphopeptides using mass spectrometry, it is still difficult to quantify the extent of phosphorylation of a substrate due to physiochemical differences between unphosphorylated and phosphorylated peptides. Here we report experiments to investigate those differences using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for a set of synthetic peptides by creating calibration curves of known input ratios of peptides/phosphopeptides and analyzing their resulting signal intensity ratios. These calibration curves reveal subtleties in sequence-dependent differences for relative desorption/ionization efficiencies that cannot be seen from single-point calibrations. We found that the behaviors were reproducible with a variability of 5–10% for observed phosphopeptide signal. Although these data allow us to begin addressing the issues related to modeling these properties and predicting relative signal strengths for other peptide sequences, it is clear this behavior is highly complex and needs to be further explored. PMID:18064576

  3. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  4. Mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Burlingame, A.L.; Baillie, T.A.; Derrick, P.J.

    1986-04-01

    It is the intention of the review to bring together in one source the direction of major developments in mass spectrometry and to illustrate these by citing key contributions from both fundamental and applied research. The Review is intended to provide the reader with a sense of the main currents, their breadth and depth, and probable future directions. It is also intended to provide the reader with a glimpse of the diverse discoveries and results that underpin the eventual development of new methods and instruments - the keys to obtaining new insights in all the physical, chemical, and biological sciences which depend on mass spectrometry at various levels of sophistication. Focal points for future interdisciplinary synergism might be selective quantitative derivatization of large peptides, which would convey properties that direct fragmentation providing specific sequence information, or optimization of LCMS for biooligomer sequencing and mixture analysis, or the perfect way to control or enhance the internal energy of ions of any size, or many others. 1669 references.

  5. Investigations of paleoclimate variations using accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Southon, J R; Kashgarian, M; Brown, T A

    2000-08-24

    This project has used Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) {sup 14}C measurements to study climate and carbon cycle variations on time scales from decades to millennia over the past 30,000 years, primarily in the western US and the North Pacific. {sup 14}C dates provide a temporal framework for records of climate change, and natural radiocarbon acts as a carbon cycle tracer in independently dated records. The overall basis for the study is the observation that attempts to model future climate and carbon cycle changes cannot be taken seriously if the models have not been adequately tested. Paleoclimate studies are unique because they provide realistic test data under climate conditions significantly different from those of the present, whereas instrumental results can only sample the system as it is today. The aim of this project has been to better establish the extent, timing, and causes of past climate perturbations, and the carbon cycle changes with which they are linked. This provides real-world data for model testing, both for the development of individual models and also for inter-model diagnosis and comparison activities such as those of LLNL's PCMDI program; it helps us achieve a better basic understanding of how the climate system works so that models can be improved; and it gives an indication of the natural variability in the climate system underlying any anthropogenically-driven changes. The research has involved four projects which test hypotheses concerning the overall behavior of the North Pacific climate system. All are aspects of an overall theme that climate linkages are strong and direct, so that regional climate records are correlated, details of fine structure are important, and accurate and precise dating is critical for establishing correlations and even causality. An important requirement for such studies is the requirement for an accurate and precise radiocarbon calibration, to allow better correlation of radiocarbon-dated records with

  6. MASS SPECTROMETRY

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, L.

    1962-01-01

    method is described for operating a mass spectrometer to improve its resolution qualities and to extend its period of use substantially between cleanings. In this method, a small amount of a beta emitting gas such as hydrogen titride or carbon-14 methane is added to the sample being supplied to the spectrometer for investigation. The additive establishes leakage paths on the surface of the non-conducting film accumulating within the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer, thereby reducing the effect of an accumulated static charge on the electrostatic and magnetic fields established within the instrument. (AEC)

  7. MASS SPECTROMETRY

    DOEpatents

    Nier, A.O.C.

    1959-08-25

    A voltage switching apparatus is described for use with a mass spectrometer in the concentratron analysis of several components of a gas mixture. The system automatically varies the voltage on the accelerating electrode of the mass spectrometer through a program of voltages which corresponds to the particular gas components under analysis. Automatic operation may be discontinued at any time to permit the operator to manually select any desired predetermined accelerating voltage. Further, the system may be manually adjusted to vary the accelerating voltage over a wide range.

  8. Electrospray and MALDI mass spectrometry in the identification of spermicides in criminal investigations.

    PubMed

    Hollenbeck, T P; Siuzdak, G; Blackledge, R D

    1999-07-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry have been used to examine evidence in a sexual assault investigation. Because condoms are being used increasingly by sexual assailants and some condom brands include the spermicide nonoxynol-9 (nonylphenoxy polyethoxyethanol) in the lubricant formulation, the recovery, and identification of nonoxynol-9 from evidence items may assist in proving corpus delicti. A method was developed for the recovery of nonoxynol-9 from internal vaginal swabs and for its identification by reverse phase liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC ESI-MS), nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) mass spectrometry, and high resolution MALDI Fourier transform mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTMS). The method was tested on extracts from precoitus, immediate postcoitus, and four-hours postcoitus vaginal swabs provided by a volunteer whose partner does not normally use condoms, but for this trial used a condom having a water-soluble gel-type lubricant that includes 5% nonoxynol-9 in its formulation. Subsequently, LC ESI-MS was used to identify traces of nonoxynol-9 from the internal vaginal swab of a victim of a sexual assault. PMID:10432613

  9. Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

  10. Applications of Mass Spectrometry in Investigations of Alleged Use of Chemical Warfare Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Robert W.

    Chemical warfare agents were used extensively throughout the twentieth century. Many such uses are well documented; however some allegations of use of chemical warfare agents were not easily confirmed. During the early 1980s interest developed into investigation of alleged use by analytical techniques, particularly mass spectrometry. Since that time, many combined chromatographic - mass spectrometric methods have been developed, both for application to the analysis of environmental and biomedical samples and for investigation of physiological interactions of chemical warfare agents. Examples are given of some of the investigations in which the author has been involved, including those into Yellow Rain and uses of chemical warfare agents in Iraq and Iran. These examples illustrate the use of combined chromatographic-mass spectrometric methods and emphasise the importance of controls in analytical investigations.

  11. Investigating the degradation of the sympathomimetic drug phenylephrine by electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trommer, Hagen; Raith, Klaus; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2010-06-01

    The frequently used sympathomimetic drug phenylephrine has been studied by electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry. The stability of the adrenoceptor agonist was examined by investigations of the pharmaceutically used salts phenylephrine hydrochloride and phenylephrine bitartrate. Photostability has been studied by use of an irradiation equipment emitting a solar radiation spectrum. The experiments were carried out by analysis of aqueous drug solutions before and after irradiation treatment. The phenylephrine derivative with unsaturated side chain originating from the drug by loss of one water molecule has been detected as the major degradation product of both phenylephrine salts the hydrochloride and the bitartrate. Further degradation and oxidation products were detectable already in the full scan mode demonstrating a low stability of the drug. Tandem mass spectrometry and multiple stage mass spectrometry experiments enabled the establishment of fragmentation schemes of both salts for the first time. Irradiation treatment indicated that phenylephrine bitartrate is more prone to degradation than the hydrochloride because of an additional decomposition sensitivity of the tartaric acid counter ion. An interaction between phenylephrine and its counter ion degradation products via a nucleophilic addition mechanism is suggested to be the explanation for the detected ion signals after irradiation treatment of phenylephrine bitartrate. PMID:20122809

  12. Investigation of Elemental Mass Spectrometry in Pharmacology for Peptide Quantitation at Femtomolar Levels

    PubMed Central

    Cordeau, Emmanuelle; Arnaudguilhem, Carine; Bouyssiere, Brice; Hagège, Agnès; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles; Cantel, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    In the search of new robust and environmental-friendly analytical methods able to answer quantitative issues in pharmacology, we explore liquid chromatography (LC) associated with elemental mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to monitor peptides in such complex biological matrices. The novelty is to use mass spectrometry to replace radiolabelling and radioactivity measurements, which represent up-to now the gold standard to measure organic compound concentrations in life science. As a proof of concept, we choose the vasopressin (AVP)/V1A receptor system for model pharmacological assays. The capacity of ICP-MS to provide highly sensitive quantitation of metallic and hetero elements, whatever the sample medium, prompted us to investigate this technique in combination with appropriate labelling of the peptide of interest. Selenium, that is scarcely present in biological media, was selected as a good compromise between ICP-MS response, covalent tagging ability using conventional sulfur chemistry and peptide detection specificity. Applying selenium monitoring by elemental mass spectrometry in pharmacology is challenging due to the very high salt content and organic material complexity of the samples that produces polyatomic aggregates and thus potentially mass interferences with selenium detection. Hyphenation with a chromatographic separation was found compulsory. Noteworthy, we aimed to develop a straightforward quantitative protocol that can be performed in any laboratory equipped with a standard macrobore LC-ICP-MS system, in order to avoid time-consuming sample treatment or special implementation of instrumental set-up, while allowing efficient suppression of all mass interferences to reach the targeted sensitivity. Significantly, a quantification limit of 57 ng Se L-1 (72 femtomoles of injected Se) was achieved, the samples issued from the pharmacological assays being directly introduced into the LC-ICP-MS system. The established method was successfully validated and

  13. Qualitative and quantitative metabolomic investigation of single neurons by capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nemes, Peter; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Aerts, Jordan T.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell mass spectrometry (MS) empowers metabolomic investigations by decreasing analytical dimensions to the size of individual cells and subcellular structures. We describe a protocol for investigating and quantifying metabolites in individual isolated neurons using single-cell capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to electrospray ionization time-of-flight MS. The protocol requires ~2 h for sample preparation, neuron isolation, and metabolite extraction, and 1 h for metabolic measurement. The approach was used to detect more than 300 distinct compounds in the mass range of typical metabolites in various individual neurons (25–500-µm in diameter) isolated from the sea slug (Aplysia californica) central and rat (Rattus norvegicus) peripheral nervous systems. A subset of identified compounds was sufficient to reveal metabolic differences among freshly isolated neurons of different types and changes in the metabolite profiles of cultured neurons. The protocol can be applied to the characterization of the metabolome in a variety of smaller cells and/or subcellular domains. PMID:23538882

  14. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for Investigating DNA Damage-Associated Protein Ubiquitylation

    PubMed Central

    Heidelberger, Jan B.; Wagner, Sebastian A.; Beli, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Modification of proteins with the 76 amino acid protein ubiquitin plays essential roles in cellular signaling. Development of methods for specific enrichment of ubiquitin remnant peptides and advances in high-resolution mass spectrometry have enabled proteome-wide identification of endogenous ubiquitylation sites. Moreover, ubiquitin remnant profiling has emerged as a powerful approach for investigating changes in protein ubiquitylation in response to cellular perturbations, such as DNA damage, as well as for identification of substrates of ubiquitin-modifying enzymes. Despite these advances, interrogation of ubiquitin chain topologies on substrate proteins remains a challenging task. Here, we describe mass spectrometry-based approaches for quantitative analyses of site-specific protein ubiquitylation and highlight recent studies that employed these methods for investigation of ubiquitylation in the context of the cellular DNA damage response. Furthermore, we provide an overview of experimental strategies for probing ubiquitin chain topologies on proteins and discuss how these methods can be applied to analyze functions of ubiquitylation in the DNA damage response. PMID:27379159

  15. Thin-Layer Chromatography/Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Investigation of Goldenseal Alkaloids

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2007-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was investigated as a means to qualitatively identify and to quantify analytes directly from developed normal-phase thin layer chromatography plates. The atmospheric sampling capillary of a commercial ion trap mass spectrometer was extended to permit sampling and ionization of analytes in bands separated on intact TLC plates (up to 10 cm x 10 cm). A surface positioning software package and the appropriate hardware enabled computer-controlled surface scanning along the length of development lanes or at fixed RF value across the plates versus the stationary desorption electrospray emitter. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and related alkaloids and commercial dietary supplements were used as standards and samples. Alkaloid standards and samples were spotted and separated on aluminum- or glass-backed plates using established literature methods. The mass spectral signal levels as a function of desorption spray solvent were investigated with acetonitrile proving superior to methanol. The detection levels (ca. 5 ng each or 14 -28 pmol) in mass spectral full scan mode were determined statistically from the calibration curves (2.5 - 100 pmol) for the standards berberine, palmatine and hydrastinine spotted as a mixture and separated on the plates. Qualitative screening of the major alkaloids present in six different over-the-counter "goldenseal" dietary supplements was accomplished by obtaining full scan mass spectra during surface scans along the development lane in the direction of increasing RF value. In one sample, alkaloids were detected that strongly suggested the presence of at least one additional herb undeclared on the product label. These same data indicated the misidentification of one of the alkaloids in the TLC literature. Quantities of the alkaloids present in two of the samples determined using the mass spectral data were in reasonable agreement with the label values indicating the quantitative ability of

  16. Investigation of formation and ageing of biogenic secondary aerosols by soft ionization aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Lars; Reinnig, Marc-Christopher; Vogel, Alexander; Mentel, Thomas; Tillmann, Ralf; Schlosser, E.; Wahner, Andreas; Donahue, Neil; Saathoff, Harald; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2010-05-01

    The knowledge of the chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol is one essential key to understand the significance and fate of SOA in the atmosphere. However, the chemical evolution of SOA, from the very first condensing/nucleating molecules to the final oxidation products is still insufficiently understood and object of current research [1-3]. Consequently, the formation and photochemical ageing of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated in a series of reaction chamber experiments by applying on-line aerosol mass spectrometry (atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI/MS)) as well as off-line high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). In a set of experiments, performed in the large outdoor reaction chamber SAPHIR (Jülich, Germany), SOA was generated from a boreal mixture of biogenic VOCs. During a two-day experiment the generated biogenic SOA was exposed to OH-radicals and the temporal evolution of the chemical composition was characterized. The applied on-line MS method not only provides highly time resolved chemical information (such as an AMS) but also allows molecular identification/quantification of specific marker compounds. Several first and higher generation BSOA products were identified. Among the higher generation products, especially a tricarboxylic acid (3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid) [2] was observed as an eye-catching oxidative processing marker. A more detailed investigation of hydroxyl radical induced SOA aging at the AIDA chamber facility in Karlsruhe, again using terpenes as SOA precursors, clearly showed that the formation of the tricarboxylic acid takes place in the gas phase by the reaction of semivolatile first generation products and hydroxyl radicals. Actually, there were no indications for OH induced oxidation of compounds in the condensed phase. The consequences of these results will be discussed in the contribution. 1. Rudich, Y., N.M. Donahue, and T.F. Mentel

  17. Investigation of some biologically relevant redox reactions using electrochemical mass spectrometry interfaced by desorption electrospray ionization

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mei; Wolff, Chloe; Cui, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    Recently we have shown that, as a versatile ionization technique, desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) can serve as a useful interface to combine electrochemistry (EC) with mass spectrometry (MS). In this study, the EC/DESI-MS method has been further applied to investigate some aqueous phase redox reactions of biological significance, including the reduction of peptide disulfide bonds and nitroaromatics as well as the oxidation of phenothiazines. It was found that knotted/enclosed disulfide bonds in the peptides apamin and endothelin could be electrochemically cleaved. Subsequent tandem MS analysis of the resulting reduced peptide ions using collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-capture dissociation (ECD) gave rise to extensive fragment ions, providing a fast protocol for sequencing peptides with complicated disulfide bond linkages. Flunitrazepam and clonazepam, a class of nitroaromatic drugs, are known to undergo reduction into amines which was proposed to involve nitroso and N-hydroxyl intermediates. Now in this study, these corresponding intermediate ions were successfully intercepted and their structures were confirmed by CID. This provides mass spectrometric evidence for the mechanism of the nitro to amine conversion process during nitroreduction, an important redox reaction involved in carcinogenesis. In addition, the well-known oxidation reaction of chlorpromazine was also examined. The putative transient one-electron transfer product, the chlorpromazine radical cation (m/z 318), was captured by MS, for the first time, and its structure was also verified by CID. In addition to these observations, some features of the DESI-interfaced electrochemical mass spectrometry were discussed, such as simple instrumentation and the lack of background signal. These results further demonstrate the feasibility of EC/DESI-MS for the study of the biology-relevant redox chemistry and would find applications in proteomics and drug development research. PMID

  18. Online Investigation of Aqueous-Phase Electrochemical Reactions by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mei; Liu, Yong; Helmy, Roy; Martin, Gary E; Dewald, Howard D; Chen, Hao

    2015-10-01

    Electrochemistry (EC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool for elucidation of electrochemical reaction mechanisms. However, direct online analysis of electrochemical reaction in aqueous phase was rarely explored. This paper presents the online investigation of several electrochemical reactions with biological relevance in the aqueous phase, such as nitrosothiol reduction, carbohydrate oxidation, and carbamazepine oxidation using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). It was found that electroreduction of nitrosothiols [e.g., nitrosylated insulin B (13-23)] leads to free thiols by loss of NO, as confirmed by online MS analysis for the first time. The characteristic mass shift of 29 Da and the reduced intensity provide a quick way to identify nitrosylated species. Equally importantly, upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the reduced peptide ion produces more fragment ions than its nitrosylated precursor ion (presumably the backbone fragmentation cannot compete with the facile NO loss for the precursor ion), thus facilitating peptide sequencing. In the case of saccharide oxidation, it was found that glucose undergoes electro-oxidation to produce gluconic acid at alkaline pH, but not at neutral and acidic pHs. Such a pH-dependent electrochemical behavior was also observed for disaccharides such as maltose and cellobiose. Upon electrochemical oxidation, carbamazepine was found to undergo ring contraction and amide bond cleavage, which parallels the oxidative metabolism observed for this drug in leucocytes. The mechanistic information of these redox reactions revealed by EC/DESI-MS would be of value in nitroso-proteome research and carbohydrate/drug metabolic studies. PMID:26242804

  19. Online Investigation of Aqueous-Phase Electrochemical Reactions by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mei; Liu, Yong; Helmy, Roy; Martin, Gary E.; Dewald, Howard D.; Chen, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Electrochemistry (EC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool for elucidation of electrochemical reaction mechanisms. However, direct online analysis of electrochemical reaction in aqueous phase was rarely explored. This paper presents the online investigation of several electrochemical reactions with biological relevance in the aqueous phase, such as nitrosothiol reduction, carbohydrate oxidation, and carbamazepine oxidation using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). It was found that electroreduction of nitrosothiols [e.g., nitrosylated insulin B (13-23)] leads to free thiols by loss of NO, as confirmed by online MS analysis for the first time. The characteristic mass shift of 29 Da and the reduced intensity provide a quick way to identify nitrosylated species. Equally importantly, upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the reduced peptide ion produces more fragment ions than its nitrosylated precursor ion (presumably the backbone fragmentation cannot compete with the facile NO loss for the precursor ion), thus facilitating peptide sequencing. In the case of saccharide oxidation, it was found that glucose undergoes electro-oxidation to produce gluconic acid at alkaline pH, but not at neutral and acidic pHs. Such a pH-dependent electrochemical behavior was also observed for disaccharides such as maltose and cellobiose. Upon electrochemical oxidation, carbamazepine was found to undergo ring contraction and amide bond cleavage, which parallels the oxidative metabolism observed for this drug in leucocytes. The mechanistic information of these redox reactions revealed by EC/DESI-MS would be of value in nitroso-proteome research and carbohydrate/drug metabolic studies.

  20. Development of Laser Desorption Imaging Mass Spectrometry Methods to Investigate the Molecular Composition of Latent Fingermarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauzon, Nidia; Dufresne, Martin; Chauhan, Vinita; Chaurand, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    For a century, fingermark analysis has been one of the most important and common methods in forensic investigations. Modern chemical analysis technologies have added the potential to determine the molecular composition of fingermarks and possibly identify chemicals a suspect may have come into contact with. Improvements in analytical detection of the molecular composition of fingermarks is therefore of great importance. In this regard, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and laser desorption ionization (LDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) have proven to be useful technologies for fingermark analysis. In these analyses, the choice of ionizing agent and its mode of deposition are critical steps for the identification of molecular markers. Here we propose two novel and complementary IMS approaches for endogenous and exogenous substance detection in fingermarks: sublimation of 2-mercaptobenzothiazol (2-MBT) matrix and silver sputtering.

  1. Development of laser desorption imaging mass spectrometry methods to investigate the molecular composition of latent fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Lauzon, Nidia; Dufresne, Martin; Chauhan, Vinita; Chaurand, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    For a century, fingermark analysis has been one of the most important and common methods in forensic investigations. Modern chemical analysis technologies have added the potential to determine the molecular composition of fingermarks and possibly identify chemicals a suspect may have come into contact with. Improvements in analytical detection of the molecular composition of fingermarks is therefore of great importance. In this regard, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and laser desorption ionization (LDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) have proven to be useful technologies for fingermark analysis. In these analyses, the choice of ionizing agent and its mode of deposition are critical steps for the identification of molecular markers. Here we propose two novel and complementary IMS approaches for endogenous and exogenous substance detection in fingermarks: sublimation of 2-mercaptobenzothiazol (2-MBT) matrix and silver sputtering. PMID:25846823

  2. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Saetveit, Nathan Joe

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 μg L-1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 μL injection in a physiological saline matrix.

  3. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

  4. Investigation of PARP-1, PARP-2, and PARG interactomes by affinity-purification mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) catalyze the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr), a post-translational modification involved in several important biological processes, namely surveillance of genome integrity, cell cycle progression, initiation of the DNA damage response, apoptosis, and regulation of transcription. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), on the other hand, catabolizes pADPr and thereby accounts for the transient nature of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Our investigation of the interactomes of PARP-1, PARP-2, and PARG by affinity-purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) aimed, on the one hand, to confirm current knowledge on these interactomes and, on the other hand, to discover new protein partners which could offer insights into PARPs and PARG functions. Results PARP-1, PARP-2, and PARG were immunoprecipitated from human cells, and pulled-down proteins were separated by gel electrophoresis prior to in-gel trypsin digestion. Peptides were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Our AP-MS experiments resulted in the identifications of 179 interactions, 139 of which are novel interactions. Gene Ontology analysis of the identified protein interactors points to five biological processes in which PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARG may be involved: RNA metabolism for PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARG; DNA repair and apoptosis for PARP-1 and PARP-2; and glycolysis and cell cycle for PARP-1. Conclusions This study reveals several novel protein partners for PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARG. It provides a global view of the interactomes of these proteins as well as a roadmap to establish the systems biology of poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism. PMID:20388209

  5. Investigating a novel protein using mass spectrometry: the example of tumor differentiation factor (TDF).

    PubMed

    Woods, Alisa G; Sokolowska, Izabela; Deinhardt, Katrin; Darie, Costel C

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of central nervous system (CNS) molecules can include the identification of new molecules and their receptor systems. Discovery of novel proteins and elucidation of receptor targets can be accomplished using mass spectrometry (MS). We describe a case study of such a molecule, which our lab has studied using MS in combination with other protein identification techniques, such as immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting. This molecule is known as tumor differentiation factor (TDF), a recently-found protein secreted by the pituitary into the blood. TDF mRNA has been detected in brain; not heart, placenta, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, or pancreas. Currently TDF has an unclear function, and prior to our studies, its localization was only minimally understood, with no understanding of receptor targets. We investigated the distribution of TDF in the rat brain using IHC and immunofluorescence (IF). TDF protein was detected in pituitary and most other brain regions, in specific neurons but not astrocytes. We found TDF immunoreactivity in cultured neuroblastoma, not astrocytoma. These data suggest that TDF is localized to neurons, not to astrocytes. Our group also conducted studies to identify the TDF receptor (TDF-R). Using LC-MS/MS and Western blotting, we identified the members of the Heat Shock 70-kDa family of proteins (HSP70) as potential TDF-R candidates in both MCF7 and BT-549 human breast cancer cells (HBCC) and PC3, DU145, and LNCaP human prostate cancer cells (HPCC), but not in HeLa cells, NG108 neuroblastoma, or HDF-a and BLK CL.4 cell fibroblasts or fibroblast-like cells. These studies have combined directed protein identification techniques with mass spectrometry to increase our understanding of a novel protein that may have distinct actions as a hormone in the body and as a growth factor in the brain. PMID:24952200

  6. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  7. Thin-layer chromatography/desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: investigation of goldenseal alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2007-04-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was investigated as a means to qualitatively identify and to quantify analytes directly from developed normal-phase thin-layer chromatography plates. The atmospheric sampling capillary of a commercial ion trap mass spectrometer was extended to permit sampling and ionization of analytes in bands separated on intact TLC plates (up to 10 cmx10 cm). A surface positioning software package and the appropriate hardware enabled computer-controlled surface scanning along the length of development lanes or at fixed Rf value across the plates versus the stationary desorption electrospray emitter. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and related alkaloids and commercial dietary supplements were used as standards and samples. Alkaloid standards and samples were spotted and separated on aluminum- or glass-backed plates using established literature methods. The mass spectral signal levels as a function of desorption spray solvent were investigated with acetonitrile proving superior to methanol. The detection levels (approximately 5 ng each or 14-28 pmol) in mass spectral full-scan mode were determined statistically from the calibration curves (2.5-100 pmol) for the standards berberine, palmatine, and hydrastinine spotted as a mixture and separated on the plates. Qualitative screening of the major alkaloids present in six different over-the-counter "goldenseal" dietary supplements was accomplished by obtaining full-scan mass spectra during surface scans along the development lane in the direction of increasing Rf value. In one sample, alkaloids were detected that strongly suggested the presence of at least one additional herb undeclared on the product label. These same data indicated the misidentification of one of the alkaloids in the TLC literature. Quantities of the alkaloids present in two of the samples determined using the mass spectral data were in reasonable agreement with the label values, indicating the quantitative

  8. INVESTIGATION OF ARSINE-GENERATING REACTIONS USING DEUTERIUM-LABELED REAGENTS AND MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectrometry was used to detect transfer of deuterium from labeled reagents to arsines following hydride-generation reactions. The arsine gases liberated from the reactions of arsenite, arsenate, methylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid with HC1 and NaBD4 in H2O, or with...

  9. Investigation of palladium and platinum levels in food by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frazzoli, Chiara; Cammarone, Roberta; Caroli, Sergio

    2007-05-01

    Over the last two decades, there has been increased concern regarding the impact of some noble metals, such as Pd and Pt, on human health. These elements pollute the environment due to their widespread use as catalytic converters and in medical applications. The risk they pose to human health and the environment is still controversial; however, literature data point to diet as an important source of uptake by the human body. Within this context, the total Pd and Pt content of several Italian food commodities has been investigated. A total of 90 samples, including flour products, vegetables and foodstuffs of animal origin (meat, milk and eggs), were collected and freeze-dried. Samples were analyzed by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) after chopping or crushing followed by freeze-drying and microwave (MW)-assisted acid digestion in a Class-100 clean-room. A mathematical approach was adopted to correct the mass signals for still unresolved interference (mDeltam = 300, 10 000). The lowest and highest concentrations of Pt, i.e. 17 and 93 ng kg(-1) (dry weight, dw), were found in vegetables and flour products, respectively. The lowest Pd level (2830 ng kg(-1) dw) was found in eggs and the highest (47 800 ng kg(-1) dw) in vegetables. PMID:17487666

  10. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  11. High resolution mass spectrometry to investigate omeprazole and venlafaxine metabolites in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Boix, Clara; Ibáñez, María; Bagnati, Renzo; Zuccato, Ettore; Sancho, Juan V; Hernández, Félix; Castiglioni, Sara

    2016-01-25

    This study reports an investigation of omeprazole and venlafaxine parent substances and metabolites in Italian municipal influent wastewaters (IWWs). These pharmaceuticals were selected because they are widely consumed in Italy, but are poorly detected in waste and surface water. The aim of the study was to identify the most relevant pharmaceuticals metabolites in wastewater in order to improve the prioritization step and choose priority pollutants for environmental monitoring campaigns. This was done by investigating omeprazole, venlafaxine and their main metabolites in 30 IWWs from ten Italian cities and by comparing results with information from pharmacokinetic studies. Analysis was performed by solid phase extraction (SPE) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). We searched for 23 omeprazole and four venlafaxine metabolites using data-dependent and MS/MS methods. Parent omeprazole was never present in the samples. Six omeprazole metabolites were found in IWWs. Venlafaxine and two metabolites were present in all the samples. The metabolic profiles in Italian IWW agreed with results in IWW from Spain and with urinary excretion profiles from pharmacokinetic studies. Comparing results from different sources was useful to improve the identification of pharmaceuticals metabolites in environmental samples and to focus the attention of future studies on the most relevant compounds. PMID:26476321

  12. Investigation of the biotransformation of osthole by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Chan, Wan

    2013-02-23

    Osthole is an active ingredient and one of the major coumarin compounds that were identified in the genus Cnidium moonnieri (L.) Cussion, the fruit of which was used as traditional Chinese medicine to treat male impotence, ringworm infection and blood stasis conventionally. Recent studies revealed that osthole has diverse pharmacological effects, such as improving male sexual dysfunction, anti-diabetes, and anti-hypertentions. The inhibition of thrombosis and platelet aggregation and protection of central nerve were also observed. On the other hand, the metabolism of osthole has not yet been investigated thoroughly. Herein the biotransformation of osthole in rat was investigated after oral administration of osthole by using efficient and sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF/MS). Eighteen osthole metabolites and the parent drug were detected and identified in rat urine. Fourteen metabolites of osthole were identified and characterized for the first time. Structures of metabolites of osthole were elucidated by comparing fragment pattern under MS/MS scan and change of molecular weight with those of osthole. The main phase I metabolic pathways were summed as 7-demethylation, 8-dehydrogenation, hydroxylation on coumarin and 3,4-epoxide. Sulfate conjugates were detected as phase II metabolites of osthole. PMID:23245246

  13. Forensic Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William D; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques. PMID:26070716

  14. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  15. Investigation of a measure of robustness in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makonnen, Yoseif; Beauchemin, Diane

    2015-01-01

    In industrial/commercial settings where operators often have minimal expertise in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS), there is a prevalent need for a response factor indicating robust plasma conditions, which is analogous to the Mg II/Mg I ratio in ICP optical emission spectrometry (OES), whereby a Mg II/Mg I ratio of 10 constitutes robust conditions. While minimizing the oxide ratio usually corresponds to robust conditions, there is no specific target value that is widely accepted as indicating robust conditions. Furthermore, tuning for low oxide ratios does not necessarily guarantee minimal matrix effects, as they really address polyatomic interferences. From experiments, conducted in parallel for both MS and OES, there were some element pairs of similar mass and very different ionization potential that were exploited for such a purpose, the rationale being that, if these elements were ionized to the same extent, then that could be indicative of a robust plasma. The Be II/Li I intensity ratio was directly related to the Mg II/Mg I ratio in OES. Moreover, the 9Be+/7Li+ ratio was inversely related to the CeO+/Ce+ and LaO+/La+ oxide ratios in MS. The effects of different matrices (i.e. 0.01-0.1 M Na) were also investigated and compared to a conventional argon plasma optimized for maximum sensitivity. The suppression effect of these matrices was significantly reduced, if not eliminated in the case of 0.01 M Na, when the 9Be+/7Li+ ratio was around 0.30 on the Varian 820 MS instrument. Moreover, a very similar ratio (0.28) increased robustness to the same extent on a completely different ICP-MS instrument (PerkinElmer NEXION). Much greater robustness was achieved using a mixed-gas plasma with nitrogen in the outer gas and either nitrogen or hydrogen as a sheathing gas, as the 9Be+/7Li+ ratio was then around 1.70. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on using a simple analyte intensity ratio, 9Be+/7Li+, to gauge plasma robustness.

  16. Plasma Lipidomics Investigation of Hemodialysis Effects by Using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lichao; Hu, Chunxiu; Liu, Shuxin; Chang, Ming; Gao, Peng; Wang, Lili; Pan, Zaifa; Xu, Guowang

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been a global health problem that has a great possibility of being developed into uremia in the end. Hemodialysis (HD) is the most commonly used strategy for treating uremic patients; however, the patients still have a high risk of suffering various complications. It is well recognized that lipid disorder usually occurs in maintenance HD patients. To systemically study the effects of HD on lipid metabolism associated with uremia, we employed an ultraperformance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS)-based lipidomics method. A total of 87 human plasma samples from patients with prehemodialysis (pre-HD)/posthemodialysis (post-HD) treatment and the healthy controls were enrolled in the study. As compared with pre-HD patients, many plasma lipids showed significant changes (p < 0.05) in patients receiving HD therapy. Specifically, sum of free fatty acids (FFA) as well as saturated FFA and eicosanoids and sums of lyso-phosphatidylinositols and lyso-phosphatidylethanolamines, FFA 16:1/FFA 16:0, and FFA 18:1/FFA 18:0 were obviously higher in the pre-HD group than in the controls while they were significantly lower in patients after HD. These results indicated that UPLC-Q-TOF/MS-based lipidomics is a promising approach to investigate lipid alterations in relation to uremia and it is helpful to understand complex complications involved in HD patients. PMID:27151145

  17. Experimental investigations of trimer ion contributions in the low resolution mass spectrometry of hydrogen isotope mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bidica, Nicolae

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on some preliminary experimental results of a work in progress regarding a problem involving the quantitative analysis of hydrogen isotopes by mass spectrometry of low resolution: the triatomic (trimer) ions interferences with the isotopic hydrogen species having the same mass/charge. These results indicate that, in complex mixtures of hydrogen isotopes, trimer ions are strongly affected by the presence of other species, and a new approach that takes into account the destruction mechanism of trimer ions is necessary for a proper determination of their contributions. PMID:23149602

  18. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  19. Protein and Peptide Composition of Male Accessory Glands of Apis mellifera Drones Investigated by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, Vladimir; Blenau, Wolfgang; Koeniger, Gudrun; Römpp, Andreas; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    In honeybees, reproductive females usually mate early in their life with more than 10 males in free flight, often within 10 minutes, and then store male gametes for up to five years. Because of the extreme polyandry and mating in free flight special adaptations in males are most likely. We present here the results of an investigation of the protein content of four types of male reproductive glands from the Western honeybee (Apis mellifera) drone, namely seminal vesicles (secretion in ejaculate), as well as bulbus, cornua and mucus glands (secretions for the mating plug). Using high resolution and accuracy mass spectrometry and a combination of database searching and de novo sequencing techniques it was possible to identify 50 different proteins in total, inside all mentioned glands, except in the mucus gland. Most of the proteins are unique for a specific gland type, only one of them (H9KEY1/ATP synthase subunit O) was found in three glands, and 7 proteins were found in two types of glands. The identified proteins represent a wide variety of biological functions and can be assigned to several physiological classes, such as protection, energy generation, maintaining optimal conditions, associated mainly with vesicula seminalis; signaling, cuticle proteins, icarpin and apolipoproteins located mainly in the bulbus and cornua glands; and some other classes. Most of the discovered proteins were not found earlier during investigation of semen, seminal fluid and tissue of reproductive glands of the bee drone. Moreover, we provide here the origin of each protein. Thus, the presented data might shed light on the role of each reproductive gland. PMID:25955586

  20. Protein and Peptide Composition of Male Accessory Glands of Apis mellifera Drones Investigated by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gorshkov, Vladimir; Blenau, Wolfgang; Koeniger, Gudrun; Römpp, Andreas; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    In honeybees, reproductive females usually mate early in their life with more than 10 males in free flight, often within 10 minutes, and then store male gametes for up to five years. Because of the extreme polyandry and mating in free flight special adaptations in males are most likely. We present here the results of an investigation of the protein content of four types of male reproductive glands from the Western honeybee (Apis mellifera) drone, namely seminal vesicles (secretion in ejaculate), as well as bulbus, cornua and mucus glands (secretions for the mating plug). Using high resolution and accuracy mass spectrometry and a combination of database searching and de novo sequencing techniques it was possible to identify 50 different proteins in total, inside all mentioned glands, except in the mucus gland. Most of the proteins are unique for a specific gland type, only one of them (H9KEY1/ATP synthase subunit O) was found in three glands, and 7 proteins were found in two types of glands. The identified proteins represent a wide variety of biological functions and can be assigned to several physiological classes, such as protection, energy generation, maintaining optimal conditions, associated mainly with vesicula seminalis; signaling, cuticle proteins, icarpin and apolipoproteins located mainly in the bulbus and cornua glands; and some other classes. Most of the discovered proteins were not found earlier during investigation of semen, seminal fluid and tissue of reproductive glands of the bee drone. Moreover, we provide here the origin of each protein. Thus, the presented data might shed light on the role of each reproductive gland. PMID:25955586

  1. An ion mobility-mass spectrometry investigation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenauer, Matthew R.; Leary, Julie A.

    2009-10-01

    In the present article we describe the gas-phase dissociation behavior of the dimeric form of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) using quadrupole-traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-time of flight mass spectrometry (q-TWIMS-TOF MS) (Waters Synapt(TM)). Through investigation of the 9+ charge state of the dimer, we were able to monitor dissociation product ion (monomer) formation as a function of activation energy. Using ion mobility, we were able to observe precursor ion structural changes occurring throughout the activation process. Arrival time distributions (ATDs) for the 5+ monomeric MCP-1 product ions, derived from the gas-phase dissociation of the 9+ dimer, were then compared with ATDs obtained for the 5+ MCP-1 monomer isolated directly from solution. The results show that the dissociated monomer is as compact as the monomer arising from solution, regardless of the trap collision energy (CE) used in the dissociation. The solution-derived monomer, when collisionally activated, also resists significant unfolding within measure. Finally, we compared the collisional activation data for the MCP-1 dimer with an MCP-1 dimer non-covalently bound to a single molecule of the semi-synthetic glycosaminoglycan (GAG) analog Arixtra(TM); the latter a therapeutic anti-thrombin III-activating pentasaccharide. We observed that while dimeric MCP-1 dissociated at relatively low trap CEs, the Arixtra-bound dimer required much higher energies, which also induced covalent bond cleavage in the bound Arixtra molecule. Both the free and Arixtra-bound dimers became less compact and exhibited longer arrival times with increasing trap CEs, albeit the Arixtra-bound complex at slightly higher energies. That both dimers shifted to longer arrival times with increasing activation energy, while the dissociated MCP-1 monomers remained compact, suggests that the longer arrival times of the Arixtra-free and Arixtra-bound dimers may represent a partial breach of non

  2. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  3. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  4. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  5. Mass spectrometry of large complexes.

    PubMed

    Bich, Claudia; Zenobi, Renato

    2009-10-01

    Mass spectrometry is becoming a more and more powerful tool for investigating protein complexes. Recent developments, based on different ionization techniques, electrospray, desorption/ionization and others are contributing to the usefulness of MS to describe the organization and structure of large non-covalent assemblies. PMID:19782560

  6. Investigation by Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Biomarker Candidates for Aging in the Hair Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Michihiko Luca; Onoue, Kenji; Takahashi, Tsukasa; Goto, Kensuke; Saito, Yusuke; Inami, Katsuaki; Makita, Ippei; Angata, Yurika; Suzuki, Tomomi; Yamashita, Mihi; Sato, Narumi; Nakamura, Saki; Yuki, Dai; Sugiura, Yuki; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Shimomura, Yutaka; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2011-01-01

    Background Human hair is one of the essential components that define appearance and is a useful source of samples for non-invasive biomonitoring. We describe a novel application of imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) of hair biomolecules for advanced molecular characterization and a better understanding of hair aging. As a cosmetic and biomedical application, molecules whose levels in hair altered with aging were comprehensively investigated. Methods Human hair was collected from 15 young (20±5 years old) and 15 older (50±5 years old) volunteers. Matrix-free laser desorption/ionization IMS was used to visualize molecular distribution in the hair sections. Hair-specific ions displaying a significant difference in the intensities between the 2 age groups were extracted as candidate markers for aging. Tissue localization of the molecules and alterations in their levels in the cortex and medulla in the young and old groups were determined. Results Among the 31 molecules detected specifically in hair sections, 2—one at m/z 153.00, tentatively assigned to be dihydrouracil, and the other at m/z 207.04, identified to be 3,4-dihydroxymandelic acid (DHMA)—exhibited a higher signal intensity in the young group than in the old, and 1 molecule at m/z 164.00, presumed to be O-phosphoethanolamine, displayed a higher intensity in the old group. Among the 3, putative O-phosphoethanolamine showed a cortex-specific distribution. The 3 molecules in cortex presented the same pattern of alteration in signal intensity with aging, whereas those in medulla did not exhibit significant alteration. Conclusion Three molecules whose levels in hair altered with age were extracted. While they are all possible markers for aging, putative dihydrouracil and DHMA, are also suspected to play a role in maintaining hair properties and could be targets for cosmetic supplementation. Mapping of ion localization in hair by IMS is a powerful method to extract biomolecules in specified regions and determine

  7. Biological Cluster Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Winograd, Nicholas; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the new physics and new applications of secondary ion mass spectrometry using cluster ion probes. These probes, particularly C60, exhibit enhanced molecular desorption with improved sensitivity owing to the unique nature of the energy-deposition process. In addition, these projectiles are capable of eroding molecular solids while retaining the molecular specificity of mass spectrometry. When the beams are microfocused to a spot on the sample, bioimaging experiments in two and three dimensions are feasible. We describe emerging theoretical models that allow the energy-deposition process to be understood on an atomic and molecular basis. Moreover, experiments on model systems are described that allow protocols for imaging on biological materials to be implemented. Finally, we present recent applications of imaging to biological tissue and single cells to illustrate the future directions of this methodology. PMID:20055679

  8. MASS SPECTROMETRY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers applications of mass spectrometry to the environmental sciences. From the early applications of mass spectrometry to environmental research in the 1960s and 1970s, mass spectrometry has played an important role in aiding our understanding of environmental poll...

  9. Progress in epigenetic histone modification analysis by mass spectrometry for clinical investigations

    PubMed Central

    Önder, Özlem; Sidoli, Simone; Carroll, Martin; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin biology and epigenetics are scientific fields in rapid expansion due to their fundamental role in understanding cell development, heritable characters and progression of diseases. Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are major regulators of the epigenetic machinery, due to their ability to modulate gene expression, DNA repair and chromosome condensation. Large- scale strategies based on mass spectrometry have been impressively improved in the last decade, so that global changes of histone PTM abundances are quantifiable with nearly routine proteomics analyses and it is now possible to determine combinatorial patterns of modifications. Presented here is an overview of the most utilized and newly developed proteomics strategies for histone PTM characterization and a number of case studies where epigenetic mechanisms have been comprehensively characterized. Moreover, a number of current epigenetics therapies are illustrated, with an emphasis on cancer PMID:26400466

  10. MASS SPECTROMETRY-BASED METABOLOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Katja; Aronov, Pavel A.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the dynamically developing field of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolomics aims at the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of wide arrays of metabolites in biological samples. These numerous analytes have very diverse physico-chemical properties and occur at different abundance levels. Consequently, comprehensive metabolomics investigations are primarily a challenge for analytical chemistry and specifically mass spectrometry has vast potential as a tool for this type of investigation. Metabolomics require special approaches for sample preparation, separation, and mass spectrometric analysis. Current examples of those approaches are described in this review. It primarily focuses on metabolic fingerprinting, a technique that analyzes all detectable analytes in a given sample with subsequent classification of samples and identification of differentially expressed metabolites, which define the sample classes. To perform this complex task, data analysis tools, metabolite libraries, and databases are required. Therefore, recent advances in metabolomics bioinformatics are also discussed. PMID:16921475

  11. A new series of uranium isotope reference materials for investigating the linearity of secondary electron multipliers in isotope mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, S.; Alonso, A.; Aregbe, Y.; Eykens, R.; Kehoe, F.; Kühn, He; Kivel, N.; Verbruggen, A.; Wellum, R.; Taylor, P. D. P.

    2009-04-01

    A new series of gravimetrically prepared uranium isotope reference materials, the so-called IRMM-074 series, with the n(235U)/n(238U) isotope ratio held constant at unity and the n(233U)/n(238U) isotope ratios varying from 1.0 to 10-6 has been prepared and certified. This series is suited for calibration of secondary electron multipliers used widely in isotope mass spectrometry, in particular for techniques such as thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS). The new IRMM-074 was prepared as a replacement for the already exhausted IRMM-072 predecessor series. Uranium materials with high isotopic enrichments of 233U, 235U and 238U were purified using identical methods involving separation on anion and cation column followed by a precipitation as peroxide. The oxides were calcined to convert them to U3O8 simultaneously, in an oven installed in a glove-box that provided a controlled low-humidity environment. The oxides of 235U and 238U were weighed and mixed with a mole ratio n(235U)/n(238U) = 1.0 and then dissolved. The 233U oxide was dissolved to form a separate solution with the same concentration and 6rom this primary solution three dilutions were made by weighing. A weighed amount of the n(235U)/n(238U) solution and weighed amounts of the 233U solutions were mixed in various proportions in order to achieve n(233U)/n(238U) isotope ratios varying from 1.0 to 10-6. The methods for the preparation, the mixing and the mixing calculations are described. The expanded uncertainties (coverage factor k = 2) of the certified isotope ratios for the IRMM-074 series are 0.015% for the n(235U)/n(238U) ratio and 0.025% for the n(233U)/n(238U) ratios, which constitutes an improvement compared to those of the predecessor IRMM-072 series. In addition, recent observations regarding the linearity response of secondary electron multipliers (SEMs

  12. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers. PMID:26486514

  13. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  14. Investigation of bn-44 Peptide Fragments Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Isotope Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Yu, Jiayi; Wang, Huixin; Wei, Zhonglin; Guo, Xinhua; Xiao, Zhaohui; Zeng, Zhoufang; Kong, Wei

    2014-12-01

    An N-terminal deuterohemin-containing hexapeptide (DhHP-6) was designed as a short peptide cytochrome c (Cyt c) mimetic to study the effect of N-terminal charge on peptide fragmentation pathways. This peptide gave different dissociation patterns than normal tryptic peptides. Upon collision-induced dissociation (CID) with an ion trap mass spectrometer, the singly charged peptide ion containing no added proton generated abundant and characteristic bn-44 ions instead of bn-28 (an) ions. Studies by high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and isotope labeling indicate that elimination of 44 Da fragments from b ions occurs via two different pathways: (1) loss of CH3CHO (44.0262) from a Thr side chain; (2) loss of CO2 (43.9898) from the oxazolone structure in the C-terminus. A series of analogues were designed and analyzed. The experimental results combined with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations on the proton affinity of the deuteroporphyrin demonstrate that the production of these novel bn-44 ions is related to the N-terminal charge via a charge-remote rather than radical-directed fragmentation pathway.

  15. Mass spectrometry and renal calculi

    PubMed Central

    Purcarea, VL; Sisu, I; Sisu, E

    2010-01-01

    The present review represents a concise and complete survey of the literature covering 2004–2009, concerning the mass spectrometric techniques involved in the structural investigation of renal calculi. After a short presentation of the fundamental mass spectrometric techniques (MALDI–TOF, QTOF, MS–MS) as well as hyphenated methods (GC–MS, LC–MS, CE–MS), an extensive study of the urinary proteome analysis as well as the detection and quantification by mass spectrometry of toxins, drugs and metabolites from renal calculi is presented. PMID:20968197

  16. Investigation of silver binding to polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers by ESI tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Carolyn L; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2006-05-01

    Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) was used to probe the binding of silver ions and reduced silver species with polyamidoamine generation 1 amine-terminated (PAMAMG1NH2) and generation 2 hydroxyl-terminated (PAMAMG2OH) dendrimers. At Ag(+)/PAMAMG2OH molar ratios of 1, 2:1 and low abundance 3:1 complexes emerge. Similar results were observed for PAMAMG1NH2. The collisional activated dissociation (CAD) patterns of the dendrimer ions are characterized by losses of amidoamine branches resulting largely from hydrogen migration and cleavage reactions. Ag+/dendrimer complexes are characterized by the loss of a dendrimer branch from the complex, with the silver ion remaining bound to a dendrimer fragment. When the Ag+-bound dendrimer complexes are reduced by hydrazine, low abundance complexes, whose m/z values are consistent with ones containing zerovalent silver species, are observed in the mass spectra. Complexes with three silver atoms are observed in the spectrum containing PAMAMG1NH2, and complexes with four and five silver atoms are observed with PAMAMG2OH. The CAD fragmentation patterns of the complexes formed after the silver reduction are different than those observed for complexes containing one silver ion and are characterized by the ejection of all silver species, possibly as a cluster, leaving the intact dendrimer ion. Experiments with Cu+, Cu2+, and Pt2+ binding to PAMAMG2OH were also done, but reduced metal clusters were not observed in the mass spectra after the addition of hydrazine. PMID:16516486

  17. Investigation of isovaline enantiomeric excesses in CM meteorites using liquid chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2003-01-01

    The enantiomeric abundances of the alpha-dialkyl amino acid isovaline were measured in the CM2 meteorites Murchison and LEW 90500 using a new liquid chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-ToF-MS) technique coupled with OPA/NAC derivatization and UV fluorescence detection. Previous analyses of Murchison have shown that L-enantiomeric excesses of isovaline range from 0 to 15.2% with significant variation between meteorite fragments [1]. For this study, hot water extracts of interior fragments (> 2 cm from fusion crust) of the Murchison (USNM 6650.2, mass 6 g) and LEW 90500 (split 69, parent 1, mass 5 g) carbonaceous meteorites were analyzed. Enantiomeric excesses were measured using the single ion LC-ToF-MS trace for the OPA/NAC derivative of isovaline at d z 393.15 (Fig. 1). L-isovaline excesses in these meteorite samples ranged from 18.9 to 20.5% for Murchison and -0.5 to 3.0% for LEW 90500. The measured values for Murchison are the largest enantiomeric excesses for isovaline reported to date. The enantiomeric excesses of L-isovaline cannot be the result of interference from other C5 amino acid isomers present in the meteorites or terrestrial contamination from the landing site environments. The L-isovaline excesses in Murchison are inconsistent with the synthesis of all of the isovaline by the Strecker-cyanohydrin pathway on the CM meteorite parent body. The mechanism(s) for the formation of the enantiomeric asymmetry in isovaline in Murchison are currently unknown and it is not clear how the asymmetry of alpha-dialkyl amino acids could be transferred to the a-hydrogen protein amino acids common in all life on Earth today.

  18. Time-resolved measurements of individual ion cloud signals to investigate space-charge effects in plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Olesik, J W; Dziewatkoski, M P

    1996-04-01

    A new approach to directly monitor space charge induced effects due to high concentrations of efficiently ionized elements in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is described. The broadening of ion clouds produced from individual, monodisperse drops of sample is measured by using time-resolved ICP-MS. The extent of broadening due to high concentrations of Pb in the sample is related inversely to the analyte mass. For the lightest analyte investigated, Li(+), the relative width of the time-resolved analyte peak increases and then shows a dip in the center as the Pb concentration is increased to 500 and then 1500 µg/mL. The initial results of experiments that investigated chemical matrix effects as a function of concomitant species concentration, analyte mass, and sampling location in ICP-MS are consistent with space-charge effects. PMID:24203362

  19. Bioaffinity Mass Spectrometry Screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ben; Feng, Yun Jiang; Vu, Hoan; McCormick, Brendan; Rowley, Jessica; Pedro, Liliana; Crowther, Gregory J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Forster, Paul I; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-02-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS or ESI-FTMS) was used to screen 192 natural product extracts and a 659-member natural product-based fragment library for bindings to a potential malaria drug target, Plasmodium falciparum Rab11a (PfRab11a, PF13_0119). One natural product extract and 11 fragments showed binding activity. A new natural product, arborside E, was identified from the active extract of Psydrax montigena as a weak binder. Its binding activity and inhibitory activity against PfRab11a were confirmed by ESI-FTMS titration experiments and an orthogonal enzyme assay. PMID:26773071

  20. Quantitative biomedical mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leenheer, Andrép; Thienpont, Linda M.

    1992-09-01

    The scope of this contribution is an illustration of the capabilities of isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) for quantification of target substances in the biomedical field. After a brief discussion of the general principles of quantitative MS in biological samples, special attention will be paid to new technological developments or trends in IDMS from selected examples from the literature. The final section will deal with the use of IDMS for accuracy assessment in clinical chemistry. Methodological aspects considered crucial for avoiding sources of error will be discussed.

  1. Investigation of Phycobilisome Subunit Interaction Interfaces by Coupled Cross-linking and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Ofir; Trabelcy, Beny; Gerchman, Yoram; Adir, Noam

    2014-01-01

    The phycobilisome (PBS) is an extremely large light-harvesting complex, common in cyanobacteria and red algae, composed of rods and core substructures. These substructures are assembled from chromophore-bearing phycocyanin and allophycocyanin subunits, nonpigmented linker proteins and in some cases additional subunits. To date, despite the determination of crystal structures of isolated PBS components, critical questions regarding the interaction and energy flow between rods and core are still unresolved. Additionally, the arrangement of minor PBS components located inside the core cylinders is unknown. Different models of the general architecture of the PBS have been proposed, based on low resolution images from electron microscopy or high resolution crystal structures of isolated components. This work presents a model of the assembly of the rods onto the core arrangement and for the positions of inner core components, based on cross-linking and mass spectrometry analysis of isolated, functional intact Thermosynechococcus vulcanus PBS, as well as functional cross-linked adducts. The experimental results were utilized to predict potential docking interactions of different protein pairs. Combining modeling and cross-linking results, we identify specific interactions within the PBS subcomponents that enable us to suggest possible functional interactions between the chromophores of the rods and the core and improve our understanding of the assembly, structure, and function of PBS. PMID:25296757

  2. Calculating Relative Ionization Probabilities of Plutonium for Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry to Support Nuclear Forensic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensegrav, Craig; Smith, Craig; Isselhardt, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Ongoing work seeks to apply the technology of Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) to problems related to nuclear forensics and, in particular, to the analysis and quantification of debris from nuclear detonations. As part of this effort, modeling and simulation methods are being applied to analyze and predict the potential for ionization by laser excitation of isotopes of both uranium and plutonium. Early work focused on the ionization potential of isotopes of uranium, and the present effort has expanded and extended the previous work by identifying and integrating new data for plutonium isotopes. In addition to extending the effort to this important new element, we have implemented more accurate descriptions of the spatial distribution of the laser beams to improve the accuracy of model predictions compared with experiment results as well as an ability to readily incorporate new experimental data as they become available. The model is used to estimate ionization cross sections and to compare relative excitation on two isotopes as a function of wavelength. This allows the study of sensitivity of these measurements to fluctuations in laser wavelength, irradiance, and bandwidth. We also report on initial efforts to include predictions of americium ionization probabilities into our modeling package. I would like to thank my co-authors, Gamani Karunasiri and Fabio Alves. My success is a product of their support and guidance.

  3. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  4. Investigating the biology of alpha herpesviruses with mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Esteban A.; Song, Ren; Koyuncu, Orkide O.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are intracellular parasites that can only replicate and spread in cells of susceptible hosts. Alpha herpesviruses (α-HVs) contain double stranded DNA genomes of at least 120 kb, encoding for 70 or more genes. The viral genome is contained in an icosahedral capsid that is surrounded by a proteinaceous tegument layer and a lipid envelope. Infection starts in epithelial cells and spreads to the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In the natural host, α-HVs establish a chronic latent infection that can be reactivated, rarely spread to the central nervous system (CNS). In the non-natural host, viral infection will in most cases spread to the CNS with often fatal outcome. The host response plays a crucial role in the outcome of viral infection. α-HVs do not encode all the genes required for viral replication and spread. They need a variety of host gene products including RNA polymerase, ribosomes, dynein, and kinesin. As a result, the infected cell is dramatically different from the uninfected cell revealing a complex and dynamic interplay of viral and host components required to complete the virus life cycle. In this review, we describe the pivotal contribution of mass spectrometry-based proteomics (MSBP) studies over the past 15 years to understanding the complicated life cycle and pathogenesis of four α-HV species from the alphaherpesvirinae subfamily: Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), varicella zoster virus (VZV), pseudorabies virus (PRV) and bovine herpes virus (BHV-1). We describe the viral proteome dynamics during host infection and the host proteomic response to counteract such pathogens. PMID:25764121

  5. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  6. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heumann, Klaus G.

    1992-09-01

    In the past isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) has usually been applied using the formation of positive thermal ions of metals. Especially in calibrating other analytical methods and for the certification of standard reference materials this type of IDMS became a routine method. Today, the progress in this field lies in the determination of ultra trace amounts of elements, e.g. of heavy metals in Antarctic ice and in aerosols in remote areas down to the sub-pg g-1 and sub-pg m-3 levels respectively, in the analysis of uranium and thorium at concentrations of a few pg g-1 in sputter targets for the production of micro- electronic devices or in the determination of sub-picogram amounts of230Th in corals for geochemical age determinations and of226Ra in rock samples. During the last few years negative thermal ionization IDMS has become a frequently used method. The determination of very small amounts of selenium and technetium as well as of other transition metals such as vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and tungsten are important examples in this field. Also the measurement of silicon in connection with a re-determination of Avogadro's number and osmium analyses for geological age determinations by the Re/Os method are of special interest. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry is increasingly being used for multi-element analyses by the isotope dilution technique. Determinations of heavy metals in samples of marine origin are representative examples for this type of multi-element analysis by IDMS. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have also been successfully applied after chelation of metals (for example Pt determination in clinical samples) or for the determination of volatile element species in the environment, e.g. dimethyl sulfide. However, IDMS--specially at low concentration levels in the environment--seems likely to be one of the most powerful analytical methods for speciation in the future. This has been shown, up to now, for species of

  7. Aqueous phase oligomerization of α,β-unsaturated carbonyls and acids investigated using ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (IMS-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Pascal; Tlili, Sabrine; Ravier, Sylvain; Quivet, Etienne; Monod, Anne

    2016-04-01

    One of the current essential issues to unravel our ability to forecast future climate change and air quality, implies a better understanding of natural processes leading to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, and in particular the formation and fate of oligomers. The difficulty in characterizing macromolecules is to discern between large oxygenated molecules from series of oligomers containing repeated small monomers of diverse structures. In the present study, taking advantage from previously established radical vinyl oligomerization of methyl vinylketone (MVK) in the aqueous phase, where relatively simple oligomers containing up to 14 monomers were observed, we have investigated the same reactivity on several other unsaturated water soluble organic compounds (UWSOCs) and on a few mixtures of these precursor compounds. The technique used to characterize the formed oligomers was a traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry coupled to a hybrid quadrupole - time of flight mass spectrometer (IMS-MS) fitted with an electrospray source and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). The technique allows for an additional separation, especially for large ions, containing long carbon chains. We have shown the efficiency of the IMS-mass spectrometry technique to detect oligomers derived from MVK photooxidation in the aqueous phase. The results were then compared to other oligomers, derived from ten other individual biogenic UWSOCs. The technique allowed distinguishing between different oligomers arising from different precursors. It also clearly showed that compounds bearing a non-conjugated unsaturation did not provide oligomerization. Finally, it was shown that the IMS-mass spectrometry technique, applied to mixtures of unsaturated conjugated precursors, exhibited the ability of these precursors to co-oligomerize, i.e. forming only one complex oligomer system bearing monomers of different structures. The results are discussed in terms of atmospheric

  8. A systematic investigation of recovery in preparative reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Picariello, Wendy; Hosein, Nicole; Towle, Marc; Goetzinger, Wolfgang

    2006-06-30

    In this paper we report a systematic recovery study based on reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) separation and mass spectrometric (MS) based fractionation. Factors including a compound's physicochemical properties, column mass loading and presence of impurities were investigated through commercially available compounds. Results suggest that the delay time between MS peak detection and fraction collection, fraction detector's signal-to-noise ratio and compound's base peak width in the chromatogram have the biggest impacts on purification recovery. In an effort to assess sample recovery within our high throughput purification process, re-purification was performed on four compound libraries that were synthesized in-house. Reproducible recoveries (>80%) were achieved in all tests. PMID:16387320

  9. Investigating Types and Sources of Organic Aerosol in Rocky Mountain National Park Using Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurman, M. I.; Lee, T.; Sun, Y.; Schichtel, B. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur Study (RoMANS) focuses on identifying pathways and sources of nitrogen deposition in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP). Past work has combined measurements from a range of instrumentation such as annular denuders, PILS-IC, Hi-Vol samplers, and trace gas analyzers. Limited information from early RoMANS campaigns is available regarding organic aerosol. While prior measurements have produced a measure of total organic carbon mass, high time resolution measures of organic aerosol concentration and speciation are lacking. One area of particular interest is characterizing the types, sources, and amounts of organic nitrogen aerosol. Organic nitrogen measurements in RMNP wet deposition reveal a substantial contribution to the total reactive nitrogen deposition budget. In this study an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in summer 2010 at RMNP to investigate organic aerosol composition and its temporal variability. The species timeline and diurnal species variations are combined with meteorological data to investigate local transport events and chemistry; transport from the Colorado Front Range urban corridor appears to be more significant for inorganic species than for the overall organic aerosol mass. Considerable variation in organic aerosol concentration is observed (0.5 to 20 μg/m3), with high concentration episodes lasting between hours and two days. High resolution AMS data are analyzed for organic aerosol, including organic nitrogen species that might be expected from local biogenic emissions, agricultural activities, and secondary reaction products of combustion emissions. Positive matrix factorization reveals that semi-volatile oxidized OA, low-volatility oxidized OA, and biomass burning OA comprise most organic mass; the diurnal profile of biomass burning OA peaks at four and nine pm and may arise from local camp fires, while constant concentrations of

  10. Analytical strategy to investigate 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) metabolites in consumers' urine by high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, María; Pozo, Óscar J; Sancho, Juan V; Orengo, Teresa; Haro, Gonzalo; Hernández, Félix

    2016-01-01

    The potential of high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) for the investigation of human in vivo metabolism of 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) using urine collected from a consumer (this is, in non-controlled experiments) has been investigated. As a control sample was not available, the common approach based on the comparison of a control/blank sample and samples collected after drug intake could not be used. Alternatively, an investigation based on common fragmentation pathways was applied, assuming that most metabolites share some fragments with the parent drug. An extension of this approach was also applied based on the fragmentation pathway of those metabolites identified in urine samples in the first step. The use of MS(E) experiments (sequential acquisition of mass spectra at low and high collision energy) has been crucial to this aim as it allowed promoting fragmentation in the collision cell without any previous precursor ion selection. MDPV belongs to the group of new psychoactive substances (NPS), being known as the "cannibal drug". This substance is being abused more and more and is associated with dangerous side effects. The human metabolites (both phase I and phase II) were detected and tentatively identified by accurate mass full-spectrum measurements using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF MS). Following this strategy, up to 10 phase I metabolites, together with some glucuronides and sulphates, were detected and tentative structures were proposed. Several compounds identified in this work have not been previously reported in the literature. PMID:26476921

  11. Nanopore Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Joseph; Mihovilovic, Mirna; Maulbetsch, William; Frenchette, Layne; Moon, Wooyoung; Pruitt, Cole; Bazemore-Walker, Carthene; Weber, Peter; Stein, Derek

    2013-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterization of a nanopore-based ion source for mass spectrometry. Our goal is to field-extract ions directly from solution into the high vacuum to enable unit collection efficiency and temporal resolution of sequential ion emissions for DNA sequencing. The ion source features a capillary whose tip, measuring tens to hundreds of nanometers in inner diameter, is situated in the vacuum ~ 1.5 cm away from an extractor electrode. The capillary was filled with conductive solution and voltage-biased relative to the extractor. Applied voltages of hundreds of volts extracted tens to hundreds of nA of current from the tip. A mass analysis of the extracted ions showed primarily singly charged clusters comprising the cation or anion solvated by several solvent molecules. Our interpretation of these results, based on the works of Taylor and of de la Mora, is that the applied electric stresses distort the fluid meniscus into a Taylor cone, where electric fields reach ~ 1V/nm and induce significant ion evaporation. Accordingly, the abundances of extracted ionic clusters resemble a Boltzmann distribution. This work was supported by NIH grant NHGRI 1R21HG005100-01.

  12. Investigating the in vitro metabolism of fipexide: characterization of reactive metabolites using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sleno, Lekha; Staack, Roland F; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2007-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism of the nootropic drug fipexide was studied using different liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) techniques. This drug has been withdrawn from the market due to toxic effects. No previous reports have investigated the possible involvement of reactive metabolites in the toxicity of fipexide. The hydrolysis of this drug leads to the formation of two potentially toxic species, 3,4-methylenedioxybenzylpiperazine (MDBP) and 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (4-CPA). Here, we investigate the in vitro metabolism of fipexide in human, rat, mouse and dog, as well as of MDBP and 4-CPA in human and rat, while focusing on the formation of reactive metabolites. A combination of LC/MS analyses on a hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap instrument and accurate mass data from QqTOF measurements was employed for the characterization of these metabolites. Microsomal metabolites of fipexide were MDBP, 4-CPA, fipexide N-oxide or hydroxyl, demethylenated fipexide and other minor ones, all of which were investigated by tandem mass spectrometry. Reactive metabolites were detected using several trapping procedures with small molecules such as glutathione, its ethyl ester derivative and N-acetylcysteine. The demethylenated metabolite, a catechol, formed its corresponding ortho-quinone, which readily reacts with these nucleophiles. MDBP was studied in a similar manner, due to its ability to form an analogous catechol. Because of its acidic nature, 4-CPA was assessed for possible acylglucuronide and acyl-CoA thioester metabolites, which could also be involved in bioactivation pathways. Several important metabolites were identified as potential mediators of toxicity via protein binding. PMID:17577876

  13. A mass spectrometry primer for mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), a rapidly growing subfield of chemical imaging, employs mass spectrometry (MS) technologies to create single- and multi-dimensional localization maps for a variety of atoms and molecules. Complimentary to other imaging approaches, MSI provides high chemical specificity and broad analyte coverage. This powerful analytical toolset is capable of measuring the distribution of many classes of inorganics, metabolites, proteins and pharmaceuticals in chemically and structurally complex biological specimens in vivo, in vitro, and in situ. The MSI approaches highlighted in this Methods in Molecular Biology volume provide flexibility of detection, characterization, and identification of multiple known and unknown analytes. The goal of this chapter is to introduce investigators who may be unfamiliar with MS to the basic principles of the mass spectrometric approaches as used in MSI. In addition to guidelines for choosing the most suitable MSI method for specific investigations, cross-references are provided to the chapters in this volume that describe the appropriate experimental protocols. PMID:20680583

  14. A mass quadrupole spectrometry investigation on proton emission by nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caridi, F.

    2015-02-01

    A nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm and at an intensity of about 1010 W/cm2 was employed to irradiate hydrogenated polymers in vacuum. The produced plasma was characterized in terms of thermal and Coulomb interactions evaluating the equivalent temperature and the acceleration voltage developed in the non-equilibrium plasma core. Particles emission along the normal to the target surface was investigated by measuring, with the Hiden EQP 300 mass quadrupole spectrometer, ion energy distributions and fitting experimental data with the "Coulomb-Boltzmann-shifted" function. Time-of-flight technique was employed in order to measure the proton energy and yield. A comparison between experimental results is presented and discussed, with a special regard to the protons emission.

  15. A mass quadrupole spectrometry investigation on proton emission by nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Caridi, F.

    2015-02-15

    A nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm and at an intensity of about 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} was employed to irradiate hydrogenated polymers in vacuum. The produced plasma was characterized in terms of thermal and Coulomb interactions evaluating the equivalent temperature and the acceleration voltage developed in the non-equilibrium plasma core. Particles emission along the normal to the target surface was investigated by measuring, with the Hiden EQP 300 mass quadrupole spectrometer, ion energy distributions and fitting experimental data with the “Coulomb-Boltzmann-shifted” function. Time-of-flight technique was employed in order to measure the proton energy and yield. A comparison between experimental results is presented and discussed, with a special regard to the protons emission.

  16. Affinity purification and mass spectrometry: an attractive choice to investigate protein-protein interactions in plant immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Affinity purification of protein complexes from biological tissues, followed by liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry (AP-MS/MS), has ballooned in recent years due to sizeable increases in nucleic acid sequence data essential for interpreting mass spectra, improvements in affinity purifica...

  17. Investigating the effect of mixing ratio on molar mass distributions of synthetic polymers determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry using design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Heike; Ehmann, Thomas; Otto, Matthias

    2010-11-01

    It is well known that the mixing ratio affects the molar mass distribution of synthetic polymers determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Surely, the molar mixing ratio determines whether a mass spectrum will be obtained or not. However, depending on the mass range, several effects such as multimer formation occur, which might be a source of errors in molar mass distribution calculations. In this study, the effect of mixing ratio was investigated for several synthetic polymers, including polystyrene (PS), poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) using statistical designs of experiments. The 2(3) full factorial design was found to be suitable in the study of more than 1000 samples. The obtained MALDI mass spectra as well as the ANOVA statistics show that the mixing ratio affects the molar mass distribution. The optimal mixing ratio for a defined synthetic polymer depends on the studied combination (matrix, cationization reagent, solvent). PMID:20685132

  18. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Abu B; Dwivedi, Prabha; Tam, Maggie; Matz, Laura; Hill, Herbert H

    2008-01-01

    This review article compares and contrasts various types of ion mobility-mass spectrometers available today and describes their advantages for application to a wide range of analytes. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), when coupled with mass spectrometry, offers value-added data not possible from mass spectra alone. Separation of isomers, isobars, and conformers; reduction of chemical noise; and measurement of ion size are possible with the addition of ion mobility cells to mass spectrometers. In addition, structurally similar ions and ions of the same charge state can be separated into families of ions which appear along a unique mass-mobility correlation line. This review describes the four methods of ion mobility separation currently used with mass spectrometry. They are (1) drift-time ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS), (2) aspiration ion mobility spectrometry (AIMS), (3) differential-mobility spectrometry (DMS) which is also called field-asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and (4) traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). DTIMS provides the highest IMS resolving power and is the only IMS method which can directly measure collision cross-sections. AIMS is a low resolution mobility separation method but can monitor ions in a continuous manner. DMS and FAIMS offer continuous-ion monitoring capability as well as orthogonal ion mobility separation in which high-separation selectivity can be achieved. TWIMS is a novel method of IMS with a low resolving power but has good sensitivity and is well intergrated into a commercial mass spectrometer. One hundred and sixty references on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) are provided. PMID:18200615

  19. Photoionization mass spectrometry for the investigation of combustion generated nascent nanoparticles and their relation to laser induced incandescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotheer, H.-H.; Wolf, K.; Hoffmann, K.

    2011-08-01

    Premixed laminar flat ethylene flames were investigated for nascent nanoparticles through photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS). Using an atmospheric McKenna burner and ethylene air flames coupled to an atmospheric sampling system, within a relatively narrow C/O range two modes of these particles were found, which can be clearly distinguished with regard to their temperature dependence, their reactivity, and their ionization behaviour. Behind a diesel engine the same particles were observed. These results were corroborated using a low pressure ethylene-O2 flame coupled to a high resolution mass spectrometer. In this case, due to a special inlet system, it was possible to operate the flame in a fairly wide C/O range without clogging of the inlet nozzles. This allowed pursuing the development of particle size distribution functions (PSDF) well into the regime of mature soot. In addition, on the low mass side of the particle spectra measurements with unity resolution were possible and this allowed gaining information concerning their growth mechanism and structure. Finally, in an attempt to mimic Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) experiments the soot-laden molecular beam was exposed to IR irradiation. This resulted in a near complete destruction of nascent particles under LII typical fluences. Small C clusters between 3 and 17 C atoms were found. In addition and with much higher intensities, clusters comprising several hundreds of C atoms were also detected, the latter even at very low fluences when small clusters were totally absent.

  20. Investigations into the origins of polyatomic ions in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Sally M.

    2010-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) is an elemental analytical instrument capable of determining nearly all elements in the periodic table at limits of detection in the parts per quadrillion and with a linear analytical range over 8-10 orders of magnitude. Three concentric quartz tubes make up the plasma torch. Argon gas is spiraled through the outer tube and generates the plasma powered by a looped load coil operating at 27.1 or 40.6 MHz. The argon flow of the middle channel is used to keep the plasma above the innermost tube through which solid or aqueous sample is carried in a third argon stream. A sample is progressively desolvated, atomized and ionized. The torch is operated at atmospheric pressure. To reach the reduced pressures of mass spectrometers, ions are extracted through a series of two, approximately one millimeter wide, circular apertures set in water cooled metal cones. The space between the cones is evacuated to approximately one torr. The space behind the second cone is pumped down to, or near to, the pressure needed for the mass spectrometer (MS). The first cone, called the sampler, is placed directly in the plasma plume and its position is adjusted to the point where atomic ions are most abundant. The hot plasma gas expands through the sampler orifice and in this expansion is placed the second cone, called the skimmer. After the skimmer traditional MS designs are employed, i.e. quadrupoles, magnetic sectors, time-of-flight. ICP-MS is the leading trace element analysis technique. One of its weaknesses are polyatomic ions. This dissertation has added to the fundamental understanding of some of these polyatomic ions, their origins and behavior. Although mainly continuing the work of others, certain novel approaches have been introduced here. Chapter 2 includes the first reported efforts to include high temperature corrections to the partition functions of the polyatomic ions in ICP-MS. This and other objections to preceeding

  1. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  2. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, David J.; Nordholt, Jane E.

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  3. Investigating the Origin and Evolution of Venus with In Situ Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, M. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Johnson, N. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of noble gas abundances on Venus remain a high priority for planetary science. These studies are only possible through in situ measurement, and can be accomplished by a modern neutral mass spectrometer (NMS) such as that developed at NASA Goddard, based on flight-proven technology. Here we show how the measurement of noble gases can be secured using demonstrated enrichment techniques.

  4. Structure investigation of codeine drug using mass spectrometry, thermal analyses and semi-emperical molecular orbital (MO) calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayed, M. A.; Hawash, M. F.; Fahmey, M. A.

    2006-05-01

    Codeine is an analgesic with uses similar to morphine, but it has a mild sedative effect. It is preferable used as phosphate form and it is often administrated by mouth with aspirin or paracetamol. Therefore, it is important to investigate its structure to know the active groups and weak bonds responsible for its medical activity. Consequently in the present work, codeine was investigated by mass spectrometry and thermal analyses (TG, DTG and DTA) and confirming by semi-empirical MO-calculation (PM3 method) in the neutral and positively charged forms of the drug. Some results of studying the d-block element complexes of codeine were used to declare the relationship between drug structure and its chemical reactivity in vitro system. The mass spectra and thermal analyses fragmentation pathways were proposed and compared to each other to select the most suitable scheme representing the correct fragmentation of this drug. From EI mass spectra, the main primary cleavage site of the charged drug molecule is that due to β-cleavage to nitrogen atom in its skeleton. It occurs in two parallel mechanisms with the same possibility, i.e. no difference in appearance activation energy between them. In the neutral drug form the primary site cleavage is that occurs in the ether ring. Thermal analyses of the neutral form of the drug revealed the high response of the drug to the temperature variation with very fast rate. It decomposed in several sequential steps in the temperature range 200-600 °C. The initial thermal fragments are very similar to that obtained by mass spectrometric fragmentation. Therefore, comparison between mass and thermal helps in selection of the proper pathway representing the fragmentation of this drug. This comparison successfully confirmed by MOC. These calculations give the bond order, charge distribution, heat of formation and possible hybridization of some atoms in different position of the drug skeleton. This helps the successful choice of the weakest

  5. Investigating types and sources of organic aerosol in Rocky Mountain National Park using aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurman, M. I.; Lee, T.; Sun, Y.; Schichtel, B. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The environmental impacts of atmospheric particles are highlighted in remote areas where visibility and ecosystem health can be degraded by even relatively low particle concentrations. Submicron particle size, composition, and source apportionment were explored at Rocky Mountain National Park using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. This summer campaign found low average, but variable, particulate mass (PM) concentrations (max = 93.1 μg m-3, avg. = 5.13 ± 2.72 μg m-3) of which 75.2 ± 11.1% is organic. Low-volatility oxidized organic aerosol (LV-OOA, 39.3% of PM1 on average) identified using Positive Matrix Factorization appears to be mixed with ammonium sulfate (3.9% and 16.6% of mass, respectively), while semi-volatile OOA (27.6%) is correlated with ammonium nitrate (nitrate: 4.3%); concentrations of these mixtures are enhanced with upslope (SE) surface winds from the densely populated Front Range area, indicating the importance of transport. A local biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA, 8.4%) source is suggested by mass spectral cellulose combustion markers (m/z 60 and 73) limited to brief, high-concentration, polydisperse events (suggesting fresh combustion), a diurnal maximum at 22:00 local standard time when campfires were set at adjacent summer camps, and association with surface winds consistent with local campfire locations. The particle characteristics determined here represent typical summertime conditions at the Rocky Mountain site based on comparison to ~10 years of meteorological, particle composition, and fire data.

  6. Investigating types and sources of organic aerosol in Rocky Mountain National Park using aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurman, M. I.; Lee, T.; Sun, Y.; Schichtel, B. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2014-07-01

    The environmental impacts of atmospheric particles are highlighted in remote areas where visibility and ecosystem health can be degraded by even relatively low particle concentrations. Submicron particle size, composition, and source apportionment were explored at Rocky Mountain National Park using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. This summer campaign found low average, but variable, particulate mass (PM) concentrations (max = 93.1 μg m-3, avg. = 5.13 ± 2.72 μg m-3) of which 75.2 ± 11.1% is organic. Low-volatility oxidized organic aerosol (LV-OOA, 39.3% of PM1 on average) identified using Positive Matrix Factorization appears to be mixed with ammonium sulfate (3.9 and 16.6% of mass, respectively), while semi-volatile OOA (27.6%) is correlated with ammonium nitrate (nitrate: 4.3%); concentrations of these mixtures are enhanced with upslope (SE) surface winds from the densely populated Front Range area, indicating the importance of transport. A local biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA, 8.4%) source is suggested by mass spectral cellulose combustion markers (m/zs 60 and 73) limited to brief, high-concentration, polydisperse events (suggesting fresh combustion), a diurnal maximum at 22:00 local standard time (LST) when campfires were set at adjacent summer camps, and association with surface winds consistent with local campfire locations. The particle characteristics determined here represent typical summertime conditions at the Rocky Mountain site based on comparison to ∼10 years of meteorological, particle composition, and fire data.

  7. Investigating the Origin and Evolution of Venus with In Situ Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainer, M. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Johnson, N. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of noble gas abundances on Venus remain a high priority for planetary science [1,2]. These studies are only possible through in situ measurement, and can be accomplished by a modern neutral mass spectrometer (NMS) such as that developed at NASA Goddard, based on flight-proven technology. Here we show how the measurement of noble gases can be secured using demonstrated enrichment techniques.

  8. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  9. Investigations on the direct introduction of cigarette smoke for trace elements analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Michael J.; Naworal, John D.; Walker, Kathleen; Connell, Chris T.

    2003-11-01

    Direct introduction of mainstream cigarette smoke into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been investigated with respect to its feasibility for on-line analysis of trace elements. An automated apparatus was designed and built interfacing a smoking machine with an ICP-MS for smoke generation, collection, injection and analysis. Major and minor elements present in the particulate phase and the gas phase of mainstream cigarette smoke of 2R4F reference cigarettes have been qualitatively identified by examination of their full mass spectra. This method provides a rapid-screening analysis of the transfer of trace elements into mainstream smoke during cigarette combustion. A full suite of elements present in the whole cigarette smoke has been identified, including As, B, Ba, Br, Cd, Cl, Cs, Cu, Hg, I, K, Li, Mn, Na, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sn, Tl and Zn. Of these elements, the major portions of B, Ba, Cs, Cu, K, Li, Mn, Na, Pb, Rb, Sn, Tl and Zn are present in the particulate phase, whereas the major portion of Hg is present in the gas phase. As, Br, Cd, Cl, I and Sb exist in a distribution between the gas phase and the particulate phase. Depending on the element, the precision of measurement ranges from 5 to 25% in terms of relative standard deviation of peak height and peak area, based on the fourth puff of 2R4F mainstream cigarette smoke analyzed in five smoking replicates.

  10. Large-Scale Mass Spectrometry Imaging Investigation of Consequences of Cortical Spreading Depression in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreira, Ricardo J.; Shyti, Reinald; Balluff, Benjamin; Abdelmoula, Walid M.; van Heiningen, Sandra H.; van Zeijl, Rene J.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Ferrari, Michel D.; Tolner, Else A.; McDonnell, Liam A.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the electrophysiological correlate of migraine aura. Transgenic mice carrying the R192Q missense mutation in the Cacna1a gene, which in patients causes familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), exhibit increased propensity to CSD. Herein, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was applied for the first time to an animal cohort of transgenic and wild type mice to study the biomolecular changes following CSD in the brain. Ninety-six coronal brain sections from 32 mice were analyzed by MALDI-MSI. All MSI datasets were registered to the Allen Brain Atlas reference atlas of the mouse brain so that the molecular signatures of distinct brain regions could be compared. A number of metabolites and peptides showed substantial changes in the brain associated with CSD. Among those, different mass spectral features showed significant ( t-test, P < 0.05) changes in the cortex, 146 and 377 Da, and in the thalamus, 1820 and 1834 Da, of the CSD-affected hemisphere of FHM1 R192Q mice. Our findings reveal CSD- and genotype-specific molecular changes in the brain of FHM1 transgenic mice that may further our understanding about the role of CSD in migraine pathophysiology. The results also demonstrate the utility of aligning MSI datasets to a common reference atlas for large-scale MSI investigations.

  11. Large-scale mass spectrometry imaging investigation of consequences of cortical spreading depression in a transgenic mouse model of migraine.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Ricardo J; Shyti, Reinald; Balluff, Benjamin; Abdelmoula, Walid M; van Heiningen, Sandra H; van Zeijl, Rene J; Dijkstra, Jouke; Ferrari, Michel D; Tolner, Else A; McDonnell, Liam A; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2015-06-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the electrophysiological correlate of migraine aura. Transgenic mice carrying the R192Q missense mutation in the Cacna1a gene, which in patients causes familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), exhibit increased propensity to CSD. Herein, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was applied for the first time to an animal cohort of transgenic and wild type mice to study the biomolecular changes following CSD in the brain. Ninety-six coronal brain sections from 32 mice were analyzed by MALDI-MSI. All MSI datasets were registered to the Allen Brain Atlas reference atlas of the mouse brain so that the molecular signatures of distinct brain regions could be compared. A number of metabolites and peptides showed substantial changes in the brain associated with CSD. Among those, different mass spectral features showed significant (t-test, P < 0.05) changes in the cortex, 146 and 377 Da, and in the thalamus, 1820 and 1834 Da, of the CSD-affected hemisphere of FHM1 R192Q mice. Our findings reveal CSD- and genotype-specific molecular changes in the brain of FHM1 transgenic mice that may further our understanding about the role of CSD in migraine pathophysiology. The results also demonstrate the utility of aligning MSI datasets to a common reference atlas for large-scale MSI investigations. PMID:25877011

  12. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for investigation of backbone dynamics of oxidized and reduced cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Molnar, Kathleen S; Coales, Stephen J; OuYang, Bo; Simorellis, Alana K; Pochapsky, Thomas C

    2008-02-01

    Backbone dynamics of the camphor monoxygenase cytochrome P450(cam) (CYP101) as a function of oxidation/ligation state of the heme iron were investigated via hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/D exchange) as monitored by mass spectrometry. Main chain amide NH hydrogens can exchange readily with solvent and the rate of this exchange depends upon, among other things, dynamic fluctuations in local structural elements. A fluxional region of the polypeptide will exchange more quickly with solvent than one that is more constrained. In most regions of the enzyme, exchange rates were similar between oxidized high-spin camphor-bound and reduced camphor- and CO-bound CYP101 (CYP-S and CYP-S-CO, respectively). However, in regions of the protein that have previously been implicated in substrate access by structural and molecular dynamics investigations, the reduced enzyme shows significantly slower exchange rates than the oxidized CYP-S. This observation corresponds to increased flexibility of the oxidized enzyme relative to the reduced form. Structural features previously found to be perturbed in CYP-S-CO upon binding of the biologically relevant effector and reductant putidaredoxin (Pdx) as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance are also more protected from exchange in the reduced state. To our knowledge, this study represents the first experimental investigation of backbone dynamics within the P450 family using this methodology. PMID:18023482

  13. Investigation of protein-protein interactions in living cells by chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sinz, Andrea

    2010-08-01

    The identification of protein-protein interactions within their physiological environment is the key to understanding biological processes at the molecular level. However, the artificial nature of in vitro experiments, with their lack of other cellular components, may obstruct observations of specific cellular processes. In vivo analyses can provide information on the processes within a cell that might not be observed in vitro. Chemical crosslinking combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the covalently connected binding partners allows us to identify interacting proteins and to map their interface regions directly in the cell. In this paper, different in vivo crosslinking strategies for deriving information on protein-protein interactions in their physiological environment are described. PMID:20076950

  14. Instrumentation for mass spectrometry: 1997

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-08-01

    All mass spectrometry experiments involve the manipulation of material, an interface with the mass spectrometer, ionization, ion manipulation/analysis, detection and data collection/reduction. Each of these elements involve instrumentation. The wide range of species now amenable to mass spectrometry and the diverse areas of physical science in which it plays a role have led to a seemingly unlimited array of instrumental combinations. However, only a limited number of mass analyzers, and their combinations, dominate. The dominant analyzers include time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance, the Paul trap, the mass filter, and the sector mass spectrometer. Why there are so few (or so many, depending upon one`s point of view) can be understood upon consideration of a set of mass analyzer figures of merit. These include mass resolution, mass accuracy, mass range, dynamic range, abundance sensitivity, precision, efficiency, speed, MS{sup n} capability, compatibility with the ionizer, cost, and size. The most appropriate form of mass spectrometry is determined by the priorities of the particular measurement placed on the various mass analyzer characteristics and the relative strengths of the analyzers in meeting the requirements. Each of the analyzer types has a unique set of figures of merit that makes it optimally suited for particular applications. This paper discusses these figures of merit, provides data illustrating recent developments for each analyzer type, and gives the figures of merit of each type of analyzer as they stand in 1997. 101 refs., 24 figs.

  15. Atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry as a tool for the investigation of the hydrolysis reaction mechanisms of phosphite antioxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanastasiou, M.; McMahon, A. W.; Allen, N. S.; Johnson, B. W.; Keck-Antoine, K.; Santos, L.; Neumann, M. G.

    2008-08-01

    The hydrolysis reaction mechanism of phosphite antioxidants is investigated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The phosphites were chosen because they differed in chemical structure and phosphorus content. Dopant assisted-atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) is chosen as the ion source for the ionization of the compounds. In our previous work, DA-APPI was shown to offer an attractive alternative to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) since it provided background-ion free mass spectra and higher sensitivity [M. Papanastasiou, et al., Polymer Degradation and Stability 91 (11) (2006) 2675-2682]. In positive ion mode, the molecules are generally detected in their protonated form. In negative ion mode, the phosphites are unstable and only fragment ions are observed; these however, are characteristic of each phosphite and may be used for the identification of the analytes in complex mixtures. The analytes under investigation are exposed to accelerated humid ageing conditions and their hydrolytic pathway and stability is investigated. Different substituents around the phosphorus atom are shown to have a significant effect on the stability of the phosphites, with phenol substituents producing very hydrolytically stable structures. Alkanox P24 and PEP-36 follow a similar hydrolytic pathway via the scission of the first and then the second POphenol bonds, eventually leading to the formation of phenol, phosphorous acid and pentaerythritol as end products. HP-10 exhibits a rather different structure and the products detected suggest scission of either the POhydrocarbon or one of the POphenol bonds. A phenomenon similar to that of autocatalysis is observed for all phosphites and is attributed to the formation of dialkyl phosphites as intermediate products.

  16. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as a general approach for investigating covalent binding of drugs to DNA.

    PubMed

    Raja, Maria; Albertí, Joan; Saurina, Javier; Sentellas, Sonia

    2016-05-01

    This paper aims at developing a general strategy to study the detection of adducts of drugs with DNA. In particular, ethacrynic acid has been chosen as a model reactive drug that could be able to bind covalently to DNA bases. Such interactions were detected by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied as an unsupervised method to try to find the potential candidate adduct from MS features. The occurrence of adducts was investigated preliminarily using deoxynucleosides of the guanine, cytosine, adenine, and thymine separately as a way to optimize both separation and detection conditions. Interpretations of MS and MS/MS spectra provided tentative structures of the compounds formed. Conclusions extracted from such simple nucleoside models were further extended to the analysis of DNA adducts. For such a purpose, DNA was incubated in the presence of ethacrynic acid under appropriate experimental conditions and its further enzymatic hydrolysis released the corresponding nucleosides. UHPLC-MS analysis of the resulting test samples under the SRM detection mode confirmed the presence of ethacrynic acid derivatives of nucleosides occurring at very low concentration levels, thus proving the overall performance of the method. Graphical Abstract General approach for investigating drug-DNA adduct formation. PMID:27007736

  17. Digital Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberger, Casimir; Renz, Uwe; Bamberger, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Methods to visualize the two-dimensional (2D) distribution of molecules by mass spectrometric imaging evolve rapidly and yield novel applications in biology, medicine, and material surface sciences. Most mass spectrometric imagers acquire high mass resolution spectra spot-by-spot and thereby scan the object's surface. Thus, imaging is slow and image reconstruction remains cumbersome. Here we describe an imaging mass spectrometer that exploits the true imaging capabilities by ion optical means for the time of flight mass separation. The mass spectrometer is equipped with the ASIC Timepix chip as an array detector to acquire the position, mass, and intensity of ions that are imaged by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) directly from the target sample onto the detector. This imaging mass spectrometer has a spatial resolving power at the specimen of (84 ± 35) μm with a mass resolution of 45 and locates atoms or organic compounds on a surface area up to ~2 cm2. Extended laser spots of ~5 mm2 on structured specimens allows parallel imaging of selected masses. The digital imaging mass spectrometer proves high hit-multiplicity, straightforward image reconstruction, and potential for high-speed readout at 4 kHz or more. This device demonstrates a simple way of true image acquisition like a digital photographic camera. The technology may enable a fast analysis of biomolecular samples in near future.

  18. Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, Greg C.

    2005-09-01

    This chapter describes research conducted in a few research groups in the 1990s in which RF quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometers were coupled to a powerful atomic ion source, the inductively coupled plasma used in conventional ICP-MS instruments. Major section titles for this chapter are: RF Quadrupole Ion Traps Features of RF Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers Selective Ion Trapping methods Inductively Coupled Plasma Source Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers

  19. Investigation of Pokemon-regulated proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma using mass spectrometry-based multiplex quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xin; Jin, Yibao; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Feng; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2013-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription regulator involved in embryonic development, cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. It is aberrantly overexpressed in multiple human cancers including Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is considered as a promising biomarker for HCC. In this work, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy was used to investigate the proteomic profile associated with Pokemon in human HCC cell line QGY7703 and human hepatocyte line HL7702. Samples were labeled with four-plex iTRAQ reagents followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 24 differentially expressed proteins were selected as significant. Nine proteins were potentially up-regulated by Pokemon while 15 proteins were potentially down-regulated and many proteins were previously identified as potential biomarkers for HCC. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment revealed that the listed proteins were mainly involved in DNA metabolism and biosynthesis process. The changes of glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (G6PD, up-regulated) and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large sub-unit (RIM1, down-regulated) were validated by Western blotting analysis and denoted as Pokemon's function of oncogenesis. We also found that Pokemon potentially repressed the expression of highly clustered proteins (MCM3, MCM5, MCM6, MCM7) which played key roles in promoting DNA replication. Altogether, our results may help better understand the role of Pokemon in HCC and promote the clinical applications. PMID:24261083

  20. Investigation of Fundamental Physical Properties of a Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) Membrane using a Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PRTMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Boscaini, Elena; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Prazeller, Peter; Mark, T. D.

    2004-12-15

    A membrane introduction proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (MI-PTRMS) has been employed for the characterisation of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane. For this purpose the diffusion and partition coefficients (which serves as a measure for solubility) have been determined experimentally for different classes of chemical compounds both non-polar and polar species, i.e. aromatics, alcohols, ketones. It turned out that not only polar compounds exhibit strong interaction with a hydrophobic membrane such as the PDMS, but also non polar compounds as trimethylbenzene or propylbenzene which bear a relevant number of methyl groups or an alkyl chain show strong interaction with a PDMS membrane. Stronger interaction analyte-membrane leads to a slower diffusion coefficient and larger partition coefficient. The effect of the temperature on the diffusion coefficient and partition coefficient is also investigated. At higher temperature diffusion becomes faster and solubility lower. Permeability is calculated from diffusion and partition coefficients and activation energy are derived from corresponding Arrhenius plots. The MI-PTRMS system shows detection limits in the order of tens of pptv and it’s linear over five orders of magnitude.

  1. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  2. Leveraging ultraviolet photodissociation and spectroscopy to investigate peptide and protein three-dimensional structure with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Nathan G; Julian, Ryan R

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry and lasers have facilitated the development of novel experiments combining the benefits of both technologies. This minireview focuses on the coupling of visible/ultraviolet photons with mass spectrometry for analysis of peptide and protein three-dimensional structure. Practical aspects of instrument design and the relationship between experiment and theory are discussed. Experiments utilizing spectroscopy, action spectroscopy, excitation energy transfer, photodissociation, and photoactivated radical chemistry are described. The strengths and weaknesses of each approach are discussed in relation to the type of information typically obtained. A significant body of data suggests that under appropriate source conditions, kinetically trapped structures are observed in these experiments rather than true gas phase minima, suggesting retention of solution phase structural features is possible. Further refinement and exploration of these methods promises to accelerate protein structure discovery in the near future. PMID:27270260

  3. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  4. Mass spectrometry in natural product chemistry.

    PubMed

    Clayton, E; Hill, H C; Reed, R I

    1966-01-01

    Some mass spectrometric techniques are described which seem applicable to investigating problems in natural product chemistry. One example is of a sample of 5 mcg of a compound being identified by comparison with an authentic sample of prostaglandin derivative. Compared were mass, ion content, and structure. In the prostaglandin/unknown substance comparison, high-resolution mass spectrometry resolved a quandary: apparent additional ions present in the unknown substance were shown to be an impurity. PMID:12262324

  5. Combining Two-Dimensional Diffusion-Ordered Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Imaging Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry, and Direct Analysis in Real-Time Mass Spectrometry for the Integral Investigation of Counterfeit Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Nyadong, Leonard; Harris, Glenn A.; Balayssac, Stéphane; Galhena, Asiri S.; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Martino, Robert; Parry, R. Mitchell; Wang, May Dongmei; Fernández, Facundo M.; Gilard, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, there has been a marked increase in the number of reported cases involving counterfeit medicines in developing and developed countries. Particularly, artesunate-based antimalarial drugs have been targeted, because of their high demand and cost. Counterfeit antimalarials can cause death and can contribute to the growing problem of drug resistance, particularly in southeast Asia. In this study, the complementarity of two-dimensional diffusion-ordered 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D DOSY 1H NMR) with direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART MS) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS) was assessed for pharmaceutical forensic purposes. Fourteen different artesunate tablets, representative of what can be purchased from informal sources in southeast Asia, were investigated with these techniques. The expected active pharmaceutical ingredient was detected in only five formulations via both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Common organic excipients such as sucrose, lactose, stearate, dextrin, and starch were also detected. The graphical representation of DOSY 1H NMR results proved very useful for establishing similarities among groups of samples, enabling counterfeit drug “chemotyping”. In addition to bulk- and surface-average analyses, spatially resolved information on the surface composition of counterfeit and genuine antimalarial formulations was obtained using DESI MS that was performed in the imaging mode, which enabled one to visualize the homogeneity of both genuine and counterfeit drug samples. Overall, this study suggests that 2D DOSY 1H NMR, combined with ambient MS, comprises a powerful suite of instrumental analysis methodologies for the integral characterization of counterfeit antimalarials. PMID:19453162

  6. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  7. Nanotip Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Lee, Jae Kyoo; Kim, Samuel C; Zare, Richard N

    2016-05-17

    A method called nanotip ambient ionization mass spectrometry (NAIMS) is described, which applies high voltage between a tungsten nanotip and a metal plate to generate a plasma in which ionized analytes on the surface of the metal plate are directed to the inlet and analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The dependence of signal intensity is investigated as a function of the tip-to-plate distance, the tip size, the voltage applied at the tip, and the current. These parameters are separately optimized to achieve sensitivity or high spatial resolution. A partially observable Markov decision process is used to achieve a stabilized plasma as well as high ionization efficiency. As a proof of concept, the NAIMS technique has been applied to phenanthrene and caffeine samples for which the limits of detection were determined to be 0.14 fmol for phenanthrene and 4 amol for caffeine and to a printed caffeine pattern for which a spatial resolution of 8 ± 2 μm, and the best resolution of 5 μm, was demonstrated. The limitations of NAIMS are also discussed. PMID:27087600

  8. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  9. Correlation between lactosylation and denaturation of major whey proteins: an investigation by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Losito, Ilario; Stringano, Elisabetta; Carulli, Saverio; Palmisano, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    The Maillard-reaction-induced lactosylation of the major whey proteins, alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-La) and beta-lactoglobulins (beta-Lg) A and B, occurring upon heating at 70, 80 and 90 degrees C for 1 to 5 h in the presence of lactose excess, was studied by HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization single and tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS, MS/MS). The presence of significant amounts of mono and bi-lactosylated forms of the three proteins and their increase with heating temperature and time were assessed from MS data. Evidences for a concomitant, significant denaturation, involving partial tertiary structure unfolding, were also obtained in the case of beta-lactoglobulins. A subsequent ESI-MS and MS/MS investigation on the tryptic digests of heated protein solutions exhibiting high percentages of mono and bi-lactosylated forms provided information on lactosylation sites. In particular, the latter were identified both on tryptic and on aspecific peptides, whose unusual relevance (compared to similar studies) was found to be due mainly to heat-induced protein degradation, occurring before protein digestion with trypsin. Among lactosylation sites identified only on tryptic peptides, i.e., those reasonably related to intact protein lactosylation, two lysines residues were found for alpha-La, both located in accessible regions of its tertiary structure. In the case of beta-Lg, besides three sites common to variants A and B (leucine 1, lysines 70, and 75), lysine 69 was found to be lactosylated only in variant B. Its proximity to a critical region of beta-Lg tertiary structure suggests that the difference between the two variants could be ascribed to a different evolution of their conformation upon heating. PMID:20151114

  10. Development of Gas Chromatographic Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hites, Ronald A

    2016-07-19

    Gas chromatographic mass spectrometry is now widely used for the quantitation and identification of organic compounds in almost any imaginable sample. These applications include the measurement of chlorinated dioxins in soil samples, the identification of illicit drugs in human blood, and the quantitation of accelerants in arson investigations, to name just a few. How did GC/MS get so popular? It turns out that it required parallel developments in mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, and computing and that no one person "invented" the technique. This Perspective traces this history from the 1950s until today. PMID:27384908

  11. Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Yuan, Cheng-Hui; Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Cho, Yi-Tzu; Shiea, Jentaie

    2010-07-01

    Mass spectrometric ionization methods that operate under ambient conditions and require minimal or no sample pretreatment have attracted much attention in such fields as biomedicine, food safety, antiterrorism, pharmaceuticals, and environmental pollution. These technologies usually involve separate ionization and sample-introduction events, allowing independent control over each set of conditions. Ionization is typically performed under ambient conditions through use of existing electrospray ionization (ESI) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) techniques. Rapid analyses of gas, liquid, and solid samples are possible with the adoption of various sample-introduction methods. This review sorts different ambient ionization techniques into two main subcategories, primarily on the basis of the ionization processes, that are further differentiated in terms of the approach used for sampling.

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Finkel, R.; Nelson, D.E.

    1995-06-01

    Accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) can be used for efficient detection of long-lived isotopes at part-per-quadrillion sensitivities with good precision. In this article we present an overview of AMS and its recent use in archaeology, geochemistry and biomolecular tracing. All AMS systems use cesium sputter ion sources to produce negative ions from a small button of a solid sample containing the element of interest, such as graphite, metal halide, or metal oxide, often mixed with a metal powder as binder and thermal conductor. Experience shows that both natural and biomedical samples are compatible in a single AMS system, but few other AMS sites make routine {sup 14}C measurements for both dating and tracing. AMS is, in one sense, just `a very sensitive decay counter`, but if AMS sensitivity is creatively coupled to analytical chemistry of certain isotopes, whole new areas of geosciences, archaeology, and life sciences can be explored. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Investigation by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of trail pheromones in ants.

    PubMed

    Tullio, Alessandra Di; Angelis, Francesco De; Reale, Samantha; Grasso, Donato A; Visicchio, Roberto; Castracani, Cristina; Mori, Alessandra; Moli, Francesco Le

    2003-01-01

    The Dufour's gland content of workers of two ant species of the genus Messor has been analyzed by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The structures of the compounds in the pheromonal mixtures have been determined. In both cases only one intact gland, inserted in a properly dimensioned capillary vial, is sufficient to produce a clean and fully interpretable GC/MS profile. It is worth noting that, for the first time in Messor ants, farnesol has been detected as a minor component of glandular secretion in Messor capitatus. PMID:12955735

  14. Mass spectrometry of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colony, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is used for chemical analysis of aerospace materials and contaminants. Years of analytical aerospace experience have resulted in the development of specialized techniques of sampling and analysis which are required in order to optimize results. This work has resulted in the evolution of a hybrid method of indexing mass spectra which include both the largest peaks and the structurally significant peaks in a concise format. With this system, a library of mass spectra of aerospace materials was assembled, including the materials responsible for 80 to 90 percent of the contamination problems at Goddard Space Flight Center during the past several years.

  15. An investigation of accelerating mode and decelerating mode constant-momentum mass spectrometry and their application to a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Y. S.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of constant momentum mass spectrometry was made. A maximum resolving power for the decelerating mode constant momentum mass spectrometer was shown theoretically to exist for a beam of ions of known energy. A vacuum system and an electron beam ionization source was constructed. Supporting electronics for a residual gas analyzer were built. Experimental investigations of various types of accelerating and decelerating impulsive modes of a constant momentum mass spectrometer as applied to a residual gas analyzer were made. The data indicate that the resolving power for the decelerating mode is comparable to that of the accelerating mode.

  16. Investigation of the Reactivity of Oligodeoxynucleotides with Glyoxal and KMnO4 Chemical Probes by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Carol; Pierce, Sarah E.; Smith, Suncerae I.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    The reactions of two well-known chemical probes, glyoxal and potassium permanganate (KMnO4), with oligodeoxynucleotides were monitored by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry to evaluate the influence of the sequence of DNA, its secondary structure, and interactions with associated ligands on the reactivity of the two probes. Glyoxal, a guanine-reactive probe, incorporated a mass shift of 58 Da, and potassium permanganate (KMnO4) is a thymine-reactive probe that resulted in a mass shift of 34 Da. The reactions depended on the accessibility of the nucleobases, and the peak abundances of the adducts in the ESI-mass spectra were used to quantify the extent of the chemical probe reactions. In this study, both mixed-base sequences were studied as well as control sequences in which one reactive site was located at the terminus or center of the oligodeoxynucleotide while the surrounding bases were a second, different nucleobase. In addition, the reactions of the chemical probes with non-covalent complexes formed between DNA and either actinomycin D or ethidium bromide, both known to interact with single strand DNA, were evaluated. PMID:21743793

  17. Elemental Composition Analysis to Investigate NOx Effects on Secondary Organic Aerosol from α-Pinene Using Ultrahigh Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. J.; Park, J. H.; Babar, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for 20-70% of atmospheric fine aerosol. NOx plays crucial roles in SOA formation and consequently affects the composition and yield of SOA. SOA component speciation is incomplete due to its complex composition of polar oxygenated and multifunctional species. In this study, ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (UHR MS) was applied to improve the understanding of NOx effects on biogenic SOA formation by identifying the elemental composition of SOA. Additional research aim was to investigate oligomer components that are considered as a driving force for SOA formation and growth. In this study α-pinene SOA from photochemical reaction was examined. SOA formation was performed in the absence and presence of NOx at dry condition (<5% RH) of room temperature (~25oC) in ~8 m3 KNU smog chamber. SOA was collected on Teflon-coated glass fiber filter, which was extracted using acetonitrile and analyzed by ultrahigh resolution 15T FT-ICR MS. UHR MS data were interpreted in various ways including molecular formula, Kendrick diagram, van Krevelen diagram, and double bond equivalent values. Substantially large fractions of them are nitrogen containing species. Thousands of individual species of SOA were identified. For SOA in the absence of NOx. intensity normalized mean O/C, H/C, N/C, OM/OC ratios were 0.43, 1.52, 0.02, and 1.68, respectively. For SOA in the presence of NOx, those ratios were 0.52, 0.95, 0.08, and 1.48, respectively. 4 different oligomer formation mechanisms (addition, H abstraction, hydrolysis and de-hydrolysis reaction) were examined on the basis of SOA compositions. Detailed discussion will be presented on the molecular structure and building block of oligomers in SOA as well as the evolution of individual elemental composition by multi-generation reactions. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MEST) (No. 2011-01350000).

  18. Glycosaminoglycan Glycomics Using Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The fact that sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are necessary for the functioning of all animal physiological systems drives the need to understand their biology. This understanding is limited, however, by the heterogeneous nature of GAG chains and their dynamic spatial and temporal expression patterns. GAGs have a regulated structure overlaid by heterogeneity but lack the detail necessary to build structure/function relationships. In order to provide this information, we need glycomics platforms that are sensitive, robust, high throughput, and information rich. This review summarizes progress on mass-spectrometry-based GAG glycomics methods. The areas covered include disaccharide analysis, oligosaccharide profiling, and tandem mass spectrometric sequencing. PMID:23325770

  19. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  20. Indium Incorporation in InxGa1-xN/GaN Nanowire Heterostructures Investigated by Line-of-Sight Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wölz, M.; Fernández-Garrido, S.; Hauswald, C.; Brandt, O.; Limbach, F.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the formation of the ternary alloy InxGa1-xN in the growth of self-induced nanowires by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. A series of samples grown at different temperatures were analyzed in situ by line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry, and the predicted composition was verified by X-ray diffraction on as-grown nanowire ensembles. The InxGa1-xN composition is determined by the thermally activated loss of In due to InN decomposition and In desorption, similar to the composition of planar layers. The convolution of decomposition, reincorporation, and desorption is described by an apparent activation energy of about 2.5 eV. We show the feasibility of in situ control of the InxGa1-xN nanowire composition by line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry.

  1. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Surface-ionization field mass-spectrometry studies of nonequilibrium surface ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blashenkov, Nikolai M.; Lavrent'ev, Gennadii Ya

    2007-01-01

    The ionization of polyatomic molecules on tungsten and tungsten oxide surfaces is considered for quasiequilibrium or essentially nonequilibrium conditions (in the latter case, the term nonequilibrium surface ionization is used for adsorbate ionization). Heterogeneous reactions are supposed to proceed through monomolecular decay of polyatomic molecules or fragments of multimolecular complexes. The nonequilibrium nature of these reactions is established. The dependences of the current density of disordered ions on the surface temperature, electric field strength, and ionized particle energy distribution are obtained in analytical form. Heterogeneous dissociation energies, the ionization potentials of radicals, and the magnitude of reaction departure from equilibrium are determined from experimental data, as are energy exchange times between reaction products and surfaces, the number of molecules in molecular complexes, and the number of effective degrees of freedom in molecules and complexes. In collecting the data a new technique relying on surface-ionization field mass-spectrometry was applied.

  2. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1987-11-10

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface. 8 figs.

  3. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  4. Space Applications of Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Limero, Thomas; Arkin, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been involved in essentially all aspects of space exploration. This chapter outlines some of these many uses. Mass spectrometers have not only helped to expand our knowledge and understanding of the world and solar system around us, they have helped to put man safely in space and expand our frontier. Mass spectrometry continues to prove to be a very reliable, robust, and flexible analytical instrument, ensuring that its use will continue to help aid our investigation of the universe and this small planet that we call home.

  5. New analytical scheme for regular old ordinary mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.M.; Russell, D.

    1994-12-31

    A unified scheme was developed to define the composition, improve detection and qualitative identification of water soluble organics in heavy oil retort. Elements of the scheme included gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), hybrid mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (EB-TOF) with electron impact (EI) and fast atom bombardment (FAB) ionization and a computerized library search program. As part of the development of the process, each element of the analytical scheme was applied to complex samples of aqueous organic materials extracted from heavy oil retorts. Preliminary investigations have indicated that the heavy oil retort contains hundreds of compounds in ppm/ppb concentrations.

  6. Investigation of pharmaceuticals in processed animal by-products by liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nácher-Mestre, Jaime; Ibáñez, María; Serrano, Roque; Boix, Clara; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Lunestad, Bjørn Tore; Hannisdal, Rita; Alm, Martin; Hernández, Félix; Berntssen, Marc H G

    2016-07-01

    There is an on-going trend for developing more sustainable salmon feed in which traditionally applied marine feed ingredients are replaced with alternatives. Processed animal products (PAPs) have been re-authorized as novel high quality protein ingredients in 2013. These PAPs may harbor undesirable substances such as pharmaceuticals and metabolites which are not previously associated with salmon farming, but might cause a potential risk for feed and food safety. To control these contaminants, an analytical strategy based on a generic extraction followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) using quadrupole time-of-flight mass analyzer (QTOF MS) was applied for wide scope screening. Quality control samples, consisting of PAP commodities spiked at 0.02, 0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg with 150 analytes, were injected in every sample batch to verify the overall method performance. The methodology was applied to 19 commercially available PAP samples from six different types of matrices from the EU animal rendering industry. This strategy allows assessing possible emergent risk exposition of the salmon farming industry to 1005 undesirables, including pharmaceuticals, several dyes and relevant metabolites. PMID:27058915

  7. Metabolomic investigation of porcine muscle and fatty tissue after Clenbuterol treatment using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanglei; Fu, Yuhua; Han, Xiaosong; Li, Xinyun; Li, Changchun

    2016-07-22

    Clenbuterol is a β-adrenergic agonist used as additive to increase the muscle mass of meat-producing animals. Previous studies were limited to evaluations of animal growth performance and determination of the residues. Several studies have focused on urine samples. Little information about the underlying molecular mechanisms that can explain Clenbuterol metabolism and promote energy repartition in animal muscle and fatty tissue is available. Therefore, this research aims to detect the metabolite variations in muscle and fatty tissue acquired from Chinese pigs fed with Clenbuterol using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Ten two-month old Enshi black pigs were fed under the same condition; five of which were fed with basic ration containing Clenbuterol for one month, whereas the other five pigs were fed only with basic ration. Muscle and fatty tissue were subjected to metabolomics analysis using GC/MS. Differences in metabolomic profiles between the two groups were characterized by multivariate statistical analysis. The muscle samples showed that 15 metabolites were significantly different in the Clenbuterol-treated group compared with the control group; 13 potential biomarkers were found in the fatty tissue. Most of the metabolites were associated with fatty acid metabolism and amino acid metabolism. Glycerol, phenylalanine, and leucine were the common metabolites between the muscle and fatty tissue. These metabolites may provide a new clue that contributes to the understanding of the energy reassignment induced by Clenbuterol. PMID:27320379

  8. Combustion chemistry of the propanol isomers : investigated by electron ionization and VUV-photoionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Kohse-Hoinghaus, Katharina; Cool, Terrill A.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Struckmeier, Ulf; OBwald, Patrick; Morel, Aude; Westmoreland, Phillip R.; Kasper, Tina Silvia

    2008-10-01

    The combustion of 1-propanol and 2-propanol was studied in low-pressure, premixed flat flames using two independent molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) techniques. For each alcohol, a set of three flames with different stoichiometries was measured, providing an extensive data base with in total twelve conditions. Profiles of stable and intermediate species, including several radicals, were measured as a function of height above the burner. The major-species mole fraction profiles in the 1-propanol flames and the 2-propanol flames of corresponding stoichiometry are nearly identical, and only small quantitative variations in the intermediate species pool could be detected. Differences between flames of the isomeric fuels are most pronounced for oxygenated intermediates that can be formed directly from the fuel during the oxidation process. The analysis of the species pool in the set of flames was greatly facilitated by using two complementary MBMS techniques. One apparatus employs electron ionization (EI) and the other uses VUV light for single-photon ionization (VUV-PI). The photoionization technique offers a much higher energy resolution than electron ionization and as a consequence, near-threshold photoionization-efficiency measurements provide selective detection of individual isomers. The EI data are recorded with a higher mass resolution than the PI spectra, thus enabling separation of mass overlaps of species with similar ionization energies that may be difficult to distinguish in the photoionization data. The quantitative agreement between the EI- and PI-datasets is good. In addition, the information in the EI- and PI-datasets is complementary, aiding in the assessment of the quality of individual burner profiles. The species profiles are supplemented by flame temperature profiles. The considerable experimental efforts to unambiguously assign intermediate species and to provide reliable quantitative concentrations are thought to be valuable for improving

  9. Combustion chemistry of the propanol isomers - investigated by electron ionization and VUV-photoionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, T.; Osswald, P.; Struckmeier, U.; Kohse-Hoeinghaus, K.; Taatjes, C.A.; Wang, J.; Cool, T.A.; Law, M.E.; Morel, A.; Westmoreland, P.R.

    2009-06-15

    The combustion of 1-propanol and 2-propanol was studied in low-pressure, premixed flat flames using two independent molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) techniques. For each alcohol, a set of three flames with different stoichiometries was measured, providing an extensive data base with in total twelve conditions. Profiles of stable and intermediate species, including several radicals, were measured as a function of height above the burner. The major-species mole fraction profiles in the 1-propanol flames and the 2-propanol flames of corresponding stoichiometry are nearly identical, and only small quantitative variations in the intermediate species pool could be detected. Differences between flames of the isomeric fuels are most pronounced for oxygenated intermediates that can be formed directly from the fuel during the oxidation process. The analysis of the species pool in the set of flames was greatly facilitated by using two complementary MBMS techniques. One apparatus employs electron ionization (EI) and the other uses VUV light for single-photon ionization (VUV-PI). The photoionization technique offers a much higher energy resolution than electron ionization and as a consequence, near-threshold photoionization-efficiency measurements provide selective detection of individual isomers. The EI data are recorded with a higher mass resolution than the PI spectra, thus enabling separation of mass overlaps of species with similar ionization energies that may be difficult to distinguish in the photoionization data. The quantitative agreement between the EI- and PI-datasets is good. In addition, the information in the EI- and PI-datasets is complementary, aiding in the assessment of the quality of individual burner profiles. The species profiles are supplemented by flame temperature profiles. The considerable experimental efforts to unambiguously assign intermediate species and to provide reliable quantitative concentrations are thought to be valuable for improving

  10. Hemoglobin variants as models for investigation of dissociation of intact polypeptide chains by ESI tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Light, K.J.; Loo, J.A.; Edmonds, C.G.; Smith, R.D.

    1991-06-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) is rapidly becoming a practical biochemical tool for peptide and protein sequence analysis. The utility of ESI-MS is through use of Collisionally Activated Dissociation (ESI-CAD-MS). Human hemoglobin (Hb, {approximately}62 kDa) consists of four polypeptide chains and a prosthetic heme group. There are over 400 Hb variants, characterized by amino acid substitutions in either the alpha or beta polypeptide chains. We investigated ESI-CAD-MS as a tool for rapidly analyzing amino acid substitutions, using eight Hb beta chain variants. The approximate location of the modification can be deduced from comparison of the CAD mass spectra and observance of the mass shifts of the fragment ion containing the substitution. Fragmentation occurs preferentially at the amino terminus of proline residues. For most substitutions, differences in CAD mass spectra were not seen. 2 figs.

  11. Neuroscience and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Palmblad, M N; Buchholz, B A; Hillegonds, D J; Vogel, J S

    2004-08-02

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a mass spectrometric method for quantifying rare isotopes. It has had great impact in geochronology and archaeology and is now being applied in biomedicine. AMS measures radioisotopes such as {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca, with zepto- or attomole sensitivity and high precision and throughput, enabling safe human pharmacokinetic studies involving: microgram doses, agents having low bioavailability, or toxicology studies where administered doses must be kept low (<1 {micro}g/kg). It is used to study long-term pharmacokinetics, to identify biomolecular interactions, to determine chronic and low-dose effects or molecular targets of neurotoxic substances, to quantify transport across the blood-brain barrier and to resolve molecular turnover rates in the human brain on the timescale of decades. We will here review how AMS is applied in neurotoxicology and neuroscience.

  12. The life sciences mass spectrometry research unit.

    PubMed

    Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    The Life Sciences Mass Spectrometry (LSMS) research unit focuses on the development of novel analytical workflows based on innovative mass spectrometric and software tools for the analysis of low molecular weight compounds, peptides and proteins in complex biological matrices. The present article summarizes some of the recent work of the unit: i) the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of drug of abuse in hair, ii) the use of high resolution mass spectrometry for simultaneous qualitative/quantitative analysis in drug metabolism and metabolomics, and iii) the absolute quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry using the selected reaction monitoring mode. PMID:22867547

  13. MASS SPECTROMETRY OF FATTY ALDEHYDES

    PubMed Central

    Berdyshev, Evgeny V.

    2011-01-01

    Fatty aldehydes are important components of the cellular lipidome. Significant interest has been developed towards the analysis of the short chain α,β-unsaturated and hydroxylated aldehydes formed as a result of oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Multiple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and subsequently liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) approaches have been developed to identify and quantify short-chain as well as long-chain fatty aldehydes. Due to the ability to non-enzymaticaly form Schiff bases with amino groups of proteins, lipids, and with DNA guanidine, free aldehydes are viewed as a marker or metric of fatty acid oxidation and not the part of intracellular signaling pathways which has significantly limited the overall attention this group of molecules have received. This review provides an overview of current GC/MS and LC/MS approaches of fatty aldehyde analysis as well as discusses technical challenges standing in the way of free fatty aldehyde quantitation. PMID:21930240

  14. Metabolomic investigation of cholestasis in a rat model using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masayo; Konya, Yutaka; Takagaki, Takeshi; Umemura, Koji; Sogame, Yoshihisa; Katsumata, Takashi; Komuro, Setsuko

    2011-07-15

    Metabolomics follows the changes in concentrations of endogenous metabolites, which may reflect various disease states as well as systemic responses to environmental, therapeutic, or genetic interventions. In this study, we applied metabolomic approaches to monitor dynamic changes in plasma and urine metabolites, and compared these metabolite profiles in Eisai hyperbilirubinemic rats (EHBR, an animal model of cholestasis) with those in the parent strain of EHBR - Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats - in order to characterize cholestasis pathophysiologically. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry-based analytical methods were used to assay metabolite levels. More than 250 metabolites were detected in both plasma and urine, and metabolite profiles of EHBR differed from those of SD rats. The levels of antioxidative and cytoprotective metabolites, taurine and hypotaurine, were markedly increased in urine of EHBR. The levels of many bile acids were also elevated in plasma and urine of EHBR, but the extent of elevation depended on the particular bile acid. The levels of cytoprotective ursodeoxycholic acid and its conjugates were markedly elevated, while that of cytotoxic chenodeoxycholic acid remained unchanged, suggesting the balance of bile acids had shifted resulting in decreased toxicity. In EHBR, reduced biliary excretion leads to increased systemic exposure to harmful compounds including some endogenous metabolites. Our metabolomic data suggest that mechanisms exist in EHBR that compensate for cholestasis-related damage. PMID:21638360

  15. Circular Dichroism in Mass Spectrometry: Quantum Chemical Investigations for the Differences between (R)-3-Methylcyclopentanone and Its Cation.

    PubMed

    Kröner, Dominik; Gaebel, Tina

    2015-08-27

    In mass spectrometry enantiomers can be distinguished by multiphoton ionization employing circular polarized laser pulses. The circular dichroism (CD) is detected from the normalized difference in the ion yield after excitation with light of opposite handedness. While there are cases in which fragment and parent ions exhibit the same sign of the CD in the ion yield, several experiments show that they might also differ in sign and magnitude. Supported by experimental observations it has been proposed that the parent ion, once it has been formed, is further excited by the laser, which may result in a change of the CD in the ion yield of the formed fragments compared to the parent ion. To gain a deeper insight in possible excitation pathways we calculated and compared the electronic CD absorption spectra of neutral and cationic (R)-3-methylcyclopentanone, applying density functional theory. In addition, electron wavepacket dynamics were used to compare the CD of one- and two-photon transitions. Our results support the proposed subsequent excitation of the parent ion as a possible origin of the difference of the CD in the ion yield between parent ion and fragments. PMID:26214257

  16. Investigating the effect of additional gases in an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet using ambient mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Furuta, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu; Bradley, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Using ambient mass spectrometry, positive and negative ions created in an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet have been detected for a variation of different traces gases (Ar, N2, and O2) added to the flow, downstream of the main helium discharge plasma. We find that such additions can change the chemistry in the outflow plasma plume. For instance, small amounts of O2 increases the formation of positive ion clusters, e.g., water clusters H+(H2O)n (with n up to 5) through hydration reactions, but decreases the intensity of heavy negative ions detected. With the addition of Ar and N2 we see a marked decrease in the intensity of negative ions in the plume but with increased Ar+ and nitrous oxide ions (e.g., N2O+) for the two cases respectively. From broadband optical emission measurements of the glowing plasma we see that the relative emission intensity of OH radical were changed with addition of the four different gases but the emission spectra were not changed. A calculation of rotational temperature of OH radicals, indicates that the gas temperatures is about 290 K for the four different gas mixture cases.

  17. Glycated human serum albumin isolated from poorly controlled diabetic patients impairs cholesterol efflux from macrophages: an investigation by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Traldi, Pietro; Castilho, Gabriela; Sartori, Camila H; Machado-Lima, Adriana; Nakandakare, Edna R; Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lucia C; Roverso, Marco; Porcu, Simona; Lapolla, Annunziata; Passarelli, Marisa

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products impair ABCA-1-mediated cholesterol efflux by eliciting inflammation, the generation of reactive oxygen species and endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress. The glycation level of human serum albumin (HSA) from type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients was determined by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and related to possible impairment of ER function and cellular cholesterol efflux. Comparison of the MALDI spectra from healthy and diabetic subjects allowed us to determine an increased HSA mean mass of 1297 Da for type 1 and 890 Da for type 2. These values reflect a mean condensation of at least 8 glucose units and 5 glucose units, respectively. Mouse peritoneal macrophages were treated with HSA from control, type 1 and type 2 diabetic subjects in order to measure the expression of Grp78, Grp94, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), calreticulin (CRT) and ABCA-1. (14)C-cholesterol overloaded-J774 macrophages were treated with HSA from control and diabetic subjects and further incubated with apo A-1 to determine the cholesterol efflux. Combined analyses comprising HSA from type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients were performed in cellular functional assays. In macrophages, PDI expression increased 89% and CRT 3.4 times in comparison to HSA from the control subjects. ABCA-1 protein level and apo A-I mediated cholesterol efflux were, respectively, 50% and 60% reduced in macrophages exposed to HSA from type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients when compared to that exposed to HSA from control subjects. We provide evidence that the level of glycation that occurs in albumin in vivo damages the ER function related to the impairment in macrophage reverse cholesterol transport and so contributes to atherosclerosis in diabetes. PMID:26307703

  18. Spatial neuroproteomics using imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Malmberg, Per; Ewing, Andrew G

    2015-07-01

    The nervous system constitutes arguably the most complicated and least understood cellular network in the human body. This consequently manifests itself in the fact that the molecular bases of neurodegenerative diseases remain unknown. The limited understanding of neurobiological mechanisms relates directly to the lack of appropriate bioanalytical technologies that allow highly resolved, sensitive, specific and comprehensive molecular imaging in complex biological matrices. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is an emerging technique for molecular imaging. The technique is characterized by its high chemical specificity allowing comprehensive, spatial protein and peptide profiling in situ. Imaging MS represents therefore a powerful approach for investigation of spatio-temporal protein and peptide regulations in CNS derived tissue and cells. This review aims to provide a concise overview of major developments and applications concerning imaging mass spectrometry based protein and peptide profiling in neurobiological and biomedical research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in Neuroscience and Neurology. PMID:25582083

  19. Mass Spectrometry Imaging under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunping; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Cooks, R. Graham; Ifa, Demian R.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has emerged as an important tool in the last decade and it is beginning to show potential to provide new information in many fields owing to its unique ability to acquire molecularly specific images and to provide multiplexed information, without the need for labeling or staining. In MSI, the chemical identity of molecules present on a surface is investigated as a function of spatial distribution. In addition to now standard methods involving MSI in vacuum, recently developed ambient ionization techniques allow MSI to be performed under atmospheric pressure on untreated samples outside the mass spectrometer. Here we review recent developments and applications of MSI emphasizing the ambient ionization techniques of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), probe electrospray ionization (PESI), desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI), femtosecond laser desorption ionization (fs-LDI), laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS), infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI), liquid microjunction surface sampling probe mass spectrometry (LMJ-SSP MS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), and plasma sources such as the low temperature plasma (LTP) probe and laser ablation coupled to flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (LA-FAPA). Included are discussions of some of the features of ambient MSI including the ability to implement chemical reactions with the goal of providing high abundance ions characteristic of specific compounds of interest and the use of tandem mass spectrometry to either map the distribution of targeted molecules with high specificity or to provide additional MS information in the structural identification of compounds. We also describe the role of bioinformatics in acquiring and interpreting the chemical and spatial information obtained through MSI, especially in biological applications for tissue

  20. Membrane-Associated Conformation of HIV-1 Nef Investigated with Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry at a Langmuir Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Pirrone, Gregory F; Emert-Sedlak, Lori A; Wales, Thomas E; Smithgall, Thomas E; Kent, Michael S; Engen, John R

    2015-07-21

    In the companion paper to this work, we described development of a new type of hydrogen exchange (HX) mass spectrometry (MS) measurement that integrates Langmuir monolayers. With Langmuir monolayers, the lipid packing density can be reproducibly controlled and changed as desired. Analysis of HX in proteins that may undergo conformational changes as a function of lipid packing (for example, conformational rearrangements after insertion into a lipid layer) are then possible. We previously used neutron reflection to characterize just such a conformational change in the myristoylated HIV-1 Nef protein (myrNef): at high lipid packing density, myrNef could not insert into the lipids and maintained a compact conformation adjacent to the monolayer, whereas at lower lipid packing density, myrNef was able to insert N-terminal arm residues, causing displacement of the core domain away from the monolayer. In order to locate where conformation may have been altered by lipid association, we applied the HX MS Langmuir monolayer method to myrNef associated with monolayers of packing densities identical to those used for the prior neutron reflection measurements. The results show that the N-terminal region and the C-terminal unstructured loop undergo conformational changes when associated with a low density lipid monolayer. The results are not consistent with the hypothesis of myrNef dimerization upon membrane association in the absence of other myrNef binding partners. The HX MS Langmuir monolayer method provides new and meaningful information for myrNef that helps explain necessary conformational changes required for function at the membrane. PMID:26133569

  1. Investigating the Synthesis of Ligated Metal Clusters in Solution Using a Flow Reactor and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, Astrid M.; Laskin, Julia; Johnson, Grant E.

    2014-09-18

    The scalable synthesis of subnanometer metal clusters containing an exact number of atoms is of interest due to the highly size-dependent catalytic, electronic and optical properties of these species. While significant research has been conducted on the batch preparation of clusters through reduction synthesis in solution, the processes of metal complex reduction as well as cluster nucleation, growth and post-reduction etching are still not well understood. Herein, we demonstrate a temperature-controlled flow reactor for studying cluster formation in solution at well-defined conditions. Employing this technique methanol solutions of a chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold precursor, 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane capping ligand and borane-tert-butylamine reducing agent were combined in a mixing tee and introduced into a heated capillary with an adjustable length. In this manner, the temperature dependence of the relative abundance of different ionic reactants, intermediates and products synthesized in real time was characterized using online mass spectrometry. A wide distribution of doubly and triply charged cationic gold clusters was observed as well as smaller singly charged metal-ligand complexes. The results demonstrate that temperature plays a crucial role in determining the relative population of cationic gold clusters and, in general, that higher temperature promotes the formation of doubly charged clusters and singly charged metal-ligand complexes while hindering the growth of triply charged clusters. Moreover, the distribution of clusters observed at elevated temperatures is found to be consistent with that obtained at longer reaction times at room temperature, thereby demonstrating that heating may be used to access cluster distributions characteristic of different stages of reduction synthesis in solution.

  2. Ion and gas chromatography mass spectrometry investigations of organophosphates in lithium ion battery electrolytes by electrochemical aging at elevated cathode potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Waldemar; Wagner, Ralf; Streipert, Benjamin; Kraft, Vadim; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2016-02-01

    The electrochemical aging of commercial non-aqueous lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6)/organic carbonate solvent based lithium ion battery electrolyte has been investigated in view of the formation of ionic and non-ionic alkylated phosphates. Subject was a solvent mixture of ethylene carbonate/ethyl methyl carbonate EC:EMC (1:1, by wt.) with 1 M LiPF6 (LP50 Selectilyte™, BASF). The analysis was carried out by ion chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for ionic compounds and (headspace) gas chromatography mass spectrometry ((HS)-GC-MS) for non-ionic compounds. The electrochemical aging was performed by galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling and potentiostatic experiments with LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LMNO) as cathode material at increased cut-off potentials (>4.5 V vs. Li/Li+). A strong dependence of the formation of organophosphates on the applied electrode potential was observed and investigated by quantitative analysis of the formed phosphates. In addition, new possible "fingerprint" compounds for describing the electrolyte status were investigated and compared to existing compounds.

  3. Mass fractions of 52 trace elements and zinc/trace element content ratios in intact human prostates investigated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zaichick, Sofia; Zaichick, Vladimir; Nosenko, Sergey; Moskvina, Irina

    2012-11-01

    Contents of 52 trace elements in intact prostate of 64 apparently healthy 13-60-year-old men (mean age 36.5 years) were investigated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Mean values (M ± SΕΜ) for mass fraction (in milligrams per kilogram, on dry-weight basis) of trace elements were as follows: Ag 0.041 ± 0.005, Al 36 ± 4, Au 0.0039 ± 0.0007, B 0.97 ± 0.13, Be 0.00099 ± 0.00006, Bi 0.021 ± 0.008, Br 29 ± 3, Cd 0.78 ± 0.09, Ce 0.028 ± 0.004, Co 0.035 ± 0.003, Cs 0.034 ± 0.003, Dy 0.0031 ± 0.0005, Er 0.0018 ± 0.0004, Gd 0.0030 ± 0.0005, Hg 0.046 ± 0.006, Ho 0.00056 ± 0.00008, La 0.074 ± 0.015, Li 0.040 ± 0.004, Mn 1.53 ± 0.09, Mo 0.30 ± 0.03, Nb 0.0051 ± 0.0009, Nd 0.013 ± 0.002, Ni 4.3 ± 0.7, Pb 1.8 ± 0.4, Pr 0.0033 ± 0.0004, Rb 15.9 ± 0.6, Sb 0.040 ± 0.005, Se 0.73 ± 0.03, Sm 0.0027 ± 0.0004, Sn 0.25 ± 0.05, Tb 0.00043 ± 0.00009, Th 0.0024 ± 0.0005, Tl 0.0014 ± 0.0001, Tm 0.00030 ± 0.00006, U 0.0049 ± 0.0014, Y 0.019 ± 0.003, Yb 0.0015 ± 0.0002, Zn 782 ± 97, and Zr 0.044 ± 0.009, respectively. The upper limit of mean contents of As, Cr, Eu, Ga, Hf, Ir, Lu, Pd, Pt, Re, Ta, and Ti were the following: As ≤ 0.018, Cr ≤ 0.64, Eu ≤ 0.0006, Ga ≤ 0.08, Hf ≤ 0.02, Ir ≤ 0.0004, Lu ≤ 0.00028, Pd ≤ 0.007, Pt ≤ 0.0009, Re ≤ 0.0015, Ta ≤ 0.005, and Ti ≤ 2.6. In all prostate samples, the content of Te was under detection limit (<0.003). Additionally, ratios of the Zn content to other trace element contents as well as correlations between Zn and trace elements were calculated. Our data indicate that the human prostate accumulates such trace elements as Al, Au, B, Br, Cd, Cr, Ga, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb, U, and Zn. No special relationship between Zn and other trace elements was found. PMID:22549701

  4. Counting Molecules by Desorption Ionization and Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooks, R. G.; Busch, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses two newer methods in mass spectrometry and shows how they can increase signal and signal-to-noise ratios, respectively. The first method, desorption ionization (DI), increases sensitivity while the second method, mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), increases specificity. Together, the two methods offer improved analytical…

  5. Applications of Mass Spectrometry to Lipids and Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Harkewicz, Richard; Dennis, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    Lipidomics, a major part of metabolomics, constitutes the detailed analysis and global characterization, both spatial and temporal, of the structure and function of lipids (the lipidome) within a living system. As with proteomics, mass spectrometry has earned a central analytical role in lipidomics, and this role will continue to grow with technological developments. Currently, there exist two mass spectrometry-based lipidomics approaches, one based on a division of lipids into categories and classes prior to analysis, the “comprehensive lipidomics analysis by separation simplification” (CLASS), and the other in which all lipid species are analyzed together without prior separation, shotgun. In exploring the lipidome of various living systems, novel lipids are being discovered, and mass spectrometry is helping characterize their chemical structure. Deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) is being used to investigate the association of lipids and membranes with proteins and enzymes, and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is being applied to the in situ analysis of lipids in tissues. PMID:21469951

  6. Fast ion mass spectrometry and charged particle spectrography investigations of transverse ion acceleration and beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, W. C.; Tomlinson, W. M.; Marshall, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Ion acceleration transverse to the magnetic field in the topside ionosphere was investigated. Transverse acceleration is believed to be responsible for the upward-moving conical ion distributions commonly observed along auroral field lines at altitudes from several hundred to several thousand kilometers. Of primary concern in this investigation is the extent of these conic events in space and time. Theoretical predictions indicate very rapid initial heating rates, depending on the ion species. These same theories predict that the events will occur within a narrow vertical region of only a few hundred kilometers. Thus an instrument with very high spatial and temporal resolution was required; further, since different heating rates were predicted for different ions, it was necessary to obtain composition as well as velocity space distributions. The fast ion mass spectrometer (FIMS) was designed to meet these criteria. This instrument and its operation is discussed.

  7. Jarosite as a Storage Mineral for Small Organic Molecules: Investigations of Natural Samples Using an 'In Situ' Laser Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, J. M.; Hinman, N. W.; Yan, B.; Stoner, D. L.; Scott, J. R.

    2007-03-01

    The use of laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry has revealed the presence of organic matter in several jarosite samples from various locations worldwide including jarosite precipitated in the lab by acidothiobacillus ferroxidans.

  8. Application of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry to the Study of Ionic Clusters: Investigation of Cluster Ions with Stable Sizes and Compositions

    PubMed Central

    Ohshimo, Keijiro; Komukai, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Tohru; Norimasa, Naoya; Wu, Jenna Wen Ju; Moriyama, Ryoichi; Koyasu, Kiichirou; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2014-01-01

    Stable cluster sizes and compositions have been investigated for cations and anions of ionic bond clusters such as alkali halides and transition metal oxides by ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS). Usually structural information of ions can be obtained from collision cross sections determined in IM-MS. In addition, we have found that stable ion sizes or compositions were predominantly produced in a total ion mass spectrum, which was constructed from the IM-MS measurement. These stable species were produced as a result of collision induced dissociations of the ions in a drift cell. We have confirmed this result in the sodium fluoride cluster ions, in which cuboid magic number cluster ions were predominantly observed. Next the stable compositions, which were obtained for the oxide systems of the first row transition metals, Ti, Fe, and Co, are characteristic for each of the metal oxide cluster ions. PMID:26819887

  9. Developments in ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Collins, D C; Lee, M L

    2002-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been used for over 30 years as a sensitive detector of organic compounds. The following is a brief review of IMS and its principles with an emphasis on its usage when coupled to mass spectrometry. Since its inception, IMS has been interfaced with quadrupole, time-of-flight, and Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. These hybrid instruments have been employed for the analysis of a variety of target analytes, including biomolecules, explosives, chemical warfare degradation products, and illicit drugs. PMID:11939214

  10. Inorganic trace analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine; Dietze, Hans-Joachim

    1998-10-01

    Mass spectrometric methods for the trace analysis of inorganic materials with their ability to provide a very sensitive multielemental analysis have been established for the determination of trace and ultratrace elements in high-purity materials (metals, semiconductors and insulators), in different technical samples (e.g. alloys, pure chemicals, ceramics, thin films, ion-implanted semiconductors), in environmental samples (waters, soils, biological and medical materials) and geological samples. Whereas such techniques as spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS), laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) have multielemental capability, other methods such as thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) have been used for sensitive mono- or oligoelemental ultratrace analysis (and precise determination of isotopic ratios) in solid samples. The limits of detection for chemical elements using these mass spectrometric techniques are in the low ng g -1 concentration range. The quantification of the analytical results of mass spectrometric methods is sometimes difficult due to a lack of matrix-fitted multielement standard reference materials (SRMs) for many solid samples. Therefore, owing to the simple quantification procedure of the aqueous solution, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is being increasingly used for the characterization of solid samples after sample dissolution. ICP-MS is often combined with special sample introduction equipment (e.g. flow injection, hydride generation, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or electrothermal vaporization) or an off-line matrix separation and enrichment of trace impurities (especially for characterization of

  11. Characterization of microbial siderophores by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pluháček, Tomáš; Lemr, Karel; Ghosh, Dipankar; Milde, David; Novák, Jiří; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Siderophores play important roles in microbial iron piracy, and are applied as infectious disease biomarkers and novel pharmaceutical drugs. Inductively coupled plasma and molecular mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with high resolution separations allow characterization of siderophores in complex samples taking advantages of mass defect data filtering, tandem mass spectrometry, and iron-containing compound quantitation. The enrichment approaches used in siderophore analysis and current ICP-MS technologies are reviewed. The recent tools for fast dereplication of secondary metabolites and their databases are reported. This review on siderophores is concluded with their recent medical, biochemical, geochemical, and agricultural applications in mass spectrometry context. PMID:25980644

  12. Tandem mass spectrometry approach for the investigation of the steroidal metabolism: structure-fragmentation relationship (SFR) in anabolic steroids and their metabolites by ESI-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Ali, Arslan; Khan, Naik Tameem; Yousuf, Maria; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal; Atta-ur-Rahman

    2013-02-01

    Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) was used to investigate the effect of different substitutions introduced during metabolism on fragmentation patterns of four anabolic steroids including methyltestosterone, methandrostenolone, cis-androsterone and adrenosterone, along with their metabolites. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) analysis was performed to correlate the major product ions of 19 steroids with structural features. The analysis is done to portray metabolic alteration, such as incorporation or reduction of double bonds, hydroxylations, and/or oxidation of hydroxyl moieties to keto functional group on steroidal skeleton which leads to drastically changed product ion spectra from the respective classes of steroids, therefore, making them difficult to identify. The comparative ESI-MS/MS study also revealed some characteristic peaks to differentiate different steroidal metabolites and can be useful for the unambiguous identification of anabolic steroids in biological fluid. Moreover, LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of fermented extract of methyltestosterone, obtained by Macrophomina phaseolina was also investigated. PMID:23159734

  13. Alpha spectrometry applications with mass separated samples.

    PubMed

    Dion, M P; Eiden, Gregory C; Farmer, Orville T; Liezers, Martin; Robinson, John W

    2016-01-01

    (241)Am has been deposited using a novel technique that employs a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. This work presents results of high-resolution alpha spectrometry on the (241)Am samples using a small area passivated implanted planar silicon detector. We have also investigated the mass-based separation capability by developing a (238)Pu sample, present as a minor constituent in a (244)Pu standard, and performed subsequent radiometric counting. With this new sample development method, the (241)Am samples achieved the intrinsic energy resolution of the detector used for these measurements. There was no detectable trace of any other isotopes contained in the (238)Pu implant demonstrating the mass-based separation (or enhancement) attainable with this technique. PMID:26583262

  14. Broadband Analysis of Bioagents by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenselau, Catherine; Wynne, Colin; Edwards, Nathan

    Mass spectrometry was first reported to provide analysis of intact metabolite biomarkers from whole cells in 1975.1 Since then advances in ionization techniques have extended our capabilities to polar lipids and, eventually, to proteins.2, 3 Mass spectrometry provides a broadband detection system, which, however, has great specificity. Bioinformatics plays an important role in providing flexible and rapid characterization of species, based on protein and peptide mass spectra collected in the field.

  15. Investigation of volatile compounds in two raspberry cultivars by two headspace techniques: solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME/GC-MS) and proton-transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS).

    PubMed

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Carlin, Silvia; Endrizzi, Isabella; Gasperi, Flavia

    2009-05-27

    The volatile compounds emitted by two raspberry varieties ( Rubus idaeus , cv. Polka and Tulameen) were analyzed, in both the case of fresh fruits and juices, by two headspace methods that are rapid, solvent-free, and with reduced or no sample pretreatment: solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME/GC-MS) and proton-transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Multivariate analysis of the SPME/GC-MS results allows for an unambiguous sample discrimination for both mashed fruits and juices. PTR-MS instrumental fingerprint provides, in a faster way, similar qualitative information on the overall flavor profile. The two cultivars show both qualitative and quantitative differences. SPME/GC-MS analysis shows that alcohols and aldehydes are more abundant in the headspace of Tulameen as, e.g., hexanal and hexanol that induce herbaceous odor notes. This observation has been confirmed by sensory analysis. PTR-MS was also used to monitor rapid processes that modify the original aromatic profile, such as lipo-oxigenase activity induced by tissue damages occurring during industrial transformation, accidental mechanical damages, or as a consequence of chewing. PMID:19348421

  16. Mass Spectrometry on Future Mars Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry investigations on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and the 2018 ExoMars missions will address core science objectives related to the potential habitability of their landing site environments and more generally the near-surface organic inventory of Mars. The analysis of complex solid samples by mass spectrometry is a well-known approach that can provide a broad and sensitive survey of organic and inorganic compounds as well as supportive data for mineralogical analysis. The science value of such compositional information is maximized when one appreciates the particular opportunities and limitations of in situ analysis with resource-constrained instrumentation in the context of a complete science payload and applied to materials found in a particular environment. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on MSL and the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on ExoMars will thus benefit from and inform broad-based analog field site work linked to the Mars environments where such analysis will occur.

  17. Ion chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method development and investigation of lithium hexafluorophosphate-based organic electrolytes and their thermal decomposition products.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Vadim; Grützke, Martin; Weber, Waldemar; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2014-08-01

    A method based on the coupling of ion chromatography (IC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for the separation and determination of thermal decomposition products of LiPF6-based organic electrolytes is presented. The utilized electrolytes, LP30 and LP50, are commercially available and consist of 1mol/l LiPF6 dissolved in ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate and ethylene carbonate/ethyl methyl carbonate, respectively. For the separation method development three ion chromatographic columns with different capacity and stationary phase were used and compared. Besides the known hydrolysis products of lithium hexafluorophosphate, several new organophosphates were separated and identified with the developed IC-ESI-MS method during aging investigations of the electrolytes. The chemical structures were elucidated with IC-ESI-MS/MS. PMID:24939088

  18. Investigation of the persistence of nerve agent degradation analytes on surfaces through wipe sampling and detection with ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Willison, Stuart A

    2015-01-20

    The persistence of chemical warfare nerve agent degradation analytes on surfaces is important, from indicating the presence of nerve agent on a surface to guiding environmental restoration of a site after a release. Persistence was investigated for several chemical warfare nerve agent degradation analytes on indoor surfaces and presents an approach for wipe sampling of surfaces, followed by wipe extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry detection. Commercially available wipe materials were investigated to determine optimal wipe recoveries. Tested surfaces included porous/permeable (vinyl tile, painted drywall, and wood) and largely nonporous/impermeable (laminate, galvanized steel, and glass) surfaces. Wipe extracts were analyzed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). UPLC provides a separation of targeted degradation analytes in addition to being nearly four times faster than high-performance liquid chromatography, allowing for greater throughput after a large-scale contamination incident and subsequent remediation events. Percent recoveries from nonporous/impermeable surfaces were 60-103% for isopropyl methylphosphonate (IMPA), GB degradate; 61-91% for ethyl methylphosphonate (EMPA), VX degradate; and 60-98% for pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMPA), GD degradate. Recovery efficiencies for methyl phosphonate (MPA), nerve agent degradate, and ethylhydrogen dimethylphosphonate (EHDMAP), GA degradate, were lower, perhaps due to matrix effects. Diisopropyl methylphosphonate, GB impurity, was not recovered from surfaces. The resulting detection limits for wipe extracts were 0.065 ng/cm(2) for IMPA, 0.079 ng/cm(2) for MPA, 0.040 ng/cm(2) for EMPA, 0.078 ng/cm(2) for EHDMAP, and 0.013 ng/cm(2) for PMPA. The data indicate that laboratories may hold wipe samples for up to 30 days prior to analysis. Target analytes were observed to persist on surfaces for at least 6 weeks. PMID:25495198

  19. Structure investigation of sertraline drug and its iodine product using mass spectrometry, thermal analyses and MO-calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayed, M. A.; Hawash, M. F.; Fahmey, M. A.; El-Habeeb, Abeer A.

    2007-11-01

    Sertraline (C 17H 17Cl 2N) as an antidepressant drug was investigated using thermal analysis (TA) measurements (TG/DTG and DTA) in comparison with electron impact (EI) mass spectral (MS) fragmentation at 70 eV. Semi-empirical MO-calculations, using PM3 procedure, has been carried out on neutral molecule and positively charged species. These calculations included bond length, bond order, bond strain, partial charge distribution and heats of formation (Δ Hf). Also, in the present work sertraline-iodine product was prepared and its structure was investigated using elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, MS and TA. It was also subjected to molecular orbital calculations (MOC) in order to confirm its fragmentation behavior by both MS and TA in comparison with the sertraline parent drug. In MS of sertraline the initial rupture occurred was CH 3NH 2+ fragment ion via H-rearrangement while in sertraline-iodine product the initial rupture was due to the loss of I + and/or HI + fragment ions followed by CH 2dbnd NH + fragment ion loss. In thermal analyses (TA) the initial rupture in sertraline is due to the loss of C 6H 3Cl 2 followed by the loss of CH 3-NH forming tetraline molecule which thermally decomposed to give C 4H 8, C 6H 6 or the loss of H 2 forming naphthalene molecule which thermally sublimated. In sertraline-iodine product as a daughter the initial thermal rupture is due to successive loss of HI and CH 3NH followed by the loss of C 6H 5HI and HCl. Sertraline biological activity increases with the introduction of iodine into its skeleton. The activities of the drug and its daughter are mainly depend upon their fragmentation to give their metabolites in vivo systems, which are very similar to the identified fragments in both MS and TA. The importance of the present work is also due to the decision of the possible mechanism of fragmentation of the drug and its daughter and its confirmation by MOC.

  20. Methods for recalibration of mass spectrometry data

    DOEpatents

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-03-03

    Disclosed are methods for recalibrating mass spectrometry data that provide improvement in both mass accuracy and precision by adjusting for experimental variance in parameters that have a substantial impact on mass measurement accuracy. Optimal coefficients are determined using correlated pairs of mass values compiled by matching sets of measured and putative mass values that minimize overall effective mass error and mass error spread. Coefficients are subsequently used to correct mass values for peaks detected in the measured dataset, providing recalibration thereof. Sub-ppm mass measurement accuracy has been demonstrated on a complex fungal proteome after recalibration, providing improved confidence for peptide identifications.

  1. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Durrant, S.F.

    1996-07-01

    Laser ablation for solid sample introduction to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for bulk and spatially-resolved elemental analysis is briefly reviewed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  3. Protein Sequencing with Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziady, Assem G.; Kinter, Michael

    The recent introduction of electrospray ionization techniques that are suitable for peptides and whole proteins has allowed for the design of mass spectrometric protocols that provide accurate sequence information for proteins. The advantages gained by these approaches over traditional Edman Degradation sequencing include faster analysis and femtomole, sometimes attomole, sensitivity. The ability to efficiently identify proteins has allowed investigators to conduct studies on their differential expression or modification in response to various treatments or disease states. In this chapter, we discuss the use of electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, a technique whereby protein-derived peptides are subjected to fragmentation in the gas phase, revealing sequence information for the protein. This powerful technique has been instrumental for the study of proteins and markers associated with various disorders, including heart disease, cancer, and cystic fibrosis. We use the study of protein expression in cystic fibrosis as an example.

  4. Gas-Phase Structure of Amyloid-β (12 - 28) Peptide Investigated by Infrared Spectroscopy, Electron Capture Dissociation and Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thi Nga; Poully, Jean Christophe; Lecomte, Frédéric; Nieuwjaer, Nicolas; Manil, Bruno; Desfrançois, Charles; Chirot, Fabien; Lemoine, Jerome; Dugourd, Philippe; van der Rest, Guillaume; Grégoire, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    The gas-phase structures of doubly and triply protonated Amyloid-β12-28 peptides have been investigated through the combination of ion mobility (IM), electron capture dissociation (ECD) mass spectrometry, and infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy together with theoretical modeling. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to explore the conformational space of these protonated peptides, from which several classes of structures were found. Among the low-lying conformers, those with predicted diffusion cross-sections consistent with the ion mobility experiment were further selected and their IR spectra simulated using a hybrid quantum mechanical/semiempirical method at the ONIOM DFT/B3LYP/6-31 g(d)/AM1 level. In ECD mass spectrometry, the c/z product ion abundance (PIA) has been analyzed for the two charge states and revealed drastic differences. For the doubly protonated species, N - Cα bond cleavage occurs only on the N and C terminal parts, while a periodic distribution of PIA is clearly observed for the triply charged peptides. These PIA distributions have been rationalized by comparison with the inverse of the distances from the protonated sites to the carbonyl oxygens for the conformations suggested from IR and IM experiments. Structural assignment for the amyloid peptide is then made possible by the combination of these three experimental techniques that provide complementary information on the possible secondary structure adopted by peptides. Although globular conformations are favored for the doubly protonated peptide, incrementing the charge state leads to a conformational transition towards extended structures with 310- and α-helix motifs.

  5. Ion mass spectrometry investigations of the discharge during reactive high power pulsed and direct current magnetron sputtering of carbon in Ar and Ar/N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.; Greczynski, G.; Jensen, J.; Hultman, L.; Czigany, Zs.

    2012-07-01

    Ion mass spectrometry was used to investigate discharges formed during high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) of a graphite target in Ar and Ar/N{sub 2} ambient. Ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) were recorded in time-averaged and time-resolved mode for Ar{sup +}, C{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, N{sup +}, and C{sub x}N{sub y}{sup +} ions. An increase of N{sub 2} in the sputter gas (keeping the deposition pressure, pulse width, pulse frequency, and pulse energy constant) results for the HiPIMS discharge in a significant increase in C{sup +}, N{sup +}, and CN{sup +} ion energies. Ar{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, and C{sub 2}N{sup +} ion energies, in turn, did not considerably vary with the changes in working gas composition. The HiPIMS process showed higher ion energies and fluxes, particularly for C{sup +} ions, compared to DCMS. The time evolution of the plasma species was analyzed for HiPIMS and revealed the sequential arrival of working gas ions, ions ejected from the target, and later during the pulse-on time molecular ions, in particular CN{sup +} and C{sub 2}N{sup +}. The formation of fullerene-like structured CN{sub x} thin films for both modes of magnetron sputtering is explained by ion mass-spectrometry results and demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy as well as diffraction.

  6. Mass Spectrometry in the Home and Garden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, Christopher J.; Bain, Ryan M.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application.

  7. Spatial Autocorrelation in Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cassese, Alberto; Ellis, Shane R; Ogrinc Potočnik, Nina; Burgermeister, Elke; Ebert, Matthias; Walch, Axel; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; McDonnell, Liam A; Heeren, Ron M A; Balluff, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful molecular imaging technique. In microprobe MSI, images are created through a grid-wise interrogation of individual spots by mass spectrometry across a surface. Classical statistical tests for within-sample comparisons fail as close-by measurement spots violate the assumption of independence of these tests, which can lead to an increased false-discovery rate. For spatial data, this effect is referred to as spatial autocorrelation. In this study, we investigated spatial autocorrelation in three different matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MSI data sets. These data sets cover different molecular classes (metabolites/drugs, lipids, and proteins) and different spatial resolutions ranging from 20 to 100 μm. Significant spatial autocorrelation was detected in all three data sets and found to increase with decreasing pixel size. To enable statistical testing for differences in mass signal intensities between regions of interest within MSI data sets, we propose the use of Conditional Autoregressive (CAR) models. We show that, by accounting for spatial autocorrelation, discovery rates (i.e., the ratio between the features identified and the total number of features) could be reduced between 21% and 69%. The reliability of this approach was validated by control mass signals based on prior knowledge. In light of the advent of larger MSI data sets based on either an increased spatial resolution or 3D data sets, accounting for effects due to spatial autocorrelation becomes even more indispensable. Here, we propose a generic and easily applicable workflow to enable within-sample statistical comparisons. PMID:27180608

  8. Microorganism characterization by single particle mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Russell, Scott C

    2009-01-01

    In recent years a major effort by several groups has been undertaken to identify bacteria by mass spectrometry at the single cell level. The intent of this review is to highlight the recent progress made in the application of single particle mass spectrometry to the analysis of microorganisms. A large portion of the review highlights improvements in the ionization and mass analysis of bio-aerosols, or particles that contain biologically relevant molecules such as peptides or proteins. While these are not direct applications to bacteria, the results have been central to a progression toward single cell mass spectrometry. Developments in single particle matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) are summarized. Recent applications of aerosol laser desorption/ionization (LDI) to the analysis of single microorganisms are highlighted. Successful applications of off-line and on-the-fly aerosol MALDI to microorganism detection are discussed. Limitations to current approaches and necessary future achievements are also addressed. PMID:18949817

  9. Mass Spectrometry of Intact Membrane Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Reading, Eamonn; Hopper, Jonathan T.S.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of intact soluble protein complexes has emerged as a powerful technique to study the stoichiometry, structure-function and dynamics of protein assemblies. Recent developments have extended this technique to the study of membrane protein complexes where it has already revealed subunit stoichiometries and specific phospholipid interactions. Here, we describe a protocol for mass spectrometry of membrane protein complexes. The protocol begins with preparation of the membrane protein complex enabling not only the direct assessment of stoichiometry, delipidation, and quality of the target complex, but also evaluation of the purification strategy. A detailed list of compatible non-ionic detergents is included, along with a protocol for screening detergents to find an optimal one for mass spectrometry, biochemical and structural studies. This protocol also covers the preparation of lipids for protein-lipid binding studies and includes detailed settings for a Q-ToF mass spectrometer after introduction of complexes from gold-coated nanoflow capillaries. PMID:23471109

  10. Analytical aspects of hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Engen, John R.; Wales, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The analytical aspects of measuring hydrogen exchange by mass spectrometry are reviewed. The nature of analytical selectivity in hydrogen exchange is described followed by review of the analytical tools required to accomplish fragmentation, separation, and the mass spectrometry measurements under restrictive exchange quench conditions. In contrast to analytical quantitation that relies on measurements of peak intensity or area, quantitation in hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry depends on measuring a mass change with respect to an undeuterated or deuterated control, resulting in a value between zero and the maximum amount of deuterium that could be incorporated. Reliable quantitation is a function of experimental fidelity and to achieve high measurement reproducibility, a large number of experimental variables must be controlled during sample preparation and analysis. The method also reports on important qualitative aspects of the sample, including conformational heterogeneity and population dynamics. PMID:26048552

  11. Investigation of cannabis biomarkers and transformation products in waters by liquid chromatography coupled to time of flight and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boix, Clara; Ibáñez, María; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Sancho, Juan V; Hernández, Félix

    2014-03-01

    11-Nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) is commonly selected as biomarker for the investigation of cannabis consumption through wastewater analysis. The removal efficiency of THC-COOH in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) has been reported to vary between 31% and 98%. Accordingly, possible transformation products (TPs) of this metabolite might be formed during treatment processes or in receiving surface water under environmental conditions. In this work, surface water was spiked with THC-COOH and subjected to hydrolysis, chlorination and photo-degradation (both ultraviolet and simulated sunlight) experiments under laboratory-controlled conditions. One hydrolysis, eight chlorination, three ultraviolet photo-degradation and seven sunlight photo-degradation TPs were tentatively identified by liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LC-QTOF MS). In a subsequent step, THC-COOH and the identified TPs were searched in wastewater samples using LC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with triple quadrupole. THC-COOH was found in all influent and effluent wastewater samples analyzed, although at significant lower concentrations in the effluent samples. The removal efficiency of WWTP under study was approximately 86%. Furthermore, THC-COOH was also investigated in several surface waters, and it was detected in 50% of the samples analyzed. Regarding TPs, none were found in influent wastewater, while one hydrolysis and five photo-degradation (simulated sunlight) TPs were detected in effluent and surface waters. The most detected compound, resulting from sunlight photo-degradation, was found in 60% of surface waters analyzed. This fact illustrates the importance of investigating these TPs in the aquatic environment. PMID:24216262

  12. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SULFONATED AZO DYES USING LIQUID SECONDARY ION MASS SPECTROMETRY/TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eight monosulfonated and disulfonated azo dyes were analyzed using liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry, in the negative ion mode, under low-energy conditions (110-150 eV). any structurally characteristic fragment ions were obtained, several of which ha...

  13. Quantitative mass spectrometry of urinary biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Jerebtsova, Marina; Nekhai, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of treatment of renal diseases is limited because the lack of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic markers. Despite the more than a decade of intensive investigation of urinary biomarkers, no new clinical biomarkers were approved. This is in part because the early expectations toward proteomics in biomarkers discovery were significantly higher than the capability of technology at the time. However, during the last decade, proteomic technology has made dramatic progress in both the hardware and software methods. In this review we are discussing modern quantitative methods of mass-spectrometry and providing several examples of their applications for discovery and validation of renal disease biomarkers. We are optimistic about future prospects for the development of novel of specific clinical urinary biomarkers. PMID:25984422

  14. Mass Spectrometry Methodology in Lipid Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Han, Juanjuan; Wang, Zhenpeng; Liu, Jian’an; Wei, Jinchao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2014-01-01

    Lipidomics is an emerging field, where the structures, functions and dynamic changes of lipids in cells, tissues or body fluids are investigated. Due to the vital roles of lipids in human physiological and pathological processes, lipidomics is attracting more and more attentions. However, because of the diversity and complexity of lipids, lipid analysis is still full of challenges. The recent development of methods for lipid extraction and analysis and the combination with bioinformatics technology greatly push forward the study of lipidomics. Among them, mass spectrometry (MS) is the most important technology for lipid analysis. In this review, the methodology based on MS for lipid analysis was introduced. It is believed that along with the rapid development of MS and its further applications to lipid analysis, more functional lipids will be identified as biomarkers and therapeutic targets and for the study of the mechanisms of disease. PMID:24921707

  15. Quantitative imaging of platinum based on laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to investigate toxic side effects of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Köppen, C; Reifschneider, O; Castanheira, I; Sperling, M; Karst, U; Ciarimboli, G

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a quantitative bioimaging method for platinum based on laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and its application for a biomedical study concerning toxic side effects of cisplatin. To trace the histopathology back to cisplatin, platinum was localized and quantified in major functional units of testicle, cochlea, kidney, nerve and brain sections from cisplatin treated mice. The direct consideration of the histology enables precise interpretation of the Pt images and the novel quantitative evaluation approach allows significantly more precise investigations than the pure image. For the first time, platinum was detected and quantified in all major injured structures including organ of Corti of cochlea and seminiferous tubule of testicle. In this way, proximal tubule in kidney, Leydig cells in testicle, stria vascularis and organ of Corti in cochlea and nerve fibers in sciatic nerves are confirmed as targets of cisplatin in these organs. However, the accumulation of platinum in almost all investigated structures also raises questions about more complex pathogenesis including direct and indirect interruption of several biological processes. PMID:26477751

  16. UV laser ablation of GdCa4O(BO3)3 (GdCOB) investigated by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chéty-Gimondo, Rachel; Aubriet, Frédéric; Millon, Eric; Muller, J-F

    2004-01-01

    The ions generated by laser ablation (LA) of calcium and gadolinium oxoborate GdCa4O(BO3)3 (GdCOB) were investigated by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS), a powerful tool for the characterization of ionic species produced by laser interaction with solid material. In order to better understand the matter transfer and the mechanism of thin film growth by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD), cationic and anionic clusters generated by UV laser ablation of GdCOB bulk material were studied. Laser ablation of GdCOB leads to the formation of various cluster ions which result from association of CaO, BO and B2O3 building blocks (BB) with different charge carriers (CC): H+, BO+, GdO+ in positive ion mode, and BO2-, OK-, OH-, Cl-, WO3- in negative ion mode. LA-FTICRMS investigations allow us to assign a valence state to each metallic atom included in each BB. A +II chemical state may be associated with calcium and +II and +III ones to boron. UV laser ablation of GdCOB therefore induces reduction processes of boron species in the gas phase. The oxygen reactive atmosphere used during PLD experiments allows the growth of stoichiometric thin films by fixation of oxygen on the ablated species. PMID:15529417

  17. The Potential of Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) and Gas Chromatography-IRMS Analysis of Triacetone Triperoxide in Forensic Explosives Investigations.

    PubMed

    Bezemer, Karlijn D B; Koeberg, Mattijs; van der Heijden, Antoine E D M; van Driel, Chris A; Blaga, Cornelia; Bruinsma, Jildert; van Asten, Arian C

    2016-09-01

    Studying links between triacetone triperoxide (TATP) samples from crime scenes and suspects can assist in criminal investigations. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and gas chromatography (GC)-IRMS were used to measure the isotopic compositions of TATP and its precursors acetone and hydrogen peroxide. In total, 31 TATP samples were synthesized with different raw material combinations and reaction conditions. For carbon, a good differentiation and a linear relationship were observed for acetone-TATP combinations. The extent of negative (δ(13) C) fractionation depended on the reaction yield. Limited enrichment was observed for the hydrogen isotope (δ(2) H) values of the TATP samples probably due to a constant exchange of hydrogen atoms in aqueous solution. For oxygen (δ(18) O), the small isotopic range and excess of water in hydrogen peroxide resulted in poor differentiation. GC-IRMS and IRMS data were comparable except for one TATP sample prepared with high acid concentration demonstrating the potential of compound-specific isotope analysis. Carbon IRMS has practical use in forensic TATP investigations. PMID:27356279

  18. Investigations of the Mechanism of the "Proline Effect" in Tandem Mass Spectrometry Experiments: The "Pipecolic Acid Effect"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulfs, Mary Disa M.; Breci, Linda; Bernier, Matthew; Hamdy, Omar M.; Janiga, Ashley; Wysocki, Vicki; Poutsma, John C.

    2014-10-01

    The fragmentation behavior of a set of model peptides containing proline, its four-membered ring analog azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (Aze), its six-membered ring analog pipecolic acid (Pip), an acyclic secondary amine residue N-methyl-alanine (NMeA), and the D stereoisomers of Pro and Pip has been determined using collision-induced dissociation in ESI-tandem mass spectrometers. Experimental results for AAXAA, AVXLG, AAAXA, AGXGA, and AXPAA peptides are presented, where X represents Pro, Aze, Pip, or NMeA. Aze- and Pro-containing peptides fragment according to the well-established "proline effect" through selective cleavage of the amide bond N-terminal to the Aze/Pro residue to give yn + ions. In contrast, Pip- and NMA-fragment through a different mechanism, the "pipecolic acid effect," selectively at the amide bond C-terminal to the Pip/NMA residue to give bn + ions. Calculations of the relative basicities of various sites in model peptide molecules containing Aze, Pro, Pip, or NMeA indicate that whereas the "proline effect' can in part be rationalized by the increased basicity of the prolyl-amide site, the "pipecolic acid effect" cannot be justified through the basicity of the residue. Rather, the increased flexibility of the Pip and NMeA residues allow for conformations of the peptide for which transfer of the mobile proton to the amide site C-terminal to the Pip/NMeA becomes energetically favorable. This argument is supported by the differing results obtained for AAPAA versus AA(D-Pro)AA, a result that can best be explained by steric effects. Fragmentation of pentapeptides containing both Pro and Pip indicate that the "pipecolic acid effect" is stronger than the "proline effect."

  19. Mass spectrometry and the environmental sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hites, Ronald A.

    1992-09-01

    Research in environmental mass spectrometry focuses on two broad areas: development of new methods for a wide range of pollutants; and using existing methods to understand the fate of pollutants in nature. This paper will present examples of both types of research. In some environmental settings it is important to have rapid analytical turnaround, which suggests that samples should be analyzed in the field rather than in a remote laboratory. Thus, there has been considerable interest in "fieldable" mass spectrometers. Volatile and water soluble analytes can be introduced into a mass spectrometer by passing the water sample over a semi-permeable membrane. The analytes of interest pass through the membrane, but the water does not. This method may be useful in situations that require a continuous readout of concentration. Like mass spectrometrists everywhere, environmental scientists have explored the many facets of liquid chromatographic mass spectrometry. Work in our laboratory has centered on continuous flow fast atom bombardment (CF-FAB) as the LCMS interface. In addition, flow injection analysis is possible using CF-FAB. By avoiding chromatographic separation, the throughput of the analytical system is increased. Frequently, tandem mass spectrometry is necessary to unscramble the chemical signals produced by this technique. Electron capture negative ionization mass spectrometry can achieve sensitivities of a few attomoles for selected compounds; furthermore, the technique can be remarkably specific. These features make it ideal for the analysis of highly chlorinated environmental contaminants such as chlorinated dioxins. Such an application will be presented in detail.

  20. Investigating interactions of the pentraxins serum amyloid P component and C-reactive protein by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, J Andrew; Robinson, Carol V

    2003-10-15

    The oligomeric state of human SAP (serum amyloid P component) in the absence and presence of known ligands has been investigated using nanoelectrospray ionization MS. At pH 8.0, in the absence of Ca2+, SAP has been shown to consist of pentameric and decameric forms. In the presence of physiological levels of Ca2+, SAP was observed to exist primarily as a pentamer, reflecting its in vivo state. dAMP was shown not only to promote decamerization, but also to lead to decamer stacking involving up to 30 monomers. A mechanism for this finding is proposed. CRP (C-reactive protein), a pentraxin closely related to SAP, exists as a pentamer in the presence or absence of Ca2+. Pentamers of CRP and SAP were shown to form mixed decamers in Ca2+-free buffer; however, in the presence of Ca2+, this interaction was not observed. Furthermore, no exchange of monomeric subunits was observed between the SAP and CRP oligomers, suggesting a remarkable stability of the individual pentameric complexes. PMID:12892563

  1. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  2. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Severs, J.C.

    1999-11-30

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an analyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  3. Biodegradation of carbamazepine and clarithromycin by Trichoderma harzianum and Pleurotus ostreatus investigated by liquid chromatography - high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (FTICR MS-IRMPD).

    PubMed

    Buchicchio, Alessandro; Bianco, Giuliana; Sofo, Adriano; Masi, Salvatore; Caniani, Donatella

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the capability of pharmaceutical biodegradation of fungus Trichoderma harzianum was evaluated through the comparison with the well-known biodegradation capability of white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus. The study was performed in aqueous phase under aerobic conditions, using two of the most frequently detected drugs in water bodies: carbamazepine and clarithromycin, with concentrations commonly found in treated wastewater (4μg/l and 0.03μg/l respectively). For the first time, we demonstrated that T. harzianum is able to remove carbamazepine and clarithromycin. The analyses were performed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, using high-resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry upon electrospray ionization in positive ion mode. The high selectivity and mass accuracy provided by high-resolution mass spectrometry, allowed us to identify some unknown metabolites. On the basis of our study, the major metabolites detected in liquid culture treated by T. harzianum were: 14-hydroxy-descladinosyl- and descladinosyl-clarithromycin, which are pharmacologically inactive products not dangerous for the environment. PMID:27039063

  4. Mass spectrometry imaging and profiling of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Lanni, Eric J.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging and profiling of individual cells and subcellular structures provide unique analytical capabilities for biological and biomedical research, including determination of the biochemical heterogeneity of cellular populations and intracellular localization of pharmaceuticals. Two mass spectrometry technologies—secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS)—are most often used in micro-bioanalytical investigations. Recent advances in ion probe technologies have increased the dynamic range and sensitivity of analyte detection by SIMS, allowing two- and three-dimensional localization of analytes in a variety of cells. SIMS operating in the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) mode can routinely reach spatial resolutions at the submicron level; therefore, it is frequently used in studies of the chemical composition of subcellular structures. MALDI MS offers a large mass range and high sensitivity of analyte detection. It has been successfully applied in a variety of single-cell and organelle profiling studies. Innovative instrumentation such as scanning microprobe MALDI and mass microscope spectrometers enable new subcellular MSI measurements. Other approaches for MS-based chemical imaging and profiling include those based on near-field laser ablation and inductively-coupled plasma MS analysis, which offer complementary capabilities for subcellular chemical imaging and profiling. PMID:22498881

  5. Analysis of Electroblotted Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Garcia, Jose L.; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Identification of proteins by mass spectrometry is crucial for better understanding of many biological, biochemical, and biomedical processes. Here we describe two methods for the identification of electroblotted proteins by on-membrane digestion prior to analysis by mass spectrometry. These on-membrane methods take approximately half the time of in-gel digestion and provide better digestion efficiency, due to the better accessibility of the protease to the proteins adsorbed onto the nitrocellulose, and better protein sequence coverage, especially for membrane proteins where large and hydrophobic peptides are commonly present. PMID:26139272

  6. Mass spectrometry for pectin structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Ralet, Marie-Christine; Lerouge, Patrice; Quéméner, Bernard

    2009-09-28

    Pectin are extremely complex biopolymers made up of different structural domains. Enzymatic degradation followed by purification and structural analysis of the degradation products proved to be efficient tools for the understanding of pectin fine structure, including covalent interactions between pectic structural domains or with other cell wall polysaccharides. Due to its high sensitivity, high throughput and capacity to analyze mixtures, mass spectrometry has gained more and more importance as a tool for oligosaccharides structural characterization in the past 10 years. This review will focus on the combined use of mass spectrometry and enzymatic digestion for pectins structural characterization. PMID:19058795

  7. Ultraviolet femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Imasaka, Totaro

    2008-01-01

    For this study, multiphoton ionization/mass spectrometry using an ultraviolet (UV) femtosecond laser was employed for the trace analysis of organic compounds. Some of the molecules, such as dioxins, contain several chlorine atoms and have short excited-state lifetimes due to a "heavy atom" effect. A UV femtosecond laser is, then, useful for efficient resonance excitation and subsequent ionization. A technique of multiphoton ionization using an extremely short laser pulse (e.g., <10 fs), referred to as "impulsive ionization," may have a potential for use in fragmentation-free ionization, thus providing information on molecular weight in mass spectrometry. PMID:18302290

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors: investigation of urinary metabolites and oxidation products of sodium borocaptate by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gibson, C R; Staubus, A E; Barth, R F; Yang, W; Kleinholz, N M; Jones, R B; Green-Church, K; Tjarks, W; Soloway, A H

    2001-12-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on a nuclear capture reaction that occurs when boron-10, a stable isotope, is irradiated with low energy neutrons to produce high-energy alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. The purpose of the present study was to determine what urinary metabolites, if any, could be detected in patients with brain tumors who were given sodium borocaptate (BSH), a drug that has been used clinically for BNCT. BSH was infused intravenously over a 1-h time period at doses of 26.5, 44.1, or 88.2 mg/kg of body weight to patients with high-grade brain tumors. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has been used to investigate possible urinary metabolites of BSH. Chemical and instrument conditions were established to detect BSH and its possible metabolites in both positive and negative electrospray ionization modes. Using this methodology, boronated ions were found in patients' urine samples that appeared to be consistent with the following chemical structures: BSH sulfenic acid (BSOH), BSH sulfinic acid (BSO(2)H), BSH disulfide (BSSB), BSH thiosulfinate (BSOSB), and a BSH-S-cysteine conjugate (BSH-CYS). Although BSH has been used clinically for BNCT since the late 1960s, this is the first report of specific biotransformation products following administration to patients. Further studies will be required to determine both the biological significance of these metabolites and whether any of these accumulate in significant amounts in brain tumors. PMID:11717178

  9. Processing Technology Investigation of Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) Leaf by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Combined with Chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Labin; Jiang, Xue; Huang, Linfang; Chen, Shilin

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF/MS) and multivariate statistical analysis were used to investigate the processing technology of Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) leaf (pipaye, PPY). The differences in samples processed using different methods were revealed by unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA). In the scores plot of PCA, honey-processed PPY (PPPY), crude PPY (CPPY), and heated PPY (HPPY) were clearly discriminated. Furthermore, samples processed at different temperatures could also be distinguished; indeed, our PCA results demonstrated the importance of temperature during processing. Two unique marker ions were found to discriminate between PPPY and CPPY by orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), which could be used as potential chemical markers. The method was further confirmed by a verification test with commercial PPY. The orthogonal array experiment revealed an optimized processing condition with 50% honey at 140°C for 20 min after 4 h of moistening time, a process that provides significant information for standardized production. PMID:23667702

  10. Investigation of the chemical interface in the soybean–aphid and rice–bacteria interactions using MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Klein, Adam T.; Yagnik, Gargey B.; Hohenstein, Jessica D.; Ji, Zhiyuan; Zi, Jiachen; Reichert, Malinda D.; MacIntosh, Gustavo C.; Yang, Bing; Peters, Reuben J.; Vela, Javier; et al

    2015-04-27

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is an emerging technology for high-resolution plant biology. It has been utilized to study plant–pest interactions, but limited to the surface interfaces. Here we expand the technology to explore the chemical interactions occurring inside the plant tissues. Two sample preparation methods, imprinting and fracturing, were developed and applied, for the first time, to visualize internal metabolites of leaves in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-MSI. This is also the first time nanoparticle-based ionization was implemented to ionize diterpenoid phytochemicals that were difficult to analyze with traditional organic matrices. The interactions between rice–bacterium and soybean–aphid were investigated asmore » two model systems to demonstrate the capability of high-resolution MSI based on MALDI. Localized molecular information on various plant- or pest-derived chemicals provided valuable insight for the molecular processes occurring during the plant–pest interactions. Basically, salicylic acid and isoflavone based resistance was visualized in the soybean–aphid system and antibiotic diterpenoids in rice–bacterium interactions.« less

  11. Further investigation of a peptide extraction method with mesoporous silica using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan; Wu, Dapeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2016-06-01

    Mobil Composition of Matter No. 41 (MCM-41) was the most frequently used mesoporous silica material to extract peptides from complex biological samples. However, there were confusing extraction conditions and large extraction efficiency variance among related reports, which resulted from unclear understanding about the interaction between the material and peptides. In this study, the extraction mechanism was investigated with one set of tryptic peptides by using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Generally, hydrophobic interaction and electrostatic attraction were two major driving forces for extraction of peptides, while electrostatic repulsion greatly weakened the interaction between the material and peptides with isoelectric points below the pH. With most peptides positively charged and MCM-41 slightly negatively charged, most efficient extraction was obtained at pH 3, and it was proved that electrostatic and hydrophobic interaction acted in synergy for extraction of all the peptides. A mixed solution of acetonitrile with buffers of high pH or ion strength was demonstrated to be favorable for elution, which performed much better than the commonly used eluate (mixture of acetonitrile with 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid). Finally, under optimum conditions, it was found that extraction efficiency of MCM-41 for protein digest and human serum was greatly improved. PMID:27059091

  12. Investigation of the chemical interface in the soybean–aphid and rice–bacteria interactions using MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Adam T.; Yagnik, Gargey B.; Hohenstein, Jessica D.; Ji, Zhiyuan; Zi, Jiachen; Reichert, Malinda D.; MacIntosh, Gustavo C.; Yang, Bing; Peters, Reuben J.; Vela, Javier; Lee, Young Jin

    2015-04-27

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is an emerging technology for high-resolution plant biology. It has been utilized to study plant–pest interactions, but limited to the surface interfaces. Here we expand the technology to explore the chemical interactions occurring inside the plant tissues. Two sample preparation methods, imprinting and fracturing, were developed and applied, for the first time, to visualize internal metabolites of leaves in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-MSI. This is also the first time nanoparticle-based ionization was implemented to ionize diterpenoid phytochemicals that were difficult to analyze with traditional organic matrices. The interactions between rice–bacterium and soybean–aphid were investigated as two model systems to demonstrate the capability of high-resolution MSI based on MALDI. Localized molecular information on various plant- or pest-derived chemicals provided valuable insight for the molecular processes occurring during the plant–pest interactions. Basically, salicylic acid and isoflavone based resistance was visualized in the soybean–aphid system and antibiotic diterpenoids in rice–bacterium interactions.

  13. Structural characterization of major soyasaponins in traditional cultivars of Fagioli di Sarconi beans investigated by high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Giuliana; Buchicchio, Alessandro; Cataldi, Tommaso R I

    2015-08-01

    Major soyasaponins, i.e., soyasaponins I, V, βg, and αg from traditional Fagioli di Sarconi beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., ecotype Tabacchino), were analyzed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS) using high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS on electrospray ionization in positive-ion mode. Fagioli di Sarconi beans are protected by the European Union [Commission Regulation (EC) No 1263/96] with the mark PGI (for "Protected Geographical Indication"), and are cultivated in Basilicata (southern Italy). Protonated adducts of soyasaponins I, V, βg, and αg were observed at m/z 943.5262, 959.5213, 1069.5583, and 1085.5534, respectively. Gas-phase dissociation of soyasaponins by infrared multiphoton dissociation FTICR MS was performed using a CO2 laser source at a wavelength of 10.6 μm. Most of the fragment ions were identified unambiguously by using the high-resolution and accurate mass value provided by the FTICR mass spectrometer. All soyasaponins exhibit a sequential and neutral loss of sugar moieties at relatively short irradiation times (i.e., less than 50 ms). When the pulse length was increased, a more pronounced fragmentation occurred, with several signals in the lower part of the mass spectrum. In the case of soyasaponins βg and αg, the occurrence of the conjugated product ion at m/z 127.0389 ([C6H6O3 + H](+), 2,3-dihydro-2,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one) was evidenced. Coupling reversed-phase liquid chromatography with high-performance FTICR MS in combination with infrared multiphoton dissociation tandem MS proved to be very promising for the structural characterization of soyasaponins, and is also suitable for the rapid and accurate structural investigation of other saponins. Graphical Abstract Representative Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation (IRMPD)-FTICR MS spectra of main group B saponins in Fagioli di Sarconi beans. PMID:26065561

  14. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Kenneth L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses reactions and characteristics of fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectroscopy in which samples are ionized in a condensed state by bombardment with xenon or argon atoms, yielding positive/negative secondary ions. Includes applications of FAB to structural problems and considers future developments using the technique. (Author/JN)

  15. Continuous Simultaneous Detection in Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.; Sperline, Roger P.; Denton, M. Bonner; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2007-10-15

    In mass spectrometry, several advantages can be derived when multiple mass-to-charge values are detected simultaneously. One such advantage is an improved duty cycle, which leads to superior limits of detection, better precision, shorter analysis times, and reduced sample sizes. A second advantage is the ability to reduce correlated noise by taking the ratio of two or more simultaneously collected signals, enabling greatly enhanced isotope ratio data. A final advantage is the elimination of spectral skew, leading to more accurate transient signal analysis. Here, these advantages are demonstrated by means of a novel Faraday-strip array detector coupled to a Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrograph. The same system is used to monitor elemental fractionation phenomena in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  16. Targeted quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Daniel C; Zimmerman, Lisa J

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative measurement of proteins is one of the most fundamental analytical tasks in a biochemistry laboratory, but widely used immunochemical methods often have limited specificity and high measurement variation. In this review, we discuss applications of multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, which allows sensitive, precise quantitative analyses of peptides and the proteins from which they are derived. Systematic development of MRM assays is permitted by databases of peptide mass spectra and sequences, software tools for analysis design and data analysis, and rapid evolution of tandem mass spectrometer technology. Key advantages of MRM assays are the ability to target specific peptide sequences, including variants and modified forms, and the capacity for multiplexing that allows analysis of dozens to hundreds of peptides. Different quantitative standardization methods provide options that balance precision, sensitivity, and assay cost. Targeted protein quantitation by MRM and related mass spectrometry methods can advance biochemistry by transforming approaches to protein measurement. PMID:23517332

  17. Mass spectrometry in the home and garden.

    PubMed

    Pulliam, Christopher J; Bain, Ryan M; Wiley, Joshua S; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application. PMID:25510934

  18. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry biometrics

    DOEpatents

    Leclerc, Marion; Bowen, Benjamin; Northen, Trent

    2015-09-08

    Several embodiments described herein are drawn to methods of identifying an analyte on a subject's skin, methods of generating a fingerprint, methods of determining a physiological change in a subject, methods of diagnosing health status of a subject, and assay systems for detecting an analyte and generating a fingerprint, by nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS).

  19. Atmospheric pressure femtosecond laser imaging mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coello, Yves; Gunaratne, Tissa C.; Dantus, Marcos

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel imaging mass spectrometry technique that uses femtosecond laser pulses to directly ionize the sample. The method offers significant advantages over current techniques by eliminating the need of a laser-absorbing sample matrix, being suitable for atmospheric pressure sampling, and by providing 10μm resolution, as demonstrated here with a chemical image of vegetable cell walls.

  20. Accelerator mass spectrometry with heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberstock, Günther; Heinzl, Johann; Korschinek, Gunther; Morinaga, Haruhiko; Nolte, Eckehart; Ratzinger, Ulrich; Kato, Kazuo; Wolf, Manfred

    1986-11-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry measurements with fully stripped 36Cl ions have been performed at the Munich accelerator laboratory in order to date groundwaters and palaeontological samples, to study anthropogenic 36Cl produced through nuclear tests and to determine the fast neutron flux of the Hiroshima A-bomb.

  1. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Rune; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied to study biomolecules and one rapidly developing field is the global analysis of proteins, proteomics. Understanding and handling mass spectrometry data is a multifaceted task that requires many decisions to be made to get the most comprehensive information from an experiment. Later chapters in this book deal in-depth with various aspects of the process and how different tools can be applied to the many analytical challenges. This introductory chapter is intended as a basic introduction to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to set the scene for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different aspects of the proteome can be explored by choosing the right combination of sample preparation, MS instrumentation and data processing. This chapter gives an outline for some of these commonly used setups and some of the key concepts, many of which are explored in greater depth in later chapters. PMID:23666720

  2. Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry of Complex Organic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuzelaar, Henk L. C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Illustrates the state of the art in pyrolysis mass spectrometry techniques through applications in: (1) structural determination and quality control of synthetic polymers; (2) quantitative analysis of polymer mixtures; (3) classification and structural characterization of fossil organic matter; and (4) nonsupervised numerical extraction of…

  3. Optimization Of A Mass Spectrometry Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Jose; Alegria, F. Correa; Redondo, Luis; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Rocha, Jorge

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present and discuss a system developed in order to optimize the mass spectrometry process of an ion implanter. The system uses a PC to control and display the mass spectrum. The operator interacts with the I/O board, that interfaces with the computer and the ion implanter by a LabVIEW code. Experimental results are shown and the capabilities of the system are discussed.

  4. Investigation of the new sorption preconcentration systems for determination of noble metals in rocks by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dubenskiy, A S; Seregina, I F; Blinnikova, Z K; Tsyurupa, M P; Pavlova, L A; Davankov, V A; Bolshov, M A

    2016-06-01

    The reversible sorption preconcentration of noble metals (NMs) prior to their determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was investigated. Six new hypercrosslinked polystyrene sorbents were tested. The dependence of the degree of NMs sorption on the average degree of polymer network crosslinking and pore diameters was investigated. It was found that sorbents HP-100/6, HP-300/6 and HP-500/6 have low efficiency of NMs chlorocomplexes extraction. Among Stirosorb sorbents (Stirosorb-2, Stirosorb-514 and Stirosorb-584) the highest efficiency of the extraction of NMs' chlorocomplexes has Stirosorb-514. Tributylamine (TBA), N-methylbenzylamine (MBA), N,N-dimethylbenzylamine (DMBA), N,N-dibenzylmetylamine (DBMA) were studied as the reagents for extraction of Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt and Au chlorocomplexes from hydrochloric acid solutions in the form of ion associates by reversed-phase mechanism. The reversible quantitative extraction of Ru, Pd, Pt and Au in system Stirosorb-514 - TBA - 1M HCl in ethanol as eluent was achieved. It was found that resulting eluates do not contain matrix components which may cause spectral interferences on the stage of NMs determination by ICP-MS. The found scheme of NMs reversible sorption was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials of basic and ultrabasic rocks GPt-5, GPt-6 and SARM-7. Good agreement between the measured NMs concentrations and the certified values was demonstrated. The achieved limits of detection for Ru, Pd, Pt and Au vary within 10(-8)-10(-7)wt% range. PMID:27130114

  5. Application of mass spectrometry for metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuguang; Chowdhury, Swapan K; Alton, Kevin B

    2006-06-01

    Metabolism studies play a pivotal role in drug discovery and development. Characterization of metabolic "hot-spots" as well as reactive and pharmacologically active metabolites is critical to designing new drug candidates with improved metabolic stability, toxicological profile and efficacy. Metabolite identification in the preclinical species used for safety evaluation is required in order to determine whether human metabolites have been adequately tested during non-clinical safety assessment. From an instrumental standpoint, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) dominates all analytical tools used for metabolite identification. The general strategies employed for metabolite identification in both drug discovery and drug development settings together with sample preparation techniques are reviewed herein. These include a discussion of the various ionization methods, mass analyzers, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques that are used for structural characterization in a modern drug metabolism laboratory. Mass spectrometry-based techniques, such as stable isotope labeling, on-line H/D exchange, accurate mass measurement to enhance metabolite identification and recent improvements in data acquisition and processing for accelerating metabolite identification are also described. Rounding out this review, we offer additional thoughts about the potential of alternative and less frequently used techniques such as LC-NMR/MS, CRIMS and ICPMS. PMID:16787159

  6. Liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry for screening in vitro drug metabolites in humans: investigation on seven phenethylamine-based designer drugs.

    PubMed

    Lai, Foon Yin; Erratico, Claudio; Kinyua, Juliet; Mueller, Jochen F; Covaci, Adrian; van Nuijs, Alexander L N

    2015-10-10

    Phenethylamine-based designer drugs are prevalent within the new psychoactive substance market. Characterisation of their metabolites is important in order to identify suitable biomarkers which can be used for better monitoring their consumption. Careful design of in vitro metabolism experiments using subcellular liver fractions will assist in obtaining reliable outcomes for such purposes. The objective of this study was to stepwise investigate the in vitro human metabolism of seven phenethylamine-based designer drugs using individual families of enzymes. This included para-methoxyamphetamine, para-methoxymethamphetamine, 4-methylthioamphetamine, N-methyl-benzodioxolylbutanamine, benzodioxolylbutanamine, 5-(2-aminopropyl) benzofuran and 6-(2-aminopropyl) benzofuran. Identification and structural elucidation of the metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The targeted drugs were mainly metabolised by cytochrome P450 enzymes via O-dealkylation as the major pathway, followed by N-dealkylation, oxidation of unsubstituted C atoms and deamination (to a small extent). These drugs were largely free from Phase II metabolism. Only a limited number of metabolites were found which was consistent with the existing literature for other phenethylamine-based drugs. Also, the metabolism of most of the targeted drugs progressed at slow rate. The reproducibility of the identified metabolites was assessed through examining formation patterns using different incubation times, substrate and enzyme concentrations. Completion of the work has led to a set of metabolites which are representative for specific detection of these drugs in intoxicated individuals and also for meaningful evaluation of their use in communities by wastewater-based drug epidemiology. PMID:26112925

  7. Compositions and Structures of Vanadium Oxide Cluster Ions VmOn(±) (m = 2-20) Investigated by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jenna W J; Moriyama, Ryoichi; Tahara, Hiroshi; Ohshimo, Keijiro; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2016-06-01

    Stable compositions and geometrical structures of vanadium oxide cluster ions, VmOn(±), were investigated by ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS). The most stable compositions of vanadium oxide cluster cations were (V2O4)(V2O5)(m-2)/2(+) and (VO2)(V2O5)(m-1)/2(+), depending on the clusters with even and odd numbers of vanadium atoms. Compositions one-oxygen richer than the cations, such as (V2O5)m/2(-) and (VO3)(V2O5)(m-1)/2(-), were predominantly observed for cluster anions. Assignments of these stable cluster ion compositions, which were determined as a result of collision-induced dissociations in IM-MS, can partly be explained with consideration of spin density distribution. By comparing the experimental collision cross sections (CCSs) obtained from ion mobility measurement with CCSs of the theoretically calculated structures, we confirmed the patterned growth of geometrical structures partially discussed in previous theoretical and spectroscopic studies. We showed that even sized (V2O5)m/2(±) where m = 6-12 had right polygonal prism structures except for the anionic V12O30(-), and for the clusters of odd numbers of vanadium m, cations and anions can either have bridged or pyramid structures. Both of the odd sized structures proposed were derivatives from the even sized right polygonal prism structures. The exception, V12O30(-), which had a CCS almost equal to that of the neighboring smaller V11O28(-), should have a structure of higher density than the right hexagonal prism, in which it was proposed to be a captured pyramid structure, derived from V11O28(-). PMID:27172006

  8. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, T.; Booth, M.; Benyezzar, M.; Bacak, A.; Alfarra, M. R. R.; Topping, D. O.; Percival, C.

    2015-12-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  9. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas; Booth, A. Murray; Alfarra, Rami; Bacak, Asan; Pericval, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  10. Evolution of Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliuk, Shannon; Makarov, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We discuss the evolution of OrbitrapTM mass spectrometry (MS) from its birth in the late 1990s to its current role as one of the most prominent techniques for MS. The Orbitrap mass analyzer is the first high-performance mass analyzer that employs trapping of ions in electrostatic fields. Tight integration with the ion injection process enables the high-resolution, mass accuracy, and sensitivity that have become essential for addressing analytical needs in numerous areas of research, as well as in routine analysis. We examine three major families of instruments (related to the LTQ Orbitrap, Q Exactive, and Orbitrap Fusion mass spectrometers) in the context of their historical development over the past ten eventful years. We discuss as well future trends and perspectives of Orbitrap MS. We illustrate the compelling potential of Orbitrap-based mass spectrometers as (ultra) high-resolution platforms, not only for high-end proteomic applications, but also for routine targeted analysis.

  11. Nuclear applications of inorganic mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Laeter, John

    2010-01-01

    There are several basic characteristics of mass spectrometry that are not always fully appreciated by the science community. These characteristics include the distinction between relative and absolute isotope abundances, and the influence of isotope fractionation on the accuracy of isotopic measurements. These characteristics can be illustrated in the field of nuclear physics with reference to the measurement of nuclear parameters, which involve the use of enriched isotopes, and to test models of s-, r-, and p-process nucleosynthesis. The power of isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) to measure trace elements in primitive meteorites to produce accurate Solar System abundances has been essential to the development of nuclear astrophysics. The variety of mass spectrometric instrumentation used to measure the isotopic composition of elements has sometimes been accompanied by a lack of implementation of basic mass spectrometric protocols which are applicable to all instruments. These metrological protocols are especially important in atomic weight determinations, but must also be carefully observed in cases where the anomalies might be very small, such as in studies of the daughter products of extinct radionuclides to decipher events in the early history of the Solar System. There are occasions in which misleading conclusions have been drawn from isotopic data derived from mass spectrometers where such protocols have been ignored. It is important to choose the mass spectrometer instrument most appropriate to the proposed experiment. The importance of the integrative nature of mass spectrometric measurements has been demonstrated by experiments in which long, double beta decay and geochronological decay half-lives have been measured as an alternative to costly radioactive-counting experiments. This characteristic is also illustrated in the measurement of spontaneous fission yields, which have accumulated over long periods of time. Mass spectrometry is also a

  12. Linking Mass Spectrometry with Toxicology for Emerging Water Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This overview presentation will discuss the benefits of combining mass spectrometry with toxicology. These benefits will be described for 3 main areas: (1) Toxicity assays used to test new environmental contaminants previously identified using mass spectrometry, such that furth...

  13. Laser-desorption mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry and the mechanism of desorption ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zakett, D.; Schoen, A.E.; Cooks, R.G.; Hemberger, P.H.

    1981-03-11

    This paper reports sucrose mass spectra obtained by combining laser desorption with mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Remarkable similarities in fragmentation behavior with secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) provide evidence for mechanistic similarities between SIMS and laser desorption (LD). Attachment of alkali metals to organic molecules (cationization) is a common feature of desorption ionization. This process also occurs during laser desorption of involatile compounds which further indicates the existence of underlying similarities between LD and SIMS. Steady ion currents (several thousand ions per laser pulse) of cationized sucrose are obtained for relatively long periods (minutes).

  14. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Biemann, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    I review laboratory research on the development of mass spectrometric methodology for the determination of the structure of natural products of biological and medical interest, which I conducted from 1958 to the end of the twentieth century. The methodology was developed by converting small peptides to their corresponding polyamino alcohols to make them amenable to mass spectrometry, thereby making it applicable to whole proteins. The structures of alkaloids were determined by analyzing the fragmentation of a known alkaloid and then using the results to deduce the structures of related compounds. Heparin-like structures were investigated by determining their molecular weights from the mass of protonated molecular ions of complexes with highly basic, synthetic peptides. Mass spectrometry was also employed in the analysis of lunar material returned by the Apollo missions. A miniaturized gas chromatograph mass spectrometer was sent to Mars on board of the two Viking 1976 spacecrafts. PMID:26161970

  15. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemann, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    I review laboratory research on the development of mass spectrometric methodology for the determination of the structure of natural products of biological and medical interest, which I conducted from 1958 to the end of the twentieth century. The methodology was developed by converting small peptides to their corresponding polyamino alcohols to make them amenable to mass spectrometry, thereby making it applicable to whole proteins. The structures of alkaloids were determined by analyzing the fragmentation of a known alkaloid and then using the results to deduce the structures of related compounds. Heparin-like structures were investigated by determining their molecular weights from the mass of protonated molecular ions of complexes with highly basic, synthetic peptides. Mass spectrometry was also employed in the analysis of lunar material returned by the Apollo missions. A miniaturized gas chromatograph mass spectrometer was sent to Mars on board of the two Viking 1976 spacecrafts.

  16. Application of high-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to the investigation of glycosidically bound components related to cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale L. Var. Nanum) volatiles.

    PubMed

    Bicalho, B; Pereira, A S; Aquino Neto, F R; Pinto, A C; Rezende, C M

    2000-04-01

    Free and bound volatile components of a Brazilian cashew apple variety (Anacardium occidentale L. var. nanum) were obtained by simultaneous distillation-extraction (SDE) and XAD-2 adsorption. According to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses and retention indices, 62 free volatile constituents were characterized and quantified. They were esters (40%), terpenes (20%), hydrocarbons (14%), fatty acids (9%), aldehydes (8%), alcohols (3%), lactones (3%), ketones (1%), phenols (1%), and norisoprenoids (1%). The glycosidically bound volatile precursors were analyzed by high-temperature GC-MS, after room temperature silylation. Several conjugated alcohols and cinnamic acids were detected and reported as cashew apple glycosyl constituents for the first time. PMID:10775367

  17. High resolution laser mass spectrometry bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kermit K; Seneviratne, Chinthaka A; Ghorai, Suman

    2016-07-15

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was introduced more than five decades ago with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and a decade later with laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Large biomolecule imaging by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was developed in the 1990s and ambient laser MS a decade ago. Although SIMS has been capable of imaging with a moderate mass range at sub-micrometer lateral resolution from its inception, laser MS requires additional effort to achieve a lateral resolution of 10μm or below which is required to image at the size scale of single mammalian cells. This review covers untargeted large biomolecule MSI using lasers for desorption/ionization or laser desorption and post-ionization. These methods include laser microprobe (LDI) MSI, MALDI MSI, laser ambient and atmospheric pressure MSI, and near-field laser ablation MS. Novel approaches to improving lateral resolution are discussed, including oversampling, beam shaping, transmission geometry, reflective and through-hole objectives, microscope mode, and near-field optics. PMID:26972785

  18. Choosing between high-resolution mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry: Environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, M.J. ); Tondeur, Y. )

    1990-12-01

    Selectivity in environmental analyses requires the use of fractionation techniques and HRMS or MS/MS to eliminate specific and nonspecific interferences. In the analysis of TCDDs and TCDFs, HRMS is the method of choice when specific interferences arising from compounds with molecular or fragment ions can be separated from TCDD and TCDF ions at a resolving power of 10,000. In cases where HRMS does not provide adequate selectivity at this resolving power, MS/MS is needed. Analyses on a pulp and paper effluent extract show that MS/MS was able to substantially eliminate interferences due to the presence of methyl and ethyl tetrachlorinated dibenzofurans that were not removed by HRMS at resolving powers of 10,000 and 18,000. Nonspecific interferences may also be present due to coelution of compounds that cause changes in the response of the mass spectrometer and are best eliminated by fractionation techniques or by altering conditions of analyses.

  19. Detection of Gunshot Residues Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Blanes, Lucas; Cole, Nerida; Doble, Philip; Roux, Claude

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, forensic scientists have become increasingly interested in the detection and interpretation of organic gunshot residues (OGSR) due to the increasing use of lead- and heavy metal-free ammunition. This has also been prompted by the identification of gunshot residue- (GSR-) like particles in environmental and occupational samples. Various techniques have been investigated for their ability to detect OGSR. Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to a chromatographic system is a powerful tool due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. Further, modern MS instruments can detect and identify a number of explosives and additives which may require different ionization techniques. Finally, MS has been applied to the analysis of both OGSR and inorganic gunshot residue (IGSR), although the “gold standard” for analysis is scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microscopy (SEM-EDX). This review presents an overview of the technical attributes of currently available MS and ionization techniques and their reported applications to GSR analysis. PMID:24977168

  20. Signatures for Mass Spectrometry Data Quality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring data quality and proper instrument functionality is a prerequisite for scientific investigation. Manual quality assurance is time-consuming and subjective. Metrics for describing liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) data have been developed; however, the wide variety of LC–MS instruments and configurations precludes applying a simple cutoff. Using 1150 manually classified quality control (QC) data sets, we trained logistic regression classification models to predict whether a data set is in or out of control. Model parameters were optimized by minimizing a loss function that accounts for the trade-off between false positive and false negative errors. The classifier models detected bad data sets with high sensitivity while maintaining high specificity. Moreover, the composite classifier was dramatically more specific than single metrics. Finally, we evaluated the performance of the classifier on a separate validation set where it performed comparably to the results for the testing/training data sets. By presenting the methods and software used to create the classifier, other groups can create a classifier for their specific QC regimen, which is highly variable lab-to-lab. In total, this manuscript presents 3400 LC–MS data sets for the same QC sample (whole cell lysate of Shewanella oneidensis), deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD000320–PXD000324. PMID:24611607

  1. Cytotoxicity Test and Mass Spectrometry of IPMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Kazuto; Kamamichi, Norihiro; Yagi, Tohru; Asaka, Kinji; Mukai, Toshiharu

    Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) is a promising material in biomedical actuators and sensors because IPMC is soft and flexible, leading to the safety of the device itself. The purpose of this study is to investigate the biocompatibility of IPMC by in vitro experiments, in order to evaluate the applicability in biomedical fields. In addition to an IPMC specimen prepared by the conventional “impregnation-reduction method” using cationic gold complexes and reducing agents, two specimens were prepared by processes in addition to that used for the conventional IPMC specimen. One specimen was reduced in Na2SO3 solution and another specimen was cleaned in H2O2 solution. Colony-forming test using Chinese hamster V79 cells shows high cytotoxicity of all IPMC specimens. Examination of direct inlet mass spectrometry (DI-MS) revealed that the peak intensity of gold complex (particularly, m/z=180) was different from that of Nafion film. Monitoring the peak at m/z=180 showed a remnant with the structure of phenanthroline in IPMC specimens which were not cleaned in H2O2 solution.

  2. Mass spectrometry in Chronic Kidney Disease research

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has evolved into an invaluable tool for biomedical research and for research on renal diseases. A central player in the proteomic revolution is the mass spectrometer and its application to analyze biological samples. Our need to understand both the identity of proteins and their abundance has led to improvements in mass spectrometers and their ability to analyze complex tryptic peptide mixtures with high sensitivity and high mass accuracy in a high throughput fashion (such as the LTQ-Orbitrap). It should not be surprising that this occurred coincident with dramatic improvements in our understanding chronic kidney disease (CKD), the mechanisms through which CKD progresses and the development of candidate CKD biomarkers. This review attempts to present a basic framework for the operational components of mass spectrometers, basic insight into how they are used in renal research and a discussion of CKD research that was driven by mass spectrometry. PMID:21044768

  3. Storage-Ring Mass Spectrometry in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzaki, Fumi; Yamaguchi, Takayuki

    Atomic masses are a fundamental ground-state property of nuclei, reflecting a wide variety of structures and dynamics among nucleons. High-precision mass values of short-lived, in particular neutron-rich, nuclei are a key issue toward full understanding of astrophysical nucleosynthesis, as well as nuclear shell evolution far from stability. Beyond the precision mass measurements performed at worldwide ion-trap facilities, a new method of storage-ring mass spectrometry is now being developed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory in Japan. Combined with the highest intensities of intermediate-energy radioactive ion beams currently available through in-flight separation of uranium fission products, the present method will enable us to measure the masses of extremely neutron-rich, rare species located on the r-process pathway, with a tiny yield (as low as ~1 counts/day).

  4. Laser-Cooling-Assisted Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Christian; Schowalter, Steven J.; Chen, Kuang; Sullivan, Scott T.; Hudson, Eric R.

    2014-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is used in a wide range of scientific disciplines including proteomics, pharmaceutics, forensics, and fundamental physics and chemistry. Given this ubiquity, there is a worldwide effort to improve the efficiency and resolution of mass spectrometers. However, the performance of all techniques is ultimately limited by the initial phase-space distribution of the molecules being analyzed. Here, we dramatically reduce the width of this initial phase-space distribution by sympathetically cooling the input molecules with laser-cooled, cotrapped atomic ions, improving both the mass resolution and detection efficiency of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer by over an order of magnitude. Detailed molecular-dynamics simulations verify the technique and aid with evaluating its effectiveness. This technique appears to be applicable to other types of mass spectrometers.

  5. Biological particle analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilker, V. L.; Platz, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    An instrument that analyzes the chemical composition of biological particles in aerosol or hydrosol form was developed. Efforts were directed toward the acquisition of mass spectra from aerosols of biomolecules and bacteria. The filament ion source was installed on the particle analysis by mass spectrometry system. Modifications of the vacuum system improved the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer. After the modifications were incorporated, detailed mass spectra of simple compounds from the three major classes of biomolecules, proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates were obtained. A method of generating bacterial aerosols was developed. The aerosols generated were collected and examined in the scanning electron microscope to insure that the bacteria delivered to the mass spectrometer were intact and free from debris.

  6. Mass spectrometry imaging for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangjiang; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The development of mass spectrometry imaging technologies is of significant current research interest. Mass spectrometry potentially is capable of providing highly specific information about the distribution of chemical compounds on tissues at highly sensitive levels. The required in-situ analysis for the tissue imaging forced MS analysis being performed off the traditional conditions optimized in pharmaceutical applications with intense sample preparation. This critical review seeks to present an overview of the current status of the MS imaging with different sampling ionization methods and to discuss the 3D imaging and quantitative imaging capabilities needed to be further developed, the importance of the multi-modal imaging, and a balance between the pursuit of the high imaging resolution and the practical application of MS imaging in biomedicine. PMID:23539099

  7. Antibodies as means for selective mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boström, Tove; Takanen, Jenny Ottosson; Hober, Sophia

    2016-05-15

    For protein analysis of biological samples, two major strategies are used today; mass spectrometry (MS) and antibody-based methods. Each strategy offers advantages and drawbacks. However, combining the two using an immunoenrichment step with MS analysis brings together the benefits of each method resulting in increased sensitivity, faster analysis and possibility of higher degrees of multiplexing. The immunoenrichment can be performed either on protein or peptide level and quantification standards can be added in order to enable determination of the absolute protein concentration in the sample. The combination of immunoenrichment and MS holds great promise for the future in both proteomics and clinical diagnostics. This review describes different setups of immunoenrichment coupled to mass spectrometry and how these can be utilized in various applications. PMID:26565067

  8. Biomarker Signature Discovery from Mass Spectrometry Data.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ao; Gupta, Chinmaya; Ferrari, Mauro; Agostini, Marco; Bedin, Chiara; Bouamrani, Ali; Tasciotti, Ennio; Azencott, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry based high throughput proteomics are used for protein analysis and clinical diagnosis. Many machine learning methods have been used to construct classifiers based on mass spectrometry data, for discrimination between cancer stages. However, the classifiers generated by machine learning such as SVM techniques typically lack biological interpretability. We present an innovative technique for automated discovery of signatures optimized to characterize various cancer stages. We validate our signature discovery algorithm on one new colorectal cancer MALDI-TOF data set, and two well-known ovarian cancer SELDI-TOF data sets. In all of these cases, our signature based classifiers performed either better or at least as well as four benchmark machine learning algorithms including SVM and KNN. Moreover, our optimized signatures automatically select smaller sets of key biomarkers than the black-boxes generated by machine learning, and are much easier to interpret. PMID:26356346

  9. High-sensitivity mass spectrometry with a tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, W.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristic features of accelerator mass spectrometry are discussed. A short overview is given of the current status of mass spectrometry with high-energy (MeV/nucleon) heavy-ion accelerators. Emphasis is placed on studies with tandem accelerators and on future mass spectrometry of heavier isotopes with the new generation of higher-voltage tandems.

  10. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  11. Mass Spectrometry in Plant-omics.

    PubMed

    Gemperline, Erin; Keller, Caitlin; Li, Lingjun

    2016-04-01

    Plant-omics is rapidly becoming an important field of study in the scientific community due to the urgent need to address many of the most important questions facing humanity today with regard to agriculture, medicine, biofuels, environmental decontamination, ecological sustainability, etc. High-performance mass spectrometry is a dominant tool for interrogating the metabolomes, peptidomes, and proteomes of a diversity of plant species under various conditions, revealing key insights into the functions and mechanisms of plant biochemistry. PMID:26889688

  12. A Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Data Management Platform*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vagisha; Eng, Jimmy K.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Riffle, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is increasingly being used in biomedical research. These experiments typically generate a large volume of highly complex data, and the volume and complexity are only increasing with time. There exist many software pipelines for analyzing these data (each typically with its own file formats), and as technology improves, these file formats change and new formats are developed. Files produced from these myriad software programs may accumulate on hard disks or tape drives over time, with older files being rendered progressively more obsolete and unusable with each successive technical advancement and data format change. Although initiatives exist to standardize the file formats used in proteomics, they do not address the core failings of a file-based data management system: (1) files are typically poorly annotated experimentally, (2) files are “organically” distributed across laboratory file systems in an ad hoc manner, (3) files formats become obsolete, and (4) searching the data and comparing and contrasting results across separate experiments is very inefficient (if possible at all). Here we present a relational database architecture and accompanying web application dubbed Mass Spectrometry Data Platform that is designed to address the failings of the file-based mass spectrometry data management approach. The database is designed such that the output of disparate software pipelines may be imported into a core set of unified tables, with these core tables being extended to support data generated by specific pipelines. Because the data are unified, they may be queried, viewed, and compared across multiple experiments using a common web interface. Mass Spectrometry Data Platform is open source and freely available at http://code.google.com/p/msdapl/. PMID:22611296

  13. Dissecting SUMO Dynamics by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Drabikowski, Krzysztof; Dadlez, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Protein modification by SUMO proteins is one of the key posttranslational modifications in eukaryotes. Here, we describe a workflow to analyze SUMO dynamics in response to different stimuli, purify SUMO conjugates, and analyze the changes in SUMOylation level in organisms, tissues, or cell culture. We present a protocol for lysis in denaturing conditions that is compatible with downstream IMAC and antibody affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and data analysis. PMID:27613044

  14. Investigation of the utility of laser-secondary neutral mass spectrometry for the detection of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in individual atmospheric aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Bonnie J; Dambach, Steffen; Galla, Sebastian; Peterson, Richard E; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient aerosol particles is of importance to both human health and climate forcing. Although time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has proven useful for studying the distribution of organic compounds in individual aerosol particles, it is difficult to detect PAHs at relevant concentrations in individual aerosol particles because of their low ion yield. In this study, we explore the potential of using laser secondary neutral mass spectrometry (Laser-SNMS) to study three PAHs: pyrene, anthracene, and naphthalene. Because of the high volatility of PAHs, a cryostage was required for the analysis to prevent sublimation of the molecules into the vacuum chamber. We studied two laser systems, a 157 nm excimer laser, which is capable of single-photon ionization of the PAHs, and a 193 nm laser, which requires multiphoton ionization. Under optimized conditions for laser power density and primary ion pulse length, 193 nm postionization resulted in a 2-50-fold increase in ion yield over ToF-SIMS. Using the 157 nm laser, the yield was increased by more than 3 orders of magnitude for all 3 PAHs studied. The single-photon postionization process proved superior in terms of both yield enhancement and reduced fragmentation. By using the optimized 157 nm laser system and a cryostage, we were able to detect PAHs on the surface of 2 μm diameter ambient aerosol particles. PMID:21823569

  15. May the Best Molecule Win: Competition ESI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Sarah; Wilson, W. David

    2015-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has become invaluable in the characterization of macromolecular biological systems such as nucleic acids and proteins. Recent advances in the field of mass spectrometry and the soft conditions characteristic of electrospray ionization allow for the investigation of non-covalent interactions among large biomolecules and ligands. Modulation of genetic processes through the use of small molecule inhibitors with the DNA minor groove is gaining attention as a potential therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the development of a competition method using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to probe the interactions of multiple DNA sequences with libraries of minor groove binding molecules. Such an approach acts as a high-throughput screening method to determine important information including the stoichiometry, binding mode, cooperativity, and relative binding affinity. In addition to small molecule-DNA complexes, we highlight other applications in which competition mass spectrometry has been used. A competitive approach to simultaneously investigate complex interactions promises to be a powerful tool in the discovery of small molecule inhibitors with high specificity and for specific, important DNA sequences. PMID:26501262

  16. Investigation of amino acid δ 13C signatures in bone collagen to reconstruct human palaeodiets using liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Kyungcheol; Smith, Colin I.; Fuller, Benjamin T.; Richards, Michael P.

    2010-11-01

    This research presents the individual amino acid δ 13C values in bone collagen of humans ( n = 9) and animals ( n = 27) from two prehistoric shell midden sites in Korea. We obtained complete baseline separation of 16 of the 18 amino acids found in bone collagen by using liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). The isotopic results reveal that the humans and animals in the two sites had similar patterns in essential amino acids (EAAs) and non-essential amino acids (NEAAs). The EAA and NEAA δ 13C values in humans are intermediate between those in marine and terrestrial animals. However, the threonine δ 13C values in humans and animals measured in this study are more highly enriched than those of other amino acids. At both sites, all amino acids in marine animals are 13C-enriched relative to those of the terrestrial animals. The isotopic evidence suggests that the Tongsamdong human had EAAs and NEAAs from marine food resources, while the Nukdo humans mainly had EAAs from terrestrial food resources but obtained NEAAs from both terrestrial and marine resources. The δ 13C isotopic differences in amino acids between marine and terrestrial animals were the largest for glycine (NEAA) and histidine (EAA) and the smallest for tyrosine (NEAA) and phenylalanine (EAA). In addition, threonine among the EAAs also had a large difference (˜8‰) in δ 13C values between marine and terrestrial animals, and has the potential to be used as an isotopic marker in palaeodietary studies. Threonine δ 13C values were used in conjunction with the established Δ 13C Glycine-phenylalanine values and produced three distinct dietary groups (terrestrial, omnivorous, and marine). In addition, threonine δ 13C values and Δ 13C Serine-phenylalanine values were discovered to separate between two dietary groups (terrestrial vs. marine), and these δ 13C values may provide a potential new indicator for investigating the distinction between marine and terrestrial protein

  17. Investigation of plant hormone level changes in shoot tips of longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) treated with potassium chlorate by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Susawaengsup, Chanthana; Rayanakorn, Mongkon; Wongpornchai, Sugunya; Wangkarn, Sunanta

    2011-08-15

    The endogenous levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), gibberellins (GAs), abscisic acid (ABA) and cytokinins (CKs) and their changes were investigated in shoot tips of ten longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) trees for off-season flowering until 60 days after potassium chlorate treatment in comparison with those of ten control (untreated) longan trees. These analytes were extracted and interfering matrices removed with a single mixed-mode solid phase extraction under optimum conditions. The recoveries at three levels of concentration were in the range of 72-112%. The endogenous plant hormones were separated and quantified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Detection limits based on the signal-to-noise ratio ranged from 10 ng mL(-1) for gibberellin A4 (GA4) to 200 ng mL(-1) for IAA. Within the first week after potassium chlorate treatment, dry weight (DW) amounts in the treated longan shoot tips of four gibberellins, namely: gibberellin A1(GA1), gibberellic acid (GA3), gibberellin A19 (GA19) and gibberellin A20 (GA20), were found to increase to approximately 25, 50, 20 and 60 ng g(-1) respectively, all of which were significantly higher than those of the controls. In contrast, gibberellin A8 (GA8) obtained from the treated longan was found to decrease to approximately 20 ng g(-1)DW while that of the control increased to around 80 ng g(-1)DW. Certain CKs which play a role in leaf bud induction, particularly isopentenyl adenine (iP), isopentenyl adenosine (iPR) and dihydrozeatin riboside (DHZR), were found to be present in amounts of approximately 20, 50 and 60 ng g(-1)DW in the shoot tips of the control longan. The analytical results obtained from the two-month off-season longan flowering period indicate that high GA1, GA3, GA19 and GA20 levels in the longan shoot tips contribute to flower bud induction while high levels of CKs, IAA and ABA in the control longan contribute more to the vegetative development. PMID:21726716

  18. Advances in Mass Spectrometry for Lipidomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanksby, Stephen J.; Mitchell, Todd W.

    2010-07-01

    Recent expansion in research in the field of lipidomics has been driven by the development of new mass spectrometric tools and protocols for the identification and quantification of molecular lipids in complex matrices. Although there are similarities between the field of lipidomics and the allied field of mass spectrometry (e.g., proteomics), lipids present some unique advantages and challenges for mass spectrometric analysis. The application of electrospray ionization to crude lipid extracts without prior fractionation—the so-called shotgun approach—is one such example, as it has perhaps been more successfully applied in lipidomics than in any other discipline. Conversely, the diverse molecular structure of lipids means that collision-induced dissociation alone may be limited in providing unique descriptions of complex lipid structures, and the development of additional, complementary tools for ion activation and analysis is required to overcome these challenges. In this article, we discuss the state of the art in lipid mass spectrometry and highlight several areas in which current approaches are deficient and further innovation is required.

  19. Mass spectrometry imaging: Towards a lipid microscope?

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain; Laprévote, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Biological imaging techniques are the most efficient way to locally measure the variation of different parameters on tissue sections. These analyses are gaining increasing interest since 20 years and allow observing extremely complex biological phenomena at lower and lower time and resolution scale. Nevertheless, most of them only target very few compounds of interest, which are chosen a priori, due to their low resolution power and sensitivity. New chemical imaging technique has to be introduced in order to overcome these limitations, leading to more informative and sensitive analyses for biologists and physicians. Two major mass spectrometry methods can be efficiently used to generate the distribution of biological compounds over a tissue section. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS) needs the co-crystallization of the sample with a matrix before to be irradiated by a laser, whereas the analyte is directly desorbed by a primary ion bombardment for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) experiments. In both cases, energy used for desorption/ionization is locally deposited -some tens of microns for the laser and some hundreds of nanometers for the ion beam- meaning that small areas over the surface sample can be separately analyzed. Step by step analysis allows spectrum acquisitions over the tissue sections and the data are treated by modern informatics software in order to create ion density maps, i.e., the intensity plot of one specific ion versus the (x,y) position. Main advantages of SIMS and MALDI compared to other chemical imaging techniques lie in the simultaneous acquisition of a large number of biological compounds in mixture with an excellent sensitivity obtained by Time-of-Flight (ToF) mass analyzer. Moreover, data treatment is done a posteriori, due to the fact that no compound is selectively marked, and let us access to the localization of different lipid classes in only one complete acquisition. PMID:20570708

  20. Probing the hydrophobic effect of noncovalent complexes by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bich, Claudia; Baer, Samuel; Jecklin, Matthias C; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-02-01

    The study of noncovalent interactions by mass spectrometry has become an active field of research in recent years. The role of the different noncovalent intermolecular forces is not yet fully understood since they tend to be modulated upon transfer into the gas phase. The hydrophobic effect, which plays a major role in protein folding, adhesion of lipid bilayers, etc., is absent in the gas phase. Here, noncovalent complexes with different types of interaction forces were investigated by mass spectrometry and compared with the complex present in solution. Creatine kinase (CK), glutathione S-transferase (GST), ribonuclease S (RNase S), and leucine zipper (LZ), which have dissociation constants in the nM range, were studied by native nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) combined with chemical cross-linking (XL). Complexes interacting with hydrogen bonds survived the transfer into gas phase intact and were observed by nanoESI-MS. Complexes that are bound largely by the hydrophobic effect in solution were not detected or only at very low intensity. Complexes with mixed polar and hydrophobic interactions were detected by nanoESI-MS, most likely due to the contribution from polar interactions. All noncovalent complexes could easily be studied by XL MALDI-MS, which demonstrates that the noncovalently bound complexes are conserved, and a real "snap-shot" of the situation in solution can be obtained. PMID:19931466

  1. Headspace solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry in the investigation of volatile organic compounds in an ectomycorrhizae synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Menotta, Michele; Gioacchini, Anna M; Amicucci, Antonella; Buffalini, Michele; Sisti, Davide; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2004-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizae formation represents one of the most significant steps in the truffle life cycle and is determined by a complex molecular signaling between two symbionts. In order to understand the molecular pathway of ectomycorrhiza development, we focused on the signaling interaction between the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber borchii Vittad. and the Tilia americana L. plant roots. The medium of a pre-symbiotic (T. americana-T. borchii) in vitro system was analysed by headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. In total, 73 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified. Twenty-nine of these VOCs were produced only during the interaction phase between the two partners, leading to a hypothesis that these molecules might act as molecular messengers in order to pilot the ectomycorrhizae formation. PMID:14745771

  2. Investigation of heavy-metal accumulation in selected plant samples using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiová, M.; Kaiser, J.; Novotný, K.; Novotný, J.; Vaculovič, T.; Liška, M.; Malina, R.; Stejskal, K.; Adam, V.; Kizek, R.

    2008-12-01

    Single-pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser-Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were applied for mapping the silver and copper distribution in Helianthus Annuus L. samples treated with contaminant in controlled conditions. For Ag and Cu detection the 328.07 nm Ag(I) and 324.75 nm Cu(I) lines were used, respectively. The LIBS experimental conditions (mainly the laser energy and the observation window) were optimized in order to avoid self-absorption effect in the measured spectra. In the LA-ICP-MS analysis the Ag 107 and Cu 63 isotopes were detected. The capability of these two analytical techniques for high-resolution mapping of selected trace chemical elements was demonstrated.

  3. Uncoiling collagen: a multidimensional mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Simon, H J; van Agthoven, M A; Lam, P Y; Floris, F; Chiron, L; Delsuc, M-A; Rolando, C; Barrow, M P; O'Connor, P B

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry can be used to determine structural information about ions by activating precursors and analysing the resulting series of fragments. Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (2D FT-ICR MS) is a technique that correlates the mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio of fragment and precursor ions in a single spectrum. 2D FT-ICR MS records the fragmentation of all ions in a sample without the need for isolation. To analyse specific precursors, horizontal cross-sections of the spectrum (fragment ion scans) are taken, providing an alternative to conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments. In this work, 2D FT-ICR MS has been used to study the tryptic digest of type I collagen, a large protein. Fragment ion scans have been extracted from the 2D FT-ICR MS spectrum for precursor m/z ratios: 951.81, 850.41, 634.34, and 659.34, and 2D FT-ICR MS spectra are compared with a set of 1D MS/MS spectra using different fragmentation methods. The results show that two-dimensional mass spectrometry excells at MS/MS of complex mixtures, simplifying spectra by eliminating contaminant peaks, and aiding the identification of species in the sample. Currently, with desktop computers, 2D FT-ICR MS is limited by data processing power, a limitation which should be alleviated using cluster parallel computing. In order to explore 2D FT-ICR MS for collagen, with reasonable computing time, the resolution in the fragment ion dimension is limited to 256k data points (compared to 4M data points in 1D MS/MS spectra), but the vertical precursor ion dimension has 4096 lines, so the total data set is 1G data points (4 Gbytes). The fragment ion coverage obtained with a blind, unoptimized 2D FT-ICR MS experiment was lower than conventional MS/MS, but MS/MS information is obtained for all ions in the sample regardless of selection and isolation. Finally, although all 2D FT-ICR MS peak assignments were made with the aid of 1D FT-ICR MS data, these results

  4. Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline. PMID:23453222

  5. Analysis of Glycosaminoglycans Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Gregory O.; Zaia, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear polysaccharides expressed on animal cell surfaces and in extracellular matrices. Their biosynthesis is under complex control and confers a domain structure that is essential to their ability to bind to protein partners. Key to understanding the functions of GAGs are methods to determine accurately and rapidly patterns of sulfation, acetylation and uronic acid epimerization that correlate with protein binding or other biological activities. Mass spectrometry (MS) is particularly suitable for the analysis of GAGs for biomedical purposes. Using modern ionization techniques it is possible to accurately determine molecular weights of GAG oligosaccharides and their distributions within a mixture. Methods for direct interfacing with liquid chromatography have been developed to permit online mass spectrometric analysis of GAGs. New tandem mass spectrometric methods for fine structure determination of GAGs are emerging. This review summarizes MS-based approaches for analysis of GAGs, including tissue extraction and chromatographic methods compatible with LC/MS and tandem MS. PMID:25705143

  6. Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry of low molecular weight synthetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anthony T; Williams, Jonathan P; Scrivens, James H

    2006-01-01

    A range of low molecular weight synthetic polymers has been characterised by means of desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) combined with both mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Accurate mass experiments were used to aid the structural determination of some of the oligomeric materials. The polymers analysed were poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polypropylene glycol (PPG), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(alpha-methyl styrene). An application of the technique for characterisation of a polymer used as part of an active ingredient in a pharmaceutical tablet is described. The mass spectra and tandem mass spectra of all of the polymers were obtained in seconds, indicating the sensitivity of the technique. PMID:16912984

  7. Resonant Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry: An Alternative to AMS?

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Klaus; Trautmann, N.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2001-02-15

    Resonant laser ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) has developed into a versatile experimental method particularly concerning applications for highly selective ultratrace analaysis. Apart from providing nearly complete isobaric suspression and high overall efficiency, the possibolility for combining optical isotpic selectivity with that of hte mass spectrometer leads to remarkable specifications. The widespread analytical potential and applicability of different techniques based on resonant laser ionization is demonstrated in investigations on stable and radioactive ultratrace isotopes with the focus on applications which require high selectivity, concerning, e.g., the noble gas isotopes, 81,85KR, PU isotopes, 89,90SR, 99Tc and 41Ca. Selective ultratrace determination of these radioisotopes proved access to a variety of fundamental research problems in environmental sciences, geo- and cosmochemistry, archaeology, and biomedicine, which previously were often an exclusive domain for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS).

  8. Recent developments in Penning-trap mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, M.

    2016-06-01

    Penning-trap mass spectrometry provides atomic masses with the highest precision. At accelerator-based on-line facilities it is applied to investigate exotic radionuclides in the context of tests of fundamental symmetries, nuclear structure studies, and nuclear astrophysics research. Recent progress in slowing down radioactive ion-beams in buffer-gas cells in combination with advanced ion-manipulation techniques has paved the way to reach nuclides ever-more far from stability. In this endeavor many efforts are underway to increase the sensitivity, the efficiency, and the precision of Penning-trap mass spectrometry. In this article some recent experimental developments are addressed with the focus on the phase-imaging ion-cyclotron-resonance technique and the Fourier transform ion-cyclotron-resonance technique.

  9. Membrane composition analysis by imaging mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, S G; Kraft, M L; Longo, M; Hutcheon, I D; Weber, P K

    2006-03-29

    Membranes on solid supports offer an ideal format for imaging. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) can be used to obtain composition information on membrane-associated components. Using the NanoSIMS50, images of composition variations in membrane domains can be obtained with a lateral resolution better than 100 nm. By suitable calibration, these variations in composition can be translated into a quantitative analysis of the membrane composition. Progress towards imaging small phase-separated lipid domains, membrane-associated proteins and natural biological membranes will be described.

  10. Study of CPP Mechanisms by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sagan, Sandrine; Bechara, Chérine; Burlina, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Studying the mechanisms of entry of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) requires reliable methods to measure their cellular uptake efficiency, monitor their metabolic stability, and identify their intracellular localization. We describe here a protocol based on the direct detection of peptides by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), which allows the absolute quantification of the intact internalized species and the analysis of their intracellular degradation. This protocol can be easily applied to the simultaneous quantification of different species, for example mixtures of CPPs. PMID:26202265