Science.gov

Sample records for mass spectrum analysis

  1. [Study on spectrum analysis of X-ray based on rotational mass effect in special relativity].

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Quan; Xiao, Qing-Quan

    2010-04-01

    Based on special relativity, the formation mechanism of characteristic X-ray has been studied, and the influence of rotational mass effect on X-ray spectrum has been given. A calculation formula of the X-ray wavelength based upon special relativity was derived. Error analysis was carried out systematically for the calculation values of characteristic wavelength, and the rules of relative error were obtained. It is shown that the values of the calculation are very close to the experimental values, and the effect of rotational mass effect on the characteristic wavelength becomes more evident as the atomic number increases. The result of the study has some reference meaning for the spectrum analysis of characteristic X-ray in application. PMID:20545180

  2. Analysis of the QCD spectrum and chiral symmetry breaking with varying quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2013-04-15

    The meson spectrum of QCD is studied in the framework of nonperturbative QCD as a function of varying quark masses m{sub q}. It is shown that the total spectrum consists of two branches: 1) the standard one, which may be called the flux-tube spectrum, depending approximately linearly on m{sub q}, and 2) the chiral symmetry breaking (CSB) spectrum for pseudoscalar (PS) flavor nonsinglet mesons with mass dependence {radical}m{sub q}. The formalism for PS mesons is derived from the QCD Lagrangian with m{sub q} corrections, and a unified form of the PS propagator was derived. It is shown that the CSB branch of PS mesons joins to the flux-tube branch at around m{sub q} = 200 MeV. All these results are in close correspondence with recent numerical data on large lattices.

  3. Analysis of the p p-bar mass spectrum in J/Psi

    SciTech Connect

    J. Haidenbauer; S. Krewald; U.-G. Meissner; A. Sibirtsev; A. W. Thomas

    2005-05-16

    The near-threshold enhancement in the p p-bar invariant mass spectrum of the reaction J/Psi --> gamma p p-bar, observed in an experiment by the BES Collaboration, is analysed. It is shown, within the Watson-Migdal approach to final state interactions, that the mass dependence of the p p-bar spectrum close to the threshold can be reproduced by the S-wave p p-bar interaction of the Jülich N N-bar model in the isospin I=1 state. Difficulties in the consistent interpretation of the p invariant mass spectrum of the reaction J/Psi --> pi^0 p p-bar, where there are no obvious signs for a final state interaction, are discussed.

  4. On the Hadronic Mass Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Rolf

    We argue that the sole requirement of a self-consistent bootstrap including all hadrons up to infinite mass leads to asymptotically exponential laws for the hadron mass spectrum, for momentum distributions, and for form factors (and to a highest temperature).

  5. Mass exponent spectrum analysis of human ECG signals and its application to complexity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Du, Sidan; Ning, Xinbao; Bian, Chunhua

    2008-06-01

    The complexity of electrocardiogram (ECG) signal may reflect the physiological function and healthy status of the heart. In this paper, we introduced two novel intermediate parameters of multifractality, the mass exponent spectrum curvature and area, to characterize the nonlinear complexity of ECG signal. These indicators express the nonlinear superposition of the discrepancies of singularity strengths from all the adjacent points of the spectrum curve and thus overall subsets of original fractal structure. The evaluation of binomial multifractal sets validated these two variables were entirely effective in exploring the complexity of this time series. We then studied the ECG mass exponent spectra taken from the cohorts of healthy, ischemia and myocardial infarction (MI) sufferer based on a large sets of 12 leads’ recordings, and took the statistical averages among each crowd. Experimental results suggest the two values from healthy ECG are apparently larger than those from the heart diseased. While the values from ECG of MI sufferer are much smaller than those from the other two groups. As for the ischemia sufferer, they are almost of moderate magnitude. Afterward, we compared these new indicators with the nonlinear parameters of singularity spectrum. The classification indexes and results of total separating ratios (TSR, defined in the paper) both indicated that our method could achieve a better effect. These conclusions may be of some values in early diagnoses and clinical applications.

  6. Design Spectrum Analysis in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, T. G.

    1984-01-01

    The utility of Design Spectrum Analysis is to give a mode by mode characterization of the behavior of a design under a given loading. The theory of design spectrum is discussed after operations are explained. User instructions are taken up here in three parts: Transient Preface, Maximum Envelope Spectrum, and RMS Average Spectrum followed by a Summary Table. A single DMAP ALTER packet will provide for all parts of the design spectrum operations. The starting point for getting a modal break-down of the response to acceleration loading is the Modal Transient rigid format. After eigenvalue extraction, modal vectors need to be isolated in the full set of physical coordinates (P-sized as opposed to the D-sized vectors in RF 12). After integration for transient response the results are scanned over the solution time interval for the peak values and for the times that they occur. A module called SCAN was written to do this job, that organizes these maxima into a diagonal output matrix. The maximum amplifier in each mode is applied to the eigenvector of each mode which then reveals the maximum displacements, stresses, forces and boundary reactions that the structure will experience for a load history, mode by mode. The standard NASTRAN output processors have been modified for this task. It is required that modes be normalized to mass.

  7. Acoustooptical spectrum analysis modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmody, M. J.

    1981-06-01

    A summary of Bragg deflection theory and various approaches to direct detection acoustooptic spectrum analysis (AOSA) modeling is presented. A suitable model is chosen and extended to include the effects of diffraction efficiency, transducer efficiency, irradiance profiles of incident laser illumination, aperture size of the Bragg cell, and the acoustic attenuation experienced by the acoustic wavetrain generated by the input r-f signal. A FORTRAN program is developed to model the AOSA and predict the output image plane intensity profiles. A second version of the program includes a time variable permitting dynamic simulation of the system response.

  8. The mass spectrum of interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, John M.; Garwood, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    The abundances of diffuse clouds and molecular clouds in the inner Galaxy and at the solar circle are compared. Using results of recent low-latitude 21 cm absorption studies, the number of diffuse clouds per kiloparsec along the line of sight is derived as a function of the cloud column density, under two assumptions relating cloud densities and temperatures. The density of clouds is derived as a function of cloud mass. The results are consistent with a single, continuous mass spectrum for interstellar clouds from less than 1 solar mass to 1,000,000 solar masses, with perhaps a change of slope at masses where the atomic and molecular mass fractions are roughly equal.

  9. Electron Ionization Mass Spectrum of Tellurium Hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Richard A.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Peterson, James M.; Govind, Niranjan; Andersen, Amity; Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2015-05-18

    The first electron ionization mass spectrum of tellurium hexafluoride (TeF6) is reported. The starting material was produced by direct fluorination of Te metal or TeO2 with nitrogen trifluoride. Formation of TeF6 was confirmed through cryogenic capture of the tellurium fluorination product and analysis through Raman spectroscopy. The eight natural abundance isotopes were observed for each of the set of fragment ions: TeF5+, TeF4+ TeF3+, TeF2+, TeF1+, and Te+, Te2+. A trend in increasing abundance was observed for the even fluoride bearing ions: TeF1+ < TeF3+ < TeF5+, and a decreasing abundance was observed for the even fragment series: Te(0)+ > TeF2+ > TeF4+ > TeF6+, with the molecular ion TeF6+ not observed at all. Density functional theory based electronic structure calculations were used to calculate optimized ground state geometries of these gas phase species and their relative stabilities explain the trends in the data and the lack of observed signal for TeF6+.

  10. Superfine resolution acoustooptic spectrum analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Homayoon; Lesh, James R.

    1991-01-01

    High resolution spectrum analysis of RF signals is required in applications such as the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, RF interference monitoring, or general purpose decomposition of signals. Sub-Hertz resolution in three-dimensional acoustooptic spectrum analysis is theoretically and experimentally demonstrated. The operation of a two-dimensional acoustooptic spectrum analyzer is extended to include time integration over a sequence of CCD frames.

  11. Characterization of solvent-extractable organics in urban aerosols based on mass spectrum analysis and hygroscopic growth measurement.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Toshiyuki; Mochida, Michihiro

    2011-11-01

    To characterize atmospheric particulate organics with respect to polarity, aerosol samples collected on filters in the urban area of Nagoya, Japan, in 2009 were extracted using water, methanol, and ethyl acetate. The extracts were atomized and analyzed using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer. The atmospheric concentrations of the extracted organics were determined using phthalic acid as a reference material. Comparison of the organic carbon concentrations measured using a carbon analyzer and the HR-ToF-AMS suggests that organics extracted with water (WSOM) and ethyl acetate (EASOM) or those extracted with methanol (MSOM) comprise the greater part of total organics. The oxygen-carbon ratios (O/C) of the extracted organics varied: 0.51-0.75 (WSOM), 0.37-0.48 (MSOM), and 0.27-0.33 (EASOM). In the ion-group analysis, WSOM, MSOM, and EASOM were clearly characterized by the different fractions of the CH and CO(2) groups. On the basis of the hygroscopic growth measurements of the extracts, κ of organics at 90% relative humidity (κ(org)) were estimated. Positive correlation of κ(org) with O/C (r 0.70) was found for MSOM and EASOM, but no clear correlation was found for WSOM. PMID:21877700

  12. The mass spectrum of the first stars

    SciTech Connect

    Susa, Hajime; Tominaga, Nozomu; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2014-09-01

    We perform cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with non-equilibrium primordial chemistry to obtain 59 minihalos that host first stars. The obtained minihalos are used as the initial conditions of local three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations to investigate the formation of the first stars. We find that two-thirds of the minihalos host multiple stars, while the other third has single stars. The mass of the stars found in our simulations are in the range of 1 M {sub ☉} ≲ M ≲ 300 M {sub ☉}, peaking at several× 10 M {sub ☉}. Most of the very massive stars of ≳ 140 M {sub ☉} are born as single stars, although not all of the single stars are very massive. We also find a few stars of ≲ 1 M {sub ☉} that are kicked by the gravitational three body interactions to the position distant from the center of mass. The frequency that a star forming minihalo contains a binary system is ∼50%. We also investigate the abundance pattern of the stellar remnants by summing up the contributions from the first stars in the simulations. Consequently, the pattern is compatible with that of the low metallicity damped Lyα systems or the extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars, if the mass spectrum obtained in our experiment is shifted to the low mass side by 0.2 dex. If we consider the case that an EMP star is born in the remnant of the individual minihalo without mixing with others, the chemical signature of the pair instability supernova is more prominent, because most of them are born as single stars.

  13. The Mass Spectrum of the First Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susa, Hajime; Hasegawa, Kenji; Tominaga, Nozomu

    2014-09-01

    We perform cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with non-equilibrium primordial chemistry to obtain 59 minihalos that host first stars. The obtained minihalos are used as the initial conditions of local three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations to investigate the formation of the first stars. We find that two-thirds of the minihalos host multiple stars, while the other third has single stars. The mass of the stars found in our simulations are in the range of 1 M ⊙ <~ M <~ 300 M ⊙, peaking at several× 10 M ⊙. Most of the very massive stars of >~ 140 M ⊙ are born as single stars, although not all of the single stars are very massive. We also find a few stars of <~ 1 M ⊙ that are kicked by the gravitational three body interactions to the position distant from the center of mass. The frequency that a star forming minihalo contains a binary system is ~50%. We also investigate the abundance pattern of the stellar remnants by summing up the contributions from the first stars in the simulations. Consequently, the pattern is compatible with that of the low metallicity damped Lyα systems or the extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars, if the mass spectrum obtained in our experiment is shifted to the low mass side by 0.2 dex. If we consider the case that an EMP star is born in the remnant of the individual minihalo without mixing with others, the chemical signature of the pair instability supernova is more prominent, because most of them are born as single stars.

  14. Towards optimal cluster power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert E.; Marian, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The power spectrum of galaxy clusters is an important probe of the cosmological model. In this paper, we develop a formalism to compute the optimal weights for the estimation of the matter power spectrum from cluster power spectrum measurements. We find a closed-form analytic expression for the optimal weights, which takes into account: the cluster mass, finite survey volume effects, survey masking, and a flux limit. The optimal weights are w(M,χ ) ∝ b(M,χ )/[1+bar{n}_h(χ ) overline{b^2}(χ )overline{P}(k)], where b(M, χ) is the bias of clusters of mass M at radial position χ(z), bar{n}_h(χ ) and overline{b^2}(χ ) are the expected space density and bias squared of all clusters, and overline{P}(k) is the matter power spectrum at wavenumber k. This result is analogous to that of Percival et al. We compare our optimal weighting scheme with mass weighting and also with the original power spectrum scheme of Feldman et al. We show that our optimal weighting scheme outperforms these approaches for both volume- and flux-limited cluster surveys. Finally, we present a new expression for the Fisher information matrix for cluster power spectrum analysis. Our expression shows that for an optimally weighted cluster survey the cosmological information content is boosted, relative to the standard approach of Tegmark.

  15. Mass Spectrum Analysis of Gas Emitted during Organic Contaminant Removal from a Metal Surface with an Arc in Low Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Masaya; Takeda, Koichi

    2006-05-05

    The gas emitted during organic contaminant removal from a metal surface with an arc in low vacuum is investigated using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The experimental results show that fragment molecules of the contaminant material, which are created by the decomposition of the contaminant material, exist in the emitted gas. The decomposition rate of the contaminant increased with the treatment current, which indicates that the decomposition occurs not in the cathode spot, but in the arc column.

  16. Analysis of NH spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss, M.

    1976-01-01

    The A3Pi to X3Sigma- transition of NH is a common feature of cometary spectra. Since the NH molecule is likely to be formed by photodissociation of molecules such as ammonia or hydrazine, identifying the final states of the photolysis would shed light on the identity of the parent. It is shown that the transition rate for the a 1Delta to X3Sigma- transition is sufficiently fast to deplete any a1Delta concentration formed in the original photolysis process. This analysis focused on experimental spectra obtained for the comet Kohoutek. The fluorescence pumping of the NH molecule is calculated for November 29, 1973 and January 25, 1974 using the model of radiative equilibrium which assumes no collisions.

  17. Comprehensive 2-Dimensional Gas Chromatography coupled to a Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer for broad-spectrum organic analysis on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, S.; Block, B.; Waite, J. H.; Sacks, R.; McGuigan, M.; Libardoni, M.; Stevens, P. T.; Hasselbrink, E. F.; Hunt, P.

    An analytical chemistry suite for in-situ broad-spectrum analysis of organic compounds on the Martian surface will be presented. The purpose is to identify nature and abundance of organic components in solid sample material. The instrument uses pyrolysis extraction followed by a comprehensive 2-dimensional gas chromatograph (2DGC) coupled to a Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). The 2DGC consists of a serial arrangement of two columns connected by a thermal modulator. The first column with a non-stationary phase separates components based primarily on their volatility, whereas the second column with a polar stationary phase separates the sample material based on the polarity. The thermal modulator is a resistively heated and liquid cooled wall coated capillary tube made out of stainless steel. The TOFMS uses electron impact ionization with orthogonal ion acceleration, a reflectron and a multi-channel plate detector. We will present the instrument design for the laboratory prototype, focusing on a discussion of the critical instrument components. We will show experimental results of Martian analogous Earth soil samples. These samples yield a chromatographic peak capacity of more than 1000 peaks. These are displayed as highly structured chromatograms. Qualitative identification of sample constituents can be derived from homologous series standards. These results are further verified via the TOFMS system. By coupling the 2DGC to a TOFMS, quantitative and mass spectrometric information is available for each data point in the chromatogram. This design will allow us to remotely analyze Martian soil samples to determine the presence, nature and abundance of organic materials.

  18. Spectrum analysis in beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-04-23

    In this article, we discuss fundamentals of the spectrum analysis in beam diagnostics, where several important particle motions in a circular accelerator are considered. The properties of the Fourier transform are presented. Then the coasting and the bunched beam motion in both longitudinal and transverse are studied. The discussions are separated for the signal particle, multiple particle, and the Schottky noise cases. To demonstrate the interesting properties of the beam motion spectrum, time domain functions are generated, and then the associated spectra are calculated and plotted. In order to show the whole picture in a single plot, some data have been scaled, therefore they may not be realistic in an accelerator.

  19. Tandem Mass Spectrum Identification via Cascaded Search.

    PubMed

    Kertesz-Farkas, Attila; Keich, Uri; Noble, William Stafford

    2015-08-01

    Accurate assignment of peptide sequences to observed fragmentation spectra is hindered by the large number of hypotheses that must be considered for each observed spectrum. A high score assigned to a particular peptide-spectrum match (PSM) may not end up being statistically significant after multiple testing correction. Researchers can mitigate this problem by controlling the hypothesis space in various ways: considering only peptides resulting from enzymatic cleavages, ignoring possible post-translational modifications or single nucleotide variants, etc. However, these strategies sacrifice identifications of spectra generated by rarer types of peptides. In this work, we introduce a statistical testing framework, cascade search, that directly addresses this problem. The method requires that the user specify a priori a statistical confidence threshold as well as a series of peptide databases. For instance, such a cascade of databases could include fully tryptic, semitryptic, and nonenzymatic peptides or peptides with increasing numbers of modifications. Cascaded search then gradually expands the list of candidate peptides from more likely peptides toward rare peptides, sequestering at each stage any spectrum that is identified with a specified statistical confidence. We compare cascade search to a standard procedure that lumps all of the peptides into a single database, as well as to a previously described group FDR procedure that computes the FDR separately within each database. We demonstrate, using simulated and real data, that cascade search identifies more spectra at a fixed FDR threshold than with either the ungrouped or grouped approach. Cascade search thus provides a general method for maximizing the number of identified spectra in a statistically rigorous fashion. PMID:26084232

  20. Tandem Mass Spectrum Identification via Cascaded Search

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assignment of peptide sequences to observed fragmentation spectra is hindered by the large number of hypotheses that must be considered for each observed spectrum. A high score assigned to a particular peptide–spectrum match (PSM) may not end up being statistically significant after multiple testing correction. Researchers can mitigate this problem by controlling the hypothesis space in various ways: considering only peptides resulting from enzymatic cleavages, ignoring possible post-translational modifications or single nucleotide variants, etc. However, these strategies sacrifice identifications of spectra generated by rarer types of peptides. In this work, we introduce a statistical testing framework, cascade search, that directly addresses this problem. The method requires that the user specify a priori a statistical confidence threshold as well as a series of peptide databases. For instance, such a cascade of databases could include fully tryptic, semitryptic, and nonenzymatic peptides or peptides with increasing numbers of modifications. Cascaded search then gradually expands the list of candidate peptides from more likely peptides toward rare peptides, sequestering at each stage any spectrum that is identified with a specified statistical confidence. We compare cascade search to a standard procedure that lumps all of the peptides into a single database, as well as to a previously described group FDR procedure that computes the FDR separately within each database. We demonstrate, using simulated and real data, that cascade search identifies more spectra at a fixed FDR threshold than with either the ungrouped or grouped approach. Cascade search thus provides a general method for maximizing the number of identified spectra in a statistically rigorous fashion. PMID:26084232

  1. Injection Locking Techniques for Spectrum Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gathma, Timothy D.; Buckwalter, James F.

    2011-04-19

    Wideband spectrum analysis supports future communication systems that reconfigure and adapt to the capacity of the spectral environment. While test equipment manufacturers offer wideband spectrum analyzers with excellent sensitivity and resolution, these spectrum analyzers typically cannot offer acceptable size, weight, and power (SWAP). CMOS integrated circuits offer the potential to fully integrate spectrum analysis capability with analog front-end circuitry and digital signal processing on a single chip. Unfortunately, CMOS lacks high-Q passives and wideband resonator tunability that is necessary for heterodyne implementations of spectrum analyzers. As an alternative to the heterodyne receiver architectures, two nonlinear methods for performing wideband, low-power spectrum analysis are presented. The first method involves injecting the spectrum of interest into an array of injection-locked oscillators. The second method employs the closed loop dynamics of both injection locking and phase locking to independently estimate the injected frequency and power.

  2. Quark masses and the meson spectrum: A holographic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, S. S.; Pusenkov, I. V.

    2015-09-01

    Based on experimental data, we can assume that the radial spectrum of vector mesons with a hidden quark flavor has a Regge form and propose its concrete form. The parameters of the Regge spectrum turn out to depend strongly on the mass of the quarks forming the mesons. We consider the problem of finding the form of these dependences in the framework of the holographic approach to strong interactions. The obtained results agree well with the phenomenology and with models of Veneziano-like dual amplitudes.

  3. Analysis of the Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrum of Staphylococcus aureus Identifies Mutations That Allow Differentiation of the Main Clonal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Josten, Michaele; Reif, Marion; Szekat, Christiane; Al-Sabti, Nahed; Roemer, Terry; Sparbier, Katrin; Kostrzewa, Markus; Rohde, Holger; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2013-01-01

    Nosocomial infections involving epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are a serious problem in many countries. In order to analyze outbreaks, the infectious isolates have to be typed; however, most molecular methods are expensive or labor-intensive. Here, we evaluated matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of cell extracts for the molecular characterization of S. aureus strains. The peak patterns of 401 MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains, including clinical and laboratory strains, were analyzed. Database searches indicated the peptides that were represented by the corresponding peaks in the spectra. The identities of the peptides were confirmed by the sequencing of mutants, the expression of antisense RNA fragments that resulted in the knockdown of the peptide of interest and the concomitant loss of the signal, or tandem MALDI-TOF MS (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). It was shown that the signals derive mainly from stress proteins and ribosomal proteins. Peak shifts that differentiate the main S. aureus clonal complexes CC5, CC22, CC8, CC45, CC30, and CC1 correlate to point mutations in the respective genes. Retrospective typing of an MRSA outbreak showed that it is possible to differentiate unrelated MSSA, MRSA, and borderline resistant S. aureus (BORSA) strains isolated from health care workers. In conclusion, this method allows for the detection of the epidemic lineages of S. aureus during species identification by MALDI-TOF MS analysis. PMID:23554199

  4. Mass spectrum and Higgs profile in B -L symmetric SSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ün, Cem Salih; Özdal, Özer

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the predictions on the mass spectrum and Higgs boson decays in the supersymmetric standard model extended by U (1 )B-L symmetry (BLSSM). The model requires two singlet Higgs fields, which are responsible for the radiative breaking of U (1 )B-L symmetry. It predicts degenerate right-handed neutrino masses (1.7-2.2 TeV) as well as the right-handed sneutrinos of mass ≲4 TeV . The presence of right-handed neutrinos and sneutrinos triggers the baryon and lepton number violation processes, until they decouple from the standard model particles. Besides, the model predicts rather heavy colored particles; mt ˜ , mb ˜≳1.5 TeV , while mτ ˜≳100 GeV and mχ˜1±≳600 GeV . Even though the implications are similar to the minimal supersymmetric standard model, BLSSM can predict another Higgs boson lighter than 150 GeV. We find that the second Higgs boson can be degenerate with the lightest charge parity (C P )-even Higgs boson of mass about 125 GeV and contribute to the Higgs decay into two photons. In addition, it can provide an explanation for the excess in h →4 l at the mass scale ˜145 GeV .

  5. Enhancing MALDI Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer Performance through Spectrum Averaging

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Morgan; Mali, Sujina; King, Charles C.; Bark, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometers are simple and robust mass spectrometers used for analysis of biologically relevant molecules in diverse fields including pathogen identification, imaging mass spectrometry, and natural products chemistry. Despite high nominal resolution and accuracy, we have observed significant variability where 30–50% of individual replicate measurements have errors in excess of 5 parts-per-million, even when using 5-point internal calibration. Increasing the number of laser shots for each spectrum did not resolve this observed variability. What is responsible for our observed variation? Using a modern MALDI-TOF/TOF instrument, we evaluated contributions to variability. Our data suggest a major component of variability is binning of the raw flight time data by the electronics and clock speed of the analog-to-digital (AD) detection system, which requires interpolation by automated peak fitting algorithms and impacts both calibration and the observed mass spectrum. Importantly, the variation observed is predominantly normal in distribution, which implies multiple components contribute to the observed variation and suggests a method to mitigate this variability through spectrum averaging. Restarting the acquisition impacts each spectrum within the electronic error of the AD detector system and defines a new calibration function. Therefore, averaging multiple independent spectra and not a larger number of laser shots leverages this inherent binning error to mitigate variability in accurate MALDI-TOF mass measurements. PMID:25798583

  6. Enhancing MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometer performance through spectrum averaging.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Morgan; Mali, Sujina; King, Charles C; Bark, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometers are simple and robust mass spectrometers used for analysis of biologically relevant molecules in diverse fields including pathogen identification, imaging mass spectrometry, and natural products chemistry. Despite high nominal resolution and accuracy, we have observed significant variability where 30-50% of individual replicate measurements have errors in excess of 5 parts-per-million, even when using 5-point internal calibration. Increasing the number of laser shots for each spectrum did not resolve this observed variability. What is responsible for our observed variation? Using a modern MALDI-TOF/TOF instrument, we evaluated contributions to variability. Our data suggest a major component of variability is binning of the raw flight time data by the electronics and clock speed of the analog-to-digital (AD) detection system, which requires interpolation by automated peak fitting algorithms and impacts both calibration and the observed mass spectrum. Importantly, the variation observed is predominantly normal in distribution, which implies multiple components contribute to the observed variation and suggests a method to mitigate this variability through spectrum averaging. Restarting the acquisition impacts each spectrum within the electronic error of the AD detector system and defines a new calibration function. Therefore, averaging multiple independent spectra and not a larger number of laser shots leverages this inherent binning error to mitigate variability in accurate MALDI-TOF mass measurements. PMID:25798583

  7. Higgs mass predictions of public NMSSM spectrum generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, Florian; Athron, Peter; Ellwanger, Ulrich; Gröber, Ramona; Mühlleitner, Margarete; Slavich, Pietro; Voigt, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    The publicly available spectrum generators for the NMSSM often lead to different predictions for the mass of the standard model-like Higgs boson, even though they all implement two-loop computations in the DR bar renormalization scheme. Depending on the parameter point, the differences can exceed 5 GeV, and even reach 8 GeV for moderate superparticle masses of up to 2 TeV. It is shown here that these differences can be traced back to the calculation of the running standard model parameters entering all calculations, to the approximations used in the two-loop corrections included in the different codes, and to different choices for the renormalization conditions and scales. In particular, the importance of the calculation of the top Yukawa coupling is pointed out.

  8. Neutrino mass from the beta spectrum in the decay of tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Boris, S.; Golutvin, A.; Laptin, L.; Lubimov, V.; Nagovizin, V.; Nozik, V.; Novikov, E.; Soloshenko, V.; Tihomirov, I.; Tretjakov, E.; and others

    1987-05-18

    The data from the spectrum measurement of the tritium decay in a valine molecule carried out in a wide energy range (3.4 KeV) with the ITEP spectrometer are analyzed. The combined analysis of both these data and the data of the previous cycle gives the neutrino mass 30.3/sub -8//sup +2/ eV. The model-independent mass interval 17mass difference of the doublet /sup 3/H-/sup 3/He.

  9. Differentiating organically and conventionally grown oregano using ultraperformance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (headspace-GC-FID), and flow injection mass spectrum (FIMS) fingerprints combined with multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Boyan; Qin, Fang; Ding, Tingting; Chen, Yineng; Lu, Weiying; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2014-08-13

    Ultraperformance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), flow injection mass spectrometry (FIMS), and headspace gas chromatography (headspace-GC) combined with multivariate data analysis techniques were examined and compared in differentiating organically grown oregano from that grown conventionally. It is the first time that headspace-GC fingerprinting technology is reported in differentiating organically and conventionally grown spice samples. The results also indicated that UPLC-MS, FIMS, and headspace-GC-FID fingerprints with OPLS-DA were able to effectively distinguish oreganos under different growing conditions, whereas with PCA, only FIMS fingerprint could differentiate the organically and conventionally grown oregano samples. UPLC fingerprinting provided detailed information about the chemical composition of oregano with a longer analysis time, whereas FIMS finished a sample analysis within 1 min. On the other hand, headspace GC-FID fingerprinting required no sample pretreatment, suggesting its potential as a high-throughput method in distinguishing organically and conventionally grown oregano samples. In addition, chemical components in oregano were identified by their molecular weight using QTOF-MS and headspace-GC-MS. PMID:25050447

  10. The dijet mass spectrum at D-Zero

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-11-01

    We present preliminary results from an analysis of jet data collected during the 1994-95 Tevatron Collider run with an integrated luminosity of 93 pb{sup -1}. Measurements of dijet mass spectra in {anti p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV are compared to next-to-leading order QCD calculations.

  11. The Higgs mass and natural supersymmetric spectrum from the landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Savoy, Michael; Serce, Hasan

    2016-07-01

    In supersymmetric models where the superpotential μ term is generated with μ ≪msoft (e.g. from radiative Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking or compactified string models with sequestration and stabilized moduli), and where the string landscape 1. favors soft supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking terms as large as possible and 2. where the anthropic condition that electroweak symmetry is properly broken with a weak scale m W , Z , h ∼ 100 GeV (i.e. not too weak of weak interactions), then these combined landscape/anthropic requirements act as an attractor pulling the soft SUSY breaking terms towards values required by models with radiatively-driven naturalness: near the line of criticality where electroweak symmetry is barely broken and the Higgs mass is ∼ 125 GeV. The pull on the soft terms serves to ameliorate the SUSY flavor and CP problems. The resulting sparticle mass spectrum may barely be accessible at high-luminosity LHC while the required light higgsinos should be visible at a linear e+e- collider with √{ s} > 2 m (higgsino).

  12. New Physics Search in Dijet Mass Spectrum with Compact Muon Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Chiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Many extensions of the SM predict the existence of new massive objects that couple to quarks and gluons and result in resonances in the dijet mass spectrum. In this thesis we present a search for narrow resonances in the dijet mass spectrum using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a proton-proton collision energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ $TeV$. %This dijet analysis is searching for new particles in the dijet mass spectrum decaying to dijets. These new particles are predicted by new physics beyond Standard Model. This thesis presents a dijet analysis performed at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ $TeV$ for an integrated luminosities of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$. The dijet mass distribution of two leading jets is measured and compared to QCD predictions, simulated by PYTHIA with the CMS detector simulation. We select events which have two leading jets with $\\mid \\Delta\\eta \\mid < 1.3$ and $\\mid \\eta \\mid < 2.5$. We fit the dijet mass spectrum with QCD parameters. Since no evidence of new physics was found, we set upper limits at 95\\% CL on the resonance cross section and compare to the theoretical prediction for several models of new particles: string resonances, axigluons, colorons, excited quarks, $E_{6}$ diquarks, Randall-Sundrum gravitons, W' and Z'. We exclude at 95\\% CL string resonances in the mass range $1.0 < M(S) < 4.00$ TeV, excited quarks in the mass range $1.0mass range $1.0mass range $1.0mass range $1.0

  13. Constraining Amplitude and Slope of the Mass Fluctuation Spectrum Using a Cluster Baryon Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voevodkin, A.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2004-02-01

    We derive the baryon mass function for a complete sample of low-redshift clusters and argue that it is an excellent proxy for the total mass function if the ratio fb=Mb/Mtot in all clusters is close to its universal value, Ωb/ΩM. Under this assumption, the baryon mass function can be used to constrain the amplitude and slope of the density fluctuation power spectrum on cluster scales. This method does not use observational determinations of the total mass and thus bypasses major uncertainties in the traditional analyses based on the X-ray temperature function. However, it is sensitive to possible systematic variations of the baryon fraction as a function of cluster mass. Adapting a weak dependence fb(M), suggested by observations and numerical simulations by Bialek et al., we derive σ8=0.72+/-0.04 and the shape parameter ΩMh=0.13+/-0.07, in good agreement with a number of independent methods. We discuss the sensitivity of these values to other cosmological parameters and to different assumptions about variations in fb.

  14. Non-perturbative Calculation of the Positronium Mass Spectrum in Basis Light-Front Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiecki, Paul; Li, Yang; Zhao, Xingbo; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.

    2015-09-01

    We report on recent improvements to our non-perturbative calculation of the positronium spectrum. Our Hamiltonian is a two-body effective interaction which incorporates one-photon exchange terms, but neglects fermion self-energy effects. This effective Hamiltonian is diagonalized numerically in a harmonic oscillator basis at strong coupling () to obtain the mass eigenvalues. We find that the mass spectrum compares favorably to the Bohr spectrum of non-relativistic quantum mechanics evaluated at this unphysical coupling.

  15. Higher-order mass defect analysis for mass spectra of complex organic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Roach, Patrick J; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2011-06-15

    Higher-order mass defect analysis is introduced as a unique formula assignment and visualization method for the analysis of complex mass spectra. This approach is an extension of the concepts of Kendrick mass transformation widely used for identification of homologous compounds differing only by a number of base units (e.g., CH(2), H(2), O, CH(2)O, etc.) in complex mixtures. We present an iterative renormalization routine for defining higher-order homologous series and multidimensional clustering of mass spectral features. This approach greatly simplifies visualization of complex mass spectra and increases the number of chemical formulas that can be confidently assigned for given mass accuracy. The potential for using higher-order mass defects for data reduction and visualization is shown. Higher-order mass defect analysis is described and demonstrated through third-order analysis of a deisotoped high-resolution mass spectrum of crude oil containing nearly 13,000 peaks. PMID:21526851

  16. The stealth spectrum analysis (SSA) of the electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dequan

    Stealth spectrum analysis is discussed for assessing total system stability in aircraft communications and navigation equipment by evaluating the stealth circuit. The general frequency response and convolution are calculated for the entire frequency spectrum in both the frequency and time domains. The general energy-density spectrum and the general equivalent noise bandwidth can be computed to analyze problems with stealth technologies.

  17. Mass-Selective Chiral Analysis.

    PubMed

    Boesl, Ulrich; Kartouzian, Aras

    2016-06-12

    Three ways of realizing mass-selective chiral analysis are reviewed. The first is based on the formation of diastereomers that are of homo- and hetero- type with respect to the enantiomers of involved chiral molecules. This way is quite well-established with numerous applications. The other two ways are more recent developments, both based on circular dichroism (CD). In one, conventional or nonlinear electronic CD is linked to mass spectrometry (MS) by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. The other is based on CD in the angular distribution of photoelectrons, which is measured in combination with MS via photoion photoelectron coincidence. Among the many important applications of mass-selective chiral analysis, this review focuses on its use as an analytical tool for the development of heterogeneous enantioselective chemical catalysis. There exist other approaches to combine chiral analysis and mass-selective detection, such as chiral chromatography MS, which are not discussed here. PMID:27070181

  18. Mass-Selective Chiral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesl, Ulrich; Kartouzian, Aras

    2016-06-01

    Three ways of realizing mass-selective chiral analysis are reviewed. The first is based on the formation of diastereomers that are of homo- and hetero- type with respect to the enantiomers of involved chiral molecules. This way is quite well-established with numerous applications. The other two ways are more recent developments, both based on circular dichroism (CD). In one, conventional or nonlinear electronic CD is linked to mass spectrometry (MS) by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. The other is based on CD in the angular distribution of photoelectrons, which is measured in combination with MS via photoion photoelectron coincidence. Among the many important applications of mass-selective chiral analysis, this review focuses on its use as an analytical tool for the development of heterogeneous enantioselective chemical catalysis. There exist other approaches to combine chiral analysis and mass-selective detection, such as chiral chromatography MS, which are not discussed here.

  19. An Analysis of Spectrum Research on Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatoupis, Constantine

    2010-01-01

    Spectrum research on teaching has been conducted since 1970s. The purpose of this study was to identify, categorize, and analyze research in this area. Fifty three Spectrum studies conducted between 1970 and 2008 were included in this study. Each paper was coded for (a) decade the study was published, (b) publication outlet/dissertation research,…

  20. Method and apparatus for frequency spectrum analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Steven W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for frequency spectrum analysis of an unknown signal in real-time is discussed. The method is based upon integration of 1-bit samples of signal voltage amplitude corresponding to sine or cosine phases of a controlled center frequency clock which is changed after each integration interval to sweep the frequency range of interest in steps. Integration of samples during each interval is carried out over a number of cycles of the center frequency clock spanning a number of cycles of an input signal to be analyzed. The invention may be used to detect the frequency of at least two signals simultaneously. By using a reference signal of known frequency and voltage amplitude (added to the two signals for parallel processing in the same way, but in a different channel with a sampling at the known frequency and phases of the reference signal), the absolute voltage amplitude of the other two signals may be determined by squaring the sine and cosine integrals of each channel and summing the squares to obtain relative power measurements in all three channels and, from the known voltage amplitude of the reference signal, obtaining an absolute voltage measurement for the other two signals by multiplying the known voltage of the reference signal with the ratio of the relative power of each of the other two signals to the relative power of the reference signal.

  1. The application of an optical Fourier spectrum analyzer on detecting defects in mass-produced satellite photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athale, R.; Lee, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    Various defects in mass-produced pictures transmitted to earth from a satellite are investigated. It is found that the following defects are readily detectable via Fourier spectrum analysis: (1) bit slip, (2) breakup causing loss of image, and (3) disabled track at the top of the imagery. The scratches made on the film during mass production, which are difficult to detect by visual observation, also show themselves readily in Fourier spectrum analysis. A relation is established between the number of scratches, their width and depth and the intensity of their Fourier spectra. Other defects that are found to be equally suitable for Fourier spectrum analysis or visual (image analysis) detection are synchronous loss without blurring of image, and density variation in gray scale. However, the Fourier spectrum analysis is found to be unsuitable for detection of such defects as pin holes, annotation error, synchronous loss with blurring of images, and missing image in the beginning of the work order. The design of an automated, real time system, which will reject defective films, is treated.

  2. Electrical spectrum analysis of operating Hydro Electric machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timperley, J. E.

    1981-12-01

    The electrical spectrum analysis of the operation of five pumped storage machines is discussed. It was found that machines without electrical problems produced little radio noise, although all machines produced some noise. Severe problems produced severe radio noise. If stator deterioration increases, the noise level increases. Similar machines produce similar electrical spectrum signatures. The general source of discharges can be located. A likelihood of failure can be calculated from spectrum analysis.

  3. Decision Analysis of Dynamic Spectrum Access Rules

    SciTech Connect

    Juan D. Deaton; Luiz A. DaSilva; Christian Wernz

    2011-12-01

    A current trend in spectrum regulation is to incorporate spectrum sharing through the design of spectrum access rules that support Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA). This paper develops a decision-theoretic framework for regulators to assess the impacts of different decision rules on both primary and secondary operators. We analyze access rules based on sensing and exclusion areas, which in practice can be enforced through geolocation databases. Our results show that receiver-only sensing provides insufficient protection for primary and co-existing secondary users and overall low social welfare. On the other hand, using sensing information between the transmitter and receiver of a communication link, provides dramatic increases in system performance. The performance of using these link end points is relatively close to that of using many cooperative sensing nodes associated to the same access point and large link exclusion areas. These results are useful to regulators and network developers in understanding in developing rules for future DSA regulation.

  4. Neutrino masses and cosmology with Lyman-alpha forest power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Baur, Julien; Magneville, Christophe; Rossi, Graziano; Lesgourgues, Julien; Borde, Arnaud; Burtin, Etienne; LeGoff, Jean-Marc; Rich, James; Viel, Matteo; Weinberg, David

    2015-11-01

    We present constraints on neutrino masses, the primordial fluctuation spectrum from inflation, and other parameters of the ΛCDM model, using the one-dimensional Lyα-forest power spectrum measured by [1] from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III), complemented by Planck 2015 cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and other cosmological probes. This paper improves on the previous analysis by [2] by using a more powerful set of calibrating hydrodynamical simulations that reduces uncertainties associated with resolution and box size, by adopting a more flexible set of nuisance parameters for describing the evolution of the intergalactic medium, by including additional freedom to account for systematic uncertainties, and by using Planck 2015 constraints in place of Planck 2013. Fitting Lyα data alone leads to cosmological parameters in excellent agreement with the values derived independently from CMB data, except for a weak tension on the scalar index ns. Combining BOSS Lyα with Planck CMB constrains the sum of neutrino masses to ∑ mν < 0.12 eV (95% C.L.) including all identified systematic uncertainties, tighter than our previous limit (0.15 eV) and more robust. Adding Lyα data to CMB data reduces the uncertainties on the optical depth to reionization τ, through the correlation of τ with σ8. Similarly, correlations between cosmological parameters help in constraining the tensor-to-scalar ratio of primordial fluctuations r. The tension on ns can be accommodated by allowing for a running dns/d ln k. Allowing running as a free parameter in the fits does not change the limit on ∑ mν. We discuss possible interpretations of these results in the context of slow-roll inflation.

  5. [CCD spectrum processing of automobile lamp testing with wavelet analysis].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-mei; Gao, Chun-ge; Jiang, Yong-heng

    2003-06-01

    According to the wavelet multi-resolution analysis, the optical spectrum signal received by CCD was processed and analyzed by using the wavelet transformation technique. The noise in the optical spectrum signal can be removed by using the wavelet multi-resolution analysis technique. The curve of spectral signal can be smoothed. The ratio of signal to noise was enhanced. The spectrum of Asource by CCD was smoothed with wavelet multi-resolution analysis. The processing results with different wavelets in different orders were discussed. An effective data processing method was used for spectrum analysis. The difficulty in the analysis and processing of real-time signal can be solved, which is significant in the color testing field. PMID:12953544

  6. Gamma-ray pulse height spectrum analysis on systems with multiple Ge detectors using spectrum summing

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, E.W.

    1997-11-01

    A technique has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to sum high resolution gamma-ray pulse spectra from systems with multiple Ge detectors. Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company operates a multi-detector spectrometer configuration at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant facility which is used to characterize the radionuclide contents in waste drums destined for shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This summing technique was developed to increase the sensitivity of the system, reduce the count times required to properly quantify the radio-nuclides and provide a more consistent methodology for combining data collected from multiple detectors. In spectrometer systems with multiple detectors looking at non homogeneous waste forms it is often difficult to combine individual spectrum analysis results from each detector to obtain a meaningful result for the total waste container. This is particularly true when the counting statistics in each individual spectrum are poor. The spectrum summing technique adds the spectra collected by each detector into a single spectrum which has better counting statistics than each individual spectrum. A normal spectral analysis program can then be used to analyze the sum spectrum to obtain radio-nuclide values which have smaller errors and do not have to be further manipulated to obtain results for the total waste container. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Spectrum Analysis of Some Kinetic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tong; Yu, Hongjun

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the spectrum structure of some kinetic equations qualitatively by using semigroup theory and linear operator perturbation theory. The models include the classical Boltzmann equation for hard potentials with or without angular cutoff and the Landau equation with {γ≥q-2} . As an application, we show that the solutions to these two fundamental equations are asymptotically equivalent (mod time decay rate {t^{-5/4}} ) as {tto∞} to that of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for initial data around an equilibrium state.

  8. Polychromatic sparse image reconstruction and mass attenuation spectrum estimation via B-spline basis function expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Renliang; Dogandžić, Aleksandar

    2015-03-01

    We develop a sparse image reconstruction method for polychromatic computed tomography (CT) measurements under the blind scenario where the material of the inspected object and the incident energy spectrum are unknown. To obtain a parsimonious measurement model parameterization, we first rewrite the measurement equation using our mass-attenuation parameterization, which has the Laplace integral form. The unknown mass-attenuation spectrum is expanded into basis functions using a B-spline basis of order one. We develop a block coordinate-descent algorithm for constrained minimization of a penalized negative log-likelihood function, where constraints and penalty terms ensure nonnegativity of the spline coefficients and sparsity of the density map image in the wavelet domain. This algorithm alternates between a Nesterov's proximal-gradient step for estimating the density map image and an active-set step for estimating the incident spectrum parameters. Numerical simulations demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

  9. Polychromatic sparse image reconstruction and mass attenuation spectrum estimation via B-spline basis function expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Renliang E-mail: ald@iastate.edu; Dogandžić, Aleksandar E-mail: ald@iastate.edu

    2015-03-31

    We develop a sparse image reconstruction method for polychromatic computed tomography (CT) measurements under the blind scenario where the material of the inspected object and the incident energy spectrum are unknown. To obtain a parsimonious measurement model parameterization, we first rewrite the measurement equation using our mass-attenuation parameterization, which has the Laplace integral form. The unknown mass-attenuation spectrum is expanded into basis functions using a B-spline basis of order one. We develop a block coordinate-descent algorithm for constrained minimization of a penalized negative log-likelihood function, where constraints and penalty terms ensure nonnegativity of the spline coefficients and sparsity of the density map image in the wavelet domain. This algorithm alternates between a Nesterov’s proximal-gradient step for estimating the density map image and an active-set step for estimating the incident spectrum parameters. Numerical simulations demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

  10. Unification and mass spectrum in a B-L extended MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Pinto, R. J.; Perez-Lorenzana, A.

    2009-04-20

    The simplest B-L extension of the minimum supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) may change some of the conceptions about the path for gauge unification as well as to affect the predicted spectrum of the supersymmetric particles at low energy. We present our results for the running of gauge coupling constants and mass parameter in this context.

  11. Neutrino mass limits: Robust information from the power spectrum of galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, Antonio J.; Niro, Viviana; Verde, Licia

    2016-09-01

    We present cosmological upper limits on the sum of active neutrino masses using large-scale power spectrum data from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) sample of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG). Combining measurements on the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarisation anisotropies by the Planck satellite together with WiggleZ power spectrum results in a neutrino mass bound of 0.37 eV at 95% C.L., while replacing WiggleZ by the SDSS-DR7 LRG power spectrum, the 95% C.L. bound on the sum of neutrino masses is 0.38 eV. Adding Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distance scale measurements, the neutrino mass upper limits greatly improve, since BAO data break degeneracies in parameter space. Within a ΛCDM model, we find an upper limit of 0.13 eV (0.14 eV) at 95% C.L., when using SDSS-DR7 LRG (WiggleZ) together with BAO and Planck. The addition of BAO data makes the neutrino mass upper limit robust, showing only a weak dependence on the power spectrum used. We also quantify the dependence of neutrino mass limit reported here on the CMB lensing information. The tighter upper limit (0.13 eV) obtained with SDSS-DR7 LRG is very close to that recently obtained using Lyman-alpha clustering data, yet uses a completely different probe and redshift range, further supporting the robustness of the constraint. This constraint puts under some pressure the inverted mass hierarchy and favours the normal hierarchy.

  12. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SPACETIME GEOMETRY AROUND 10 STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES FROM THE DISK'S THERMAL SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Lingyao; Li, Zilong; Bambi, Cosimo

    2014-12-20

    In a previous paper, one of us (C. Bambi) described a code to compute the thermal spectrum of geometrically thin and optically thick accretion disks around generic stationary and axisymmetric black holes, which are not necessarily of the Kerr type. As the structure of the accretion disk and the propagation of electromagnetic radiation from the disk to the distant observer depend on the background metric, the analysis of the thermal spectrum of thin disks can be used to test the actual nature of black hole candidates. In this paper, we consider the 10 stellar-mass black hole candidates for which the spin parameter has already been estimated from the analysis of the disk's thermal spectrum under the assumption of the Kerr background, and we translate the measurements reported in the literature into constraints on the spin parameter-deformation parameter plane. The analysis of the disk's thermal spectrum can be used to estimate only one parameter of the geometry close to the compact object; therefore, it is not possible to get independent measurements of both the spin and the deformation parameters. The constraints obtained here will be used in combination with other measurements in future work with the final goal of breaking the degeneracy between the spin and possible deviations from the Kerr solution and thus test the Kerr black hole hypothesis.

  13. Constraints on the Spacetime Geometry around 10 Stellar-mass Black Hole Candidates from the Disk's Thermal Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingyao; Li, Zilong; Bambi, Cosimo

    2014-12-01

    In a previous paper, one of us (C. Bambi) described a code to compute the thermal spectrum of geometrically thin and optically thick accretion disks around generic stationary and axisymmetric black holes, which are not necessarily of the Kerr type. As the structure of the accretion disk and the propagation of electromagnetic radiation from the disk to the distant observer depend on the background metric, the analysis of the thermal spectrum of thin disks can be used to test the actual nature of black hole candidates. In this paper, we consider the 10 stellar-mass black hole candidates for which the spin parameter has already been estimated from the analysis of the disk's thermal spectrum under the assumption of the Kerr background, and we translate the measurements reported in the literature into constraints on the spin parameter-deformation parameter plane. The analysis of the disk's thermal spectrum can be used to estimate only one parameter of the geometry close to the compact object; therefore, it is not possible to get independent measurements of both the spin and the deformation parameters. The constraints obtained here will be used in combination with other measurements in future work with the final goal of breaking the degeneracy between the spin and possible deviations from the Kerr solution and thus test the Kerr black hole hypothesis.

  14. Spectrum analysis with quantum dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Shilin; Ang, Shan Zheng; Wheatley, Trevor A.; Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Furusawa, Akira; Huntington, Elanor H.; Tsang, Mankei

    2016-04-01

    Measuring the power spectral density of a stochastic process, such as a stochastic force or magnetic field, is a fundamental task in many sensing applications. Quantum noise is becoming a major limiting factor to such a task in future technology, especially in optomechanics for temperature, stochastic gravitational wave, and decoherence measurements. Motivated by this concern, here we prove a measurement-independent quantum limit to the accuracy of estimating the spectrum parameters of a classical stochastic process coupled to a quantum dynamical system. We demonstrate our results by analyzing the data from a continuous-optical-phase-estimation experiment and showing that the experimental performance with homodyne detection is close to the quantum limit. We further propose a spectral photon-counting method that can attain quantum-optimal performance for weak modulation and a coherent-state input, with an error scaling superior to that of homodyne detection at low signal-to-noise ratios.

  15. Characterization of bone microstructure using photoacoustic spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ting; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Xu, Guan; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Deng, Cheri X.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a progressive bone disease that is characterized by a decrease in bone mass and deterioration in microarchitecture. This study investigates the feasibility of characterizing bone microstructure by analyzing the frequency spectrum of the photoacoustic signals from the bone. Modeling and numerical simulation of photoacoustic signals and their frequency-domain analysis were performed on trabecular bones with different mineral densities. The resulting quasilinear photoacoustic spectra were fit by linear regression, from which spectral parameter slope can be quantified. The modeling demonstrates that, at an optical wavelength of 685 nm, bone specimens with lower mineral densities have higher slope. Preliminary experiment on osteoporosis rat tibia bones with different mineral contents has also been conducted. The finding from the experiment has a good agreement with the modeling, both demonstrating that the frequency-domain analysis of photoacoustic signals can provide objective assessment of bone microstructure and deterioration. Considering that photoacoustic measurement is non-ionizing, non-invasive, and has sufficient penetration in both calcified and noncalcified tissues, this new technology holds unique potential for clinical translation.

  16. Characterization of bone microstructure using photoacoustic spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ting; Perosky, Joseph E; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Xu, Guan; Cheng, Qian; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Deng, Cheri X; Wang, Xueding

    2015-09-21

    Osteoporosis is a progressive bone disease that is characterized by a decrease in bone mass and the deterioration in bone microarchitecture. This study investigates the feasibility of characterizing bone microstructure by analyzing the frequency spectrum of the photoacoustic (PA) signal from the bone. Modeling and numerical simulation of PA signal were performed on trabecular bone simulations and CT scans with different trabecular thicknesses. The resulting quasi-linear photoacoustic spectra were fittted by linear regression, from which the spectral parameter slope was quantified. The simulation based on two different models both demonstrate that bone specimens with thinner trabecular thicknesses have higher slope. Experiment on osteoporotic rat femoral heads with different mineral content was conducted. The finding from the experiment was in good agreement with the simulation, demonstrating that the frequency-domain analysis of PA signals can provide an objective assessment of bone microstructure and deterioration. Considering that PA measurement is non-ionizing, non-invasive, and has sufficient penetration in both calcified and non-calcified tissues, this new bone evaluation method based on photoacoustic spectral analysis holds potential for clinical management of osteoporosis and other bone diseases. PMID:26406719

  17. High-resolution mass-analyzed threshold ion spectrum of Argon obtained on beamline 9.0.2.2

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.W.; Lu, K.T.; Evans, M.

    1997-04-01

    The first mass analyzed threshold ion (MATI) spectrum using dc electric fields and a continuous wave light source has been obtained on End Station 2 of the Chemical Dynamics Beamline (9.0.2.2) at the Advanced Light Source. MATI provides researchers with fundamental spectroscopic information about atomic and molecular ions with the added advantage of mass analysis. The MATI technique involves the detection of ions formed by field ionization of long-lived high-n Rydberg states approaching an ionization threshold. The MATI apparatus consists of a differentially pumped supersonic molecular beam source, a photoionization region followed by a series of electrostatic lenses, a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and a Daly-type detector. The MATI technique can be used to probe the Rydberg states approaching an ionization continuum and yield information about the lifetimes of these states. In addition, MATI could be used to obtain the spectrum of a single species present in a sample mixture due to the mass selective nature of the experiment. MATI could also be used to form mass selected and state specific ions for use in ion molecule reaction experiments.

  18. Measurement of the electron antineutrino mass from the beta spectrum of gaseous tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, D.A.

    1986-12-01

    A measurement has been made of the mass of the electron antineutrino using the beta spectrum from a source of gaseous molecular tritium, and an upper limit of 36 eV/c/sup 2/ has been set on this mass. This measurement is the first upper limit on neutrino mass that does not rely on assumptions about the atomic configuration after the beta decay, and it has significantly smaller systematic errors associated with it than do previous measurements. 130 refs., 83 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Absorption-line profiles in a companion spectrum of a mass-losing cool supergiant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Liliya L.; Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    Cool star winds can best be observed in resonance absorption lines seen in the spectrum of a hot companion, due to the wind passing in front of the blue star. We calculated absorption line profiles that would be seen in the ultraviolet part of the blue companion spectrum. Line profiles are derived for different radial dependences of the cool star wind and for different orbital phases of the binary. Bowen and Wilson find theoretically that stellar pulsations drive mass loss. We therefore apply our calculations to the Cepheid binary S Muscae which has a B5V companion. We find an upper limit for the Cepheid mass loss of M less than or equal to 7 x 10 (exp -10) solar mass per year provided that the stellar wind of the companion does not influence the Cepheid wind at large distances.

  20. Absorption line profiles in a companion spectrum of a mass losing cool supergiant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Liliya L.; Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1990-01-01

    Cool star winds can best be observed in resonance absorption lines seen in the spectrum of a hot companion, due to the wind passing in front of the blue star. We calculated absorption line profiles that would be seen in the ultraviolet part of the blue companion spectrum. Line profiles are derived for different radial dependences of the cool star wind and for different orbital phases of the binary. Bowen and Wilson find theoretically that stellar pulsations drive mass loss. We therefore apply our calculations to the Cepheid binary S Muscae which has a B5V companion. We find an upper limit for the Cepheid mass loss of M less than or equal to 7 x 10(exp -10) solar mass per year provided that the stellar wind of the companion does not influence the Cepheid wind at large distances.

  1. Photoionization mass spectrometric study of HOCl: Photoionization efficiency spectrum and ionization energy

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, R.P. Jr.; Stief, L.J.

    1999-02-18

    The photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range {lambda} = 102--115 nm, using a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) apparatus coupled to a synchrotron radiation source. The PIE spectra displayed steplike behavior near threshold. This study represents the first determination of the HOCl photoionization efficiency spectrum and the photoionization threshold. A value of 11.12{sub 3} {+-} 0.01{sub 8} eV was obtained for the adiabatic ionization energy (IE) of HOCl from analysis of photoion thresholds, corresponding to the HOCl{sup +}(X{sup 2}A{double_prime}) {l_arrow} HOCl(X{sup 1}A{double_prime}) transition. The PIMS result is identical to the only previous experimental measurement and in good agreement with a recent ab initio calculation. From the result for IE(HOCl), a value of 999.4 {+-} 3.6 kJ mol{sup {minus}1} was calculated for {Delta}{sub f}H{degree}{sub 0}(HOCl{sup +}), and from the latter, the proton affinity of ClO at T = 0 K, PA{sub 0}(ClO), was determined to be 629.6 {+-} 3.6 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}. At 298 K, the computed values for {Delta}{sub f}H{degree}{sub 298}(HOCl{sup +}) and PA{sub 298}(ClO) are 996.5 {+-} 3.6 and 635.1 {+-} 3.6 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}, respectively.

  2. Heart Sound Biometric System Based on Marginal Spectrum Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhidong; Shen, Qinqin; Ren, Fangqin

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a heart sound biometric system based on marginal spectrum analysis, which is a new feature extraction technique for identification purposes. This heart sound identification system is comprised of signal acquisition, pre-processing, feature extraction, training, and identification. Experiments on the selection of the optimal values for the system parameters are conducted. The results indicate that the new spectrum coefficients result in a significant increase in the recognition rate of 94.40% compared with that of the traditional Fourier spectrum (84.32%) based on a database of 280 heart sounds from 40 participants. PMID:23429515

  3. Reference MWA EoR Power Spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelton, Bryna; Pober, Jonathan; Beardsley, Adam; Morales, Miguel F.; Sullivan, Ian S.; MWA Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the Epoch of Reionization using redshifted 21cm HI emission promise to provide sensitive new cosmological constraints in the next few years. The current generation of HI EoR telescopes are targeting a statistical detection of the EoR in the power spectrum of the 21cm emission. The principal challenge lies in extracting the faint cosmological signal in the face of bright foregrounds and instrumental systematics that threaten to overwhelm it.We present the UW EoR power spectrum code, the reference code for the MWA and the first power spectrum analysis to analytically propagate the error bars through the full data analysis pipeline. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the power spectrum as a diagnostic tool for identifying subtle systematics and show power spectra of the first season of MWA observations.

  4. Learning score function parameters for improved spectrum identification in tandem mass spectrometry experiments

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Marina; Bereman, Michael S.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Noble, William Stafford

    2012-01-01

    The identification of proteins from spectra derived from a tandem mass spectrometry experiment involves several challenges: matching each observed spectrum to a peptide sequence, ranking the resulting collection of peptide-spectrum matches, assigning statistical confidence estimates to the matches, and identifying the proteins. The present work addresses algorithms to rank peptide-spectrum matches. Many of these algorithms, such as PeptideProphet, IDPicker, or Q-ranker, follow similar methodology that includes representing peptide-spectrum matches as feature vectors and using optimization techniques to rank them. We propose a richer and more flexible feature set representation that is based on the parametrization of the SEQUEST XCorr score and that can be used by all of these algorithms. This extended feature set allows a more effective ranking of the peptide-spectrum matches based on the target-decoy strategy, in comparison to a baseline feature set devoid of these XCorr-based features. Ranking using the extended feature set gives 10–40% improvement in the number of distinct peptide identifications relative to a range of q-value thresholds. While this work is inspired by the model of the theoretical spectrum and the similarity measure between spectra used specifically by SEQUEST, the method itself can be applied to the output of any database search. Further, our approach can be trivially extended beyond XCorr to any linear operator that can serve as similarity score between experimental spectra and peptide sequences. PMID:22866926

  5. Singular spectrum analysis for time series with missing data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2001-01-01

    Geophysical time series often contain missing data, which prevents analysis with many signal processing and multivariate tools. A modification of singular spectrum analysis for time series with missing data is developed and successfully tested with synthetic and actual incomplete time series of suspended-sediment concentration from San Francisco Bay. This method also can be used to low pass filter incomplete time series.

  6. Dipion invariant mass spectrum in X(3872)→J/ψππ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewon; Ko, P.

    2005-02-01

    It is pointed out that dipion invariant mass spectrum in X(3872)→J/ψππ is a useful probe for the JPC quantum number of the X(3872), complementary to the angular distributions. If X(3872) is a 1P1 state, the dipion has a peak at a low mππ region, which is not in accordance with the preliminary Belle data. If X(3872) is a 3D2 or 3D3 state, the dipion spectrum shows a peak at a high mππ region, which is broader than the ρ resonance that might come from the decay of a molecular state: (DD*¯)(I=1)→J/ψρ→J/ψπ+π-. Better measurement of the mππ spectrum will shed light on the nature of X(3872).

  7. Near threshold enhancement of the p p-bar mass spectrum in J/Psi decay

    SciTech Connect

    A. Sibirtsev; J. Haidenbauer; S. Krewald; Ulf-G. Meissner; A.W. Thomas

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the nature of the near-threshold enhancement in the p {bar p} invariant mass spectrum of the reaction J/{Psi} {yields} {gamma} p {bar p} reported recently by the BES Collaboration. Using the Juelich N {bar N} model we show that the mass dependence of the p {bar p} spectrum close to the threshold can be reproduced by the S-wave p {bar p} final state interaction in the isospin I=1 state within the Watson-Migdal approach. However, because of our poor knowledge of the N {bar N} interaction near threshold and of the J/{Psi} {yields} {gamma} p {bar p} reaction mechanism and in view of the controversial situation in the decay J/{Psi} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} p {bar p}, where no obvious signs of a p {bar p} final state interaction are seen, explanations other than final state interactions cannot be ruled out at the present stage.

  8. The Murchison Widefield Array 21 cm Power Spectrum Analysis Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Daniel C.; Hazelton, B. J.; Trott, C. M.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Pindor, B.; Sullivan, I. S.; Pober, J. C.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, Judd D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Corey, B. E.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Emrich, D.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kim, HS; Kratzenberg, E.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Neben, A. R.; Thyagarajan, N.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, S.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sethi, Shiv K.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tegmark, M.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-07-01

    We present the 21 cm power spectrum analysis approach of the Murchison Widefield Array Epoch of Reionization project. In this paper, we compare the outputs of multiple pipelines for the purpose of validating statistical limits cosmological hydrogen at redshifts between 6 and 12. Multiple independent data calibration and reduction pipelines are used to make power spectrum limits on a fiducial night of data. Comparing the outputs of imaging and power spectrum stages highlights differences in calibration, foreground subtraction, and power spectrum calculation. The power spectra found using these different methods span a space defined by the various tradeoffs between speed, accuracy, and systematic control. Lessons learned from comparing the pipelines range from the algorithmic to the prosaically mundane; all demonstrate the many pitfalls of neglecting reproducibility. We briefly discuss the way these different methods attempt to handle the question of evaluating a significant detection in the presence of foregrounds.

  9. Automated mass spectrometer analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuppermann, Aron (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor); Giffin, Charles E. (Inventor); Boettger, Heinz G. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An automated mass spectrometer analysis system is disclosed, in which samples are automatically processed in a sample processor and converted into volatilizable samples, or their characteristic volatilizable derivatives. Each volatilizable sample is sequentially volatilized and analyzed in a double focusing mass spectrometer, whose output is in the form of separate ion beams all of which are simultaneously focused in a focal plane. Each ion beam is indicative of a different sample component or different fragments of one or more sample components and the beam intensity is related to the relative abundance of the sample component. The system includes an electro-optical ion detector which automatically and simultaneously converts the ion beams, first into electron beams which in turn produce a related image which is transferred to the target of a vilicon unit. The latter converts the images into electrical signals which are supplied to a data processor, whose output is a list of the components of the analyzed sample and their abundances. The system is under the control of a master control unit, which in addition to monitoring and controlling various power sources, controls the automatic operation of the system under expected and some unexpected conditions and further protects various critical parts of the system from damage due to particularly abnormal conditions.

  10. Automated mass spectrometer analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettger, Heinz G. (Inventor); Giffin, Charles E. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor); Kuppermann, Aron (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An automated mass spectrometer analysis system is disclosed, in which samples are automatically processed in a sample processor and converted into volatilizable samples, or their characteristic volatilizable derivatives. Each volatizable sample is sequentially volatilized and analyzed in a double focusing mass spectrometer, whose output is in the form of separate ion beams all of which are simultaneously focused in a focal plane. Each ion beam is indicative of a different sample component or different fragments of one or more sample components and the beam intensity is related to the relative abundance of the sample component. The system includes an electro-optical ion detector which automatically and simultaneously converts the ion beams, first into electron beams which in turn produce a related image which is transferred to the target of a vidicon unit. The latter converts the images into electrical signals which are supplied to a data processor, whose output is a list of the components of the analyzed sample and their abundances. The system is under the control of a master control unit, which in addition to monitoring and controlling various power sources, controls the automatic operation of the system under expected and some unexpected conditions and further protects various critical parts of the system from damage due to particularly abnormal conditions.

  11. The REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey: power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C.; Guzzo, L.; Phleps, S.

    2011-05-01

    We present the power spectrum of galaxy clusters measured from the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. This new sample extends the flux limit of the original REFLEX catalogue to 1.8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2, yielding a total of 911 clusters with ≥94 per cent completeness in redshift follow-up. The analysis of the data is improved by creating a set of 100 REFLEX II-catalogue-like mock galaxy cluster catalogues built from a suite of large-volume Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) N-body simulations (L-BASICC II). The measured power spectrum is in agreement with the predictions from a ΛCDM cosmological model. The measurements show the expected increase in the amplitude of the power spectrum with increasing X-ray luminosity. On large scales, we show that the shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a scale-independent bias and provide a model for the amplitude that allows us to connect our measurements with a cosmological model. By implementing a luminosity-dependent power-spectrum estimator, we observe that the power spectrum measured from the REFLEX II sample is weakly affected by flux-selection effects. The shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a featureless power spectrum on scales k > 0.01 h Mpc-1 and hence no statistically significant signal of baryonic acoustic oscillations can be detected. We show that the measured REFLEX II power spectrum displays signatures of non-linear evolution.

  12. The radial dependence of the mass-spectrum and lifetime of molecular clouds in our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, D.-L.; Lou, G.-F.

    1985-09-01

    The galactic radial distribution of several parameters of interstellar molecules and clouds deduced from observational data is described. The radial distribution of the physical properties of the (C-13)O clouds are not in one-to-one correspondence with the 21 cm H I arms identified by Cohen (1980). Large-mass clouds and hot clouds show no clear tendency toward concentrating in the arms. Small clouds show a gapless distribution. The arm and interarm regions have the same mass spectrum, hence the same growth rate and cloud lifetime.

  13. Physiological analysis of extended-spectrum oscillometry.

    PubMed

    Wouters, E F; Lándsér, F J; Polko, A H; Visser, B F

    1988-01-01

    Using a forced oscillation technique, the resistance and reactance of the respiratory system in a frequency range between 4 and 52 Hz were described in a group of healthy subjects and a group of patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In normal subjects, resistance values increased at higher frequencies. As compared to the results in normal subjects, resistance values were much higher and decreased with frequency in COPD patients. Reactance values were more negative, resulting in an increase of resonant frequency. Using matrix network topography, these findings were analyzed in a modified Mead's model. Compressibility of alveolar gas was incorporated in the model calculations. Resistance and reactance values slightly decreased by adding gas compliance in the model calculations. Our results support Mead's hypothesis that the shunt compliance is formed by the compliance of intrathoracic airway walls. Input impedance measurement by forced oscillation is therefore an easily implemented, non-invasive method to investigate respiratory mechanics not requiring active cooperation from the subject. Analysis of resistance and reactance over an extended frequency range gives information about the distribution of resistance along the bronchial system and about compliance of the intrathoracic airway walls as expanding structures in parallel with the air spaces. PMID:3249842

  14. A featureless transmission spectrum for the Neptune-mass exoplanet GJ 436b.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Heather A; Benneke, Björn; Deming, Drake; Homeier, Derek

    2014-01-01

    GJ 436b is a warm--approximately 800 kelvin--exoplanet that periodically eclipses its low-mass (half the mass of the Sun) host star, and is one of the few Neptune-mass planets that is amenable to detailed characterization. Previous observations have indicated that its atmosphere has a ratio of methane to carbon monoxide that is 10(5) times smaller than predicted by models for hydrogen-dominated atmospheres at these temperatures. A recent study proposed that this unusual chemistry could be explained if the planet's atmosphere is significantly enhanced in elements heavier than hydrogen and helium. Here we report observations of GJ 436b's atmosphere obtained during transit. The data indicate that the planet's transmission spectrum is featureless, ruling out cloud-free, hydrogen-dominated atmosphere models with an extremely high significance of 48σ. The measured spectrum is consistent with either a layer of high cloud located at a pressure level of approximately one millibar or with a relatively hydrogen-poor (three per cent hydrogen and helium mass fraction) atmospheric composition. PMID:24380953

  15. 2009 Autism Spectrum Disorder Research: Portfolio Analysis Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the Office of Autism Research Coordination (OARC) and Acclaro Research Solutions, Inc., on behalf of the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC), conducted a comprehensive analysis of the 2009 autism spectrum disorder (ASD) research portfolio of major Federal agencies and private organizations. This is the second annual analysis…

  16. A Featureless Transmission Spectrum for the Neptune-Mass Exoplanet GJ 436b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Heather; Benneke, B.; Deming, D.; Homeier, D.

    2013-10-01

    Observations of eclipsing extrasolar planets offer an invaluable window into the properties of planetary atmospheres. The Neptune-mass exoplanet GJ 436b has a size intermediate between hydrogen-dominated gas giants and the compositionally diverse “super-Earths,” and observations of its atmosphere therefore provide important clues as to the nature of planets in this transitional mass regime. Moses et al. (2013) recently proposed that this planet's puzzling dayside chemistry could be explained if its atmosphere is enhanced in elements heavier than H and He by a factor of ten or more relative to Neptune. We present complementary observations of GJ 436b’s transmission spectrum obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. By measuring the wavelength-dependence of the planet’s near-infrared transit depth when it passes in front of its host star we should have been able to determine the amount of water vapor in its atmosphere. Our observations instead indicate that the planet’s transmission spectrum is effectively featureless, ruling out cloud-free, hydrogen-dominated atmosphere models with high statistical significance. The measured spectrum is consistent with either a high cloud deck located at a pressure of approximately 1 mbar or with a hydrogen-poor atmospheric composition. A hydrogen-poor atmosphere would place stringent constraints on the bulk composition and corresponding formation scenarios for this planet unless it can be shown that proximity to a younger and more luminous primary could have stripped off a primordial hydrogen atmosphere.

  17. Female children with autism spectrum disorder: an insight from mass-univariate and pattern classification analyses.

    PubMed

    Calderoni, Sara; Retico, Alessandra; Biagi, Laura; Tancredi, Raffaella; Muratori, Filippo; Tosetti, Michela

    2012-01-16

    Several studies on structural MRI in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have mainly focused on samples prevailingly consisting of males. Sex differences in brain structure are observable since infancy and therefore caution is required in transferring to females the results obtained for males. The neuroanatomical phenotype of female children with ASD (ASDf) represents indeed a neglected area of research. In this study, we investigated for the first time the anatomic brain structures of a sample entirely composed of ASDf (n=38; 2-7 years of age; mean=53 months; SD=18) with respect to 38 female age and non verbal IQ matched controls, using both mass-univariate and pattern classification approaches. The whole brain volumes of each group were compared using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) with diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated lie algebra (DARTEL) procedure, allowing us to build a study-specific template. Significantly more gray matter (GM) was found in the left superior frontal gyrus (SFG) in ASDf subjects compared to controls. The GM segments obtained in the VBM-DARTEL preprocessing are also classified with a support vector machine (SVM), using the leave-pair-out cross-validation protocol. Then, the recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) approach allows for the identification of the most discriminating voxels in the GM segments and these prove extremely consistent with the SFG region identified by the VBM analysis. Furthermore, the SVM-RFE map obtained with the most discriminating set of voxels corresponding to the maximum Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC(max)=0.80) highlighted a more complex circuitry of increased cortical volume in ASDf, involving bilaterally the SFG and the right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). The SFG and TPJ abnormalities may be relevant to the pathophysiology of ASDf, since these structures participate in some core atypical features of autism. PMID:21896334

  18. [EMD Time-Frequency Analysis of Raman Spectrum and NIR].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-yu; Fang, Yi-ming; Tan, Feng; Tong, Liang; Zhai, Zhe

    2016-02-01

    This paper analyzes the Raman spectrum and Near Infrared Spectrum (NIR) with time-frequency method. The empirical mode decomposition spectrum becomes intrinsic mode functions, which the proportion calculation reveals the Raman spectral energy is uniform distributed in each component, while the NIR's low order intrinsic mode functions only undertakes fewer primary spectroscopic effective information. Both the real spectrum and numerical experiments show that the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) regard Raman spectrum as the amplitude-modulated signal, which possessed with high frequency adsorption property; and EMD regards NIR as the frequency-modulated signal, which could be preferably realized high frequency narrow-band demodulation during first-order intrinsic mode functions. The first-order intrinsic mode functions Hilbert transform reveals that during the period of empirical mode decomposes Raman spectrum, modal aliasing happened. Through further analysis of corn leaf's NIR in time-frequency domain, after EMD, the first and second orders components of low energy are cut off, and reconstruct spectral signal by using the remaining intrinsic mode functions, the root-mean-square error is 1.001 1, and the correlation coefficient is 0.981 3, both of these two indexes indicated higher accuracy in re-construction; the decomposition trend term indicates the absorbency is ascending along with the decreasing to wave length in the near-infrared light wave band; and the Hilbert transform of characteristic modal component displays, 657 cm⁻¹ is the specific frequency by the corn leaf stress spectrum, which could be regarded as characteristic frequency for identification. PMID:27209743

  19. Potential NRQCD for unequal masses and the B c spectrum at N3LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peset, Clara; Pineda, Antonio; Stahlhofen, Maximilian

    2016-05-01

    We determine the 1 /m and 1 /m 2 spin-independent heavy quarkonium potentials in the unequal mass case with {O} ( α 3) and {O} ( α 2) accuracy, respectively. We discuss in detail different methods to calculate the potentials, and show the equivalence among them. In particular we obtain, for the first time, the manifestly gauge invariant 1 /m and 1 /m 2 potentials in terms of Wilson loops with next-to-leading order (NLO) precision. As an application of our results we derive the theoretical expression for the B c spectrum in the weak-coupling limit through next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO).

  20. Spectral saliency via automatic adaptive amplitude spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Dai, Jialun; Zhu, Yafei; Zheng, Haiyong; Qiao, Xiaoyan

    2016-03-01

    Suppressing nonsalient patterns by smoothing the amplitude spectrum at an appropriate scale has been shown to effectively detect the visual saliency in the frequency domain. Different filter scales are required for different types of salient objects. We observe that the optimal scale for smoothing amplitude spectrum shares a specific relation with the size of the salient region. Based on this observation and the bottom-up saliency detection characterized by spectrum scale-space analysis for natural images, we propose to detect visual saliency, especially with salient objects of different sizes and locations via automatic adaptive amplitude spectrum analysis. We not only provide a new criterion for automatic optimal scale selection but also reserve the saliency maps corresponding to different salient objects with meaningful saliency information by adaptive weighted combination. The performance of quantitative and qualitative comparisons is evaluated by three different kinds of metrics on the four most widely used datasets and one up-to-date large-scale dataset. The experimental results validate that our method outperforms the existing state-of-the-art saliency models for predicting human eye fixations in terms of accuracy and robustness.

  1. A SEYFERT-2-LIKE SPECTRUM IN THE HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY MICROQUASAR V4641 SGR

    SciTech Connect

    Morningstar, Warren R.; Miller, Jon M.; Reynolds, M. T.; Maitra, Dipankar E-mail: jonmm@umich.edu

    2014-05-10

    We present an analysis of three archival Chandra observations of the black hole V4641 Sgr, performed during a decline into quiescence. The last two observations in the sequence can be modeled with a simple power law. The first spectrum, however, is remarkably similar to spectra observed in Seyfert-2 active galactic nuclei, which arise through a combination of obscuration and reflection from distant material. This spectrum of V4641 Sgr can be fit extremely well with a model including partial-covering absorption and distant reflection. This model recovers a Γ ≅ 2.0 power-law incident spectrum, typical of black holes at low Eddington fractions. The implied geometry is plausible in a high-mass X-ray binary like V4641 Sgr, and may be as compelling as explanations invoking Doppler-split line pairs in a jet, and/or unusual Comptonization. We discuss potential implications and means of testing these models.

  2. Super-heavy nuclei with Z = 118 and their mass and charge spectrum of fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslyuk, V. T.; Smolyanyuk, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The first results of the calculation of the mass and charge yields of fission fragments for over 60 isotopes which have Z = 118 are presented. The results were obtained from the condition of thermodynamic ordering of the ensemble of fission fragments. The role of neutrons shells with N = 82 or N = 126 and protons shells with Z = 50 in the realization of symmetric (or one-humped) and asymmetric (2- or 3-humped) shapes of the fission-fragment yields with the transition from neutron-proficient to neutron-deficient isotopes was investigated. The data of fragments yields had been analyzed under the conditions of a “cold” and “hot” fission. The calculations show the possibility to identify super-heavy nuclei with Z ≥ 118 produced synthetically by heavy-ion reaction on their mass/charge spectrum division.

  3. [Research of Identify Spatial Object Using Spectrum Analysis Technique].

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Feng, Shi-qi; Shi, Jing; Xu, Rong; Wang, Gong-chang; Li, Bin-yu; Liu, Yu; Li, Shuang; Cao Rui; Cai, Hong-xing; Zhang, Xi-he; Tan, Yong

    2015-06-01

    The high precision scattering spectrum of spatial fragment with the minimum brightness of 4.2 and the resolution of 0.5 nm has been observed using spectrum detection technology on the ground. The obvious differences for different types of objects are obtained by the normalizing and discrete rate analysis of the spectral data. Each of normalized multi-frame scattering spectral line shape for rocket debris is identical. However, that is different for lapsed satellites. The discrete rate of the single frame spectrum of normalized space debris for rocket debris ranges from 0.978% to 3.067%, and the difference of oscillation and average value is small. The discrete rate for lapsed satellites ranges from 3.118 4% to 19.472 7%, and the difference of oscillation and average value relatively large. The reason is that the composition of rocket debris is single, while that of the lapsed satellites is complex. Therefore, the spectrum detection technology on the ground can be used to the classification of the spatial fragment. PMID:26601348

  4. Primary cystic peritoneal masses and mimickers: spectrum of diseases with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Arraiza, María; Metser, Ur; Vajpeyi, Rajkumar; Khalili, Korosh; Hanbidge, Anthony; Kennedy, Erin; Ghai, Sangeet

    2015-04-01

    Cystic lesions within the peritoneum have been classified classically according to their lining on histology into four categories-endothelial, epithelial, mesothelial, and others (germ cell tumors, sex cord gonadal stromal tumors, cystic mesenchymal tumors, fibrous wall tumors, and infectious cystic peritoneal lesions). In this article, we will proceed to classify cystic peritoneal lesions focusing on the degree of radiological complexity into three categories-simple cystic, mildly complex, and cystic with solid component lesions. Many intra-abdominal collections within the peritoneal cavity such as abscess, seroma, biloma, urinoma, or lymphocele may mimic primary peritoneal cystic masses and need to be differentiated. Clinical history and imaging features may help differentiate intra-abdominal collections from primary peritoneal masses. Lymphangiomas are benign multilocular cystic masses that can virtually occur in any location within the abdomen and insinuate between structures. Ultrasound may help differentiate enteric duplication cysts from other mesenteric and omental cysts in the abdomen. Double-layered wall along the mesenteric side of bowel may suggest its diagnosis in the proper clinical setting. Characteristic imaging features of hydatid cysts are internal daughter cysts, floating membranes and matrix, peripheral calcifications, and collagenous pericyst. Non-pancreatic psuedocysts usually have a fibrotic thick wall and chylous content may lead to a fat-fluid level. Pseudomyxoma peritonei appears as loculated fluid collections in the peritoneal cavity, omentum, and mesentery and may scallop visceral surfaces. Many of the primary cystic peritoneal masses have specific imaging features which can help in accurate diagnosis and management of these entities. Knowledge of the imaging spectrum of cystic peritoneal masses is necessary to distinguish from other potential cystic abdominal mimicker masses. PMID:25269999

  5. Condensing Raman spectrum for single-cell phenotype analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, high throughput and non-invasive Raman spectrometry technique has matured as an effective approach to identification of individual cells by species, even in complex, mixed populations. Raman profiling is an appealing optical microscopic method to achieve this. To fully utilize Raman proling for single-cell analysis, an extensive understanding of Raman spectra is necessary to answer questions such as which filtering methodologies are effective for pre-processing of Raman spectra, what strains can be distinguished by Raman spectra, and what features serve best as Raman-based biomarkers for single-cells, etc. Results In this work, we have proposed an approach called rDisc to discretize the original Raman spectrum into only a few (usually less than 20) representative peaks (Raman shifts). The approach has advantages in removing noises, and condensing the original spectrum. In particular, effective signal processing procedures were designed to eliminate noise, utilising wavelet transform denoising, baseline correction, and signal normalization. In the discretizing process, representative peaks were selected to signicantly decrease the Raman data size. More importantly, the selected peaks are chosen as suitable to serve as key biological markers to differentiate species and other cellular features. Additionally, the classication performance of discretized spectra was found to be comparable to full spectrum having more than 1000 Raman shifts. Overall, the discretized spectrum needs about 5storage space of a full spectrum and the processing speed is considerably faster. This makes rDisc clearly superior to other methods for single-cell classication. PMID:26681607

  6. Inorganic trace analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine; Dietze, Hans-Joachim

    1998-10-01

    Mass spectrometric methods for the trace analysis of inorganic materials with their ability to provide a very sensitive multielemental analysis have been established for the determination of trace and ultratrace elements in high-purity materials (metals, semiconductors and insulators), in different technical samples (e.g. alloys, pure chemicals, ceramics, thin films, ion-implanted semiconductors), in environmental samples (waters, soils, biological and medical materials) and geological samples. Whereas such techniques as spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS), laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) have multielemental capability, other methods such as thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) have been used for sensitive mono- or oligoelemental ultratrace analysis (and precise determination of isotopic ratios) in solid samples. The limits of detection for chemical elements using these mass spectrometric techniques are in the low ng g -1 concentration range. The quantification of the analytical results of mass spectrometric methods is sometimes difficult due to a lack of matrix-fitted multielement standard reference materials (SRMs) for many solid samples. Therefore, owing to the simple quantification procedure of the aqueous solution, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is being increasingly used for the characterization of solid samples after sample dissolution. ICP-MS is often combined with special sample introduction equipment (e.g. flow injection, hydride generation, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or electrothermal vaporization) or an off-line matrix separation and enrichment of trace impurities (especially for characterization of

  7. Wavelet spectrum analysis approach to model validation of dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaomo; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2011-02-01

    Feature-based validation techniques for dynamic system models could be unreliable for nonlinear, stochastic, and transient dynamic behavior, where the time series is usually non-stationary. This paper presents a wavelet spectral analysis approach to validate a computational model for a dynamic system. Continuous wavelet transform is performed on the time series data for both model prediction and experimental observation using a Morlet wavelet function. The wavelet cross-spectrum is calculated for the two sets of data to construct a time-frequency phase difference map. The Box-plot, an exploratory data analysis technique, is applied to interpret the phase difference for validation purposes. In addition, wavelet time-frequency coherence is calculated using the locally and globally smoothed wavelet power spectra of the two data sets. Significance tests are performed to quantitatively verify whether the wavelet time-varying coherence is significant at a specific time and frequency point, considering uncertainties in both predicted and observed time series data. The proposed wavelet spectrum analysis approach is illustrated with a dynamics validation challenge problem developed at the Sandia National Laboratories. A comparison study is conducted to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed methodologies over classical frequency-independent cross-correlation analysis and time-independent cross-coherence analysis for the validation of dynamic systems.

  8. Underground fluid composition analysis based on the near infrared spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenxi; Liao, Yanbiao; Zhang, Min

    2011-11-01

    The near-infrared spectrum is very practical for real-time analyzing in the field of industry. This paper describes the structure of optical system, which is a part of the well logging instruments. The optical system is designed to analyze the composition of underground fluid, using the differences between oil and water in near-infrared absorption. Using Beer- Lambert law, the article analyzes the light intensity when broad-spectrum light passes through the liquid. According to the results of analysis, a group of wavelength including center wavelength and bandwidth can be selected. With each selected wavelength, light intensity changes significantly as the concentration of liquid changes. By measuring the light intensity, the system can analyse the composition of underground fluid.

  9. Broad-Spectrum Drug Screening Using Liquid Chromatography-Hybrid Triple-Quadrupole Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stone, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Urine is processed with a simple C18 solid-phase extraction (SPE) and reconstituted in mobile phase. The liquid chromatography system (LC) injects 10 μL of extracted sample onto a reverse-phase LC column for gradient analysis with ammonium formate/acetonitrile mobile phases. Drugs in the column eluent become charged in the ion source using positive electrospray ionization (ESI). Pseudomolecular ions (M + H) are analyzed by a hybrid triple-quadrupole linear ion trap (QqQ and QqLIT) mass spectrometer using an SRM-IDA-EPI acquisition. An initial 125 compound selected ion monitoring (SRM) survey scan (triple quadrupole or QqQ mode) is processed by the information-dependent acquisition (IDA) algorithm. The IDA algorithm selects SRM signals from the survey scan with a peak height above the threshold (the three most abundant SRM signals above 1000 cps) to define precursor ions for subsequent dependent scanning. In the dependent QqLIT scan(s), selected precursor ion(s) are passed through the first quadrupole (Q1), fragmented with three different collision energies in the collision cell (Q2 or q), and product ions are collected in the third quadrupole (Q3), now operating as a linear ion trap (LIT). The ions are scanned out of the LIT in a mass dependent manner to produce a full-scan product ion spectrum (m/z 50-700) defined as an Enhanced (meaning acquired in LIT mode) Product Ion (EPI) spectrum (Mueller et al., Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 19:1332-1338, 2005). Each EPI spectrum is linked to its precursor ion and to the associated SRM peak from the survey scan. EPI spectra are automatically searched against a 125 drug library of reference EPI spectra for identification. When the duty cycle is complete (one survey scan of 125 SRMs plus 0-3 dependent IDA-EPI scans) the mass spectrometer begins another survey scan of the 125 SRMs. PMID:26660183

  10. Shock interactions, turbulence and the origin of the stellar mass spectrum.

    PubMed

    Pudritz, Ralph E; Kevlahan, N K-R

    2013-11-28

    Supersonic turbulence is an essential element in understanding how structure within interstellar gas is created and shaped. In the context of star formation, many computational studies show that the mass spectrum of density and velocity fluctuations within dense clouds, as well as the distribution of their angular momenta, trace their origin to the statistical and physical properties of gas that is lashed with shock waves. In this paper, we review the observations, simulations and theories of how turbulent-like processes can account for the structures we see in molecular clouds. We then compare traditional ideas of supersonic turbulence with a simpler physical model involving the effects of multiple shock waves and their interactions in the interstellar medium. Planar intersecting shock waves produce dense filaments and generate vortex sheets that are essential to create the broad range of density and velocity structure in clouds. As an example, the lower-mass behaviour of the stellar initial mass function can be traced to the tendency of a collection of shock waves to build up a lognormal density distribution (or column density). Vorticity--which is essential to produce velocity structure over a very broad range of length scales in shocked clouds--can also be generated by the passage of curved shocks or intersecting planar shocks through such media. Two major additional physical forces affect the structure of star-forming gas--gravity and feedback processes from young stars. Both of these can produce power-law tails at the high-mass end of the initial mass function. PMID:24146011

  11. Black magic session of concordance: Regge mass spectrum from Casson’s invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodenko, Arkady

    2015-11-01

    Recently, there had been a great deal of interest in obtaining and describing all kinds of knots in links in hydrodynamics, electrodynamics, non-Abelian gauge field theories and gravity. Although knots and links are observables of the Chern-Simons (CS) functional, the dynamical conditions for their generation lie outside the scope of the CS theory. The nontriviality of dynamical generation of knotted structures is caused by the fact that the complements of all knots/links, say, in S3 are 3-manifolds which have positive, negative or zero curvature. The ability to curve the ambient space is thus far attributed to masses. The mass theorem of general relativity requires the ambient 3-manifolds to be of nonnegative curvature. Recently, we established that, in the absence of boundaries, complements of dynamically generated knots/links are represented by 3-manifolds of nonnegative curvature. This fact opens the possibility to discuss masses in terms of dynamically generated knotted/linked structures. The key tool is the notion of knot/link concordance. The concept of concordance is a specialization of the concept of cobordism to knots and links. The logic of implementation of the concordance concept to physical masses results in new interpretation of Casson’s surgery formula in terms of the Regge trajectories. The latest thoroughly examined Chew-Frautschi (CF) plots associated with these trajectories demonstrate that the hadron mass spectrum for both mesons and baryons is nicely described by the data on the corresponding CF plots. The physics behind Casson’s surgery formula is similar but not identical to that described purely phenomenologically by Keith Moffatt in 1990. The developed topological treatment is fully consistent with available rigorous mathematical and experimentally observed results related to physics of hadrons.

  12. Broadband Analysis of Bioagents by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenselau, Catherine; Wynne, Colin; Edwards, Nathan

    Mass spectrometry was first reported to provide analysis of intact metabolite biomarkers from whole cells in 1975.1 Since then advances in ionization techniques have extended our capabilities to polar lipids and, eventually, to proteins.2, 3 Mass spectrometry provides a broadband detection system, which, however, has great specificity. Bioinformatics plays an important role in providing flexible and rapid characterization of species, based on protein and peptide mass spectra collected in the field.

  13. Tom Bonner Prize Lecture: The Beta Spectrum of Tritium and the Problem of Neutrino Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, R. G. Hamish

    1997-04-01

    Enrico Fermi showed more than 60 years ago that the shape of beta spectra was sensitive to the mass of the unobserved particle, the neutrino, proposed by Wolfgang Pauli. With the discovery of tritium and its small decay energy, increasingly stringent limits were placed on the electron antineutrino mass. A roadblock at about 50 eV, namely the atomic and molecular structure of tritium-containing substances, was surmounted in the 1980s with the development at Los Alamos of methods for high-resolution beta spectroscopy with gases, together with worldwide theoretical work on the structure of diatomic T2 and T^3He^+. It was then possible to reach the very interesting region of cosmological relevance below 20 eV. An unexpected and strange new roadblock has now been encountered in all experiments on T_2. The spectrum near the endpoint is not consistent with theory either with or without neutrino mass. The questions now are, do the experiments all report the same phenomenon, and (if so) is it atomic theory, particle theory, or perhaps cosmology that needs repair?

  14. Mass spectrum of vector mesons and their leptonic-decay constants in the bilocal relativistic potential model

    SciTech Connect

    Ablakulov, Kh. Narzikulov, Z.

    2015-01-15

    A phenomenological model is developed in terms of bilocal meson fields in order to describe a vector meson and its leptonic decays. A new Salpeter equation for this particle and the Schwinger-Dyson equation allowing for the presence of an arbitrary potential and for a modification associated with the renormalization of the quark (antiquark ) wave function within the meson are given. An expression for the constant of the leptonic decay of the charged rho meson is obtained from an analysis of the decay process τ → ρν via parametrizing in it the hadronization of intermediate charged weak W bosons into a bilocal vector meson. The potential is chosen in the form of the sum of harmonic-oscillator and Coulomb potentials, and the respective boundary-value problem is formulated. It is shown that the solutions to this problem describe both the mass spectrum of vector mesons and their leptonic-decay constants.

  15. Mixed Spectrum Analysis on fMRI Time-Series.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Lin, Feng; Rajapakse, Jagath C

    2016-06-01

    Temporal autocorrelation present in functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) data poses challenges to its analysis. The existing approaches handling autocorrelation in fMRI time-series often presume a specific model of autocorrelation such as an auto-regressive model. The main limitation here is that the correlation structure of voxels is generally unknown and varies in different brain regions because of different levels of neurogenic noises and pulsatile effects. Enforcing a universal model on all brain regions leads to bias and loss of efficiency in the analysis. In this paper, we propose the mixed spectrum analysis of the voxel time-series to separate the discrete component corresponding to input stimuli and the continuous component carrying temporal autocorrelation. A mixed spectral analysis technique based on M-spectral estimator is proposed, which effectively removes autocorrelation effects from voxel time-series and identify significant peaks of the spectrum. As the proposed method does not assume any prior model for the autocorrelation effect in voxel time-series, varying correlation structure among the brain regions does not affect its performance. We have modified the standard M-spectral method for an application on a spatial set of time-series by incorporating the contextual information related to the continuous spectrum of neighborhood voxels, thus reducing considerably the computation cost. Likelihood of the activation is predicted by comparing the amplitude of discrete component at stimulus frequency of voxels across the brain by using normal distribution and modeling spatial correlations among the likelihood with a conditional random field. We also demonstrate the application of the proposed method in detecting other desired frequencies. PMID:26800533

  16. The Spectrum of LSST Data Analysis Challenges: Kiloscale to Petascale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Babu, G. J.; Borne, K. D.; Feigelson, E. D.; Gray, A. G.; Informatics, LSST; Statistics Science Collaboration proposed

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented science opportunities enabled by LSST's wide-fast-deep mode of operation are accompanied by equally unprecedented data analysis challenges, due to the huge size and synoptic scope of LSST data products. While the most obvious challenges are those due to the petabyte scale of fundamental LSST databases, new and difficult data analysis problems that span a broad range of sizes, types, and complexity, and require a matching breadth of methodological research, must also be addressed. Some smaller-scale LSST data products, such as multicolor light curves for individual objects, will present challenging statistics problems; e.g., requiring multivariate time series methods capable of handling nonuniform, non-simultaneous sampling with measurement errors. Very large-scale LSST data products, such as comprehensive catalogs of stars or galaxies, will require significant informatics/data mining innovation; e.g., to enable accurate classification or photo-z estimation for huge samples. These scales mark the boundaries of a broad spectrum of LSST data analysis problems; research-level informatics and statistics challenges arise in various combinations across this whole spectrum. We survey the diversity of forthcoming LSST data analysis problems and opportunities, highlighting representative problems that address compelling astronomical science and present significant methodological challenges involving both astrostatistics and astroinformatics.

  17. Energy enhancement and spectrum narrowing in terahertz electron sources due to negative mass instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Yu.; Bratman, V. L.; Savilov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Simulations of coherent spontaneous undulator radiation in a waveguide demonstrate that the use of negative mass instability (NMI) for retaining longitudinal sizes of dense electron bunches, which are formed in laser-driven photoinjectors, allows one to increase power capabilities of a terahertz radiation source by many times. The NMI is realized in an undulator with combined helical and over-resonance uniform longitudinal magnetic fields due to nonisochronous longitudinal oscillations of electrons, whose frequencies increase/decrease with increasing/decreasing particle energy. In such conditions, an effective longitudinal size of the bunches can be preserved at long distance even at an extremely high electron density. Correspondingly, an energy extraction efficiency of more than 20% is revealed at a narrow frequency radiation spectrum, suggesting realization of a compact and powerful THz source.

  18. Low-mass fission detector for the fission neutron spectrum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C Y; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Haight, R C; Lee, H Y

    2010-10-20

    For the fission neutron spectrum measurement, the neutron energy is determined in a time-of-flight experiment by the time difference between the fission event and detection of the neutron. Therefore, the neutron energy resolution is directly determined by the time resolution of both neutron and fission detectors. For the fission detection, the detector needs not only a good timing response but also the tolerance of radiation damage and high {alpha}-decay rate. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to particles, which is important for experiments with - emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. In the following sections, the description will be given for the design and performance of a new low-mass PPAC for the fission-neutron spectrum measurements at LANL.

  19. Measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872) ---> J/psi pi+ pi- decays

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2005-12-01

    The authors measure the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays using 360 pb{sup -1} of {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. The spectrum is fit with predictions for odd C-parity ({sup 3}S{sub 1}, {sup 1}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}D{sub J}) charmonia decaying to J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, as well as event C-parity states in which the pions are from {rho}{sup 0} decay. The latter case also encompasses exotic interpretations, such as a D{sup 0}{bar D}*{sup 0} molecule. Only the {sup 3}S{sub 1} and J/{psi} {rho} hypotheses are compatible with the data. Since {sup 3}S{sub 1} is untenable on other grounds, decay via J/{psi} {rho} is favored, which implies C = +1 for the X(3872). Models for different J/{psi}-{rho} angular momenta L are considered. Flexibility in the models, especially the introduction of {rho}-{omega} interference, enable good descriptions of the data for both L = 0 and 1.

  20. Observation of variations in the T +T neutron spectrum with varying center-of-mass energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Zylstra, A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Forrest, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, T.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Sayre, D.; Caggiano, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Hatarik, R.; McNabb, D. P.; Pino, J. E.; Bacher, A.; Herrmann, H.; Kim, Y.; Bourgade, J.-. L.; Landoas, O.; Rosse, B.

    2014-10-01

    C. BRUNE, Ohio University - The T +T fusion reaction, which produces two neutrons and an alpha particle in a 3-body final state, has been studied in a series of direct-drive, T2-gas-filled thin (~3 μm) glass-capsule implosions at OMEGA. The shapes of the reaction product spectra are dictated by the final-state interactions between n- α (5He in the ground- and excited states) and n-n (di-neutron interaction). The theory behind final-state interactions is not well understood and detailed study of the reaction product spectra can teach us about the intricacies of the nuclear theory involved. In this presentation, measured neutron spectra are interpreted in terms of the sequential decay through 5He in the ground- and excited states. A clear energy dependence in relative reaction-channel strength at low center-of-mass energy (18-55 keV) is observed in the data. The role of the di-neutron interaction could be more clearly deduced through study of the alpha particle spectrum. In the presentation, we also identify steps required to successfully measure the T +T alpha spectrum in future experiments. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, NLUF, LLNL and LLE.

  1. Measurement of the Dipion Mass Spectrum in X(3872)→J/ψπ+π- Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Azzurri, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Baroiant, S.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Belloni, A.; Ben Haim, E.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Berry, T.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bishai, M.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bolshov, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bourov, S.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carron, S.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chapman, J.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, I.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chu, P. H.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciljak, M.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Coca, M.; Connolly, A.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooper, B.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cruz, A.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cyr, D.; Daronco, S.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dagenhart, D.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; Lentdecker, G. De; Dell'Orso, M.; Demers, S.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; de Pedis, D.; Derwent, P. F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dituro, P.; Dörr, C.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; Donega, M.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Efron, J.; Ehlers, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, I.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Flores-Castillo, L. R.; Foland, A.; Forrester, S.; Foster, G. W.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Fujii, Y.; Furic, I.; Gajjar, A.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garcia Sciveres, M.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gay, C.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gerdes, D.; Giagu, S.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.; Giokaris, N.; Giolo, K.; Giordani, M.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Goldstein, J.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gotra, Y.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Griffiths, M.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Hahn, K.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamilton, A.; Han, B.-Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Hayward, H.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Hennecke, M.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Holloway, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Huston, J.; Ikado, K.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ishizawa, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Iyutin, B.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeans, D.; Jensen, H.; Jeon, E. J.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kang, J.; Karagoz-Unel, M.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kemp, Y.; Kephart, R.; Kerzel, U.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kirby, M.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Klute, M.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, H.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kordas, K.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kovalev, A.; Kraus, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Kreps, M.; Kreymer, A.; Kroll, J.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lai, S.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecci, C.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, S. W.; Lefèvre, R.; Leonardo, N.; Leone, S.; Levy, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, K.; Lin, C.; Lin, C. S.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Liss, T. M.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Loverre, P.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Manca, G.; Margaroli, F.; Marginean, R.; Marino, C.; Martin, A.; Martin, M.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Maruyama, T.; Matsunaga, H.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazini, R.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, D.; McIntyre, P.; McNamara, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Menzemer, S.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Messina, A.; von der Mey, M.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miles, J.; Miller, R.; Miller, J. S.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Miquel, R.; Miscetti, S.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyamoto, A.; Moggi, N.; Mohr, B.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Nachtman, J.; Nahn, S.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Naumov, D.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Ogawa, T.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Oldeman, R.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Paoletti, R.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Piedra, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Pope, G.; Portell, X.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Rakitin, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Ratnikov, F.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; van Remortel, N.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Rinnert, K.; Ristori, L.; Robertson, W. J.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Rott, C.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Ryan, D.; Saarikko, H.; Sabik, S.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Salamanna, G.; Salto, O.; Saltzberg, D.; Sanchez, C.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, K.; Savard, P.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Semeria, F.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sill, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Sjolin, J.; Skiba, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soderberg, M.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spinella, F.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Staveris-Polykalas, A.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumorok, K.; Sun, H.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Takikawa, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Tether, S.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Tönnesmann, M.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Tourneur, S.; Trischuk, W.; Tsuchiya, R.; Tsuno, S.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Unverhau, T.; Uozumi, S.; Usynin, D.; Vacavant, L.; Vaiciulis, A.; Vallecorsa, S.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Velev, G.; Veramendi, G.; Veszpremi, V.; Vickey, T.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vollrath, I.; Volobouev, I.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Wan, Z.; Wang, M. J.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, B.; Waschke, S.; Waters, D.; Watts, T.; Weber, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Worm, S.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, T.; Yang, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zetti, F.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, J.; Zucchelli, S.

    2006-03-01

    We measure the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872)→J/ψπ+π- decays using 360pb-1 of p¯p collisions at s=1.96TeV collected with the CDF II detector. The spectrum is fit with predictions for odd C-parity (S13, P11, and DJ3) charmonia decaying to J/ψπ+π-, as well as even C-parity states in which the pions are from ρ0 decay. The latter case also encompasses exotic interpretations, such as a D0D¯*0 molecule. Only the S13 and J/ψρ hypotheses are compatible with our data. Since S13 is untenable on other grounds, decay via J/ψρ is favored, which implies C=+1 for the X(3872). Models for different J/ψ-ρ angular momenta L are considered. Flexibility in the models, especially the introduction of ρ-ω interference, enables good descriptions of our data for both L=0 and 1.

  2. Analysis of cascade impactor mass distributions.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Craig; Mitchell, Jolyon

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the approaches for analyzing cascade impactor (CI) mass distributions produced by pulmonary drug products and the considerations necessary for selecting the appropriate analysis procedure. There are several methods available for analyzing CI data, yielding a hierarchy of information in terms of nominal, ordinal and continuous variables. Mass distributions analyzed as a nominal function of the stages and auxiliary components is the simplest approach for examining the whole mass emitted by the inhaler. However, the relationship between the mass distribution and aerodynamic diameter is not described by such data. This relationship is a critical attribute of pulmonary drug products due to the association between aerodynamic diameter and the mass of particulates deposited to the respiratory tract. Therefore, the nominal mass distribution can only be utilized to make decisions on the discrete masses collected in the CI. Mass distributions analyzed as an ordinal function of aerodynamic diameter can be obtained by introducing the stage size range, which generally vary in magnitude from one stage to another for a given type of CI, and differ between CIs of different designs. Furthermore, the mass collected by specific size ranges within the CI are often incorrectly used to estimate in vivo deposition at various regions of the respiratory tract. A CI-generated mass distribution can be directly related to aerodynamic diameter by expressing the mass collected by each size-fractionating stage in terms of either mass frequency or cumulative mass fraction less than the aerodynamic size appropriate to each stage. Analysis of the aerodynamic diameter as a continuous variable allows comparison of mass distributions obtained from different products, obtained by different CI designs, as well as providing input to in vivo particle deposition models. The lack of information about the mass fraction emitted by the inhaler that is not size-analyzed by

  3. Conditions for statistical determination of the neutrino mass spectrum in radiative emission of neutrino pairs in atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ningqiang; Boyero Garcia, R.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Peralta Conde, A.; Taron, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The photon spectrum in macrocoherent atomic deexcitation via radiative emission of neutrino pairs has been proposed as a sensitive probe of the neutrino mass spectrum, capable of competing with conventional neutrino experiments. In this paper we revisit this interesting proposal in order to quantify the requirements for statistical determination of some of the properties of the neutrino spectrum, in particular, the neutrino mass scale and the mass ordering. Our results are shown as the product of the experimental lifetime, the target volume, and the number density of atoms which have to be set in a coherence state with a given electric field in the target, needed for determination of these properties with a given confidence level.

  4. Broad spectrum drug screening using electron-ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (EI-GCMS).

    PubMed

    Stone, Judy

    2010-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of drugs and internal standard (promazine) is performed by mixing urine at basic pH with 1-chlorobutane. There are no hydrolysis or derivatization steps. After centrifugation the organic (upper) layer is transferred to another tube and evaporated. The dried extract is reconstituted with ethyl acetate and 1 microL is injected onto the GCMS. Drugs are volatilized in the GC inlet and separated on a capillary column. In the EI source drugs become positively charged and fragment. Mass analysis of ionized fragments occurs with a single quadrupole. The resulting full scan mass spectra are automatically searched against three libraries. PMID:20077071

  5. Optical spectrum of HDE 226868 = Cygnus X-1. II. Spectrophotometry and mass estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Gies, D.R.; Bolton, C.T.

    1986-05-01

    In part I of this series, Gies and Bolton (1982) have presented the results of radial velocity measures of 78 high-dispersion spectrograms of HDE 226868 = Cyg X-1. For the present study, 55 of the best plates considered by Gies and Bolton were selected to form 10 average spectra. An overall mean spectrum with S/N ratio = 300 was formed by coadding the 10 averaged spectra. There is no evidence for statistically significant variations of the spectral type about the mean value of 09.7 Iab, and all the absorption line strengths are normal for the spectral type. Evidence is presented that the He II lambda 4846 emission line is formed in the stellar wind above the substellar point on the visible star. Probable values regarding the mass for the visible star and its companion are 33 and 16 solar masses, respectively. Theoretical He II lambda 4686 emission line profiles are computed for the focused stellar wind model for the Cyg X-1 system considered by Friend and Castor (1982). 105 references.

  6. Search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton mass spectrum at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Vienna, OAW /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /Antwerp U., WISINF /Vrije U., Brussels /Brussels U. /Gent U. /Louvain U. /UMH, Mons /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U.

    2011-12-01

    A search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum has been performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb{sup -1}. In the context of the large-extra-dimensions model, lower limits are set on the effective Planck scale in the range of 2.3-3.8 TeV at the 95% confidence level. These limits are the most restrictive bounds on virtual-graviton exchange to date. The most restrictive lower limits to date are also set on the mass of the first graviton excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model in the range of 0.86-1.84 TeV, for values of the associated coupling parameter between 0.01 and 0.10.

  7. Search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton mass spectrum at the large hadron collider.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knapitsch, A; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Trauner, C; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Bansal, S; Benucci, L; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Luyckx, S; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; Mccartin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Ceard, L; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; De Jesus Damiao, D; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Anjos, T S; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Tomei, T R Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Darmenov, N; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Karadzhinova, A; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Guo, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Wang, S; Zhu, B; Zou, W; Cabrera, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Ellithi Kamel, A; Khalil, S; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Karjalainen, A; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Elgammal, S; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Greder, S; Juillot, P; Karim, M; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Baty, C; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Bedjidian, M; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Boumediene, D; Brun, H; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Falkiewicz, A; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sordini, V; Tosi, S; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Lomidze, D; Anagnostou, G; Beranek, S; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Erdmann, M; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Klimkovich, T; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Lingemann, J; Magass, C; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Weber, M

    2012-03-16

    A search for signatures of extra spatial dimensions in the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum has been performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb(-1). In the context of the large-extra-dimensions model, lower limits are set on the effective Planck scale in the range of 2.3-3.8 TeV at the 95% confidence level. These limits are the most restrictive bounds on virtual-graviton exchange to date. The most restrictive lower limits to date are also set on the mass of the first graviton excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model in the range of 0.86-1.84 TeV, for values of the associated coupling parameter between 0.01 and 0.10. PMID:22540461

  8. NICMOS Imaging Survey of Dusty Debris Around Nearby Stars Across the Stellar Mass Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Joseph

    2007-07-01

    Association of planetary systems with dusty debris disks is now quite secure, and advances in our understanding of planet formation and evolution can be achieved by the identification and characterization of an ensemble of debris disks orbiting a range of central stars with different masses and ages. Imaging debris disks in starlight scattered by dust grains remains technically challenging so that only about a dozen systems have thus far been imaged. A further advance in this field needs an increased number of imaged debris disks. However, the technical challege of such observations, even with the superb combination of HST and NICMOS, requires the best targets. Recent HST imaging investigations of debris disks were sample-limited not limited by the technology used. We performed a search for debris disks from a IRAS/Hipparcos cross correlation which involved an exhaustive background contamination check to weed out false excess stars. Out of ~140 identified debris disks, we selected 22 best targets in terms of dust optical depth and disk angular size. Our target sample represents the best currently available target set in terms of both disk brightness and resolvability. For example, our targets have higher dust optical depth, in general, than newly identified Spitzer disks. Also, our targets cover a wider range of central star ages and masses than previous debris disk surveys. This will help us to investigate planetary system formation and evolution across the stellar mass spectrum.The technical feasibility of this program in two-gyro mode guiding has been proven with on-orbit calibration and science observations during HST cycles 13, 14, and 15.

  9. Analysis of Ocean Electromagnetic Data Using a Hilbert Spectrum Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Jeffrey; Larsen, Michael L.; Waldman, Cye H.; Gabbay, Michael; Buntzen, Rodney R.; Rees, C. David

    2003-08-01

    We apply a newly developed time series analysis technique, the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT), to naturally occurring ocean electromagnetic data obtained from bottom-mounted sensors. The HHT was originally developed as an alternative to the Fourier power spectral density for the analysis of nonlinear phenomena in water waves. The HHT is applied to the data in two steps. In the first step, an empirical mode decomposition is used to extract individual oscillatory modes possessing different characteristic time scales. Unlike Fourier modes, however, these modes can vary in amplitude and frequency. In the second step, the Hilbert transform is used to determine physically meaningful instantaneous frequencies from these modes. We present results showing that the HHT provides a more compact representation of the ocean electromagnetic environment than the Fourier spectrum. In particular, the HHT is able to capture nonlinear wave phenomena associated with ocean swell in a single mode without the need for higher order harmonics.

  10. The mass of the planet-hosting giant star β Geminorum determined from its p-mode oscillation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, A. P.; Zechmeister, M.; Matthews, J.; Kuschnig, R.; Walker, G. A. H.; Döllinger, M.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: Our aim is to use precise radial velocity measurements and photometric data to derive the frequency spacing of the p-mode oscillation spectrum of the planet-hosting star β Gem. This spacing along with the interferometric radius for this star can then be used to derive an accurate stellar mass. Methods: We use a long time series of over 60 h of precise stellar radial velocity measurements of β Gem taken with an iodine absorption cell at the echelle spectrograph mounted on the 2 m Alfred Jensch Telescope. We also present complementary photometric data for this star taken with the MOST microsatellite spanning 3.6 d. A Fourier analysis is used to derive the frequencies that are present in each data set. Results: The Fourier analysis of the radial velocity data reveals the presence of up to 17 significant pulsation modes in the frequency interval 10-250 μHz. Most of these fall on a grid of equally-spaced frequencies having a separation of 7.14 ± 0.12 μHz. An analysis of 3.6 days of high precision photometry taken with the MOST space telescopes shows the presence of up to 16 modes, six of which are consistent with modes found in the spectral (radial velocity) data. This frequency spacing is consistent with high overtone radial pulsations; however, until the pulsation modes are identified we cannot be sure if some of these are nonradial modes or even mixed modes. The radial velocity frequency spacing along with angular diameter measurements of β Gem via interferometry results in a stellar mass of M = 1.91 ± 0.09 M⊙. This value confirms the intermediate mass of the star determined using stellar evolutionary tracks. Conclusions.β Gem is confirmed to be an intermediate mass star. Stellar pulsations in giant stars along with interferometric radius measurements can provide accurate determinations of the stellar mass of planet hosting giant stars. These can also be used to calibrate stellar evolutionary tracks. Based on observations obtained at the 2 m Alfred

  11. The analysis of comet mass spectrometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balm, S. P.; Hare, J. P.; Kroto, H. W.

    1991-04-01

    The mass spectra from the Giotto PICCA experiment have been studied using computer simulations based on tabulated mass spectrometric data. It is shown that random mixtures of organic compounds give rise to mass spectra with peaks at about 45, 60, 75, and 90 amu; i.e., separated by about 15 amu. In particular it is shown that the products of Urey-Miller type experiments give mass spectra which can match the observed Giotto data closely. The analysis indicates that the material consists mainly of C/H/O/N (i.e., it is organic), but that the assignment to any well defined organic material is less certain. It is not clear that mass spectrometric studies of complex mixtures have the prospect of yielding this type of information without some form of preseparation.

  12. Biological particle analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilker, V. L.; Platz, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    An instrument that analyzes the chemical composition of biological particles in aerosol or hydrosol form was developed. Efforts were directed toward the acquisition of mass spectra from aerosols of biomolecules and bacteria. The filament ion source was installed on the particle analysis by mass spectrometry system. Modifications of the vacuum system improved the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer. After the modifications were incorporated, detailed mass spectra of simple compounds from the three major classes of biomolecules, proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates were obtained. A method of generating bacterial aerosols was developed. The aerosols generated were collected and examined in the scanning electron microscope to insure that the bacteria delivered to the mass spectrometer were intact and free from debris.

  13. Terahertz spectrum analysis of leather at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiusheng; Yao, Jianquan; Li, Jianrui

    2008-12-01

    Over the past ten years, electromagnetic terahertz (THz) frequencies region from 100 GHz to 10 THz (or wavelengths of 30 μm ~3 mm) have received extensive attention and investigation. Terahertz wave detection enables direct calculations of both the imaginary and the real parts of the refractive index without using the Kramers-Kronig relations. There are many potential applications such as radio astronomy, atmospheric studies, remote sensing, and plasma diagnostics. Shoes, neckties and sofa, etc are mainly made of skin of animal, imitated skin and artificial leather. It has important practical value to component analysis and quality assessment by measuring absorption, refractive index, and other optical parameters. In this paper, the spectral characteristics of sheepskin, imitated sheepskin and artificial leather have been measured with terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the range of 0.1~2.0THz. The results show that there have not absorption peak in the absorption spectrum of the sheepskin. However, it is found that there are three absorption peaks in the absorption spectrum of the artificial leather at the frequency of 1.13THz, 1.21THz, and 1.36THz, respectively. The potential application of the leather in THz frequency region is also discussed.

  14. Gamma-ray pulse height spectrum analysis on systems with multiple Ge detectors using a spectrum summing

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, E.W.

    1997-05-01

    A technique has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to sum high resolution gamma-ray pulse spectra from systems with multiple Ge detectors. Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company operates a multi-detector spectrometer configuration at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant facility which is used to characterize the radio nuclide contents in waste drums destined for shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This summing technique was developed to increase the sensitivity of the system, reduce the count times required to properly quantify the radionuclides and provide a more consistent methodology for combining data collected from multiple detectors. In spectrometer systems with multiple detectors looking at non homogenous waste forms it is often difficult to combine individual spectrum analysis results from each detector to obtain a meaningful result for the total waste container. This is particularly true when the counting statistics in each individual spectrum are poor. The spectrum summing technique adds the spectra collected by each detector into a single spectrum which has better counting statistics than each individual spectrum. A normal spectral analysis program can then be used to analyze the sum spectrum to obtain radio nuclide values which have smaller errors and do not have to be further manipulated to obtain results for the total waste container.

  15. PI: An open-source software package for validation of the SEQUEST result and visualization of mass spectrum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has emerged as the leading method for high- throughput protein identification in proteomics. Recent technological breakthroughs have dramatically increased the efficiency of MS/MS data generation. Meanwhile, sophisticated algorithms have been developed for identifying proteins from peptide MS/MS data by searching available protein sequence databases for the peptide that is most likely to have produced the observed spectrum. The popular SEQUEST algorithm relies on the cross-correlation between the experimental mass spectrum and the theoretical spectrum of a peptide. It utilizes a simplified fragmentation model that assigns a fixed and identical intensity for all major ions and fixed and lower intensity for their neutral losses. In this way, the common issues involved in predicting theoretical spectra are circumvented. In practice, however, an experimental spectrum is usually not similar to its SEQUEST -predicted theoretical one, and as a result, incorrect identifications are often generated. Results Better understanding of peptide fragmentation is required to produce more accurate and sensitive peptide sequencing algorithms. Here, we designed the software PI of novel and exquisite algorithms that make a good use of intensity property of a spectrum. Conclusions We designed the software PI with the novel and effective algorithms which made a good use of intensity property of the spectrum. Experiments have shown that PI was able to validate and improve the results of SEQUEST to a more satisfactory degree. PMID:21672262

  16. Analysis of Glycosaminoglycans Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Gregory O.; Zaia, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear polysaccharides expressed on animal cell surfaces and in extracellular matrices. Their biosynthesis is under complex control and confers a domain structure that is essential to their ability to bind to protein partners. Key to understanding the functions of GAGs are methods to determine accurately and rapidly patterns of sulfation, acetylation and uronic acid epimerization that correlate with protein binding or other biological activities. Mass spectrometry (MS) is particularly suitable for the analysis of GAGs for biomedical purposes. Using modern ionization techniques it is possible to accurately determine molecular weights of GAG oligosaccharides and their distributions within a mixture. Methods for direct interfacing with liquid chromatography have been developed to permit online mass spectrometric analysis of GAGs. New tandem mass spectrometric methods for fine structure determination of GAGs are emerging. This review summarizes MS-based approaches for analysis of GAGs, including tissue extraction and chromatographic methods compatible with LC/MS and tandem MS. PMID:25705143

  17. A Machine Learning Based Approach to de novo Sequencing of Glycans from Tandem Mass Spectrometry Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kumozaki, Shotaro; Sato, Kengo; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, glycomics has been actively studied and various technologies for glycomics have been rapidly developed. Currently, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is one of the key experimental tools for identification of structures of oligosaccharides. MS/MS can observe MS/MS peaks of fragmented glycan ions including cross-ring ions resulting from internal cleavages, which provide valuable information to infer glycan structures. Thus, the aim of de novo sequencing of glycans is to find the most probable assignments of observed MS/MS peaks to glycan substructures without databases. However, there are few satisfiable algorithms for glycan de novo sequencing from MS/MS spectra. We present a machine learning based approach to de novo sequencing of glycans from MS/MS spectrum. First, we build a suitable model for the fragmentation of glycans including cross-ring ions, and implement a solver that employs Lagrangian relaxation with a dynamic programming technique. Then, to optimize scores for the algorithm, we introduce a machine learning technique called structured support vector machines that enable us to learn parameters including scores for cross-ring ions from training data, i.e., known glycan mass spectra. Furthermore, we implement additional constraints for core structures of well-known glycan types including N-linked glycans and O-linked glycans. This enables us to predict more accurate glycan structures if the glycan type of given spectra is known. Computational experiments show that our algorithm performs accurate de novo sequencing of glycans. The implementation of our algorithm and the datasets are available at http://glyfon.dna.bio.keio.ac.jp/. PMID:26671799

  18. Modeling daily realized futures volatility with singular spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomakos, Dimitrios D.; Wang, Tao; Wille, Luc T.

    2002-09-01

    Using singular spectrum analysis (SSA), we model the realized volatility and logarithmic standard deviations of two important futures return series. The realized volatility and logarithmic standard deviations are constructed following the methodology of Andersen et al. [J. Am. Stat. Ass. 96 (2001) 42-55] using intra-day transaction data. We find that SSA decomposes the volatility series quite well and effectively captures both the market trend (accounting for about 34-38% of the total variance in the series) and, more importantly, a number of underlying market periodicities. Reliable identification of any periodicities is extremely important for options pricing and risk management and we believe that SSA can be a useful addition to the financial practitioners’ toolbox.

  19. Singular Spectrum Analysis Based on L1-Norm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Mahdi; Yarmohammadi, Masoud; Hassani, Hossein

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, the singular spectrum analysis (SSA) technique has been further developed and increasingly applied to solve many practical problems. The aim of this research is to introduce a new version of SSA based on L1-norm. The performance of the proposed approach is assessed by applying it to various real and simulated time series, especially with outliers. The results are compared with those obtained using the basic version of SSA which is based on the Frobenius norm or L2-norm. Different criteria are also examined including reconstruction errors and forecasting performances. The theoretical and empirical results confirm that SSA based on L1-norm can provide better reconstruction and forecasts in comparison to basic SSA when faced with time series which are polluted by outliers.

  20. Singular spectrum analysis and forecasting of hydrological time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, C. A. F.; Ferreira, J. A.; Rocha, A.; Castanheira, J. M.; Melo-Gonçalves, P.; Vaz, N.; Dias, J. M.

    The singular spectrum analysis (SSA) technique is applied to some hydrological univariate time series to assess its ability to uncover important information from those series, and also its forecast skill. The SSA is carried out on annual precipitation, monthly runoff, and hourly water temperature time series. Information is obtained by extracting important components or, when possible, the whole signal from the time series. The extracted components are then subject to forecast by the SSA algorithm. It is illustrated the SSA ability to extract a slowly varying component (i.e. the trend) from the precipitation time series, the trend and oscillatory components from the runoff time series, and the whole signal from the water temperature time series. The SSA was also able to accurately forecast the extracted components of these time series.

  1. Performance analysis of spread spectrum modulation in data hiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Litao; Akansu, Ali N.; Ramkumar, Mahalingam

    2001-12-01

    Watermarking or steganography technology provides a possible solution in digital multimedia copyright protection and pirate tracking. Most of the current data hiding schemes are based on spread spectrum modulation. A small value watermark signal is embedded into the content signal in some watermark domain. The information bits can be extracted via correlation. The schemes are applied both in escrow and oblivious cases. This paper reveals, through analysis and simulation, that in oblivious applications where the original signal is not available, the commonly used correlation detection is not optimal. Its maximum likelihood detection is analyzed and a feasible suboptimal detector is derived. Its performance is explored and compared with the correlation detector. Subsequently a linear embedding scheme is proposed and studied. Experiments with image data hiding demonstrates its effectiveness in applications.

  2. Reduction of S-parameter errors using singular spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Turgut; Uluer, İhsan; Ünal, İlhami

    2016-07-01

    A free space measurement method, which consists of two horn antennas, a network analyzer, two frequency extenders, and a sample holder, is used to measure transmission (S21) coefficients in 75-110 GHz (W-Band) frequency range. Singular spectrum analysis method is presented to eliminate the error and noise of raw S21 data after calibration and measurement processes. The proposed model can be applied easily to remove the repeated calibration process for each sample measurement. Hence, smooth, reliable, and accurate data are obtained to determine the dielectric properties of materials. In addition, the dielectric constant of materials (paper, polyvinylchloride-PVC, Ultralam® 3850HT, and glass) is calculated by thin sheet approximation and Newton-Raphson extracting techniques using a filtered S21 transmission parameter. PMID:27475579

  3. Reduction of S-parameter errors using singular spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Turgut; Uluer, Ihsan; Ünal, Ilhami

    2016-07-01

    A free space measurement method, which consists of two horn antennas, a network analyzer, two frequency extenders, and a sample holder, is used to measure transmission (S21) coefficients in 75-110 GHz (W-Band) frequency range. Singular spectrum analysis method is presented to eliminate the error and noise of raw S21 data after calibration and measurement processes. The proposed model can be applied easily to remove the repeated calibration process for each sample measurement. Hence, smooth, reliable, and accurate data are obtained to determine the dielectric properties of materials. In addition, the dielectric constant of materials (paper, polyvinylchloride-PVC, Ultralam® 3850HT, and glass) is calculated by thin sheet approximation and Newton-Raphson extracting techniques using a filtered S21 transmission parameter.

  4. Probability-Based Pattern Recognition and Statistical Framework for Randomization: Modeling Tandem Mass Spectrum/Peptide Sequence False Match Frequencies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimating and controlling the frequency of false matches between a peptide tandem mass spectrum and candidate peptide sequences is an issue pervading proteomics research. To solve this problem, we designed an unsupervised pattern recognition algorithm for detecting patterns with various lengths fr...

  5. Quantification of tissue texture with photoacoustic spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Xu, Guan; Meng, Zhuo-Xian; Lin, Jiandie; Carson, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging technology that could map the functional contrasts in deep biological tissues in high resolution by "listening" to the laser induced thermoelastic waves. Almost all of the current studies in PA imaging are focused on the intensity of the PA signals as an indication of the optical absorbance of the biological tissues. Our group has for the first time demonstrated that the frequency domain power distribution of the broadband PA signals encode the texture information within the regions-of-interest (ROI). Following the similar method of ultrasound spectral analysis (USSA), photoacoustic spectrum analysis (PASA) could evaluate the relative concentrations and, more importantly, the dimensions of microstructures of the optically absorbing materials in biological tissues, including lipid, collagen, water and hemoglobin. By providing valuable insights into tissue pathology, PASA should benefit basic research and clinical management of many diseases, and may help achieve eventual "noninvasive biopsy". In this work, taking advantage of the optical absorption contrasts contributed by lipid and hemoglobin at 1200-nm and 532-nm wavelengths respectively, we investigated the capability of PASA in identifying histological changes corresponding to fat accumulation livers through the study on ex vivo and in situ mouse models. The PA signals from the mouse livers were acquired using our PA and US dual-modality imaging system, and analyzed in the frequency domain. After quantifying the power spectrum by fitting it to a first order model, three spectral parameters, including the intercept, the midband fit and the slope, were extracted and used to differentiate fatty livers from normal livers. The comparison between the PASA parameters from the normal and the fatty livers supports our hypotheses that PASA can quantitatively identify the microstructure changes in liver tissues for differentiating normal and fatty livers.

  6. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W.; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2005-12-13

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  7. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2007-12-04

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  8. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2013-07-16

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  9. Spectrum and mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range 1015-1018 eV derived from the Yakutsk array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knurenko, S. P.; Sabourov, A.

    2013-06-01

    A spectrum of cosmic rays within energy range 1015 - 3 × 1017 eV was derived from the data of the small Cherenkov setup, which is a part of the Yakutsk complex EAS array. In this, work a new series of observation is covered. These observations lasted from 2000 till 2010 and resulted in increased number of registered events within interval 1016-1018 eV, which in turn made it possible to reproduce cosmic ray spectrum in this energy domain with better precision. A sign of a thin structure is observed in the shape of the spectrum. It could be related to the escape of heavy nuclei from our Galaxy. Cosmic ray mass composition was obtained for the energy region 1016-1018 eV. A joint analysis of spectrum and mass composition of cosmic rays was performed. Obtained results are considered in the context of theoretical computations that were performed with the use of hypothesis of galactic and meta-galactic origin of cosmic rays.

  10. Wind speed power spectrum analysis for Bushland, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, E.D.

    1996-12-31

    Numerous papers and publications on wind turbulence have referenced the wind speed spectrum presented by Isaac Van der Hoven in his article entitled Power Spectrum of Horizontal Wind Speed Spectrum in the Frequency Range from 0.0007 to 900 Cycles per Hour. Van der Hoven used data measured at different heights between 91 and 125 meters above the ground, and represented the high frequency end of the spectrum with data from the peak hour of hurricane Connie. These facts suggest we should question the use of his power spectrum in the wind industry. During the USDA - Agricultural Research Service`s investigation of wind/diesel system power storage, using the appropriate wind speed power spectrum became a significant issue. We developed a power spectrum from 13 years of hourly average data, 1 year of 5 minute average data, and 2 particularly gusty day`s 1 second average data all collected at a height of 10 meters. While the general shape is similar to the Van der Hoven spectrum, few of his peaks were found in the Bushland spectrum. While higher average wind speeds tend to suggest higher amplitudes in the high frequency end of the spectrum, this is not always true. Also, the high frequency end of the spectrum is not accurately described by simple wind statistics such as standard deviation and turbulence intensity. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. D{O} top quark mass analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Strovink, M.

    1995-07-01

    Based on (44-48 pb{sup -1}) of lepton + jets data, we review D0`s initial analysis of the top quark mass. The result, M{sub top} = 199 {+-} 19/21 (stat.) {+-} 22 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, is insensitive to background normalization. The errors are based on ISAJET top Monte Carlo, with its more severe gluon radiation, and allow for ISAJET/HERWIG differences. Good progress is being made in reducing the systematic error. We present a new study based on two-dimensional distributions of reconstructed top quark vs. dijet mass. With 98.7% confidence we observe a peak in the top mass - dijet mass plane. The peak and its projections are similar both in shape and magnitude to expectations based on the decay sequence 1 {yields} bW, W {yields} jj.

  12. Blind Extraction of an Exoplanetary Spectrum through Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, I. P.; Tinetti, G.; Deroo, P.; Hollis, M. D. J.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.

    2013-03-01

    Blind-source separation techniques are used to extract the transmission spectrum of the hot-Jupiter HD189733b recorded by the Hubble/NICMOS instrument. Such a "blind" analysis of the data is based on the concept of independent component analysis. The detrending of Hubble/NICMOS data using the sole assumption that nongaussian systematic noise is statistically independent from the desired light-curve signals is presented. By not assuming any prior or auxiliary information but the data themselves, it is shown that spectroscopic errors only about 10%-30% larger than parametric methods can be obtained for 11 spectral bins with bin sizes of ~0.09 μm. This represents a reasonable trade-off between a higher degree of objectivity for the non-parametric methods and smaller standard errors for the parametric de-trending. Results are discussed in light of previous analyses published in the literature. The fact that three very different analysis techniques yield comparable spectra is a strong indication of the stability of these results.

  13. BLIND EXTRACTION OF AN EXOPLANETARY SPECTRUM THROUGH INDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, I. P.; Tinetti, G.; Hollis, M. D. J.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.; Deroo, P.

    2013-03-20

    Blind-source separation techniques are used to extract the transmission spectrum of the hot-Jupiter HD189733b recorded by the Hubble/NICMOS instrument. Such a 'blind' analysis of the data is based on the concept of independent component analysis. The detrending of Hubble/NICMOS data using the sole assumption that nongaussian systematic noise is statistically independent from the desired light-curve signals is presented. By not assuming any prior or auxiliary information but the data themselves, it is shown that spectroscopic errors only about 10%-30% larger than parametric methods can be obtained for 11 spectral bins with bin sizes of {approx}0.09 {mu}m. This represents a reasonable trade-off between a higher degree of objectivity for the non-parametric methods and smaller standard errors for the parametric de-trending. Results are discussed in light of previous analyses published in the literature. The fact that three very different analysis techniques yield comparable spectra is a strong indication of the stability of these results.

  14. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-07-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis.

  15. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis. PMID:27412335

  16. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis. PMID:27412335

  17. Incident spectrum determination for time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, J. P.

    1998-08-27

    Accurate characterization of the incident neutron spectrum is an important requirement for precise Rietveld analysis of time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction data. Without an accurate incident spectrum the calculated model for the measured relative intensities of individual Bragg reflections will possess systematic errors. We describe a method for obtaining an accurate numerical incident spectrum using data from a transmitted beam monitor.

  18. Broad spectrum drug screening using liquid chromatography-hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stone, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Centrifuged urine, internal standard (promazine), and ammonium formate buffer are mixed in an autosampler vial to achieve a 10-fold dilution of the specimen. Without additional pretreatment, 10 microL of the sample is injected onto a C18 reverse phase column for gradient analysis with ammonium formate/acetonitrile mobile phases. Drugs in the column eluent become charged in the ion source using positive electrospray atmospheric pressure ionization. Pseudomolecular drug ions are analyzed by a hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer operated with a 264-drug selected ion monitoring (SRM) acquisition method that includes an information-dependant acquisition (IDA) algorithm. PMID:20077072

  19. Power spectrum analysis for defect screening in integrated circuit devices

    DOEpatents

    Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Cole Jr., Edward I.; Stein, David J.

    2011-12-01

    A device sample is screened for defects using its power spectrum in response to a dynamic stimulus. The device sample receives a time-varying electrical signal. The power spectrum of the device sample is measured at one of the pins of the device sample. A defect in the device sample can be identified based on results of comparing the power spectrum with one or more power spectra of the device that have a known defect status.

  20. Broken valence chiral symmetry and chiral polarization of Dirac spectrum in Nf=12 QCD at small quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandru, Andrei; Horváth, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The validity of recently proposed equivalence between valence spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking (vSChSB) and chiral polarization of low energy Dirac spectrum (ChP) in SU(3) gauge theory, is examined for the case of twelve mass-degenerate fundamental quark flavors. We find that the vSChSB-ChP correspondence holds for regularized systems studied. Moreover, our results suggest that vSChSB occurs in two qualitatively different circumstances: there is a quark mass mc such that for m > mc the mode condensing Dirac spectrum exhibits standard monotonically increasing density, while for mch < m < mc the peak around zero separates from the bulk of the spectrum, with density showing a pronounced depletion at intermediate scales. Valence chiral symmetry restoration may occur at yet smaller masses m < mch, but this has not yet been seen by overlap valence probe, leaving the mch = 0 possibility open. The latter option could place massless Nf=12 theory outside of conformal window. Anomalous behavior of overlap Dirac spectrum for mch < m < mc is qualitatively similar to one observed previously in zero and few-flavor theories as an effect of thermal agitation.

  1. Localizing heart sounds in respiratory signals using singular spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Foad; Mohseni, Hamid R; Sanei, Saeid

    2011-12-01

    Respiratory sounds are always contaminated by heart sound interference. An essential preprocessing step in some of the heart sound cancellation methods is localizing primary heart sound components. Singular spectrum analysis (SSA), a powerful time series analysis technique, is used in this paper. Despite the frequency overlap of the heart and lung sound components, two different trends in the eigenvalue spectra are recognizable, which leads to find a subspace that contains more information about the underlying heart sound. Artificially mixed and real respiratory signals are used for evaluating the performance of the method. Selecting the appropriate length for the SSA window results in good decomposition quality and low computational cost for the algorithm. The results of the proposed method are compared with those of well-established methods, which use the wavelet transform and entropy of the signal to detect the heart sound components. The proposed method outperforms the wavelet-based method in terms of false detection and also correlation with the underlying heart sounds. Performance of the proposed method is slightly better than that of the entropy-based method. Moreover, the execution time of the former is significantly lower than that of the latter. PMID:21788177

  2. Features in the primordial spectrum from WMAP: A wavelet analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shafieloo, Arman; Souradeep, Tarun; Manimaran, P.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.; Rangarajan, Raghavan

    2007-06-15

    Precise measurements of the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background enable us to do an accurate study on the form of the primordial power spectrum for a given set of cosmological parameters. In a previous paper [A. Shafieloo and T. Souradeep, Phys. Rev. D 70, 043523 (2004).], we implemented an improved (error sensitive) Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm on the measured angular power spectrum from the first year of WMAP data to determine the primordial power spectrum assuming a concordance cosmological model. This recovered spectrum has a likelihood far better than a scale invariant, or, 'best fit' scale free spectra ({delta}lnL{approx_equal}25 with respect to the Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum, and, {delta}lnL{approx_equal}11 with respect to the power law spectrum with n{sub s}=0.95). In this paper we use the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) to decompose the local features of the recovered spectrum individually to study their effect and significance on the recovered angular power spectrum and hence the likelihood. We show that besides the infrared cutoff at the horizon scale, the associated features of the primordial power spectrum around the horizon have a significant effect on improving the likelihood. The strong features are localized at the horizon scale.

  3. Features in the primordial spectrum from WMAP: A wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafieloo, Arman; Souradeep, Tarun; Manimaran, P.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.; Rangarajan, Raghavan

    2007-06-01

    Precise measurements of the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background enable us to do an accurate study on the form of the primordial power spectrum for a given set of cosmological parameters. In a previous paper [A. Shafieloo and T. Souradeep, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ0556-2821 70, 043523 (2004).10.1103/PhysRevD.70.043523], we implemented an improved (error sensitive) Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm on the measured angular power spectrum from the first year of WMAP data to determine the primordial power spectrum assuming a concordance cosmological model. This recovered spectrum has a likelihood far better than a scale invariant, or, “best fit” scale free spectra (Δln⁡L≈25 with respect to the Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum, and, Δln⁡L≈11 with respect to the power law spectrum with ns=0.95). In this paper we use the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) to decompose the local features of the recovered spectrum individually to study their effect and significance on the recovered angular power spectrum and hence the likelihood. We show that besides the infrared cutoff at the horizon scale, the associated features of the primordial power spectrum around the horizon have a significant effect on improving the likelihood. The strong features are localized at the horizon scale.

  4. Analysis of Electroblotted Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Garcia, Jose L.; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Identification of proteins by mass spectrometry is crucial for better understanding of many biological, biochemical, and biomedical processes. Here we describe two methods for the identification of electroblotted proteins by on-membrane digestion prior to analysis by mass spectrometry. These on-membrane methods take approximately half the time of in-gel digestion and provide better digestion efficiency, due to the better accessibility of the protease to the proteins adsorbed onto the nitrocellulose, and better protein sequence coverage, especially for membrane proteins where large and hydrophobic peptides are commonly present. PMID:26139272

  5. Mass spectrometry for pectin structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Ralet, Marie-Christine; Lerouge, Patrice; Quéméner, Bernard

    2009-09-28

    Pectin are extremely complex biopolymers made up of different structural domains. Enzymatic degradation followed by purification and structural analysis of the degradation products proved to be efficient tools for the understanding of pectin fine structure, including covalent interactions between pectic structural domains or with other cell wall polysaccharides. Due to its high sensitivity, high throughput and capacity to analyze mixtures, mass spectrometry has gained more and more importance as a tool for oligosaccharides structural characterization in the past 10 years. This review will focus on the combined use of mass spectrometry and enzymatic digestion for pectins structural characterization. PMID:19058795

  6. Neutrino Mass Spectrum from Gravitational Waves Generated by Double Neutrino Spin-Flip in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera Cuesta, Herman J.; Lambiase, Gaetano

    2008-12-01

    The supernova (SN) neutronization phase produces mainly electron (νe) neutrinos, the oscillations of which must take place within a few mean free paths of their resonance surface located nearby their neutrinosphere. The latest research on the SN dynamics suggests that a significant part of these νe can convert into right-handed neutrinos by virtue of the interaction of the electrons and the protons flowing with the SN outgoing plasma, whenever the Dirac neutrino magnetic moment is of strength μν < 10-11μB, with μB being the Bohr magneton. In the SN envelope, some of these neutrinos can flip back to the left-handed flavors due to the interaction of the neutrino magnetic moment with the magnetic field in the SN expanding plasma (see the work by Kuznetsov & Mikheev; Kuznetsov, Mikheev, & Okrugin; Akhmedov & Khlopov; Itoh & Tsuneto; and Itoh et al.), a region where the field strength is currently accepted to be Bgtrsim 1013 G. This type of ν oscillation was shown to generate powerful gravitational wave (GW) bursts (see the work by Mosquera Cuesta; Mosquera Cuesta & Fiuza; and Loveridge). If such a double spin-flip mechanism does run into action inside the SN core, then the release of both the oscillation-produced νμ and ντ particles and the GW pulse generated by the coherent ν spin-flips provides a unique emission offset Δ TemiGW leftrightarrow ν = 0 for measuring the ν travel time to Earth. As massive ν particles get noticeably delayed on their journey to Earth with respect to the Einstein GW they generated during the reconversion transient, then the accurate measurement of this time-of-flight delay by SNEWS + LIGO, VIRGO, BBO, DECIGO, etc., might readily assess the absolute ν mass spectrum.

  7. Broad-spectrum drug screening of meconium by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ristimaa, Johanna; Gergov, Merja; Pelander, Anna; Halmesmäki, Erja; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2010-09-01

    Analysis of the major drugs of abuse in meconium has been established in clinical practice for detecting fetal exposure to illicit drugs, particularly for the ready availability of the sample and ease of collection from diapers, compared with neonatal hair and urine. Very little is known about the occurrence and detection possibilities of therapeutic and licit drugs in meconium. Meconium specimens (n = 209) were collected in delivery hospitals, from infants of mothers who were suspected to be drug abusers. A targeted analysis method by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for abused drugs: amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, morphine, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine, oxycodone, methadone, tramadol, buprenorphine, and norbuprenorphine. A separate LC-MS/MS method was developed for 11-nor-∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid. A screening method based on LC coupled to time-of-flight MS was applied to a broad spectrum of drugs. As a result, a total of 77 different compounds were found. The main drug findings in meconium were as follows: local anesthetics 82.5% (n = 172), nicotine or its metabolites 61.5% (n = 129), opioids 48.5% (n = 101), stimulants 21.0% (n = 44), hypnotics and sedatives 19.0% (n = 40), antidepressants 18.0% (n = 38), antipsychotics 5.5% (n = 11), and cannabis 3.0% (n = 5). By revealing drugs and metabolites beyond the ordinary scope, the present procedure helps the pediatrician in cases where maternal denial is strong but the infant seems to suffer from typical drug-withdrawal symptoms. Intrapartum drug administration cannot be differentiated from gestational drug use by meconium analysis, which affects the interpretation of oxycodone, tramadol, fentanyl, pethidine, and ephedrine findings. PMID:20617307

  8. Multivariate singular spectrum analysis and the road to phase synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, Andreas; Ghil, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Singular spectrum analysis (SSA) and multivariate SSA (M-SSA) are based on the classical work of Kosambi (1943), Loeve (1945) and Karhunen (1946) and are closely related to principal component analysis. They have been introduced into information theory by Bertero, Pike and co-workers (1982, 1984) and into dynamical systems analysis by Broomhead and King (1986a,b). Ghil, Vautard and associates have applied SSA and M-SSA to the temporal and spatio-temporal analysis of short and noisy time series in climate dynamics and other fields in the geosciences since the late 1980s. M-SSA provides insight into the unknown or partially known dynamics of the underlying system by decomposing the delay-coordinate phase space of a given multivariate time series into a set of data-adaptive orthonormal components. These components can be classified essentially into trends, oscillatory patterns and noise, and allow one to reconstruct a robust "skeleton" of the dynamical system's structure. For an overview we refer to Ghil et al. (Rev. Geophys., 2002). In this talk, we present M-SSA in the context of synchronization analysis and illustrate its ability to unveil information about the mechanisms behind the adjustment of rhythms in coupled dynamical systems. The focus of the talk is on the special case of phase synchronization between coupled chaotic oscillators (Rosenblum et al., PRL, 1996). Several ways of measuring phase synchronization are in use, and the robust definition of a reasonable phase for each oscillator is critical in each of them. We illustrate here the advantages of M-SSA in the automatic identification of oscillatory modes and in drawing conclusions about the transition to phase synchronization. Without using any a priori definition of a suitable phase, we show that M-SSA is able to detect phase synchronization in a chain of coupled chaotic oscillators (Osipov et al., PRE, 1996). Recently, Muller et al. (PRE, 2005) and Allefeld et al. (Intl. J. Bif. Chaos, 2007) have

  9. Gravidynamics Scalar-Tensor Gravitation) and the Observed Discrete Mass Spectrum of Compact Stellar Remnants in Close Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    There are two new observational facts: the mass spectrum of neutron stars and black hole candidates (or collapsars) shows an evident absence of compact objects with masses within the interval from 2 M⊙ (with a peak for neutron stars about 1.4 M⊙) to about 6 M⊙, and in close binary stellar systems with a low-massive (about 0.6 M⊙) optical companion the most probable mass value (the peak in the masses distribution of black hole candidates) is close to 7 M⊙. The problem of the compact objects discrete mass spectra demands some solution both in the context of the supernovae and gamma-ray bursts relation, and in connection with the core-collapse supernovae explosion mechanism itself. In the totally non-metric scalar-tensor model of gravitational interaction (in a modified or extended Feynman field approach to gravitation) the total mass of a compact relativistic object with extremely strong gravitational field (an analog of black holes in General Relativity) is approximately equal to 6.7 M⊙ with radius of a region filled with a matter (quark-gluon plasma) ≈ 10 km. Polarized emission of long gamma-ray bursts, a black-body component in their spectrum and other observed properties could be explained by the direct manifestation of a surface of these collapsars.

  10. Strategy integrating stepped fragmentation and glycan diagnostic ion-based spectrum refinement for the identification of core fucosylated glycoproteome using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qichen; Zhao, Xinyuan; Zhao, Qing; Lv, Xiaodong; Ma, Cheng; Li, Xianyu; Zhao, Yan; Peng, Bo; Ying, Wantao; Qian, Xiaohong

    2014-07-15

    Core fucosylation (CF) is a special glycosylation pattern of proteins that has a strong relationship with cancer. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the core fucosylated α-fetoprotein as a biomarker for the early diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The technology for identifying core fucosylated proteins has significant practical value. The major method for core fucosylated glycoprotein/glycopeptide analysis is neutral loss-based MS(3) scanning under collision-induced dissociation (CID) by ion trap mass spectrometry. However, due to the limited speed and low resolution of the MS(3) scan mode, it is difficult to achieve high-throughput, with only dozens of core fucosylated proteins identified in a single run. In this work, we developed a novel strategy for the identification of CF glycopeptides at a large scale, integrating the stepped fragmentation function, one novel feature of quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometry, with "glycan diagnostic ion"-based spectrum optimization. By using stepped fragmentation, we were able to obtain both highly accurate glycan and peptide information of a simplified CF glycopeptide in one spectrum. Moreover, the spectrum could be recorded with the same high speed as the conventional MS(2) scan. By using the "glycan diagnostic ion"-based spectrum refinement method, the efficiency of the CF glycopeptide discovery was significantly improved. We demonstrated the feasibility and reproducibility of our method by analyzing CF glycoproteomes of mouse liver tissue and HeLa cell samples spiked with standard CF glycoprotein. In total, 1364 and 856 CF glycopeptides belonging to 702 and 449 CF glycoproteins were identified, respectively, within a 78-min gradient analysis, which was approximately a 7-fold increase in the identification efficiency of CF glycopeptides compared to the currently used method. In this work, we took core fucosylated glycopeptides as a practical example to demonstrate the great potential of our

  11. Mass Spectrometry Methodology in Lipid Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Han, Juanjuan; Wang, Zhenpeng; Liu, Jian’an; Wei, Jinchao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2014-01-01

    Lipidomics is an emerging field, where the structures, functions and dynamic changes of lipids in cells, tissues or body fluids are investigated. Due to the vital roles of lipids in human physiological and pathological processes, lipidomics is attracting more and more attentions. However, because of the diversity and complexity of lipids, lipid analysis is still full of challenges. The recent development of methods for lipid extraction and analysis and the combination with bioinformatics technology greatly push forward the study of lipidomics. Among them, mass spectrometry (MS) is the most important technology for lipid analysis. In this review, the methodology based on MS for lipid analysis was introduced. It is believed that along with the rapid development of MS and its further applications to lipid analysis, more functional lipids will be identified as biomarkers and therapeutic targets and for the study of the mechanisms of disease. PMID:24921707

  12. INFRARED SPECTRUM OF POTASSIUM-CATIONIZED TRIETHYLPHOSPHATE GENERATED USING TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY AND INFRARED MULTIPLE PHOTON DISSOCIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold; Christopher M. Leavitt; Ryan P. Dain; Jos Oomens; Jeff Steill; van Stipdonk, Michael J.

    2009-09-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry and wavelength selective infrared photodissociation was used to generate an infrared spectrum of gas-phase triethylphosphate cationized by attachment of K+. Prominent absorptions were observed in the region of 900 to 1300 cm-1 that are characteristic of phosphate P=O and P-O-R stretches. The relative positions and intensities of the IR absorptions were reproduced well by density functional theory (DFT) calculations performed using the B3LYP functional and the 6-31+g(d), 6-311+g(d,p) and 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis sets. Because of good correspondence between experiment and theory for the cation, DFT was then used to generate a theoretical spectrum for neutral triethylphosphate, which in turn accurately reproduces the IR spectrum of the neat liquid when solvent effects are included in the calculations.

  13. Statistical and evaporation models for the neutron emission energy spectrum in the center-of-mass system from fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, T.; Talou, P.; Stetcu, I.; Chadwick, M. B.

    2013-09-01

    The neutron emission energy spectra in the CMS (center-of-mass) frame from two compound nuclei produced by fission are studied. The neutron spectra calculated with the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model are compared with the evaporation theory, and the definition of the temperature is revisited. Using the Monte Carlo technique we average the CMS neutron spectra from many fission fragments to construct the representative CMS spectrum from both the light and heavy fragments. The CMS spectra for each fission fragment pair are also converted into the laboratory frame to calculate the total prompt fission neutron spectrum that can be observed experimentally. This is compared to measured laboratory data for thermal neutron induced fission on 235U. We show that the Hauser-Feshbach calculation gives a different spectrum shape than the Madland-Nix model calculation.

  14. Meta-Analysis of Gene Expression in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, Carolyn; Kwok, Willie; Rogic, Sanja; Pavlidis, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are clinically heterogeneous and biologically complex. In general it remains unclear, what biological factors lead to changes in the brains of autistic individuals. A considerable number of transcriptome analyses have been performed in attempts to address this question, but their findings lack a clear consensus. As a result, each of these individual studies has not led to any significant advance in understanding the autistic phenotype as a whole. Here, we report a meta-analysis of more than 1000 microarrays across twelve independent studies on expression changes in ASD compared to unaffected individuals, in both blood and brain tissues. We identified a number of known and novel genes that are consistently differentially expressed across three studies of the brain (71 samples in total). A subset of the highly ranked genes is suggestive of effects on mitochondrial function. In blood, consistent changes were more difficult to identify, despite individual studies tending to exhibit larger effects than the brain studies. Our results are the strongest evidence to date of a common transcriptome signature in the brains of individuals with ASD. PMID:25720351

  15. Roller element bearing fault diagnosis using singular spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muruganatham, Bubathi; Sanjith, M. A.; Krishnakumar, B.; Satya Murty, S. A. V.

    2013-02-01

    Most of the existing time series methods of feature extraction involve complex algorithm and the extracted features are affected by sample size and noise. In this paper, a simple time series method for bearing fault feature extraction using singular spectrum analysis (SSA) of the vibration signal is proposed. The method is easy to implement and fault feature is noise immune. SSA is used for the decomposition of the acquired signals into an additive set of principal components. A new approach for the selection of the principal components is also presented. Two methods of feature extraction based on SSA are implemented. In first method, the singular values (SV) of the selected SV number are adopted as the fault features, and in second method, the energy of the principal components corresponding to the selected SV numbers are used as features. An artificial neural network (ANN) is used for fault diagnosis. The algorithms were evaluated using two experimental datasets—one from a motor bearing subjected to different fault severity levels at various loads, with and without noise, and the other with bearing vibration data obtained in the presence of a gearbox. The effect of sample size, fault size and load on the fault feature is studied. The advantages of the proposed method over the exiting time series method are discussed. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed bearing fault diagnosis method is simple, noise tolerant and efficient.

  16. Ultrasonic attenuation tomography based on log-spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirik, Radovan; Stotzka, Rainer; Taxt, Torfinn

    2005-04-01

    The paper presents a new ultrasonic attenuation imaging method which might be used as a new imaging modality, targeted at breast cancer diagnostics. Two approaches based on ultrasonic imaging are combined together, namely the estimation of ultrasound attenuation coefficients from pulse-echo B-mode imaging data and an ultrasound computer tomography imaging technique. A recently published method for estimation of the ultrasound attenuation coefficient using the log--spectrum analysis is applied to radiofrequency signals acquired by an ultrasound computer tomography system to estimate images of the attenuation coefficients. The examined volume (e.g. female breast) is enclosed by several thousand ultrasound transducers. Radiofrequency signals from all transducers using all sending positions are recorded. Compared to the known ultrasound attenuation tomography methods, not only the directly transmitted signal, but also the reflected and scattered signals are processed here, i.e. substantially more information is used. The method is presented in its initial stage. The applied algorithm is derived using simplifying assumptions which will be relaxed in further research. However, even at this stage the resulting attenuation image is of higher quality than the standard attenuation imaging methods applied to the same data set.

  17. Forecasting Ambient O3 Concentration Using Singular Spectrum Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B. T.; Noguchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    The time series given by daily maximum ambient O3 concentration has a strong seasonal component and correlated errors. Use of singular spectrum analysis (SSA) combined with an autoregressive (AR) model (SSA+AR hereafter) captures such features and performs well in multiple-day point forecasts. On the other hand, after SSA+AR is fitted to the O3 concentration data at various monitoring stations in the United States, the residuals from the model also appear to exhibit seasonality in volatility. That is, interval forecasts (prediction intervals) based on the common assumption of homoskedastic residuals may not properly address the changes in future volatility. Additionally, both the point and interval forecasts generated by SSA+AR may include negative numbers, a physical impossibility. We discuss methods that provide non-negative competitive one- to five-day point and interval forecasts. Our methods include forecasting the logarithm of the O3 concentration and symmetrizing the resultant time series. We apply SSA+AR to our transformed time series to derive point forecasts. As the residuals from the SSA+AR fit exhibit seasonality in volatility, we apply the same methods to forecast the logarithm of the absolute residuals: First symmetrize the data and apply SSA+AR. We combine these two types of forecasts to derive our interval forecasts. We then compare our interval forecast performance in terms of sharpness and resolution against those based on the original SSA+AR that assumes homoskedastic residuals.

  18. THE SPECTRUM AND TERM ANALYSIS OF V II

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, A. P.; Pickering, J. C.; Semeniuk, J. I.

    2013-07-15

    The spectrum and extended term analysis of V II are presented. Fourier transform spectrometry was used to record high resolution spectra of singly ionized vanadium in the region 1492-5800 A (67020-17260 cm{sup -1}) with vanadium-neon and vanadium-argon hollow cathode lamps as sources. The wavenumber uncertainty for the center of gravity of the strongest lines is typically 0.002 cm{sup -1}, an improvement of an order of magnitude over previous measurements. Most of the lines exhibit partly resolved hyperfine structure. The V II energy levels in the 1985 compilation of Sugar and Corliss have been confirmed and revised, with the exception of the high-lying 4f levels and eight of the lower levels. Thirty-nine of the additional eighty-five high levels published by Iglesias et al. have also been confirmed and revised, and three of their missing levels have been found. The energy uncertainty of the revised levels has been reduced by about an order of magnitude. In total, 176 even levels and 233 odd levels are presented. Wavenumbers and classifications are given for 1242 V II lines.

  19. Analysis of noise power spectrum of gamma rays camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hongwei; Zhang, Faqiang; Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Jinchuan; Chen, Dingyang; Li, Linbo

    2014-01-01

    Gamma rays camera is widely used in many studies, including the image diagnostics of the radiation sources, flash photography, and nondestructive assessment (NDA), etc. As a major component of the high sensitivity gamma rays camera, the MCP image intensifier is characterized in the intensified image, tunable shutter time and gain. The gamma rays camera is consisting with rays-fluorescence convertor, the optical imaging system, the MCP image intensifier, CCD and other devices. The performance of the gamma rays camera is mainly dependent on such parameters as the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), etc. All of the parameters are somewhat limited by the noise characteristics of the system. Compared with the standard derivative noise distribution, the NPS, which can reflect the evolution characteristics of the noise of the imaging system with the change of the spatial frequency, could convey more information on the noise distribution in the system. In this paper, theoretical analysis is presented on the major sources of the noise in the gamma rays camera. Based on the analysis, the noise power spectra of the gamma rays camera were calibrated under various radiation dosages respectively with the visible light and gamma rays radiation sources (0.2MeV and 1.25MeV in energy, respectively). As indicated by the experimental results, the noise is majorly induced by the fluctuations of the gain of the MCP image intensifier. And the remarkable noise peak occurs nearby the spatial frequency of about 0.633 Hz/mm. And almost the same phenomena were found with both the 0.2MeV and 1.25MeV radiation energy. Besides, the noise power spectra are in circular symmetrical distribution, whose intensities are rapidly decreased with the increasing spatial frequencies.

  20. Spectrum Analysis of the Linearized Relativistic Landau Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Lan; Yu, Hongjun

    2016-05-01

    In this work we prove the complete spectrum structure of the linearized relativistic Landau equation in L^2 by using the semigroup theory and the linear operator perturbation theory. Our results include the physical interesting Coulombic interaction.

  1. Bottom-up approach to moduli dynamics in heavy gravitino scenario: Superpotential, soft terms, and sparticle mass spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Motoi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Koichi

    2005-07-01

    The physics of moduli fields is examined in the scenario where the gravitino is relatively heavy with mass of order 10 TeV, which is favored in view of the severe gravitino problem. The form of the moduli superpotential is shown to be determined, if one imposes a phenomenological requirement that no physical CP phase arise in gaugino masses from conformal anomaly mediation. This bottom-up approach allows only two types of superpotential, each of which can have its origins in a fundamental underlying theory such as superstring. One superpotential is the sum of an exponential and a constant, which is identical to that obtained by Kachru et al. (KKLT), and the other is the racetrack superpotential with two exponentials. The general form of soft supersymmetry-breaking masses is derived, and the pattern of the superparticle mass spectrum in the minimal supersymmetric standard model is discussed with the KKLT-type superpotential. It is shown that the moduli mediation and the anomaly mediation make comparable contributions to the soft masses. At the weak scale, the gaugino masses are rather degenerate compared to the minimal supergravity, which bring characteristic features on the superparticle masses. In particular, the lightest neutralino, which often constitutes the lightest superparticle and thus a dark matter candidate, is a considerable admixture of gauginos and Higgsinos. We also find a small mass hierarchy among the moduli, gravitino, and superpartners of the standard-model fields. Cosmological implications of the scenario are briefly described.

  2. CT Texture Analysis of Renal Masses

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Siva P.; Chen, Yifei; Schroeder, James L.; Huang, Peng; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Computed tomography texture analysis (CTTA) allows quantification of heterogeneity within a region of interest. This study investigates the possibility of distinguishing between several common renal masses using CTTA-derived parameters by developing and validating a predictive model. Materials and Methods CTTA software was used to analyze 20 clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), 20 papillary RCCs, 20 oncocytomas, and 20 renal cysts. Regions of interest were drawn around each mass on multiple slices in the arterial, venous, and delayed phases on renal mass protocol CT scans. Unfiltered images and spatial band-pass filtered images were analyzed to quantify heterogeneity. Random forest method was used to construct a predictive model to classify lesions using quantitative parameters. The model was externally validated on a separate set of 19 unknown cases. Results The random forest model correctly categorized oncocytomas in 89% of cases (sensitivity = 89%, specificity = 99%), clear cell RCCs in 91% of cases (sensitivity = 91%, specificity = 97%), cysts in 100% of cases (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 100%), and papillary RCCs in 100% of cases (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 98%). Conclusions CTTA, in conjunction with random forest modeling, demonstrates promise as a tool to characterize lesions. Various renal masses were accurately classified using quantitative information derived from routine scans. PMID:25239842

  3. Analysis of X chromosome inactivation in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiaohong; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Toma, Claudio; Betancur, Catalina; Chaste, Pauline; Delorme, Richard; Durand, Christelle; Fauchereau, Fabien; Botros, Hany Goubran; Leboyer, Marion; Mouren-Simeoni, Marie-Christine; Nygren, Gudrun; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Rastam, Maria; Gillberg, I Carina; Gillberg, Christopher; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Carone, Simona; Nummela, Ilona; Rossi, Mari; Battaglia, Agatino; Jarvela, Irma; Maestrini, Elena; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex genetic disorders more frequently observed in males. Skewed X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is observed in heterozygous females carrying gene mutations involved in several X-linked syndromes. In this study, we aimed to estimate the role of X-linked genes in the susceptibility to ASD by ascertaining the XCI pattern in a sample of 543 informative mothers of children with ASD and in a sample of 163 affected girls. The XCI pattern was also determined in two control groups (144 adult females and 40 young females) with a similar age distribution to the mothers sample and affected girls sample, respectively. We observed no significant excess of skewed XCI in families with ASD. Interestingly, two mothers and one girl carrying known mutations in X-linked genes (NLGN3, ATRX, MECP2) showed highly skewed XCI, suggesting that ascertainment of XCI could reveal families with X-linked mutations. Linkage analysis was carried out in the subgroup of multiplex families with skewed XCI (80:20) and a modest increased allele sharing was obtained in the Xq27-Xq28 region, with a peak Z-score of 1.75 close to rs719489. In summary, our results suggest that there is no major X-linked gene subject to XCI and expressed in blood cells conferring susceptibility to ASD. However, the possibility that rare mutations in X-linked genes could contribute to ASD cannot be excluded. We propose that the XCI profile could be a useful criteria to prioritize families for mutation screening of X-linked candidate genes. PMID:18361425

  4. MIA: non-targeted mass isotopolome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weindl, Daniel; Wegner, Andre; Hiller, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Summary: MIA detects and visualizes isotopic enrichment in gas chromatography electron ionization mass spectrometry (GC–EI-MS) datasets in a non-targeted manner. It provides an easy-to-use graphical user interface that allows for visual mass isotopomer distribution analysis across multiple datasets. MIA helps to reveal changes in metabolic fluxes, visualizes metabolic proximity of isotopically enriched compounds and shows the fate of the applied stable isotope labeled tracer. Availability and Implementation: Linux and Windows binaries, documentation, and sample data are freely available for download at http://massisotopolomeanalyzer.lu. MIA is a stand-alone application implemented in C ++  and based on Qt5, NTFD and the MetaboliteDetector framework. Contact: karsten.hiller@uni.lu PMID:27273671

  5. Spectrum recovery method analysis on nonuniform sampling interference data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fengzhen; Li, Jingzhen; Cao, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Temporally and Spatially Modulated Fourier Transform Imaging Spectrometer (TSMFTIS) is a new imaging spectrometer without moving mirrors and slits. The interferogram of the target point can be consisted by sequentially arranging the interference information extracted from the same target point of the sequential images, and the spectrum can be recovered by using fast Fourier transform. In the practical application, there is nonuniform sampling in the interference data, and many researchers have carried out researches on nonuniform sampling with the fast Fourier transform algorithm. As to the issue of interference data in the nonuniform sampling, the nonuniform sampling degree's impact on the recovered spectrum precision is currently and mainly analyzed. This paper has adapted several typical nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) methods, carried out spectrum recovery precision comparison on the interferogram of the nonuniform sampling point with the above methods, and further analyzed the impact of kernel function type, oversampling ratio and kernel function width's on spectrum recovery precision in the above mentioned methods. The experiment result indicates that, when the oversampling ratio is 4 and the kernel function width is 4, the spectrum recovery precision with NUFFT based on Blackman type kernel function is optimal, however, the Gaussian kernel function is stable.

  6. Search for Resonances in the Dijet Mass Spectrum from 7 TeV pp Collisions at CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-10-01

    A search for narrow resonances with a mass of at least 1 TeV in the dijet mass spectrum is performed using pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 inverse femtobarn, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. No resonances are observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level are presented on the product of the resonance cross section, branching fraction into dijets, and acceptance, separately for decays into quark-quark, quark-gluon, and gluon-gluon pairs. The data exclude new particles predicted in the following models at the 95% confidence level: string resonances with mass less than 4.00 TeV, E6 diquarks with mass less than 3.52 TeV, excited quarks with mass less than 2.49 TeV, axigluons and colorons with mass less than 2.47 TeV, and W' bosons with mass less than 1.51 TeV.

  7. Quantitative analysis of LISA pathfinder test-mass noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraioli, Luigi; Congedo, Giuseppe; Hueller, Mauro; Vitale, Stefano; Hewitson, Martin; Nofrarias, Miquel; Armano, Michele

    2011-12-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is a mission aiming to test the critical technology for the forthcoming space-based gravitational-wave detectors. The main scientific objective of the LPF mission is to demonstrate test masses free falling with residual accelerations below 3×10-14ms-2/Hz at 1 mHz. Reaching such an ambitious target will require a significant amount of system optimization and characterization, which will in turn require accurate and quantitative noise analysis procedures. In this paper, we discuss two main problems associated with the analysis of the data from LPF: i) excess noise detection and ii) noise parameter identification. The mission is focused on the low-frequency region ([0.1, 10] mHz) of the available signal spectrum. In such a region, the signal is dominated by the force noise acting on test masses. At the same time, the mission duration is limited to 90 days and typical data segments will be 24 hours in length. Considering those constraints, noise analysis is expected to deal with a limited amount of non-Gaussian data, since the spectrum statistics will be far from Gaussian and the lowest available frequency is limited by the data length. In this paper, we analyze the details of the expected statistics for spectral data and develop two suitable excess noise estimators. One is based on the statistical properties of the integrated spectrum, the other is based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The sensitivity of the estimators is discussed theoretically for independent data, then the algorithms are tested on LPF synthetic data. The test on realistic LPF data allows the effect of spectral data correlations on the efficiency of the different noise excess estimators to be highlighted. It also reveals the versatility of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov approach, which can be adapted to provide reasonable results on correlated data from a modified version of the standard equations for the inversion of the test statistic. Closely related to excess noise detection, the

  8. Membrane composition analysis by imaging mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, S G; Kraft, M L; Longo, M; Hutcheon, I D; Weber, P K

    2006-03-29

    Membranes on solid supports offer an ideal format for imaging. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) can be used to obtain composition information on membrane-associated components. Using the NanoSIMS50, images of composition variations in membrane domains can be obtained with a lateral resolution better than 100 nm. By suitable calibration, these variations in composition can be translated into a quantitative analysis of the membrane composition. Progress towards imaging small phase-separated lipid domains, membrane-associated proteins and natural biological membranes will be described.

  9. Improvement of the edge rotation diagnostic spectrum analysis via simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.; Zhuang, G. Cheng, Z. F.; Zhang, X. L.; Hou, S. Y.; Cheng, C.

    2014-11-15

    The edge rotation diagnostic (ERD) system has been developed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak to measure the edge toroidal rotation velocity by observing the shifted wavelength of carbon V (C V 227.09 nm). Since the measured spectrum is an integrated result along the viewing line from the plasma core to the edge, a method via simulation has been developed to analyze the ERD spectrum. With the necessary parameters such as C V radiation profile and the ion temperature profile, a local rotation profile at the normalized minor radius of 0.5-1 is obtained.

  10. Improvement of the edge rotation diagnostic spectrum analysis via simulation.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Zhuang, G; Cheng, Z F; Zhang, X L; Hou, S Y; Cheng, C

    2014-11-01

    The edge rotation diagnostic (ERD) system has been developed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak to measure the edge toroidal rotation velocity by observing the shifted wavelength of carbon V (C V 227.09 nm). Since the measured spectrum is an integrated result along the viewing line from the plasma core to the edge, a method via simulation has been developed to analyze the ERD spectrum. With the necessary parameters such as C V radiation profile and the ion temperature profile, a local rotation profile at the normalized minor radius of 0.5-1 is obtained. PMID:25430334

  11. Improvement of the edge rotation diagnostic spectrum analysis via simulationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Zhuang, G.; Cheng, Z. F.; Zhang, X. L.; Hou, S. Y.; Cheng, C.

    2014-11-01

    The edge rotation diagnostic (ERD) system has been developed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak to measure the edge toroidal rotation velocity by observing the shifted wavelength of carbon V (C V 227.09 nm). Since the measured spectrum is an integrated result along the viewing line from the plasma core to the edge, a method via simulation has been developed to analyze the ERD spectrum. With the necessary parameters such as C V radiation profile and the ion temperature profile, a local rotation profile at the normalized minor radius of 0.5-1 is obtained.

  12. [Chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum analysis of greenhouse cucumber disease and insect damage].

    PubMed

    Sui, Yuan-yuan; Yu, Hai-ye; Zhang, Lei; Luo, Han; Ren, Shun; Zhao, Guo-gang

    2012-05-01

    The present paper is based on chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum analysis. The wavelength 685 nm was determined as the primary characteristic point for the analysis of healthy or disease and insect damaged leaf by spectrum configuration. Dimensionality reduction of the spectrum was achieved by combining simple intercorrelation bands selection and principal component analysis (PCA). The principal component factor was reduced from 10 to 5 while the spectrum information was kept reaching 99.999%. By comparing and analysing three modeling methods, namely the partial least square regression (PLSR), BP neural network (BP) and least square support vector machine regression (LSSVMR), regarding correlation coefficient of true value and predicted value as evaluation criterion, eventually, LSSVMR was confirmed as the appropriate method for modeling of greenhouse cucumber disease and insect damage chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum analysis. PMID:22827075

  13. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY DURING ECLIPSE OF THE YOUNG SUBSTELLAR ECLIPSING BINARY 2MASS 0535-0546. II. SECONDARY SPECTRUM: NO EVIDENCE THAT SPOTS CAUSE THE TEMPERATURE REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Stassun, Keivan G. E-mail: keivan.stassun@vanderbilt.edu

    2012-10-10

    We present high-resolution optical spectra of the young brown dwarf eclipsing binary 2M0535-05, obtained during eclipse of the higher-mass (primary) brown dwarf. Combined with our previous spectrum of the primary alone (Paper I), the new observations yield the spectrum of the secondary alone. We investigate, through a differential analysis of the two binary components, whether cool surface spots are responsible for suppressing the temperature of the primary. In Paper I, we found a significant discrepancy between the empirical surface gravity of the primary and that inferred via fine analysis of its spectrum. Here we find precisely the same discrepancy in surface gravity, both qualitatively and quantitatively. While this may again be ascribed to either cool spots or model opacity errors, it implies that cool spots cannot be responsible for preferentially lowering the temperature of the primary: if they were, spot effects on the primary spectrum should be preferentially larger, and they are not. The T{sub eff}'s we infer for the primary and secondary, from the TiO-{epsilon} bands alone, show the same reversal, in the same ratio, as is empirically observed, bolstering the validity of our analysis. In turn, this implies that if suppression of convection by magnetic fields on the primary is the fundamental cause of the T{sub eff} reversal, then it cannot be a local suppression yielding spots mainly on the primary (though both components may be equally spotted), but a global suppression in the interior of the primary. We briefly discuss current theories of how this might work.

  14. [The measurement and analysis of visible-absorption spectrum and fluorescence spectrum of lycopene].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-zhan; Li, Ping; Dai, Song-hui; Wu, Da-cheng; Li, Rui-xia; Yang, Jian-hui; Xiao, Hai-bo

    2005-11-01

    Using ICCD spectral detection system, the absorbency of lycopene-carbon bisulfide solution with different concentration was measured, and the result shows that in a specified range the absorption rule of lycopene solution agrees with Lambert-Beer Law. Absorption spectral wavelength shifts were measured respectively when lycopene was dissolved in acetone, normal hexane, petroleum ether, benzene, ethyl acetate, and carbon bisulfide, and comparing to acetone, different red-shift appeared when lycopene was dissolved in benzene, ethyl acetate, and carbon bisulfide when water was added in lycopene-acetone solution, t he absorbency of lycopene dropped, the fine structure of absorption spectrum became indistinct, and a new absorption peak appeared in UV. The reason for these phenomena is that the solvent molecule had different effect on lycopene molecule when lycopene was dissolved in different solvent. Using fluorecence spectrophotometer, fluorescence spectra of lycopene in different concentrations were collected, and the results show that the fluorescence spectra of lycopene were mainly in 500-680 nm. When concentration was lower than 50 microg x mL(-1), the fluorescence intensity linearly increased with increasing concentration, and when concentration was higher than 60 microg x mL(-1), the fluorescence intensity dropped because of the interaction between lycopene molecules. PMID:16499057

  15. Primary CR energy spectrum and mass composition by the data of Tunka-133 array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosin, V. V.; Berezhnev, S. F.; Budnev, N. M.; Chiavassa, A.; Chvalaev, O. A.; Dyachok, A. V.; Epimakhov, S. N.; Gress, O. A.; Gress, T. I.; Kalmykov, N. N.; Karpov, N. I.; Konstantinov, E. N.; Korobchenko, A. V.; Korosteleva, E. E.; Kozhin, V. A.; Kuzmichev, L. A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Lubsandorzhiev, N. B.; Mirgazov, R. R.; Monkhoev, R. D.; Osipova, E. A.; Pakhorukov, A. L.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Pankov, L. V.; Popova, E. G.; Ptuskin, V. S.; Semeney, Y. A.; Silaev, A. A.; Silaev, A. A., Jr.; Skurikhin, A. V.; Spiering, C.; Sveshnikova, L. G.; Zagorodnikov, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    The Cherenkov light array for the registration of extensive air showers (EAS) Tunka-133 collected data during 5 winter seasons from 2009 to 2014.-The differential energy spectrum of all particles and the dependence of the average maximum depth on the energy in the range of 6 ṡ 1015-1018 eV measured for 1540 hours of observation are presented.

  16. The fractal energy measurement and the singularity energy spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Gang; Zhang, Shuning; Yang, Xiaoniu

    2012-12-01

    The singularity exponent (SE) is the characteristic parameter of fractal and multifractal signals. Based on SE, the fractal dimension reflecting the global self-similar character, the instantaneous SE reflecting the local self-similar character, the multifractal spectrum (MFS) reflecting the distribution of SE, and the time-varying MFS reflecting pointwise multifractal spectrum were proposed. However, all the studies were based on the depiction of spatial or differentiability characters of fractal signals. Taking the SE as the independent dimension, this paper investigates the fractal energy measurement (FEM) and the singularity energy spectrum (SES) theory. Firstly, we study the energy measurement and the energy spectrum of a fractal signal in the singularity domain, propose the conception of FEM and SES of multifractal signals, and investigate the Hausdorff measure and the local direction angle of the fractal energy element. Then, we prove the compatibility between FEM and traditional energy, and point out that SES can be measured in the fractal space. Finally, we study the algorithm of SES under the condition of a continuous signal and a discrete signal, and give the approximation algorithm of the latter, and the estimations of FEM and SES of the Gaussian white noise, Fractal Brownian motion and the multifractal Brownian motion show the theoretical significance and application value of FEM and SES.

  17. Dynamic substructuring for shock spectrum analysis using component mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpheeters, Barton W.; Lev, Avivi; Bogert, Philip B.; Scavuzzo, Rudolph J.

    1988-01-01

    Component mode synthesis was used to analyze different types of structures with MSC NASTRAN. The theory and technique of using Multipoint Constraint Equations (MPCs) to connect substructures to each other or to a common foundation is presented. Computation of the dynamic response of the system from shack spectrum inputs was automated using the DMAP programming language of the MSC NASTRAN finite element code.

  18. Dream Content Analysis in Persons with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daoust, Anne-Marie; Lusignan, Felix-Antoine; Braun, Claude M. J.; Mottron, Laurent; Godbout, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Dream questionnaires were completed by 28 young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) participants. Seventy-nine typically developed individual served as the control group. In a subset of 17 persons with ASD and 11 controls matched for verbal IQ, dream narratives were obtained following REM sleep awakenings in a sleep laboratory.…

  19. Peptide-Centric Proteome Analysis: An Alternative Strategy for the Analysis of Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Ying S.; Egertson, Jarrett D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Kim, Sangtae; MacLean, Brendan; Kall, Lukas; Aebersold, Ruedi; Smith, Richard D.; Noble, William; MacCoss, Michael

    2015-09-01

    In mass spectrometry-based bottom-up proteomics, data-independent acquisition (DIA) is an emerging technique due to its comprehensive and unbiased sampling of precursor ions. However, current DIA methods use wide precursor isolation windows, resulting in co- fragmentation and complex mixture spectra. Thus, conventional database searching tools that identify peptides by interpreting individual MS/MS spectra are inherently limited in analyzing DIA data. Here we discuss an alternative approach, peptide-centric analysis, which tests directly for the presence and absence of query peptides. We discuss how peptide-centric analysis resolves some limitations of traditional spectrum-centric analysis, and we outline the benefits of peptide-centric analysis in general.

  20. 78 FR 31568 - Proposed Collection; 60-day Comment Request: Autism Spectrum Disorder Research Portfolio Analysis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Spectrum Disorder Research Portfolio Analysis SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c... Research Coordination, NIMH, NIH, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Blvd., MSC 9663, Room 6184, Bethesda... days of the date of this publication. Proposed Collection: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)...

  1. Analysis of a discrete spectrum analyzer for the detection of radio frequency interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitt, B. K.

    1977-01-01

    As the radio frequency spectrum becomes increasingly overcrowded, interference with mission-critical DSN operations is rising at an alarming rate. To alleviate this problem the DSN is developing a wideband surveillance system for on-site detection and identification of potential sources of radio frequency interference (RFI), which will complement the existing frequency coordination activities. The RFI monitoring system is based on a wideband, multi-look discrete spectrum analyzer operating on fast Fourier transform principles. An extensive general statistical analysis is presented of such spectrum analyzers and derives threshold detection performance formulas for signals of interest. These results are then applied to the design of the RFI spectrum analyzer under development.

  2. Changes in the ultraviolet spectrum of the mass-losing Be star 59 Cygni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlborough, J. M.; Snow, T. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of a few selected wavelength regions in the ultraviolet spectrum of the Be star 59 Cyg, obtained in 1975 November, are compared with the complete low-resolution Copernicus scan of the same star obtained in 1972 October. Changes in the spectrum between the two times are discussed and interpreted in terms of the two distinct shell episodes revealed by optical data. A wide range of ionization exists from Fe III to N V, with a range in radial velocity of approximately 1000 km/s. Changes in the Si III, Si IV, and N V absorption arising in the stellar wind show that the velocity structure of the wind may have changed, and that the ionization balance also was altered over the 3 year interim.

  3. Extended analysis of fifth spectrum of bromine: Br V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riyaz, A.; Tauheed, A.; Rahimullah, K.

    2014-11-01

    The fifth spectrum of bromine (Br V) has been studied in the 200-2400 Å wavelength region. The spectrum was photographed on a 3-m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at the St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish (Canada) and 6.65-m grazing incidence spectrograph at the Zeeman laboratory (Amsterdam). The light sources used were a triggered spark and sliding spark. The ground configuration of Br V is 4s24p. The excited configurations 4s4p2+4s2(4d+5d+5s+6s+7s+5g+6g)+4s4p(5p+4f)+4p24d in the even parity system and the 4p3+4s2(5p+6p+7p+4f)+4s4p4d+4s4p5s configurations in the odd parity system have been studied. Relativistic Hartree-Fock (HFR) and least squares fitted (LSF) parametric calculations have been used to interpret the observed spectrum. 99 levels of Br V have now been established, 43 being new. Among 394 classified spectral lines, 181 are newly classified. The level 4s27s 2S1/2 is revised. We estimate the accuracy of our measured wavelengths for sharp and unblended lines to be±0.005 Å. The ionization limit is determined as 479,657±200 cm-1 (59.470±0.025 eV).

  4. Autism spectrum traits in normal individuals: a preliminary VBM analysis

    PubMed Central

    Focquaert, Farah; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-01-01

    In light of the new DSM-5 autism spectrum disorders diagnosis in which the autism spectrum reflects a group of neurodevelopmental disorders existing on a continuum from mild to severe expression of autistic traits, and recent empirical findings showing a continuous distribution of autistic traits in the general population, our voxel based morphometry study compares normal individuals with high autistic traits to normal individuals with low autistic traits. We hypothesize that normal individuals with high autistic traits in terms of empathizing and systemizing [high systemizing (HS)/low empathizing (LE)] share brain irregularities with individuals that fall within the clinical autism spectrum disorder. We find differences in several social brain network areas between our groups. Specifically, we find increased gray matter (GM) volume in the orbitofrontal cortex, the cuneus, the hippocampus and parahippocampus and reduced GM volume in the inferior temporal cortex, the insula, and the amygdala in our HS/LE individuals relative to our HE/LS (low autistic traits in terms of empathizing and systemizing) individuals. PMID:26029082

  5. Hadron spectrum, quark masses, and decay constants from light overlap fermions on large lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Galletly, D.; Horsley, R.; Guertler, M.; Perlt, H.; Schiller, A.; Rakow, P. E. L.; Schierholz, G.; Streuer, T.

    2007-04-01

    We present results from a simulation of quenched overlap fermions with Luescher-Weisz gauge field action on lattices up to 24{sup 3}48 and for pion masses down to {approx_equal}250 MeV. Among the quantities we study are the pion, rho, and nucleon masses; the light and strange quark masses; and the pion decay constant. The renormalization of the scalar and axial vector currents is done nonperturbatively in the RI-MOM scheme. The simulations are performed at two different lattice spacings, a{approx_equal}0.1 fm and {approx_equal}0.15 fm, and on two different physical volumes, to test the scaling properties of our action and to study finite volume effects. We compare our results with the predictions of chiral perturbation theory and compute several of its low-energy constants. The pion mass is computed in sectors of fixed topology as well.

  6. Reactions of vinyl chloride and methanol in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer during VOC analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, L.; Alley, E.G.; Lynn, B.C. Jr.

    1999-05-01

    A reaction between vinyl chloride and the solvent (methanol) was observed during volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis on a gas chromatograph/quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (GC/MS). A chromatographic peak at a retention time consistent with vinyl chloride produced a mass spectrum without the characteristic chlorine isotope ions m/z 62 and 64 but instead contained an apparent molecular ion, m/z 58. The m/z 58 ion is not found in the reference spectrum of vinyl chloride. This spectrum was observed when methanol was used as solvent in internal standard, surrogate standard, or analyte solutions. Subsequent VOC standard analysis indicated that the abundance of the m/z 58 ion was directly proportional to the amount of vinyl chloride in the water samples. The correct spectrum for vinyl chloride was observed when no methanol was added. From these experiments, the authors concluded that a reaction was occurring between the vinyl chloride and methanol in the ion trap producing a new species with a molecular ion at m/z 58. When ethanol was used as the solvent for the internal standard solution or surrogate standard, a correct spectrum of vinyl chloride was obtained.

  7. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  8. A Pilot Proteomic Analysis of Salivary Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ngounou Wetie, Armand G; Wormwood, Kelly L; Russell, Stefanie; Ryan, Jeanne P; Darie, Costel C; Woods, Alisa G

    2015-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prevalence is increasing, with current estimates at 1/68-1/50 individuals diagnosed with an ASD. Diagnosis is based on behavioral assessments. Early diagnosis and intervention is known to greatly improve functional outcomes in people with ASD. Diagnosis, treatment monitoring and prognosis of ASD symptoms could be facilitated with biomarkers to complement behavioral assessments. Mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomics may help reveal biomarkers for ASD. In this pilot study, we have analyzed the salivary proteome in individuals with ASD compared to neurotypical control subjects, using MS-based proteomics. Our goal is to optimize methods for salivary proteomic biomarker discovery and to identify initial putative biomarkers in people with ASDs. The salivary proteome is virtually unstudied in ASD, and saliva could provide an easily accessible biomaterial for analysis. Using nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we found statistically significant differences in several salivary proteins, including elevated prolactin-inducible protein, lactotransferrin, Ig kappa chain C region, Ig gamma-1 chain C region, Ig lambda-2 chain C regions, neutrophil elastase, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1. Our results indicate that this is an effective method for identification of salivary protein biomarkers, support the concept that immune system and gastrointestinal disturbances may be present in individuals with ASDs and point toward the need for larger studies in behaviorally-characterized individuals. PMID:25626423

  9. Study of the Dijet Mass Spectrum in pp→W+jets Events at s=7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Weber, M.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Costanza, F.; Dammann, D.; Diez Pardos, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Riedl, C.; Ron, E.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Höing, R. S.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Nowak, F.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Röcker, S.; Scheurer, A.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mehta, P.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Fanelli, C.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Sigamani, M.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Heo, S. G.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Son, T.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Cho, Y.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Ansari, M. H.; Asghar, M. I.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Gokieli, R.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Kossov, M.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Popov, A.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Felcini, M.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Graziano, A.; Jorda, C.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron Sanudo, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Coarasa Perez, J. A.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegner, B.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y.-J.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. J.; Mekterovic, D.; Singh, A. P.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, M.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karaman, T.; Karapinar, G.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Cankocak, K.; Levchuk, L.; Bostock, F.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Stoye, M.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; St. John, J.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Traczyk, P.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kilminster, B.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. 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I.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Safdi, B.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Brownson, E.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Roh, Y.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Johnston, C.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Palmonari, F.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2012-12-01

    We report an investigation of the invariant mass spectrum of the two jets with highest transverse momentum in pp→W+2-jet and W+3-jet events to look for resonant enhancement. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at s=7TeV. We find no evidence for the anomalous structure reported by the CDF Collaboration, and establish an upper limit of 5.0 pb at 95% confidence level on the production cross section for a generic Gaussian signal with mass near 150 GeV. Additionally, we exclude two theoretical models that predict a CDF-like dijet resonance near 150 GeV.

  10. Nuclear quadrupole resonance studies project. [spectrometer design and spectrum analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, A. N.

    1978-01-01

    The participation of undergraduates in nuclear quadrupole resonance research at Grambling University was made possible by NASA grants. Expanded laboratory capabilities include (1) facilities for high and low temperature generation and measurement; (2) facilities for radio frequency generation and measurement with the modern spectrum analyzers, precision frequency counters and standard signal generators; (3) vacuum and glass blowing facilities; and (4) miscellaneous electronic and machine shop facilities. Experiments carried out over a five year period are described and their results analyzed. Theoretical studies on solid state crystalline electrostatic fields, field gradients, and antishielding factors are included.

  11. Mass Media Representation of Teaching: A Behaviour Analysis Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Sandy; Mackie, Stirling

    Although psychological studies of the mass media have been dominated by cognitivist and psychodynamic concepts, a study of the mass media using a behavior analysis method may be used to analyze the content of the mass media. By applying that analysis to fictional teacher-learner interactions an interpretation of those relationships can be made and…

  12. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MASS FLUX REDUCTION AND SOURCE-ZONE MASS REMOVAL: ANALYSIS OF FIELD DATA

    PubMed Central

    DiFilippo, Erica L.

    2010-01-01

    The magnitude of contaminant mass flux reduction associated with a specific amount of contaminant mass removed is a key consideration for evaluating the effectiveness of a source-zone remediation effort. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing, estimating, and predicting relationships between mass flux reduction and mass removal. Published data collected for several field studies were examined to evaluate relationships between mass flux reduction and source-zone mass removal. The studies analyzed herein represent a variety of source-zone architectures, immiscible-liquid compositions, and implemented remediation technologies. There are two general approaches to characterizing the mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal relationship, end-point analysis and time-continuous analysis. End-point analysis, based on comparing masses and mass fluxes measured before and after a source-zone remediation effort, was conducted for 21 remediation projects. Mass removals were greater than 60% for all but three of the studies. Mass flux reductions ranging from slightly less than to slightly greater than one-to-one were observed for the majority of the sites. However, these single-snapshot characterizations are limited in that the antecedent behavior is indeterminate. Time-continuous analysis, based on continuous monitoring of mass removal and mass flux, was performed for two sites, both for which data were obtained under water-flushing conditions. The reductions in mass flux were significantly different for the two sites (90% vs. ~8%) for similar mass removals (~40%). These results illustrate the dependence of the mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal relationship on source-zone architecture and associated mass-transfer processes. Minimal mass flux reduction was observed for a system wherein mass removal was relatively efficient (ideal mass transfer and displacement). Conversely, a significant degree of mass flux reduction was observed for a site wherein mass removal was inefficient

  13. Singularity spectrum of fractal signals from wavelet analysis: Exact results

    SciTech Connect

    Bacry, E.; Muzy, J.F.; Arneodo, A. )

    1993-02-01

    The multifractal formalism for singular measures is revisited using the wave transform. For Bernoulli invariant measures of some expanding Markov maps, the generalized fractal dimensions are proved to be transition points for the scaling exponents of some partition functions defined from the wavelet transform modulus maxima. The generalization of this formalism to fractal signals is established for the class of distribution functions of these singular invariant measures. It is demonstrated that the Hausdorff dimension D(h) of the set of singularities of Hoelder exponent h can be directly determined from the wavelet transform modulus maxima. The singularity spectrum so obtained is shown to be not disturbed by the presence, in the signal, of a superimposed polynomial behavior of order n, provided one uses an analyzing wavelet that possesses at least N > n vanishing moments. However, it is shown that a C[infinity] behavior generally induces a phase transition in the D(h) singularity spectrum that somewhat masks the weakest singularities. This phase transition actually depends on the number N of vanishing moments of the analyzing wavelet; its observation is emphasized as a reliable experimental test for the existence of nonsingular behavior in the considered signal. These theoretical results are illustrated with numerical examples. They are likely to be valid for a large class of fractal functions as suggested by recent applications to fractional Brownian motions and turbulent velocity signals.

  14. Hadron energy spectrum in polarized top-quark decays considering the effects of hadron and bottom quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejad, S. Mohammad Moosavi; Balali, Mahboobe

    2016-03-01

    We present the analytical expressions for the next-to-leading order corrections to the partial decay width t(\\uparrow ) rightarrow bW^+, followed by brightarrow H_bX, for nonzero b-quark mass (m_bne 0) in the fixed-flavor-number scheme (FFNs). To make the predictions for the energy distribution of outgoing hadrons H_b, as a function of the normalized H_b-energy fraction x_H, we apply the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme (GM-VFNs) in a specific helicity coordinate system where the polarization of top quark is evaluated relative to the b-quark momentum. We also study the effects of gluon fragmentation and finite hadron mass on the hadron energy spectrum so that hadron masses are responsible for the low-x_H threshold. In order to describe both the b-quark and the gluon hadronizations in top decays we apply realistic and nonperturbative fragmentation functions extracted through a global fit to the e^+e^- annihilation data from CERN LEP1 and SLAC SLC by relying on their universality and scaling violations.

  15. The fragmentation of expanding shells - III. Oligarchic accretion and the mass spectrum of fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, James E.; Wünsch, Richard; Smith, Rowan J.; Whitworth, Anthony; Palouš, Jan

    2011-03-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations to investigate the gravitational fragmentation of expanding shells through the linear and non-linear regimes. The results are analysed using spherical-harmonic decomposition to capture the initiation of structure during the linear regime, the potential-based method of Smith et al. to follow the development of clumps in the mildly non-linear regime and sink particles to capture the properties of the final bound objects during the highly non-linear regime. In the early, mildly non-linear phase of fragmentation, we find that the clump mass function still agrees quite well with the mass function predicted by the analytic model. However, the sink mass function is quite different, in the sense of being skewed towards high-mass objects. This is because, once the growth of a condensation becomes non-linear, it tends to be growing non-competitively from its own essentially separate reservoir; we call this oligarchic accretion.

  16. FINAL REPORT. REAL-TIME BROAD SPECTRUM CHARACTERIZATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE BY MEMBRANE INTRODUCTION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project was to expand the range of chemical species that may be detected by membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) in environmental, and specifically in Mixed Waste, monitoring and characterization applications. There were three major thrusts to this work...

  17. REAL-TIME BROAD SPECTRUM CHARACTERIZATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE BY MEMBRANE INTRODUCTION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose to expand the real-time monitoring capabilities of Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry (MIMS) to the pivotal problem of Mixed Hazardous Wastes, with secondary emphasis on monitoring incinerator stack gases for both organics and toxic metals. The methodologies devel...

  18. Analysis of the Palierne model by relaxation time spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Mi Kyung; Cho, Kwang Soo

    2016-02-01

    Viscoelasticity of immiscible polymer blends is affected by relaxation of the interface. Several attempts have been made for linear viscoelasticity of immiscible polymer blends. The Palierne model (1990) and the Gramespacher-Meissner model (1992) are representative. The Gramespacher-Meissner model consists of two parts: ingredients and interface. Moreover, it provides us the formula of the peak of interface in weighted relaxation time spectrum, which enables us to analyze the characteristics relating to interface more obviously. However, the Gramespacher-Meissner model is a kind of empirical model. Contrary to the Gramespacher-Meissner model, the Palierne model was derived in a rigorous manner. In this study, we investigated the Palierne model through the picture of the Gramespacher-Meissner model. We calculated moduli of immiscible blend using two models and obtained the weighted relaxation time spectra of them. The fixed-point iteration of Cho and Park (2013) was used in order to determine the weighted relaxation spectra.

  19. Primordial power spectrum: a complete analysis with the WMAP nine-year data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar; Shafieloo, Arman; Souradeep, Tarun

    2013-07-01

    We have improved further the error sensitive Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm making it applicable directly on the un-binned measured angular power spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background observations to reconstruct the form of the primordial power spectrum. This improvement makes the application of the method significantly more straight forward by removing some intermediate stages of analysis allowing a reconstruction of the primordial spectrum with higher efficiency and precision and with lower computational expenses. Applying the modified algorithm we fit the WMAP 9 year data using the optimized reconstructed form of the primordial spectrum with more than 300 improvement in χ2eff with respect to the best fit power-law. This is clearly beyond the reach of other alternative approaches and reflects the efficiency of the proposed method in the reconstruction process and allow us to look for any possible feature in the primordial spectrum projected in the CMB data. Though the proposed method allow us to look at various possibilities for the form of the primordial spectrum, all having good fit to the data, proper error-analysis is needed to test for consistency of theoretical models since, along with possible physical artefacts, most of the features in the reconstructed spectrum might be arising from fitting noises in the CMB data. Reconstructed error-band for the form of the primordial spectrum using many realizations of the data, all bootstrapped and based on WMAP 9 year data, shows proper consistency of power-law form of the primordial spectrum with the WMAP 9 data at all wave numbers. Including WMAP polarization data in to the analysis have not improved much our results due to its low quality but we expect Planck data will allow us to make a full analysis on CMB observations on both temperature and polarization separately and in combination.

  20. Primordial power spectrum: a complete analysis with the WMAP nine-year data

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar; Shafieloo, Arman; Souradeep, Tarun E-mail: arman@apctp.org

    2013-07-01

    We have improved further the error sensitive Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm making it applicable directly on the un-binned measured angular power spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background observations to reconstruct the form of the primordial power spectrum. This improvement makes the application of the method significantly more straight forward by removing some intermediate stages of analysis allowing a reconstruction of the primordial spectrum with higher efficiency and precision and with lower computational expenses. Applying the modified algorithm we fit the WMAP 9 year data using the optimized reconstructed form of the primordial spectrum with more than 300 improvement in χ{sup 2}{sub eff} with respect to the best fit power-law. This is clearly beyond the reach of other alternative approaches and reflects the efficiency of the proposed method in the reconstruction process and allow us to look for any possible feature in the primordial spectrum projected in the CMB data. Though the proposed method allow us to look at various possibilities for the form of the primordial spectrum, all having good fit to the data, proper error-analysis is needed to test for consistency of theoretical models since, along with possible physical artefacts, most of the features in the reconstructed spectrum might be arising from fitting noises in the CMB data. Reconstructed error-band for the form of the primordial spectrum using many realizations of the data, all bootstrapped and based on WMAP 9 year data, shows proper consistency of power-law form of the primordial spectrum with the WMAP 9 data at all wave numbers. Including WMAP polarization data in to the analysis have not improved much our results due to its low quality but we expect Planck data will allow us to make a full analysis on CMB observations on both temperature and polarization separately and in combination.

  1. Estimating 2-D vector velocities using multidimensional spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Oddershede, Niels; Løvstakken, Lasse; Torp, Hans; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2008-08-01

    Wilson (1991) presented an ultrasonic wideband estimator for axial blood flow velocity estimation through the use of the 2-D Fourier transform. It was shown how a single velocity component was concentrated along a line in the 2-D Fourier space, where the slope was given by the axial velocity. Later, it was shown that this approach could also be used for finding the lateral velocity component by also including a lateral sampling. A single velocity component would then be concentrated along a plane in the 3-D Fourier space, tilted according to the 2 velocity components. This paper presents 2 new velocity estimators for finding both the axial and lateral velocity components. The estimators essentially search for the plane in the 3- D Fourier space, where the integrated power spectrum is largest. The first uses the 3-D Fourier transform to find the power spectrum, while the second uses a minimum variance approach. Based on this plane, the axial and lateral velocity components are estimated. Several phantom measurements, for flow-to-depth angles of 60, 75, and 90 degrees, were performed. Multiple parallel lines were beamformed simultaneously, and 2 different receive apodization schemes were tried. The 2 estimators were then applied to the data. The axial velocity component was estimated with an average standard deviation below 2.8% of the peak velocity, while the average standard deviation of the lateral velocity estimates was between 2.0% and 16.4%. The 2 estimators were also tested on in vivo data from a transverse scan of the common carotid artery, showing the potential of the vector velocity estimation method under in vivo conditions. PMID:18986918

  2. Mass spectrum in SQCD and problems with the Seiberg duality. Another scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyak, V. L.

    2012-01-15

    The N = 1 SQCD with SU(N{sub c}) colors and N{sub F} flavors of light quarks is considered within the dynamical scenario that assumes that quarks can be in the two different phases only: the heavy-quark phase, where they are confined, and the phase of higgsed quarks, at the appropriate values of the Lagrangian parameters. The mass spectra of this (direct) theory and its Seiberg dual are obtained and compared for quarks of small equal or unequal masses. It is shown that in those regions of the parameter space where an additional small parameter exists (it is bar b{sub 0} /N{sub F} = (3N{sub c} - N{sub F} )/N{sub F} <<1 at the right end of the conformal window, where the direct theory is weakly coupled in the vicinity of its IR fixed point, or its analog 0 < b{sub 0}/N{sub F} = (2N{sub F} - 3N{sub c})/N{sub F} Much-Less-Than 1 for the dual theory at the left end of the conformal window), the mass spectra of the direct and dual theories are parametrically different. A number of other regimes are also considered.

  3. Observation of a broad structure in the pi+ pi- J/psi mass spectrum around 4.26 GeV/c2.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; van Bakel, N; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Williams, G; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-09-30

    We study initial-state radiation events, e+ e- --> gammaISR pi+ pi- J/psi, with data collected with the BABAR detector. We observe an accumulation of events near 4.26 GeV/c2 in the invariant-mass spectrum of pi+ pi- J/psi. Fits to the mass spectrum indicate that a broad resonance with a mass of about 4.26 GeV/c2 is required to describe the observed structure. The presence of additional narrow resonances cannot be excluded. The fitted width of the broad resonance is 50 to 90 MeV/c2, depending on the fit hypothesis. PMID:16241645

  4. Tandem mass spectrometry: analysis of complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    Applications of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the analysis of complex mixtures results in increased specificity and selectivity by using a variety of reagent gases in both negative and positive ion modes. Natural isotopic abundance ratios were examined in both simple and complex mixtures using parent, daughter and neutral loss scans. MS/MS was also used to discover new compounds. Daughter scans were used to identify seven new alkaloids in a cactus species. Three of these alkaloids were novel compounds, and included the first simple, fully aromatic isoquinoline alkaloids reported in Cactaceae. MS/MS was used to characterize the chemical reaction products of coal in studies designed to probe its macromolecular structure. Negative ion chemical ionization was utilized to study reaction products resulting from the oxidation of coal. Possible structural units in the precursor coal were predicted based on the reaction products identified, aliphatic and aromatic acids and their anhydrides. The MS/MS method was also used to characterize reaction products resulting from coal liquefaction and/or extraction. These studies illustrate the types of problems for which MS/MS is useful. Emphasis has been placed on characterization of complex mixtures by selecting experimental parameters which enhance the information obtained. The value of using MS/MS in conjunction with other analytical techniques as well as the chemical pretreatment is demonstrated.

  5. Conversion of Ca2+ salt of an organic compound to its Li+ salt to simplify the fast atom bombardment mass spectrum.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, Naoko; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Baba, Yoshiyasu; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Hashimoto, Yuichi

    2003-11-01

    The FAB mass spectrum of the Ca(2+) salt of RK-682 (1, MW 368), a potent protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, shows a complex pattern due to Ca(2+) adduct ions with multimers of 1 and their decomposition ions. Addition of LiCl greatly simplified the FAB mass spectrum, providing a prominent Li(+) adduct ion of 1 at m/z 381 [M+2Li-H](+). The addition of LiCl also greatly simplified the FAB mass spectrum of calcium pantothenate. This approach may be generally useful for molecular weight determination of multivalent metal salts of organic compounds, or organic compounds that can form Li salts, by FAB mass spectrometry. PMID:14600389

  6. DSP-Based dual-polarity mass spectrum pattern recognition for bio-detection

    SciTech Connect

    Riot, V; Coffee, K; Gard, E; Fergenson, D; Ramani, S; Steele, P

    2006-04-21

    The Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) instrument analyzes single aerosol particles using a dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectrometer recording simultaneously spectra of thirty to a hundred thousand points on each polarity. We describe here a real-time pattern recognition algorithm developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that has been implemented on a nine Digital Signal Processor (DSP) system from Signatec Incorporated. The algorithm first preprocesses independently the raw time-of-flight data through an adaptive baseline removal routine. The next step consists of a polarity dependent calibration to a mass-to-charge representation, reducing the data to about five hundred to a thousand channels per polarity. The last step is the identification step using a pattern recognition algorithm based on a library of known particle signatures including threat agents and background particles. The identification step includes integrating the two polarities for a final identification determination using a score-based rule tree. This algorithm, operating on multiple channels per-polarity and multiple polarities, is well suited for parallel real-time processing. It has been implemented on the PMP8A from Signatec Incorporated, which is a computer based board that can interface directly to the two one-Giga-Sample digitizers (PDA1000 from Signatec Incorporated) used to record the two polarities of time-of-flight data. By using optimized data separation, pipelining, and parallel processing across the nine DSPs it is possible to achieve a processing speed of up to a thousand particles per seconds, while maintaining the recognition rate observed on a non-real time implementation. This embedded system has allowed the BAMS technology to improve its throughput and therefore its sensitivity while maintaining a large dynamic range (number of channels and two polarities) thus maintaining the systems specificity for bio-detection.

  7. Localization and mass spectrum of q-form fields on branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chun-E.; Zhong, Yuan; Xie, Qun-Ying; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate localization of a bulk massless q-form field on codimension-one branes by using a new Kaluza-Klein (KK) decomposition, for which there are two types of KK modes for the bulk q-form field, the q-form and (q - 1)-form modes. The first modes may be massive or massless while the second ones are all massless. These two types of KK modes satisfy two Schrödinger-like equations. For a five-dimensional brane model with a finite extra dimension, the spectrum of a bulk 3-form field on the brane consists of some massive bound 3-form KK modes as well as some massless bound 2-form ones with different configuration along the extra dimension. These 2-form modes are different from those obtained from a bulk 2-form field. For a five-dimensional degenerated Bloch brane model with an infinite extra dimension, some massive 3-form resonant KK modes and corresponding massless 2-form resonant ones are obtained for a bulk 3-form field.

  8. Photoacoustic spectrum analysis for microstructure characterization in biological tissue: Analytical model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guan; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Tao, Chao; Liu, Xiaojun; Wang, Xueding

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic spectrum analysis (PASA) has demonstrated the capability of identifying the microstructures in phantoms and biological tissues. PASA adopts the procedures in ultrasound (US) spectrum analysis although the signal generation mechanisms related to ultrasound backscatter and photoacoustic wave generation differ. The purpose of this study is to theoretically validate the method of PASA. The analytical solution to the power spectrum of PA signals generated by identical microspheres following discrete uniform random distribution in space was derived. The simulation and experiment validation of analytical solution include: 1) the power spectrum profile of a single microsphere with a diameter of 300 μm; and 2) the PASA parameters of the PA signals generated by randomly distributed microspheres of diameters of 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 μm, and at concentrations of 30, 60, 120, 240, 480 per 1.53cm3 in the observation range of [0.5, 13MHz]. PMID:25748521

  9. The Far-Infrared Polarization Spectrum: First Results and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, R. H.; Dotson, J. L.; Dowell, C. D.; Schleuning, D. A.; Vaillancourt, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    We present data on the polarization of the thermal emission from Galactic Clouds at 60 micrometers, 100 micrometers, and 350 micrometers. There are examples of rising polarization spectra in dense cloud cores [P(350 micrometers/P(100 micrometers) approximately equal to 2], and falling spectra in cloud envelopes [P(350)/P(100 micrometers) approximately equal to 0.6]. We also present data showing that the relationship, P(tau), between polarization and optical depth in cloud cores is different from that in cloud envelopes. We review the principles governing the far-infrared polarization spectrum and discuss applications to the data on P(lambda) and P(tau). We conclude that the cloud envelopes we have observed must contain two populations of grains that differ in their polarization efficiencies and in their emission spectra. We propose a model for cloud envelopes in which the contrasting populations reside in domains of different mean temperatures where the warmer domains contain the aligned grains.

  10. Blood Glutamate Levels in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhen; Zhu, Tingting; Qu, Yi; Mu, Dezhi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Glutamate plays an important role in brain development, neuronal migration, differentiation, survival and synaptogenesis. Recent studies have explored the relationship between blood glutamate levels and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, the findings are inconsistent. We undertook the first systematic review with a meta-analysis of studies examining blood glutamate levels in ASD compared with controls. Methods A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library for studies published before March 2016. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) of the outcomes. Subgroup analyses were used to explore the potential sources of heterogeneity, and the publication bias was estimated using Egger’s tests. Results Twelve studies involving 880 participants and 446 incident cases were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis provided evidence for higher blood glutamate levels in ASD [SMD = 0.99, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.58–1.40; P < 0.001] with high heterogeneity (I2 = 86%, P < 0.001) across studies. The subgroup analyses revealed higher glutamate levels in ASD compared with controls in plasma [SMD = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.58–1.50; P < 0.001] but not true in serum [SMD = 0.79, 95% CI = -0.41–1.99; P = 0.20]. Studies employing high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) assays also revealed higher blood glutamate levels in ASD. A sensitivity analysis found that the results were stable, and there was no evidence of publication bias. Conclusions Blood glutamate levels might be a potential biomarker of ASD. PMID:27390857

  11. CFM-ID: a web server for annotation, spectrum prediction and metabolite identification from tandem mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Allen, Felicity; Pon, Allison; Wilson, Michael; Greiner, Russ; Wishart, David

    2014-07-01

    CFM-ID is a web server supporting three tasks associated with the interpretation of tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) for the purpose of automated metabolite identification: annotation of the peaks in a spectrum for a known chemical structure; prediction of spectra for a given chemical structure and putative metabolite identification--a predicted ranking of possible candidate structures for a target spectrum. The algorithms used for these tasks are based on Competitive Fragmentation Modeling (CFM), a recently introduced probabilistic generative model for the MS/MS fragmentation process that uses machine learning techniques to learn its parameters from data. These algorithms have been extensively tested on multiple datasets and have been shown to out-perform existing methods such as MetFrag and FingerId. This web server provides a simple interface for using these algorithms and a graphical display of the resulting annotations, spectra and structures. CFM-ID is made freely available at http://cfmid.wishartlab.com. PMID:24895432

  12. CFM-ID: a web server for annotation, spectrum prediction and metabolite identification from tandem mass spectra

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Felicity; Pon, Allison; Wilson, Michael; Greiner, Russ; Wishart, David

    2014-01-01

    CFM-ID is a web server supporting three tasks associated with the interpretation of tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) for the purpose of automated metabolite identification: annotation of the peaks in a spectrum for a known chemical structure; prediction of spectra for a given chemical structure and putative metabolite identification—a predicted ranking of possible candidate structures for a target spectrum. The algorithms used for these tasks are based on Competitive Fragmentation Modeling (CFM), a recently introduced probabilistic generative model for the MS/MS fragmentation process that uses machine learning techniques to learn its parameters from data. These algorithms have been extensively tested on multiple datasets and have been shown to out-perform existing methods such as MetFrag and FingerId. This web server provides a simple interface for using these algorithms and a graphical display of the resulting annotations, spectra and structures. CFM-ID is made freely available at http://cfmid.wishartlab.com. PMID:24895432

  13. [Quantitative spectrum analysis of characteristic gases of spontaneous combustion coal].

    PubMed

    Liang, Yun-Tao; Tang, Xiao-Jun; Luo, Hai-Zhu; Sun, Yong

    2011-09-01

    Aimed at the characteristics of spontaneous combustion gas such as a variety of gases, lou limit of detection, and critical requirement of safety, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis is presented to analyze characteristic gases of spontaneous combustion In this paper, analysis method is introduced at first by combing characteristics of absorption spectra of analyte and analysis requirement. Parameter setting method, sample preparation, feature variable abstract and analysis model building are taken into consideration. The methods of sample preparation, feature abstraction and analysis model are introduced in detail. And then, eleven kinds of gases were tested with Tensor 27 spectrometer. CH4, C2H6, C3H8, iC4H10, nC4H10, C2 H4, C3 H6, C3 H2, SF6, CO and CO2 were included. The optical path length was 10 cm while the spectra resolution was set as 1 cm(-1). The testing results show that the detection limit of all analytes is less than 2 x 10(-6). All the detection limits fit the measurement requirement of spontaneous combustion gas, which means that FTIR may be an ideal instrument and the analysis method used in this paper is competent for spontaneous combustion gas measurement on line. PMID:22097853

  14. Spectral analysis of the fifth spectrum of indium: In V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swapnil; Tauheed, A.

    2016-01-01

    The fifth spectrum of indium (In V) has been investigated in the grazing and normal incidence wavelength regions. In4+ is a Rh-like ion with the ground configuration 4p64d9 and first excited configurations of the type 4p64d8nℓ (n≥4). The theoretical predications for this ion were made by Cowan's quasi-relativistic Hartree-Fock code with superposition of configurations involving 4p64d8(5p+6p+7p+4f+5f+6f), 4p54d10, 4p64d75s(5p+4f) for the odd parity matrix and 4p64d8 (5s+6s+7s+5d+6d), 4p64d7(5s2+5p2) for the even parity system. The spectra used for this work were recorded on 10.7 m grazing and normal incidence spectrographs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (USA) and also on a 3-m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at Antigonish (Canada). The sources used were a sliding spark and a triggered spark respectively. Two hundred and thirty two energy levels based on the identification of 873 spectral lines have been established, forty six being new. Least squares fitted parametric calculations were used to interpret the observed level structure. The energy levels were optimized using a level optimization computer program (LOPT). Our wavelength accuracy for sharp and unblended lines is estimated to be within ±0.005 Å for λ below 400 Å and ±0.006 Å up to 1200 Å.

  15. EEG Power Spectrum Analysis in Children with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Kamida, Akira; Shimabayashi, Kenta; Oguri, Masayoshi; Takamori, Toshihiro; Ueda, Naoyuki; Koyanagi, Yuki; Sannomiya, Naoko; Nagira, Haruki; Ikunishi, Saeko; Hattori, Yuiko; Sato, Kengo; Fukuda, Chisako; Hirooka, Yasuaki; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Attention deficit disorder/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a pathological condition that is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated electroencephalographic (EEG) power differences between children with ADHD and healthy control children. Methods EEGs were recorded as part of routine medical care received by 80 children with ADHD aged 4–15 years at the Department of Pediatric Neurology in Tottori University Hospital. Additionally, we recorded in 59 control children aged 4–15 years after obtaining informed consent. Specifically, awake EEG signals were recorded from each child using the international 10–20 system, and we used ten 3-s epochs on the EEG power spectrum to calculate the powers of individual EEG frequency bands. Results The powers of different EEG bands were significantly higher in the frontal brain region of those in the ADHD group compared with the control group. In addition, the power of the beta band in the ADHD group was significantly higher in all brain regions, except for the occipital region, compared with control children. With regard to developmental changes, the power of the alpha band in the occipital region showed an age-dependent decrease in both groups, with slightly lower power in the ADHD group. Additionally, the intergroup difference decreased in children aged 11 years or older. As with the alpha band in the occipital region, the beta band in the frontal region showed an age-dependent decrease in both groups. Unlike the alpha band, the power of the beta band was higher in the ADHD group than in the control group for children of all ages. Conclusion The observed intergroup differences in EEG power may provide insight into the brain function of children with ADHD. PMID:27493489

  16. The Origin of the Stellar Mass Spectrum in Turbulence and Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Mark

    The origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is one of the oldest problems in theoretical astrophysics, and one of the most profound. This distribution touches virtually every area of astrophysics, from interpreting observations of integrated starlight, to synthesis of heavy elements, to formation of galaxies, to the development of life. A comprehensive theory of the IMF, and its possible variation, is directly relevant to the NASA mission of understanding our origins, and would also be invaluable for interpreting observations from NASA missions that measure integrated starlight. While the problem of the IMF has stood for a long time, recent developments in both numerical and analytic techniques make the problem ripe for solution. We propose to develop a comprehensive theory for the origin of the IMF that is based on two main ingredients: the statistical properties of the ubiquitous turbulence in interstellar clouds, and the role of stellar radiative feedback in shaping how that gas fragments under the action of self-gravity. This work will proceed on two fronts. Analytically, we will extend the excursion set formalism for turbulence recently developed by Hopkins to account for the effects of local sources of stellar radiative feedback, which have been shown by both simulations and observations to have profound effects on how gas fragments. In parallel, we will conduct adaptive mesh refinement radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to test and guide the development of this analytic framework. The goal will be to develop a predictive theory of the IMF that is capable of explaining both the shape and the normalization of the stellar mass function, and its possible variation with star-forming environment.

  17. Analysis of radioactive metals by spark source mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A J; Kozy, A; Morris, R N

    1969-04-01

    A spark source mass spectrograph with photographic plate recording has been adapted for the analysis of plutonium and americium metals. Over seventy elements can be determined simultaneously in these metals. A comparison has been made between results obtained by mass spectrography and by conventional methods for impurity elements. The operations involved in handling radioactive materials in the mass spectrograph are also discussed. PMID:18960537

  18. Sociosexuality Education for Persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Pamela S.; Condo, Bethany; Hardaway, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis (ABA) has emerged as one of the most effective empirically based strategies for instructing individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Four ABA-based strategies that have been found effective are video modeling, visual strategies, social script fading, and task analysis. Individuals with ASD often struggle with…

  19. Factor Analysis of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkley, Jason; Nations, Laura; Abramson, Ruth K.; Hall, Alicia; Wright, Harry H.; Gabriels, Robin; Gilbert, John R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A. O.; Cuccaro, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Exploratory factor analysis (varimax and promax rotations) of the aberrant behavior checklist-community version (ABC) in 275 individuals with Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) identified four- and five-factor solutions which accounted for greater than 70% of the variance. Confirmatory factor analysis (Lisrel 8.7) revealed indices of moderate fit for…

  20. Multichannel singular spectrum analysis in application to GRACE and Jason-1 satellites data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotov, Leonid; Barinov, Michael; Nosova, Svetlana; Huang, Zhenwei; Shum, C. K.

    2010-05-01

    Multichannel singular spectrum analysis (MSSA) was applied to the Stokes coefficients of the temporal gravity filed solutions obtained from the GRACE twin-satellite gravity mapping mission, and to the 10-days gridded maps of Sea Surface Height (SSH) time series from Jason-1 altimetry satellite. With use of this method Principal components (PCs), representing different physical phenomena were separated, and the noise has been filtered out from these data sets. MSSA is a generalization of Principal Components Analysis (PCA) for the multidimensional time series. It allows one to recognize correlated spatially-temporal patterns and separate them into the PCs. MSSA is more flexible then PCA in terms of oscillations, trends and noise separation, because it searches for correlations in the time series over an embedding space of large dimensionality, or globally. Instead of using covariance matrix analysis for each component, full trajectory matrix for all the components is analyzed at once. Natural extension of MSSA is the prediction of components. MSSA of GRACE monthly gravity anomalies allowed to decompose the signal into an average, PC of annual period, secular component, and higher order components containing geographically-correlated high-frequency noise (stripes) and transient mass redistributions. MSSA-processing of ocean altimetry SSH-maps from Jason-1 satellite demonstrated the strength of the method by providing the PCs of different periods separated from the noise. Results are available at http://lnfm1.sai.msu.ru/~tempus/science/MSSA/ We conclude that the suggested processing method of multidimensional, time-variable observations simplifies studies of quantifying geophysical phenomena, related with global environmental changes, post-glacial rebound, annual cycles, El Nino. Acknowledgment. This work is supported by grant of the President of Russia MK-4234.2009.5. the Ohio State University (OSU) component of the research is supported by NASA and by OSU's Climate

  1. Charge ratio analysis method: approach for the deconvolution of electrospray mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Maleknia, Simin D; Downard, Kevin M

    2005-01-01

    A new method to interpret electrospray mass spectral data based on calculating the ratio of mass-to-charge (m/z) values of multiply charged ions is described. The mass-to-charge ratios of any two multiply charged ions corresponding to a single compound are unique numbers that enable the charge states for each ion to be unequivocally identified. The multiply charged ions in electrospray mass spectra originate from the addition or abstraction of protons, cations, or anions to and from a compound under analysis. In contrast to existing deconvolution processes, the charge ratio analysis method (CRAM), identifies the charge states of multiply charged ions without any prior knowledge of the nature of the charge-carrying species. In the case of high-resolution electrospray mass spectral data, in which multiply charged ions are resolved to their isotopic components, the CRAM is capable of correlating the isotope peaks of different multiply charged ions that share the same isotopic composition. This relative ratio method is illustrated here for electrospray mass spectral data of lysozyme and oxidized ubiquitin recorded at low- to high-mass resolution on quadrupole ion trap and Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometers, and theoretical data for the protein calmodulin based upon a reported spectrum recorded on the latter. PMID:15623285

  2. Maternal Smoking and Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Brittany N.; Lee, Brian K.; Lee, Nora L.; Yang, Yunwen; Burstyn, Igor

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 15 studies on maternal prenatal smoking and ASD risk in offspring. Using a random-effects model, we found no evidence of an association (summary OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.93-1.12). Stratifying by study design, birth year, type of healthcare system, and adjustment for socioeconomic status or psychiatric history did not alter…

  3. Gamma-Ray Spectrum Analysis Method for Minicomputers.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1984-01-24

    Version 00 SAMPO80 is a rapid and accurate analysis program for gamma-ray spectra measured with Ge(Li) or HPGe detectors. SAMPO80 consists of three separate parts, the shape calibration part SAMPOSHAPE, the peak search and fitting part SAMPOFIT, and the nuclide identification part SAMPOID.

  4. Spectrum-Based and Collaborative Network Topology Analysis and Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Xianlin

    2013-01-01

    Networks are of significant importance in many application domains, such as World Wide Web and social networks, which often embed rich topological information. Since network topology captures the organization of network nodes and links, studying network topology is very important to network analysis. In this dissertation, we study networks by…

  5. Analysis of selective reflection spectrum in cholesteric liquid crystal cells for solar-ray controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Kakiuchida, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    The cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) cells are fabricated by varying the concentration of various chiral dopants and liquid crystal (LC) diacrylate monomers. The wavelength and bandwidth of selective reflection spectrum in CLC cells are measured by a spectroscopic technique. The variation of the selective reflection spectrum in CLC cells is investigated by doping the different kinds of liquid crystal (LC) diacrylate monomers which stabilize a helical twisting structure by photopolymerization. The effects of the selective reflection spectrum on the visible and infrared lights in spectral solar irradiance are explained by the performance for a solar-ray controller based on the spectral solar irradiance for air mass 1.5 and the standard luminous efficiency function for photopic vision.

  6. Mass quantity gauging by RF mode analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, R. S.; Ellerbruch, D.; Cruz, J. E.; Stokes, R. W.; Luft, P. E.; Peterson, R. G.; Hiester, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    Work done to date is reported concerning Radio Frequency Mass Quantity Gauging. Experimental apparatus has been designed and tested which measures the resonant frequencies of a tank in the time domain. These frequencies correspond to the total mass of fluid within the tank. Experimental results are discussed for nitrogen and hydrogen in normal gravity both in the supercritical state and also in the two phase (liquid-gas) region. Theoretical discussions for more general cases are given.

  7. MACRAD: A mass analysis code for radiators

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    A computer code to estimate and optimize the mass of heat pipe radiators (MACRAD) is currently under development. A parametric approach is used in MACRAD, which allows the user to optimize radiator mass based on heat pipe length, length to diameter ratio, vapor to wick radius, radiator redundancy, etc. Full consideration of the heat pipe operating parameters, material properties, and shielding requirements is included in the code. Preliminary results obtained with MACRAD are discussed.

  8. Adolescent ovarian masses: A retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Bindiya; Guleria, Kiran; Suneja, Amita; Vaid, Neelam B; Rajaram, Shalini; Wadhwa, Neelam

    2016-05-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to review incidence, clinical practice, surgical management and histology of adolescent ovarian masses in order to audit and improve future practices. Complete hospital records of all adolescents between 10 and 20 years who had undergone surgery for ovarian masses were analysed between November 2006 to 2014. Parameters analysed were age, clinical features, diagnosis, operative procedure and histopathology. Ninety-four patients were included in the study and among them, 37 had non-neoplastic masses, 30 had benign neoplasms while 27 had malignant tumors. The main clinical presentations were abdominal pain (54%) and abdominal mass (41%). Dermoid was the most common benign neoplasm while germ cell tumor was the most common malignant mass; dysgerminoma being the commonest (68%). Malignancy was more common in early adolescence (12 ± 4.8 years) while non-neoplastic masses were seen more frequently in late adolescence (17.7 ± 2.2 years). There was a fair correlation between ultrasound and histopathological diagnosis. PMID:26789784

  9. Crux: rapid open source protein tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, Sean; Tamura, Kaipo; Kertesz-Farkas, Attila; Grant, Charles E; Diament, Benjamin; Frewen, Barbara; Howbert, J Jeffry; Hoopmann, Michael R; Käll, Lukas; Eng, Jimmy K; MacCoss, Michael J; Noble, William Stafford

    2014-10-01

    Efficiently and accurately analyzing big protein tandem mass spectrometry data sets requires robust software that incorporates state-of-the-art computational, machine learning, and statistical methods. The Crux mass spectrometry analysis software toolkit ( http://cruxtoolkit.sourceforge.net ) is an open source project that aims to provide users with a cross-platform suite of analysis tools for interpreting protein mass spectrometry data. PMID:25182276

  10. Quaternion Singular Spectrum Analysis of Electroencephalogram With Application in Sleep Analysis.

    PubMed

    Enshaeifar, Shirin; Kouchaki, Samaneh; Took, Clive Cheong; Sanei, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    A novel quaternion-valued singular spectrum analysis (SSA) is introduced for multichannel analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG). The analysis of EEG typically requires the decomposition of data channels into meaningful components despite the notoriously noisy nature of EEG--which is the aim of SSA. However, the singular value decomposition involved in SSA implies the strict orthogonality of the decomposed components, which may not reflect accurately the sources which exhibit similar neural activities. To allow for the modelling of such co-channel coupling, the quaternion domain is considered for the first time to formulate the SSA using the augmented statistics. As an application, we demonstrate how the augmented quaternion-valued SSA (AQSSA) can be used to extract the sources, even at a signal-to-noise ratio as low as -10 dB. To illustrate the usefulness of our quaternion-valued SSA in a rehabilitation setting, we employ the proposed SSA for sleep analysis to extract statistical descriptors for five-stage classification (Awake, N1, N2, N3 and REM). The level of agreement using these descriptors was 74% as quantified by the Cohen's kappa. PMID:26276995

  11. An analysis of space power system masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Cull, Ronald C.; Kankam, M. David

    1990-01-01

    Various space electrical power system masses are analyzed with particular emphasis on the power management and distribution (PMAD) portion. The electrical power system (EPS) is divided into functional blocks: source, interconnection, storage, transmission, distribution, system control and load. The PMAD subsystem is defined as all the blocks between the source, storage and load, plus the power conditioning equipment required for the source, storage and load. The EPS mass of a wide range of spacecraft is then classified as source, storage or PMAD and tabulated in a database. The intent of the database is to serve as a reference source for PMAD masses of existing and in-design spacecraft. The PMAD masses in the database range from 40 kg/kW to 183 kg/kW across the spacecraft systems studied. Factors influencing the power system mass are identified. These include the total spacecraft power requirements, total amount of load capacity and physical size of the spacecraft. It is found that a new utility class of power systems, represented by Space Station Freedom, is evolving.

  12. Advanced alpha spectrum analysis based on the fitting and covariance analysis of dependent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihantola, S.; Pelikan, A.; Pöllänen, R.; Toivonen, H.

    2011-11-01

    The correct handling of statistical uncertainties is crucial especially when unfolding alpha spectra that contain a low number of counts or overlapping peaks from different nuclides. For this purpose, we have developed a new spectrum analysis software package called ADAM, which performs a full covariance calculus for alpha-particle emitting radionuclides. By analyzing a large number of simulated and measured spectra, the program was proved to give unbiased peak areas and statistically correct uncertainty limits. This applies regardless of the peak areas and the number of unknown parameters during the fitting. In addition, ADAM performs reliable deconvolution for multiplets, which opens the way for the determination of isotope ratios, such as 239Pu/240Pu.

  13. [Research progress in water quality monitoring technology based on ultraviolet spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tian-Ling; Wen, Zhi-Yu; Wen, Zhong-Quan; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Wei, Kang-Lin

    2013-04-01

    The water quality monitoring technology based on ultraviolet spectrum analysis has the characteristics of small volume, low cost, and no secondary pollution, and it doesn't need any reagent and sample pretreatment. On account of these characteristics, the direct ultra-violet technology has remarkable superiority over traditional technologies when applied in online monitoring of drinking water, surface water and industrial wastewater, and it has become an important development tendency of modern water monitoring technologies. The principle, characteristics, present situation and development trend of modern water quality monitoring technology based on ultra-violet spectrum analysis were introduced, and the key technical problems were further discussed in this paper. PMID:23841436

  14. Ultrasound characterization of the infertile male testis with rf power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Jonathan A.; Silverman, Ronald H.; Rondeau, Mark; Coleman, D. J.; Schlegel, Peter

    2002-04-01

    Objective: To investigate and diagnose testicular pathology in patients with testicular dysfunction using the technique of ultrasound power spectrum analysis. Methods: Testicular ultrasound studies with power spectrum tissue characterization analysis were performed on men with testicular abnormalities as well as normal controls. Semen analysis, biopsy data, microscopic intra-operative findings and data pertaining to testicular function were collected for each surgically evaluated subject. Ultrasound data were analyzed for power spectrum characteristics of microscopic scatterer size and concentration within discrete areas of testicular tissue. Results: Patients with varicoceles and greater than 2x106 sperm/ml on semen analysis had larger average scatterer size (107.7 micrometers ) and lower scatterer concentration (-15.02 dB) than non-obstructed, azoospermic patients with varicoceles (92.4 micrometers and -11.41 dB, respectively). Subjects with obstructed azoospermia had slightly larger average tissue scatterer size (108.1 micrometers ) and lower concentration (-15.73 dB) while normal control data revealed intermediate values of size (102.3 micrometers ) and concentration (-13.1 dB) of scatterers. Spectral data from pure testicular seminoma lesions had the lowest average scatterer size (82.3 micrometers ) with low relative concentration (-14.7 dB). Summary: Ultrasound tissue characterization based on RF spectrum analysis may distinguish different types of testicular pathology including obstructed and non-obstructed azoospermia and tissue changes due to varicocele and tumor.

  15. Measurement of the Hadronic Mass Spectrum in B to Xulnu Decaysand Determination of the b-Quark Mass at the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tackmann, Kerstin

    2008-06-26

    I present preliminary results of the measurement of the hadronic mass spectrum and its first three spectral moments in inclusive charmless semileptonic B-meson decays. The truncated hadronic mass moments are used for the first determination of the b-quark mass and the nonperturbative parameters μπ2 and ρD3 in this B-meson decay channel. The study is based on 383 x 106 B$\\bar{B}$ decays collected with the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e+e- storage rings, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The first, second central, and third central hadronic mass moment with a cut on the hadronic mass mX2 < 6.4GeV2 and the lepton momentum p* > 1 GeV are measured to be: M1 = (1.96 ± 0.34stat ± 0.53syst) GeV2; U2 = (1.92 ± 0.59stat ± 0.87syst) GeV4; and U3 = (1.79 ± 0.62stat ± 0.78syst) GeV6; with correlation coefficients ρ12 = 0.99, ρ23 = 0.94, and ρ13 = 0.88, respectively. Using Heavy Quark Effective Theory-based predictions in the kinetic scheme we extract: mb = (4.60 ± 0.13stat ± 0.19syst ± 0.10theo GeV); μπ2 = (0.40 ± 0.14stat ± 0.20syst ± 0.04theo) GeV2; ρD3 = (0.10 ± 0.02stat ± 0.02syst ± 0.07theo) GeV3; at μ = 1 GeV, with correlation coefficients ρmbμπ2 = -0.99, ρ μπ2ρD3 = 0.57, and ρmbρD3 = -0.59. The results are in good agreement with earlier determinations in inclusive charmed semileptonic and radiative penguin B-meson decays and have a

  16. Thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass-spectrometric analysis of geochemical samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Johnson, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass-spectrometric-analysis techniques can be used to study a wide variety of problems involving decomposition processes and identification of released volatile components. A recording vacuum thermoanalyzer has been coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The rapid scan capabilities of the quadrupole mass spectrometer are used to identify the gaseous components released. The capability of the thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass spectrometer to provide analytical data for identification of the released volatile components, for determination of their sequence of release and for correlation of thermal-decomposition studies is illustrated by an analysis of the Orgueil carbonaceous chondrite.

  17. [Analysis of fluorescence spectrum of petroleum-polluted water].

    PubMed

    Huang, Miao-Fen; Song, Qing-Jun; Xing, Xu-Feng; Jian, Wei-Jun; Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Zu-Long

    2014-09-01

    In four ratio experiments, natural waters, sampled from the mountain reservoir and the sea water around Dalian city, were mixed with the sewage from petroleum refinery and petroleum exploitation plants. The fluorescence spectra of water samples containing only chromophoric dissolved organic matters(CDOM), samples containing only petroleum, and samples containing a mixture of petroleum and CDOM were analyzed, respectively. The purpose of this analysis is to provide a basis for determining the contribution of petroleum substances and CDOM to the total absorption coefficient of the petroleum-contaminated water by using fluorescence technique. The results showed that firstly, CDOM in seawater had three main fluorescence peaks at Ex: 225-230 nm/Em: 320-330 nm, Ex: 280 nm/Em: 340 nm and Ex: 225-240 nm/Em: 430-470 nm, respectively, and these may arise from the oceanic chlorophyll. CDOM in natural reservoir water had two main fluorescence peaks at EX: 240- 260 nm/Em: 420-450 nm and Ex: 310~350 nm/Em: 420--440 nm, respectively, and these may arise from the terrestrial sources; secondly, the water samples containing only petroleum extracted with n-hexane had one to three fluorescence spectral peaksat Ex: 220-240 nm/Em: 320-340 nm, Ex: 270-290 nm/Em: 310-340 nm and Ex: 220-235 nm/Em: 280-310 nm, respectively, caused by their hydrocarbon component; finally, the water samples containing both petroleum and CDOM showed a very strong fluorescence peak at Ex: 230-250 nm/Em: 320-370 nm, caused by the combined effect of CDOM and petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:25532346

  18. [Air Dielectric Barrier Discharge Emission Spectrum Measurement and Particle Analysis of Discharge Process].

    PubMed

    Shen, Shuang-yan; Jin, Xing; Zhang, Peng

    2016-02-01

    The emission spectrum detection and diagnosis is one of the most common methods of application to the plasma. It provides wealth of information of the chemical and physical process of the plasma. The analysis of discharge plasma dynamic behavior plays an important role in the study of gas discharge mechanism and application. An air dielectric discharge spectrum measuring device was designed and the emission spectrum data was measured under the experimental condition. The plasma particles evolution was analyzed from the emission spectrum. The numerical calculation model was established and the density equation, energy transfer equation and the Boltzmann equation was coupled to analyze the change of the particle density to explain the emission spectrum characteristics. The results are that the particle density is growing with the increasing of reduced electric field. The particle density is one or two orders of magnitude difference for the same particle at the same moment for the reduced electric field of 40, 60 or 80 Td. A lot of N₂ (A³), N₂ (A³) and N₂ (C³) particles are generated by the electric field excitation. However, it transforms quickly due to the higher energy level. The transformation returns to the balance after the discharge of 10⁻⁶ s. The emission spectrometer measured in the experiments is mostly generated by the transition of excited nitrogen. The peak concentration of O₂ (A¹), O₂ (B¹) and O₂ (A³ ∑⁺u) is not low compared to the excited nitrogen molecules. These particles energy is relatively low and the transition spectral is longer. The spectrometer does not capture the oxygen emission spectrum. And the peak concentration of O particles is small, so the transition emission spectrum is weak. The calculation results of the stabled model can well explain the emission spectrum data. PMID:27209731

  19. Energy spectrum analysis of blast waves based on an improved Hilbert-Huang transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wang, F.; Shang, F.; Jia, Y.; Zhao, C.; Kong, D.

    2016-07-01

    Using the improved Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), this paper investigates the problems of analysis and interpretation of the energy spectrum of a blast wave. It has been previously established that the energy spectrum is an effective feature by which to characterize a blast wave. In fact, the higher the energy spectra in a frequency band of a blast wave, the greater the damage to a target in the same frequency band. However, most current research focuses on analyzing wave signals in the time domain or frequency domain rather than considering the energy spectrum. We propose here an improved HHT method combined with a wavelet packet to extract the energy spectrum feature of a blast wave. When applying the HHT, the signal is first roughly decomposed into a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by empirical mode decomposition. The wavelet packet method is then performed on each IMF to eliminate noise on the energy spectrum. Second, a coefficient is introduced to remove unrelated IMFs. The energy of each instantaneous frequency can be derived through the Hilbert transform. The energy spectrum can then be obtained by adding up all the components after the wavelet packet filters and screens them through a coefficient to obtain the effective IMFs. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by 12 groups of experimental data, and an energy attenuation model is established based on the experimental data. The improved HHT is a precise method for blast wave signal analysis. For other shock wave signals from blasting experiments, an energy frequency time distribution and energy spectrum can also be obtained through this method, allowing for more practical applications.

  20. Particle analysis using laser ablation mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Eric P.; Rosenthal, Stephen E.; Trahan, Michael W.; Wagner, John S.

    2003-09-09

    The present invention provides a method of quickly identifying bioaerosols by class, even if the subject bioaerosol has not been previously encountered. The method begins by collecting laser ablation mass spectra from known particles. The spectra are correlated with the known particles, including the species of particle and the classification (e.g., bacteria). The spectra can then be used to train a neural network, for example using genetic algorithm-based training, to recognize each spectra and to recognize characteristics of the classifications. The spectra can also be used in a multivariate patch algorithm. Laser ablation mass specta from unknown particles can be presented as inputs to the trained neural net for identification as to classification. The description below first describes suitable intelligent algorithms and multivariate patch algorithms, then presents an example of the present invention including results.

  1. Recovery of macular pigment spectrum in vivo using hyperspectral image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawzi, Amani A.; Lee, Noah; Acton, Jennifer H.; Laine, Andrew F.; Smith, R. Theodore

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the feasibility of a novel method for hyperspectral mapping of macular pigment (MP) in vivo. Six healthy subjects were recruited for noninvasive imaging using a snapshot hyperspectral system. The three-dimensional full spatial-spectral data cube was analyzed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), wherein the data was decomposed to give spectral signatures and spatial distribution, in search for the MP absorbance spectrum. The NMF was initialized with the in vitro MP spectrum and rank 4 spectral signature decomposition was used to recover the MP spectrum and optical density in vivo. The recovered MP spectra showed two peaks in the blue spectrum, characteristic of MP, giving a detailed in vivo demonstration of these absorbance peaks. The peak MP optical densities ranged from 0.08 to 0.22 (mean 0.15+/-0.05) and became spatially negligible at diameters 1100 to 1760 μm (4 to 6 deg) in the normal subjects. This objective method was able to exploit prior knowledge (the in vitro MP spectrum) in order to extract an accurate in vivo spectral analysis and full MP spatial profile, while separating the MP spectra from other ocular absorbers. Snapshot hyperspectral imaging in combination with advanced mathematical analysis provides a simple cost-effective approach for MP mapping in vivo.

  2. Recovery of macular pigment spectrum in vivo using hyperspectral image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fawzi, Amani A.; Lee, Noah; Acton, Jennifer H.; Laine, Andrew F.; Smith, R. Theodore

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of a novel method for hyperspectral mapping of macular pigment (MP) in vivo. Six healthy subjects were recruited for noninvasive imaging using a snapshot hyperspectral system. The three-dimensional full spatial-spectral data cube was analyzed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), wherein the data was decomposed to give spectral signatures and spatial distribution, in search for the MP absorbance spectrum. The NMF was initialized with the in vitro MP spectrum and rank 4 spectral signature decomposition was used to recover the MP spectrum and optical density in vivo. The recovered MP spectra showed two peaks in the blue spectrum, characteristic of MP, giving a detailed in vivo demonstration of these absorbance peaks. The peak MP optical densities ranged from 0.08 to 0.22 (mean 0.15+/−0.05) and became spatially negligible at diameters 1100 to 1760 μm (4 to 6 deg) in the normal subjects. This objective method was able to exploit prior knowledge (the in vitro MP spectrum) in order to extract an accurate in vivo spectral analysis and full MP spatial profile, while separating the MP spectra from other ocular absorbers. Snapshot hyperspectral imaging in combination with advanced mathematical analysis provides a simple cost-effective approach for MP mapping in vivo. PMID:22029355

  3. Mass spectrometric analysis of monolayer protected nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhengjiang

    Monolayer protected nanoparticles (NPs) include an inorganic core and a monolayer of organic ligands. The wide variety of core materials and the tunable surface monolayers make NPs promising materials for numerous applications. Concerns related to unforeseen human health and environmental impacts of NPs have also been raised. In this thesis, new analytical methods based on mass spectrometry are developed to understand the fate, transport, and biodistributions of NPs in the complex biological systems. A laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) method has been developed to characterize the monolayers on NP surface. LDI-MS allows multiple NPs taken up by cells to be measured and quantified in a multiplexed fashion. The correlations between surface properties of NPs and cellular uptake have also been explored. LDI-MS is further coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to quantitatively measure monolayer stability of gold NPs (AuNPs) and quantum dots (QDs), respectively, in live cells. This label-free approach allows correlating monolayer structure and particle size with NP stability in various cellular environments. Finally, uptake, distribution, accumulation, and excretion of NPs in higher order organisms, such as fish and plants, have been investigated to understand the environmental impact of nanomaterials. The results indicate that surface chemistry is a primary determinant. NPs with hydrophilic surfaces are substantially less toxic and present a lower degree of bioaccumulation, making these nanomaterials attractive for sustainable nanotechnology.

  4. Mass spectrum and leptonic decay constants of ground and radially excited states of ηc and ηb in a Bethe-Salpeter equation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negash, Hluf; Bhatnagar, Shashank

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we study the mass spectrum and decay constants of ground state (1S) and radially excited states (2S and 3S) of heavy equal mass pseudoscalar mesons, ηc and ηb. We have employed the framework of Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) under Covariant Instantaneous Ansatz (CIA). Our predictions are in reasonable agreement with the data on available states and results of other models.

  5. OMA and OPA—Software-Supported Mass Spectra Analysis of Native and Modified Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyakas, Adrien; Blum, Lorenz C.; Stucki, Silvan R.; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Schürch, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    The platform-independent software package consisting of the oligonucleotide mass assembler (OMA) and the oligonucleotide peak analyzer (OPA) was created to support the analysis of oligonucleotide mass spectra. It calculates all theoretically possible fragments of a given input sequence and annotates it to an experimental spectrum, thus, saving a large amount of manual processing time. The software performs analysis of precursor and product ion spectra of oligonucleotides and their analogues comprising user-defined modifications of the backbone, the nucleobases, or the sugar moiety, as well as adducts with metal ions or drugs. The ability to expand the library of building blocks and to implement individual structural variations makes it extremely useful for supporting the analysis of therapeutically active compounds. The functionality of the software tool is demonstrated on the examples of a platinated double-stranded oligonucleotide and a modified RNA sequence. Experiments also reveal the unique dissociation behavior of platinated higher-order DNA structures.

  6. Exploring the Relationship between Autism Spectrum Disorder and Epilepsy Using Latent Class Cluster Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuccaro, Michael L.; Tuchman, Roberto F.; Hamilton, Kara L.; Wright, Harry H.; Abramson, Ruth K.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Gilbert, John R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy co-occurs frequently in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Understanding this co-occurrence requires a better understanding of the ASD-epilepsy phenotype (or phenotypes). To address this, we conducted latent class cluster analysis (LCCA) on an ASD dataset (N = 577) which included 64 individuals with epilepsy. We identified a 5-cluster…

  7. Video Modeling for Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Teresa Lynn

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to conduct a meta-analysis to examine existing research studies on video modeling as an effective teaching tool for children and adolescents diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Study eligibility criteria included (a) single case research design using multiple baselines, alternating treatment designs,…

  8. Using the Language Environment Analysis (LENA) System in Preschool Classrooms with Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Jessica R.; Sabatos-DeVito, Maura G.; Irvin, Dwight W.; Boyd, Brian A.; Hume, Kara A.; Odom, Sam L.

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the language environment of preschool programs serving children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and examines relationships between child characteristics and an automated measure of adult and child language in the classroom. The Language Environment Analysis (LENA) system was used with 40 children with ASD to collect data…

  9. Facial Structure Analysis Separates Autism Spectrum Disorders into Meaningful Clinical Subgroups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obafemi-Ajayi, Tayo; Miles, Judith H.; Takahashi, T. Nicole; Qi, Wenchuan; Aldridge, Kristina; Zhang, Minqi; Xin, Shi-Qing; He, Ying; Duan, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Varied cluster analysis were applied to facial surface measurements from 62 prepubertal boys with essential autism to determine whether facial morphology constitutes viable biomarker for delineation of discrete Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) subgroups. Earlier study indicated utility of facial morphology for autism subgrouping (Aldridge et al. in…

  10. Innovative Technology-Based Interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grynszpan, Ouriel; Weiss, Patrice L.; Perez-Diaz, Fernando; Gal, Eynat

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the results of a meta-analysis of technology-based intervention studies for children with autism spectrum disorders. We conducted a systematic review of research that used a pre-post design to assess innovative technology interventions, including computer programs, virtual reality, and robotics. The selected studies provided…